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Sample records for subacromial syndrome rotator

  1. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umer, M.; Qadir, I.; Azam, M.

    2012-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a

  2. Subacromial impingement syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Masood Umer; Irfan Qadir; Mohsin Azam

    2012-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matter of debate. However, the etiology is multi-factorial, and it has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Management includes physical therapy, injections, and, for some patient...

  3. Subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umer, Masood; Qadir, Irfan; Azam, Mohsin

    2012-05-09

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matter of debate. However, the etiology is multi-factorial, and it has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Management includes physical therapy, injections, and, for some patients, surgery. No high-quality randomized controlled trials are available so far to provide possible evidence for differences in outcome of different treatment strategies. There remains a need for high-quality clinical research on the diagnosis and treatment of SAIS.

  4. Subacromial impingement syndrome

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    Masood Umer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS represents a spectrum of pathology ranging from subacromial bursitis to rotator cuff tendinopathy and full-thickness rotator cuff tears. The relationship between subacromial impingement and rotator cuff disease in the etiology of rotator cuff injury is a matter of debate. However the etiology is multi-factorial, and has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Management includes physical therapy, injections, and, for some patients, surgery. No high-quality RCTs are available so far to provide possible evidence for differences in outcome of different treatment strategies. There remains a need for high-quality clinical research on the diagnosis and treatment of SAIS.

  5. The clinical utility of ultrasonography for rotator cuff disease, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis.

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    Awerbuch, Mark S

    2008-01-07

    Periarticular shoulder disorders are common in clinical practice, and diagnosis is often difficult. Medicare statistics indicate that between 2001 and 2006 the use of diagnostic shoulder ultrasonography increased significantly. Rotator cuff disease, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis are among the most common diagnoses reported on shoulder ultrasonography. Shoulder ultrasonography is useful in the diagnosis of full thickness tears, but its utility for other rotator cuff disorders, shoulder impingement syndrome and subacromial bursitis is less well established.

  6. RIGID TAPE VERSUS KINESIO TAPE ON SCAPULAR ROTATION AND FORWARD HEAD ANGLE IN SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME

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    Eman A. Embaby; Eman M.A. Abdalgwad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rigid and kinesio taping is commonly used in the rehabilitation and prevention of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). It is proposed to have positive effects on shoulder function and scapular kinematics. However, there is a paucity of literature regarding the effectiveness of rigid versus elastic taping on scapular upward rotation and forward head posture (FHP), which is commonly adopted in SIS. Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the effect of taping with post...

  7. Current Status of Open Surgical Treatment Protocols for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Associated with Rotator Tear

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    Oktay Gazi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the recent treatment protocols for Neer stage III subacromial impingement syndrome with open anterior acromioplasty and rotator cuff repair. Material and Methods: Twenty-two patients (8 males, 14 females; mean age: 52.9±10.2 who were diagnosed with a rotator cuff tear based on clinical and radiological findings between 2009 and 2010 participated in the study.. We used the open surgical decompression technique which was previously described by Neer. The ruptured tendon ends were isolated and were fixed to the bones with appropriate suture anchors and transosseoz sutures. Preoperative, postoperative and the final follow-up Constant and UCLA shoulder scores were evaluated. Results: The mean preoperative Constant score was 34.4±6.6 and UCLA score was 13.8±3.3. The mean postoperative Constant score was 73±7.6 and UCLA score was 31.7±3.3. Significant improvement was observed in postoperative shoulder scores (p<0.01 and postoperative shoulder range of motion in all patients (p<0.01. Conclusion: Currently, clinical and functional results of open and arthroscopic subacromial rotator cuff decompression are similar. However, many surgeons prefer the open method and achieve successful results. (The Me di cal Bul le tin of Ha se ki 2012; 50: 59-63

  8. Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Caused by a Voluminous Subdeltoid Lipoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Christophe Murray; Stéphane Pelet

    2014-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a clinical diagnosis encompassing a spectrum of possible etiologies, including subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and partial- to full-thickness rotator cuff tears. This report presents an unusual case of subdeltoid lipoma causing extrinsic compression and subacromial impingement syndrome. The patient, a 60-year-old man, presented to our institution with a few years' history of nontraumatic, posteriorly localized throbbing pain in his right sh...

  9. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of subacromial pain syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diercks, Ronald; Bron, Carel; Dorrestijn, Oscar; Meskers, Carel; Naber, René; de Ruiter, Tjerk; Willems, Jaap; Winters, Jan; van der Woude, Henk Jan

    Treatment of "subacromial impingement syndrome" of the shoulder has changed drastically in the past decade. The anatomical explanation as "impingement" of the rotator cuff is not sufficient to cover the pathology. "Subacromial pain syndrome", SAPS, describes the condition better. A working group

  10. Patients With Impingement Syndrome With and Without Rotator Cuff Tears Do Well 20 Years After Arthroscopic Subacromial Decompression.

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    Jaeger, Moritz; Berndt, Thomas; Rühmann, Oliver; Lerch, Solveig

    2016-03-01

    To present the long-term outcome of arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) for patients with impingement syndrome with or without rotator cuff tears as well as with or without calcific tendinitis in a follow-up of 20 years. We included 95 patients after a mean follow-up of 19.9 (19.5 to 20.5) years. All patients underwent ASD, including acromioplasty, resection of the coracoacromial ligament, and coplaning without cuff repair. The Constant score was used to assess the functioning of the shoulder. In addition, we defined a combined failure end point of a poor Constant score and revision surgery. Revision surgery was performed in14.7% of the patients. The combined end point showed successful results in 78.8% of all cases. All patients with isolated impingement syndrome achieved successful results. Those with partial-thickness tears had successful outcomes in 90.9% of all cases, and patients with full-thickness tears had successful outcomes in 70.6% of all cases. The tendinitis calcarea group showed the poorest results, with a 65.2% success rate. Our long-term results show that patients with impingement syndrome who received ASD, including acromioplasty, resection of the coracoacromial ligament, and coplaning do well 20 years after the index surgery. ASD without cuff repair even appears to be a safe, efficacious, and sustainable procedure for patients with partial rotator cuff tears. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Injection of the subacromial bursa in patients with rotator cuff syndrome: a prospective, randomized study comparing the effectiveness of different routes.

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    Marder, Richard A; Kim, Sunny H; Labson, Jerry D; Hunter, John C

    2012-08-15

    Rotator cuff syndrome is often treated with subacromial injection of corticosteroid and local anesthetic. It has not been established if the common injection routes of the bursa are equally accurate. We conducted a prospective clinical trial involving seventy-five shoulders in seventy-five patients who were randomly assigned to receive a subacromial injection through an anterior, lateral, or posterior route with respect to the acromion. An experienced physician performed the injections, which contained radiopaque contrast medium, corticosteroid, and local anesthetic. After the injection, a musculoskeletal radiologist, blinded to the injection route, interpreted all of the radiographs. The rate of accuracy varied with the route of injection, with a rate of 56% for the posterior route, 84% for the anterior route, and 92% for the lateral route (p = 0.006; chi-square test). The accuracy of injection through the posterior route was significantly lower than that through either the anterior or the lateral route (p bursa in females.

  12. Subacromial lipoma causing shoulder impingement syndrome.

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    Sucuoglu, Hamza; Akgun, Kenan

    2017-01-01

    Subacromial lipoma represents a rare cause of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). A 49-year-old male patient presented to clinic with progressive right shoulder pain and limited movement, ongoing for approximately 1 month. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a lesion, compatible with lipoma, extending through subacromial space and pressing on supraspinatus muscle. After histopathological verification of lipoma, mass was excised. Postoperatively, patient completed 1 month physical therapy and rehabilitation program. Patient was free of pain at 4-month follow-up. Subacromial lipoma should be included in differential diagnosis of SIS for patients unresponsive to conservative treatment; MRI is very useful to determine precise etiology and inform surgical treatment.

  13. Subacromial impingement syndrome caused by a voluminous subdeltoid lipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jean-Christophe; Pelet, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a clinical diagnosis encompassing a spectrum of possible etiologies, including subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and partial- to full-thickness rotator cuff tears. This report presents an unusual case of subdeltoid lipoma causing extrinsic compression and subacromial impingement syndrome. The patient, a 60-year-old man, presented to our institution with a few years' history of nontraumatic, posteriorly localized throbbing pain in his right shoulder. Despite a well-followed 6-months physiotherapy program, the patient was still suffering from his right shoulder. The MRI scan revealed a well-circumscribed 6 cm × 2 cm × 5 cm homogenous lesion compatible with a subdeltoid intermuscular lipoma. The mass was excised en bloc, and subsequent histopathologic examination confirmed a benign lipoma. At 6-months follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with a complete return to his activities. Based on this case and a review of the literature, a subacromial lipoma has to be included in the differential diagnosis of a subacromial impingement syndrome refractory to nonoperative treatment. Complementary imaging modalities are required only after a failed conservative management to assess the exact etiology and successfully direct the surgical treatment.

  14. Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Caused by a Voluminous Subdeltoid Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Christophe Murray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement syndrome is a clinical diagnosis encompassing a spectrum of possible etiologies, including subacromial bursitis, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and partial- to full-thickness rotator cuff tears. This report presents an unusual case of subdeltoid lipoma causing extrinsic compression and subacromial impingement syndrome. The patient, a 60-year-old man, presented to our institution with a few years' history of nontraumatic, posteriorly localized throbbing pain in his right shoulder. Despite a well-followed 6-months physiotherapy program, the patient was still suffering from his right shoulder. The MRI scan revealed a well-circumscribed 6 cm × 2 cm × 5 cm homogenous lesion compatible with a subdeltoid intermuscular lipoma. The mass was excised en bloc, and subsequent histopathologic examination confirmed a benign lipoma. At 6-months follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with a complete return to his activities. Based on this case and a review of the literature, a subacromial lipoma has to be included in the differential diagnosis of a subacromial impingement syndrome refractory to nonoperative treatment. Complementary imaging modalities are required only after a failed conservative management to assess the exact etiology and successfully direct the surgical treatment.

  15. Subacromial injections of corticosteroids and xylocaine for painful subacromial impingement syndrome.

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    Yu, Chung-Ming; Chen, Chih-Hwa; Liu, Hsien-Tao; Dai, Ming-Hsun; Wang, I-Chun; Wang, Kun-Chung

    2006-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome, with pain and limited motion, is a common disease encountered daily in clinics. This study determined the efficacy of subacromial injections of corticosteroids and local anesthesia for treatment of painful subacromial impingement syndrome. A total of 238 shoulders in 209 patients, with regular follow-up, were enrolled in this study. Mean patient age was 51 years (range 31-72 years). Each patient complained of shoulder pain with progressive motion limitation present for more than one month, which was not relieved by various nonsurgical treatments. The mean duration of symptoms before injection was five months (range 1-12 months). Each patient had a positive Neer impingement sign, Hawkins impingement sign, painful tendon sign, limited range of motion and did not show clinical evidence of a rotator cuff tear. Each patient was administered an injection of 1 ml of 2% Xylocaine and 1 ml of Rinderon suspension. A second injection was administered one week later for patients without obvious improvement. Following injections, patients were instructed to perform a home rehabilitation program for four weeks. Follow-up examinations were scheduled for one, two and four weeks, and three, six, nine and 12 months after injection. Outcome measures included the Constant-Murley score and shoulder range of motion. At follow-up four weeks after the first injection, 216 shoulders (91%) had satisfactory improvement in amount of pain and range of motion: mean improvements in the active range of motion of forward elevation, abduction, internal rotation and external rotation were 56 degrees, 48 degrees, 18 degrees and 22 degrees, respectively. However, at the first year follow-up, the satisfaction rate was slightly down at 88%, and 19 shoulders (8%; 16 patients) had recurrent pain and motion limitation after an average of 5.4 months (range 3-12 months). Each of these patients received another injection. Surgery was recommended for 22 shoulders (9%; 18

  16. The molecular pathophysiology of subacromial bursitis in rotator cuff disease.

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    Blaine, Theodore A; Kim, Yang-Soo; Voloshin, Ilya; Chen, Darwin; Murakami, Koko; Chang, Seong-Sil; Winchester, Robert; Lee, Francis Y; O'keefe, Regis J; Bigliani, Louis U

    2005-01-01

    Little information exists on the molecular and biochemical pathophysiology of subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff disease. We investigated the pattern of expression of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1beta, IL-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor [TNF] alpha, small inducible cytokines), metalloproteases, and cyclooxygenases in the subacromial bursa in patients with rotator cuff disease. Subacromial bursa specimens were prepared for molecular and biochemical analysis in patients undergoing shoulder surgery following an institutional review board-approved protocol. Specimens were analyzed for the presence of cytokines, metalloproteases, and cyclooxygenases by use of microarray for gene expression and immunohistocytochemistry. Microarray analysis for gene expression and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the expression of several cytokine genes (TNF, IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6) was increased in patients with subacromial bursitis compared with control specimens. Furthermore, the expression of metalloproteases (MMP-1 and MMP-9) and cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) in the bursitis group was found to be increased as compared with controls. Although further investigation is required, these studies suggest that inflammation of the subacromial bursa does occur in patients with rotator cuff disease. These findings support the role of anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of subacromial impingement and emphasize the importance of subacromial bursectomy to reduce inflammation in rotator cuff disease.

  17. Internal- and External-Rotation Peak Toque in Little League Baseball Players With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Improved by Closed Kinetic Chain Shoulder Training.

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    Lee, Dong-Rour; Kim, Laurentius Jongsoon

    2016-08-01

    Many studies have explored closed kinetic chain (CKC) shoulder exercises (SEs) with a sling because they are safer and more effective than open-chain exercises, especially in early stages of treatment. However, the application of CKC SE in youth baseball players has rarely been attempted, although teenage baseball players also experience shoulder pain. To investigate the effects of CKC SE on the peak torque of shoulder internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) in youth baseball players. Single-group pretest, posttest. Biomechanics laboratory. 23 Little League Baseball players with subacromial impingement syndrome. The CKC SE with a sling was CKC shoulder-flexion exercise, extension exercise, IR exercise, and ER exercise. This exercise regimen was conducted 2 or 3 times/wk for 8 wk. The peak torque of shoulder IR and ER was measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. Concentric shoulder rotation was performed, with 5 repetitions at an angular velocity of 60°/s and 15 at 180°/s. The IR and ER peak torque significantly increased at each angular velocity after the exercise program. In particular, the increase in IR and ER peak torque values was statistically significant at an angular velocity of 180°/s. CKC SE was effective in increasing shoulder IR and ER strength, demonstrating its potential benefits in the prevention and treatment of shoulder injury. In addition, increased IR peak torque appears to improve throwing velocity in baseball players.

  18. Subacromial osteochondroma: A rare cause of impingement syndrome.

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    Çıtlak, Atilla; Akgün, Ulaş; Bulut, Tugrul; Aslan, Cihan; Mete, Berna Dirim; Şener, Muhittin

    2015-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is one of the most common disorders of shoulder. Scapula is a very rare site for osteochondromas, and osteochondromas arising under the acromion cause impingement syndrome. We presented 34-year old female patient with subacromial impingement syndrome secondary to osteochondroma. She had received conservative treatment several times in other clinics. The osteochondroma causing impingement was not diagnosed. Physical examination of the right shoulder revealed 90° flexion, 70° abduction, 20° external rotation and internal rotation to sacrum. X-ray, CT and MRI of the shoulder was obtained. Osteochondroma of the acromion (35×33×25mm) causing impingement was detected. The osteochondroma of acromion compressed, displaced and ruptured the supraspinatus tendon. Also an osseous prominence of glenoid was detected during shoulder arthroscopy, and it was removed arthroscopically. The giant osteochondroma of acromion could not remove arthroscopically due to the size of the lesion, and it was removed totally through a mini open approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of osteochondroma. Scapular, clavicular and humeral osteochondromas cause impingement syndrome. Osteochondroma should be treated with total excision. Recurrences can be seen due to insufficient removal of osteochondromas. We think that, total excision is important to prevent recurrence. Subacromial osteochondroma is a very rare cause of impingement syndrome, and if it isn't diagnosed early it limits shoulder movements, causes severe shoulder impingement and rotator cuff tear. The diagnosis of subacromial osteochondroma should be considered in any patient with shoulder impingement syndrome and good functional results can be expected following total excision. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of subacromial pain syndrome: a multidisciplinary review by the Dutch Orthopaedic Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diercks, R.; Bron, C.; Dorrestijn, O.; Meskers, C.; Naber, R.; Ruiter, T. de; Willems, J.; Winters, J.; Woude, H.J. van der; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of "subacromial impingement syndrome" of the shoulder has changed drastically in the past decade. The anatomical explanation as "impingement" of the rotator cuff is not sufficient to cover the pathology. "Subacromial pain syndrome", SAPS, describes the condition better. A working group

  20. EFFECT OF POSTURAL CORRECTION WITH DIFFERENT TAPING MATERIALS ON SCAPULAR KINEMATICS AND MYOELECTRIC ACTIVITIES OF SCAPULAR ROTATORS IN SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME A RANDOMIZED PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman Mohamad Abd Al-Gawad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rigid and kinesio tapings are commonly used in the rehabilitation of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS. Yet; the effect of postural correction with the two taping materials in SIS has not been extensively studied. The purpose of the study is to examine the effect of postural correction with two different taping materials on scapular kinematics and electromyography of scapular upward rotators in patients with SIS. Methods: Twenty female patients with SIS participated in this study. Their age ranged from 30-60 years. Participants were randomly assigned into: Group I (Kinesio tape, n=10 and Group II (rigid tape, n=10. Thoracic and scapular taping with posture correction was applied to both groups. Scapular upward rotation at 0˚, 60˚, 90˚ and 120˚ of shoulder elevation and the activity level of the upper fibers of trapezius (UT, lower fibers of trapezius (LT and serratus anterior (SA muscles were measured before and immediately after taping application. Results: Both taping materials significantly increased scapular upward rotation at 60°, 90° and 120° angles (P =.004,.002 and .047 respectively after the application of tape as compared to the before. In addition, significantly greater muscle activity of the LT and SA muscles (P =.027 and 0.05 respectively were demonstrated by the kinesio-taping group as compared to rigid taping group during real taping condition. Conclusion: Both taping materials are effective in restoring scapular kinematics. Furthermore, kinesio taping has a facilitatory effect on the LT and SA muscles. Kinesio taping may be considered an alternative to rigid taping in patients with SIS.

  1. Proinflammatory cytokines and metalloproteases are expressed in the subacromial bursa in patients with rotator cuff disease.

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    Voloshin, Ilya; Gelinas, Jill; Maloney, Michael D; O'Keefe, Regis J; Bigliani, Louis U; Blaine, Theodore A

    2005-09-01

    The pathophysiology of subacromial impingement syndrome is poorly understood. We investigated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, metalloproteases, and the cyclooxygenases in the subacromial bursa in control patients and in patients with rotator cuff tear. Basic science evaluation. Eighteen patients undergoing shoulder surgery had a subacromial bursa biopsy examination. Patients were divided into 2 groups. Group I (study group) had 10 patients with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (RCT). Group II (control group) had 8 patients. Seven of 8 underwent shoulder arthroscopy with anterior capsular reconstruction for instability; 1 of 8 underwent open reduction internal fixation for acute proximal humerus fracture. None of the patients in group II had any history of symptoms or signs consistent with subacromial impingement. H&E and immunohistochemical antibody (MMP-1, MMP-9, IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha, COX-1, and COX-2) stained specimens were examined by 2 blinded observers using a histologic scale (grade 0 = no staining to grade 4 = intense staining). Histologic evidence of inflammation was present in all patients with RCT (group I). No or mild inflammation was noted in group II. The average staining grade for inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha) and proteinases (MMP-1 and MMP-9) was significantly more pronounced in the RCT group (P bursa of patients with rotator cuff tear. These findings support the role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids in RCT treatment, and emphasize the importance of subacromial bursectomy to reduce inflammation in RCT surgery.

  2. Fewer rotator cuff tears fifteen years after arthroscopic subacromial decompression.

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    Björnsson, Hanna; Norlin, Rolf; Knutsson, Anders; Adolfsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    A successful clinical result is reported in 75% to 85% of impingement patients after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. The result is maintained over time, but few studies have investigated the integrity of the rotator cuff in these patients. Using ultrasonography, we examined the integrity of the rotator cuff in 70 patients 15 years after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. All patients had an intact rotator cuff at the index procedure. Tendons were still intact in 57 patients (82%), 10 (14%) had partial-thickness tears, and 3 (4%) had full-thickness tears. The total number of 18% tears (partial and full thickness) in this study, including patients clinically diagnosed with subacromial impingement at a mean age of 60 years, is unexpectedly low compared with 40% degenerative tears reported in asymptomatic adults of the same age. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression seems to reduce the prevalence of rotator cuff tears in impingement patients. This appears attributable to elimination of extrinsic factors such as mechanical wear and bursitis. The potential effect of surgery on intrinsic cuff degeneration is unknown, but intrinsic factors may explain tears still developing despite decompression. Level III, therapeutic study.

  3. Blood supply of the subacromial bursa and rotator cuff tendons on the bursal side.

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    Põldoja, Elle; Rahu, Madis; Kask, Kristo; Weyers, Imke; Kolts, Ivo

    2017-07-01

    Vascularity of the subacromial bursa and rotator cuff tendons is key factors in the pathogenesis of subacromial bursitis and impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tendinitis, and rotator cuff tears. The purpose of this study was to investigate and describe blood supply to the cranial and caudal parts of the subacromial bursa and the vascularity of the rotator cuff tendons on the bursal side. Fourteen fresh cadaveric shoulders from six females and eight males with a mean age of 71.7 (±10.8) years were studied. Before dissection, an arterial injection of 10% aqueous dispersion of latex was administered. Post-injection, the shoulders were fixed in an alcohol-formalin-glycerol solution. The cranial and caudal bursa of all specimens was mainly supplied by the thoracoacromial, suprascapular, and anterior and posterior circumflex humeral arteries. The cranial part of the bursa was supplied anteriorly by the thoracoacromial artery, and posteriorly and medially by the posterior circumflex humeral artery as far as the medial third. The caudal part received arterial blood anteriorly from the anterior circumflex humeral artery, and posteriorly and medially by the posterior circumflex humeral artery as far as the medial third of the caudal bursa. In addition, the suprascapular artery branched at the upper surface of the coracohumeral ligament, and the subcoracoid artery branched at the under surface of the same ligament. The subacromial bursa appears well vascularized. The results of the present investigation showed that blood supply to the subacromial bursa at the caudal part and rotator cuff tendons on the bursal side was linked to the same arteries. The subcoracoid artery supplied interval rotator structures close to the caudal bursa. It is the wish of the authors that this meticulous anatomical work will help surgeons in their day-to-day clinical work, e.g. to minimize the risk of complications such as perioperative bleeding.

  4. Adhesion of the subacromial bursa may cause subacromial impingement in patients with rotator cuff tears: pressure measurements in 18 patients.

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    Machida, Akitoshi; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Miyamoto, Takashi; Inui, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Tetsu; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2004-02-01

    In order to determine whether adhesion of the subacromial bursa leads to impingement, we measured the subacromial contact pressures before and after release of adhesion of this bursa. 18 shoulders with cuff tears and adhesion of the subacromial bursa were evaluated in 8 male and 10 female patients, of mean age 62 (53-71) years and who had no particular limitation of shoulder motion. We recorded subacromial pressures using a very sensitive film inserted under the acromion during surgery. In passive scapular plane elevation (scaption) at 100 degrees, the mean subacromial contact pressure and area declined from 1.43 (SD 0.23) MPa before release to 1.14 (SD 0.35) MPa after release (p bursa increases impingement between the acromion and the insertion of rotator cuff tendons.

  5. Subacromial osteochondroma: A rare cause of impingement syndrome

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    Çıtlak, Atilla; Akgün, Ulaş; Bulut, Tugrul; Aslan, Cihan; Mete, Berna Dirim; Şener, Muhittin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Subacromial impingement syndrome is one of the most common disorders of shoulder. Scapula is a very rare site for osteochondromas, and osteochondromas arising under the acromion cause impingement syndrome. Presentation of case We presented 34-year old female patient with subacromial impingement syndrome secondary to osteochondroma. She had received conservative treatment several times in other clinics. The osteochondroma causing impingement was not diagnosed. Physical examination...

  6. Clavicular hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion--dynamic sonographic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsin-Yu; Wong, Poo-Kuang; Ho, Wei-Pin; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Liao, Yi-Shyan; Wong, Chin-Chean

    2014-02-06

    Clavicular hook plates are effective fixation devices for distal clavicle fractures and severe acromioclavicular joint dislocations. However, increasing number of studies has revealed that subacromial portion of the hook may induce acromial bony erosion, shoulder impingement, or even rotator cuff damage. By sonographic evaluation, we thus intended to determine whether the presence of hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and its relationship relative to surrounding subacromial structures. We prospectively followed 40 patients with either distal clavicle fracture or acromioclavicular joint dislocation that had surgery using the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) clavicular hook plate. All patients were evaluated by monthly clinical and radiographic examinations. Static and dynamic musculoskeletal sonography examinations were performed at final follow-up before implant removal. Clinical results for pain, shoulder function, and range of motion were evaluated using Constant-Murley and Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores. Clinically, 15 out of 40 patients (37.5%) presented with subacromial impingement syndrome and their functional scores were poorer than the non-impinged patients. Among them, six patients were noted to have rotator cuff lesion. Acromial erosion caused by hook pressure developed in 20 patients (50%). We demonstrated by musculoskeletal sonography that clavicular hook plate caused subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion. The data also suggest an association between hardware-induced impingement and poorer functional scores. To our knowledge, the only solution is removal of the implant after bony consolidation/ligamentous healing has taken place. Thus, we advocate the removal of the implant as soon as bony union and/or ligamentous healing is achieved.

  7. Clavicular hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion - dynamic sonographic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Clavicular hook plates are effective fixation devices for distal clavicle fractures and severe acromioclavicular joint dislocations. However, increasing number of studies has revealed that subacromial portion of the hook may induce acromial bony erosion, shoulder impingement, or even rotator cuff damage. By sonographic evaluation, we thus intended to determine whether the presence of hook plate may induce subacromial shoulder impingement and its relationship relative to surrounding subacromial structures. Methods We prospectively followed 40 patients with either distal clavicle fracture or acromioclavicular joint dislocation that had surgery using the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO) clavicular hook plate. All patients were evaluated by monthly clinical and radiographic examinations. Static and dynamic musculoskeletal sonography examinations were performed at final follow-up before implant removal. Clinical results for pain, shoulder function, and range of motion were evaluated using Constant-Murley and Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scores. Results Clinically, 15 out of 40 patients (37.5%) presented with subacromial impingement syndrome and their functional scores were poorer than the non-impinged patients. Among them, six patients were noted to have rotator cuff lesion. Acromial erosion caused by hook pressure developed in 20 patients (50%). Conclusions We demonstrated by musculoskeletal sonography that clavicular hook plate caused subacromial shoulder impingement and rotator cuff lesion. The data also suggest an association between hardware-induced impingement and poorer functional scores. To our knowledge, the only solution is removal of the implant after bony consolidation/ligamentous healing has taken place. Thus, we advocate the removal of the implant as soon as bony union and/or ligamentous healing is achieved. PMID:24502688

  8. Detection of subacromial bursa thickening by sonography in shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yao-Hung; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Wei-Hsiu; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Li, Yen-Yao; Peng, Kuo-Ti; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2007-01-01

    Normally, the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa is thinner than 2 mm using ultrasound examination. The subtle thickening of the bursa could be an early sign of subacromial impingement and possibly a rotator cuff tear. The aim of this study was to compare the thickness of subacromial bursa measured using ultrasonography in the painful shoulder with normal side, and also to differentiate Neer stages I and II impingements in patients with unilateral shoulder pain. We performed bilateral shoulder sonography in 268 consecutive patients with unilateral shoulder pain and clinical suggestion of rotator cuff pathology. The study group consisted of 102 cases of Neer stage I and 166 cases of Neer stage II impingement syndrome. The bursa thickness was calculated from the superficial peribursal fat to the upper margin of the supraspinatus. A statistically significant association was detected (p bursa in patients with Neer stage I impingement had no statistically important link the results of the patients with Neer stage II impingement. Increased bursa thickness in the symptomatic side may be an alternative sonographic indicator of subacromial bursitis and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, even when measured to be less than 2 mm. Sonographic examination of subacromial bursa thickness is not an appropriate technique to differentiate the Neer stages I and II impingement. Further study is needed to quantify the echogenicity of the supraspinatus tendon and to show a level of accuracy in patients with rotator cuff tendinosis or partial tears.

  9. Relation Between Subacromial Bursitis on Ultrasonography and Efficacy of Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection in Rotator Cuff Disease: A Prospective Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Doo-Hyung; Hong, Ji Yeon; Lee, Michael Young; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Yoon, Seung-Hyun

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the correlations between subacromial bursitis (bursal thickening and effusion) on ultrasonography and its response to subacromial corticosteroid injection in patients with rotator cuff disease. Prospective, longitudinal comparison study. University-affiliated tertiary care hospital. Patients with rotator cuff disease (N=69) were classified into 3 groups based on ultrasonographic findings; (1) normative bursa group (group 1, n=23): bursa and effusion thickness 2mm and effusion thickness 2mm. A single subacromial injection with 20mg of triamcinolone acetonide. Visual analog scale (VAS) of shoulder pain, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ), angles of active shoulder range of motion (flexion, abduction, external rotation, and internal rotation), and bursa and effusion thickness at pre- and posttreatment at week 8. There were no significant differences between the 3 groups in demographic characteristics pretreatment. Groups 2 and 3 showed a significant difference compared with group 1 in changes on the VAS and abduction; group 3 showed a significant difference compared with group 1 in changes of the SDQ, internal rotation, and external rotation; and all groups showed significant differences when compared with each other (groups 1 and 3, 2 and 3, and 1 and 2) in changes of thickness. A patient with ultrasonographic observation of subacromial bursitis, instead of normative bursa, can expect better outcome with subacromial corticosteroid injection. Therefore, we recommend a careful selection of patients using ultrasonography prior to injection. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Filip Holst; Pedersen, Christina Gravgaard; Jensen, Majbritt Lykke

    Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.......Physiotherapy improves patient reported shoulder function and health status in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome....

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    José L. Arias-Buría; Sebastián Truyols-Domínguez; Raquel Valero-Alcaide; Jaime Salom-Moreno; María A. Atín-Arratibel; César Fernández-de-las-Peñas

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US-) guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n = 17) group or exercise (n = 19) group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous ele...

  12. Subacromial impingement syndrome--effectiveness of physiotherapy and manual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremariam, Lukas; Hay, Elaine M; van der Sande, Renske; Rinkel, Willem D; Koes, Bart W; Huisstede, Bionka M A

    2014-08-01

    The subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) includes the rotator cuff syndrome, tendonitis and bursitis of the shoulder. Treatment includes surgical and non-surgical modalities. Non-surgical treatment is used to reduce pain, to decrease the subacromial inflammation, to heal the compromised rotator cuff and to restore satisfactory function of the shoulder. To select the most appropriate non-surgical intervention and to identify gaps in scientific knowledge, we explored the effectiveness of the interventions used, concentrating on the effectiveness of physiotherapy and manual therapy. The Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, PEDro and CINAHL were searched for relevant systematic reviews and randomised clinical trials (RCTs). Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality. A best-evidence synthesis was used to summarise the results. Two reviews and 10 RCTs were included. One RCT studied manual therapy as an add-on therapy to self-training. All other studies studied the effect of physiotherapy: effectiveness of exercise therapy, mobilisation as an add-on therapy to exercises, ultrasound, laser and pulsed electromagnetic field. Moderate evidence was found for the effectiveness of hyperthermia compared to exercise therapy or ultrasound in the short term. Hyperthermia and exercise therapy were more effective in comparison to controls or placebo in the short term (moderate evidence). For the effectiveness of hyperthermia, no midterm or long-term results were studied. In the midterm, exercise therapy gave the best results (moderate evidence) compared to placebo or controls. For other interventions, conflicting, limited or no evidence was found. Some physiotherapeutic treatments seem to be promising (moderate evidence) to treat SIS, but more research is needed before firm conclusions can be drawn. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Conservative or surgical treatment for subacromial impingement syndrome? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrestijn, Oscar; Stevens, Martin; Winters, Jan C.; van der Meer, Klaas; Diercks, Ron L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Patients with subacromial impingement syndrome are often operated on when conservative treatments fail. But does surgery really lead to better results than nonoperative measures? This systematic review compared effects of conservative and surgical treatment for subacromial impingement

  14. Accuracy of physical examination in subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L; Andréu, J L; Muñoz, P; Pastrana, M; Millán, I; Sanz, J; Barbadillo, C; Fernández-Castro, M

    2008-05-01

    Shoulder pain is a common complaint, frequently caused by subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). There are a number of physical examination (PE) manoeuvres that explore the subacromial space. MRI provides an accurate anatomic image of the subacromial space, being the current gold standard in the diagnosis of SIS. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the PE in the diagnosis of SIS and/or subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis (SSB) confirmed by MRI. Consecutive outpatients with an episode of shoulder pain were prospectively included in the study. They were examined by a rheumatologist and, within 3 days, an MRI was done. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of PE manoeuvres were calculated using a 2 x 2 table. Fourteen males and 16 females were included. All the tests exhibited acceptable sensitivity. As a result Yocum manoeuvre was considered the most sensitive and most accurate for SIS. With regard to SSB, the Gerber test was the most sensitive. The majority of the PE manoeuvres showed low specificity. Most PE manoeuvres identify reasonably well subacromial impingement of the shoulder, although, in general, they have low specificity. The Yocum test has the best sensitivity and precision. Our data suggest that imaging techniques should be recommended to better define shoulder lesions.

  15. Increased substance P in subacromial bursa and shoulder pain in rotator cuff diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, M; Hamada, K; Yamakawa, H; Inoue, A; Fukuda, H

    1998-09-01

    The subacromial bursa is recognized as a site associated with the shoulder pain caused by rotator cuff disease in the middle-aged and elderly. Substance P is contained in primary afferent nerves, and its quantity increases during chronic pain. The amount of substance P in the subacromial bursa of patients with rotator cuff disease was examined. Radioimmunoassay and immunohistochemistry were employed to quantify and localize substance P. The preoperative pain level was measured with a visual analogue scale with 0 as no pain, 5 as moderate, and 10 as severe. Thirty-seven patients that had undergone operation were divided into two groups: one composed of 19 patients with subacromial bursitis and a partial-thickness tear of the rotator cuff (nonperforated cuff) and the other composed of 18 patients with a full-thickness tear (perforated cuff). Subacromial bursae obtained from seven fresh cadavers with no shoulder pain before death were used as controls. The visual analogue scale showed significantly greater pain in the group with the nonperforated rotator cuff than in the group with the perforated cuff. Consistent with these results, the amount of substance P in the subacromial bursa was significantly greater in the former group than in the latter. Nerve fibers immunoreactive to substance P were localized around the vessels, with a larger number of fibers in the group with the nonperforated rotator cuff. Therefore, an increased amount of substance P in the subacromial bursa appears to correlate with the pain caused by rotator cuff disease.

  16. Augmented Fixation With Biodegradable Subacromial Spacer After Repair of Massive Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Murat; Akkaya, Mustafa; Gursoy, Safa; Isik, Cetin

    2015-10-01

    Unsuccessful outcomes after repair of massive rotator cuff ruptures accompanied by muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration are frequently associated with inadequate management and secondary tears. We report the functional differences after rotator cuff rupture repair with a biodegradable spacer application. In these patients, rotator cuff rupture repair should provide coverage of the humeral head. Subsequently, acromioplasty should be performed to allow adequate space for the subacromial spacer. Thereafter measurement of the intra-articular space required for application of the biodegradable spacer is performed. Using this method can decrease the rate of tears by providing a safe subacromial space in cases of massive rotator cuff rupture.

  17. Shoulder proprioception in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ebru; Dilek, Banu; Baydar, Meltem; Gundogdu, Mehtap; Ergin, Burcu; Manisali, Metin; Akalin, Elif; Gulbahar, Selmin

    2017-01-01

    Recently, proprioception deficits of the rotator cuff and the deltoid muscles have been suggested to play a pivotal role in the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). To date, there are no study has been found where the kinesthesia and joint position senses have been evaluated together in SIS. To investigate the shoulder proprioception in patients with SIS. Sixty-one patients with SIS and 30 healthy controls, aging between 25 and 65 years, were included in the study. Main outcome measure was proprioception, assessed with an isokinetic dynamometer. Kinesthesia, active and passive joint repositioning senses were tested at 0° and 10° external rotation. All tests were repeated 4 times and the mean of angular errors were obtained. The mean age was 49.14 ± 10.27 and 48.80 ± 11.09 years in patient group and in control group respectively. No significant difference was found between two groups in terms of age, gender and dominance. When involved and uninvolved shoulders of the patient group were compared, kinesthesia, active and passive joint position senses were significantly impaired in involved shoulders at all angles (P shoulders of the patient group were compared to the control group, kinesthesia, active and passive joint position senses were significantly impaired in involved shoulders in patient group at all angles (P shoulders of the patient group were compared to the control group, kinesthesia at 10° was significantly impaired (P shoulder proprioception was impaired in patients with SIS. This proprioceptive impairment was found not only in involved shoulders but also in uninvolved shoulders in patients with SIS.

  18. Subacromial Anesthetics Increase Proprioceptive Deficit in the Shoulder and Elbow in Patients With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Lucas R; Shapiro, Matthew; Karduna, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Shoulder proprioception gives information regarding arm joint position and movement direction. Several studies have investigated shoulder proprioceptive acuity in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS); however, differences in protocols and between-subjects designs have limited scientific inferences regarding proprioception and SIS. We aimed to determine within-subject differences in shoulder and elbow proprioceptive acuity in 17 patients with stage 2 SIS following treatment of a local anesthetic injection. In addition, we used 17 healthy, age-, sex-, and arm dominance-matched controls to determine the magnitude of differences after treatment. Joint position sense (JPS) was measured before and after treatment in both groups in the sagittal plane for the shoulder and elbow. Our results indicate that patients with SIS have less sensitivity to angular position and tended to overshoot their targets with greater variability during angle-matching tasks for the shoulder (1.8° difference, P = .042) and elbow (5.6° difference, P = .001) than controls. The disparities in JPS found in patients with SIS were not resolved following subacromial injection; in fact, the magnitude of the errors increased after treatment where postinjection errors were significantly greater (P = .046) than controls, with an average difference of 2.4°. These findings suggest that patients with SIS have decrements in either the signaling or processing of proprioceptive information and may use pain to reduce these inequalities.

  19. Subacromial Anesthetics Increase Proprioceptive Deficit in the Shoulder and Elbow in Patients With Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R Ettinger

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder proprioception gives information regarding arm joint position and movement direction. Several studies have investigated shoulder proprioceptive acuity in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS; however, differences in protocols and between-subjects designs have limited scientific inferences regarding proprioception and SIS. We aimed to determine within-subject differences in shoulder and elbow proprioceptive acuity in 17 patients with stage 2 SIS following treatment of a local anesthetic injection. In addition, we used 17 healthy, age-, sex-, and arm dominance–matched controls to determine the magnitude of differences after treatment. Joint position sense (JPS was measured before and after treatment in both groups in the sagittal plane for the shoulder and elbow. Our results indicate that patients with SIS have less sensitivity to angular position and tended to overshoot their targets with greater variability during angle-matching tasks for the shoulder (1.8° difference, P  = .042 and elbow (5.6° difference, P  = .001 than controls. The disparities in JPS found in patients with SIS were not resolved following subacromial injection; in fact, the magnitude of the errors increased after treatment where postinjection errors were significantly greater ( P  = .046 than controls, with an average difference of 2.4°. These findings suggest that patients with SIS have decrements in either the signaling or processing of proprioceptive information and may use pain to reduce these inequalities.

  20. Comparison of subacromial tenoxicam and steroid injections in the treatment of impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çift, Hakan; Özkan, Feyza Ünlü; Tolu, Sena; Şeker, Ali; Mahiroğulları, Mahir

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to assess and compare the efficacy of subacromial tenoxicam and steroid injections in treating patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Forty patients having shoulder impingement syndrome with findings of rotator cuff tendinitis or subacromial bursitis on magnetic resonance imaging were included in the study. Patients were randomized into two subacromial injection groups: patients in the first group (10 males, 10 females; mean age 45.3 years; range 32 to 67 years) were administered 20 mg tenoxicam three times by weekly intervals, and patients in the second group (8 males, 12 females; mean age 46.5 years; range 29 to 73 years) were administered 40 mg methylprednisolone acetate just for once. Visual analog scale (VAS), active range of motion (ROM) of the shoulder joint, and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire scores were evaluated at baseline, six weeks after treatment, and first year. Visual analog scale, DASH, and active ROM scores in both groups were statistically significantly improved. No statistically significant difference was detected between subacromial tenoxicam and steroid injections in terms of post-treatment VAS, DASH, and active ROM scores. Mean pre- and post-treatment VAS scores in tenoxicam group were 7.8 (range, 3-9) and 2.6 (range, 2-4), respectively. Mean pre- and post-treatment VAS scores in steroid group were 6.2 (range, 3-10) and 3.6 (range, 0-7), respectively. Mean pre- and post-treatment DASH scores in tenoxicam group were 59.4 (range, 45-80) and 14.7 (range, 8.3-25.8), respectively. Mean pre- and post-treatment DASH scores in steroid group were 56.7 (range, 33.3-85.8) and 18.1 (range, 0-69.2), respectively. Although the improvement in active ROM was higher in the steroid group, difference between two groups was not statistically significant. Both subacromial tenoxicam and steroid injections may be successfully used in the treatment of patients with impingement syndrome. Subacromial tenoxicam

  1. Case reports: ossified mass of the rotator cuff tendon in the subacromial bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Isshin; Ito, Yoichi; Tomo, Hiroyasu; Nakao, Yoshihiro; Takaoka, Kunio

    2005-08-01

    Unlike calcification, ossification is infrequent in the rotator cuff. We describe the clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings in 64-year-old man with an ossified mass arising from a calcified portion of the rotator cuff tendon within the subacromial bursa. Mechanical stress and ischemic events are possible causes of cartilage formation followed by endochondral ossification, producing a mass causing outlet impingement.

  2. Effect of subacromial sodium hyaluronate injection on rotator cuff disease: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtaderi, Alireza; Sajadiyeh, Sepideh; Khosrawi, Saeid; Dehghan, Farnaz; Bateni, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a common cause of shoulder pain. There are studies about the effectiveness of sodium hyaluronate injection on shoulder and knee pain, but few studies demonstrating the efficacy of sodium hyaluronate ultrasonography guided injection for rotator cuff disease. This study evaluates effectiveness of ultrasonography guided subacromial sodium hyaluronate injection in patients with impingment syndrome without rotator cuff complete tear. This prospective, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial study was performed among 40 patients with subacromial impingement syndrome without complete tear of rotator cuff. Patients randomly injected ultrasonography guided in 2 groups: Case group by 20 mg of sodium hyaluronate (Fermathron™) and control group by 0.9% normal saline. Both groups received 3 weekly injections. The pain score (100 mm visual analogue score [VAS]) was evaluated before first injection and one week after each injection. The constant score was evaluated before first and 12 week after last injection. Data was analyzed statistically by Independent t-test. In both groups mean VAS has decreased, but more significantly in case group (P hyaluronate are effective in treating rotator cuff disease without complete tears.

  3. A comparison of isometric, isotonic concentric and isotonic eccentric exercises in the physiotherapy management of subacromial pain syndrome/rotator cuff tendinopathy: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Rita; Cowan, Sallie M; Watson, Lyn; Pizzari, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Subacromial pain syndrome (SPS) involving rotator cuff tendinopathy is a common cause of shoulder pain and disability. Evidence suggests that structured physiotherapy may be as effective as surgery in this condition with significant improvements demonstrated in trials involving scapular retraining, rotator cuff strengthening and flexibility exercises. Most published programs typically utilise isotonic concentric and/or eccentric strengthening modes. Recently, immediate analgesic effects and muscle strength gains following heavy-load isometric exercises in lower limb tendinopathy conditions have been observed. It is pertinent to ascertain whether such outcomes can be replicated in SPS/rotator cuff tendinopathy. The primary aim of this study is to establish the feasibility of undertaking a full-scale randomised controlled trial (RCT) that compares the effects of isometric, isotonic concentric and isotonic eccentric rotator cuff contractions when used as part of a semi-standardised exercise-based physiotherapy program in patients diagnosed with SPS. The secondary aim is to explore potential trends or treatment effects of the exercise intervention. Thirty-six participants diagnosed with SPS will be randomised to one of three intervention groups and undergo a one-on-one exercise-based physiotherapy intervention, involving scapular and rotator cuff muscle retraining and strengthening. Each group will utilise a different mode of rotator cuff strengthening-isometric, isotonic concentric or isotonic eccentric. Rotator cuff tendon responses to isometric loading are not yet established in the literature; hence, individualised, progressive loading will be used in this pilot study in accordance with symptoms. The intervention will involve two phases: during Phase 1 (weeks 1-6) participants undertake the active group-specific physiotherapy treatment; in Phase 2 (weeks 6-12), they undertake a progressive, but no longer group-specific exercise program. To determine feasibility, an

  4. Visual scapular dyskinesis: kinematics and muscle activity alterations in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Andrea Diniz; Timmons, Mark K; Grover, Molly; Ciconelli, Rozana Mesquita; Michener, Lori A

    2015-02-01

    To characterize scapular kinematics and shoulder muscle activity in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome, with and without visually identified scapular dyskinesis. Cross-sectional study. Laboratory. Participants with subacromial impingement syndrome (N=38) were visually classified using a scapular dyskinesis test with obvious scapular dyskinesis (n=19) or normal scapular motion (n=19). Not applicable. An electromagnetic motion capture system measured 3-dimensional kinematics of the thorax, humerus, and scapula. Simultaneously, surface electromyography was used to measure muscle activity of the upper, middle, and lower trapezius; serratus anterior; and infraspinatus during ascending and descending phases of weighted shoulder flexion. Separate mixed-model analyses of variance for the ascending and descending phases of shoulder flexion compared kinematics and muscle activity between the 2 groups. Shoulder disability was assessed with the Pennsylvania Shoulder Score (Penn). The group with obvious dyskinesis reported 6 points lower on Penn shoulder function (0-60 points), exhibited a main group effect of less scapular external rotation of 2.1° during ascent and 2.5° during descent, and had 12.0% higher upper trapezius muscle activity during ascent in the 30° to 60° interval. Patients with obvious dyskinesis and subacromial impingement syndrome have reduced scapular external rotation and increased upper trapezius muscle activity, along with a greater loss of shoulder function compared with those without dyskinesis. These biomechanical alterations can lead to or be caused by scapular dyskinesis. Future studies should determine if correction of these deficits will eliminate scapular dyskinesis and improve patient-rated shoulder use. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tendon vascularity in overhead athletes with subacromial pain syndrome and its correlation with the resting subacromial space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Sammi Sin Mei; Leong, Hio Teng; Leung, Vivian Yee Fong; Ying, Michael; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2017-05-01

    Supraspinatus tendinopathy is one of the common causes of subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS) in overhead athletes. Changes in tendon vascularity have been reported in painful tendons; however, the prevalence and distribution have not been investigated in young overhead athletes. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 47 overhead athletes (male, 31; female, 16) aged 18 to 36 years with SAPS for >3 months. A sonographer graded the severity of the tendinopathy and area of vascularization. Ultrasound imaging was used to measure supraspinatus tendon thickness, vascularity, and resting subacromial space. A self-written program was used to semiquantify the intensity of vascularity, expressed as the vascular index. The majority (87.2%) of the participants had signs of tendinopathy in the supraspinatus tendon, and 40 (85.1%) of the tendinopathic tendons had vascularity. The majority (66.0%) of the vascularized subjects presented with minimal increase in vascularity, and 19.1% had moderate to severe vascularization. Most (79.2%) of the vascularization was observed in the pericortical region. The vascular index was negatively correlated with the resting subacromial space in male athletes with a reduced subacromial space (ρ = -0.63; P = .038). Of overhead athletes with SAPS, 87.2% had supraspinatus tendinopathy with minimal to moderate vascularization, with the majority of vascularization occurring in the pericortical region. In male athletes with a reduced subacromial space, greater vascularity in the supraspinatus tendon was associated with a smaller resting subacromial space. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Buría, José L.; Truyols-Domínguez, Sebastián; Valero-Alcaide, Raquel; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Atín-Arratibel, María A.; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US-) guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n = 17) group or exercise (n = 19) group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions). Shoulder pain (NPRS) and disability (DASH) were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention. PMID:26649058

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Buría, José L; Truyols-Domínguez, Sebastián; Valero-Alcaide, Raquel; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Atín-Arratibel, María A; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US-) guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n = 17) group or exercise (n = 19) group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions). Shoulder pain (NPRS) and disability (DASH) were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P percutaneous electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention.

  8. Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Electrolysis and Eccentric Exercises for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Arias-Buría

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare effects of ultrasound- (US- guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles in subacromial pain syndrome. Methods. Thirty-six patients were randomized and assigned into US-guided percutaneous electrolysis (n=17 group or exercise (n=19 group. Patients were asked to perform an eccentric exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice every day for 4 weeks. Participants assigned to US-guided percutaneous electrolysis group also received the application of galvanic current through acupuncture needle on each session once a week (total 4 sessions. Shoulder pain (NPRS and disability (DASH were assessed at baseline, after 2 sessions, and 1 week after the last session. Results. The ANOVA revealed significant Group∗Time interactions for shoulder pain and disability (all, P<0.01: individuals receiving US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with the eccentric exercises experienced greater improvement than those receiving eccentric exercise alone. Conclusions. US-guided percutaneous electrolysis combined with eccentric exercises resulted in small better outcomes at short term compared to when only eccentric exercises were applied in subacromial pain syndrome. The effect was statistically and clinically significant for shoulder pain but below minimal clinical difference for function. Future studies should investigate the long-term effects and potential placebo effect of this intervention.

  9. SHOULDER MUSCLE IMBALANCE AND SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME IN OVERHEAD ATHLETES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Subacromial impingement is a frequent and painful condition among athletes, particularly those involved in overhead sports such as baseball and swimming. There are generally two types of subacromial impingement: structural and functional. While structural impingement is caused by a physical loss of area in the subacromial space due to bony growth or inflammation, functional impingement is a relative loss of subacromial space secondary to altered scapulohumeral mechanics resulting from glenohumeral instability and muscle imbalance. The purpose of this review is to describe the role of muscle imbalance in subacromial impingement in order to guide sports physical therapy evaluation and interventions. PMID:21655457

  10. Synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa causing a bursal-sided rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Julie A; Garrigues, Grant E

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon condition, and involvement of the shoulder is even more rare. We report on a 39-year-old female who presented with symptoms, radiographic features, and intraoperative findings consistent with multiple subacromial loose bodies resulting in a partial-thickness, bursal-sided rotator cuff tear of the supraspinatus muscle. She was treated with an arthroscopic removal of loose bodies, complete excision of the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa, acromioplasty, and rotator cuff repair. To our knowledge, this is the first report of arthroscopic treatment for a bursal-sided, partial-thickness rotator cuff tear treated with greater than two-year clinical and radiographic follow-up. We utilized shoulder scores, preoperative and postoperative range of motion, and imaging to assess the results of treatment and surveillance for recurrence in our patient after two-year follow-up.

  11. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of subacromial pain syndrome: a multidisciplinary review by the Dutch Orthopaedic Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, Ron; Bron, Carel; Dorrestijn, Oscar; Meskers, Carel; Naber, René; de Ruiter, Tjerk; Willems, Jaap; Winters, Jan; van der Woude, Henk Jan

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of "subacromial impingement syndrome" of the shoulder has changed drastically in the past decade. The anatomical explanation as "impingement" of the rotator cuff is not sufficient to cover the pathology. "Subacromial pain syndrome", SAPS, describes the condition better. A working group formed from a number of Dutch specialist societies, joined by the Dutch Orthopedic Association, has produced a guideline based on the available scientific evidence. This resulted in a new outlook for the treatment of subacromial pain syndrome. The important conclusions and advice from this work are as follows: (1) The diagnosis SAPS can only be made using a combination of clinical tests. (2) SAPS should preferably be treated non-operatively. (3) Acute pain should be treated with analgetics if necessary. (4) Subacromial injection with corticosteroids is indicated for persistent or recurrent symptoms. (5) Diagnostic imaging is useful after 6 weeks of symptoms. Ultrasound examination is the recommended imaging, to exclude a rotator cuff rupture. (6) Occupational interventions are useful when complaints persist for longer than 6 weeks. (7) Exercise therapy should be specific and should be of low intensity and high frequency, combining eccentric training, attention to relaxation and posture, and treatment of myofascial trigger points (including stretching of the muscles) may be considered. (8) Strict immobilization and mobilization techniques are not recommended. (9) Tendinosis calcarea can be treated by shockwave (ESWT) or needling under ultrasound guidance (barbotage). (10) Rehabilitation in a specialized unit can be considered in chronic, treatment resistant SAPS, with pain perpetuating behavior. (11) There is no convincing evidence that surgical treatment for SAPS is more effective than conservature management. (12) There is no indication for the surgical treatment of asymptomatic rotator cuff tears.

  12. The Use of Physiotherapy among Patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Frich, Lars Henrik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physiotherapy with exercises is generally recommended in the treatment of patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the use of physiotherapy in patients with SIS in Danish hospital settings as part of initial non-surgical treatment...... and after SIS-related surgery and to evaluate to which extent sex, socio-demographic and clinical factors predict the use of physiotherapy. METHODS: Using national health registers, we identified 57,311 patients who had a first hospital contact with a diagnosis of ICD-10, groups M75.1-75.9, 1 July 2007...... to 30 June 2011. Records of physiotherapy were extracted within 52 weeks after first contact (or until surgery), and for surgically treated patients within 26 weeks after surgery. Predictors of the use of physiotherapy after first contact and after surgery were analysed as time-to-event. RESULTS: Within...

  13. Shoulder abduction torque steadiness is preserved in subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Paula Rezende; Avila, Mariana Arias; de Oliveira, Ana Beatriz; Asso, Naoe Aline; Benze, Benedito Galvão; de Fátima Salvini, Tania

    2009-06-01

    This study compared peak torque and torque steadiness during isometric abduction in subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) and those with no upper limb disorders. The SIS group consisted of 27 subjects (33.48 +/- 9.94 years) with unilateral SIS. The control group consisted of 23 healthy and active subjects (32.26 +/- 9.04 years). Peak torque and torque steadiness were measured during isometric abduction (80 masculine in the scapular plane) of the shoulder. Standard deviation, coefficient of variation, stability time, median frequency, and relative power were measured from the steadiness trials. There were neither significant interactions between group and side (P > 0.05), nor were there significant main effects of group and side (P > 0.05) for all variables analyzed. The results of this study showed that steadiness is preserved by SIS during isometric abduction of the shoulder.

  14. Efficacy of a Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection for Persistent Pain After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Do, Nam-Hoon; Lee, Juyeob; Ko, Young-Won

    2016-09-01

    Corticosteroid injections have been widely used for reducing shoulder pain. However, catastrophic complications induced by corticosteroid such as infections and tendon degeneration have made surgeons hesitant to use a corticosteroid injection as a pain control modality, especially during the postoperative recovery phase. To determine the effectiveness and safety of a subacromial corticosteroid injection for persistent pain control during the recovery period and to analyze the factors causing persistent pain after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 458 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were included in this study. Patient-specific parameters, tear size and pattern, and pain intensity were reviewed. Seventy-two patients were administered a postoperative subacromial corticosteroid injection under ultrasound guidance. The corticosteroid injection was administered to patients who awakened overnight because of constant severe shoulder pain or whose pain was exacerbated at the time of rehabilitation exercises within 8 weeks after surgery. Pain intensity, patient satisfaction, and functional outcomes using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) and Constant scores were compared between the patients with and without a subacromial corticosteroid injection. The retear rate was evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging at 6 months postoperatively. In patients with an injection, the mean (±SD) visual analog scale for pain (pVAS) score was 7.7 ± 1.2 at the time of the injection. This significantly decreased to 2.3 ± 1.4 at the end of the first month after the injection, demonstrating a 70.2% reduction in pain (P rotator cuff tears (41.8%) showed a higher occurrence of severe postoperative persistent pain. Preoperative shoulder stiffness was revealed as a predisposing factor for persistent pain (odds ratio, 0.2; P = .04). A subacromial corticosteroid injection can be considered as a useful and safe

  15. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the subdeltoid, subacromial bursa in painful and painless rotator cuff tears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Hensor, E M A; Barron, D; Robinson, P

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although shoulder pain is often associated with rotator cuff tears, many tears are asymptomatic and are not the cause of the patient's pain. This may explain the persistence of symptoms in some patients despite technically successful rotator cuff repair. It has been proposed that rotator cuff tears cause pain through subdeltoid/subacromial bursal inflammation. The aim of this study was to determine whether bursal inflammation seen on MRI is associated with pain in patients with rotator cuff tears of the shoulder. Methods The shoulders of 255 patients were screened with ultrasound. 33 full-thickness rotator cuff tears (18 with shoulder pain and 15 without pain) were identified and subsequently studied using contrast-enhanced MRI of the shoulder. Enhancement of the subacromial bursa was scored independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Logistic regression was used to determine whether bursal enhancement was independently associated with pain. Results There was a significant association between pain and age, with greater likelihood of pain in younger patients. Bursal enhancement was common in both painful and painless tears. No statistically significant link between pain and bursal enhancement was seen, even after accounting for age. Conclusion Although enhancement of the subdeltoid/subacromial bursa was common, no evidence was found to support the hypothesis that bursal enhancement is associated with pain in rotator cuff tears. It is therefore unlikely to determine reliably which patients would benefit from rotator cuff repair. Advances in knowledge Bursal enhancement and thickening does not reliably correlate with symptoms or presence of rotator cuff tear. PMID:23091289

  16. Efficacy of Proprioceptive Exercises in Patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilek, Banu; Gulbahar, Selmin; Gundogdu, Mehtap; Ergin, Burcu; Manisali, Metin; Ozkan, Mustafa; Akalin, Elif

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of proprioceptive exercises on shoulder proprioception, range of motion, pain, muscle strength, and function in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Sixty-one patients with subacromial impingement syndrome participated in this prospective, single-blind randomized controlled trial. All patients were randomly divided into two groups: control group (conventional physiotherapy, n = 30) and intervention group (proprioceptive exercise and conventional physiotherapy, n = 31). The primary outcome measures were sense of kinesthesia and active and passive repositioning for proprioception at 0 degrees and 10 degrees external rotation at 12 wks. The secondary outcome measures were pain at rest, at night, and during activities of daily living with the visual analog scale (0-10 cm), the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff index, the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons index, range of motion, and isometric muscle strength at both 6 and 12 wks. After treatment, significant improvement was found in range of motion, pain, isometric muscle strength, kinesthesia at 0 degrees external rotation, and functional tests in both groups. The intervention group showed a significant improvement in kinesthesia at 10 degrees external rotation and active and passive repositioning at 10 degrees external rotation. When groups were compared, there were no statistically significant differences in any of the parameters at 12 wks. Although proprioceptive exercises may provide better proprioceptive acuity, no additional positive effect on other clinical parameters was observed.

  17. Effect of dynamic humeral centring (DHC) treatment on painful active elevation of the arm in subacromial impingement syndrome. Secondary analysis of data from an RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreuil, Johann; Lasbleiz, Sandra; Aout, Mounir; Vicaut, Eric; Yelnik, Alain; Bardin, Thomas; Orcel, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    The physiotherapy dynamic humeral centring (DHC) aims to prevent subacromial impingement of rotator cuff tendons during elevation of the arm. The objective of the study was to determine whether DHC acts via an effect on subacromial impingement mechanism by assessing its effect on painful elevation of the arm in subacromial impingement syndrome. This is a secondary analysis of results of a randomised controlled trial of the effectiveness of DHC. Sixty-nine patients with subacromial impingement syndrome were prospectively included. Patients and the assessor were blinded to the study hypothesis and treatment, respectively. Patients underwent DHC or non-specific mobilisation as a control for 6 weeks in 15 supervised individual outpatient sessions with home exercises. Outcomes were pain-free range of motion and presence of painful arc of the shoulder, both in active flexion and abduction of the arm at 3 months. At 3 months, pain-free range of motion, both flexion and abduction, was greater in the DHC group than in the mobilisation group. The number of patients with painful arc during flexion was decreased in the DHC group. DHC improves painful active elevation of the arm. We suggest that DHC may act via a specific effect on subacromial impingement mechanism. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Arthroscopic treatment for synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa associated with partial rotator cuff tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Caiqi; Yang, Xingguang; Zhao, Jinzhong

    2015-02-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is characterized by benign synovial proliferation that leads to chondral or osteochondral foci formation. In this case report, a right-handed female suffered from progressively worsening pain and limited mobility of forward elevation, abduction and external rotation in her right shoulder. A shoulder arthroscopy was conducted, during which, thickened bursal synovium and several loose bodies were observed, associated with bursal side tear of rotator cuff. A thorough synovectomy, subacromial debridement and acromioplasty were conducted. The pathological findings were consistent with synovial chondromatosis. After systematic rehabilitation, the patient had relief of shoulder pain and full range of motions in 14-months follow-up. Case report, Level IV.

  19. Association between kyphosis and subacromial impingement syndrome: LOHAS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otoshi, Kenichi; Takegami, Misa; Sekiguchi, Miho; Onishi, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Shin; Otani, Koji; Shishido, Hiroaki; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Konno, Shinichi

    2014-12-01

    Kyphosis is a cause of scapular dyskinesis, which can induce various shoulder disorders, including subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). This study aimed to clarify the impact of kyphosis on SIS with use of cross-sectional data from the Locomotive Syndrome and Health Outcome in Aizu Cohort Study (LOHAS). The study enrolled 2144 participants who were older than 40 years and participated in health checkups in 2010. Kyphosis was assessed by the wall-occiput test (WOT) for thoracic kyphosis and the rib-pelvic distance test (RPDT) for lumbar kyphosis. The associations between kyphosis, SIS, and reduction in shoulder elevation (RSE) were investigated. Age- and gender-adjusted logistic regression analysis demonstrated significant association between SIS and WOT (odds ratio, 1.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.02, 2.64; P shoulder elevation induced by the restriction of the thoracic spine extension and scapular dyskinesis. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscopic repair for subacromial incarceration of a torn rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nakamizo

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Arthroscopic reduction and repair are applicable for inverted flap tears of the rotator cuff. The findings of the present study indicated that patients with a heel-type acromion in the anteroposterior view of radiographs are at greater risk for inverted flap tears of the rotator cuff.

  1. Exercises and Dry Needling for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: A Randomized Parallel-Group Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Buría, José L; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Palacios-Ceña, María; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Salom-Moreno, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial investigated the effectiveness of exercise versus exercise plus trigger point (TrP) dry needling (TrP-DN) in subacromial pain syndrome. A randomized parallel-group trial, with 1-year follow-up was conducted. Fifty subjects with subacromial pain syndrome were randomly allocated to receive exercise alone or exercise plus TrP-DN. Participants in both groups were asked to perform an exercise program of the rotator cuff muscles twice daily for 5 weeks. Further, patients allocated to the exercise plus TrP-DN group also received dry needling to active TrPs in the muscles reproducing shoulder symptoms during the second and fourth sessions. The primary outcome was pain-related disability assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included mean current pain and the worst pain experienced in the shoulder during the previous week. They were assessed at baseline, 1 week, and 3, 6, and 12 months after the end of treatment. Analysis was according to intention to treat with mixed analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline outcomes. At 12 months, 47 patients (94%) completed follow-up. Statistically larger improvements (all, P < .01) in shoulder disability was found for the exercise plus TrP-DN group at all follow-up periods (post: Δ -20.6 [95% confidence interval (CI) -23.8 to -17.4]; 3 months: Δ -23.2 [95% CI -28.3 to -18.1)]; 6 months: Δ -23.6 [95% CI -28.9 to -18.3]; 12 months: Δ -13.9 [95% CI -17.5 to -10.3]). Both groups exhibited similar improvements in shoulder pain outcomes at all follow-up periods. The inclusion of TrP-DN with an exercise program was effective for improving disability in subacromial pain syndrome. No greater improvements in shoulder pain were observed. This study found that the inclusion of 2 sessions of TrP-DN into an exercise program was effective for improving shoulder pain-related disability at short-, medium-, and long-term; however, no greater

  2. Increased IL-1beta expression and myofibroblast recruitment in subacromial bursa is associated with rotator cuff lesions with shoulder stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jih-Yang; Wang, Feng-Sheng; Huang, Hsuan-Ying; Wang, Ching-Jen; Tseng, Shin-Ling; Hsu, Chin

    2008-08-01

    We evaluated whether proinflammatory cytokine expression and myofibroblast recruitment in subacromial bursa was linked to rotator cuff lesions with shoulder stiffness. We analyzed expressions of IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha in subacromial bursa and joint fluid collected from 14 patients with cuff tears with stiffness as a study group (Group I) and 14 patients with rotator cuff tears without shoulder stiffness as a control group (Group II) using real-time RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and ELISA. Myofibroblast apoptosis in subacromial bursa was analyzed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase -mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) and alpha-smooth muscle actin immunofluorescence staining. Shoulder function was evaluated using the Constant score. Group I had higher mRNA expression (p bursa and IL-1beta levels in joint fluid were correlated with a preoperative deficit in shoulder motion (p bursa in rotator cuff lesions are linked to shoulder stiffness.

  3. Is there evidence in favor of surgical interventions for the subacromial impingement syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Robert Z

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of surgical and postsurgical interventions for the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Using terms including randomized controlled trial (RCT), shoulder impingement syndrome, rotator cuff impingement, and interventions, the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, PEDro, and CINAHL were searched up to February 2009. Relevant systematic reviews and RCTs in any language that included patients with SIS that was not caused by systemic disease or acute trauma; that evaluated surgical or postsurgical treatment for SIS; that reported outcomes of pain, function, or recovery; and that had a follow-up of ≥ 2 weeks, were selected by 2 independent reviewers and confirmed by consensus. Data on the study population, interventions, outcome measures, and length of follow-up (6 months) were extracted. Two reviewers assessed the methods of the RCTs that were included in reviews other than Cochrane reviews and in RCTs published more recently, rating RCTs that met 6 of 12 Furlan criteria as high quality. The effectiveness of the intervention was rated as moderate, limited, or no evidence, depending on the consistency and quality of the evidence. The included studies were 11 RCTs from a Cochrane review, an additional 2 RCTs that reported on the effectiveness of surgery for SIS, and 3 further RCTs that reported on postsurgical interventions. The quality of the studies was generally poor (10/11 RCTs in the Cochrane review had a high risk of bias; and 3 of the additional RCTs were rated moderate to low quality). Arthroscopic or open subacromial decompression compared with physiotherapy or exercise was investigated in 3 trials. No evidence for differences between the treatments in pain, function, or time to recovery was found in the short, medium, or long term. Five comparisons of arthroscopic versus open subacromial decompression showed no differences in pain or shoulder function scores at any follow-up assessment. One study found no difference in short- or

  4. Effects of dry needling to the symptomatic versus control shoulder in patients with unilateral subacromial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenhaver, Shane; Embry, Robin; Ciccarello, John; Waltrip, Justin; Pike, Rachel; Walker, Michael; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar; Croy, Theodore; Flynn, Timothy

    2016-12-01

    Initial reports suggest that treating myofascial trigger points in the infraspinatus with dry needling may be effective in treating patients with shoulder pain. However, to date, high quality clinical trials and thorough knowledge of the physiologic mechanisms involved is lacking. To examine the effect of dry needling to the infraspinatus muscle on muscle function, nociceptive sensitivity, and shoulder range of motion (ROM) in the symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulders of individuals with unilateral subacromial pain syndrome. Within-subjects controlled trial. Fifty-seven volunteers with unilateral subacromial pain syndrome underwent one session of dry needling to bilateral infraspinatus muscles. Outcome assessments, including ultrasonic measures of infraspinatus muscle thickness, pressure algometry, shoulder internal rotation and horizontal adduction ROM, and questionnaires regarding pain and related disability were taken at baseline, immediately after dry needling, and 3-4 days later. Participants experienced statistically significant and clinically relevant changes in all self-report measures. Pressure pain threshold and ROM significantly increased 3-4 days, but not immediately after dry needling only in the symptomatic shoulder [Pressure pain threshold: 5.1 (2.2, 8.0) N/cm(2), internal rotation ROM: 9.6 (5.0, 14.1) degrees, horizontal adduction ROM: 5.9 (2.5, 9.4) degrees]. No significant changes occurred in resting or contracted infraspinatus muscle thickness in either shoulder. This study found changes in shoulder ROM and pain sensitivity, but not in muscle function, after dry needling to the infraspinatus muscle in participants with unilateral subacromial pain syndrome. These changes generally occurred 3-4 days after dry needling and only in the symptomatic shoulders. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A new interdisciplinary treatment strategy versus usual medical care for the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrestijn, Oscar; Stevens, Martin; Diercks, Ron L.; van der Meer, Klaas; Winters, Jan C.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is the most frequently recorded shoulder disorder. When conservative treatment of SIS fails, a subacromial decompression is warranted. However, the best moment of referral for surgery is not well defined. Both early and late referrals have

  6. Preoperative conventional magnetic resonance images versus magnetic resonance arthrography of subacromial impingement syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang Hyuk; Park, Jung Hwan; Moon, Tae Yong [Pusan National Univ. Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In Sook; Lee, Seung Jun [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of conventional magnetic resonance images (MRI) for arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images (MRA). The preoperative MRI of 77 patients (45 females, 32 males) (52 right, 25 left) and MRA of 34 patients (14 females, 20 males) (24 right, 10 left) with subsequent arthroscopic confirmation of subacromial impingement syndrome were reviewed retrospectively. The lesions requiring arthroscopic surgery were 95 subacromial spurs, 101 subacromial bursitis, and 51 full-thickness and 44 partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus among 111 cases for both studies. A two by two table was constructed in order to calculate the sensitivity and specificity of both studies against arthroscopic outcomes. Also we analyzed the false positive and false negative cases of the full-thickness tears individually. The detection rates of subacromial spur and bursitis and full and partial thickness tears of the supraspinatus were 91%, 94%, 77%, and 65% in MRI and 93%, 100%, 83%, and 77% in MRA respectively. Their specificities were 33%, 33%, 90%, and 76% in MRI and 50%, 75%, 100%, and 71% in MRA respectively. Eleven false negative cases in regards to MRI resulted in Ellman's grade 3 partial thickness tear (72.7%), mild bursitis (63.6%), greater tuberosity erosion (45.5%), and negative fluid signal of the glenohumeral joint (81.8%). Three false positive cases on the MRI were induced from errors with lower window depth and width on the imagings. Two false negative cases on MRA were induced from the adhesion between Ellman's grade 3 rim rent tear and the glenohumeral joint cavity. Conventional MR images could be used to decide the arthroscopic surgery in subacromial impingement syndrome, as an alternative to MR arthrography with additional T2 fat saturation images.

  7. Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie

    Dansk resuméSubacromial Impingement Syndrom (SIS), som er karakteriseret ved både skuldersmerte ogfunktionsnedsættelse, er en af de hyppigst rapporterede skulderlidelser i primærsektoren. SIS relateres ofte tilen ubalance mellem de skapula-stabiliserende muskler. Indenfor udvalgte specielle popul...

  8. Expression of bioactive bone morphogenetic proteins in the subacromial bursa of patients with chronic degeneration of the rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuwirth, Jana; Fuhrmann, Renée A E; Veit, Amanda; Aurich, Matthias; Stonâns, Ilmars; Trommer, Tilo; Hortschansky, Peter; Chubinskaya, Susanna; Mollenhauer, Juergen A

    2006-01-01

    Degeneration of the rotator cuff is often associated with inflammation of the subacromial bursa and focal mineralization of the supraspinatus tendon. Portions of the supraspinatus tendon distant from the insertion site could transform into fibrous cartilage, causing rotator-cuff tears owing to mechanical instability. Indirect evidence is presented to link this pathology to ectopic production and secretion of bioactive bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) from sites within the subacromial bursa. Surgically removed specimens of subacromial bursa tissue from patients with chronic tears of the rotator cuff were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR. Bioactive BMP was detected in bursa extracts by a bioassay based on induction of alkaline phosphatase in the osteogenic/myogenic cell line C2C12. Topical and differential expression of BMP-2/4 and BMP-7 mRNA and protein was found in bursa tissue. The bioassay of C2C12 cells revealed amounts of active BMP high enough to induce osteogenic cell types, and blocking BMP with specific antibodies or soluble BMP receptors Alk-3 and Alk-6 abolished the inductive properties of the extract. Sufficient information was gathered to explain how ectopic expression of BMP might induce tissue transformation into ectopic bone/cartilage and, therefore, promote structural degeneration of the rotator cuff. Early surgical removal of the subacromial bursa might present an option to interrupt disease progression.

  9. Study protocol subacromial impingement syndrome: the identification of pathophysiologic mechanisms (SISTIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is the most common diagnosed disorder of the shoulder in primary health care, but its aetiology is unclear. Conservative treatment regimes focus at reduction of subacromial inflammatory reactions or pathologic scapulohumeral motion patterns (intrinsic aetiology). Long-lasting symptoms are often treated with surgery, which is focused at enlarging the subacromial space by resection of the anterior part of the acromion (based on extrinsic aetiology). Despite that acromionplasty is in the top-10 of orthopaedic surgical procedures, there is no consensus on its indications and reported results are variable (successful in 48-90%). We hypothesize that the aetiology of SIS, i.e. an increase in subacromial pressure or decrease of subacromial space, is multi-factorial. SIS can be the consequence of pathologic scapulohumeral motion patterns leading to humerus cranialisation, anatomical variations of the scapula and the humerus (e.g. hooked acromion), a subacromial inflammatory reaction (e.g. due to overuse or micro-trauma), or adjoining pathology (e.g. osteoarthritis in the acromion-clavicular-joint with subacromial osteophytes). We believe patients should be treated according to their predominant etiological mechanism(s). Therefore, the objective of our study is to identify and discriminate etiological mechanisms occurring in SIS patients, in order to develop tailored diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Methods In this cross-sectional descriptive study, applied clinical and experimental methods to identify intrinsic and extrinsic etiologic mechanisms comprise: MRI-arthrography (eligibility criteria, cuff status, 3D-segmented bony contours); 3D-motion tracking (scapulohumeral rhythm, arm range of motion, dynamic subacromial volume assessment by combining the 3D bony contours and 3D-kinematics); EMG (adductor co-activation) and dynamometry instrumented shoulder radiographs during arm tasks (force and muscle activation

  10. Study protocol subacromial impingement syndrome: the identification of pathophysiologic mechanisms (SISTIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Witte Pieter

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS is the most common diagnosed disorder of the shoulder in primary health care, but its aetiology is unclear. Conservative treatment regimes focus at reduction of subacromial inflammatory reactions or pathologic scapulohumeral motion patterns (intrinsic aetiology. Long-lasting symptoms are often treated with surgery, which is focused at enlarging the subacromial space by resection of the anterior part of the acromion (based on extrinsic aetiology. Despite that acromionplasty is in the top-10 of orthopaedic surgical procedures, there is no consensus on its indications and reported results are variable (successful in 48-90%. We hypothesize that the aetiology of SIS, i.e. an increase in subacromial pressure or decrease of subacromial space, is multi-factorial. SIS can be the consequence of pathologic scapulohumeral motion patterns leading to humerus cranialisation, anatomical variations of the scapula and the humerus (e.g. hooked acromion, a subacromial inflammatory reaction (e.g. due to overuse or micro-trauma, or adjoining pathology (e.g. osteoarthritis in the acromion-clavicular-joint with subacromial osteophytes. We believe patients should be treated according to their predominant etiological mechanism(s. Therefore, the objective of our study is to identify and discriminate etiological mechanisms occurring in SIS patients, in order to develop tailored diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Methods In this cross-sectional descriptive study, applied clinical and experimental methods to identify intrinsic and extrinsic etiologic mechanisms comprise: MRI-arthrography (eligibility criteria, cuff status, 3D-segmented bony contours; 3D-motion tracking (scapulohumeral rhythm, arm range of motion, dynamic subacromial volume assessment by combining the 3D bony contours and 3D-kinematics; EMG (adductor co-activation and dynamometry instrumented shoulder radiographs during arm tasks (force and

  11. Effects of conservative therapy applied before arthroscopic subacromial decompression on the clinical outcome in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ali; Yildiz, Vahit; Topal, Murat; Tuncer, Kutsi; Köse, Mehmet; Şenocak, Eyüp

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of conservative therapy applied before arthroscopic subacromial decompression on the clinical outcome in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome. Sixty-eight patients having stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome and treated with arthroscopic subacromial decompression were included in the study. We divided these patients into 2 groups, whereby 32 (47%) patients received conservative therapy before arthroscopic subacromial decompression and 36 (53%) patients did not receive conservative therapy. We compared both groups in terms of the the Constant, UCLA, and VAS scores for shoulder pain before and after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Constant, UCLA, and VAS scores were statistically significantly improved in both groups after arthroscopic subacromial decompression (P 0.05). Conservative therapy applied in patients with stage 2 shoulder impingement syndrome before arthroscopic subacromial decompression does not have a positive contribution on the clinical outcome after arthroscopic subacromial decompression.

  12. The effectiveness of low laser therapy in subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized placebo controlled double-blind prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebnem Koldas Dogan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Conflicting results were reported about the effectiveness of Low level laser therapy on musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of 850-nm gallium arsenide aluminum (Ga-As-Al laser therapy on pain, range of motion and disability in subacromial impingement syndrome. METHODS: A total of 52 patients (33 females and 19 males with a mean age of 53.59±11.34 years with subacromial impingement syndrome were included. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups. Group I (n = 30, laser group received laser therapy (5 joule/cm² at each point over maximum 5-6 painful points for 1 minute. Group II (n = 22, placebo laser group received placebo laser therapy. Initially cold pack (10 minutes was applied to all of the patients. Also patients were given an exercise program including range of motion, stretching and progressive resistive exercises. The therapy program was applied 5 times a week for 14 sessions. Pain severity was assessed by using visual analogue scale. Range of motion was measured by goniometer. Disability was evaluated by using Shoulder Pain and Disability Index. RESULTS: In group I, statistically significant improvements in pain severity, range of motion except internal and external rotation and SPADI scores were observed compared to baseline scores after the therapy (p0.05. CONCLUSIONS: The Low level laser therapy seems to have no superiority over placebo laser therapy in reducing pain severity, range of motion and functional disability.

  13. Subacromial impingement syndrome: An electromyographic study of shoulder girdle muscle fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Roebuck, Margaret M; Makki, Ahmed T; Frostick, Simon P

    2018-02-01

    Muscle fatigue affecting glenohumeral and/or scapular muscles is suggested as one of the contributing factors to the development of subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS). Nonetheless, the fatigability of shoulder girdle muscles in association with the pathomechanics of SAIS has not been reported. This study aimed to measure and compare fatigue progression within the shoulder girdle musculature of patients and healthy controls. 75 participants including 39 patients (20 females; 19 males) and 36 healthy controls (15 females; 21 males) participated in the study. Study evaluated the progression of muscle fatigue in 15 shoulder girdle muscles by means of surface and fine-wire EMG during submaximal contraction of four distinct movements (abduction, flexion, internal and external rotation). Shoulder strength, subjective pain experience (McGill Pain Questionnaire), and psychological status (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) were also assessed. The results were compared between patient and control groups according to the gender. Despite marked fatigue observed in the majority of muscles particularly during flexion and abduction at 90°, overall results indicated a lower tendency of fatigue progression in the impingement group across the tests (p fatigue progression in the impingement group can be attributed to the presence of fear avoidance and pain-related muscle inhibition, which in turn lead to adaptations in motor programme to reduce muscle recruitment and activation. The significantly higher levels of pain experience and anxiety/depression in the impingement group further support this proposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. MR imaging after rotator cuff repair: full-thickness defects and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities in asymptomatic subjects

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    Zanetti, M.; Hodler, J. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland); Jost, B.; Gerber, C. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, University Hospital Balgrist, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2000-06-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities on MR images after rotator cuff repair in asymptomatic subjects, and to define the clinical relevance of these findings.Design and patients. Fourteen completely asymptomatic patients and 32 patients with residual symptoms were investigated 27-53 months (mean 39 months) after open transosseous reinsertion of the rotator cuff. Coronal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and turbo STIR or T2-weighted fat-suppressed MR images were obtained. The prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears of the rotator cuff and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities were determined.Results. Residual defects or retears were detected in three (21%) and bursitis-like abnormalities in 14 (100%) of the 14 asymptomatic patients. Fifteen (47%) residual defects or retears and 31 (97%) bursitis-like abnormalities were diagnosed in the 32 patients with residual symptoms. The size of the residual defects/retears was significantly smaller in the asymptomatic group (mean 8 mm, range 6-11 mm) than in the symptomatic group (mean 32 mm, range 7-50 mm) (t-test, P=0.001). The extent of the bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities did not significantly differ (t-test, P>0.05) between asymptomatic (mean 28 x 3 mm) and symptomatic patients (mean 32 x 3 mm).Conclusion. Small residual defects or retears (<1 cm) of the rotator cuff are not necessarily associated with clinical symptoms. Subacromial bursitis-like MR abnormalities are almost always seen after rotator cuff repair even in patients without residual complaints. They may persist for several years after rotator cuff repair and appear to be clinically irrelevant. (orig.)

  15. Comprehensive impairment-based exercise and manual therapy intervention for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Angela R; McClure, Philip W; Young, Ian A; Salvatori, Renata; Michener, Lori A

    2010-08-01

    Case series. Few studies have defined the dosage and specific techniques of manual therapy and exercise for rehabilitation for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. This case series describes a standardized treatment program for subacromial impingement syndrome and the time course and outcomes over a 12-week period. Ten patients (age range, 19-70 years) with subacromial impingement syndrome defined by inclusion and exclusion criteria were treated with a standardized protocol for 10 visits over 6 to 8 weeks. The protocol included a 3-phase progressive strengthening program, manual stretching, thrust and nonthrust manipulation to the shoulder and spine, patient education, activity modification, and a daily home exercise program of stretching and strengthening. Patients completed a history and measures of impairments and functional disability at 2, 4, 6, and 12 weeks. Treatment success was defined as both a 50% improvement on the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score and a global rating of change of at least "moderately better." At 6 weeks, 6 of 10 patients had a successful (mean +/- SD) DASH outcome score (initial, 33.9 +/- 16.2; 6 weeks, 8.1 +/- 9.2). At 12 weeks, 8 of 10 patients had a successful DASH outcome score (initial, 33.1 +/- 14; 12 weeks, 8.3 +/- 6.4). As a group, the largest improvement was in the first 2 weeks. The most common impairments for all 10 patients were rotator cuff and trapezius muscle weakness (10 of 10 patients), limited shoulder internal rotation motion (8 of 10 patients), and reduced kyphosis of the midthoracic area (7 of 10 patients). A program aimed at strengthening rotator cuff and scapular muscles, with stretching and manual therapy aimed at thoracic spine and the posterior and inferior soft-tissue structures of the glenohumeral joint appeared to be successful in the majority of patients. This case series describes a comprehensive impairment-based treatment which resulted in symptomatic and functional

  16. Specific or general exercise strategy for subacromial impingement syndrome-does it matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shire, Alison R; Stæhr, Thor A B; Overby, Jesper B

    2017-01-01

    strategy. There is however a lack of evidence comparing such exercise strategies to determine which is the most effective in the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome. The aim of this review is to evaluate whether implementing specific exercise strategies involving resistive exercises are more......, article reference lists and Clinicaltrials.gov were searched. Studies were considered eligible if they included interventions with resistive specific exercises as compared to general resistance exercise. Four reviewers assessed risk of bias and methodological quality guided by Cochrane recommendations...... was SMD −0.19 (95% CI −0.61, 0.22) and SMD 0.30 (95% CI −0.16, 0.76) for function. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of specific resistive exercise strategies in the rehabilitation of subacromial impingement syndrome. More high quality research is needed...

  17. MR imaging after rotator cuff repair: full-thickness defects and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, M; Jost, B; Hodler, J; Gerber, C

    2000-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities on MR images after rotator cuff repair in asymptomatic subjects, and to define the clinical relevance of these findings. Fourteen completely asymptomatic patients and 32 patients with residual symptoms were investigated 27-53 months (mean 39 months) after open transosseous reinsertion of the rotator cuff. Coronal T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and turbo STIR or T2-weighted fat-suppressed MR images were obtained. The prevalence and extent of residual defects or retears of the rotator cuff and bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities were determined. Residual defects or retears were detected in three (21%) and bursitis-like abnormalities in 14 (100%) of the 14 asymptomatic patients. Fifteen (47%) residual defects or retears and 31 (97%) bursitis-like abnormalities were diagnosed in the 32 patients with residual symptoms. The size of the residual defects/retears was significantly smaller in the asymptomatic group (mean 8 mm, range 6-11 mm) than in the symptomatic group (mean 32 mm, range 7-50 mm) (t-test, P = 0.001). The extent of the bursitis-like subacromial abnormalities did not significantly differ (t-test, P > 0.05) between asymptomatic (mean 28 x 3 mm) and symptomatic patients (mean 32 x 3 mm). Small residual defects or retears (Subacromial bursitis-like MR abnormalities are almost always seen after rotator cuff repair even in patients without residual complaints. They may persist for several years after rotator cuff repair and appear to be clinically irrelevant.

  18. The role of tendon and subacromial bursa in rotator cuff tear pain: a clinical and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillemi, Claudio; Petrozza, Vincenzo; Franceschini, Vincenzo; Garro, Luca; Pacchiarotti, Alberto; Porta, Natale; Cirenza, Mirko; Salate Santone, Francesco; Castagna, Alessandro

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate a possible association of shoulder pain with the clinical features and the histopathological changes occurring in the ruptured tendon and subacromial bursa of patients with rotator cuff tear. One hundred and eighty patients were clinically evaluated with the constant score and the visual analogue pain scale. Radiographs and MRI were performed. The chronology of the rupture, the muscle fatty degeneration according to Goutallier's scale and the tear size were evaluated. For each patient, a biopsy of the supraspinatus tendon and subacromial bursa was performed during arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair and the specimens were histopathologically analysed. Clinically, the shoulder was more painful in females, in the presence of a chronic cuff lesion and a low Goutallier's grade (P bursa were directly associated with pain (P bursa compared with those in the rotator cuff. Considering that the bursa plays also an essential role during the healing process, this "new" role of the subacromial bursa as pain generator has important repercussions in both pharmacological and surgical treatments of rotator cuff tears. IV.

  19. Evaluation of the effectiveness of three physiotherapeutic treatments for subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Merino, L; Casajuana, M C; Bernal, G; Faba, J; Astilleros, A E; González, R; Giralt, M; Romeu, M; Nogués, M R

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether dexketoprofen administered by phonophoresis or iontophoresis is more effective for the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) than conventional ultrasound therapy. Randomised clinical trial. University hospital. Ninety-nine participants with SIS without a complete tear of the rotator cuff were assigned at random to three intervention groups. Participants received ultrasound (n=32), phonophoresis with dexketoprofen (50mg/session) (n=33) or iontophoresis with dexketoprofen (50mg/session) (n=34). All participants completed 20 treatment sessions plus exercise therapy and cryotherapy. A visual analogue scale (VAS), the Constant-Murley Scale (CMS) and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire were administered pre-treatment (baseline), post-treatment and 1 month post-treatment. At baseline, there were no differences between the groups. Post-treatment, VAS score improved by -1.2 points and CMS score improved by 8.9 points in the ultrasound group compared with the iontophoresis group [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.2 to -2.2 and 95% CI 17.0 to 0.7, respectively]. CMS score improved by 7.1 points in the phonophoresis group compared with the iontophoresis group (95% CI 14.8 to -0.7). At 1 month post-treatment, no significant differences were detected between the groups. VAS, CMS and DASH scores of all groups improved post-treatment and at 1 month post-treatment. Ultrasound, iontophoresis with dexketoprofen and phonophoresis with dexketoprofen can improve pain, shoulder function, and physical functioning and symptoms in the upper limb in patients with SIS without a complete tear of the rotator cuff. CLINICAL TRIALS. NCT01748188. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Exercise therapy after ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injections in patients with subacromial pain syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Karen; Christensen, Robin; Rosager, Sara

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS) accounts for around 50 % of all cases of shoulder pain. The most commonly used treatments are glucocorticosteroid (steroid) injections and exercise therapy; however, despite treatment SAPS patients often experience relapse of their symptoms. Therefore...... the clinical effect of combining steroid and exercise therapy is highly relevant to clarify. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate if exercise therapy added to steroid injection in patients with SAPS will improve the effect of the injection therapy on shoulder pain. METHODS......: In this two-arm randomized trial running over 26 weeks, patients with unilateral shoulder pain (> 4 weeks) and thickened subacromial bursa (> 2 mm on US) were included. At baseline all participants received two steroid injections into the painful shoulder with an interval of one week. Subsequently they were...

  1. Subacromial impingement syndrome and pain: protocol for a randomised controlled trial of exercise and corticosteroid injection (the SUPPORT trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, Edward; Zwierska, Irena; Hay, Elaine M; Jowett, Sue; Lewis, Martyn; Stevenson, Kay; van der Windt, Danielle; Foster, Nadine E

    2014-03-14

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most frequent cause of shoulder problems which themselves affect 1 in 3 adults. Management commonly includes exercise and corticosteroid injection. However, the few existing trials of exercise or corticosteroid injection for subacromial impingement syndrome are mostly small, of poor quality, and focus only on short-term results. Exercise packages tend to be standardised rather than individualised and progressed. There has been much recent interest in improving outcome from corticosteroid injections by using musculoskeletal ultrasound to guide injections. However, there are no high-quality trials comparing ultrasound-guided and blind corticosteroid injection in subacromial impingement syndrome. This trial will investigate how to optimise the outcome of subacromial impingement syndrome from exercise (standardised advice and information leaflet versus physiotherapist-led exercise) and from subacromial corticosteroid injection (blind versus ultrasound-guided), and provide long-term follow-up data on clinical and cost-effectiveness. The study design is a 2x2 factorial randomised controlled trial. 252 adults with subacromial impingement syndrome will be recruited from two musculoskeletal Clinical Assessment and Treatment Services at the primary-secondary care interface in Staffordshire, UK. Participants will be randomised on a 1:1:1:1 basis to one of four treatment groups: (1) ultrasound-guided subacromial corticosteroid injection and a physiotherapist-led exercise programme, (2) ultrasound-guided subacromial corticosteroid injection and an advice and exercise leaflet, (3) blind subacromial corticosteroid injection and a physiotherapist-led exercise programme, or (4) blind subacromial corticosteroid injection and an advice and exercise leaflet. The primary intention-to-treat analysis will be the mean differences in Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) scores at 6 weeks for the comparison between injection interventions and at

  2. Analyses of possible risk factors for subacromial impingement syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin; Kapkird, Anucha

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association between various risk factors, including sleeping position, and impingement syndrome. Impingement syndrome is the most common cause of shoulder problems. The pathogenesis of this problem is still debated these days.

  3. A new interdisciplinary treatment strategy versus usual medical care for the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Meer Klaas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS is the most frequently recorded shoulder disorder. When conservative treatment of SIS fails, a subacromial decompression is warranted. However, the best moment of referral for surgery is not well defined. Both early and late referrals have disadvantages – unnecessary operations and smaller improvements in shoulder function, respectively. This paper describes the design of a new interdisciplinary treatment strategy for SIS (TRANSIT, which comprises rules to treat SIS in primary care and a well-defined moment of referral for surgery. Methods/Design The effectiveness of an arthroscopic subacromial decompression versus usual medical care will be evaluated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT. Patients are eligible for inclusion when experiencing a recurrence of SIS within one year after a first episode of SIS which was successfully treated with a subacromial corticosteroid injection. After inclusion they will receive injection treatment again by their general practitioner. When, after this treatment, there is a second recurrence within a year post-injection, the participants will be randomized to either an arthroscopic subacromial decompression (intervention group or continuation of usual medical care (control group. The latter will be performed by a general practitioner according to the Dutch National Guidelines for Shoulder Problems. At inclusion, at randomization and three, six and 12 months post-randomization an outcome assessment will take place. The primary outcome measure is the patient-reported Shoulder Disability Questionnaire. The secondary outcome measures include both disease-specific and generic measures, and an economic evaluation. Treatment effects will be compared for all measurement points by using a GLM repeated measures analyses. Discussion The rationale and design of an RCT comparing arthroscopic subacromial decompression with usual medical care for subacromial

  4. [Diagnostic value of a predictive model for complete ruptures of the rotator cuff associated to subacromial impingement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Águila-Ledesma, I R; Córdova-Fonseca, J L; Medina-Pontaza, O; Núñez-Gómez, D A; Calvache-García, C; Pérez-Atanasio, J M; Torres-González, R

    2017-01-01

    Pathology related to the rotator cuff remains among the most prevalent musculoskeletal diseases. There is an increasing need for imaging studies (MRI, US, arthroscopy) to test the diagnostic performance of the medical history and physical examination. To prove the diagnostic value of a clinical-radiographic predictive model to find complete ruptures of the rotator cuff. Descriptive, observational, prospective, transversal and analytical study. Fifty-five patients with preoperative shoulder pain were evaluated with 13 predictive variables: age > 50 years, nocturnal pain, muscle weakness, clinical signs of Neer, Hawkins, Jobe, external rotation lag (ERLS), belly-press, bear hug, and lift-off, radiographic measurement of subacromial space, acromial index and critical shoulder angle. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were measured in each variable, comparing the results of each one against the postoperative findings. Of the 55 patients evaluated, 42 had a complete rupture of the rotator cuff in the postoperative period. The eight variables with a higher diagnostic value were selected and a ROC curve was performed, providing an area under the curve of 0.88. This predictive model uses eight variables (age > 50 years, nocturnal pain, muscle weakness, Jobe, Hawkins, ERLS, subacromial space ≤ 6 mm, and critical shoulder angle > 35°), which together add the predictive value of 0.88 (AUC) to diagnose complete ruptures of the supraspinatus tendon.

  5. Carrageenan-induced subacromial bursitis caused changes in the rat's rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillander, B; Franzén, L E; Nilsson, E; Norlin, R

    2001-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the histologic expression of the rat's supra- and infraspinatus tendons in carrageenan-induced subacromial bursitis. Thirty-two rats received subacromial injections with carrageenan (n = 28) or saline (n = 4). The tendons were analysed microscopically after staining with hematoxyline eosin, Van Giesons hematoxyline and immunofluorescent staining of fibronectin and fibrinogen. In the controls (saline x 10) and group A (carrageenan x 5) there were no changes in the tendons. In group B (carrageenan x 10) 3/8 rats showed macrophages between the collagen fibres and an increased staining of fibronectin. In group C (double dosis carrageenan) all rats had signs of fibrocartilaginous metaplasia in the supraspinatus tendon. In eight of these specimens even bony metaplasia was seen. The infraspinatus tendon showed fibrosis but no fibrocartilaginous metaplasia. The results showed that iatrogenic bursitis after carrageenan subacromial injections was associated with marked changes of the supraspinatus tendon.

  6. An evidence-based review of current perceptions with regard to the subacromial space in shoulder impingement syndromes: Is it important and what influences it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Tanya Anne; Herrington, Lee; Horlsey, Ian; Cools, Ann

    2015-08-01

    Reduction of the subacromial space as a mechanism in the etiology of shoulder impingement syndromes is debated. Although a reduction in this space is associated with shoulder impingement syndromes, it is unclear if this observation is cause or consequence. The purposes of this descriptive review are to provide a broad perspective on the current perceptions with regard to the pathology and pathomechanics of subacromial and internal impingement syndromes, consider the role of the subacromial space in impingement syndromes, describe the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms considered to influence the subacromial space, and critique the level of evidence supporting these concepts. Based on the current evidence, the hypothesis that a reduction in subacromial space is an extrinsic cause of impingement syndromes is not conclusively established and the evidence permits no conclusion. If maintenance of the subacromial space is important in impingement syndromes regardless of whether it is a cause or consequence, research exploring the correlation between biomechanical factors and the subacromial space, using the later as the outcome measure, would be beneficial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Rigid shoulder taping with physiotherapy in patients with subacromial pain syndrome: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apeldoorn, Adri T; Kamper, Steven J; Kalter, Joeri; Knol, Dirk L; van Tulder, Maurits W; Ostelo, Raymond W

    2017-04-06

    To assess the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in combination with rigid taping compared with individualized physiotherapy alone in patients with subacromial pain syndrome. A prospective randomized trial with concealed allocation. A total of 140 patients between 18 and 65 years of age from primary physiotherapy settings. The intervention group received individualized physiotherapy and shoulder taping. The control group received individualized physiotherapy only. Primary outcomes were: pain intensit (numerical rating scale) and functioning (Simple Shoulder Test). Secondary outcomes were: global perceived effect and patient-specific complaints. Data were collected at baseline, and at 4, 12 and 26 weeks' follow-up. During the 6-month follow-up period multilevel analysis showed a significant difference between groups favouring the control group on pain intensity (p = 0.02), but not on functioning. Regarding secondary outcomes, a significant difference between groups was found favouring the intervention group for global perceived effect (p = 0.02), but not for patient-specific complaints. Rigid shoulder taping, as used in this study, cannot be recommended for improving physiotherapy outcomes in people with subacromial pain syndrome.

  8. Neuromuscular control of scapula muscles during a voluntary task in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C M; Søgaard, Karen; Chreiteh, S S

    2013-01-01

    Imbalance of neuromuscular activity in the scapula stabilizers in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is described in restricted tasks and specific populations. Our aim was to compare the scapular muscle activity during a voluntary movement task in a general population with and w......Imbalance of neuromuscular activity in the scapula stabilizers in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is described in restricted tasks and specific populations. Our aim was to compare the scapular muscle activity during a voluntary movement task in a general population...... with and without SIS (n=16, No-SIS=15). Surface electromyography was measured from Serratus anterior (SA) and Trapezius during bilateral arm elevation (no-load, 1kg, 3kg). Mean relative muscle activity was calculated for SA and the upper (UT) and lower part of trapezius (LWT), in addition to activation ratio...... and time to activity onset. In spite of a tendency to higher activity among SIS 0.10-0.30 between-group differences were not significant neither in ratio of muscle activation 0.80-0.98 nor time to activity onset 0.53-0.98. The hypothesized between-group differences in neuromuscular activity of Trapezius...

  9. Effectiveness of Kinesiotaping and Subacromial Corticosteroid Injection in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin Onat, Şule; Biçer, Seda; Şahin, Zehra; Küçükali Türkyilmaz, Ayşegül; Kara, Murat; Özbudak Demir, Sibel

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether kinesiotaping or subacromial corticosteroid injection provides additional benefit when used with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Patients with shoulder impingement syndrome were divided into 3 groups as follows: NSAID group (n = 33), kinesiotaping group (kinesiotaping + NSAID) (n = 33), and injection group (subacromial corticosteroid injection + NSAID) (n = 33). Outcome measures including visual analog scale, shoulder ranges of motion, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, and University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) scale were evaluated before and after the treatment (fourth week). A total of 99 patients (21 male and 78 female patients) were enrolled in this study. Demographic and baseline clinical characteristics of the groups (except for body mass index and visual analog scale at night, both P = 0.05) were similar between the groups (all P > 0.05). Clinical parameters were found to have improved in the 3 groups (all P kinesiotaping and injection groups showed similar improvements (all P > 0.05), each group had better outcome than did the NSAID group as regards pain (activity visual analog scale), ranges of motion, and Shoulder Disability Questionnaire and UCLA scale scores (all P kinesiotaping or subacromial corticosteroid injection to NSAID treatment seems to have better/similar effectiveness in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. Therefore, kinesiotaping might serve as an alternative treatment in case (injection of) corticosteroids are contraindicated. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES:: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Delineate appropriate treatment options for shoulder impingement syndrome; (2) Identify treatment benefits of kinesiotaping and corticosteroid injections in shoulder impingement syndrome; and (3) Incorporate

  10. Specific or general exercise strategy for subacromial impingement syndrome-does it matter? A systematic literature review and meta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Alison R; Stæhr, Thor A B; Overby, Jesper B; Bastholm Dahl, Mathias; Sandell Jacobsen, Julie; Høyrup Christiansen, David

    2017-04-17

    Exercise is frequently suggested as a treatment option for patients presenting with symptoms of subacromial impingement syndrome. Some would argue implementing a specific exercise strategy with special focus on correction of kinematic deficits would be superior to general exercise strategy. There is however a lack of evidence comparing such exercise strategies to determine which is the most effective in the treatment of subacromial impingement syndrome. The aim of this review is to evaluate whether implementing specific exercise strategies involving resistive exercises are more effective than a general exercise strategy for the treatment of patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Randomized controlled trials were identified through an electronic search on PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science and PEDro. In addition, article reference lists and Clinicaltrials.gov were searched. Studies were considered eligible if they included interventions with resistive specific exercises as compared to general resistance exercise. Four reviewers assessed risk of bias and methodological quality guided by Cochrane recommendations. Results were synthesised qualitatively or quantitatively, where appropriate. Six randomized controlled trials were included with 231 participants who experienced symptoms of subacromial impingement syndrome. Four studies evaluated the effectiveness of specific scapular exercise strategy and two studies evaluated the effectiveness of specific proprioceptive strategy. Five studies were of moderate quality and one study was of low quality. No consistent statistical significant differences in outcomes between treatment groups were reported in the studies. Standardized mean difference (SMD) for pain was SMD -0.19 (95% CI -0.61, 0.22) and SMD 0.30 (95% CI -0.16, 0.76) for function. There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of specific resistive exercise strategies in the

  11. Force steadiness, muscle activity, and maximal muscle strength in subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Rasmussen, Lars; Aagaard, Per

    2006-01-01

    physically active in spite of shoulder pain and nine healthy matched controls were examined to determine isometric and isokinetic submaximal shoulder-abduction force steadiness at target forces corresponding to 20%, 27.5%, and 35% of the maximal shoulder abductor torque, and maximal shoulder muscle strength......We investigated the effects of the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) on shoulder sensory-motor control and maximal shoulder muscle strength. It was hypothesized that both would be impaired due to chronic shoulder pain associated with the syndrome. Nine subjects with unilateral SIS who remained...... (MVC). Electromyographic (EMG) activity was assessed using surface and intramuscular recordings from eight shoulder muscles. Force steadiness was impaired in SIS subjects during concentric contractions at the highest target force level only, with muscle activity largely unaffected. No between...

  12. Shoulder MRI features with clinical correlations in subacromial pain syndrome: a cross-sectional and prognostic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalvaag, Elisabeth; Anvar, Masoud; Karlberg, Anna Cecilia; Brox, Jens Ivar; Engebretsen, Kaia Beck; Soberg, Helene Lundgaard; Juel, Niels Gunnar; Bautz-Holter, Erik; Sandvik, Leiv; Roe, Cecilie

    2017-11-21

    Previous studies on shoulder patients have suggested that the prevalence of rotator cuff or bursa abnormalities are weakly related to symptoms and that similar findings are often found in asymptomatic persons. In addition, it is largely unknown whether structural changes identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) affect outcome after treatment for shoulder pain. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate the presence of structural changes on MRI in patients with subacromial pain syndrome and to determine to what extent these changes are associated with symptoms and predict outcome after treatment (evaluated by the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI)). A prospective, observational assessment of a subset of shoulder patients who were included in a randomized study was performed. All participants had an MRI of the shoulder. An MRI total score for findings at the AC joint, subacromial bursa and rotator cuff was calculated. Multiple linear regression analysis was applied to examine the relationship between the MRI total score and the outcome measure at baseline and to examine to what extent the MRI total score was associated with the change in the SPADI score from baseline to the one year follow-up. There was a weak, inverse association between the SPADI score at baseline and the MRI total score (β = -3.1, with 95% CI -5.9 to -0.34; p = 0.03), i.e. the SPADI score was higher for patients with a lower MRI total score. There was an association between the change in the SPADI score from baseline to the one year follow-up and the MRI total score (β = 8.1, 95% CI -12.3 to -3.8; p bursitis (p = 0.04) were associated with a poorer outcome after one year. In this study, MRI findings were significantly associated with the change in the SPADI score from baseline and to one year follow-up, with a poorer outcome after treatment for the patients with higher MRI total score, tendinosis and bursitis on MRI. Clinicaltrials.gov no NCT01441830

  13. Subacromial injection of autologous platelet-rich plasma versus corticosteroid for the treatment of symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Ahmed; El-Sayed, Mohamed; Gamal, Osama; Ewes, Waled

    2016-12-01

    Rotator cuff tears are one of the most common causes of chronic shoulder pain and disability. They significantly affect the quality of life. Reduced pain and improved function are the goals of conventional therapy, which includes relative rest, pain therapy, physical therapy, corticosteroid injections and surgical intervention. Tendons have a relative avascular nature; hence, their regenerative potential is limited. There is some clinical evidence that the application of autologous platelets may help to revascularize the area of injury in rotator cuff pathologies. This prospective randomized controlled study was done to evaluate the results of subacromial injection of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) versus corticosteroid injection therapy in 40 patients with symptomatic partial rotator cuff tears. All patients were assessed before injection, 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months after injection, using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Standardized Shoulder Assessment Form (ASES), the Constant-Murley Score (CMS), the Simple Shoulder Test (SST) and a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain. An MRI was performed before and 6 months after the injection for all the included patients and was graded on 0-5 scale. Both injection groups showed statistically significantly better clinical outcomes over time compared with those before injection. There was a statistically significant difference between RPP group and corticosteroid group 12 weeks after injection, regarding VAS, ASES, CMS and SST in favor of the RPP group. MRI showed an overall slight nonsignificant improvement in grades of tendinopathy/tear in both groups, however, without statistically significant differences between the two groups. PRP injections showed earlier better results as compared to corticosteroid injections, although statistically significant better results after 6 months could not be found. Therefore, subacromial RPP injection could be considered as a good alternative to corticosteroid injection, especially in

  14. Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie; Lund, Hans; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics Larsen CM1, Juul-Kristensen B1,2 Holtermann A3, Lund H1,2, Søgaard K1 1University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, DK 2Institute...... patient sample with SIS, and to assess the clinimetric properties of clinical assessment methods of scapular kinematics as important aspects for optimising effect measures of treatment in order to improve clinical guidelines in this area. METHODS: Scapular muscle activity was examined, 1) during...... a voluntary arm movement task and 2) selective activation tasks during sessions with and without on-line biofeedback, in a general population consisting of 16 SIS patients and 15 controls (No-SIS). Furthermore, 3) a systematic review was conducted of all available clinical scapular assessment methods...

  15. Electromyographic activity of the shoulder muscles during rehabilitation exercises in subjects with and without subacromial pain syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Rita; Pizzari, Tania

    2017-04-01

    Subacromial pain syndrome (SPS) is a common cause of shoulder pain and muscle activity deficits are postulated to contribute to the development and progression of the disorder. The purpose of this systematic review was to definitively determine whether evidence exists of differences in electromyography (EMG) characteristics between subjects with and without SPS. Six key databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SPORTdiscus, PEDro and The Cochrane Library (inception to May 2016). The search yielded 1414 records using terms relating to shoulder impingement, EMG, scapular and rotator cuff muscles. Twenty-two papers remained once duplicates were removed and selection criteria applied. Data extraction, quality assessment and data synthesis were performed. Effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. There was limited evidence that serratus anterior has lower amplitude, delayed activation and earlier termination in SPS participants. For the majority of muscles, regardless of task, load or arm position, significant differences were not demonstrated or results were contradictory. The understanding of SPS is changing and EMG appears unable to capture the complexities associated with this condition. Addressing aberrant movement patterns and facilitating balanced activation of all shoulder muscles may be a more appropriate treatment direction for the future.

  16. Taping patients with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome: the design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knol Dirk L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder problems are a common complaint of the musculoskeletal system. Physical therapists treat these patients with different modalities such as exercise, massage, and shoulder taping. Although different techniques have been described, the effectiveness of taping has not yet been established. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of usual physical therapy care in combination with a particular tape technique for subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder compared to usual physical therapy care without this tape technique in a primary healthcare setting. Methods and design An economic evaluation alongside a randomized controlled trial will be conducted. A sample of 140 patients between 18 and 65 years of age with a diagnosis of subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS as assessed by physical therapists will be recruited. Eligible patients will be randomized to either the intervention group (usual care in combination with the particular tape technique or the control group (usual care without this tape technique. In both groups, usual care will consist of individualized physical therapy care. The primary outcomes will be shoulder-specific function (the Simple Shoulder Test and pain severity (11-point numerical rating scale. The economic evaluation will be performed using a societal perspective. All relevant costs will be registered using cost diaries. Utilities (Quality Adjusted Life Years will be measured using the EuroQol. The data will be collected at baseline, and 4, 12, and 26 weeks follow-up. Discussion This pragmatic study will provide information about the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of taping in patients presenting with clinical signs of SAIS. Trial registration Trial registration number: NTR2575

  17. Finnish Subacromial Impingement Arthroscopy Controlled Trial (FIMPACT): a protocol for a randomised trial comparing arthroscopic subacromial decompression and diagnostic arthroscopy (placebo control), with an exercise therapy control, in the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavola, Mika; Malmivaara, Antti; Taimela, Simo; Kanto, Kari; Järvinen, Teppo Ln

    2017-06-06

    Arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) is the most commonly performed surgical intervention for shoulder pain, yet evidence on its efficacy is limited. The rationale for the surgery rests on the tenet that symptom relief is achieved through decompression of the rotator cuff tendon passage. The primary objective of this superiority trial is to compare the efficacy of ASD versus diagnostic arthroscopy (DA) in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS), where DA differs only by the lack of subacromial decompression. A third group of supervised progressive exercise therapy (ET) will allow for pragmatic assessment of the relative benefits of surgical versus non-operative treatment strategies. Finnish Subacromial Impingement Arthroscopy Controlled Trial is an ongoing multicentre, three-group randomised controlled study. We performed two-fold concealed allocation, first by randomising patients to surgical (ASD or DA) or conservative (ET) treatment in 2:1 ratio and then those allocated to surgery further to ASD or DA in 1:1 ratio. Our two primary outcomes are pain at rest and at arm activity, assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS). We will quantify the treatment effect as the difference between the groups in the change in the VAS scales with the associated 95% CI at 24 months. Our secondary outcomes are functional assessment (Constant score and Simple shoulder test), quality of life (15D and SF-36), patient satisfaction, proportions of responders and non-responders, reoperations/treatment conversions, all at 2 years post-randomisation, as well as adverse effects and complications. We recruited a total of 210 patients from three tertiary referral centres. We will conduct the primary analysis on the intention-to-treat basis. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Pirkanmaa Hospital District and duly registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. The findings of this study will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and

  18. [Eccentric strength training for the rotator cuff tendinopathies with subacromial impingement. Current evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Hernández, Salvador Israel; Pérez-Ramírez, Luis Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are the leading cause of pain and functional disability of the shoulder. Conservative treatment is an essential part of their management. Despite the limited evidence, rehabilitation is the mainstay of the treatment for rotator cuff tears associated to impingement syndrome. There are current reports on the utility of strengthening with resistance, particularly by eccentric exercise. This report aims to present an overview of the efficacy of eccentric exercises in tendinopathies and current evidence of its benefit in rotator cuff tears. We describe the information available in tendinopathy and analyzed four studies published on eccentric strengthening for rotator cuff tears. There is theoretical evidence about its usefulness in this pathology, but only a controlled clinical trial has been published with data on improvement in strength but not in pain or functionality. More studies are needed with better methodological designs in order to generate evidence of their utility and recommendation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  19. Is exercise effective for the management of subacromial impingement syndrome and other soft tissue injuries of the shoulder? A systematic review by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa) Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Sean Y; Southerst, Danielle; Côté, Pierre; Shearer, Heather M; Sutton, Deborah; Randhawa, Kristi; Varatharajan, Sharanya; Wong, Jessica J; Yu, Hainan; Marchand, Andrée-Anne; Chrobak, Karen; Woitzik, Erin; Shergill, Yaadwinder; Ferguson, Brad; Stupar, Maja; Nordin, Margareta; Jacobs, Craig; Mior, Silvano; Carroll, Linda J; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Taylor-Vaisey, Anne

    2015-10-01

    Exercise is a key component of rehabilitation for soft tissue injuries of the shoulder; however its effectiveness remains unclear. Determine the effectiveness of exercise for shoulder pain. We searched seven databases from 1990 to 2015 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort and case control studies comparing exercise to other interventions for shoulder pain. We critically appraised eligible studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria. We synthesized findings from scientifically admissible studies using best-evidence synthesis methodology. We retrieved 4853 articles. Eleven RCTs were appraised and five had a low risk of bias. Four studies addressed subacromial impingement syndrome. One study addressed nonspecific shoulder pain. For variable duration subacromial impingement syndrome: 1) supervised strengthening leads to greater short-term improvement in pain and disability over wait listing; and 2) supervised and home-based strengthening and stretching leads to greater short-term improvement in pain and disability compared to no treatment. For persistent subacromial impingement syndrome: 1) supervised and home-based strengthening leads to similar outcomes as surgery; and 2) home-based heavy load eccentric training does not add benefits to home-based rotator cuff strengthening and physiotherapy. For variable duration low-grade nonspecific shoulder pain, supervised strengthening and stretching leads to similar short-term outcomes as corticosteroid injections or multimodal care. The evidence suggests that supervised and home-based progressive shoulder strengthening and stretching are effective for the management of subacromial impingement syndrome. For low-grade nonspecific shoulder pain, supervised strengthening and stretching are equally effective to corticosteroid injections or multimodal care. CRD42013003928. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Physical Therapists' Perceptions and Use of Exercise in the Management of Subacromial Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Catherine E; Kerr, Daniel P; Wilson, Iseult M; McCracken, Martin; Sim, Julius; Basford, Jeffrey R; McVeigh, Joseph G

    2016-09-01

    Shoulder pain resulting from subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) is a common problem with a relatively poor response to treatment. There is little research exploring physical therapists' perspectives on the management of the syndrome. The study objective was to investigate physical therapists' perceptions and experiences regarding the use of exercise in the treatment of patients with SAIS. This was a qualitative focus group study. Three 60- to 90-minute focus group sessions containing 6 to 8 experienced musculoskeletal physical therapists (total number=20) were conducted. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze transcripts and develop core themes and categories. Exercise was seen as key in the management of SAIS. The overarching theme was the need to "gain buy-in to exercise" at an early stage. The main subtheme was patient education. Therapists identified the need to use education about SAIS etiology to foster buy-in and "sell" self-management through exercise to the patient. They consistently mentioned achieving education and buy-in using visual tools, postural advice, and sometimes a "quick fix" of pain control. Furthermore, experienced practitioners reported including educational interventions much earlier in treatment than when they first qualified. Therapists emphasized the need for individually tailored exercises, including: scapular stabilization; rotator cuff, lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscle strengthening; and anterior shoulder and pectoralis minor muscle stretching. Quality of exercise performance was deemed more important than the number of repetitions that the patients performed. Expanding the geographical area over which the focus groups were conducted and including therapists with less than 5 years of postgraduate experience may have strengthened the findings of this study. Experienced musculoskeletal physical therapists believe that exercise is central in treating patients with SAIS and that gaining patient buy-in to its

  1. Effects of local microwave diathermy on shoulder pain and function in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy in comparison to subacromial corticosteroid injections: a single-blind randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabini, Alessia; Piazzini, Diana B; Bertolini, Carlo; Deriu, Laura; Saccomanno, Maristella F; Santagada, Domenico A; Sgadari, Antonio; Bernabei, Roberto; Fabbriciani, Carlo; Marzetti, Emanuele; Milano, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    Single-blind randomized clinical trial, with a follow-up of 24 weeks. To determine the effects of hyperthermia via localized microwave diathermy on pain and disability in comparison to subacromial corticosteroid injections in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Hyperthermia improves symptoms and function in several painful musculoskeletal disorders. However, the effects of microwave diathermy in rotator cuff tendinopathy have not yet been established. Ninety-two patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy and pain lasting for at least 3 months were recruited from the outpatient clinic of the Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, University Hospital, Rome, Italy. Participants were randomly allocated to either local microwave diathermy or subacromial corticosteroids. The primary outcome measure was the short form of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (QuickDASH). Secondary outcome measures were the Constant-Murley shoulder outcome score and a visual analog scale for pain assessment. At the end of treatment and at follow-up, both treatment groups experienced improvements in all outcome measures relative to baseline values. Changes over time in QuickDASH, Constant-Murley, and visual analog scale scores were not different between treatment arms. In patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, the effects of localized microwave diathermy on disability, shoulder function, and pain are equivalent to those elicited by subacromial corticosteroid injections.

  2. Development and delivery of a physiotherapist-led exercise intervention in a randomised controlled trial for subacromial impingement syndrome (the SUPPORT trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kay; Jackson, Sue; Shufflebotham, Julie; Roddy, Edward; Foster, Nadine E

    2017-03-24

    This paper describes the development, content and delivery of a physiotherapist- led individualised, supervised and progressed exercise programme for use in a factorial randomised controlled trial testing treatments for subacromial impingement syndrome. To develop the intervention, a survey of community physiotherapists and national guidelines provided the basis for a consensus workshop through which a protocol was developed for the SUPPORT trial physiotherapist-led exercise programme (SUPPORT: SUbacromial impingement syndrome and Pain: a randomised controlled trial Of exeRcise and injection). The protocol included three stages of exercise progression: (1) scapular stability and active exercise with no resistance (2) range of motion exercise with scapular control, isometrics and stretches, and (3) through range resistance exercise. A two day training programme was developed for physiotherapists which included the trial background, current evidence and strategies to improve exercise adherence. Twenty physiotherapists were trained to deliver the exercise intervention. In the SUPPORT trial, 128 participants were randomised to physiotherapist-led exercise. Ninety nine (81%) participants had their first physiotherapy session within 2 to 3 weeks and 71 (56%) received six to eight treatment sessions. Frequently-used exercises were: stage 1 scapular setting with glenohumeral joint (GHJ) flexion to 90°, stage 2 GHJ medial rotation stretch, stage 3 scapular setting through lateral rotation, with resistance bands. We combined clinical and research expertise with national guidance in order to develop a physiotherapist-led, individualised, progressed and supervised exercise intervention for use within a randomised trial. The effectiveness of the intervention is being evaluated within the SUPPORT trial. Trial registration number ISRCTN 42399123. Copyright © 2017 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Force steadiness, muscle activity, and maximal muscle strength in subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandholm, Thomas; Rasmussen, Lars; Aagaard, Per; Jensen, Bente Rona; Diederichsen, Louise

    2006-11-01

    We investigated the effects of the subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) on shoulder sensory-motor control and maximal shoulder muscle strength. It was hypothesized that both would be impaired due to chronic shoulder pain associated with the syndrome. Nine subjects with unilateral SIS who remained physically active in spite of shoulder pain and nine healthy matched controls were examined to determine isometric and isokinetic submaximal shoulder-abduction force steadiness at target forces corresponding to 20%, 27.5%, and 35% of the maximal shoulder abductor torque, and maximal shoulder muscle strength (MVC). Electromyographic (EMG) activity was assessed using surface and intramuscular recordings from eight shoulder muscles. Force steadiness was impaired in SIS subjects during concentric contractions at the highest target force level only, with muscle activity largely unaffected. No between-group differences in shoulder MVC were observed. The present data suggest that shoulder sensory-motor control is only mildly impaired in subjects with SIS who are able to continue with upper body physical activity in spite of shoulder pain. Thus, physical activity should be continued by patients with SIS, if possible, to avoid the loss in neural and muscle functions associated with inactivity.

  4. Compressive cryotherapy versus ice-a prospective, randomized study on postoperative pain in patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Reynolds, Kirk A; Long, Cyndi; McCarty, Eric C

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of compressive cryotherapy (CC) vs. ice on postoperative pain in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression. A commercial device was used for postoperative CC. A standard ice wrap (IW) was used for postoperative cryotherapy alone. Patients scheduled for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression were consented and randomized to 1 of 2 groups; patients were randomized to use either CC or a standard IW for the first postoperative week. All patients were asked to complete a "diary" each day, which included visual analog scale scores based on average daily pain and worst daily pain as well as total pain medication usage. Pain medications were then converted to a morphine equivalent dosage. Forty-six patients completed the study and were available for analysis; 25 patients were randomized to CC and 21 patients were randomized to standard IW. No significant differences were found in average pain, worst pain, or morphine equivalent dosage on any day. There does not appear to be a significant benefit to use of CC over standard IW in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff repair or subacromial decompression. Further study is needed to determine if CC devices are a cost-effective option for postoperative pain management in this population of patients. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Camilla Marie

    Neuromuscular function in patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and clinical assessment of scapular kinematics Larsen CM1, Juul-Kristensen B1,2 Holtermann A3, Lund H1,2, Søgaard K1 1University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, DK 2Institute of Oc...... benefit from biofeedback training. Lastly, these results indicate that very few clinical assessment methods have sufficient clinimetric properties that can be recommended for clinical use....... a voluntary arm movement task and 2) selective activation tasks during sessions with and without on-line biofeedback, in a general population consisting of 16 SIS patients and 15 controls (No-SIS). Furthermore, 3) a systematic review was conducted of all available clinical scapular assessment methods...... parts were below 1.5% activity or (ii) an activation ratio above 95% of the total activity of all muscles, significantly fewer SIS subjects than No-SIS subjects achieved selective activation of individual scapular muscle compartments without on-line biofeedback of muscle activity from each muscle...

  6. Topographical pressure pain sensitivity maps of the shoulder region in individuals with subacromial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, I L; Camargo, P R; Alburquerque-Sendín, F; Madeleine, P; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, C; Salvini, T F

    2016-02-01

    Topographical pain maps (TPM) are useful tools to assess deep tissue sensitivity in musculoskeletal pain conditions. There is evidence suggesting bilateral sensitivity in subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS), although it is not widely accepted. No previous study has investigated TPM of the shoulder in SAPS. To investigate whether differences for TPM of the shoulder are evident among patients with unilateral SAPS and controls. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed 3 times at each point and there was a 20 s rest period between each one. The TPM were calculated using 29 pre-determined points on both shoulders in all groups by inverse distance weighted interpolation of PPT data. Multivariate Analysis of Covariance was applied to detect differences in PPTs between groups, sides, points (gender as covariate). The results revealed significant differences between points and genders (both, P shoulder. Women exhibited bilateral lower PPTs in all points than men in both groups (all, P shoulder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy on pain and functioning compared to a standard exercise protocol in patients presenting with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome. A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, Thilo O; de Bie, Rob A; Bastiaenen, Caroline H G

    2010-06-09

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common musculoskeletal complaint leading to significant reduction of health and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first choice of treatment although its effectiveness is still under debate. Systematic reviews in this field highlight the need for more high quality trials to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement, involving 90 participants aged 18-75. Participants are recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, general practitioners, and orthopaedic surgeons in Germany. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either individualized physiotherapy or to a standard exercise protocol using central randomization. The control group will perform the standard exercise protocol aiming to restore muscular deficits in strength, mobility, and coordination of the rotator cuff and the shoulder girdle muscles to unload the subacromial space during active movements. Participants of the intervention group will perform the standard exercise protocol as a home program, and will additionally be treated with individualized physiotherapy based on clinical examination results, and guided by a decision tree. After the intervention phase both groups will continue their home program for another 7 weeks. Outcome will be measured at 5 weeks and at 3 and 12 months after inclusion using the shoulder pain and disability index and patients' global impression of change, the generic patient-specific scale, the average weekly pain score, and patient satisfaction with treatment. Additionally, the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire, the pain catastrophizing scale, and patients' expectancies of treatment effect are assessed. Participants' adherence to the protocol, use of additional treatments

  8. Effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy on pain and functioning compared to a standard exercise protocol in patients presenting with clinical signs of subacromial impingement syndrome. A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bie Rob A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder impingement syndrome is a common musculoskeletal complaint leading to significant reduction of health and disability. Physiotherapy is often the first choice of treatment although its effectiveness is still under debate. Systematic reviews in this field highlight the need for more high quality trials to investigate the effectiveness of physiotherapy interventions in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Methods/Design This randomized controlled trial will investigate the effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy in patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of subacromial impingement, involving 90 participants aged 18-75. Participants are recruited from outpatient physiotherapy clinics, general practitioners, and orthopaedic surgeons in Germany. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated to either individualized physiotherapy or to a standard exercise protocol using central randomization. The control group will perform the standard exercise protocol aiming to restore muscular deficits in strength, mobility, and coordination of the rotator cuff and the shoulder girdle muscles to unload the subacromial space during active movements. Participants of the intervention group will perform the standard exercise protocol as a home program, and will additionally be treated with individualized physiotherapy based on clinical examination results, and guided by a decision tree. After the intervention phase both groups will continue their home program for another 7 weeks. Outcome will be measured at 5 weeks and at 3 and 12 months after inclusion using the shoulder pain and disability index and patients' global impression of change, the generic patient-specific scale, the average weekly pain score, and patient satisfaction with treatment. Additionally, the fear avoidance beliefs questionnaire, the pain catastrophizing scale, and patients' expectancies of treatment effect are assessed. Participants

  9. Cumulative occupational shoulder exposures and surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome: a nationwide Danish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbøge, Annett; Frost, Poul; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2014-11-01

    The primary aim was to examine exposure-response relationships between cumulative occupational shoulder exposures and surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), and to compare sex-specific exposure-response relationships. The secondary aim was to examine the time window of relevant exposures. We conducted a nationwide register study of all persons born in Denmark (1933-1977), who had at least 5 years of full-time employment. In the follow-up period (2003-2008), we identified first-time events of surgery for SIS. Cumulative exposure estimates for a 10-year exposure time window with a 1-year lag time were obtained by linking occupational codes with a job exposure matrix. The exposure estimates were expressed as, for example, arm-elevation-years in accordance with the pack-year concept of tobacco consumption. We used a multivariable logistic regression technique equivalent to discrete survival analysis. The adjusted OR (ORadj) increased to a maximum of 2.1 for arm-elevation-years, repetition-years and force-years, and to 1.5 for hand-arm-vibration-years. Sex-specific exposure-response relationships were similar for men and women, when assessed using a relative risk scale. The ORadj increased gradually with the number of years contributing to the cumulative exposure estimates. The excess fraction was 24%. Cumulative occupational shoulder exposures carried an increase in risk of surgery for SIS with similar exposure-response curves for men and women. The risk of surgery for SIS increased gradually, when the period of exposure assessment was extended. In the general working population, a substantial fraction of all first-time operations for SIS could be related to occupational exposures. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Inter- and intrarater reliability of goniometry and hand held dynamometry for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieseler, Georg; Laudner, Kevin G; Irlenbusch, Lars; Meyer, Henrike; Schulze, Stephan; Delank, Karl-Stefan; Hermassi, Souhail; Bartels, Thomas; Schwesig, René

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the intra- and interrater reliability of measuring shoulder range of motion (ROM) and strength among patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS). Twenty-five patients (14 female patients; mean age, 60.4± 7.84 years) diagnosed with SAIS were assessed to determine the intrarater reliability for glenohumeral ROM. Twenty-five patients (16 female patients; mean age, 60.4± 7.80 years) and 76 asymptomatic volunteers (52 female volunteers; mean age, 29.4± 14.1 years) were assessed for interrater reliability. Dependent variables were active shoulder ROM and isometric strength. Intrarater reliability was fair-to-excellent for the SAIS patients (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.52-0.97; standard error of measurement [SEM], 4.4°-9.9° N; coefficient of variation [CV], 7.1%-44.9%). Based on the ICC, 11 of 12 parameters (92%) displayed an excellent reliability (ICC> 0.75). The interrater reliability showed fair-to-excellent results (SAIS patients: ICC, 0.13-0.98; SEM, 2.3°-8.8°; CV, 3.6%-37.0%; controls: ICC, 0.11-0.96; SEM, 3.0°-35.4°; CV, 5.6%-26.4%). In accordance with the intrarater reliability, glenohumeral adduction ROM was the only parameter with an ICC below 0.75 for both samples. Painful shoulder ROM in the SAIS patients showed no influence on the quality of reliability for measurement. Therefore, these protocols should be considered reliable assessment techniques in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of painful shoulder conditions such as SAIS.

  11. The Relationship between the Mean Platelet Volume and Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalkın Çalık

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS characterized by inflammation of supraspinatus tendon is one of the most common causes of the shoulder pain. In some studies, platelet activity has been shown as a marker to indicate the inflammation associated with the disease. The mean platelet volume (MPV shows platelet function and activation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between MPV and SIS. Materials and Methods: Eighty seven inpatients (female/male: 55/32, mean age: 56.34±7.53 years diagnosed with SIS according to physical examination and MR findings in Bolu Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Hospital between January 2014- June 2014 constituted the case group, 87 outpatients (female/male 61/26, mean age: 52.97±8.48 years not diagnosed with SIS constituted the control group. MPV values between case and control group that were similar in terms of age and gender were compared. Results: In case group MPV (8.36±0.73*** was lower than that of the control group (8.44±1.02**** and platelet count (253.75±50.17*** was higher than that of the control group (244.79±56.19***. Both were not statistically significant (p>0.05. Significant negative correlation was found between MPV and platelet level in case group (r=-0.240, p<0.05. Conclusion: These findings present that there is no relationship between MPV and SIS. New prospective studies are needed on this subject. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2015;21: 15-8

  12. Single-lead percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation for the treatment of shoulder pain from subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Richard D; Harris, Michael A; Bennett, Maria E; Chae, John

    2012-08-01

    This case report demonstrates the feasibility of a single-lead peripheral nerve stimulation system for the treatment of pain secondary to chronic subacromial impingement syndrome. The participant was a 57-year-old man who experienced persistent pain from subacromial impingement syndrome for 20 months despite having undergone conservative therapy of steroid injection and physical therapy. After study enrollment, a single intramuscular lead was placed percutaneously into the deltoid muscle of the affected shoulder. He was treated 6 hours per day for 3 weeks and the lead was removed. The primary outcome measure was the Brief Pain Inventory (Short-form) Question 3 (BPI 3), which queries the worst pain in the last week on a 0-10 numerical rating scale. At baseline, BPI 3 was an 8. At the end of treatment and at 4 and 12 weeks after treatment, BPI 3 scores were 2, 0, and 0, respectively. Substantial improvements in shoulder impairment, quality of life, and shoulder disability measures were also observed. Additional studies are needed to further demonstrate safety and efficacy, determine optimal dose, define optimal prescriptive parameters, expand clinical indications, and demonstrate long-term effect. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Low-Load Exercise on Post-needling Induced Pain After Dry Needling of Active Trigger Point in Individuals with Subacromial Pain Syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Salom Moreno, Jaime; Jiménez Gómez, Laura; Gómez Ahufinger, Victoria; Palacios Ceña, María; Arias Buría, José Luis; Koppenhaver, Shane L.; Fernández de las Peñas, César

    2017-01-01

    Background: Application of dry needling is usually associated to post-needling induced pain. Development of post-needling intervention targeting to reduce this adverse event is needed. Objective: To determine the effectiveness of low-load exercise on reducing post-needling induced-pain after dry needling of active trigger points (TrPs) in the infraspinatus muscle in subacromial pain syndrome.

  14. Clinical effectiveness of botulinum toxin type B in the treatment of subacromial bursitis or shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho; Song, Sun Hong

    2011-01-01

    Subacromial steroid injections are used as a treatment method in subacromial bursitis (SB) or shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). However, the steroid effect is relatively restricted to the short-term and repeated injections are frequently required, which contributes to unwanted side effects. As an alternative, botulinum toxin (BT) has recently been used for pain relief. This study aimed to investigate the clinical effectiveness of BT type B and to compare this with the effectiveness of steroids. Sixty-one patients diagnosed with SB or SIS were divided into 2 groups and treated with BT type B (BT group) and trimacinolone injection (TA group) under ultrasound guidance, respectively. Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), active shoulder abduction angle, and the Korean version of the score on the Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) were measured before the treatment, and at 1 and 3 months after the treatment. Both groups obtained a significant improvement of NRS, DASH, and active shoulder abduction at 1 and 3 months follow-up. BT group showed significantly better outcomes in terms of reduction of NRS and DASH at 3 months than TA group. BT group showed strong trend toward the larger degree of active shoulder abduction than the TA group at 3 months follow-up, as well. Whereas, no significant difference was found in NRS, DASH, and active shoulder abduction between the 2 groups at 1 month follow-up. BT type B can be a useful strategy and has great potential for replacing steroids as a treatment for SB or SIS.

  15. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, subacromial impingement syndrome, rotator cuff, tendinopathy, ...

  16. Kinesiology taping does not alter shoulder strength, shoulder proprioception, or scapular kinematics in healthy, physically active subjects and subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Karen A; Akins, Jonathan S; Varnell, Michelle; Abt, John; Lovalekar, Mita; Lephart, Scott; Sell, Timothy C

    2017-03-01

    To examine the effect of kinesiology tape (KT) on shoulder strength, proprioception, and scapular kinematics in healthy and Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SAIS) subjects. Placebo-controlled quasi-experimental study. Research laboratory. A total of 30 physically active subjects participated. Ten healthy subjects with no previous history of shoulder pathology received KT on the dominant shoulder. Twenty subjects with shoulder pain for a minimum of two weeks and presenting with clinical signs of impingement were allotted to receive KT (n = 10) or placebo taping (PT, n = 10) on the involved shoulder. All participants were tested pre- and post-application. Shoulder internal/external rotation (IR/ER) strength was assessed with isokinetic dynamometry (average peak torque/body weight). Shoulder IR/ER proprioception was assessed through threshold to detect passive motion (mean absolute error in degrees). Scapular position at 90° and 120° of shoulder abduction during arm raising/lowering were assessed using a 3D motion analysis system. No significant within group or between group differences were demonstrated for any measure. Taping does not appear to aid/impair shoulder strength, shoulder proprioception, or scapular kinematics. Future research should explore if the effects of KT are time-dependent and similar in other pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Short-term effects of high-intensity laser therapy, manual therapy, and Kinesio taping in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekyavas, Nihan Ozunlu; Baltaci, Gul

    2016-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) is a major contributing factor of shoulder pain; and treatment approaches (Kinesio® taping [KT], Exercise [EX], manual therapy [MT], and high-intensity laser therapy [HILT]) have been developed to treat the pain. The key objective of this study was to compare the effects of KT, MT, and HILT on the pain, the range of motion (ROM), and the functioning in patients with SAIS. Seventy patients with SAIS were randomly divided into four groups based on the treatment(s) each group received [EX (n = 15), KT + EX (n = 20), MT + KT + EX (n = 16), and MT + KT + HILT + EX (n = 19)]. All the patients were assessed before and at the end of the treatment (15th day). The main outcome assessments included the evaluation of severity of pain by visual analogue scale (VAS) and shoulder flexion, abduction, and external rotation ROM measurements by a universal goniometry. Shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI) was used to measure pain and disability associated with shoulder pathology. Statistically significant differences were found in the treatment results of all parameters in MT + KT + EX and HILT + MT + KT + EX groups (p effective in minimizing pain and disability and increasing ROM in patients with SAIS. Further studies with follow-up periods are required to determine the advantages of these treatments conclusively.

  18. Effects of weighted and un-weighted pendulum exercises on ultrasonographic acromiohumeral distance in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaya, Nuray; Akkaya, Semih; Gungor, Harun R; Yaşar, Gokce; Atalay, Nilgun Simsir; Sahin, Fusun

    2017-01-01

    Although functional results of combined rehabilitation programs are reported, there have been no reports studying the effects of solo pendulum exercises on ultrasonographic measurements of acromiohumeral distance (AHD). To investigate the effects of weighted and un-weighted pendulum exercises on ultrasonographic AHD and clinical symptoms in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Patients with subacromial impingement syndrome were randomized to performing weighted (1.5 kilograms hand held dumbbell, N= 18) or un-weighted (free of weight, N= 16) pendulum exercises for 4 weeks, 3 sessions/day. Exercises were repeated for each direction of shoulder motion in each session (ten minutes). Clinical situation was evaluated by Constant score and Shoulder Pain Disability Index (SPADI). Ultrasonographic measurements of AHD at 0°, 30° and 60° shoulder abduction were performed. All clinical and ultrasonographic evaluations were performed at the beginning of the exercise program and at end of 4 weeks of exercise program. Thirty-four patients (23 females, 11 males; mean age 41.7 ± 8.9 years) were evaluated. Significant clinical improvements were detected in both exercise groups between pre and post-treatment evaluations (p shoulder abduction between groups (p > 0.05). There was no significant difference for pre and post-treatment narrowing of AHD (narrowing of 0°-30°, and 0°-60°) between groups (p > 0.05). While significant clinical improvements were achieved with both weighted and un-weighted solo pendulum exercises, no significant difference was detected for ultrasonographic AHD measurements between exercise groups.

  19. Physiotherapy after subacromial decompression surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Falla, Deborah; Frost, Poul

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and details of a standardised physiotherapy exercise intervention designed to address pain and disability in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after arthroscopic decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome. To develop the in...... is currently being evaluated within the framework of the Shoulder Intervention Project (ISRCTN55768749).......This paper describes the development and details of a standardised physiotherapy exercise intervention designed to address pain and disability in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after arthroscopic decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome. To develop...

  20. Inter-examiner reproducibility of clinical tests and criteria to identify subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Mikkel; Bogh, Søren Bie; Larsen, Camilla Marie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction A specific algorithm has been proposed for classifying impingement related shoulder pain in athletes with overhead activity. Data on the inter-examiner reproducibility of the suggested clinical tests and criteria and their mutual dependencies for identifying subacromial...... was followed, consisting of a training, an overall agreement and a study phase. To proceed to the study phase, an overall agreement of 0.80 was required. In total 10, 20 and 44 subjects were included in the three phases, respectively. The case prevalence in the study phase was 50%. The inclusion criterion...... reproducibility in clinical practice, as well as the validity of the tests and criteria for SIS....

  1. Surgical treatment of the impingement syndrome and of the rotator cuff tears: personal experience in 134 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rioda

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The time-course covered by the original definition of scapulo-humeral periarthritis suggested by Duplay through the more recent term of subacromial impingement syndrome coined by Neer, follows the identification of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to chronic subacromial impingement and degenerative tears of the rotator cuff. The Authors recall the functional-anatomic development evolution of the shoulder and the disequilibrium between the depressor and the elevator muscles which may promote the chronic friction against the acromion. However, the actual pathogenesis of the impingement still remains controversial. We evaluated 134 patients (81F, 53M, mean age 56.4 years with chronic subacromial impingement syndrome. In 92 cases (69% non traumatic tears of the rotator cuff were also present as confirmed by ultrasonography in 94 cases, CT in18 cases and magnetic resonance in 102 cases. The different tear patterns of the rotator cuff were classified as suggested by Ellman (L shaped, L reverse, triangular, trapezoidal and massive with retraction and clinical results were analysed following Sahlstrand clinical criteria and Costant numerical scale. According to the anatomical damage, patients were divided into those with impingement without severe cuff tendinopathy (42 cases, those with rotator cuff tears without loss of motion of the shoulder (32 cases and those with cuff tears and loss of active motion (60 cases. The different surgical techniques and rehabilitation procedures after surgery are also reported. After a mean follow-up of 1.3 years (range 8 months - 2 years, good or excellent results were obtained in 91% of the patients without rotator cuff tears, in 87% of the patients with tears but without loss of motion and in 75% of the cases with loss of active motion. Our data demonstrate that in the majority of patients with chronic impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears, surgical treatment shows high success rates. When surgery is

  2. Effects of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation and Mulligan Concepts on the Pain, Functional Level and Quality of Life on Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Karaku?, Sinem; Gelecek, Nihal; Ye?ilyaprak, Sevgi Sevi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of Proprioceptif Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) and Mulligan concepts on the pain, functional level and quality of life in the patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Methods: This study was carried out on 40 patients (26 females, 14 males), mean age 50,3?1,13 years, who had been diagnosed as SIS admitted to the physical therapy and rehabilitation clinic. Before the beginning measurements all the patients were...

  3. Pathological Fracture of Clavicle Following Sub-Acromial Decompression-Infraclavicular Compartment Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Mukhopadhyay

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old factory worker presented with pain and weakness of the left shoulder following a fall on ice on her left shoulder. An ultrasound scan of the shoulder taken 4 months after injury showed small partial articular surface tear of the supraspinatus tendon. Ten days following subacromial decompression she suffered a pathological fracture of her left clavicle. MRI, CT, and isotope bone scans showed no evidence of malignancy or infection but a collection of fluid was noted underlying the clavicle communicating to the acromioclavicular joint. Ultrasound scan guided aspiration of 20 millilitres of bloodstained fluid underlying the clavicle resulted in gradual recovery and adequate healing of the fracture.

  4. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression is effective in selected patients with shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, S A; Singh, H P; Pandey, R K

    2012-08-01

    A total of 92 patients with symptoms for over six months due to subacromial impingement of the shoulder, who were being treated with physiotherapy, were included in this study. While continuing with physiotherapy they waited a further six months for surgery. They were divided into three groups based on the following four clinical and radiological criteria: temporary benefit following steroid injection, pain in the mid-arc of abduction, a consistently positive Hawkins test and radiological evidence of impingement. Group A fulfilled all four criteria, group B three criteria and group C two criteria. A total of nine patients improved while waiting for surgery and were excluded, leaving 83 who underwent arthroscopic subacromial decompression (SAD). The new Oxford shoulder score was recorded pre-operatively and at three and 12 months post-operatively. A total of 51 patients (group A) had a significant improvement in the mean shoulder score from 18 (13 to 22) pre-operatively to 38 (35 to 42) at three months (p < 0.001). The mean score in this group was significantly better than in group B (21 patients) and C (11 patients) at this time. At one year patients in all groups showed improvement in scores, but patients in group A had a higher mean score (p = 0.01). At one year patients in groups A and B did better than those in group C (p = 0.01). Arthroscopic SAD is a beneficial intervention in selected patients. The four criteria could help identify patients in whom it is likely to be most effective.

  5. The clinical and sonographic effects of kinesiotaping and exercise in comparison with manual therapy and exercise for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: a preliminary trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Derya Ozer; Baltaci, Gul; Toprak, Ugur; Atay, Ahmet Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of manual therapy with exercise to kinesiotaping with exercise for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Randomized clinical before and after trial was used. Fifty-four patients diagnosed as having subacromial impingement syndrome who were referred for outpatient treatment were included. Eligible patients (between 30 and 60 years old, with unilateral shoulder pain) were randomly allocated to 2 study groups: kinesiotaping with exercise (n = 28) or manual therapy with exercise (n = 26). In addition, patients were advised to use cold packs 5 times per day to control for pain. Visual analog scale for pain, Disability of Arm and Shoulder Questionnaire for function, and diagnostic ultrasound assessment for supraspinatus tendon thickness were used as main outcome measures. Assessments were applied at the baseline and after completing 6 weeks of related interventions. At the baseline, there was no difference between the 2 group characteristics (P > .05). There were significant differences in both groups before and after treatment in terms of pain decrease and improvement of Disability of Arm and Shoulder Questionnaire scores (P .05). The only difference between the groups was at night pain, resulting in favor of the kinesiotaping with exercise group (P < .05). For the group of subjects studied, no differences were found between kinesiotaping with exercise and manual therapy with exercise. Both treatments may have similar results in reducing pain and disability in subacromial impingement in 6 weeks. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The impact of subacromial impingement syndrome on muscle activity patterns of the shoulder complex: a systematic review of electromyographic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Toby O

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS is a commonly reported cause of shoulder pain. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to examine whether a difference in electromyographic (EMG activity of the shoulder complex exists between people with SIS and healthy controls. Methods Medline, CINAHL, AMED, EMBASE, and grey literature databases were searched from their inception to November 2008. Inclusion, data extraction and trial quality were assessed in duplicate. Results Nine studies documented in eleven papers, eight comparing EMG intensity and three comparing EMG onset timing, representing 141 people with SIS and 138 controls were included. Between one and five studies investigated each muscle totalling between 20 and 182 participants. The two highest quality studies of five report a significant increase in EMG intensity in upper trapezius during scaption in subjects with SIS. There was evidence from 2 studies of a delayed activation of lower trapezius in patients with SIS. There was otherwise no evidence of a consistent difference in EMG activity between the shoulders of subjects with painful SIS and healthy controls. Conclusions A difference may exist in EMG activity within some muscles, in particular upper and lower trapezius, between people with SIS and healthy controls. These muscles may be targets for clinical interventions aiding rehabilitation for people with SIS. These differences should be investigated in a larger, high quality survey and the effects of therapeutically targeting these muscles in a randomised controlled trial.

  7. Predicting Response to Subacromial Injections and Lidocaine/Tetracaine Patch from Pretreatment Pain Quality in Patients with Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammaitoni, Arnold R; Trudeau, Jeremiah J; Radnovich, Richard; Galer, Bradley S; Jensen, Mark P

    2015-07-01

    No existing pain treatment is effective for all pain problems, and response to pain treatment is highly variable. Knowledge regarding the patient factors that predict response to different treatments could benefit patients by providing an empirical foundation for patient-treatment matching. This study sought to test the hypothesis that improvements following two treatments thought to operate via similar mechanisms would be predicted by similar baseline pain qualities. Prospective prediction analysis using data from a previously published open label trial comparing a heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for the treatment of pain in individuals with shoulder impingement syndrome. Consistent with the study hypothesis, the response to the two treatments were predicted by similar baseline pain qualities; specifically, higher baseline levels of unpleasant, electric, and sensitive pain predicted subsequent improvements in sleep interference, work/activity interference, and patient global ratings of improvement, respectively. The findings are consistent with the combined ideas that (1) those who have the most to gain (i.e., those reporting the highest levels of various pain qualities) can expect the best response to effective treatments and (2) different pain qualities may be associated with different types of outcomes. The findings support further research to examine how pain quality measures may be used to improve patient-treatment matching, and therefore, ultimately improve the efficiency, efficacy, and overall benefit-risk of pain treatment. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Kinesio taping or just taping in shoulder subacromial impingement syndrome? A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocyigit, Figen; Acar, Merve; Turkmen, Mehmet Besir; Kose, Tugce; Guldane, Nezahat; Kuyucu, Ersin

    2016-10-01

    To verify effects of kinesio taping (KT) in shoulder subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) when compared to sham taping applied in the same way with KT. Patients were randomized as group 1 (n = 21) KT group and group 2 (n = 20) sham-taping group. Taping was applied every three days, three times during the study period. We assessed all the patients at baseline, at the end of the taping period (12th day), and at one-month post-intervention. We assessed pain on the 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS). Shoulder range of motion (ROM), Constant Scores, and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) scores were evaluated. Of the 41 participants, 13 were males (32%) and 28 were females (68%). The mean age was 45 ± 15 years (range 20-65 years). We documented a significant decrease in VAS for nocturnal pain, and Constant Score in both groups. The KT group showed additional significant change in NHP pain and physical activity scores. KT and sham taping generated similar results regarding pain and Constant Scores.

  9. Selective activation of intra-muscular compartments within the trapezius muscle in subjects with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome. A case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C M; Juul-Kristensen, B; Olsen, H B

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular control of the scapular muscles is important in the etiology of shoulder pain. Electromyographical (EMG) biofeedback in healthy people has been shown to support a selective activation of the lower compartment of the trapezius muscle, specifically. The aim of the present paper...... that individuals with SIS may benefit from biofeedback training to gain control of the neuromuscular function of the scapular muscle....... was to investigate whether patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) were able to selectively activate the individual compartments within the trapezius muscle, with and without EMG biofeedback to the same extent as healthy controls (No-SIS). Fifteen SIS and 15 No-SIS participated in the study. Sessions...

  10. Functional thoracic hyperkyphosis model for chronic subacromial impingement syndrome: an insight on evidence based "treat the cause" concept--a case study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, M; Vijayakumar, P

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidences suggest functional thoracic hyperkyphosis (FTH) could be a different approach in the management of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). This case study aims firstly with the development of evidence informed FTH model for SIS. Secondly this study aimed to develop well defined multimodal physical therapy intervention for FTH and its related mechanical consequences in elderly patient with chronic SIS. As a result, Level IV positive evidence was found in both the short and long-term pain and disability of chronic SIS, using FTH model with 26 months of follow-up.

  11. The Use of Physiotherapy among Patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Impact of Sex, Socio-Demographic and Clinical Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Frich, Lars Henrik; Falla, Deborah; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2016-01-01

    Background Physiotherapy with exercises is generally recommended in the treatment of patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Objective We aimed to investigate the use of physiotherapy in patients with SIS in Danish hospital settings as part of initial non-surgical treatment and after SIS-related surgery and to evaluate to which extent sex, socio-demographic and clinical factors predict the use of physiotherapy. Methods Using national health registers, we identified 57,311 patients who had a first hospital contact with a diagnosis of ICD-10, groups M75.1–75.9, 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2011. Records of physiotherapy were extracted within 52 weeks after first contact (or until surgery), and for surgically treated patients within 26 weeks after surgery. Predictors of the use of physiotherapy after first contact and after surgery were analysed as time-to-event. Results Within 52 weeks after first contact, 43% of the patients had physiotherapy and 30% underwent surgery. Within 26 weeks after surgery, 80% had a record of physiotherapy. After first contact and after surgery, exercise was part of physiotherapy in 65% and 84% of the patients, respectively. A public hospital contact, physiotherapy before hospital contact, administrative region, female sex, a diagnosis of other or unspecified disorders (M75.8-M75.9), and surgical procedure predicted higher use of physiotherapy. Low education level predicted slightly lower use of physiotherapy after first contact, but not after surgery. Conclusion In patients with SIS in Danish hospital settings, physiotherapy was more often used after surgery than as part of initial non-surgical treatment. The use of physiotherapy was less common among men than women, whereas unequal use of physiotherapy in relation to education level was not noticeable. The use of physiotherapy with exercises in initial non-surgical treatment was relatively limited. PMID:26954692

  12. Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to intensities of occupational mechanical exposures across 10-year exposure time windows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbøge, Annett; Frost, Poul; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2017-08-20

    We aimed to identify intensities of occupational mechanical exposures (force, arm elevation and repetition) that do not entail an increased risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) even after prolonged durations of exposure. Additionally, we wanted to evaluate if exposure to hand-arm vibration (HAV) is an independent risk factor. We used data from a register-based cohort study of the entire Danish working population (n=2 374 403). During follow-up (2003-2008), 14 118 first-time events of surgery for SIS occurred. For each person, we linked register-based occupational codes (1993-2007) to a general population job exposure matrix to obtain year-by-year exposure intensities on measurement scales for force, upper arm elevation >90° and repetition and expert rated intensities of exposure to HAV. For 10-year exposure time windows, we calculated the duration of exposure at specific intensities above minimal (low, medium and high). We used a logistic regression technique equivalent to discrete survival analysis adjusting for cumulative effects of other mechanical exposures. We found indications of safe exposure intensities for repetition (median angular velocity 90° >2 min/day implied an increased risk reaching ORs of 1.7 and 1.5 after 10 years at low intensities. No associations were found for HAV. We found indications of safe exposure intensities for repetition. Any intensities of force and upper arm elevation >90° above minimal implied an increased risk across 10-year exposure time windows. No independent associations were found for HAV. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Effectiveness of Shortwave Diathermy for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome and Value of Night Pain for Patient Selection: A Double-Blinded, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz Kaysin, Meryem; Akpinar, Pinar; Aktas, Ilknur; Unlü Ozkan, Feyza; Silte Karamanlioglu, Duygu; Cagliyan Hartevioglu, Hulya; Vural, Nazan

    2017-09-06

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of short wave diathermy (SWD) in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. In this double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, 57 patients (aged 35-65 yrs) were classified into night pain positive (NP[+]) (n = 28) and night pain negative (NP[-]) (n = 29) groups. Both groups were randomly assigned to SWD (NP[+], n = 14; NP[-], n = 14) and sham (NP[+], n = 15; NP[-], n = 14) subgroups. Visual analog scale, Constant-Murley Scale (CS), and Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ) scores were used for evaluation. There was only a significant difference in pain with activity at 1-mo (mean difference [MD], -1.65; 95% confidence interval, -3.01 to -0.28]) and 2-mo evaluations (MD, -2.1; 95% confidence interval, -3.51 to -0.69) between SWD versus sham groups. In the NP(+) SWD group, the CS pain score was significantly higher than in the NP(+) sham group at all evaluations after treatment. At 1 mo, the NP(-) SWD group showed significantly better pain, strength, total CS, and SDQ scores than the NP(-) sham group. At 2 mos, the pain, range of motion, strength, and total CS and SDQ scores were better in the NP(-) SWD group than in the NP(-) sham group (P diathermy is more effective in subacromial impingement syndrome without NP.

  14. Effectiveness of Standardized Physical Therapy Exercises for Patients With Difficulty Returning to Usual Activities After Decompression Surgery for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Falla, Deborah; Haahr, Jens Peder; Frich, Lars Henrik; Andrea, Linda Christie; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about the effectiveness of exercise programs after decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome. For patients with difficulty returning to usual activities, special efforts may be needed to improve shoulder function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness at 3 and 12 months of a standardized physical therapy exercise intervention compared with usual care in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after subacromial decompression surgery. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted. The study was conducted in 6 public departments of orthopedic surgery, 2 departments of occupational medicine, and 2 physical therapy training centers in Central Denmark Region. One hundred twenty-six patients reporting difficulty returning to usual activities at the postoperative clinical follow-up 8 to 12 weeks after subacromial decompression surgery participated. A standardized exercise program consisting of physical therapist-supervised individual training sessions and home training was used. The primary outcome measure was the Oxford Shoulder Score. Secondary outcome measures were the Constant Score and the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire. At 3 and 12 months, follow-up data were obtained for 92% and 83% of the patients, respectively. Intention-to-treat analyses suggested a between-group difference on the Oxford Shoulder Score favoring the exercise group at 3 months, with an adjusted mean difference of 2.0 (95% confidence interval=-0.5, 4.6), and at 12 months, with an adjusted mean difference of 5.8 (95% confidence interval=2.8, 8.9). Significantly larger improvements for the exercise group were observed for most secondary and supplementary outcome measures. The nature of the exercise intervention did not allow blinding of patients and care providers. The standardized physical therapy exercise intervention resulted in statistically significant and clinically relevant improvement in shoulder pain and

  15. A randomized clinical study of the heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for the treatment of pain associated with shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnovich, Richard; Trudeau, Jeremiah; Gammaitoni, Arnold R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for pain due to shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) typically begins conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy and can include subacromial injection of corticosteroids, particularly in patients unresponsive to conservative measures. The heated lidocaine/tetracaine (HLT) patch has been reported to reduce SIS pain in a small case series. This was a prospective, randomized, open-label clinical trial in which adult patients with SIS pain lasting at least 14 days, with an average intensity of ≥4 on a 0-10 scale (0= no pain, 10= worst pain) were randomized to treatment with the HLT patch or a single subacromial injection of triamcinolone acetonide (10 mg). Patients in the HLT patch group applied a single HLT patch to the shoulder for 4 hours twice daily, with a 12-hour interval between treatments during the first 14 days, and could continue to use the patch on an as-needed basis (up to twice daily) during the second 14-day period. No treatment was allowed in the final 14-day period. At baseline and at days 14, 28, and 42, patients rated their pain and pain interference with specific activities (0-10 scale). Sixty patients enrolled in the study (average age =51 years, range 18-75, n=21 female). Average pain scores declined from 6.0±1.6 at baseline to 3.5±2.4 at day 42 in the HLT patch group (n=29, Pwork, or sleep; and range of motion. No significant between-group differences were seen for any pain or pain interference scores at any time point. These results suggest that short-term, noninvasive treatment with the HLT patch has similar efficacy to subacromial corticosteroid injections for the treatment of pain associated with SIS.

  16. The subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder treated by conventional physiotherapy, self-training, and a shoulder brace: results of a prospective, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Markus; Werner, Andreas; Stahlschmidt, Theresa; Woelfel, Rainer; Gohlke, Frank

    2004-01-01

    This prospective, randomized trial was performed to compare the results of treating subacromial impingement syndrome of the shoulder by a guided self-training program with the treatment by conventional physiotherapy or a functional brace. Sixty patients with the diagnosis of an outlet impingement syndrome of the shoulder (Neer I and II) were treated either by strengthening the depressors of the humeral head with a guided self-training program, by conventional physiotherapy, or by wearing a functional brace. The Constant-Murley score was assessed after 6 and 12 weeks. Shoulder pain was monitored with a visual analog scale. All three groups showed a significant improvement in shoulder function as well as a significant reduction in pain. There were no statistically significant differences among the groups. Guided self-training can lead to results similar to those of conventional physiotherapy. The comparable effect of the functional brace remains unclear and might be explained by an influence on proprioception.

  17. Does taping in addition to physiotherapy improve the outcomes in subacromial impingement syndrome? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracoglu, Ismail; Emuk, Yusuf; Taspinar, Ferruh

    2018-04-01

    Taping is used with or without other interventions for many purposes, especially to manage pain and improve functional activity in patients with shoulder pain. The aim of this review was to determine whether any taping technique in addition to physiotherapy care is more effective than physiotherapy care alone in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome. A systematic search of Cochrane Database of Systematic Review, MEDLINE (EBSCO), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), CINAHL (EBSCO), PUBMED, AMED, EMBASE (OVID), The Kinesio Kinesio® Taping Method, Kinesio® Tex Tape UK and International websites ( www.kinesiotaping.co.uk ; www.kinesiotaping.com ) was conducted to June 2015. The outcome measures were pain, disability, range of motion and muscle strength. As data were not suitable for meta-analysis, narrative synthesis were applied. Three randomized controlled trials and one controlled trial (135 patients) were included. The results were conflicting and weak on the effectiveness of taping as an adjunct therapy for improvement of pain, disability, range of motion and muscle strength. Clinical taping in addition to physiotherapy interventions (e.g. exercise, electrotherapy, and manual therapy) might be an optional modality for managing patients with shoulder impingement syndrome, especially for the initial stage of the treatment; however, we need further robust, placebo controlled and consistent studies to prove whether it is more effective than physiotherapy interventions without taping.

  18. Does acromioplasty result in favorable clinical and radiologic outcomes in the management of chronic subacromial pain syndrome? A double-blinded randomized clinical trial with 9 to 14 years' follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolk, Arjen; Thomassen, Bregje J W; Hund, Hajo; de Witte, Pieter Bas; Henkus, Hans-Erik; Wassenaar, Willem G; van Arkel, Ewoud R A; Nelissen, Rob G H H

    2017-08-01

    The treatment effect of acromioplasty for chronic subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS) on long-term shoulder function and rotator cuff deterioration has still to be determined. This study aimed to determine the long-term clinical and radiologic treatment effect of arthroscopic acromioplasty in patients with chronic SAPS. In this double-blind, randomized clinical trial, 56 patients with chronic SAPS (median age, 47 years; age range, 31-60 years) were randomly allocated to arthroscopic bursectomy alone or to bursectomy combined with acromioplasty and were followed up for a median of 12 years. The primary outcome was the Constant score. Secondary outcomes included the Simple Shoulder Test, visual analog scale (VAS) for pain, VAS for shoulder functionality, and rotator cuff integrity assessed with magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound. A total of 43 patients (77%) were examined at a median of 12 years' follow-up. Intention-to-treat analysis at 12 years' follow-up did not show a significant additional treatment effect of acromioplasty on bursectomy alone in improvement in Constant score (5 points; 95% confidence interval, -5.1 to 15.6), Simple Shoulder Test score, VAS score for pain, or VAS score for shoulder function. The prevalence of rotator cuff tears was not significantly different between the bursectomy group (17%) and acromioplasty group (10%). There were no relevant additional effects of arthroscopic acromioplasty on bursectomy alone with respect to clinical outcomes and rotator cuff integrity at 12 years' follow-up. These findings bring the effectiveness of acromioplasty into question and may support the idea of a more conservative approach in the initial treatment of SAPS. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of corticosteroid injections versus physiotherapy on pain, shoulder range of motion and shoulder function in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlette Burger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS is one of the most common causes of shoulder pain. Limited research has been conducted into the efficacy of corticosteroid injections (CSIs compared to physiotherapy in the management of SIS.Objective: To critically appraise and establish the best available evidence for the effectiveness of CSI in comparison with physiotherapy for the management of pain, shoulder range of motion (ROM and shoulder function in patients with SIS.Methodology:  Seven databases were searched from inception to February 2016, namely PubMed, Science Direct, EBSCO Host: SPORTDiscus, EBSCO Host: CINAHL, Cochrane, Scopus and PEDro. The main search terms were shoulder impingement syndrome and/or subacromial impingement syndrome, corticosteroid injections and/or steroid injections, physical therapy and/or physiotherapy. Only randomised controlled trials (RCTs were considered for inclusion. The articles were appraised according to the PEDro scale. The Revman© Review Manager Software was used to combine the results of shoulder function and the data were illustrated in forest plots.Results: The PEDro scores of the three RCTs that qualified for this review ranged from 7 to 8/10. There is Level II evidence suggesting that besides a significant improvement in shoulder function in favour of CSI at 6–7 weeks follow-up (p < 0.0001, no evidence was found for the superiority of CSIs compared with physiotherapy for pain, ROM and shoulder function in the short- (1–3 months, mid- (6 months and long term (12 months.Conclusion: In patients with SIS only a short term significant improvement in shoulder function was found in favour of CSIs.

  20. A randomized clinical study of the heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for the treatment of pain associated with shoulder impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radnovich R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Richard Radnovich,1 Jeremiah Trudeau,2 Arnold R Gammaitoni3 1Injury Care Medical Center, Boise, ID, USA; 2Analgesic Solutions, Natick, MA, USA; 3Nuvo Research Inc., West Chester, PA, USA Background: Treatment for pain due to shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS typically begins conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy and can include subacromial injection of corticosteroids, particularly in patients unresponsive to conservative measures. The heated lidocaine/tetracaine (HLT patch has been reported to reduce SIS pain in a small case series. Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, open-label clinical trial in which adult patients with SIS pain lasting at least 14 days, with an average intensity of ≥4 on a 0–10 scale (0= no pain, 10= worst pain were randomized to treatment with the HLT patch or a single subacromial injection of triamcinolone acetonide (10 mg. Patients in the HLT patch group applied a single HLT patch to the shoulder for 4 hours twice daily, with a 12-hour interval between treatments during the first 14 days, and could continue to use the patch on an as-needed basis (up to twice daily during the second 14-day period. No treatment was allowed in the final 14-day period. At baseline and at days 14, 28, and 42, patients rated their pain and pain interference with specific activities (0–10 scale. Results: Sixty patients enrolled in the study (average age =51 years, range 18–75, n=21 female. Average pain scores declined from 6.0±1.6 at baseline to 3.5±2.4 at day 42 in the HLT patch group (n=29, P<0.001 and from 5.6±1.2 to 3.2±2.6 in the injection group (n=31, P<0.001. Similar improvements were seen in each group for worst pain; pain interference with general activity, work, or sleep; and range of motion. No significant between-group differences were seen for any pain or pain interference scores at any time point. Conclusion: These results suggest that short-term, noninvasive treatment

  1. A double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of subacromial injection with corticosteroid versus NSAID in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyong Su; St Pierre, Patrick; Ryan, Paul M; Marchant, Bryant G; Wilson, Christopher J; Arrington, Edward D

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of subacromial injection of triamcinolone compared to injection of ketorolac in the treatment of external shoulder impingement syndrome. Thirty-two patients diagnosed with external shoulder impingement syndrome were included in this double-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial. Each patient was randomized into the steroid group or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) group. The steroid syringe contained 40 mg triamcinolone; and the NSAID syringe contained 60 mg ketorolac. Each patient was evaluated in terms of arc of motion, visual analog scale (VAS) for evaluating pain, and the UCLA (The University of California at Los Angeles) shoulder rating scale. At 1 month follow-up, both treatment arms resulted in increased range of motion and decreased pain. The steroid group decreased in active abduction while the NSAID group increased (steroid: 134°, NSAID: 151°, P = .03). The mean improvement in the UCLA shoulder rating scale at 4 weeks was 7.15 for the NSAID group and 2.13 for the steroid group (P = .03). Subgroup analysis of the UCLA scale demonstrated an increase in both forward flexion strength (P = .04) and patient satisfaction (P = .03) in the NSAID group. No significant difference could be seen in all other outcome measures. In this study, an injection of ketorolac resulted in greater improvements in the UCLA shoulder rating scale than an injection of triamcinolone at 4 weeks follow-up. While both triamcinolone and ketorolac are effective in the treatment of isolated subacromial impingement, ketorolac appears to have equivalent if not superior efficacy; all the while decreasing patient exposure to the potential side-effects of corticosteroids. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  2. Immediate changes in pressure pain sensitivity after thoracic spinal manipulative therapy in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardouni, Joseph R; Shaffer, Scott W; Pidcoe, Peter E; Finucane, Sheryl D; Cheatham, Seth A; Michener, Lori A

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic SMT can improve symptoms in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. However, at this time the mechanisms of SMT are not well established. It is possible that changes in pain sensitivity may occur following SMT. To assess the immediate pain response in patients with shoulder pain following thoracic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) using pressure pain threshold (PPT), and to assess the relationship of change in pain sensitivity to patient-rated outcomes of pain and function following treatment. Randomized Controlled Study. Subjects with unilateral subacromial impingement syndrome (n = 45) were randomly assigned to receive treatment with thoracic SMT or sham thoracic SMT. PPT was measured at the painful shoulder (deltoid) and unaffected regions (contralateral deltoid and bilateral lower trapezius areas) immediately pre- and post-treatment. Patient-rated outcomes were pain (numeric pain rating scale - NPRS), function (Pennsylvania Shoulder Score - Penn), and global rating of change (GROC). There were no significant differences between groups in pre-to post-treatment changes in PPT (p ≥ 0.583) nor were there significant changes in PPT within either group (p ≥ 0.372) following treatment. NPRS, Penn and GROC improved across both groups (p < 0.001), but there were no differences between the groups (p ≥ 0.574). There were no differences in pressure pain sensitivity between participants receiving thoracic SMT versus sham thoracic SMT. Both groups had improved patient-rated pain and function within 24-48 h of treatment, but there was no difference in outcomes between the groups. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. SHORT‐TERM EFFECTS OF INSTRUMENT‐ASSISTED SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION ON PAIN FREE RANGE OF MOTION IN A WEIGHTLIFTER WITH SUBACROMIAL PAIN SYNDROME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Joseph Paul; Reynolds, Timothy James

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose While there is limited evidence supporting the use of soft tissue mobilization techniques for Subacromial Pain Syndrome (SAPS), synonymous with subacromial impingement syndrome, previous studies have reported successful outcomes using soft tissue mobilization as a treatment technique. The purpose of this case report is to document the results of Instrument‐Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM) for the treatment of SAPS. Case Description Diagnosis was reached based on the subject's history, tenderness to palpation, and four out of five positive tests in the diagnostic cluster. Treatment consisted of three visits where the IASTM technique was applied to the pectoral muscles as well as periscapular musculature followed by retesting pain‐free shoulder flexion active range of motion (AROM) and Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) during active shoulder flexion. Scapulothoracic mobilization and stretching were performed after AROM measurement. Outcomes The subject reported an NPRS of 0/10 and demonstrated improvements in pain free flexion AROM in each of the three treatment sessions post‐IASTM: 85 ° to 181 °, 110 ° to 171 °, and 163 ° to 174 ° with some carryover in pain reduction and pain free AROM to the next treatment. Through three treatments, DASH score improved by 17.34%, Penn Shoulder Score improved 29%, worst NPRS decreased from 4/10 to 0/10, and a GROC score of 6. Discussion IASTM may have a beneficial acute effect on pain free shoulder flexion. In conjunction with scapulothoracic mobilizations and stretching, IASTM may improve function, decrease pain, and improve patient satisfaction. While this technique will not ameliorate the underlying pathomechanics contributing to SAPS, it may serve as a valuable tool to restore ROM and decrease pain allowing the patient to reap the full benefits of a multi‐modal treatment approach. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:28217425

  4. SHORT-TERM EFFECTS OF INSTRUMENT-ASSISTED SOFT TISSUE MOBILIZATION ON PAIN FREE RANGE OF MOTION IN A WEIGHTLIFTER WITH SUBACROMIAL PAIN SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coviello, Joseph Paul; Kakar, Rumit Singh; Reynolds, Timothy James

    2017-02-01

    While there is limited evidence supporting the use of soft tissue mobilization techniques for Subacromial Pain Syndrome (SAPS), synonymous with subacromial impingement syndrome, previous studies have reported successful outcomes using soft tissue mobilization as a treatment technique. The purpose of this case report is to document the results of Instrument-Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM) for the treatment of SAPS. Diagnosis was reached based on the subject's history, tenderness to palpation, and four out of five positive tests in the diagnostic cluster. Treatment consisted of three visits where the IASTM technique was applied to the pectoral muscles as well as periscapular musculature followed by retesting pain-free shoulder flexion active range of motion (AROM) and Numerical Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) during active shoulder flexion. Scapulothoracic mobilization and stretching were performed after AROM measurement. The subject reported an NPRS of 0/10 and demonstrated improvements in pain free flexion AROM in each of the three treatment sessions post-IASTM: 85 ° to 181 °, 110 ° to 171 °, and 163 ° to 174 ° with some carryover in pain reduction and pain free AROM to the next treatment. Through three treatments, DASH score improved by 17.34%, Penn Shoulder Score improved 29%, worst NPRS decreased from 4/10 to 0/10, and a GROC score of 6. IASTM may have a beneficial acute effect on pain free shoulder flexion. In conjunction with scapulothoracic mobilizations and stretching, IASTM may improve function, decrease pain, and improve patient satisfaction. While this technique will not ameliorate the underlying pathomechanics contributing to SAPS, it may serve as a valuable tool to restore ROM and decrease pain allowing the patient to reap the full benefits of a multi-modal treatment approach. 5.

  5. Effects of Low-Load Exercise on Postneedling-Induced Pain After Dry Needling of Active Trigger Point in Individuals With Subacromial Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Jiménez-Gómez, Laura; Gómez-Ahufinger, Victoria; Palacios-Ceña, María; Arias-Buría, José L; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2017-05-05

    The application of dry needling usually is associated with postneedling-induced pain. A postneedling intervention reduce this adverse event is needed. To determine the effectiveness of low-load exercise on reducing postneedling-induced pain after dry needling of active trigger points (TrPs) in the infraspinatus muscle in subacromial pain syndrome. A 72-hour follow-up, single-blind randomized controlled trial. Urban hospitals. Individuals with subacromial pain syndrome (n = 90, 52% female, mean age: 35 ± 13 years) with active TrPs in the infraspinatus muscle. All individuals received dry needling into the infraspinatus active TrP. Then, they were divided randomly into an experimental group, which received a single bout of low-load exercise of shoulder muscles; a placebo group, which received inactive ultrasound for 10 minutes; and a control group, which did not receive any intervention. Numerical Pain Rating Scale (0-10 point) was administered postneedling, immediately postintervention (2 minutes), and 24, 48, and 72 hours after needling. Shoulder pain (Numerical Pain Rating Scale, 0-10) and disability (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand; Shoulder Pain and Disability Index) were assessed before and 72 hour after needling. The 5 × 3 analysis of covariance showed that the exercise group demonstrated a larger decrease in postneedling-induced pain immediately after (P = .001), 24 hours (P = .001), and 48 hours after (P = .006) than placebo or control groups. No differences were found at 72 hours (P = .03). Similar improvements in shoulder pain (P needling, irrespective of the treatment group. Low-load exercise was effective for reducing postneedling-induced pain on active TrPs in the infraspinatus muscle 24 and 48 hours after needling. The application of a postneedling intervention did not influence short-term pain and disability changes. To be determined. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc

  6. A randomized clinical study of the heated lidocaine/tetracaine patch versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for the treatment of pain associated with shoulder impingement syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radnovich, Richard; Trudeau, Jeremiah; Gammaitoni, Arnold R

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment for pain due to shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) typically begins conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy and can include subacromial injection of corticosteroids, particularly in patients unresponsive to conservative measures. The heated lidocaine/tetracaine (HLT) patch has been reported to reduce SIS pain in a small case series. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, open-label clinical trial in which adult patients with SIS pain lasting at least 14 days, with an average intensity of ≥4 on a 0–10 scale (0= no pain, 10= worst pain) were randomized to treatment with the HLT patch or a single subacromial injection of triamcinolone acetonide (10 mg). Patients in the HLT patch group applied a single HLT patch to the shoulder for 4 hours twice daily, with a 12-hour interval between treatments during the first 14 days, and could continue to use the patch on an as-needed basis (up to twice daily) during the second 14-day period. No treatment was allowed in the final 14-day period. At baseline and at days 14, 28, and 42, patients rated their pain and pain interference with specific activities (0–10 scale). Results Sixty patients enrolled in the study (average age =51 years, range 18–75, n=21 female). Average pain scores declined from 6.0±1.6 at baseline to 3.5±2.4 at day 42 in the HLT patch group (n=29, P<0.001) and from 5.6±1.2 to 3.2±2.6 in the injection group (n=31, P<0.001). Similar improvements were seen in each group for worst pain; pain interference with general activity, work, or sleep; and range of motion. No significant between-group differences were seen for any pain or pain interference scores at any time point. Conclusion These results suggest that short-term, noninvasive treatment with the HLT patch has similar efficacy to subacromial corticosteroid injections for the treatment of pain associated with SIS. PMID:25525385

  7. Shoulder function and work disability after decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomised controlled trial of physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Susanne W; Christiansen, David H; Haahr, Jens Peder; Andrea, Linda C; Frost, Poul

    2014-06-21

    Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome is often performed in working age and postoperative physiotherapy exercises are widely used to help restore function. A recent Danish study showed that 10% of a nationwide cohort of patients retired prematurely within two years after surgery. Few studies have compared effects of different postoperative exercise programmes on shoulder function, and no studies have evaluated workplace-oriented interventions to reduce postoperative work disability. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance compared with usual care in improving shoulder function and reducing postoperative work disability after arthroscopic subacromial decompression. The study is a mainly pragmatic multicentre randomised controlled trial. The trial is embedded in a cohort study of shoulder patients referred to public departments of orthopaedic surgery in Central Denmark Region. Patients aged ≥18-≤63 years, who still have shoulder symptoms 8-12 weeks after surgery, constitute the study population. Around 130 participants are allocated to: 1) physiotherapy exercises, 2) occupational medical assistance, 3) physiotherapy exercises and occupational medical assistance, and 4) usual care. Intervention manuals allow individual tailoring. Primary outcome measures include Oxford Shoulder Score and sickness absence due to symptoms from the operated shoulder. Randomisation is computerised with allocation concealment by randomly permuted block sizes. Statistical analyses will primarily be performed according to the intention-to-treat principle. The paper presents the rationale, design, methods, and operational aspects of the Shoulder Intervention Project (SIP). SIP evaluates a new rehabilitation approach, where physiotherapy and occupational interventions are provided in continuity of surgical episodes of care. If successful, the project may serve as a model for rehabilitation of surgical shoulder

  8. The effect of interferential current therapy on patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazligul, Tuba; Akpinar, Pinar; Aktas, Ilknur; Unlu Ozkan, Feyza; Cagliyan Hartevioglu, Hulya

    2017-09-11

    Although interferential current (IFC) is a common electrotherapeutic modality used to treat musculoskeletal pain, there is not any randomized controlled trial investigating its clinical efficacy in subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS). Investigation of effectiveness of IFC treatment in patients with SAIS. Randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study. Physical medicine and rehabilitation outpatient clinic. Patients (n=65) between 25 and 65 years of age, with a diagnosis of SAIS according to clinical evaluation and subacromial injection test. Patients were randomly distributed into two groups: 1) active IFC group (n=33); 2) sham IFC group (n=32). Exercise, cryotherapy, and a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) were given to both groups. Ten sessions of IFC with bipolar method were applied to the active IFC group daily 20 minutes per session, 5 days per week, for 2 weeks while sham IFC was applied to the sham IFC group with the same protocol. Visual analog scale (VAS), Constant scores, and Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ) were used for evaluation at baseline, immediately post-treatment, and 1 month post-treatment. Both the patients and the researcher who assessed the outcomes were blinded to the treatment protocol throughout the study period. Sixty of the 65 patients (active IFC group n=30, sham IFC group n=30) completed the study, 3 patients from active IFC, 2 from sham IFC group dropped during the follow up period. Statistically significant improvement was observed in all parameters of both groups immediately and 1 month post-treatment (p0.05). Our results demonstrated that IFC therapy does not provide additional benefit to NSAID, cryotherapy, and exercise program in treatment of SAIS. Our study responds to the needs of the lack of evidence in the field of rehabilitation. IFC therapy does not provide additional benefit for the treatment of SAIS.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of exercise therapy after corticosteroid injection for moderate to severe shoulder pain due to subacromial impingement syndrome: a trial-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowett, Sue; Crawshaw, Dickon P; Helliwell, Philip S; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Hay, Elaine M; Conaghan, Philip G

    2013-08-01

    To perform a cost-effectiveness analysis of subacromial corticosteroid injection combined with exercise compared with exercise alone in patients with moderate to severe shoulder pain from subacromial impingement syndrome. A within-trial cost-effectiveness analysis with 232 patients randomized to physiotherapy-led injection combined with exercise (n = 115) or exercise alone (n = 117). The analysis was from a health care perspective with 24-week follow-up. Resource use information was collected from all patients on interventions, medication, primary and secondary care contacts, private health care use and over-the-counter purchases. The measure of outcome was quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), calculated from EQ-5D responses at baseline and three further time points. An incremental cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted. Mean per patient NHS costs (£255 vs £297) and overall health care costs (£261 vs £318) were lower in the injection plus exercise arm, but this difference was not statistically significant. Total QALYs gained were very similar in the two trial arms (0.3514 vs 0.3494 QALYs), although slightly higher in the injection plus exercise arm, indicating that injection plus exercise may be the dominant treatment option. At a willingness to pay of £20,000 per additional QALY gained, there was a 61% probability that injection plus exercise was the most cost-effective option. Injection plus exercise delivered by therapists may be a cost-effective use of resources compared with exercise alone and lead to lower health care costs and less time off work. International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number Register, http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/, ISRCT 25817033.

  10. Effectiveness of Standardized Physiotherapy Exercises for Patients With Difficulty Returning to Usual Activities After Decompression Surgery for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Frost, Poul; Falla, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    was to evaluate the effectiveness at 3 and 12 months of a standardized physical therapy exercise intervention compared with usual care in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after subacromial decompression surgery. DESIGN: A multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted. SETTING......: The study was conducted in 6 public departments of orthopedic surgery, 2 departments of occupational medicine, and 2 physical therapy training centers in Central Denmark Region. PATIENTS: One hundred twenty-six patients reporting difficulty returning to usual activities at the postoperative clinical follow...... outcome measures. LIMITATIONS: The nature of the exercise intervention did not allow blinding of patients and care providers. CONCLUSION: The standardized physical therapy exercise intervention resulted in statistically significant and clinically relevant improvement in shoulder pain and function at 12...

  11. Intra and inter-examiner reliability of the subacromial impingement index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Carlos Eduardo Sala; Ferreira, Felipe Varella; Carvalho Sposito, Guilherme de; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani de [University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto School of Medicine, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2010-01-15

    The present study aimed to assess the reliability of intra and inter-examiner subacromial impingement index (SII) measures obtained from radiographs. Thirty-six individuals were enrolled and divided into two groups: control group, composed of 18 volunteers in good general health without shoulder problems, and a group of 18 patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). Radiographic images were taken with the dominant upper limb in neutral rotation, while the volunteers held their arm at 90 of abduction in the frontal plane. The beam of radiation at 30 craniocaudal inclination was used to provide an antero-posterior image view. Three blinded examiners each performed three measurements from the subacromial space (SS) and the anatomical neck of the humerus (NH). The SII was calculated as the ratio of the SS and the NH measures. The mean values of SII were compared using t-tests. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess intra- and inter-examiner reliability of the measures. The mean values of SII were greater for the control group (0.12) than for the SIS group (0.08; p = 0.0071). SII measurements showed excellent intra (0.96-0.99) and inter-examiner reliability (0.94) for both the control and SIS group. The results of this study show the potential use of the SII; a greater mean value for the control group compared to the SIS group and excellent reliability for intra- and inter-examiner measurement. Validation studies of the index should be conducted to correlate the index with clinical findings from subacromial impingement syndrome. (orig.)

  12. Kazuistika fyzioterapeutické péče o pacienta s diagnózou syndrom rotátorové manžety

    OpenAIRE

    Janatová, Klára

    2014-01-01

    Title: Case study of physiotherapy care of a patient diagnosed with rotator cuff syndrome. Objectives: Summary of theoretical knowledge of the rotator cuff conditions and their treatment using physical therapy. Case study of a patient diagnosed with rotator cuff syndrome. Methods: The general part covers conditions of the rotator cuff, the impingement syndrome and physiotherapy methods used in pathology of the subacromial space. It also includes anatomy, kinesiology and biomechanics of the sh...

  13. Clinical and radiological outcome of conservative vs. surgical treatment of atraumatic degenerative rotator cuff rupture : design of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerspink, Frederik O. Lambers; Hoogeslag, Roy A. G.; Diercks, Ron L.; van Eerden, Pepijn J. M.; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Subacromial impingement syndrome is a frequently observed disorder in orthopedic practice. Lasting symptoms and impairment may occur when a subsequent atraumatic rotator cuff rupture is also present. However, degenerative ruptures of the rotator cuff can also be observed in asymptomatic

  14. Responsiveness and minimal important change of the Norwegian version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH) in patients with subacromial pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysstad, Tarjei; Røe, Yngve; Haldorsen, Benjamin; Svege, Ida; Strand, Liv Inger

    2017-06-08

    The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH) is a valid and reliable patient-reported outcome measure (PROM). It was designed to measure physical disability and symptoms in patients with musculoskeletal disorders of the upper extremity, and is one of the most commonly used PROMs for patients with shoulder pain. The aim of this study was to examine responsiveness, the smallest detectable change (SDC) and the minimal important change (MIC) of the DASH, in line with international (COSMIN) recommendations. The study sample consisted of 50 patients with subacromial pain syndrome, undergoing physical therapy for 3-4 months. Responsiveness to change was examined by calculating area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) and testing a priori-formulated hypothesis regarding correlations with changes in other instruments that measuring the same construct. The SDC was calculated using a test re-test protocol, and the MIC was calculated by the anchor-based MIC distribution. MIC values for patients with low and high baseline scores were also calculated. DASH appeared to be responsive, as it was able to distinguish patients who reported to be improved from those unchanged (AUC 0.77). All of the hypotheses were accepted. The SDC was 11.8, and the MIC was 4.4. This study shows that the Norwegian version of the DASH has good responsiveness to change and may thus be recommended to measure outcome in patients with shoulder pain in Norway.

  15. Effectiveness of microwave diathermy on pain, functional capacity, muscle strength, quality of life, and depression in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: a randomized placebo-controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Yesim; Ulus, Yasemin; Durmus, Dilek; Canturk, Ferhan; Bilgici, Ayhan; Kuru, Omer; Bek, Yuksel

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic MD on pain, functional capacity, muscle strength, quality of life, and depression in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS). A total of 40 inpatient subjects with definite SIS were included in this study. These patients were sequentially randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 (n = 20) received therapeutic MD. Group 2 (n = 20) was served as control group and received sham MD. Superficial heat and exercise program were given to both groups. Both of the programs were performed 5 times weekly for 3 weeks. Patients were assessed before treatment (BT), after treatment (AT), and at a 1-month follow-up (F). Outcome measures included visual analogue scale, goniometry, Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, shoulder isokinetic muscle testing, handgrip strength, Short Form 36, and Beck Depression Index. The patients with SIS in each group had significant improvements in pain, shoulder ROM, disability, shoulder muscles and grip strength, quality of life, and depression AT and F when compared with their initial status (P 0.05). A 2,450-MHz MD regimen showed no beneficial effects in patients with SIS, so the superficial heat and exercise program, as it is efficient, may be preferable for the treatment of SIS, alone.

  16. Comparison of virtual reality exergaming and home exercise programs in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome and scapular dyskinesis: Short term effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekyavas, Nihan Ozunlu; Ergun, Nevin

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the short term effects of home exercise program and virtual reality exergaming in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS). A total of 30 patients with SAIS were randomized into two groups which are Home Exercise Program (EX Group) (mean age: 40.6 ± 11.7 years) and Virtual Reality Exergaming Program (WII Group) (mean age: 40.33 ± 13.2 years). Subjects were assessed at the first session, at the end of the treatment (6 weeks) and at 1 month follow-up. The groups were assessed and compared with Visual Analogue Scale (based on rest, activity and night pain), Neer and Hawkins Tests, Scapular Retraction Test (SRT), Scapular Assistance Test (SAT), Lateral Scapular Slide Test (LSST) and shoulder disability (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI)). Intensity of pain was significantly decreased in both groups with the treatment (p < 0.05). The WII Group had significantly better results for all Neer test, SRT and SAT than the EX Group (p < 0.05). Virtual reality exergaming programs with these programs were found more effective than home exercise programs at short term in subjects with SAIS. Level I, Therapeutic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. LIPOMA ARBORESCENS: RARE CASE OF ROTATOR CUFF TEAR ASSOCIATED WITH THE PRESENCE OF LIPOMA ARBORESCENS IN THE SUBACROMIAL-SUBDELTOID AND GLENOHUMERAL BURSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benegas, Eduardo; Neto, Arnaldo Amado Ferreiro; Teodoro, Daniel Sabatini; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius Muriano; de Oliveira, Augusto Medaglia; Filippi, Renée Zon; de Santis Prada, Flávia

    2012-01-01

    Lipoma arborescens is a rare intra-articular disease that is usually monoarticular and is characterized by extensive proliferation of the synovial villi and hyperplasia of the subsynovial fat. The synovial tissue is progressively replaced by mature fat cells in the synovial membrane. The present study reports a case of a rare condition of lipoma arborescens that was simultaneously intra-articular (glenohumeral joint) and in the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, in association with a torn supraspinatus tendon. The clinical, histological and radiographic presentations and treatment are discussed here. The description of this case includes radiographic and magnetic resonance evaluations and pathological examination. Although lipoma arborescens is a rare condition, it should be taken into consideration in cases presenting synovial hyperproliferation and synovial fat replacement.

  18. PERBANDINGAN ANTARA KOMBINASI LATIHAN STABILISASI BAHU DAN TRAKSI HUMERUS KE INFERIOR DENGAN KOMBINASI LATIHAN FUNGSIONAL BAHU DAN TRAKSI HUMERUS KE INFERIOR DALAM MENURUNKAN DISABILITAS BAHU DAN LENGAN PADA SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME MAHASISWA AKAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawaddah -

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder impingement causing interference on the motion of the shoulder joint activities and result in functional activity disorder. These injuries usually are caused by faulty movement, overuse, poor posture, occupational factors and trauma. This will cause a burden on one part of the body and cause imbalances in anatomy, which will eventually lead to disruption of the body that experienced work. This study aimed to investigate the effect of functional shoulder exercise and traction humerus to inferior with shoulder stabilization exercises and traction humerus to inferior to the decline in the shoulder and arm disabilities in subacromial impingement syndrome. This research method was experimental clinical trials with pre test and post test group design. Population student Academy Physiotherapy Widya Husada Semarang, which consists of 3 men and 12 women, aged between 18-21 years, divided into two groups. Group I was given Shoulder Stabilization exercises and Traction humerus to Inferior (n=7 and group II Functional Shoulder Exercise and Traction humerus to Inferior (n=8. This research was conducted for 3 weeks. Measurement of the value of disability shoulder and arm by using the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI. The test results on the group I average value pre 34.17, SB = 6.31, and the average value of post 11.54, SB = 4.02, p = 0.001 found significant differences obtained test results paired sample t-test, and testing group II average value pre 40.18, SB = 3.53, and the average value of post 7.82, SB = 1.57, p = 0.001 found significant differences obtained test results paired sample t-test. Comparison of Group I and II, p = 0.005 there were significant differences, test results obtained independent sample t-test. Conclusions: The combination of shoulder stabilization exercises and traction humerus to inferior can reduce disability shoulder and arm on subacromial impingement syndrome. The combination functional shoulder exercise and

  19. Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1, CXCL12) is increased in subacromial bursitis and downregulated by steroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang-Soo; Bigliani, Louis U; Fujisawa, Motoyuki; Murakami, Koko; Chang, Seong-Sil; Lee, Hahn-Jun; Lee, Francis Y; Blaine, Theodore A

    2006-08-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that inflammation in the subacromial bursa is an important component in the pathogenesis of impingement syndrome. We have demonstrated in a previous study that many inflammatory cytokines, including stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1, CXCL12), are increased in the subacromial bursa [Blaine et al. 2005. J Shoulder Elbow Surg 14(Suppl 1):84S-89S]. SDF-1 is a potent chemotactic and angiogenic factor that stimulates recruitment of inflammatory cells. In the current study, we proposed that the resident cells in subacromial bursal tissue produce SDF-1, which can play a role in the inflammatory reponse of bursal tissue, and that this chemokine can be regulated by steroid (dexamethasone) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs). Twenty-two subacromial bursa tissues (18 bursitis and 4 normal bursa) were obtained intraoperatively from patients during shoulder surgery and analyzed using the cDNA Array technique in accordance with an IRB approved protocol. cDNA array results were confirmed with real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Bursal cells (from 4 normal bursa, 3 bursitis) and two normal bone marrow with whole tissue explants were cultured for one passage. Cell culture supernatants were collected and SDF-1 protein was detected with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cultured bursal cells were treated with a COX-2 inhibitor and dexamethasone, and cells was harvested at 1-day and 4-day intervals. SDF-1 expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. cDNA Array analysis demonstrated that the gene expression of SDF-1 was increased in patients with subacromial bursitis compared to controls (p bursitis tissue is increased 10-fold over control tissue. While the normal bursal cells produced negligible amounts of SDF-1 protein, cultured cells derived from bursitis lesion released as much SDF-1 protein (235 pg/100,000 cells) as normal bone marrow stromal cells (283 pg/100,000 cells) as

  20. Diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of sub-coracoacromial spurs causing subacromial impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nörenberg, Dominik; Armbruster, Marco; Bender, Yi-Na; Walter, Thula; Ebersberger, Hans U; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd; Ockert, Ben; Makowski, Marcus R

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the potential of susceptibility-weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging (SWMR) for the detection of sub-coracoacromial spurs in patients with clinically suspected subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS), compared to standard MR-sequences and radiographs. Forty-four patients with suspected SAIS were included. All patients underwent radiography, standard MRI of the shoulder and SWMR. Radiograph-based identification of sub-coracoacromial spurs served as goldstandard. Radiographs identified twenty-three spurs in twenty-three patients. Twenty-one patients without spur formation served as reference group. Detection rate, sensitivity/specificity and interobserver-agreements were calculated. Linear regression was applied to determine the relationship between size measurements on radiographs and MRI. Detection rates for spurs on standard MRI and SWMR were 47.8 % and 91.3 % compared to radiography (pStandard MR-sequences achieved a sensitivity of 47.8 % (CI=0.185-0.775) and a specificity of 80.8 % (CI=0.642-0.978). Size measurements between SWMR and radiography showed a good correlation (R2=0.75;pstandard MRI (R2=0.24;psuperior to standard MR-sequences using radiography as goldstandard. • SWMR has the potential to reliably identify sub-coracoacromial spurs without radiation exposure. • SWMR provides comparable detection rates to conventional radiography for sub-coracoacromial spur formation. • SWMR yields higher detection rates compared to standard-MR regarding sub-coracoacromial spur formation. • SWMR can be implemented in routine shoulder MRI protocols.

  1. One-year outcome of subacromial corticosteroid injection compared with manual physical therapy for the management of the unilateral shoulder impingement syndrome: a pragmatic randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhon, Daniel I; Boyles, Robert B; Cleland, Joshua A

    2014-08-05

    Corticosteroid injections (CSIs) and physical therapy are used to treat patients with the shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) but have never been directly compared. To compare the effectiveness of 2 common nonsurgical treatments for SIS. Randomized, single-blind, comparative-effectiveness, parallel-group trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01190891). Military hospital-based outpatient clinic in the United States. 104 patients aged 18 to 65 years with unilateral SIS between June 2010 and March 2012. Random assignment into 2 groups: 40-mg triamcinolone acetonide subacromial CSI versus 6 sessions of manual physical therapy. The primary outcome was change in Shoulder Pain and Disability Index scores at 1 year. Secondary outcomes included the Global Rating of Change scores, the Numeric Pain Rating Scale scores, and 1-year health care use. Both groups demonstrated approximately 50% improvement in Shoulder Pain and Disability Index scores maintained through 1 year; however, the mean difference between groups was not significant (1.5% [95% CI, -6.3% to 9.4%]). Both groups showed improvements in Global Rating of Change scale and pain rating scores, but between-group differences in scores for the Global Rating of Change scale (0 [CI, -2 to 1]) and pain rating (0.4 [CI, -0.5 to 1.2]) were not significant. During the 1-year follow-up, patients receiving CSI had more SIS-related visits to their primary care provider (60% vs. 37%) and required additional steroid injections (38% vs. 20%), and 19% needed physical therapy. Transient pain from the CSI was the only adverse event reported. The study occurred at 1 center with patients referred to physical therapy. Both groups experienced significant improvement. The manual physical therapy group used less 1-year SIS-related health care resources than the CSI group. Cardon Rehabilitation Products through the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists.

  2. Risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to neck-shoulder complaints and occupational biomechanical exposures: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Dalbøge, Annett; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Thomsen, Jane Frølund; Frost, Poul

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to evaluate the risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) in relation to neck-shoulder complaints and occupational biomechanical shoulder exposures. The study was based on the Musculoskeletal Research Database at the Danish Ramazzini Centre. We linked baseline questionnaire information from 1993-2004 on neck-shoulder complaints, job titles, psychosocial work factors, body mass index, and smoking with register information on first-time surgery for SIS from 1996-2008. Biomechanical exposure measures were obtained from a job exposure matrix based on expert judgment. We applied multivariable Cox regression. During 280 125 person-years of follow-up among 37 402 persons, 557 first-time operations for SIS occurred. Crude surgery rates increased from 1.1 to 2.5 per 1000 person-years with increasing shoulder load. Using no neck-shoulder complaints and low shoulder load at baseline as a reference, no neck-shoulder complaints and high shoulder load showed an adjusted hazard ratio (HR(adj)) of 2.55 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.59-4.09], while neck-shoulder complaints in combination with high shoulder load showed an HR(adj) of 4.52 (95% CI 2.87-7.13). Subanalyses based on 18 856 persons showed an HR(adj) of 5.40 (95% CI 2.88-10.11) for complaints located specifically in the shoulder in combination with high shoulder load. Based on these findings, persons with neck-shoulder and especially shoulder complaints in combination with high shoulder load seem an obvious target group for interventions aimed at reducing exposures to prevent surgery for SIS.

  3. Diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of sub-coracoacromial spurs causing subacromial impingement syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik; Armbruster, Marco [Munich University Hospitals Campus Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Bender, Yi-Na; Walter, Thula; Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Ockert, Ben [Munich University Hospitals Campus Grosshadern, Department of Trauma and Orthopedic Surgery, Shoulder and Elbow Service, Munich (Germany); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate the potential of susceptibility-weighted-magnetic-resonance-imaging (SWMR) for the detection of sub-coracoacromial spurs in patients with clinically suspected subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS), compared to standard MR-sequences and radiographs. Forty-four patients with suspected SAIS were included. All patients underwent radiography, standard MRI of the shoulder and SWMR. Radiograph-based identification of sub-coracoacromial spurs served as goldstandard. Radiographs identified twenty-three spurs in twenty-three patients. Twenty-one patients without spur formation served as reference group. Detection rate, sensitivity/specificity and interobserver-agreements were calculated. Linear regression was applied to determine the relationship between size measurements on radiographs and MRI. Detection rates for spurs on standard MRI and SWMR were 47.8 % and 91.3 % compared to radiography (p<0.001). SWMR demonstrated a sensitivity of 97.7 % (CI=0.92-1) and a specificity of 91.3 % (CI=0.788-1) for the identification of spurs. Standard MR-sequences achieved a sensitivity of 47.8 % (CI=0.185-0.775) and a specificity of 80.8 % (CI=0.642-0.978). Size measurements between SWMR and radiography showed a good correlation (R{sup 2}=0.75;p<0.0001), while overestimating lesion size (5.7±1.2 mm; 4.3±1.3 mm;p<0.0001). Interobserver-agreement for spurs was high on SWMR (R{sup 2}=0.74;p<0.0001), but low on standard MRI (R{sup 2}=0.24;p<0.0001). SWMR allows a reliable detection of sub-coracoacromial spur formation in patients with SAIS and is superior to standard MR-sequences using radiography as goldstandard. (orig.)

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of rotator cuff tears in shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freygant, Magdalena; Dziurzyńska-Białek, Ewa; Guz, Wiesław; Samojedny, Antoni; Gołofit, Andrzej; Kostkiewicz, Agnieszka; Terpin, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder joint is a common site of musculoskeletal pain caused, among other things, by rotator cuff tears due to narrowing of subacromial space, acute trauma or chronic shoulder overload. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent modality for imaging of soft tissues of the shoulder joint considering a possibility of multiplanar image acquisition and non-invasive nature of the study. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of partial and complete rotator cuff tears in magnetic resonance images of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and to review the literature on the causes and classification of rotator cuff tears. We retrospectively analyzed the results of 137 shoulder MRI examinations performed in 57 women and 72 men in Magnetic Resonance facility of the Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging at the St. Jadwiga the Queen Regional Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow between June 2010 and February 2013. Examinations were performed using Philips Achieva 1.5T device, including spin echo and gradient echo sequences with T1-, T2- and PD-weighted as well as fat saturation sequences in transverse, frontal and sagittal oblique planes. Patients were referred from hospital wards as well as from outpatient clinics of the subcarpathian province. The most frequently reported injuries included partial supraspinatus tendon tear and complete tearing most commonly involved the supraspinatus muscle tendon. The smallest group comprised patients with complete tear of subscapularis muscle tendon. Among 137 patients in the study population, 129 patients suffered from shoulder pain, including 57 patients who reported a history of trauma. There was 44% women and 56% men in a group of patients with shoulder pain. Posttraumatic shoulder pain was predominantly reported by men, while women comprised a larger group of patients with shoulder pain not preceded by injury. Rotator cuff injury is a very common pathology in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome

  5. Efficacy and safety of a subacromial continuous ropivacaine infusion for post-operative pain management following arthroscopic rotator cuff surgery: A protocol for a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Simon N

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major shoulder surgery often results in severe post-operative pain and a variety of interventions have been developed in an attempt to address this. The continuous slow infusion of a local anaesthetic directly into the operative site has recently gained popularity but it is expensive and as yet there is little conclusive evidence that it provides additional benefits over other methods of post-operative pain management. Methods/Design This will be a randomised, placebo-controlled trial involving 158 participants. Following diagnostic arthroscopy, all participants will undergo arthroscopic subacromial decompression with or without rotator cuff repair, all operations performed by a single surgeon. Participants, the surgeon, nurses caring for the patients and outcome assessors will be blinded to treatment allocation. All participants will receive a pre-incision bolus injection of 20 mls of ropivacaine 1% into the shoulder and an intra-operative intravenous bolus of parecoxib 40 mg. Using concealed allocation participants will be randomly assigned to active treatment (local anaesthetic ropivacaine 0.75% or placebo (normal saline administered continuously into the subacromial space by an elastomeric pump at 5 mls per hour post-operatively. Patient controlled opioid analgesia and oral analgesics will be available for breakthrough pain. Outcome assessment will be at 15, 30 and 60 minutes, 2, 4, 8, 12, 18 and 24 hours, and 2 or 4 months for decompression or decompression plus repair respectively. The primary end point will be average pain at rest over the first 12-hour post-operative period on a verbal analogue pain score. Secondary end points will be average pain at rest over the second 12-hour post-operative period, maximal pain at rest over the first and second 12-hour periods, amount of rescue medication used, length of inpatient stay and incidence of post-operative adhesive capsulitis. Discussion The results of this trial will

  6. Exercises versus arthroscopic decompression in patients with subacromial impingement: a randomised, controlled study in 90 cases with a one year follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, J. P.; Ostergaard, S.; Dalsgaard, J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the effect of graded physiotherapeutic training of the rotator cuff versus arthroscopic subacromial decompression in patients with subacromial impingement. METHODS: Randomised controlled trial with 12 months' follow up in a hospital setting. Ninety consecutive patients aged...... 18 to 55 years were enrolled. Symptom duration was between six months and three years. All fulfilled a set of diagnostic criteria for rotator cuff disease, including a positive impingement sign. Patients were randomised either to arthroscopic subacromial decompression, or to physiotherapy...

  7. "Pinching subacromial problems” - A clinical and biomechanical approach -

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Pieter Bas de

    2015-01-01

    The Subacromial Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is the most prevalent disorder of the shoulder in primary health care. Acromionplasty, as the main surgical treatment of SIS, is one of the most performed orthopedic surgeries. However, its results are highly variable. Possibly, there are different

  8. Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to occupational exposures, lifestyle factors and diabetes mellitus: a nationwide nested case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbøge, Annett; Frost, Poul; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Svendsen, Susanne Wulff

    2017-10-01

    To estimate the risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) in relation to occupational exposures, lifestyle factors and diabetes mellitus. We conducted a case-control study nested in a register-based cohort study of the Danish working population. For each of 3000 first-time cases of surgery for SIS, two age-matched and sex-matched controls were drawn. Cases and controls received a questionnaire on job history and other factors. Job histories were combined with a psychosocial job exposure matrix (JEM) and the updated Shoulder JEM, which provided exposure intensities on measurement scales. Ten-year cumulative exposures to upper arm elevation >90°, repetitive shoulder movements, forceful shoulder exertions and hand-arm vibrations (HAVs) were estimated. We used conditional logistic regression. There were 5396 persons (60%) who answered the questionnaire. For occupational mechanical exposures, the adjusted OR (ORadj) ranged from 1.9 (95% CI 1.5 to 2.5 for HAVs) to 2.5 (95% CI 1.9 to 3.5 for force) among men and 1.7 (95% CI 1.2 to 2.5 for HAVs) to 2.0 (95% CI 1.3 to 2.9 for force) among women. No statistically significant associations were found for occupational psychosocial factors. Body mass index (BMI) and pack-years of smoking showed ORadj up to 2.0. Diabetes mellitus showed ORadj of 1.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.2) for men and 2.2 (95% CI 1.4 to 3.4) for women. Our findings add to the evidence of an increased risk of surgery for SIS in relation to occupational cumulative mechanical exposures, even when an increased risk in relation to BMI, smoking and diabetes mellitus is taken into account. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Shoulder Retractor Strengthening Exercise to Minimize Rhomboid Muscle Activity and Subacromial Impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Jeremy; Mochizuki, George; Ismail, Farooq; Boulias, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the best position for shoulder retractor strengthening exercise to maximize middle trapezius activity and minimize rhomboid major activity. Although both trapezius and rhomboids are scapular retractors, rhomboids also act as downward rotators of the scapula, which can worsen subacromial impingement. Methods: Twelve healthy participants (age 30 [SD 6] y) with no history of shoulder pain were recruited for this study, which used fine-wire electromyography to examine maximal muscle activation of the middle trapezius and rhomboid major muscle fibres in four different positions: with the shoulder in 90° abduction with elbow completely extended and (1) shoulder internal rotation, (2) shoulder neutral rotation, (3) shoulder external rotation, and (4) rowing (shoulder neutral rotation and elbow flexed 90°). The ratio of trapezius to rhomboid muscles was compared with Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: Muscle activation ratio during shoulder retraction exercise was significantly lower by 22% (i.e., rhomboid was more active than middle trapezius) when performed with the shoulder in rowing position (elbow flexed) than with the shoulder in external rotation (elbow extended) position (p=0.031). All four positions produced coactivation of trapezius and rhomboids. Discussion: Rowing position may not be the best position for shoulder retractor strengthening in patients with impingement syndrome. The preferable position for maximizing middle trapezius activity and minimizing rhomboid activity may be shoulder external rotation with elbow extended. PMID:27504044

  10. Synovial osteochondromatosis in the subacromial bursa mimicking calcific tendinitis: sonographic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Kwon; Lee, Dae-Hee; Park, Jong-Hoon; Kim, Chul-Hwan; Jeong, Woong-Kyo

    2014-05-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is an idiopathic benign metaplasia of the synovial membrane rarely found in an extra-articular bursa. We describe the case of a 55-year-old woman with synovial osteochondromatosis in the subacromial bursa mimicking calcific tendinitis. Plain radiographs showed a radiopaque mass over the middle facet of the greater tuberosity, suggesting calcific tendinitis. Sonography, however, showed a loose body in the subacromial bursa, and no evidence of calcification inside the rotator cuff. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Differences in scapular orientation, subacromial space and shoulder pain between the full can and empty can tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Mark K; Lopes-Albers, Andrea Diniz; Borgsmiller, Lindsey; Zirker, Catherine; Ericksen, Jeff; Michener, Lori A

    2013-04-01

    The empty and full can arm positions are used as diagnostic tests and in therapeutic exercise programs for patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. The adverse effects of these arm positions on the rotator cuff have not been fully described. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the acromio-humeral distance, three-dimensional scapular position, and shoulder pain during maximum isometric contractions in the empty and full can arm positions. Subjects with subacromial impingement syndrome (n=28) and a matched control group without shoulder pain (n=28) participated. Acromio-humeral distance, scapular/clavicular positions and shoulder pain were measured during maximal isometric contractions in each position. No difference was found in acromio-humeral distance (P=0.314) between the arm positions or between the groups (P=0.598). The empty can position resulted in greater scapular upward rotation (Ppain in the EC position might be due to the lack of an association amongst the scapular positions rather than the deficiency of a single scapular motion. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Which shoulder motions cause subacromial impingement? Evaluating the vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament by ultrasound speckle tracking imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In; Lee, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Sung-Eun; Bae, Sung-Ho; Byun, Chu-Hwan; Kim, Yang-Soo

    2015-11-01

    Subacromial impingement is a common cause of shoulder pain and one cause of rotator cuff disease. We aimed to identify which shoulder motions cause subacromial impingement by measuring the vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament using ultrasound speckle tracking imaging. Sixteen shoulders without shoulder disability were enrolled. All subjects were men, and the average age was 28.6 years. The vertical displacement and peak strain of the coracoacromial ligament were analyzed by the motion tracing program during the following active assisted motions (active motion controlled by the examiner): (1) forward flexion in the scapular plane, (2) horizontal abduction in the axial plane, (3) external rotation with the arm at 0° abduction (ER0), (4) internal rotation with the arm at 0° abduction (IR0), (5) internal rotation with the arm at 90° abduction (IR90), and (6) internal rotation at the back (IRB). The mean vertical displacement of the coracoacromial ligament during forward flexion (2.2 mm), horizontal abduction (2.2 mm), and IR90 (2.4 mm) was significantly greater than that during the other motions (ER0, -0.7 mm; IR0, 0.5 mm; IRB, 1.0 mm; P impingement. It is recommended that patients with impingement syndrome or a repaired rotator cuff avoid these shoulder motions. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Heterotaxy syndromes and abnormal bowel rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley [Stanford University, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Koppolu, Raji; Sylvester, Karl [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Surgery, Stanford, CA (United States); Murphy, Daniel [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Cardiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bowel rotation abnormalities in heterotaxy are common. As more children survive cardiac surgery, the management of gastrointestinal abnormalities has become controversial. To evaluate imaging of malrotation in heterotaxy with surgical correlation and provide an algorithm for management. Imaging reports of heterotaxic children with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) and/or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) were reviewed. Subsequently, fluoroscopic images were re-reviewed in conjunction with CT/MR studies. The original reports and re-reviewed images were compared and correlated with surgical findings. Nineteen of 34 children with heterotaxy underwent UGI, 13/19 also had SBFT. In 15/19 reports, bowel rotation was called abnormal: 11 malrotation, 4 non-rotation, no cases of volvulus. Re-review, including CT (10/19) and MR (2/19), designated 17/19 (90%) as abnormal, 10 malrotation (abnormal bowel arrangement, narrow or uncertain length of mesentery) and 7 non-rotation (small bowel and colon on opposite sides plus low cecum with probable broad mesentery). The most useful CT/MR findings were absence of retroperitoneal duodenum in most abnormal cases and location of bowel, especially cecum. Abnormal orientation of mesenteric vessels suggested malrotation but was not universal. Nine children had elective bowel surgery; non-rotation was found in 4/9 and malrotation was found in 5/9, with discrepancies (non-rotation at surgery, malrotation on imaging) with 4 original interpretations and 1 re-review. We recommend routine, early UGI and SBFT studies once other, urgent clinical concerns have been stabilized, with elective laparoscopic surgery in abnormal or equivocal cases. Cross-sectional imaging, usually obtained for other reasons, can contribute diagnostically. Attempting to assess mesenteric width is important in differentiating non-rotation from malrotation and more accurately identifies appropriate surgical candidates. (orig.)

  14. Interleukin-1β stimulates stromal-derived factor-1α expression in human subacromial bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaine, Theodore A; Cote, Mindy A; Proto, Al; Mulcahey, Mary; Lee, Francis Y; Bigliani, Louis U

    2011-11-01

    Chemokines produced by synoviocytes of the subacromial bursa are up-regulated in subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff disease. We hypothesized that SDF-1α production in bursal synoviocytes may be induced by local cytokines such as interleukin IL-1β and IL-6. Subacromial bursa specimens were obtained from patients undergoing shoulder surgery. Bursal specimens were stained with anti-human antibodies to IL-1, IL-6, and SDF-1α by immunohistochemistry and compared to normal and rheumatoid controls. Bursal cells were also isolated from specimens and cultured. Early passaged cells were then treated with cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6) and SDF-1α expression was measured by ELISA and RT-PCR. SDF-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were expressed at high levels in bursitis specimens from human subacromial bursa compared to normal controls. In cultured bursal synoviocytes, there was a dose-dependent increase in SDF-1α production in the supernatants of cells treated with IL-1β. SDF-1α mRNA expression was also increased in bursal cells treated with IL-1β. IL-6 caused a minimal but not statistically significant increase in SDF-1α expression. SDF-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 are expressed in the inflamed human subacromial bursal tissues in patients with subacromial bursitis. In cultured bursal synoviocytes, SDF-1α gene expression and protein production are stimulated by IL-1β. IL-1β produced by bursal syvoviocytes and inflammatory cells in the human subacromial bursa is an important signal in the inflammatory response that occurs in subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff disease. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  15. Spontaneous Isolated Infection of the Subacromial Bursa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tawil, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Isolated infection of the subacromial bursa is a rare entity. We present the case of a previously fit man who was found to have staphylococcal infection of the sub-acromial bursa, without an obvious precipitant. Preoperative MRI scanning determined the specific locus of infection, and the patient was successfully treated with arthroscopic washout of the sub-acromial bursa followed by empirical antibiotic therapy. PMID:23984140

  16. Rotator cuff related shoulder pain: Assessment, management and uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeremy

    2016-06-01

    Rotator cuff related shoulder pain (RCRSP) is an over-arching term that encompasses a spectrum of shoulder conditions including; subacromial pain (impingement) syndrome, rotator cuff tendinopathy, and symptomatic partial and full thickness rotator cuff tears. For those diagnosed with RCRSP one aim of treatment is to achieve symptom free shoulder movement and function. Findings from published high quality research investigations suggest that a graduated and well-constructed exercise approach confers at least equivalent benefit as that derived from surgery for; subacromial pain (impingement) syndrome, rotator cuff tendinopathy, partial thickness rotator cuff (RC) tears and atraumatic full thickness rotator cuff tears. However considerable deficits in our understanding of RCRSP persist. These include; (i) cause and source of symptoms, (ii) establishing a definitive diagnosis, (iii) establishing the epidemiology of symptomatic RCRSP, (iv) knowing which tissues or systems to target intervention, and (v) which interventions are most effective. The aim of this masterclass is to address a number of these areas of uncertainty and it will focus on; (i) RC function, (ii) symptoms, (iii) aetiology, (iv) assessment and management, (v) imaging, and (vi) uncertainties associated with surgery. Although people experiencing RCRSP should derive considerable confidence that exercise therapy is associated with successful outcomes that are comparable to surgery, outcomes may be incomplete and associated with persisting and recurring symptoms. This underpins the need for ongoing research to; better understand the aetiology, improve methods of assessment and management, and eventually prevent these conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Is Ultrasound-Guided Injection More Effective in Chronic Subacromial Bursitis?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    HSIEH, LIN-FEN; HSU, WEI-CHUN; LIN, YI-JIA; WU, SHIH-HUI; CHANG, KAE-CHWEN; CHANG, HSIAO-LAN

    2013-01-01

    .... Therefore, this study aimed to compare the efficacy of subacromial corticosteroid injection under US guidance with palpation-guided subacromial injection in patients with chronic subacromial bursitis...

  18. Arthroscopic Finding of an Extra-Articular Loose Body in the Subacromial Space: Case Report Presentation and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartelius, Carl; Apostolopoulos, Alexandros P; Zaman, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    Loose bodies are pieces of soft tissue that run free within a body cavity, typically in the synovium; loose bodies outside of synovial cavities are very rare. This case study demonstrates such an instance occurring in the subacromial space, which is especially unusual. We report on it coupled with an analysis of the literature of known cases that have occurred previously. A 55-year old right-hand-dominant female patient presented with left shoulder pain. She had injured her left shoulder 7 yr previously and had achieved adequate pain and symptomatic control with physiotherapy. A magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated subacromial subdeltoid bursitis with a large subacromial spur, a bulky acromioclavicular (AC) joint, and a partial tear of the supraspinatous tendon. The patient subsequently underwent shoulder arthroscopy for subacromial decompression and AC joint excision. Arthroscopy demonstrated a suspected impingement of the rotator cuff in the subacromial space, bursitis, and a prominent acromion that limited the subacromial space (bigliani, type III), but during the procedure a detached white mass was discovered in the subacromial bursa. After histological analysis, the mass showed osteocartilagenous tissue, consistent with a loose body. Following the procedure, there were no complications, and the patient's symptoms gradually resolved. Extraarticular loose bodies are extremely rare, especially in the subacromial bursa. Reported cases have all been associated with either traumatic or degenerative shoulder pathology, and the diagnosis was commonly established incidentally on arthroscopy. Cases were managed with removal during the same procedure. Arthroscopic removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement, good options for treatment of loose bodies in the subacromial space, can result in good function.

  19. Rotating shift work and the metabolic syndrome: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bacquer, D; Van Risseghem, M; Clays, E; Kittel, F; De Backer, G; Braeckman, L

    2009-06-01

    Several studies have documented on the elevated cardiovascular risk among shift workers. In order to further explore this relation, we aimed at assessing the association between rotating shift work and the incidence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). In this population-based prospective study, 1529 employees from several large Belgian companies were followed for a median observation period of 6.6 years with respect to the onset of the MetS and its separate components. At baseline, 309 men (20.2%) were rotating shift workers. The MetS incidence rate in these shift workers (60.6 per 1000 person-years) was increased in comparison with day workers (37.2 per 1000 person-years) with an odds ratio (95% CI) of 1.77 (1.34-2.32). Multivariate adjustment for potential lifestyle and work-related confounders did only marginally affect the strength of the association. The risk for the development of MetS gradually increased independently with accumulated years of shift work. Rotating shift work not only had an impact on MetS as a cluster of conditions but on each of its individual components as well. Hence, prospective evidence was found that rotating shift work increases the risk for developing the MetS over a period of 6 years.

  20. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression results in normal shoulder function after two years in less than 50% of patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konradsen, Lars Aage Glud; Jensen, Claus Hjorth

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome two years after arthroscopic subacromial decompression using the Western Ontario Rotator-Cuff (WORC) index and a diagram-based questionnaire to self-assess active shoulder range of motion (ROM). METHODS: Outcomes in 80 patients...... with impingement of the shoulder undergoing arthroscopic subacromial decompression were prospectively assessed preoperatively, at three months and at two years post-operatively using the WORC index. All patients had received non-operative treatment for at least six months before undergoing surgery. Active range......, but only 45% reported near normal or normal WORC scores, and 56% presented with a reduced active ROM at two years. CONCLUSION: Arthroscopic subacromial decompression -appears effective in alleviating symptoms in patients with subacromial impingement who are resistant to conservative treatment, but can only...

  1. Lipoma arborescens: caso raro de ruptura do manguito rotador associado à presença de lipoma arborescens na bursa subacromial-subdeltoidea e glenoumeral Lipoma arborescens: rare case of rotator cuff tear associated with the presence of lipoma arborescens in the subacromial-subdeltoid and glenohumeral bursa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Benegas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipoma arborescens é uma condição rara de moléstia intra-articular, usualmente monoarticular, caracterizada por extensa proliferação dos vilos sinoviais e hiperplasia da gordura subsinovial. O tecido sinovial é progressivamente substituído por células maduras de gordura na membrana sinovial. O presente trabalho é o relato de caso de uma condição rara de lipoma arborescens tanto intra-articular (glenoumeral como da bursa subacromial-subdeltoide além de ruptura do tendão do supraespinhoso. As apresentações clínicas, histológicas e radiográficas assim como o tratamento são discutidos no presente estudo. A apresentação do caso contempla também a avaliação radiográfica, ressonância magnética e exame patológico. Apesar do lipoma arborescens ser uma condição rara, tal hipótese deve ser considerada frente a um caso com hiperproliferação sinovial e lipossubstituição da sinovial.Lipoma arborescens is a rare intra-articular disease that is usually monoarticular and is characterized by extensive proliferation of the synovial villi and hyperplasia of the subsynovial fat. The synovial tissue is progressively replaced by mature fat cells in the synovial membrane. The present study reports a case of a rare condition of lipoma arborescens that was simultaneously intra-articular (glenohumeral joint and in the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, in association with a torn supraspinatus tendon. The clinical, histological and radiographic presentations and treatment are discussed here. The description of this case includes radiographic and magnetic resonance evaluations and pathological examination. Although lipoma arborescens is a rare condition, it should be taken into consideration in cases presenting synovial hyperproliferation and synovial fat replacement.

  2. Distances to the subacromial bursa from 3 different injection sites as measured arthroscopically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardelli, Matthew; Burks, Robert T

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the distance for a standard needle to reach the subacromial bursa through 3 commonly used approaches. Thirty patients without associated rotator cuff tears underwent arthroscopic evaluation of the shoulder. The bursa was entered without shaving or altering of the bursa. By use of standard arthroscopic portals, a spinal needle was inserted from an anterior, lateral, and posterior position and measured to define the distance to the subacromial bursa from the skin. The mean distance with anterior needle placement was 2.9 +/- 0.6 cm. The mean distance with lateral needle placement was 2.9 +/- 0.7 cm. The mean distance with posterior needle placement was 5.2 +/- 1.1 cm. The mean body mass index for the group of patients was 27.5. The minimum was 18.7, and the maximum was 42.8. The distance to the subacromial bursa from the anterior and lateral approaches appears to be consistent and within reach of a standard 22- or 25-gauge needle. The distance to the subacromial bursa from a posterior approach appears to be almost double that of the anterior and lateral approaches and may not be reachable by standard 22- and 25-gauge needles in all patients. There appears to be no correlation between distances to the subacromial bursa from the anterior, lateral, or posterior approaches and the patient's body mass index. Given the relative distances measured to the subacromial bursa from the anterior, lateral, and posterior positions, clinicians may choose a longer needle to improve the accuracy of placement when approaching the subacromial bursa from a posterior position. Use of a standard-length needle will provide reasonable accuracy from the anterior and lateral positions.

  3. Glenohumeral and scapulothoracic strength impairments exists in patients with subacromial impingement, but these are not reflected in the shoulder pain and disability index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M B; Witten, A; Holm, K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pain and loss of function are cardinal symptoms associated with Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), while the presence and magnitude of deficits in strength and range of motion (ROM) are largely undescribed in non-athletic patients with SIS. Moreover, the relevance of impairments...... diagnostic criteria. Prior to specialist examination, questionnaires regarding shoulder function (Shoulder Pain And Disability Index, SPADI) demographics and kinesiophobia (TSK-11) were collected, and shoulder strength and ROM was measured by trained testers, with the patient reporting pain levels during...... testing and for the last week. Impairments in strength (abduction, external-rotation, (protraction and horizontal-extension) and ROM (abduction and internal rotation) were investigated in patients with unilateral shoulder pain, using one-sample t-tests. SPADI total score (SPADI) and SPADI function score...

  4. Arthroscopic Resection of The Distal Clavicle With Concomitant Subacromial Decompression: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HZ Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder impingement syndrome and acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis often occur simultaneously and easily missed. Kay et al. reported excellent results with combined arthroscopic subacromial decompression and resection of the distal end of the clavicle in patients with both disorders. Arthroscopic treatment of these disorders produces more favourable results than open procedures. We report two patients who were not responding to conservative management and were treated with direct arthroscopic distal clavicle excision and subacromial decompression in single setting. Both patients gained good postoperative outcome in terms of pain score, function and strength improvement assessed objectively with visual analogue score (VAS and University of California Los Angeles Score (UCLA.

  5. The effect of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish; Wassinger, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder injuries may be associated with proprioceptive deficits, however, it is unknown whether these changes are due to the experience of pain, tissue damage, or a combination of these. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on proprioceptive variables. Sub-acromial pain was induced via hypertonic saline injection in 20 healthy participants. Passive joint replication (PJR) and threshold to detection of movement direction (TTDMD) were assessed with a Biodex System 3 Pro isokinetic dynamometer for baseline control, experimental pain and recovery control conditions with a starting position of 60° shoulder abduction. The target angle for PJR was 60° external rotation, starting from 40°. TTDMD was tested from a position of 20° external rotation. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine differences between PJR absolute and variable errors and TTDMD for the control and experimental conditions. Pain was elicited with a median 7 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. TTDMD was significantly decreased for the experimental pain condition compared to baseline and recovery conditions (≈30%, P = 0.003). No significant differences were found for absolute (P = 0.152) and variable (P = 0.514) error for PJR. Movement sense was enhanced for the experimental sub-acromial pain condition, which may reflect protective effects of the central nervous system in response to the pain. Where decreased passive proprioception is observed in shoulders with injuries, these may be due to a combination of peripheral tissue injury and neural adaptations that differ from those due to acute pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test for diagnosing cubital tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, Kensuke; Horiuchi, Yukio; Tanabe, Aya; Waseda, Makoto; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Koyanagi, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    Shoulder internal rotation enhances symptom provocation attributed to cubital tunnel syndrome. We present a modified elbow flexion test--the shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test--for diagnosing cubital tunnel syndrome. Fifty-five ulnar nerves in cubital tunnel syndrome patients and 123 ulnar nerves in controls were examined with 5 seconds each of elbow flexion, shoulder internal rotation, and shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion tests before and after treatment (surgery in 18; conservative in others). For the shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test position, 90° abduction, maximum internal rotation, and 10° flexion of the shoulder were combined with the elbow flexion test position. The test was considered positive if any symptom for cubital tunnel syndrome developed cubital tunnel syndrome nerves and 7 control nerves. The sensitivities/specificities of the 5-second elbow flexion, shoulder internal rotation, and shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion tests were 25%/100%, 58%/100%, and 87%/98%, respectively. Sensitivity differences between the shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test and the other two tests were significant. Shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test results and cubital tunnel syndrome symptoms were significantly correlated. Influence of the shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test on the ulnar nerve was seen in 8 of 10 cubital tunnel syndrome nerves but not in controls. The 5-second shoulder internal rotation elbow flexion test is specific, easy and quick provocative test for diagnosing cubital tunnel syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Subacromial shoulder disorders among baggage handlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Pedersen, Ellen Bøtker

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the influence of cumulative employment as baggage handler on the risk of incident subacromial shoulder disorders. Baggage handling is characterized by repetitive work primarily consisting of heavy lifting in awkward positions and time pressure. METHODS: This cohort study is based...... System. The primary exposure was cumulative years of employment as a baggage handler, and the primary outcome was diagnoses and surgical treatment of subacromial shoulder disorders. RESULTS: The cohort contained 3396 baggage handlers and 63,909 workers in the reference group. Baggage handlers with longer...... increased incidence of subacromial shoulder disorders for workers with longer cumulative years of employment. These results support that long-term lifting in awkward positions and time pressure influences the risk of subacromial shoulder disorders....

  8. Dynamic enhanced MRI of the subacromial bursa: correlation with arthroscopic and histological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Kosei-nenkin Hospital (Japan); Yoneda, M. [Shoulder and Sports Medicine Service, Osaka Kosei-nenkin Hospital, Osaka City, Osaka (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [Dept. of Pathology, Osaka Kosei-nenkin Hospital (Japan); Fukushima, S. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sapporo Tokeidai Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Wakitani, S. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Shinsyu Univ., Matsumato (Japan)

    2003-09-01

    Objective: To assess dynamic MRI with Gd-DTPA enhancement for evaluating inflammatory changes in the subacromial bursa. Design and patients: We detected the signal intensity changes in dynamic MRI of the subacromial bursa, and confirmed these macroscopically by arthroscopy and histologically. The signal intensity was measured using built-in software, and the enhancement ratio (E ratio) was calculated from dynamic MR images. In addition, as a parameter of the rate of the increase in the signal intensity from 0 to 80 s, the mean increase per second in the E ratio was obtained as the coefficient of enhancement (CE). The correlation was studied of the E ratio and CE with the arthroscopic findings (redness, villous formation, thickening and adhesion), and of the E ratio and CE with the histological findings (capillary proliferation, papillary hyperplasia, fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration) of the subacromial bursa. Of patients with shoulder pain, this study included those with rotator cuff injury; patients with rheumatoid arthritis or pitching shoulder disorders were excluded. There were 27 patients (15 men, 12 women) ranging in age from 25 to 73 years (mean 49.1 years). Dynamic MRI of the shoulder was also performed on the healthy side of 10 patients and in five normal young volunteers. Results and conclusions: Changes in signal intensity on dynamic MRI were measured in the subacromial bursa. The E ratio (80 s) and CE (0-80 s) were significantly correlated with redness and villous formation as arthroscopic findings, positively correlated with capillary proliferation and papillary hyperplasia as histological findings (p < 0.05), and negatively correlated with fibrosis as a histological finding (p < 0.05) in the subacromial bursa. The patterns of dynamic curves were well correlated with the bursoscopic and histological findings of the synovium of the subacromial bursa. Dynamic MRI appears to correlate with inflammatory activity of synovium of the subacromial

  9. MR imaging after therapeutic injection of the subacromial bursa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Major, N.M. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Division Musculoskeletal, Durham, NC (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Objective. As a therapeutic injection into the subacromial bursa (SAB) is commonly performed for impingement syndrome, it is important to know whether this fluid can be retained for a period of time and cause confusion with a pathologic collection of fluid. This study identifies and describes the appearance of recent subacromial injection using MR imaging, and the appearance of a potential complication.Design and patients. Fourteen asymptomatic shoulders were studied with MR imaging using fast spin echo T2-weighted imaging (1.5 T) prior to injection with 7 cm{sup 3} of xylocaine. Four shoulders had subacromial fluid and were eliminated from the study. The remaining 10 (9 men, 1 woman; age range 27-36 years, average age 33 years) were then re-imaged immediately, and at 6, 12 and 24 h after the injection or until fluid resolved. Each set of images was reviewed for the presence of fluid in the SAB and for additional abnormalities.Results. Fluid was identified in all subjects in the SAB in the immediate, 6 and 12 h post-injection images. At 24 h, fluid was not identified within the SAB in eight of 10 patients. In one patient fluid resolved in 48 h. The other continued to demonstrate fluid in the SAB and in the joint as well as abnormal signal in the infraspinatus muscle from a presumed myositis. Imaging was performed up to 10 days after the injection in this patient.Conclusions. It is known that fluid identified in the SAB without evidence of a cuff tear may be due to bursitis. However, if MR imaging is performed within 24 h of injection, the presence of the fluid may be iatrogenic. In addition, the history of recent therapeutic injection is very important as complications such as myositis can occur as a result of the injection. Knowledge of injection prior to imaging is vital for accurate interpretation of MR shoulder examinations. (orig.)

  10. An analysis of the diagnostic accuracy of the Hawkins and Neer subacromial impingement signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, P B; Clark, P; Sutherland, K

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the Neer and Hawkins impingement signs for the diagnosis of subacromial bursitis or rotator cuff pathosis. Eighty-five consecutive patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy by a single surgeon were documented prospectively for the positive and negative clinical and arthroscopic pathologic findings. The Neer sign was found to have a sensitivity of 75% for the appearance suggestive of subacromial bursitis; this compared with 92% for the Hawkins sign. For rotator cuff tearing, the sensitivity of the Neer sign was 85% and the sensitivity of the Hawkins sign was 88%. Specificity and positive predictive values for the two tests were low, being not much higher than pretest probability. The two tests had a high negative predictive value (96% for bursitis, 90% for rotator cuff tearing) when they were combined. The results are compared with those reported in the literature. We conclude that the Neer and Hawkins signs are sensitive for appearances suggestive of subacromial bursitis and rotator cuff partial or complete tearing with a high negative predictive value. However, they lack specificity in comparison with arthroscopic findings.

  11. [Functional results of type A botulinum toxin versus oral anti-inflammatory agents in the rehabilitation of painful shoulder syndrome caused by rotator cuff lesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Bautista P; Negrete-Corona, J; Chávez-Hinojosa, E

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff conditions are characterized by unspecific signs, as well as anatomic alterations and symptoms. They have a multifactorial etiology and may include everything from tendinitis to massive, full thickness tears of the rotator cuff tendon that compromise the normal biomechanics of the involved shoulder. They usually occur in people over 40 years of age but lesions resulting from trauma may vary according to the mechanism of injury and are not directly related with the age at onset of symptoms. Vascular factors have been described as related with rotator cuff tendon damage in conditions affecting the microcirculation. However, recent studies have not proven that the tendon under direct observation shows hypovascularity. Type A botulinum toxin acts by blocking the release of acetylcholine in the neuromuscular plate; in the joints it releases capsular tension and reduces proinflammatory factors such as interleukin-1 (IL-1). There are only a few papers on its intraarticular benefit; in muscle and tendon groups it not only has a muscle relaxant effect, but several publications support its utility for pain management. It has been widely used in the rehabilitation of this group of patients at low doses. Material and methods: Prospective, investigational and longitudinal study involving the follow-up of 24 patients with a diagnosis of painful shoulder syndrome proven clinically and with imaging tests, and caused by rotator cuff lesions. The patients either did not meet the criteria for immediate surgical repair or had already undergone such a repair. Type A botulinum toxin was applied to 12 patients in the subacromial space around the rotator cuff conjoint tendon, as well as in the painful spots and in the muscle contracture in the shoulder. The total dose of Type A botulinum toxin was 200 IU. The control group, also composed of 12 patients, was given a COX-2 oral antiinflammatory agent for 6 weeks (Celecoxib, 100 mg BID). Both groups followed a pre

  12. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection of the subacromial bursa: an unusual complication following subacromial corticosteroid injection (a report of two cases).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Kar H; Jones, Sian A; Gurunaidu, Subramaniam; Pritchard, Mark G

    2015-07-01

    Subacromial corticosteroid injections are frequently used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in shoulder pain. Subacromial septic bursitis is a recognized but rare complication. There have been no reports of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections of the subacromial bursa after subacromial injections in the literature. We describe case reports of two patients who presented with subacromial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic bursitis following subacromial corticosteroid injections in the community and highlight the diagnostic and management challenges of this condition.

  13. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection of the subacromial bursa: an unusual complication following subacromial corticosteroid injection (a report of two cases)

    OpenAIRE

    Teoh, Kar. H.; Jones, Sian A; Gurunaidu, Subramaniam; Pritchard, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    Subacromial corticosteroid injections are frequently used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in shoulder pain. Subacromial septic bursitis is a recognized but rare complication. There have been no reports of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections of the subacromial bursa after subacromial injections in the literature. We describe case reports of two patients who presented with subacromial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic bursitis following subacromi...

  14. A manual physical therapy approach versus subacromial corticosteroid injection for treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome: a protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, Robert E; Cleland, Joshua A; Brown, David L

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Corticosteroid injections (CSI) are a recommended and often-used first-line intervention for shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) in primary care and orthopaedic settings. Manual physical therapy (MPT) offers a non-invasive approach with negligible risk for managing SIS. There is limited evidence to suggest significant long-term improvements in pain, strength and disability with the use of MPT, and there are conflicting reports from systematic reviews that question the long-term efficacy of CSI. Specifically, the primary objective is to compare the effect of CSI and MPT on pain and disability in subjects with SIS at 12 months. Design This pragmatic randomised clinical trial will be a mixed-model 2×5 factorial design. The independent variables are treatment (MPT and CSI) and time with five levels from baseline to 1 year. The primary dependent variable is the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, and the secondary outcome measures are the Global Rating of Change and the Numeric Pain Rating Scale. For each ANOVA, the hypothesis of interest will be the two-way group-by-time interaction. Methods and analysis The authors plan to recruit 104 participants meeting established impingement criteria. Following examination and enrolment, eligible participants will be randomly allocated to receive a pragmatic approach of either CSI or MPT. The MPT intervention will consist of six sessions, and the CSI intervention will consist of one to three sessions. All subjects will continue to receive usual care. Subjects will be followed for 12 months. Dissemination and ethics The protocol was approved by the Madigan Army Medical Center Institutional Review Board. The results may have an impact on clinical practice guidelines. This study was funded in part by the Orthopaedic Physical Therapy Products Grant through the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists. Trial Registration http://clinicaltrials.gov/ NCT01190891. PMID:22021870

  15. Physical therapist management following rotator cuff repair for a patient with postpolio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Mary; Hadlock, Tana

    2007-02-01

    Postpoliomyelitis sequelae, such as gait instability and progressive weakness, predispose people with postpolio syndrome to secondary disabilities. With aging, people who depend on their upper extremities to accommodate lower-extremity deficits may anticipate overuse injuries. The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of mobilization and exercise in postoperative rehabilitation of rotator cuff surgery on a patient with postpolio syndrome. A 48-year-old woman with postpolio syndrome had rotator cuff surgical repair followed by physical therapy intervention. Maitland mobilization and mild functional exercises were chosen to avoid triggering fatigue. Measurements taken preoperatively, before and after physical therapy intervention, and 2 years after intervention showed return to independent status with excellent retention. No fatigue or overuse weakness was encountered. This is the first case report to document physical therapy following rotator cuff repair in a patient with postpolio syndrome.

  16. Subacromial impingement in patients with whiplash injury to the cervical spine

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    Giddins Grey E

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impingement syndrome and shoulder pain have been reported to occur in a proportion of patients following whiplash injuries to the neck. In this study we aim to examine these findings to establish the association between subacromial impingement and whiplash injuries to the cervical spine. Methods and results We examined 220 patients who had presented to the senior author for a medico-legal report following a whiplash injury to the neck. All patients were assessed for clinical evidence of subacromial impingement. 56/220 patients (26% had developed shoulder pain following the injury; of these, 11/220 (5% had clinical evidence of impingement syndrome. Only 3/11 patients (27% had the diagnosis made prior to evaluation for their medico-legal report. In the majority, other clinicians had overlooked the diagnosis. The seatbelt shoulder was involved in 83% of cases (p Conclusion After a neck injury a significant proportion of patients present with shoulder pain, some of whom have treatable shoulder pathology such as impingement syndrome. The diagnosis is, however, frequently overlooked and shoulder pain is attributed to pain radiating from the neck resulting in long delays before treatment. It is important that this is appreciated and patients are specifically examined for signs of subacromial impingement after whiplash injuries to the neck. Direct seatbelt trauma to the shoulder is one possible explanation for its aetiology.

  17. Accuracy of diagnostic ultrasound in patients with suspected subacromial disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottenheijm, Ramon P; Jansen, Mariëtte J; Staal, J Bart; van den Bruel, Ann; Weijers, René E; de Bie, Rob A; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2010-10-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for detecting subacromial disorders in patients presenting in primary and secondary care settings. Medline and Embase were searched on June 9, 2010. In addition, the reference list of 1 systematic review and all included articles were searched to identify relevant studies. Two reviewers independently selected the articles evaluating the accuracy of ultrasound for detecting subacromial disorders from the title and abstracts retrieved by the literature search. Selection criteria were ultrasound frequency greater than or equal to 7.5MHz as index test, surgery, magnetic resonance imaging and/or radiography as reference standards, and subacromial disorders as target conditions. Two reviewers independently extracted the data on study characteristics and results to construct 2 by 2 tables and performed a methodologic quality assessment. Twenty-three studies were included: 22 reported on full-thickness rotator cuff tears, 15 on partial-thickness tears, 3 on subacromial bursitis, 2 on tendinopathy, and 2 on calcifying tendonitis, respectively. For full-thickness tears, pooled sensitivity of ultrasound was .95 (95% confidence interval, .90-.97), and specificity .96 (.93-.98). For partial-thickness tears, pooled sensitivity was .72 (.58-.83), and specificity .93 (.89-.96). Statistical pooling was not possible for the other disorders. For subacromial bursitis, sensitivity ranged from .79 to .81, and specificity from .94 to .98. For tendinopathy, sensitivity ranged from .67 to .93, specificity from .88 to 1.00. Sensitivity for calcifying tendonitis was 1.00 in both studies, with specificity ranging from .85 to .98. We strongly recommend ultrasound in patients for whom conservative treatment fails, to rule in or out full-thickness tears, to rule in partial-thickness tears, and to a lesser extent to diagnose tendinopathy, subacromial bursitis, and calcifying tendonitis. These results can help physicians tailor treatment

  18. Physiotherapy intervention in subacromial impingement syndrome

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    Cardoso, Ricardo Manuel Tavares; Leite, Marcelo Soares Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUÇÃO: Os problemas do ombro são responsáveis por cerca de 10% de todos os encaminhamentos para os fisioterapeutas, sendo a síndrome de colisão do ombro o diagnóstico mais comum entre as patologias do ombro, representando 44 a 65%. Contudo, a efectividade da fisioterapia nesta patologia continua a ser um tema em discussão. OBJECTIVO: Determinar a efectividade da fisioterapia no tratamento de pacientes com síndrome de colisão do ombro. METODOLOGIA: Pesquisa computadorizada nas bases de da...

  19. Subacute effects of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust in addition to shoulder manual therapy plus exercise intervention in individuals with subacromial impingement syndrome: a prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alexis A; Donaldson, Megan; Wassinger, Craig A; Emerson-Kavchak, Alicia J

    2017-09-01

    To determine the subacute effects of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust in addition to shoulder non-thrust plus exercise in patients with subacromial pathology. This was a randomized, single blinded controlled trial pilot study. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01753271) and reported according to Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials requirements. Patients were randomly assigned to either shoulder treatment plus cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust or shoulder treatment-only group. Primary outcomes were average pain intensity (Numeric Pain Rating Scale) and physical function (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index) at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and patient discharge. 18 patients, mean age 43.1(15.8) years satisfied the eligibility criteria and were analyzed for follow-up data. Both groups showed statistically significant improvements in both pain and function at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and discharge. The between-group differences for changes in pain or physical function were not significant at any time point. The addition of cervicothoracic spinal thrust/non-thrust to the shoulder treatment-only group did not significantly alter improvement in pain or function in patients with subacromial pathology. Both approaches appeared to provide an equally notable benefit. Both groups improved on all outcomes and met the criteria for clinical relevance for both pain and function. 2b.

  20. Rotations

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    John R. Jones; Wayne D. Shepperd

    1985-01-01

    The rotation, in forestry, is the planned number of years between formation of a crop or stand and its final harvest at a specified stage of maturity (Ford-Robertson 1971). The rotation used for many species is the age of culmination of mean usable volume growth [net mean annual increment (MAI)]. At that age, usable volume divided by age reaches its highest level. That...

  1. In vivo temperature measurement in the subacromial bursa during arthroscopic subacromial decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Scott L; Johnstone, Alan J; Kumar, Kapil

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether use of a bi-polar radiofrequency (RF) ablation wand would cause excess heating, which may lead to collateral damage to the surrounding tissues during arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Cadaveric studies have shown that high temperatures can potentially be reached when using RF ablation wands in arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Only 1 other published study assesses these temperature rises in the clinical setting. Fifteen patients were recruited to participate in the study. A standard arthroscopic subacromial decompression was performed using continuous flow irrigation, with intermittent use of the RF ablation wand for soft tissue debridement. The temperature of the irrigation fluid within the subacromial bursa and the outflow fluid from the suction port of the wand were measured during the procedure using fiber-optic thermometers. The mean peak temperature recorded in the subacromial bursa was 32.0°C (29.3-43.1°C), with a mean rise from baseline of 9.8°C. The mean peak temperature recorded from the outflow fluid from the wand was 71.6°C (65.6-77.6°C), with a mean rise from baseline of 49.4°C. High temperatures were noted in the outflow fluid from the wand; however, this was not evident in the subacromial bursa itself. Use of room temperature inflow fluid, maintenance of flow through the bursa, and avoidance of prolonged uninterrupted use of the wand all appear to ensure that safe temperatures are maintained in the subacromial bursa not only in the laboratory but also in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Subacromial Bursa Injection of Hyaluronate with Steroid in Patients with Peri-articular Shoulder Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Seung Deuk; Choi, Won Duck; Lee, Zee Ihn

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the additive effect of sono-guided subacromial bursa injection of hyaluronate with steroid in patients with peri-articular shoulder disorders. Method This prospective randomized controlled trial involved 26 patients who had shoulder pain. Group A, consisting of 13 patients, was treated with a sono-guided subacromial bursa injection containing a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine (5 ml) and triamcinolone 40 mg (1 ml), followed by injection with sodium hyaluronate (2 ml) once a week for 3 weeks. The other 13 patients (Group B) were treated with a sono-guided subacromial bursa injection containing a mixture of 0.5% lidocaine (5 ml) and triamcinolone 40 mg (1 ml) once a week for 3 weeks. The effects were assessed using a visual analogue scale (VAS) of shoulder pain, active range of motion (AROM), shoulder function assessment scale (SFA), shoulder disability questionnaire (SDQ) at study entry and every week from first injection until 4 weeks after the 1st injection (= 2 weeks after 3rd injection). Results (1) Demographic features and all parameters measured before injection did not show a significant difference between the 2 groups. (2) Statistically significant improvements were shown in VAS, SFA, SDQ during the 1st, 2nd, and 4th week after the first injection in both groups (pbursa injection of hyaluronate with steroid in patients with peri-articular shoulder disorders has additive effects on functional improvement of the affected shoulder, including the AROM of internal rotation. PMID:22506189

  3. Ultrasonography of the Rotator Cuff

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    Yoon, Yong Cheol [Samsung Medica Center, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    The ultrasonography (US) is an important modality in evaluating shoulder disease. It is accurate in diagnosing the various shoulder diseases including tendinosis, calcific tendinitis, and subacromial bursitis as well as rotator cuff tears. This article presents a pictorial review of US anatomy of the shoulder, the technical aspects of shoulder US, major types of shoulder pathology, and interventional procedure under US guidance

  4. Involvement of the anterior portion of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa in the painful shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallenberg, Bernard; Destate, Nathalie; Feipel, Véronique; Gevenois, Pierre Alain

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to verify that increased widening of the anterior portion of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa is associated with anteromedial shoulder pain. Bursography, sonography, and CT were performed in six cadaver shoulders and compared with anatomic sections in neutral position and while the humerus was extended and internally rotated. For the clinical study, the width of the anterior portion of the bursa was measured in both positions in both shoulders of 27 patients referred because of shoulder pain and in eight asymptomatic volunteers. Pain was coded as absent, experienced in the anteromedial portion of the shoulder, or experienced elsewhere but not anteromedially, and we compared the pain scores between shoulder positions. In all cadaver shoulders, when compared with CT scans and anatomic sections, sonography showed the morphology of the bursa, its relationships with surrounding structures, and morphologic changes associated with position. In volunteers, the mean width of the bursa was 0.74 +/- 0.05 and 0.93 +/- 0.09 mm (p = 0.013), respectively, in neutral and stress position. In patients, the same values were 0.70 +/- 0.07 and 0.81 +/- 0.14 mm (p = 0.286) in the asymptomatic side and 1.20 +/- 0.11 and 1.75 +/- 0.23 mm (p bursa was wider in patients experiencing pain anteromedially than in those who experienced pain elsewhere and volunteers (p = 0.002 and bursa was wider in symptomatic shoulders than in asymptomatic shoulders (p bursa is associated with anteromedial shoulder pain and the clinical syndrome of coracoid impingement.

  5. Do subacromial ultrasonography findings predict efficacy of intra-bursal injection? Prospective study in 39 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouju, Y; Bouilleau, L; Dubois de Montmarin, G; Bacle, G; Favard, L

    2014-12-01

    Ultrasonography has become an investigation of choice in the management of shoulder pain. The objective of this study was to determine whether the efficacy of subacromial-subdeltoid bursa injection correlated with the ultrasound findings. We prospectively recruited patients who were seen between November 2012 and November 2013 for subacromial pain and whose rotator cuff was either intact or showed a full-thickness tear less than 1cm in length. A standardised physical examination of the shoulder was followed immediately by static and dynamic ultrasonography, intra-bursal injection of lidocaine, and a repetition of the same physical examination. Recorded ultrasonography features were the appearance of the bursa, shape of the coraco-acromial ligament, and bursal deformation induced by passage under the coraco-acromial ligament during dynamic imaging. A response to the injection was defined as greater than 75% improvements in at least three of the physical examination parameters. We included 39 patients with a mean age of 56.7 years. Ultrasonography showed abnormalities of the bursa in 30 patients, including 1 with an intra-bursal effusion, 10 with thickening, and 19 with both. Deformation of the bursa under the coraco-acromial ligament was noted in 26 patients. The proportions of patients with bursal effusion and with bursal thickening were similar in the 20 responders and 19 non-responders. Neither were any significant differences found for coraco-acromial ligament shape or bursal deformation under the ligament. No correlation was found between ultrasonography findings and the efficacy of a local anaesthetic injection into the subacromial bursa. These findings suggest that ultrasound abnormalities may constitute mere physiological changes, in keeping with earlier studies in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, subacromial impingement may be currently overdiagnosed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in the glenohumeral compared with the subacromial space in primary shoulder arthroscopies.

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    Patzer, Thilo; Petersdorf, Sabine; Krauspe, Ruediger; Verde, Pablo Emilio; Henrich, Birgit; Hufeland, Martin

    2018-01-18

    We hypothesized that the prevalence of Propionibacterium acnes in patients undergoing primary shoulder arthroscopy is equal in the glenohumeral space compared with the subacromial space. Patients aged 18 years or older with shoulder arthroscopies were included. The exclusion criteria were prior shoulder operations, complete rotator cuff tears, systemic inflammatory diseases, tumors, shoulder injections within 6 months of surgery, and antibiotic therapy within 14 days preoperatively. After standardized skin disinfection with Kodan Tinktur Forte Gefärbt, a skin swab was taken at the posterior portal. Arthroscopy was performed without cannulas, prospectively randomized to start either in the glenohumeral space or in the subacromial space, with direct harvesting of a soft-tissue biopsy specimen. Sample cultivation was conducted according to standardized criteria for bone and joint aspirate samples and incubated for 14 days. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight spectrometry was used for specimen identification in positive culture results. The study prospectively included 115 consecutive patients with normal C-reactive protein levels prior to surgery (54.8% men; mean age, 47.2 ± 14.6 years). P acnes was detected on the skin after disinfection in 36.5% of patients, in the glenohumeral space in 18.9%, and in the subacromial space in 3.5% (P = .016). The prevalence of P acnes is significantly higher in the glenohumeral space compared with the subacromial space in primary shoulder arthroscopies. The results do not confirm the contamination theory but also cannot clarify whether P acnes is a commensal or enters the joint hematologically or even lymphatically or via an unknown pathway. Despite standardized surgical skin disinfection, P acnes can be detected in skin swab samples in more than one-third of patients. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Unusual lesions mimicking impingement syndrome in the shoulder joint - Think medially.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rohit; Malhotra, Akshay; Cribb, Gillian; Cool, Paul; Hay, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    Impingement syndrome is usually caused by irritation of the rotator cuff within the sub acromial space and this includes the coraco-acromial arch (Acromion and Coraco-acromial ligament), the acromio-clavicular joint and occasionally the coracoid. Iatrogenic causes such as sutures, pins, plates or wires left from previous surgery can cause similar symptoms. We present a series of four cases mimicking "classical" impingement symptoms/signs in which the causal pathology was identified outside the sub-acromial space. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed lesions that were present in the supra-spinatus fossa but were causing pressure effects on the sub-acromial space, namely - a ganglion cyst in one case, lipomata in two other cases, and a glomus tumour. A ganglion cyst and glomus tumour mimicking impingement syndrome is a rare reported case to our knowledge. These are unusual causes that should be considered when investigating classical impingement syndrome and particularly those who may have failed to respond to decompression surgery. They highlight the potential value of looking beyond the sub-acromial space for causal lesions and in these cases, at a time when limited ultrasound investigation has become increasingly popular; MRI has clearly played an important and was essential in planning surgery as these lesions would not have been identified on USS. Even though the symptoms were classical.

  8. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder following double row suture anchor technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rambani Rohit

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff is a demanding surgery. Accurate placement of anchors is key to success. Case presentation A 38-year-old woman received arthroscopic repair of her rotator cuff using a double row suture anchor technique. Postoperatively, she developed impingement syndrome which resulted from vertical displacement of a suture anchor once the shoulder was mobilised. The anchor was removed eight weeks following initial surgery and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Conclusion Impingement syndrome following arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuffs using double row suture anchor has not been widely reported. This is the first such case where anchoring has resulted in impingement syndrome.

  9. Typical and atypical shoulder impingement syndrome: diagnosis, treatment, and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Daniel D; Freehill, Michael Q; Marra, Guido

    2009-01-01

    The cause of shoulder impingement syndrome usually is considered to be compression of the rotator cuff and subacromial bursa against the anterolateral aspect of the acromion. The typical symptom is anterolateral shoulder pain that worsens at night and with overhead activity. However, the pain may be caused by factors other than a hooked acromion. Atypical impingement syndrome most commonly results from an os acromiale, a subcoracoid disorder, acromioclavicular joint undersurface hypertrophy, a deconditioned rotator cuff, or scapular dyskinesis. The correct diagnosis is made through the patient history and physical examination, with appropriate diagnostic imaging. Nonsurgical treatment is successful for most types of impingement syndrome; if it is not successful, all structural causes of mechanical impingement must be corrected.

  10. The role of experimentally-induced subacromial pain on shoulder strength and throwing accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassinger, Craig A; Sole, Gisela; Osborne, Hamish

    2012-10-01

    Shoulder injuries often comprise two separate yet related components, structural tissue damage and pain. The role of each of these components on shoulder function is difficult to ascertain. Experimental pain models allow the assessment of consequences of localized pain when applied to healthy individuals. By understanding the role of pain on shoulder function, clinicians will be able to more efficiently assess and treat shoulder injuries. The objective of the study was to evaluate the role of experimentally-induced sub-acromial pain on shoulder isokinetic rotational strength and throwing accuracy. This was a block counterbalanced, crossover, repeated measures study design utilizing 20 individuals without self-reported shoulder or cervical pathology. Shoulder function was measured with and without experimental pain injection (2 mL of 5% hypertonic saline) in the sub-acromial space. Functional tasks consisted of shoulder rotational strength utilizing isokinetic testing and throwing accuracy via the functional throwing performance index. The hypertonic saline induced moderate pain levels in all participants (4.3-5.1/10). Normalized shoulder internal (t = 3.76, p = 0.001) and external (t = 3.12, p = 0.006) rotation strength were both diminished in the painful condition compared to the pain free condition. Throwing accuracy was also reduced while the participants experienced pain (t = 3.99, p = 0.001). Moderate levels of experimental shoulder pain were sufficient to negatively influence shoulder strength and throwing accuracy in participants without shoulder pathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analgesia para a sutura artroscópica do manguito rotador: estudo comparativo entre o bloqueio interescalênico do plexo braquial e o bloqueio da bursa subacromial contínuo Management of pain after the rotator cuff arthroscopic suture: comparative study among the interescalenic blockade and the continuous intrabursal infusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Almeida

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o nível de dor pós-operatória de pacientes submetidos à sutura artroscópica da lesão do manguito rotador (MR que receberam protocolos diferentes de analgesia pós-operatória. Demonstrar a relação entre dor e o sexo do paciente, a dimensão da lesão suturada e a utilização da capsulotomia interna. Verificar a prevalência dos efeitos colaterais. MÉTODO: Foram analisados três grupos de pacientes operados entre 1º de junho de 2004 e 31 de maio de 2007. O grupo I foi composto pelos pacientes que receberam bloqueio interescalênico com ropivacaína a 0,75%. No grupo II, o mesmo bloqueio foi acrescido de 150µg de clonidina. No grupo III foi administrado um bolus de 30ml de ropivacaína a 0,75% para infiltração dos portais artroscópicos e diretamente no espaço subacromial, seguido de infusão contínua de ropivacaína a 0,2% em bomba de infusão. Os pacientes foram submetidos à medição da escala analógica visual (EAV com 24 horas após o procedimento. As variáveis estudadas foram: EAV, sexo, tamanho da lesão, necessidade de capsulotomia interna e prevalência dos efeitos colaterais. O estudo avaliou 196 pacientes, dos quais foram excluídos 51, totalizando n = 145 pacientes. O total de pacientes no grupo I foi de 65; no grupo II, de 19; e no grupo III, de 61. RESULTADOS: O índice da EAV médio encontrado no grupo I foi de 3,88 ± 1,737 (3; no grupo II, de 3,8 ± 1,6 (3; e no grupo III, de 1,95 ± 1,6 (2. Houve diferença significativa ao comparar os grupos I e III (p OBJECTIVE: To compare the level of postoperative pain in patients submitted to arthroscopic suture of a rotator cuff lesion who had different analgesia protocols. To demonstrate the relationship between pain and the gender of the patient, the dimension of the lesion sutured, and the use of internal capsulotomy. To check the prevalence of side effects. METHODS: Three groups of patients operated on between June 01, 2004 and May 31, 2007 were

  12. Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Examination and Imaging Findings for Identifying Subacromial Pain.

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    Angela Cadogan

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of subacromial pathology is limited by the poor accuracy of clinical tests for specific pathologies. The aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination and imaging features for identifying subacromial pain (SAP defined by a positive response to diagnostic injection, and to evaluate the influence of imaging findings on the clinical diagnosis of SAP.In a prospective, diagnostic accuracy design, 208 consecutive patients presenting to their primary healthcare practitioner for the first time with a new episode of shoulder pain were recruited. All participants underwent a standardized clinical examination, shoulder x-ray series and diagnostic ultrasound scan. Results were compared with the response to a diagnostic block of xylocaineTM injected into the SAB under ultrasound guidance using ≥80% post-injection reduction in pain intensity as the positive anaesthetic response (PAR criterion. Diagnostic accuracy statistics were calculated for combinations of clinical and imaging variables demonstrating the highest likelihood of a PAR. A PAR was reported by 34% of participants. In participants with no loss of passive external rotation, combinations of three clinical variables (anterior shoulder pain, strain injury, absence of symptoms at end-range external rotation (in abduction demonstrated 100% specificity for a PAR when all three were positive (LR+ infinity; 95%CI 2.9, infinity. A full-thickness supraspinatus tear on ultrasound increased the likelihood of a PAR irrespective of age (specificity 98% (95%CI 94, 100; LR+ 6.2; 95% CI 1.5, 25.7. Imaging did not improve the ability to rule-out a PAR.Combinations of clinical examination findings and a full-thickness supraspinatus tear on ultrasound scan can help confirm, but not exclude, the presence of subacromial pain. Other imaging findings were of limited value for diagnosing SAP.

  13. Suture slippage in knotless suture anchors resulting in subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayeri, Mohammad Reza; Keefe, Daniel T; Chang, Eric Y

    2016-05-01

    Rotator cuff repair using a suture bridge and knotless suture anchors is a relatively new, but increasingly used technique. The suture bridge technique creates an anatomically similar and more secure rotator cuff repair compared with conventional arthroscopic techniques and the use of knotless anchors eliminates the challenges associated with knot tying during arthroscopic surgery. However, previous in vitro biomechanical tests have shown that the hold of the suture in a knotless suture anchor is far lower than the pullout strength of the anchor from bone. Up until now slippage has been a theoretical concern. We present a prospectively diagnosed case of in vivo suture loosening after rotator cuff repair using a knotless bridge technique resulting in subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis.

  14. Rehabilitation for Subacromial Impingement Starts at the Scapula

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    Peggy A. Houglum

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Subacromial impingement, especially secondary subacromial impingement, is a common malady of athletes and non-athletes alike. Although several pathologies may lead to impingement, they all relate back to poor posture. Over time, postural changes increase stress to soft tissue structures to change both alignment and performance. Injury results as low-level stresses impact weakening tissues to the point of overload. Crucial to effective treatment of secondary subacromial impingement is the identification and correction of all causes. Basic to successful treatment is correction of posture, including scapular posture and muscles which control, stabilize, and move the scapula. An evidence-based approach to not only identifying the causes but also creating a treatment regimen to effectively resolve secondary subacromial impingement is presented.

  15. The accurate assessment and physiotherapeutic treatment of rotator cuff myofascial Pain Syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. B. Barker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Management  of  patients  with  rotator  cuff  myofascial  pain syndrome varies  and  successful  intervention  is  dependent  on accurate assessment. The aim of this case report is to show the importance of accurate assessment  and  clinical  reasoning  in  the  physiotherapeutic management  of a  patient  suffering  from  ante-cubital  and  anterior shoulder  pain.  The  patient was  referred  for  physiotherapy  after proving refractory  to  treatment  with  non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication. The physiotherapist diagnosed a rotator cuff myofascial pain syndrome and treatment proceeded on that basis. Treatment consisted of twitch-obtaining dry needling, myofascial release and exercise therapy.  The result was a change in the harryman rotator cuff functional Assessment Scale score from 22/52 to 43/52 over eight treatments. Strength was regained and subjective pain report on the visual rating scale was improved to 1/10. The case study highlights the importance of accurate assessment and consideration of alternative myofascial sources for pain even in circumstances which initially seem trauma related. Precise diagnosis of the cause - in this case rotator cuff myofascial pain syndrome – will result in effective treatment being administered.

  16. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare: a rare cause of subacromial bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Raj; Tuckett, John; Hide, Geoff; Dildey, Petra; Karsandas, Alvin

    2015-01-01

    Septic subacromial bursitis is an uncommon disorder with only a few reported cases in the literature. The most common causative organism is Staphylococcus aureus. We report the case of a 61-year-old female with a septic subacromial bursitis where the causative organism was found to be Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI). The diagnosis was only made following a biopsy, and we use this case to highlight the importance of recognising the need to consider a biopsy and aspiration in atypical situations.

  17. Current UK practices in the management of subacromial impingement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Colin; Tait, Gavin R

    2015-01-01

    Background Controversy presently exists surrounding the management of patients with subacromial impingement. This study aims to highlight current UK practices in the management of these patients. Methods BESS members were invited to complete a questionnaire and responses were received from 157 consultant shoulder surgeons. Results Physiotherapy is an integral part of management for 93% of surgeons with a minimum period of 12 weeks being most popular prior to consideration of arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Subacromial steroid injection is used by 95% and 86% repeat this if the patient has failed to respond to a previous injection by the general practioner. From initial presentation, 77% felt there should be at least 3 months of conservative management before proceeding to surgery. Good but transient response to subacromial injection was considered the best predictor of good surgical outcome by 77%. The coracoacromial ligament is fully released by 78%, although there was greater variation in how aggressive surgeons were with acromioplasty. Most (59%) do not include the nontender acromioclavicular joint to any extent in routine acromioplasty. Hospital physiotherapy protocols are used by 63% for postoperative rehabilitation. Conclusions Variation exists in the management regimes offered to patients with subacromial impingement, but most employ a minimum period of 12 weeks of conservative management incorporating physiotherapy and at least 2 subacromial steriod injections. PMID:27582972

  18. Comparison of surgical outcome in impingement syndrome with and without stiff shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Young; Pandher, Dilbans Singh; Moon, Gi-Hyuk; Yoo, Moon-Jib; Lee, Sung Tae

    2008-04-01

    In impingment syndrome with associated stiff shoulder the general protocol of management is to conservatively treat the stiff shoulder followed by operative treatment of the impingement syndrome. This consecutive prospective study was carried out to evaluate the functional outcome of surgical management for impingement syndrome associated with stiff shoulder and to compare the results with surgical management of impingement syndrome alone. We evaluated a total of 100 patients with impingement syndrome, consisting of 76 patients with impingement syndrome alone (Group A) and 24 patients of stiff shoulder associated with impingement syndrome (Group B). Group A patients were treated by subacromial decompression alone and Group B patients were treated by closed manipulation under anesthesia followed by subacromial decompression. According to the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) evaluation score satisfactory results were obtained in 80% patients of Group A and 67% patients of Group B, while for patients with diabetes [(n = 18), Group A (n = 11), Group B (n = 7)] satisfactory results were achieved in 82% of patients of Group A(9/11) and 43% of Group B(3/7). Overall, Group B patients had a lower range of motion for external rotation postoperatively, thus indicating that procedures to improve the external rotation, such as a release of the rotator interval or anterior capsule, might be considered in conjunction with other surgical procedures in patients with impingement syndrome with associated stiffness to further improve functional outcome. Acromioplasty can be performed in stiff shoulder associated with impingement syndrome without fears of further worsening of stiffness from adhesions with the exposed raw undersurface of acromian. Patients with diabetes mellitus and shoulder stiffness tend to have poor clinical outcomes and must receive appropriate counseling preoperatively.

  19. Comparison of surgical outcome in impingement syndrome with and without stiff shoulder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jin-Young

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In impingment syndrome with associated stiff shoulder the general protocol of management is to conservatively treat the stiff shoulder followed by operative treatment of the impingement syndrome. This consecutive prospective study was carried out to evaluate the functional outcome of surgical management for impingement syndrome associated with stiff shoulder and to compare the results with surgical management of impingement syndrome alone. Materials and Methods: We evaluated a total of 100 patients with impingement syndrome, consisting of 76 patients with impingement syndrome alone (Group A and 24 patients of stiff shoulder associated with impingement syndrome (Group B. Group A patients were treated by subacromial decompression alone and Group B patients were treated by closed manipulation under anesthesia followed by subacromial decompression. Results: According to the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES evaluation score satisfactory results were obtained in 80% patients of Group A and 67% patients of Group B, while for patients with diabetes [( n = 18, Group A (n = 11, Group B (n = 7] satisfactory results were achieved in 82% of patients of Group A(9/11 and 43% of Group B(3/7. Overall, Group B patients had a lower range of motion for external rotation postoperatively, thus indicating that procedures to improve the external rotation, such as a release of the rotator interval or anterior capsule, might be considered in conjunction with other surgical procedures in patients with impingement syndrome with associated stiffness to further improve functional outcome. Conclusion: Acromioplasty can be performed in stiff shoulder associated with impingement syndrome without fears of further worsening of stiffness from adhesions with the exposed raw undersurface of acromian. Patients with diabetes mellitus and shoulder stiffness tend to have poor clinical outcomes and must receive appropriate counseling preoperatively.

  20. The effects of low arched feet on foot rotation during gait in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, M; Cimolin, V; Rigoldi, C; Pau, M; Costici, P; Albertini, G

    2014-08-01

    In children with Down syndrome (DS) hypotonia and ligament laxity are characteristic features which cause a number of orthopaedic issues, such as flat foot. The aim of this study was to determine if children with flat foot are characterised by an accentuated external foot rotation during walking. Fifty-five children with DS and 15 typically developing children recruited as control group were assessed using three-dimensional gait analysis, using an optoelectronic system, force platforms and video recording. Parameters related to foot rotation were identified and calculated and the participants' foot morphology was assessed using the arch index. Data obtained in this study showed that while DS children without flat foot displayed the foot position on the transverse plane globally close to controls during the whole gait cycle, the DS children with flat foot were characterised by higher extra-rotation of the foot in comparison with those without flat foot and controls. Our results suggest that the presence of flatfoot lead the children with DS to extra-rotate their feet more than the children without flat foot. From a clinical point of view, these results could enhance the rehabilitative programmes in DS. © 2013 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Isolated subacromial bursal fluid on MRI of the shoulder in symptomatic patients: correlation with arthroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monu, J.U.V. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Pruett, S. [Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Vanarthos, W.J. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Pope, T.L. Jr. [Dept. of Radiology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Fluid in the subacromial bursa (SAB) is a common finding on magnetic resonance (MR) images of the shoulder, and the implications of this finding have not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed and correlated the MR features with arthroscopic findings in 21 symptomatic patients who had fluid in the SAB on MR imaging without demonstrable rotator cuff tear. Rotator cuff impingement was the most frequent surgical finding (42.9%). Other frequent surgical observations were glenbid labrum abnormality (28.6%), bursitis (19%), and supraspinatus tendinitis (14.3%). Distribution of acromial types was similar to that reported by Bigliani et al., and impingement was evenly distributed among acromial types in our study population. We conclude that in our patient population group the MR finding of isolated SAB fluid in symptomatic patients is highly likely to be associated with the finding of other abnormalities in the shoulder joint at surgery. (orig.)

  2. Acromion Types and Role of Corticosteroid with Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad; Shah Gillani, Syed Faraz Ul Hassan; Farooqi, Faheem Mubashir; Awais, Syed Muhammad

    2016-12-01

    To determine the association between shoulder impingement and morphological characteristics of acromion and the role of sub-acromial injection of methylprednisolone in the short-term treatment for relieving pain and improve functional disability of these patients. A descriptive study. Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology Unit-I (DOST-I), Mayo Hospital, Lahore, between November 2013 to June 2014. All patients presented in OPD with shoulder pain were included as subjects and evaluated by clinical test and categorised using X-ray scapula Y-view. Patients with impingement syndrome were correlated with Bigliani types and offered intra-lesional injection into sub-acromial space with 2ml of xylocaine 2% and 40 mg of methylprednisolone using 22 gauge needle. The effectiveness was assessed in terms of relieving pain and good functional outcomes; and rotator cuff tear was clinically assessed among impingement positive patient. The pain was assessed using visual analogue score before and after the administration of the injection. Demographic variables for frequencies and their associations were analysed using SPSS version 20.0. Significance level was p shoulder impingement. Most had moderate pain. Thirty-four patients required intralesional steroid, which relieved the pain in 31 of them. Shoulder impingement syndrome without tear of rotator cuff tendon was found in younger age group between 40 to 45 years, which was relieved by intralesional corticosteroid administration. These patients had type II (curved) acromion, according to Bigliani classification.

  3. Efficacy of Kinesiology Taping as an Adjunct Treatment of Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C A Fitch; T R Frendt; C L Lipinski; C D Moore; L Donovan

    2017-01-01

    ... with shoulder impingement syndrome is presented. Kinesiology tape may be effective in reducing impairments, such as altered range of motion and decreased subacromial space, commonly associated with shoulder impingement syndrome...

  4. Effects of Repetitive Shoulder Activity on the Subacromial Space in Manual Wheelchair Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Sheng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated (1 the effect of repetitive weight-relief raises (WR and shoulder external rotation (ER on the acromiohumeral distance (AHD among manual wheelchair users (MWUs and (2 the relationship between shoulder pain, subject characteristics, and AHD changes. Twenty-three MWUs underwent ultrasound imaging of the nondominant shoulder in an unloaded baseline position and while holding a WR position before and after the WR/ER tasks. Paired t-tests and Spearman correlational analysis were used to assess differences in the AHD before and after each task and the relationships between pain, subject characteristics, and the AHD measures. A significant reduction in the subacromial space (P<0.01 occurred when subjects performed a WR position compared to baseline. Individuals with increased years of disability had greater AHD percentage narrowing after WR (P=0.008. Increased shoulder pain was associated with AHD percentage narrowing after ER (P≤0.007. The results support clinical practice guidelines that recommend MWUs limit WR to preserve shoulder function. The isolated repetitive shoulder activity did not contribute to the changes of subacromial space in MWUs. The ultrasonographic measurement of the AHD may be a target for identifying future interventions that prevent pain.

  5. Is radiofrequency treatment effective for shoulder impingement syndrome? A prospective randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Zhang, Qiang; Zhu, Yiming; Jiang, Chunyan

    2013-11-01

    To determine whether radiofrequency based plasma microtenotomy has a positive effective in the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome with cuff tendinosis. Eighty patients with impingement syndrome and cuff tendinosis that were treated arthroscopically were enrolled in the study. The patients were randomly assigned to receive either arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) alone (ASD group, n = 40) or arthroscopic subacromial decompression combined with radiofrequency (RF) based plasma microtenotomy (RF group, n = 40). Clinical outcome data including VAS pain score, shoulder range of motion (ROM), ASES, UCLA, Constant-Murley, and SST score were recorded preoperatively and at 3 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Sixty-five out of eighty patients (81.3%) were available for the final follow-up at 1 year postoperation. There were 32 patients in the ASD group and 33 in the RF group. Both treatment groups showed significantly (P = .031 in the ASD group vs P = .017 in the RF group) reduced pain 3 weeks postoperatively. Both treatment groups showed significantly improved functional scores 3 months postoperatively. Both treatment groups showed significantly improved flexion elevation (FE) and external rotation (ER) 1 year postoperatively and internal rotation (IR) 6 months postoperatively. No significant difference between the 2 groups was found in any of the outcome measurements at any time point postoperatively. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression is a reliable treatment for refractory impingement syndrome. The additional radiofrequency based plasma microtenotomy did not show any significant positive effects regarding pain relief, ROM, or functional recovery. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder following double row suture anchor technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Rambani Rohit; Hackney Roger G

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff is a demanding surgery. Accurate placement of anchors is key to success. Case presentation A 38-year-old woman received arthroscopic repair of her rotator cuff using a double row suture anchor technique. Postoperatively, she developed impingement syndrome which resulted from vertical displacement of a suture anchor once the shoulder was mobilised. The anchor was removed eight weeks following initial surgery and the patient had an u...

  7. Subacromial bursitis related to HIV infection: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejnisman, Benno; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio de; Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Lima, Ana Lucia L Munhoz; Uip, David E

    2010-01-01

    Describe a subacromial bursitis at the right shoulder of a 45-year-old male subject. The patient has been living with HIV/AIDS for 22 years. The ultrasonography and the MRI revealed the presence of a pronounced subacromial effusion, with an inflammatory reaction of adjacent tissues. The tumoration was handled firstly with a needle-puncture aspiration, with a thick liquid outflow, followed by an open drainage. Histopathological evaluation showed no evidence of any AIDS defining disease. There was complete remission of the infection after five months thereafter the symptoms had started. After reviewing the scarce literature in the area, no reports of subacromial bursitis in HIV/AIDS patients were found. The authors point out that, although rare, this disease should be considered as differential diagnosis of shoulder diseases in HIV-infected subjects.

  8. Subacromial bursitis with rice bodies : a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Soo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Park, Dong Woo; Lee, Hak Soo; Oh, Jae Cheon; Lee, Yong Joo; Lee, Won Mi [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-04-01

    Multiple rice bodies in joints or bursae are rarely encountered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We report the radiologic findings of massive subacromial bursitis with innumerable rice bodies on the right shoulder of a 38-year-old man with rheumatoid arthritis. Subacromial bursography showed markedly distended bursa with multiple nodular filling defects. Precontrast CT scanning revealed well-demarcated hypodense lesion without calcification in subacromio-subdeltoid bursa. Multiple rice bodies showed slightly high signal intensity of T1WI and T2WI, and no enhancement after gadolinium injection. (author). 7 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Association between rotating night shift work and metabolic syndrome in Korean workers: differences between 8-hour and 12-hour rotating shift work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jae-Il; Yim, Hyeon Woo

    2017-10-19

    This study aimed to analyze the association between the shift work schedule and metabolic syndrome (MetS). This is a retrospective longitudinal study based on the 2015 health checkup data of 2,090 workers evaluated for MetS in 2010 at a general hospital in Korea. The participants were divided according to their shift work schedule into daytime, three-shift (8-hour rotation), and two-shift (12-hour rotation) workers. The index that indicates the association between the shift work schedule and MetS is the odds ratio (OR) calculated using multivariate logistic regression. The analysis for the entire group of workers indicated that there was positive association between two-shift rotation and MetS (OR=1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.09, 2.29). In the analysis of rotating night-shift workers, the years of rotating night shifts, frequency of night-shift work, and sleep disturbance were added to the confounding variables, and two-shift work remained positively associated with MetS (OR=1.72, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.70). The risk of MetS differs based on the shift work schedules they engage in. Hence, structural changes to the shift work schedules are required to prevent MetS in night-shift workers.

  10. The activity pattern of shoulder muscles in subjects with and without subacromial impingement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Nørregaard, Jesper; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Altered shoulder muscle activity is frequently believed to be a pathogenetic factor of subacromial impingement (SI) and therapeutic interventions have been directed towards restoring normal motor patterns. Still, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding the changes in muscle activity...... in patients with SI. The aim of the study was to determine and compare the activity pattern of the shoulder muscles in subjects with and without SI. Twenty-one subjects with SI and 20 healthy controls were included. Electromyography (EMG) was assessed from eight shoulder muscles from both shoulders during...... and serratus anterior muscles on the symptomatic side compared to the healthy subjects. On the asymptomatic side, the groups showed different muscle activity during external rotation. Our findings of an altered shoulder muscle activity pattern on both the symptomatic and asymptomatic side in patients indicate...

  11. Glenohumeral and scapulothoracic strength impairments exists in patients with subacromial impingement, but these are not reflected in the shoulder pain and disability index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, M B; Witten, A; Holm, K; Christensen, K B; Attrup, M L; Hölmich, P; Thorborg, K

    2017-07-17

    Pain and loss of function are cardinal symptoms associated with Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS), while the presence and magnitude of deficits in strength and range of motion (ROM) are largely undescribed in non-athletic patients with SIS. Moreover, the relevance of impairments in strength and ROM to patient-reported shoulder function is not well described, even though testing of strength is recommended in clinical guidelines. The purpose of this study was, first, to investigate impairments in glenohumeral and scapulothoracic strength and in abduction and internal rotation ROM in patients with SIS. Secondly, to investigate the influence of these impairments on patient-reported shoulder function. Cross-sectional study based on a consecutive cohort of 157 patients referred to specialist examination and diagnosed with shoulder impingement (SIS) using predefined validated diagnostic criteria. Prior to specialist examination, questionnaires regarding shoulder function (Shoulder Pain And Disability Index, SPADI) demographics and kinesiophobia (TSK-11) were collected, and shoulder strength and ROM was measured by trained testers, with the patient reporting pain levels during testing and for the last week. Impairments in strength (abduction, external-rotation, (protraction and horizontal-extension) and ROM (abduction and internal rotation) were investigated in patients with unilateral shoulder pain, using one-sample t-tests. SPADI total score (SPADI) and SPADI function score (SPADI-F), were chosen as dependent variables in multiple regressions to investigate the influence of impairments on patient-reported shoulder function. Independent variables of interest were; strength in abduction and external rotation, abduction ROM, pain-during-tests, pain-last-week and kinesiophobia. Significant impairments were found for all impairment tests, but most pronounced for glenohumeral strength and abduction ROM (29-33% deficits), and less for scapulothoracic strength and internal

  12. Subdeltoid/subacromial bursitis associated with influenza vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Ian F

    2013-01-01

    A 76-year-old male presented with subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis following influenza vaccine administration into the left deltoid muscle. This shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) could have been prevented by the use of a safe, evidence based protocol for the intramuscular injection of the deltoid muscle.

  13. Arthroscopic treatment of bony loose bodies in the subacromial space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Xiao, De-Ming; Jiang, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Wen-Tao; Lei, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Multiple bony loose bodies in the subacromial space caused form cartilage or bone cells and continue to grow. A 58-year-old man with two-year history of swelling and pain of the right shoulder. He had no history of tuberculosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Magnetic resonance (MR) images showed some bony loose bodies in the subacromial space. The removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement were performed arthroscopically. Histological diagnosis of them was synovitis with fibrous bodies. Extra-articular loose bodies is extremely rare, especially in the subacromial space, which maybe originated in the proliferative synovial bursa. Most authors recommend open removal to relive the pain, but there were choice to apply arthroscopy to remove them. The mechanism of formation of bony loose bodies is not clear, may be associated with synovial cartilage metaplasia. Arthroscopic removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement is a good option for treatment of the loose body in the subacromial space, which can receive good function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Subdeltoid/subacromial bursitis associated with influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian F

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old male presented with subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis following influenza vaccine administration into the left deltoid muscle. This shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) could have been prevented by the use of a safe, evidence based protocol for the intramuscular injection of the deltoid muscle.

  15. Arthroscopic treatment of bony loose bodies in the subacromial space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The mechanism of formation of bony loose bodies is not clear, may be associated with synovial cartilage metaplasia. Arthroscopic removal of loose bodies and bursa debridement is a good option for treatment of the loose body in the subacromial space, which can receive good function.

  16. Does Subacromial Osteolysis Affect Shoulder Function after Clavicle Hook Plating?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwei Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate whether subacromial osteolysis, one of the major complications of the clavicle hook plate procedure, affects shoulder function. Methods. We had performed a retrospective study of 72 patients diagnosed with a Neer II lateral clavicle fracture or Degree-III acromioclavicular joint dislocation in our hospital from July 2012 to December 2013. All these patients had undergone surgery with clavicle hook plate and were divided into two groups based on the occurrence of subacromial osteolysis. By using the Constant-Murley at the first follow-up visit after plates removal, we evaluated patients’ shoulder function to judge if it has been affected by subacromial osteolysis. Results. We have analyzed clinical data for these 72 patients, which shows that there is no significant difference between group A (39 patients and group B (33 patients in age, gender, injury types or side, and shoulder function (the Constant-Murley scores are 93.38±3.56 versus 94.24±3.60, P>0.05. Conclusion. The occurrence of subacromial osteolysis is not rare, and also it does not significantly affect shoulder function.

  17. Does Subacromial Osteolysis Affect Shoulder Function after Clavicle Hook Plating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Siwei; Gan, Minfeng; Sun, Han; Wu, Guizhong; Yang, Huilin; Zhou, Feng

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether subacromial osteolysis, one of the major complications of the clavicle hook plate procedure, affects shoulder function. We had performed a retrospective study of 72 patients diagnosed with a Neer II lateral clavicle fracture or Degree-III acromioclavicular joint dislocation in our hospital from July 2012 to December 2013. All these patients had undergone surgery with clavicle hook plate and were divided into two groups based on the occurrence of subacromial osteolysis. By using the Constant-Murley at the first follow-up visit after plates removal, we evaluated patients' shoulder function to judge if it has been affected by subacromial osteolysis. We have analyzed clinical data for these 72 patients, which shows that there is no significant difference between group A (39 patients) and group B (33 patients) in age, gender, injury types or side, and shoulder function (the Constant-Murley scores are 93.38 ± 3.56 versus 94.24 ± 3.60, P > 0.05). The occurrence of subacromial osteolysis is not rare, and also it does not significantly affect shoulder function.

  18. Migration of calcium deposits into subacromial-subdeltoid bursa and into humeral head as a rare complication of calcifying tendinitis: sonography and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Valle, Valeria; Bassi, Emilio Maria; Calliada, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of the shoulder is a common condition characterized by the deposition of calcium, predominantly hydroxyapatite crystals, in the rotator cuff. A rare complication of this condition is the migration of calcium deposits from tendons, usually the supraspinatus, into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa or into the humeral greater tuberosity. These complications are responsible for intense acute shoulder pain and functional disability. Patient anamnesis and clinical symptoms must be considered to make the diagnosis, but imaging, particularly sonography, is often necessary, showing a typical presentation related to the locations of calcium deposits. We present sonographic and other imaging features of subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis and humeral osteitis related to the migration of calcium.

  19. Case study of physiotherapy treatment of a patient after arthroscopic for subacromial decompression

    OpenAIRE

    Hiršová, Pavlína

    2013-01-01

    Title: Case study of physiotherapy treatment of a patient after arthroscopic for subacromial decompression The objective of this bachelor thesis is introduction with theme of physiotherapy of shoulder joint after arthroscopy for subacromial decompression. The thesis is divided in two main parts. The first (general) part describes anatomy, kinesiology and biomechanics of shoulder girdle briefly. There is also the reference of pathology in subacromial space and arthroscopic method description. ...

  20. Arthroscopic treatment for synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Ho; Noh, Haeng Kee; Bada, Leela P; Wang, Joon Ho; Park, Jong Woong

    2007-10-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa has been reported rarely. To the best of our knowledge, there was no case report of arthroscopic treatment for synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa in English literature. The authors present a case of synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial space in a 45-year-old male, which was managed by arthroscopy. This rare condition can be well managed on similar lines as the other joints through arthroscopic surgery.

  1. A specific exercise strategy reduced the need for surgery in subacromial pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Hanna C Björnsson; Holmgren, Theresa; Oberg, Birgitta; Johansson, Kajsa; Adolfsson, Lars E

    2014-10-01

    A programme based on eccentric exercises for treating subacromial pain was in a previous study found effective at 3-month follow-up. The purposes of the present study were to investigate whether the results were maintained after 1 year and whether the baseline Constant-Murley score, rotator cuff status and radiological findings influenced the outcome. 97 patients on the waiting list for arthroscopic subacromial decompression had been randomised to a specific exercise programme or unspecific exercises (controls). After 3 months of exercises, the patients were asked whether they still wanted surgery and this option was available until a 1-year follow-up. 1 year after inclusion or 1 year after surgery, the number of patients who decided to have surgery in each group was compared. The choice of surgery was related to the baseline Constant-Murley score, ultrasound and radiographs taken at inclusion. All patients had improved significantly (p<0.0001) in the Constant-Murley score at the 1-year follow-up. Significantly more patients in the control group decided to have surgery (63%) than those in the specific exercise group (24%; p<0.0001). Patients who decided to have surgery had a significantly lower baseline Constant-Murley score and more often a full-thickness tear. Patients with partial tears did not differ from those with intact tendons. The positive short-term results of specific exercises were maintained after 1 year, and this exercise strategy reduces the need for surgery. Full-thickness tear and a low baseline Constant-Murley score appear to be a predictive marker for a less good outcome. Clinical trials NCT01037673. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Comparison of risk factors for shoulder pain and rotator cuff syndrome in the working population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Julie; Ha, Catherine; Chastang, Jean-François; Descatha, Alexis; Leclerc, Annette; Goldberg, Marcel; Imbernon, Ellen; Roquelaure, Yves

    2012-07-01

    To compare risk factors for shoulder pain without and with rotator cuff syndrome (RCS). A total of 3,710 workers of a French region were randomly included in the cross-sectional study between 2002 and 2005. Personal and occupational risk factors were assessed during a physical examination and by a self-administered questionnaire. Multinomial logistic modeling was used for the following outcomes: no shoulder pain and no RCS (reference), shoulder pain without RCS (called "shoulder pain") and RCS, separately for men and women. The prevalence rates of "shoulder pain" for men and women were 28.0% and 31.1%, respectively, and the prevalence rates of RCS were 6.6% and 8.5%, respectively. In men, "shoulder pain" and RCS were associated with age, high-perceived physical exertion, and arm abduction. Automatic work pace and low supervisor support were associated with "shoulder pain," and high psychological demand and low skill discretion with RCS. In women, "shoulder pain" and RCS were associated with age, repetitiveness of tasks, and low supervisor support. High perceived physical exertion and exposure to cold temperatures were associated with "shoulder pain." Age was more strongly associated with RCS than with shoulder pain without RCS for both genders. Biomechanical and psychosocial factors were associated with "shoulder pain" and RCS and differed between genders. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Subacromial bursitis following human papilloma virus vaccine misinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Soshi; Sakai, Akinori; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2012-12-17

    A patient presented at our clinic with severe subacromial bursitis, which persisted for several months following a third booster injection with Cervarix™. Chronic subacromial bursitis manifested itself in this patient after what appeared to be the misinjection of vaccine in close proximity to the acromion. This bursitis was resistant to conventional physiotherapy and to corticosteroid therapy, but was responsive to arthroscopic surgery. Since such patients may present to an arthroscopic surgeon only months after receiving a vaccine injection, this etiological link may not be fully appreciated by treating clinicians. Further, the accuracy of injection in the deltoid region also appears under appreciated, and this report highlights the importance of accurate injection to the deltoid region or in certain cases, the value of simply changing the injection site to another larger muscle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Huge tumor-like subacromial bursitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, M; Wakitani, S; Yamamoto, T

    2001-09-01

    Abstract We report a rare case of a huge subacromial bursitis in rheumatoid arthritis. A solid tumor was initially suspected because it was very large with no apparent local sign of inflammation, and because no fluid retention was observed. We performed radiograms, a plain computed tomogram, a (99)mTc-MDP bone scintigram, a (67)Ga-citrate scintigram, and a digital subtraction arteriogram, which all indicated no evidence of tumor. Finally, a bursogram proved the mass to be a huge enlarged subacromial bursa. Surgical exploration revealed that the bursa contained 450 g of a yellowish, jelly-like substance, which was considered to be a thick collection of fibrin. No recurrence was noted at a follow-up 16 years after surgery.

  5. Subacromial space in adult patients with thoracic hyperkyphosis and in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumina, Stefano; Di Giorgio, Giantony; Postacchini, Franco; Postacchini, Roberto

    2008-02-01

    The assumption that subacromial space decreases in patients with thoracic hyperkyphosis arises from sporadic and personal observations. The purpose of this study was to compare width of subacromial space calculated on radiographs and CT scans of a high number of patients with thoracic hyperkyphosis that registered on exams of healthy volunteers. We measured the subacromial space, using Petersson's method, on radiographs of 47 patients with idiopathic or acquired thoracic hyperkyphosis and of 175 healthy shoulder volunteers. Both groups were further distinguished considering gender and age. Females with hyperkyphosis were also divided in two subgroups: those with a kyphotic curve of less (24 patients) or more (19 patients) than 50 degrees , respectively. Subacromial space of all patients and of 21 volunteers was also evaluated using CT. Acromio-humeral space was less wide in patients with hyperkyphosis with respect to coeval volunteers of the same gender; in females and in subjects older than 60. Subacromial width of females with hyperkyphosis whose curve was more than 50 degrees was significantly narrower (phyperkyphosis greater than 50 degrees had a subacromial space narrower than that measured in patients with a less severe kyphosis. This suggests that subacromial width is directly related to severity of thoracic kyphosis. Because hyperkyphosis of patients with osteoporotic vertebral fractures may worsen over the time, subacromial decompression could give only temporary shoulder pain relief.

  6. Targeted knockout of TNF-α by injection of lentivirus-mediated siRNA into the subacromial bursa for the treatment of subacromial bursitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Li, Quan; Wei, Xianzhao; Xu, Jie; Chen, Qi; Song, Shuang; Lu, Zhe; Wang, Zimin

    2015-09-01

    Subacromial bursitis (SAB) is the major source of pain in rotator cuff disease. Although multiple investigations have provided support for the role of inflammatory cytokines in SAB, few have focussed on the use these cytokines in the treatment of SAB. The aim of the present study was to observe the therapeutic efficacy of lentivirus‑mediated RNA interference (RNAi) on carrageenan‑induced SAB by injecting lentivirus‑tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑RNAi expressing TNF‑α small interfering (si)RNA. Using screened siRNA segments, an siRNA was designed. A lentivirus vector expressing siRNA was established and packed as lentivirus particles. A lentivirus that expressed the negative sequence was used as a lentivirus‑negative control (NC). The carrageenan‑induced SAB model was established in 32 male Sprague‑Dawley rats. The modeled rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Lentivirus‑RNAi treatment group, lentivirus‑NC group, SAB group and phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS) blank control group. The lentivirus was injected (1x10(7) transducing units) into the subacromial bursa of the rats in the lentivirus‑RNAi group and lentivirus‑NC group, whereas 100 µl PBS was injected at the same site in the SAB group and the PBS blank control group. At 5 weeks following injection, the animals were sacrificed and venous blood was obtained. The effect of TNF‑α interference and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were determined by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, hematoxylin and eosin staining, Van Gieson's staining and immunofluorescence. The expression of TNF‑α was decreased in the lentivirus‑TNF‑α‑RNAi group compared with that in the SAB group. Morphological observations revealed that the number of inflammatory cells were reduced and damage to tendon fibers was attenuated in this group, suggesting that the downregulation of the protein expression levels of TNF‑α‑associated nuclear

  7. Isolation and characterization of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from shoulder tissues involved in rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Hajime; Uchida, Soshi; Sekiya, Ichiro; Sakai, Akinori; Moridera, Kuniaki; Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies report a relatively high failure rate for tendon-bone healing after rotator cuff repair. Several studies have investigated biologically augmented rotator cuff repair; however, none has shown the application of synovial mesenchymal stem cells for such repair. To demonstrate whether cells derived from shoulder tissues have mesenchymal stem cell properties and to identify which tissue is the best source of the mesenchymal stem cells. Controlled laboratory study. Forty-two patients with a diagnosed rotator cuff tear preoperatively were enrolled in this study. Human mesenchymal tissues were obtained during arthroscopic surgery for rotator cuff tears from 19 donors who met the inclusion criteria and had investigable amounts of tissue. Colony-forming units, yield obtained, expandability, differentiation potential, epitope profile, and gene expression were compared among the cells from 4 shoulder tissues: synovium of the glenohumeral joint, subacromial bursa, margin of the ruptured supraspinatus tendon, and residual tendon stump on the greater tuberosity (enthesis). The number of live passage 0 cells from whole tissue was significantly higher in cells derived from the subacromial bursa (P source. The findings indicate that the subacromial bursa is a good candidate for the source of mesenchymal stem cells in rotator cuff tears. Synovial cells from the subacromial bursa in patients with rotator cuff tears are a superior cell source in vitro, suggesting that mesenchymal stem cells from this tissue could be good candidates for biological augmentation of rotator cuff repair.

  8. Is ultrasound-guided injection more effective in chronic subacromial bursitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Lin-Fen; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Lin, Yi-Jia; Wu, Shih-Hui; Chang, Kae-Chwen; Chang, Hsiao-Lan

    2013-12-01

    Although ultrasound (US)-guided subacromial injection has shown increased accuracy in needle placement, whether US-guided injection produces better clinical outcome is still controversial. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the efficacy of subacromial corticosteroid injection under US guidance with palpation-guided subacromial injection in patients with chronic subacromial bursitis. Patients with chronic subacromial bursitis were randomized to a US-guided injection group and a palpation-guided injection group. The subjects in each group were injected with a mixture of 0.5 mL dexamethasone suspension and 3 mL lidocaine into the subacromial bursa. The primary outcome measures were the visual analog scale for pain and active and passive ranges of motion of the affected shoulder. Secondary outcome measures were the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, the Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, and the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). The primary outcome measures were evaluated before, immediately, 1 wk, and 1 month after the injection; the secondary outcome measures were evaluated before, 1 wk, and 1 month after the injection. Of the 145 subjects screened, 46 in each group completed the study. Significantly greater improvement in passive shoulder abduction and in physical functioning and vitality scores on the SF-36 were observed in the US-guided group. The pre- and postinjection within-group comparison revealed significant improvement in the visual analog scale for pain and range of motion, as well as in the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index, Shoulder Disability Questionnaire, and SF-36 scores, in both groups. The US-guided subacromial injection technique produced significantly greater improvements in passive shoulder abduction and in some items of the SF-36. US is effective in guiding the needle into the subacromial bursa in patients with chronic subacromial bursitis.

  9. Alternativas terapéuticas en el manejo del Síndrome Subacromial: Cross Taping

    OpenAIRE

    Dizy-Friera, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    El síndrome subacromial, también conocido como síndrome de pinzamiento del hombro, es un trastorno muy prevalente en nuestra sociedad que genera un alto coste socioeconómico y una elevada discapacidad. El síndrome subacromial supone un desafío terapéutico para los fisioterapeutas. Existen múltiples formas de tratamiento, sin embargo la evidencia científica que las apoya es escasa. El propósito de este estudio es evaluar la efectividad del cross taping en el síndrome subacromial, incluyendo...

  10. Subacromial corticosteroid injections transiently decrease suture anchor pullout strength: biomechanical studies in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolkart, Oleg; Chechik, Ofir; Bivas, Assaf; Brosh, Tamar; Drexler, Michael; Weinerman, Zachary; Maman, Eran

    2017-10-01

    Arthroscopic rotator cuff (RC) repair incorporates suture anchors to secure torn RC tendons to the greater tuberosity (GT) bone. RC repair strength depends on the anchor-bone interface and on the quality of the GT. We evaluated the effect of single and multiple corticosteroid injections on the pullout strength of suture anchors. Fifty rats were divided into those receiving saline solution injection (control group), a single methylprednisolone acetate (MTA) injection (MTA1 group), or 3 once-weekly MTA injections (MTA3 group). Rats were killed humanely at 1 or 4 weeks after the last injection. A mini-suture anchor was inserted into the humeral head through the GT. Specimens were tested biomechanically. At 1 week after the last injection, the mean maximal pullout strength was significantly reduced in the MTA1 group (63.5%) and MTA3 group (56%) compared with the control group (P suture anchor at 1 week. However, this effect was transient and resolved within a relatively short period. These findings indicate that a waiting period is required between subacromial corticosteroid injection and RC repair surgery that involves the use of suture anchors. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Association of Bicipital Peritendinous Effusion with Subacromial Impingement: A Dynamic Ultrasonographic Study of 337 Shoulders

    OpenAIRE

    Ke-Vin Chang; Wei-Ting Wu; Levent Özçakar

    2016-01-01

    Bicipital peritendinous effusion (BPE) is the most common biceps tendon abnormality and can be related to various shoulder ultrasonographic findings. Since the association of BPE with subacromial impingement is unclear, our study aimed to explore its association with the dynamic subacromial impingement test during ultrasound (US) imaging. We included 337 shoulders referred for US examinations and quantified the amount of BPE. Effusion more than 1?mm in thickness was considered a positive find...

  12. Clinical and radiological outcome of conservative vs. surgical treatment of atraumatic degenerative rotator cuff rupture: design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Akker-Scheek Inge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subacromial impingement syndrome is a frequently observed disorder in orthopedic practice. Lasting symptoms and impairment may occur when a subsequent atraumatic rotator cuff rupture is also present. However, degenerative ruptures of the rotator cuff can also be observed in asymptomatic elderly individuals. Treatment of these symptomatic degenerative ruptures may be conservative or surgical. Acceptable results are reported for both treatment modalities. No evidence-based level-1 studies have been conducted so far to compare these treatment modalities. The objective of this study is to determine whether there is a difference in outcome between surgical reconstruction and conservative treatment of a degenerative atraumatic rotator cuff tendon rupture. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial will be conducted. Patients aged between 45 and 75 with a symptomatic atraumatic rotator cuff rupture as diagnosed by MRI will be included. Exclusion criteria are traumatic rotator cuff rupture, frozen shoulder and diabetes mellitus. Patients will be randomized into two groups. Conservative treatment includes physical therapy according to a standardized protocol, NSAIDs and, if indicated, subacromial infiltration with a local anesthetic and corticosteroids. Surgical reconstruction is performed under general anesthesia in combination with an interscalenus plexus block. An acromioplasty with reconstruction of the rotator cuff tendon is performed, as described by Rockwood et al. Measurements take place preoperatively and 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. The primary outcome measure is the Constant score. Secondary measures include both disease-specific and generic outcome measures, and an economic evaluation. Additionally, one year after inclusion a second MRI will be taken of all patients in order to determine whether extent and localization of the rupture as well as the amount of fatty degeneration are prognostic

  13. Shoulder Impingement Syndromes: Implications on Physical Therapy Examination and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    A painful shoulder presents challenges in examination, diagnosis and intervention for the physical therapist because of the complexity of the structures involved. A common cause of shoulder pain is shoulder impingement syndrome. This was first described as a condition in which the soft tissues of the subacromial space were chronically entrapped and compressed between the humeral head and the subacromial arch. This definition does not account for the myriad potential causes of shoulder impingement conditions, as forms of impingement other than subacromial soft tissue compression may explain different symptomatic shoulder injuries. This paper describes shoulder impingement syndromes that have been hypothesized, identified and analyzed in the literature. Physical Therapy examination and intervention for these syndromes are also discussed. PMID:25792938

  14. Joint position sense is not altered during shoulder medial and lateral rotations in female assembly line workers with shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haik, Melina N; Camargo, Paula R; Zanca, Gisele G; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; Salvini, Tania F; Mattiello-Rosa, Stela M

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated joint position sense (JPS) during medial and lateral rotations of the shoulder in female workers with and without shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Three groups were assessed. The case group consisted of 15 female assembly line workers (35.5, SD 5.8 years) with unilateral SIS. Control group 1 consisted of 15 female assembly line workers asymptomatic for SIS (34.4, SD 5.5 years) and control group 2 consisted of 15 female subjects (33.1, SD 6.2 years) asymptomatic for SIS and with no exposure to activities with the upper limbs. The JPS was evaluated bilaterally during passive (2°/sec) and active (5°/sec) repositioning tests using an isokinetic dynamometer. The target angles were 45° of lateral rotation (achieved by medially rotating the shoulder from 90° of lateral rotation) and 75° of lateral rotation (achieved by laterally rotating the shoulder from neutral rotation). There were no differences between sides for all groups (p  >  0.05). There were no differences in any of the variables between the case group and the control groups (p  >  0.05). The results of this study suggest that JPS during medial and lateral rotations of the shoulder is not altered in female assembly line workers with SIS.

  15. Impingement syndrome of the ankle following supination external rotation trauma: MR imaging findings with arthroscopic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffler, Gottfried J. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 150, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Department of Radiology, University Hospital Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 9, 8036 Graz (Austria); Tirman, Phillip F.J.; Stoller, David W. [San Francisco Magnetic Resonance Center, 3333 California Street, Suite 105, San Francisco, CA 94118 (United States); Genant, Harry K. [Department of Radiology, University of California San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 150, San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Ceballos, Cecar; Dillingham, Michael F. [Sports Orthopedics and Rehabilitation, 2884 Sand Hill Rd., Suite 110, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Our objective was to identify MR imaging findings in patients with syndesmotic soft tissue impingement of the ankle and to investigate the reliability of these imaging characteristics to predict syndesmotic soft tissue impingement syndromes of the ankle. Twenty-one ankles with chronic pain ultimately proven to have anterior soft tissue impingement syndrome were examined by MR imaging during January 1996 to June 2001. The MR imaging protocol included sagittal and coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), sagittal T1-weighted spin echo, axial and coronal proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences. Nineteen ankles that underwent MR imaging during the same period of time and that had arthroscopically proven diagnosis different than impingement syndrome served as a control group. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments possibly related to syndesmotic soft tissue impingement were recorded. Arthroscopy was performed subsequently in all patients and was considered the gold standard. The statistical analysis revealed an overall frequency of scarred syndesmotic ligaments of 70% in the group with ankle impingement. Fibrovascular scar formations distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments presented with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and remained low to intermediate in signal intensity on T2-weighted MR imaging. Compared with arthroscopy, MR imaging revealed a sensitivity of 89%, a specificity of 100%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 93% for scarred syndesmotic ligaments. The frequency of scar formation distinct from the syndesmotic ligaments in patients with impingement syndrome of the ankle was not statistically significantly higher than in the control group. In contrast to that, anterior tibial osteophytes and talar osteophytes were statistically significantly higher in the group with anterior impingement than in the control group. Conventional MR imaging was found to be insensitive for the diagnosis of syndesmotic soft tissue

  16. The influence of induced shoulder muscle pain on rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscle activity during elevation of the arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelein, Birgit; Cools, Ann; Parlevliet, Thierry; Cagnie, Barbara

    2017-03-01

    Altered recruitment of rotator cuff and scapulothoracic muscles has been identified in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. To date, however, the cause-consequence relationship between pain and altered muscle recruitment has not been fully unraveled. The effect of experimental shoulder pain induced by injection of hypertonic saline in the supraspinatus on the activity of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, trapezius, and serratus anterior activity was investigated during the performance of an elevation task by use of muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging in 25 healthy individuals. Measurements were taken at 4 levels (C6-C7, T2-T3, T3-T4, and T6-T7) at rest and after the elevation task performed without and with experimental shoulder pain. During arm elevation, experimentally induced pain caused a significant activity reduction, expressed as reduction in T2 shift of the IS (P = .029). No significant changes in T2 shift values were found for the other rotator cuff muscles or the scapulothoracic muscles. This study demonstrates that acute experimental shoulder pain has an inhibitory effect on the activity of the IS during arm elevation. Acute experimental shoulder pain did not seem to influence the scapulothoracic muscle activity significantly. The findings suggest that rotator cuff muscle function (infraspinatus) should be a consideration in the early management of patients with shoulder pain. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of the standardized ultrasound protocol for assessing subacromial structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs Kjær, Birgitte; Ellegaard, Karen; Wieland, Ina

    2017-01-01

    : To investigate the intra- and inter-rater reliability of the existing ultrasound (US) examinations of the subacromial space, the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, and the supraspinatus tendon. METHOD: In a three-phased design, two physiotherapists using a standardized US protocol examined the thickness...

  18. Association of Bicipital Peritendinous Effusion with Subacromial Impingement: A Dynamic Ultrasonographic Study of 337 Shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Özçakar, Levent

    2016-12-12

    Bicipital peritendinous effusion (BPE) is the most common biceps tendon abnormality and can be related to various shoulder ultrasonographic findings. Since the association of BPE with subacromial impingement is unclear, our study aimed to explore its association with the dynamic subacromial impingement test during ultrasound (US) imaging. We included 337 shoulders referred for US examinations and quantified the amount of BPE. Effusion more than 1 mm in thickness was considered a positive finding. A comparison of three grades of subacromial impingement, adjusted by patient demographics, static sonographic shoulder pathology, and physical findings, by using multivariate regression models revealed that the odds ratio of subacromial impingement (with 95% confidence intervals) in the presence of BPE was 6.54 (3.21-13.32) in grade 1, 6.93 (3.05-15.76) in grade 2 and 3.18 (1.48-6.80) in grade 3. An increase in age, subdeltoid bursitis, full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear, and shoulder stiffness were also associated with BPE. Since our study demonstrated a positive association of BPE with all grades of impingement, a US dynamic subacromial impingement test is suggested when BPE is present. Future prospective studies are needed to identify changes in BPE after treatment.

  19. Inflammatory cytokines are overexpressed in the subacromial bursa of frozen shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lho, Yun-Mee; Ha, Eunyoung; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Song, Kwang-Soon; Min, Byung-Woo; Bae, Ki-Cheor; Lee, Kyung-Jae; Hwang, Ilseon; Park, Hyung-Bin

    2013-05-01

    Frozen shoulder is a debilitating condition characterized by gradual loss of glenohumeral motion with chronic inflammation and capsular fibrosis. Yet its pathogenesis remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that the subacromial bursa may be responsible for the pathogenesis of frozen shoulder by producing inflammatory cytokines. We obtained joint capsules and subacromial bursae from 14 patients with idiopathic frozen shoulder and from 7 control subjects to determine the expression levels of interleukin (IL) 1α, IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase (COX) 1, and COX-2 by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IL-1α, IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-1, and COX-2 were expressed at significantly high levels in the joint capsules of the frozen shoulder group compared with those of the control group. Intriguingly, IL-1α, TNF-α, and COX-2 were also expressed at significantly high levels in the subacromial bursae of the frozen shoulder group compared with those of the control group. Immunohistochemical analysis showed increased expression of COX-2 in both the joint capsules and subacromial bursae of the frozen shoulder group. These findings imply that elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines in the subacromial bursa may be associated with the pathogenesis of inflammation evolving into fibrosis. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Secondary Subacromial Impingement after Valgus Closing-Wedge Osteotomy for Proximal Humerus Varus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Sano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 31-year-old construction worker had been suffering from both the motion pain and the restriction of elevation in his right shoulder due to severe varus deformity of humeral neck, which occurred after proximal humeral fracture. The angle for shoulder flexion and abduction was restricted to 50 and 80 degrees, respectively. Valgus closing-wedge osteotomy followed by the internal fixation using a locking plate was carried out at 12 months after injury. Postoperatively, the head-shaft angle of the humerus improved from 65 to 138 degrees. Active flexion and abduction angles improved from 80 to 135 degrees and from 50 to 135 degrees, respectively. However, the patient complained from a sharp pain with a clicking sound during shoulder abduction even after removal of the locking plate. Since subacromial steroid injection temporarily relieved his shoulder pain, we assumed that the secondary subacromial impingement was provoked after osteotomy. Thus, arthroscopic subacromial decompression was carried out at 27 months after the initial operation, which finally relieved his symptoms. In the valgus closing-wedge osteotomy, surgeons should pay attention to the condition of subacromial space to avoid causing the secondary subacromial impingement.

  1. Subacromial bursitis with giant rice bodies as initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Ramesh; Tan, Justina Wei Lyn; Chau, Cora Yuk Ping; Lee, Keng Thiam

    2012-10-01

    Rice body formation is a nonspecific response to chronic synovial inflammation associated with tuberculous arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, seronegative inflammatory arthritis, and even osteoarthritis. Such bodies were termed rice bodies because of their close resemblance to grains of polished white rice. We present a case report of a middle-aged woman with right shoulder subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis with giant rice body formation as her initial presentation of rheumatoid arthritis. Her right shoulder symptoms resolved after subacromial and subdeltoid bursectomy and removal of the rice bodies. She subsequently developed inflammatory arthritis of other joints, met the criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, and has been treated medically.

  2. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder; Schulterimpingement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung Radiodiagnostik fuer chirurgische Faecher, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Wien (Austria); Breitenseher, M.J. [Klinische Abteilung fuer Osteologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik der Universitaet Wien (Austria); Waldviertelklinikum Horn (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    The impingement syndrome is a clinical entity characterized by shoulder pain due to primary or secondary mechanical irritation of the rotator cuff. The primary factors for the development of impingement are a curved or hook-shaped anterior acromion as well as subacromial osteophytes, which may lead to tearing of the supraspinatus tendon. Secondary impingement is mainly caused by calcific tendinopathy, glenohumeral instability, os acromiale and degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint. Conventional radiographs are initially obtained, mainly for evaluation of the bony structures of the shoulder. If available, sonography can be used for detection of lesions and tears of the rotator cuff. Finally, MR-imaging provides detailed information about the relationship of the acromion and the acromioclavicular joint to the rotator cuff itself. In many cases however, no morphologic cause for impingement syndrome can be found. While patients are initially treated conservatively, chronic disease usually requires surgical intervention. (orig.) [German] Das Impingementsyndrom ist ein klinisches Krankheitsbild multifaktorieller Genese, bei dem es primaer oder sekundaer zu einer schmerzhaften mechanischen Beeintraechtigung der Rotatorenmanschette kommt. Als primaere Faktoren gelten ein gebogener oder hakenfoermiger Vorderrand des Akromions oder von diesem entspringende Osteophyten, was zu Laesionen der Supraspinatussehne fuehren kann. Zu den sekundaeren Faktoren zaehlt man v. a. eine Tendinitis calcarea, eine glenohumerale Instabilitaet, ein Os acromiale sowie degenerative Veraenderungen im Bereich des Akromioklavikulargelenks. Bildgebend steht an erster Stelle ein Nativroentgen, mit dem sich die knoechernen Strukturen gut darstellen lassen. Falls vorhanden, kann in weiterer Folge die Sonographie Auskunft ueber den Zustand der Rotatorenmanschette geben. Mit der MRT schliesslich laesst sich die Beziehung von Akromion und gelenkassoziierten Strukturen zur Rotatorenmanschette

  3. Effects of the abdominal drawing-in maneuver on muscle activity, pelvic motions, and knee flexion during active prone knee flexion in patients with lumbar extension rotation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyue-Nam; Cynn, Heon-Seock; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Lee, Won-Hwee; Ha, Sung-Min; Kim, Su-Jung; Weon, Jong-Hyuck

    2011-09-01

    To investigate the effects of performing an abdominal drawing-in maneuver (ADIM) during active prone knee flexion on the hamstrings and erector spinae muscle activity, the amounts of pelvic motion and knee flexion, and onset of pelvic movements. Comparative, repeated-measures study. University research laboratory. Men patients (N=18) with lumbar extension rotation syndrome. Subjects performed prone knee flexion in 2 conditions. To measure muscle activity, surface electromyogram (EMG) of both erector spinae and the medial and lateral hamstrings was performed. Kinematic data on the pelvic motion and knee flexion were measured using a 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Repeated 1-way analysis of variance was used for the statistical analysis. Significantly decreased electromyographic activity in the right and left erector spinae and significantly increased electromyographic activity in the medial and lateral hamstrings activity were shown during prone knee flexion in ADIM condition using the pressure biofeedback unit. In addition, the amounts of anterior pelvic tilt, pelvic rotation, knee flexion, and perceived pain decreased significantly during prone knee flexion in the ADIM condition compared with the same maneuver in the non-ADIM condition. The onset of anterior pelvic tilt and pelvic rotation occurred significantly earlier in the non-ADIM condition, compared with the ADIM condition. ADIM effectively increased activation of knee flexors, decreased activation of back extensors, and reduced the pelvic motions and low back pain during prone knee flexion in patients with lumbar extension rotation syndrome. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Subaxial rotational vertebral artery syndrome: resection of the uncinate process and anterior fusion can be sufficient!: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelfaut, Sebastiaan; Verhasselt, Skrallan; Carpentier, Karel; Moke, Lieven

    2015-03-01

    A case report on rotational vertebral artery syndrome (RVAS) and surgical treatment. To illustrate a safe treatment option of RVAS with diminished risk of iatrogenic damage to the vertebral artery. RVAS is an uncommon cause of symptomatic transient vertebrobasilar insufficiency induced by physiological head rotation with temporary significant external compression of the dominant subaxial vertebral artery. Previous reports state that the treatment of choice consists of decompression of the vessel with resection of the anterior rim of the transverse process and any fibrotic sheet or intertransverse muscle, if necessary, combined with an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with uncus resection. This is a case report on RVAS and its surgical treatment. The diagnosis of RVAS due to an osteophyte of the uncinate process at level C5/C6 was confirmed using computed tomographic angiography. We performed a classic ACDF using the contralateral approach with complete resection of the uncovertebral joint at the pathologic site. In our case, the symptoms of transient vertebrobasilar insufficiency induced by head rotation completely resolved postoperatively, and computed tomographic angiography images at 3 months postoperatively showed good bony ingrowth and restoration of vertebral artery patency during extreme rotation. Classic ACDF with complete resection of the uncovertebral joint is a safe treatment option for RVAS in the subaxial cervical spine. Fusion at the pathologic level will eliminate rotation and prevent further formation of osteophytes at the operated level. Unroofing of the vertebral artery seems not always necessary, diminishing the surgical risk.

  5. Developmental changes in mental rotation ability and visual perspective-taking in children and adults with Williams Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro eHirai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a genetic disorder caused by the partial deletion of chromosome 7. Individuals with WS have atypical cognitive abilities, such as hypersociability and compromised visuospatial cognition, although the mechanisms underlying these deficits, as well as the relationship between them, remain unclear. Here, we assessed performance in mental rotation (MR and level 2 visual perspective taking (VPT2 tasks in individuals with and without WS. Individuals with WS obtained lower scores in the VPT2 task than in the MR task. These individuals also performed poorly on both the MR and VPT2 tasks compared with members of a control group. For the individuals in the control group, performance scores improved during development for both tasks, while the scores of those in the WS group improved only in the MR task, and not the VPT2 task. Therefore, we conducted a second experiment to explore the specific cognitive challenges faced by people with WS in the VPT2 task. In addition to asking participants to change their physical location (self-motion, we also asked them to adopt a third-person perspective by imagining that they had moved to a specified location (self-motion imagery. This enabled us to assess their ability to simulate the movement of their own bodies. The performance in the control group improved in both the self-motion and self-motion imagery tasks and both performances were correlated with verbal mental age. However, we did not find any developmental changes in performance for either task in the WS group. Performance scores for the self-motion imagery task in the WS group were low, similar to the scores observed for the VPT2 in this population. These results suggest that MR and VPT2 tasks involve different processes, and that these processes develop differently in people with WS. Moreover, difficulty completing VPT2 tasks may be partly because of an inability of people with WS to accurately simulate mental body motion.

  6. Subacromial corticosteroid injection for poststroke shoulder pain: an exploratory prospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, John; Jedlicka, Lynn

    2009-03-01

    To assess the effectiveness of subacromial corticosteroid injections for poststroke shoulder pain. Exploratory, prospective case series. Ambulatory setting, university-affiliated hospital. Stroke survivors (N=10) with pain in the hemiparetic shoulder. Consecutive stroke survivors with evidence of supraspinatus impingement, supraspinatus tendonitis, or subacromial bursitis received subacromial corticosteroid injections. The primary outcome measure was the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) question 12 (BPI 12), which assesses "worst pain" in the previous 7 days. Secondary measures included BPI question 15, which assesses present pain and BPI question 23 (BPI 23), which assesses pain interference with 7 daily activities. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, weekly for the first 4 weeks and then at 8 and 12 weeks postinjection. Repeated measure analysis of variance revealed significant within group time effect for BPI 12 (F=7.7, PSubacromial corticosteroid injection is associated with significant reduction in poststroke shoulder pain in patients with evidence of supraspinatus impingement, supraspinatus tendonitis, or subacromial bursitis. However, there is a gradual loss of effect with time. Controlled trials are needed to show a cause and effect relationship.

  7. Ultrasound-guided shoulder injections in the treatment of subacromial bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Max J L; Lew, Henry L; Hsu, Tsz-Ching; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Lin, Wei-Ching; Tang, Simon F T; Lee, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Rex C H; Chen, Carl P C

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the treatment effectiveness between ultrasound-guided and blind injection techniques in the treatment of subacromial bursitis. A total of 40 patients with sonographic confirmation of subacromial bursitis were recruited into this study. These patients were divided into blind and ultrasound-guided injection groups. The shoulder abduction range of motion was compared before injections and 1 wk after the completion of injections in both groups. The shoulder abduction range of motion before injection in the blind injection group was 71.03 +/- 12.38 degrees and improved to 100 +/- 18.18 degrees 1 wk after the injection treatments. However, the improvement did not reveal significant statistical differences (P > 0.05). The shoulder abduction range of motion before injection in the ultrasound-guided injection group was 69.05 +/- 14.72 degrees and improved to 139.29 +/- 20.14 degrees 1 wk after the injection treatments (P subacromial bursa. The ultrasound-guided injection technique can result in significant improvement in shoulder abduction range of motion as compared with the blind injection technique in treating patients with subacromial bursitis.

  8. Multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis: MR appearances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, J F; Peh, W C; Evans, N S; Smallman, L A; Wong, R W; Thomas, A M

    1996-07-01

    Multiple rice body formation is an unusual complication of chronic bursitis. Clinically and macroscopically, it can resemble synovial osteochondromatosis. Radiographic and MR appearances, however, may allow an accurate pre-operative diagnosis. The imaging features of two middle-aged women with multiple subacromial/subdeltoid bursa rice bodies are described.

  9. Septic subacromial bursitis caused by Mycobacterium kansasii in an immunocompromised host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Stephanie D; Tully, Charla C; Borra, Himabindu; Berven, Michael D; Arroyo, Ramon

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a common cause of pulmonary infection as a result of nontuberculous mycobacteria, but is less commonly described as a cause of an orthopedic infection. We present the first case of M. kansasii subacromial septic bursitis in an immunocompromised host. This case demonstrates the diagnostic and treatment challenges associated with orthopedic infections caused by M. kansasii.

  10. Injection of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa: blind or ultrasound-guided?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.C.M.; Maresch, B.J.; Jager, G.J.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blind injection of the subacromial-sub-deltoid bursa (SSB) for diagnostic purposes (Neer test) or therapeutic purposes (corticosteroid therapy) is frequently used. Poor response to previous blind injection or side effects may be due to a misplaced injection. It is assumed that ultrasound

  11. Bilateral subacromial bursitis with macroscopic rice bodies: Ultrasound, CT and MR appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, T.C.; Chong, S.F.; Lu, P.P. [Kwong Wah Hospital (Hong Kong). Department of Radiology; Mak, K.H. [Kwong Wah Hospital (Hong Kong). Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology

    1998-05-01

    The radiological findings of ultrasound, CT and MR of a case of bilateral subacromial bursitis with macroscopic rice bodies is described. MRI is the investigation of choice and the intravenous gadolinium-enhanced usefulness was noted. The previous literature is also reviewed. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 5 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  12. Comparison of three types of exercise in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy/shoulder impingement syndrome: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Stuart R; Woby, Steve R; Thompson, Dave P

    2017-06-01

    To assess the efficacy of three different exercise programmes in treating rotator cuff tendinopathy/shoulder impingement syndrome. Parallel group randomised clinical trial. Two out-patient NHS physiotherapy departments in Manchester, United Kingdom. 120 patients with shoulder pain of at least three months duration. Pain was reproduced on stressing the rotator cuff and participants had full passive range of movement at the shoulder. Three dynamic rotator cuff loading programmes; open chain resisted band exercises (OC) closed chain exercises (CC) and minimally loaded range of movement exercises (ROM). Change in Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) score and the proportion of patients making a Minimally Clinically Important Change (MCIC) in symptoms 6 weeks after commencing treatment. All three programmes resulted in significant decreases in SPADI score, however there were no significant differences between the groups. Participants making a MCIC in symptoms were similar across all groups, however more participants deteriorated in the ROM group. Dropout rate was higher in the CC group, but when only patients completing treatment were considered more patients in the CC group made a meaningful reduction in pain and disability. Open chain, closed chain and range of movement exercises all seem to be effective in bringing about short term changes in pain and disability in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. ISRCTN76701121. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Acute effects of scapular Kinesio Taping® on shoulder rotator strength, ROM and acromiohumeral distance in asymptomatic overhead athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harput, Gulcan; Guney, Hande; Toprak, Ugur; Colakoglu, Filiz; Baltaci, Gul

    2017-11-01

    There is limited information in the literature that shows whether scapular taping has an effect on the acromiohumeral distance (AHD) and shoulder functions. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of scapular Kinesio Taping® on shoulder internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) strength, IR and ER range of motion (ROM) and AHD in asymptomatic overhead athletes. Forty-one volleyball athletes (24 men, 17 women; mean age: 16.1±1.5 years, body mass: 66.5±9.6 kg, body height: 179.6±8.4 cm, Body Mass Index: 20.5±2.3 kg/m2, time participating in overhead sports activity: 6.2±1.4 h/week, experience in sport: 4.1±2.4 years) were included in this study. Shoulder IR and ER ROM, total rotation ROM, AHD, shoulder isometric IR and ER strength and ER:IR strength ratio of the dominant side were tested before and after taping. Scapular taping increased the shoulder IR (PROM (PROM and ER:IR ratio did not change after taping (P=0.26, P=0.98, respectively). The results of this study suggest that scapular taping could be an effective method for enhancing the acromiohumeral distance, shoulder rotator strength and range of motion. Therefore, scapular taping could be recommended for not only in the asymptomatic athletes' shoulder exercise training but also in the prevention of subacromial impingement syndrome.

  14. Dynamic ultrasound of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa in patients with shoulder impingement: a comparison with normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghir, Ahmed A; Sookur, Paul A; Shah, Sachit; Watson, Martin

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if the thickness of the subacromial-subdeltoid (SASD) bursa during dynamic ultrasound and on static views differs between patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and healthy volunteers. Twenty-two patients with a clinical diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and 23 healthy volunteers were recruited. A subset of patients showing an immediate symptom response following intrabursal injection was identified as "injection responders". Ultrasound of the shoulder was performed on all participants using three standard static views and two dynamic views (before and after arm abduction). The thickness of both the intrabursal fluid and the superficial peribursal fat was measured on all views. The bursal thickness measurements in the two groups were compared using a t test for significance. The mean increase in SASD bursal fluid thickness following arm abduction was not statistically different among all patients (0.39 ± 0.41 mm) and controls (0.35 ± 0.32 mm), p = 0.72. The same was true comparing injection responders (0.46 ± 0.49 mm) with controls, p = 0.41. On static views, greater bursal fluid thickness was found in patients (1.01 ± 0.48 mm) compared with controls (0.67 ± 0.32 mm) when using the short axis view of the supraspinatus, p = 0.006. No statistically significant difference was found between injection responders and controls when measuring peribursal fat thickness on any view. Gathering of the SASD bursa demonstrated during dynamic ultrasound does not necessarily indicate painful impingement of the bursa as it is found to a similar degree in patients with a clinical diagnosis of impingement and healthy volunteers.

  15. Exercises may be as efficient as subacromial decompression in patients with subacromial stage II impingement: 4-8-years' follow-up in a prospective, randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haahr, J. P.; Andersen, JH

    2006-01-01

    not differ between treatment groups. Self-reported outcomes after 4-8 years did not differ between treatment groups. CONCLUSION: The results of surgical decompression were equal to those of conservative treatment, and the surgery group had more income transferrals during the first year of follow-up...... with graded physiotherapy and exercises or arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Outcomes were proportion of time per year with income transfers (indexed 0-1), including total transfers (marginalization), sick leave and disability pension obtained from the registry at the Ministry of Work. Self...

  16. Efetividade da Terapia Manual na Síndrome de Conflito Subacromial

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Sónia Isabel Oliveira da

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: A síndrome do conflito subacromial representa uma das causas mais comuns de dor no ombro. Neste tipo de conflito existe comprometimento do espaço subacromial, na maioria das vezes provocada pela compressão mecânica da coifa dos rotadores, especialmente da inserção do tendão do músculo supra-espinhoso, contra a superfície antero-inferior do acrómio. A etiologia desta condição tem sido debatida ao longo dos anos e muitos autores defendem que a sua causa é multi-fatorial. Estudos ass...

  17. Distinguishing multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis from synovial chondromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Albert; Wong, Lun-Yick; Sheu, Chin-Yin; Chen, Be-Fong

    2002-02-01

    Multiple rice body formation is a complication of chronic bursitis. Although it resembles synovial chondromatosis clinically and on imaging, the literature suggests that analysis of radiographic and MR appearances should allow discrimination. We report the imaging findings in a 41-year-old man presenting with rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. We found that the signal intensity of the rice bodies is helpful in making the diagnosis.

  18. Distinguishing multiple rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis from synovial chondromatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Albert; Wong, Lun-Yick; Sheu, Chin-Yin [Department of Radiology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Chen, Be-Fong [Department of Pathology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan)

    2002-02-01

    Multiple rice body formation is a complication of chronic bursitis. Although it resembles synovial chondromatosis clinically and on imaging, the literature suggests that analysis of radiographic and MR appearances should allow discrimination. We report the imaging findings in a 41-year-old man presenting with rice body formation in chronic subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. We found that the signal intensity of the rice bodies is helpful in making the diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Subdeltoid lipoma: a case with symptoms mimicking glenohumeral instability and subacromial impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Michimasa; Ogawa, Kiyohisa

    2010-06-09

    Lipoma is the most frequently occurring benign soft tissue tumor in the shoulder and the axillary region in middle-aged and older persons, yet few such lipoma cases have been associated with clinical symptoms. A 38-year-old right-handed man presented with an enlarged feeling and a painful back-and-forth popping in his left shoulder. Although moderate tenderness of the subacromial bursa and bicipital groove existed, an obvious impingement sign was absent. Also not evidenced were signs of neurological deficits, limited range of motion, or any physical findings suggestive of instability. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a homogenous tumor in the subdeltoid that was isointense relative to the subcutaneous fat and fluid collection in the hypertrophic subacromial bursa. As the tumor was considered from the clinical and imaging findings to be attributable to all clinical symptoms, it was resected en bloc with a satisfactory result. Histopathologically, the tumor showed typical features of a simple lipoma. To our knowledge, the present case is the first of a subdeltoid intermuscular lipoma of which mechanism developing symptoms was preoperatively surmised from imaging. The symptom-mimicking shoulder instability was assumed to be produced by the back-and-forth snapping of the lipoma beneath the deltoid muscle. The mechanism for developing the subacromial impingement-like symptom was surmised to derive from the middle deltoid fibers pressuring the lipoma to push up into the subacromial space. This case is presented to emphasize the careful reading of imaging in considering the pathomechanism of the attributing symptoms. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome; Diagnostik des Schulterimpingementsyndroms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodler, J. [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Balgrist, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1996-12-01

    This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical and imaging findings in shoulder impingement syndrome. Different stages of impingement syndrome are described. Stage I relates to edema and hemorrhage of the supraspinatus tendon. Stage II is characterized by bursal inflammation and fibrosis, as well as tendinopathy. In stage III there is a tear of the rotator cuff. Clinical signs many overlap. Moreover, calcifying tendinitis, fractures and pain originating from the cervical spine may mimic shoulder impingement syndrome. Imaging is important for the exact diagnosis. Standard radiographs are the basis of imaging in shoulder impingement syndrome. They may demonstrate subchondral sclerosis of the major tuberosity, subacromial spurs, and form anomalies of the acromion. They are also important in the differential diagnosis of shoulder impingement syndrome and demonstrate calcifying tendinitis, fractures and neoplasm. Ultrasonography has found acceptance as a screening tool and even as a final diagnostic method by many authors. However, there is a high interobserver variability in the demonstration of rotator cuff tears. Its usefulness has therefore been questioned. MR imaging is probably the method of choice in the evaluation of the rotator cuff and surrounding structures. Several investigations have demonstrated that differentiation of early findings, such as tendinopathy versus partial tears, may be difficult with MR imaging. However, reproducibility for fullthickness tears appears to be higher than for sonography. Moreover, specificity appears to be superior to sonography. MR arthrography is not universally accepted. However, it allows for more exact differentiation of discrete findings and may be indicated in preoperative planning. Standard arthrography and CT have a limited role in the current assessment of the rotator cuff. (orig.) [Deutsch] Grundlage des Impingementsyndroms ist eine Kompression des Supraspinatus am akromioklavikularen Bogen vor allem bei Flexion

  1. Efficacy and safety of rotating pigtail catheter: lower extremity deep vein thrombosis of may-thurner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Kang, Byung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gang, Sung Gown [College of Medicine, Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of mechanical fragmentation of iliofemoral deep vein thromboses (DVTs) with a rotating pigtail catheter followed by aspiration thrombectomy. Ten patients (eight females, two males, 56.8 +/- 21.37 years) with iliofemoral DVT underwent treatment for a total of ten affected limbs. Approximately 5-10 min after infusing 400,000-700,000 IU urokinase (UK) into the thrombosed deep veins, the thromboses were fragmented by the mechanical action of the rotating pigtail catheter tip. Following their fragmentation, the fragmented thromboses were aspirated. After completion of the above procedure, a stent was inserted if iliac vein stenosis was demonstrated. We evaluated the total procedure time, volume of thrombolytic agent (urokinase), valvular injury, symptom-free time interval and success rate (primary patency rate). In all 10 patients, the iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis was successfully fragmented and aspirated using the combination method of a rotating pigtail catheter and aspiration thrombectomy (clinical and technical success rate, 100%). The thromboses were declotted by means of a rotating pigtail catheter with an average treatment time of 5.7 minutes. The average duration of the total intervention was 108 min. The mean primary patency was approximately 4 months with no recurrence. The total UK dose was 890,000 IU on average. There were no major complications, such as pulmonary embolism or cerebral hemorrhage, while performing the thrombus-fragmentation procedure using the rotating pigtail catheter. The combination method of a rotating pigtail catheter and aspiration thrombectomy for the treatment of iliofemoral deep vein thrombosis was found to be rapid, safe and effective for accomplishing recanalization in all cases without complication. Therefore, this procedure constitutes a potential treatment option in patients presenting with iliofemoral vein thrombosis.

  2. Shoulder Joint and Muscle Characteristics Among Weight-Training Participants With and Without Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Morey J; Hanney, William J; Cheatham, Scott W; Salamh, Paul A; Masaracchio, Michael; Liu, Xinliang

    2017-04-01

    Kolber, MJ, Hanney, WJ, Cheatham, SW, Salamh, PA, Masaracchio, M, and Liu, X. Shoulder joint and muscle characteristics among weight-training participants with and without impingement syndrome. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1024-1032, 2017-Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) has been reported as an etiological source of shoulder pain among weight-training (WT) participants; however, a paucity of evidence exists to describe intrinsic risk factors. The purpose of this study was to investigate specific risk-related joint and muscle adaptations among WT participants identified as having SIS based on a previously validated clinical testing cluster. Fifty-five men (mean age 27.3 years) who participated in recreational WT a minimum of 2 d·wk were recruited, including 24 individuals with SIS and 31 without SIS serving as controls. Active range of motion (AROM), bodyweight-adjusted strength values, and strength ratios were compared between groups. Significant differences were present as WT participants with SIS had decreased internal and external rotation AROM (p ≤ 0.016) and decreased bodyweight-adjusted strength values of the external rotator and lower trapezius musculature (p ≤ 0.02) when compared with WT participants without SIS. Select strength ratios were greater in the SIS group (p ≤ 0.004) implying agonist to antagonist muscle imbalances. The impaired joint and muscle characteristics identified among WT participants with SIS are not without consequence, as they are associated with shoulder disorders in both general and athletic populations. Practical applications for these findings may reside in exercise prescription that addresses internal rotation mobility, mitigates training bias, and favors muscles responsible for stabilization, such as the external rotators and lower trapezius. Strength and conditioning professionals should consider risk-related adaptations associated with WT when prescribing upper-extremity exercises.

  3. Static and Dynamic Shoulder Imaging to Predict Initial Effectiveness and Recurrence After Ultrasound-Guided Subacromial Corticosteroid Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ke-Vin; Wu, Wei-Ting; Han, Der-Sheng; Özçakar, Levent

    2017-10-01

    To explore factors contributing to initial effectiveness and recurrence after ultrasound (US)-guided subacromial corticosteroid injections by assessing clinical measurements and static and dynamic shoulder US images. Retrospective cohort study. Rehabilitation outpatient clinic. Adults with shoulder pain referred for injection therapy (N=164). US-guided subacromial corticosteroid injection. The association of initial effectiveness (defined as >50% decrease in any of the 3 pain subdomains after the first injection) and recurrent shoulder pain that required repeated intervention with record-based clinical measurements and static/dynamic shoulder US. This study included 164 patients, 106 of whom were responsive to a first injection. Among the 106 participants, 42 received a second injection because of recurrent shoulder pain. By using the multivariate logistic regression analysis, initial effectiveness was positively associated with right handedness, grade 2 subacromial impingement during the dynamic US examination, and bicipital groove tenderness. However, these patients had a negative association with subdeltoid bursitis, grade 3 subacromial impingement, and shoulder stiffness. Subdeltoid bursitis and a positive painful arc test were predictors of recurrent shoulder pain that necessitated a repeated injection in the Cox proportional hazards model. The initial effectiveness and recurrence after US-guided subacromial corticosteroid injection were associated with certain clinical measurements and static and dynamic shoulder US, which should be carefully evaluated (and can be used) to guide the best treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TOS, including rotator cuff injuries, cervical disc disorders, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and tumors ... TOS, including rotator cuff injuries, cervical disc disorders, fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, complex regional pain syndrome, and tumors ...

  5. Effectiveness of physical therapy treatment of clearly defined subacromial pain: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haik, M N; Alburquerque-Sendín, F; Moreira, R F C; Pires, E D; Camargo, P R

    2016-09-01

    To summarise the current evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical therapy on pain, function and range of motion in individuals with subacromial pain syndrome (SAPS). Systematic review. PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, Cochrane, Embase, Lilacs, Ibecs and Scielo databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating physical therapy modalities for SAPS on pain, function/disability or range of motion were included. 64 high-quality RCTs were included. Exercise therapy provided high evidence of being as effective as surgery intervention and better than no treatment or placebo treatment to improve pain, function and range of motion in the short, mid and long terms. The combination of mobilisation and exercises provided high evidence to decrease pain and improve function in the short term. There is limited evidence for improvements on the outcomes with the isolated application of manual therapy. High level of evidence was synthesised regarding the lack of beneficial effects of physical resources such as low-level laser, ultrasound and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on pain, function or range of motion in the treatment of SAPS. There is limited evidence for microwave diathermy and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. There is moderate evidence to no benefits with taping in the short term. Effects of diacutaneous fibrolysis and acupuncture are not well established yet. Exercise therapy should be the first-line treatment to improve pain, function and range of motion. The addition of mobilisations to exercises may accelerate reduction of pain in the short term. Low-level laser therapy, PEMF and taping should not be recommended. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Treatment of axillary web syndrome using instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization and thoracic manipulation for associated thoracic rotation dysfunction: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Patricia; Ladden, Jaclyn; Monica, Danielle

    2017-08-30

    There is a paucity of research that investigates physical therapy management for patients with axillary web syndrome (AWS) and thoracic rotation dysfunction. The purpose of this case report is to describe the management of a patient with AWS and thoracic rotation dysfunction using an impairment-based approach that includes instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM), thoracic manipulation, and stretching. The patient was a 48-year-old female with a past medical history of bilateral breast cancer with a bilateral latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction. The patient was referred to physical therapy with chief complaints of right shoulder pain with reaching and an inability to resume running due to right shoulder and scapula pain. The patient was seen in outpatient physical therapy for four visits over four weeks. Treatment consisted of IASTM, thoracic manipulation, stretching exercises, and home exercise program instruction. Upon discharge, the patient had improved right shoulder and thoracic range of motion, decreased pain, and improved function on the patient specific functional scale (PSFS). Utilization of an impairment-based physical therapy approach to treat a patient with AWS and thoracic dysfunction yielded positive outcomes. Further research on the efficacy of IASTM and physical therapy management of AWS is warranted.

  7. Gene-gene interaction between serotonin transporter (SLC6A4) and CLOCK modulates the risk of metabolic syndrome in rotating shiftworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookoian, Silvia; Gianotti, Tomas Fernandez; Burgueño, Adriana; Pirola, Carlos Jose

    2010-07-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission and the master circadian CLOCK gene are physiological modulators of the circadian system. In addition, both are involved in the physiopathology of metabolic syndrome (MS). The authors sought to examine the potential effect of the gene-gene interaction between the functional 44-bp insertion/deletion polymorphism in the promoter region (serotonin-transporter-linked promoter region polymorphism or 5-HTTLPR) of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) and common variants of the gene CLOCK on the genetic risk underlying MS of shift-workers. To test this hypothesis, 856 men were studied; 518 dayworkers were compared with 338 rotating shiftworkers. Medical history, health examination including anthropometric and arterial blood pressure measurements, a questionnaire on health-related behaviors, and biochemical determinations were obtained from every participant. 5-HTTLPR genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction followed by gel electrophoresis. Six tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CLOCK gene with a minor allele frequency >10 % (rs1554483 C/G, rs11932595 A/G, rs4580704 C/G, rs6843722 A/C, rs6850524 C/G, and rs4864548 A/G), encompassing 117 kb of chromosome 4 and representing 115 polymorphic sites (r(2) > .8), were genotyped. A significant interaction between the 5-HTTLPR variant and the haplotype rs1554483-rs4864548 of the CLOCK gene was detected for diastolic (p = .0058) and systolic blood pressure (p = .0014), arterial hypertension (p = .033), plasma triglycerides levels (p = .033), and number of MS components (p = .01). In all these cases, the higher values were observed in rotating shiftworkers homozygous for the SLC6A4 S allele and carrying the haplotype composed by the CLOCK rs1554483 G and rs4864548 A variants. In conclusion, these data suggest a potential interaction (epistatic effect) of serotonin transporter and CLOCK gene variation on the genetic susceptibility to develop MS by rotating shiftworkers.

  8. Fisioterapia en el síndrome subacromial del hombro. Revisión sistemática cualitativa.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yanxiang

    2014-01-01

    Trabajo Fin de Grado (TFG) Antecedentes: El dolor de hombro es un problema muy frecuente, se estima que un tercio de la población sufre o sufrirá a lo largo de la vida dolor de hombro en alguna ocasión. El síndrome subacromial es la causa más común. La fisioterapia es la terapia de elección frente al síndrome subacromial, con una gran variedad abordajes fisioterapéuticos como los ejercicios terapéuticos, la terapia manual, el ultrasonido, la acupuntura, etc. Objetivo: El objetivo de est...

  9. Regenerative Medicine in Rotator Cuff Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Randelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff injuries are a common source of shoulder pathology and result in an important decrease in quality of patient life. Given the frequency of these injuries, as well as the relatively poor result of surgical intervention, it is not surprising that new and innovative strategies like tissue engineering have become more appealing. Tissue-engineering strategies involve the use of cells and/or bioactive factors to promote tendon regeneration via natural processes. The ability of numerous growth factors to affect tendon healing has been extensively analyzed in vitro and in animal models, showing promising results. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is a whole blood fraction which contains several growth factors. Controlled clinical studies using different autologous PRP formulations have provided controversial results. However, favourable structural healing rates have been observed for surgical repair of small and medium rotator cuff tears. Cell-based approaches have also been suggested to enhance tendon healing. Bone marrow is a well known source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Recently, ex vivo human studies have isolated and cultured distinct populations of MSCs from rotator cuff tendons, long head of the biceps tendon, subacromial bursa, and glenohumeral synovia. Stem cells therapies represent a novel frontier in the management of rotator cuff disease that required further basic and clinical research.

  10. Two Cases of Subacromial Bursitis with Many Loose Bodies as a Cause of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    砂川, 融; 杉村, 功; 堀, 司郎; 村岡, 博; 有田, 淳

    1989-01-01

    Rice bodies caused by T.B. and R.A. in joints are relatively common and reported, but in bursa are rare. We experienced two cases of subacromial bursitis with many rice bodies :one is a 53-year-old female and the other is a 62-year-old male. They were suffering from rheumatoid arthritis for years, and complained of swelling of the shoulder joint, but had no pain and no remarkable limitation of range of motion of the shoulder joint. We resected the bursa containing a lot of rice bodies operati...

  11. Home exercises and supervised exercises are similarly effective for people with subacromial impingement: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Granviken

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: Are there different effects of home exercises and supervised exercises on pain and disability for people with subacromial impingement? Design: Randomised trial with two treatment arms, concealed allocation, blinded assessment of some outcomes, and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Forty-six patients with subacromial impingement were recruited from an interdisciplinary outpatient clinic of physical medicine and rehabilitation at a university hospital in Norway. Intervention: The home exercise group had one supervised exercise treatment followed by exercises at home for 6 weeks. The supervised exercise group had up to 10 supervised exercise treatments in addition to home exercises for 6 weeks. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI. Secondary outcome variables were: average pain during the past week, the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, participant satisfaction with treatment, active range of motion, work status and clinical shoulder tests. Pain was assessed weekly and all outcomes were assessed at 6 weeks. Participants were free to seek ongoing treatment of their choice until 26 weeks, when the SPADI was assessed again. Results: While both groups improved considerably, the groups did not differ significantly on the SPADI after the intervention at 6 weeks (0 points, 95% CI –14 to 14 or when followed up at 26 weeks (–2 points, 95% CI –21 to 17. There were no between-group differences for pain at any time. The remaining outcomes also did not differ significantly, except for the clinical tests of shoulder impingement. In the supervised exercise group, 11 out of 23 participants had two or more positive tests, compared to 18 out of 21 in the home exercise group. Conclusion: Supervision of more than the first session of a 6-week exercise regimen did not cause significant differences in pain and disability in people with subacromial impingement. Trial registration: NCT01257113

  12. Efectos del uso de acupuntura en el síndrome subacromial

    OpenAIRE

    Rueda Garrido, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: El hombro doloroso u omalgia, es una de las principales causas de dolor osteoarticular que se presentan en la práctica clínica diaria, y a menudo provoca discapacidad funcional considerable. La causa más frecuente de dolor de hombro es el síndrome subacromial. Objetivo: Conseguir una disminución de la intensidad del dolor a corto y medio plazo con el uso de acupuntura en el hombro lesionado. Método: Estudio controlado y aleatorizado, en el que participan dos grupos: uno qu...

  13. Is radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (rEWST) combined with supervised exercises (SE) more effective than sham rESWT and SE in patients with subacromial shoulder pain? Study protocol for a double-blind randomised, sham-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalvaag, Elisabeth; Brox, Jens Ivar; Engebretsen, Kaia Beck; Søberg, Helene Lundgaard; Bautz-Holter, Erik; Røe, Cecilie

    2015-09-11

    Subacromial shoulder pain is a common complaint. Radial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (rESWT) has being increasingly used to treat calcific and non-calcific tendinosis, although there is no evidence of the effectiveness of rESWT in non-calcific tendinosis of the rotator cuff. A randomised single blind study showed that the short-term effect of supervised exercises (SE) was significantly better than rESWT on subacromial shoulder pain, but both groups improved. In a clinical trial on achilles tendinopathy rESWT improved the effectiveness of treatment with eccentric loading. The objective of this present study is to evaluate if rESWT in addition to SE is more effective in improving shoulder pain and function compared with sham rESWT and SE in patients with subacromial shoulder pain. This is a double blind, randomised sham-controlled trial which is performed at the shoulder clinic at the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Oslo University Hospital, Norway. One-hundred-forty-four patients with subacromial shoulder pain lasting at least 3 months, age from 25 to 70 years old are included in the trial. Patients are randomly allocated in 1:1 ratio to receive either rESWT or sham rESWT once a week in addition to SE once a week for the initial 4 weeks. Subsequently SE are provided twice a week for 8 weeks. The primary outcome measure is a change in the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) at 24 weeks follow-up. Secondary outcomes include return to work, pain at rest and on activity, function, and health related quality of life. The patients, the physiotherapist providing the exercise regimen and the outcome assessor are blinded to group assignment. The physiotherapist providing the rESWT is not blinded. Because of the extensive use of rESWT in the treatment of subacromial shoulder pain the results of this trial will be of importance and have impact on clinical practice. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01441830.

  14. Electromyographic analysis of the rotator cuff in postoperative shoulder patients during passive rehabilitation exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cynthia A; McDermott, William J; Petersen, Roger K; Johnson, Scott E; Baxter, Stephanie A

    2013-01-01

    Numerous rehabilitation protocols exist for postoperative rotator cuff repairs. Because the goal of early rehabilitation is to prevent postoperative adhesions while protecting the repaired tendons, it would be advantageous to know which range-of-motion exercises allow the rotator cuff to remain the most passive in a painful, guarded, postsurgical shoulder. Twenty-six subjects who had undergone subacromial decompression, distal clavicle resection, or a combination of both procedures volunteered to participate within the first 4 days after surgery. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted into the subject's supraspinatus (SS) and infraspinatus (IS). Muscle activity was recorded at resting baseline (BL) and during 14 exercises that have been found in the passive phase of rotator cuff protocols and tested in healthy subjects. Each exercise was compared with BL activity as well as with other exercises in the same movement group. The SS remained as passive as BL during therapist- and self-assisted external rotation, therapist-assisted elevation, pendulums, and isometric internal rotation and adduction. The IS was activated greater than BL for all 14 exercises studied. Of the 14 exercises studied, 6 allowed the SS and 0 allowed the IS to remain as passive as quiet-stance BL in postsurgical subacromial decompression/distal clavicle resection patients. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  16. Evaluation of the Trends, Concomitant Procedures, and Complications With Open and Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs in the Medicare Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Andrew R; Cha, Peter S; Devana, Sai K; Ishmael, Chad; Di Pauli von Treuheim, Theo; D'Oro, Anthony; Wang, Jeffrey C; McAllister, David R; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2017-10-01

    Medicare insures the largest population of patients at risk for rotator cuff tears in the United States. To evaluate the trends in incidence, concomitant procedures, and complications with open and arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs in Medicare patients. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. All Medicare patients who had undergone open or arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2005 through 2011 were identified with a claims database. Annual incidence, concomitant procedures, and postoperative complications were compared between these 2 groups. In total, 372,109 rotator cuff repairs were analyzed. The incidence of open repairs decreased (from 6.0 to 4.3 per 10,000 patients, P arthroscopic repairs increased (from 4.5 to 7.8 per 10,000 patients, P arthroscopic group were more likely to have undergone concomitant subacromial decompression than those in the open group (87% vs 35%, P arthroscopic, P arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs have increased in incidence and now represent the majority of rotator cuff repair surgery. Among concomitant procedures, subacromial decompression was most commonly performed despite evidence suggesting a lack of efficacy. Infections and stiffness were rare complications that were slightly but significantly more frequent in open rotator cuff repairs.

  17. Shoulder impingement syndrome : evaluation of the causes with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Song, In Sup; Chung, Hun Young; Yoon, Sang Jin; Kim, Yang Soo; Shim, Hyung Jin; Choi, Young Hee; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Kun Sang [Chungang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yun Sun [Eulji Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    Various mechanical causes which induce shoulder impingement syndrome have been identified with the help of MRI. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of such causes. A total of 54 patients with clinically confirmed shoulder impingement syndrome and a normal control group(n=20) without symptoms were included. We evaluated the incidence of hook shaped acromion, low lying acromion, downward slope of the acromion, subacromial spur, acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale. Among the 54 patients, the following conditions were present: acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy(n=36), coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy(n=20), subacromial spur(n=18), downward sloping of the acromion(n=16), hook shaped acromion(n=11), relatively high cuff muscle bulk(n=6), low lying acromion relative to the clavicle(n=3), and os acromiale(n=1). In the normal control group there were nine cases of acromioclavicular joint hypertrophy, nine of coracoacromial ligament hypertrophy, nine of downward sloping acromion, and three of low lying acromion, but hook shaped acromion, high cuff muscle bulk, and os acromiale were not found. Among 54 patients, the syndrome was due to five simultancous causes in one patient, four causes in two, three causes in 12, two causes in 22, and one cause in 17. Hook shaped acromion and subacromial spur are the statistically significant causes of shoulder impingement syndrome. In 69% of patients, the condition was due to more than one cause.

  18. [Isolated synovial chondromatosis of the subacromial bursa: report of a new case and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhaouala, M H; Saïd, W; Salah, M Haj; Bouaziz, N; Mourali, S; Chaabane, S

    2006-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare metaplasia of the synovium of unknown etiology that may involve occasionally the subacromial bursa. We report a new case diagnosed by ultrasound in a 30-year-old man and we present pathogenetic, diagnostic and therapeutic features of this disease with a literature review.

  19. Accuracy of diagnostic ultrasound in patients with suspected subacromial disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottenheijm, R.P.; Jansen, M.J.; Staal, J.B.; Bruel, A. van den; Weijers, R.E.; Bie, R.A. de; Dinant, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound for detecting subacromial disorders in patients presenting in primary and secondary care settings. DATA SOURCES: Medline and Embase were searched on June 9, 2010. In addition, the reference list of 1 systematic review and all included

  20. Rotational seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William H K.

    2016-01-01

    Rotational seismology is an emerging study of all aspects of rotational motions induced by earthquakes, explosions, and ambient vibrations. It is of interest to several disciplines, including seismology, earthquake engineering, geodesy, and earth-based detection of Einstein’s gravitation waves.Rotational effects of seismic waves, together with rotations caused by soil–structure interaction, have been observed for centuries (e.g., rotated chimneys, monuments, and tombstones). Figure 1a shows the rotated monument to George Inglis observed after the 1897 Great Shillong earthquake. This monument had the form of an obelisk rising over 19 metres high from a 4 metre base. During the earthquake, the top part broke off and the remnant of some 6 metres rotated about 15° relative to the base. The study of rotational seismology began only recently when sensitive rotational sensors became available due to advances in aeronautical and astronomical instrumentations.

  1. Long-Term MRI Findings in Operated Rotator Cuff Tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyroelae, K.; Niemitukia, L.; Jaroma, H.; Vaeaetaeinen, U. [Kuopio Univ. Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Orthopaedics and Traumatology

    2004-08-01

    Purpose: To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings at long-term follow-up after rotator cuff (RC) tear using standard MRI sequences without fat saturation. Material and Methods: Twenty-eight patients aged 55.8{+-}7.6 underwent MRI examination 4.6{+-}2.1 years after surgery for RC tear. Standard sequences in oblique coronal, oblique sagittal, and axial planes were obtained. The RC, including re-tears and tendon degeneration, was independently evaluated by two observers. Thickness of the supraspinatus tendon and narrowing of the subacromial space were measured. The clinical outcome was evaluated with the Constant score and compared with the MRI findings. Results: The RC tear was traumatic in 18 (64%) patients and degenerative in 10 (36%). At follow-up, 11 (39%) had normal RC tendons with good clinical outcome. Four (14%) patients had painful tendinosis without RC tear. A full-thickness RC tear was found in 7 (25%) patients and a partial tear in 6 (21%). In one patient with a full-thickness tear, and in two with partial tear, tendinosis was found in another of the RC tendons. The subacromial space was narrowed in 13 (46%) of the patients. A narrowing of the subacromial space correlated with re-tear (P<0.05). Conclusions: The RC may be evaluated with standard MRI sequences without fat saturation at long-term follow-up. A normal appearance of the RC is correlated with good clinical outcome, while re-tear and tendinosis are associated with pain.

  2. Shoulder kinematic features using arm elevation and rotation tests for classifying patients with frozen shoulder syndrome who respond to physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing-lan; Chang, Chein-wei; Chen, Shiau-yee; Lin, Jiu-jenq

    2008-12-01

    Physical therapy is an intervention commonly used in the treatment of subjects with frozen shoulder symptoms, with limited proven effect. The purpose of this study was to identify the kinematic features of patients with frozen shoulder who are more likely to respond to physical therapy. Thirty-four subjects presenting frozen shoulder syndrome were studied to determine altered shoulder kinematics and functional disability. Subjects received the same standardized treatment with passive mobilization/stretching techniques, physical modalities (i.e. ultrasound, shortwave diathermy and/or electrotherapy) and active exercises twice a week for 3 months. Initially, subjects were asked to perform full active motion in 3 tests: abduction in the scapular plane, hand-to-neck and hand-to-scapula. During the test, shoulder kinematics were measured using a 3-D electromagnetic motion-capturing system. In the initial and follow-up sessions, the self-reported Flexilevel Scale of Shoulder Function (FLEX-SF) was used to determine functional disability from symptoms. Improvement with treatment was determined using percent change in FLEX-SF scores over three months of treatment [(final score-initial score)/initial score x 100, >20% improvement and 8.4 degrees during arm elevation, and external rotation >38.9 degrees during hand to neck) were identified. The presence of these two variables (positive likelihood ratio=15.71) increased the probability of improvement with treatment from 41% to 92%. It appears that shoulder kinematics may predict improvement in subjects with frozen shoulder syndrome. Prospective validation of the proposed prediction method is warranted.

  3. Radiological evaluation of acromial characteristic using supraspinatus outlet view in shoulder impingement syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Prasetyo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this study was to find the association between shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS and morphological characteristics of acromion (acromial tilt angle, type of acromion, subacromial osteophyte. Supraspinatus outlet view was performed using fluoroscopy. There were 40 SIS patients and 40 individuals with no shoulder pain examined and measured for their acromial tilt angle, type of acromion (according to Bigliani’s classification and Park’s criteria and for the presence of subacromial osteophyte. Average acromial tilt angle was 34.1° (SD 7.6 for SIS group and 32.1° (SD 7.7 for control group. Type II acromion was found more frequent in both groups (85% and 95%. The association between SIS and acromial tilt angle or between SIS and type of acromion were statistically insignificant (p=0.241 and p=0.221. Subacromial osteophyte was found in 52.5% of SIS group compare to 12.5% among the control group, and the association with SIS was statistically significant (p=0.0003. Subacromial osteophyte was found to have significant association with SIS. Such association was not found in acromial tilt angle and type of acromion. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:176-80 Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, acromion, supraspinatus

  4. Intense focused ultrasound stimulation of the rotator cuff: evaluation of the source of pain in rotator cuff tears and tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Gillenwater, Cody; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the ability of individual 0.1-s long pulses of intense focused ultrasound (iFU) emitted with a carrier frequency of 2 MHz to evoke diagnostic sensations when applied to patients whose shoulders have rotator cuff tears or tendinopathy. Patients were adults with painful shoulders and clinical and imaging findings consistent with rotator cuff disease. iFU stimulation of the shoulder was performed using B-mode ultrasound coupled with a focused ultrasound transducer that allowed image-guided delivery of precisely localized pulses of energy to different anatomic areas around the rotator cuff. The main outcome measure was iFU spatial average-temporal average intensity (I_SATA), and location required to elicit sensation. In control patients, iFU produced no sensation throughout the range of stimulation intensities (≤2000 W/cm(2) I_SATA). In patients with rotator cuff disease, iFU was able to induce sensation in the tendons of the rotator cuff, the subacromial bursa, and the subchondral bone in patients with chronic shoulder pain and rotator cuff disease, with an average ± standard deviation intensity equaling 680 ± 281 W/cm(2) I_SATA. This result suggests a primary role for these tissues in the pathogenesis of shoulder pain related to rotator cuff tendinopathy. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of methylprednisolone use on the rotator cuff in rats: biomechanical and histological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Vinícius Ghellioni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of treatment with different doses of methylprednisolone on the mechanical resistance and possible histological alterations of the rotator cuff tendon in rats.METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided randomly into four treatment groups: sham, vehicle or 0.6 mg/kg or 6.0 mg/kg of methylprednisolone. Changes to mechanical resistance (in N and histological parameters (fibrillar appearance, presence of collagen, edema and vascular proliferation of the rotator cuff tendon were evaluated. The analyses were conducted after administration of one treatment (24 h afterwards, two treatments (7 days afterward or three treatments (14 days afterwards, into the subacromial space.RESULTS: Seven and fourteen days after the treatments were started, it was found that in a dose-dependent manner, methylprednisolone reduced the mechanical resistance of the rotator cuff tendon (p < 0.05 in relation to the vehicle group. Modifications to the histological parameters were observed on the 7th and 14th days after the first infiltration, especially regarding the presence of collagen and vascular proliferation, for the dose of 0.6 mg/kg of methylprednisolone, and also regarding the presence of collagen, edema and vascular proliferation for the dose of 6.0 mg/kg of corticoid.CONCLUSION: The results obtained demonstrated a relationship between methylprednisolone use through infiltration into the subacromial space and reduction of the mechanical resistance of and histological modifications to the rotator cuff tendon in rats.

  6. Utilizing the metabolic syndrome component count in workers' health surveillance: An example of day-time vs. day-night rotating shift workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu Cheng; Hsieh, I-Chun; Chen, Pau-Chung

    2015-01-01

    To establish a practical method for assessing the general metabolic health conditions among different employee groups, this study utilized the total count of metabolic syndrome (MetS) elements as a parameter, and performed a retrospective analysis comparing changes of MetS component count (MSC) of 5 years among day-time work (DW) and day-andnight rotating shift work (RSW) employees. The data of personal histories, physical examinations, blood tests, abdominal sonographic examinations and occupational records were collected from a cohort of workers in an electronics manufacturing company. We first defined the arithmetic mean value of MSC as MSC density (MSCD) for the employee group; then we compared the changes of MSCD over 5 years between DW and RSW workers. Occupational, personal and health records were analyzed for the 1077 workers with an initial mean age of 32.4 years (standard deviation (SD): 6.2 years), including 565 RSW workers (52%). The initial MSCDs were 1.26 and 1.12 (p = 0.06) for DW and RSW workers, respectively; after 5 years, the increments of MSCD for DW and RSW workers were 0.10 and 0.39, respectively (p employee group; MSC, MSCD and their transitional changes can be applied as simple and standardized tools for monitoring metabolic health risk profiles when managing employee health, at both the individual and company levels. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. Efeito da rotação do quadril na síndrome da dor femoropatelar Effect of hip rotation on patellofemoral pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Gramani-Say

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: A proposta desse trabalho foi investigar o efeito da rotação do quadril na atividade elétrica dos músculos Vasto Medial Oblíquo (VMO, Vasto Lateral Oblíquo (VLO e Vasto Lateral Longo (VLL no agachamento a 45º de flexão do joelho associado à posição neutra, rotação lateral a 45º e rotação medial a 15 e 30º de quadril. Materiais e Método: Foram avaliadas 27 mulheres, sendo 15 mulheres normais do grupo Controle (21,1±2,1 anos e 12 portadoras de Síndrome da Dor Femoropatelar (SDFP (21,0±2,3 anos. A atividade elétrica do músculo quadríceps foi captada por eletrodos ativos diferenciais simples de superfície, eletromiógrafo de 8 canais e programa Aqdados 7.2.6. Os dados foram normalizados pela porcentagem da média do agachamento a 75º com o quadril em posição neutra RMS (µV. A análise estatística utilizada foi a ANOVA two way com medidas repetidas e Turkey post hoc (pObjective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of hip rotation on the electrical activity of the Vastus Medialis Obliquus (VMO, Vastus Lateralis Obliquus (VLO and Vastus Lateralis Longus (VLL muscles when squatting with 45º knee flexion, in association with the neutral position, 45º lateral rotation and 15 and 30º medial hip rotation. Method: 27 women were evaluated: 15 healthy women as a control group (21.1 ± 2.1 years and 12 subjects with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS (21.0 ± 2.3 years. The electrical activity of the quadriceps muscle was detected using simple active differential surface electrodes, an eight-channel electromyography system and the Aqdados 7.2.6 software. The data were normalized by the mean squatting percentage at 75º with the hip in the neutral position RMS (µV. Two-way ANOVA with repeated measurements followed by the Tukey post hoc test (p<0.05 was used for statistical analysis. Results: The results revealed interaction between groups and muscles (p=0.00, independent of hip position (p=0.39, and

  8. Conservative treatment for patients with subacromial impingement: Changes in clinical core outcomes and their relation to specific rehabilitation parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel B. Clausen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Impaired patient-reported shoulder function and pain, external-rotation strength, abduction strength, and abduction range-of-motion (ROM is reported in patients with subacromial impingement (SIS. However, it is unknown how much strength and ROM improves in real-life practice settings with current care. Furthermore, outcomes of treatment might depend on specific rehabilitation parameters, such as the time spent on exercises (exercise-time, number of physiotherapy sessions (physio-sessions and number of corticosteroid injections, respectively. However, this has not previously been investigated. The purpose of this study was to describe changes in shoulder strength, ROM, patient-reported function and pain, in real-life practice settings, and explore the association between changes in clinical core outcomes and specific rehabilitation parameters. Methods Patients diagnosed with SIS at initial assessment at an outpatient hospital clinic using predefined criteria’s, who had not undergone surgery after 6 months, were included in this prospective cohort study. After initial assessment (baseline, all patients underwent treatment as usual, with no interference from the investigators. The outcomes Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI:0–100, average pain (NRS:0–10, external rotation strength, abduction strength and abduction ROM, pain during each test (NRS:0–10, were collected at baseline and at six month follow-up. Amount of exercise-time, physio-sessions and steroid-injections was recorded at follow-up. Changes in outcomes were analyzed using Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test, and the corresponding effect sizes (ES were estimated. The associations between changes in outcomes and rehabilitation parameters were explored using multiple regression analyses. Results Sixty-three patients completed both baseline and follow-up testing. Significant improvements were seen in SPADI (19 points, ES:0.53, p  0.2. A higher number of physio-sessions was

  9. Long-Term Results of the Diagnostic Tests for Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Kelle

    2015-12-01

    Results: There were no significant differences for demographic data between groups. The all tests in both group were found mostly positive. It was seen significant change at the third months after treatment. Conclusions: The specific tests were important fort he diagnosis of SIS, furthermore they can demonstrate the efficacy of treatments. The combinad application of these tests are more important for the diagnosis and follow-up of SIS. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(4.000: 794-799

  10. The Painful Shoulder: Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yousaf; Nagy, Mathias Thomas; Malal, Joby; Waseem, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff disorders are considered to be among the most common causes of shoulder pain and disability encountered in both primary and secondary care. The general pathology of subacromial impingment generally relates to a chronic repetitive process in which the conjoint tendon of the rotator cuff undergoes repetitive compression and micro trauma as it passes under the coracoacromial arch. However acute traumatic injuries may also lead to this condition. Diagnosis remains a clinical one, however advances in imaging modalities have enabled clinicians to have an increased understanding of the pathological process. Ultrasound scanning appears to be a justifiable and cost effective assessment tool following plain radiographs in the assessment of shoulder impingment, with MRI scans being reserved for more complex cases. A period of observed conservative management including the use of NSAIDs, physiotherapy with or without the use of subacromial steroid injections is a well-established and accepted practice. However, in young patients or following any traumatic injury to the rotator cuff, surgery should be considered early. If surgery is to be performed this should be done arthroscopically and in the case of complete rotator cuff rupture the tendon should be repaired where possible. PMID:24082973

  11. Arthroscopic treatment of a case with concomitant subacromial and subdeltoid synovial chondromatosis and labrum tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Nevres Hurriyet; Kocadal, Onur; Ozmeric, Ahmet; Aktekin, Cem Nuri

    2013-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a disease that seldomly seen in shoulder joint and is related to benign synovial proliferation and synchronous chondral tissue formation within the joint cavity. Patients suffer from progressive restriction of range of motion and shoulder pain. Extra-articular involvement is an extremely rare condition. Degenerative osteoarthritis, joint subluxation, and bursitis are common complications in untreated patients. Open or arthroscopic surgery is suitable while there is no consensus related to superiority of different approaches. We presented an arthroscopic treatment of a male patient, 48 years old with labrum tear and synovial chondromatosis localized in subacromial and subdeltoid region. Advantages of arthroscopic surgery in the presence of intra- and extra-articular combined pathologies are also discussed.

  12. Arthroscopic Treatment of a Case with Concomitant Subacromial and Subdeltoid Synovial Chondromatosis and Labrum Tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevres Hurriyet Aydogan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovial chondromatosis is a disease that seldomly seen in shoulder joint and is related to benign synovial proliferation and synchronous chondral tissue formation within the joint cavity. Patients suffer from progressive restriction of range of motion and shoulder pain. Extra-articular involvement is an extremely rare condition. Degenerative osteoarthritis, joint subluxation, and bursitis are common complications in untreated patients. Open or arthroscopic surgery is suitable while there is no consensus related to superiority of different approaches. We presented an arthroscopic treatment of a male patient, 48 years old with labrum tear and synovial chondromatosis localized in subacromial and subdeltoid region. Advantages of arthroscopic surgery in the presence of intra- and extra-articular combined pathologies are also discussed.

  13. Short-Term Effectiveness of Precut Kinesiology Tape Versus an NSAID as Adjuvant Treatment to Exercise for Subacromial Impingement: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereaux, Moira; Velanoski, Kinny Quan; Pennings, Amanda; Elmaraghy, Amr

    2016-01-01

    To compare the short-term effectiveness of precut kinesiology tape (PCT) to a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) as adjuvant treatment to exercise physiotherapy in improving pain and function in patients with shoulder impingement. Randomized, controlled assessor-blind parallel-design trial with 3 groups. Academic-community hospital. One hundred patients (mean age: 48 ± 12.3, 61 men, 39 women) with a diagnosis of subacromial impingement (SAI) syndrome were randomized to a treatment group from October 2009 to June 2012. Eighty-one patients completed the study. Patients were randomized to one of the 3 treatment groups: PCT and Exercise (n = 33), NSAID and Exercise (n = 29), or Exercise only (n = 38) for a 4 session 2-week intervention with a registered physiotherapist. Numeric pain rating scales for pain at rest and pain with arm elevation, the Simple Shoulder Test (SST), and the Constant Score were assessed pretreatment and post-treatment. A statistically significant reduction in pain at rest and pain with arm elevation, as well as improvement in SST and Constant Score were observed in all 3 treatment groups, with minimal clinically important differences shown on pain with elevation and SST scores. Between-group differences on all outcome measures were not statistically significant or clinically meaningful. The improvements in pain and function observed with an NSAID or PCT as adjuvant treatments were no greater than with rehabilitation exercise alone. If adjuvant treatment is desired, PCT seems to be better tolerated than an NSAID, although the difference did not reach significance. The routine addition of adjuvant treatment is not supported by the results of this study. As adjuvant therapy, PCT seems to be better tolerated than an NSAID. If desired, clinicians may consider incorporating PCT along with an exercise component in the conservative treatment of SAI syndrome.

  14. High-resolution ultrasound of rotator cuff and biceps reflection pulley in non-elite junior tennis players: anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Cadoni, Angela; Bignotti, Bianca; Martinoli, Carlo

    2014-07-18

    Tennis is believed to be potentially harmful for the shoulder, therefore the purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomy of the rotator cuff and the coraco-humeral ligament (CHL) in a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players with high-resolution ultrasound (US). From August 2009 to September 2010 n = 90 a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players (mean age ± standard deviation: 15 ± 3) and a control group of age- and sex- matched subjects were included. Shoulder assessment with a customized standardized protocol was performed. Body mass index, dominant arm, years of practice, weekly hours of training, racket weight, grip (Eastern, Western and semi-Western), kind of strings were recorded. Abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 14/90 (15%) players. Two players had supraspinatus tendinosis, two had subacromial impingement and ten had subacromial bursitis. CHL thickness resulted comparable in the dominant and non-dominant arms (11.3 ± 4.4 mm vs. 13 ± 4.2, p > 0.05). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that no association was present among CHL thickness and the variables evaluated. In the control group, abnormalities were found at ultrasound in 6/60 (10%) subjects (sub-acromial bursitis). No statistically significant differences between players and control group were found (p = 0.71). In a-symptomatic non-elite junior tennis players only minor shoulder abnormalities were found.

  15. Rotating Wavepackets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2008-01-01

    Any free-particle wavepacket solution of Schrodinger's equation can be converted by differentiations to wavepackets rotating about the original direction of motion. The angular momentum component along the motion associated with this rotation is an integral multiple of [h-bar]. It is an "intrinsic" angular momentum: independent of origin and…

  16. Rotational elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliev, Dmitri

    2017-04-01

    We consider an infinite three-dimensional elastic continuum whose material points experience no displacements, only rotations. This framework is a special case of the Cosserat theory of elasticity. Rotations of material points are described mathematically by attaching to each geometric point an orthonormal basis that gives a field of orthonormal bases called the coframe. As the dynamical variables (unknowns) of our theory, we choose the coframe and a density. We write down the general dynamic variational functional for our rotational theory of elasticity, assuming our material to be physically linear but the kinematic model geometrically nonlinear. Allowing geometric nonlinearity is natural when dealing with rotations because rotations in dimension three are inherently nonlinear (rotations about different axes do not commute) and because there is no reason to exclude from our study large rotations such as full turns. The main result of the talk is an explicit construction of a class of time-dependent solutions that we call plane wave solutions; these are travelling waves of rotations. The existence of such explicit closed-form solutions is a non-trivial fact given that our system of Euler-Lagrange equations is highly nonlinear. We also consider a special case of our rotational theory of elasticity which in the stationary setting (harmonic time dependence and arbitrary dependence on spatial coordinates) turns out to be equivalent to a pair of massless Dirac equations. The talk is based on the paper [1]. [1] C.G.Boehmer, R.J.Downes and D.Vassiliev, Rotational elasticity, Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics, 2011, vol. 64, p. 415-439. The paper is a heavily revised version of preprint https://arxiv.org/abs/1008.3833

  17. Exercise therapy is evidence-based treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome. Current practice or recommendation only.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, J; Vuorenmaa, M; Paloneva, J; Kiviranta, I; Kautiainen, H; Oikari, M; Häkkinen, A

    2013-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is the most common indication for shoulder operation. However, exercise therapy for the conservative treatment is recommended in the first instance. To evaluate the implementation of exercise therapy in impingement syndrome. Retrospective study using structured postal questionnaire and data collected from hospital archive. A total of 104 consecutive patients who had undergone shoulder surgery due to impingement syndrome. Patients were asked about therapy modalities that they had received before and after the operation as well as pain (VAS) and functional impairment (ASES) at one-year follow-up. Before surgery 49% of patients had not received advice for shoulder muscle exercises. After operation all patients had received mobility exercises, but one quarter of patients still reported that they had not received instructions about shoulder strength exercises. At the follow-up the means of the ASES index was 85 and use of NSAID had decreased by 75%. However, 15% of patients had moderate functional impairment (ASES under 60). About half of patients reported that they had not received advice for rotator cuff exercise therapy before surgery even though with it surgery would probably have been avoided in many cases. Although symptoms in most patients had decreased after operation, several patients still suffered from pain and decreased function. Still several patients had not received advice for shoulder strengthening exercises that are important to recovery. The adherence to the current recommendations about exercise therapy is insufficient in clinical practice. Thus we recommend that it should be monitored in all institutions in which shoulder pain is treated.

  18. Utilizing the metabolic syndrome component count in workers’ health surveillance: An example of day-time vs. day-night rotating shift workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cheng Lin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To establish a practical method for assessing the general metabolic health conditions among different employee groups, this study utilized the total count of metabolic syndrome (MetS elements as a parameter, and performed a retrospective analysis comparing changes of MetS component count (MSC of 5 years among day-time work (DW and day-andnight rotating shift work (RSW employees. Material and Methods: The data of personal histories, physical examinations, blood tests, abdominal sonographic examinations and occupational records were collected from a cohort of workers in an electronics manufacturing company. We first defined the arithmetic mean value of MSC as MSC density (MSCD for the employee group; then we compared the changes of MSCD over 5 years between DW and RSW workers. Occupational, personal and health records were analyzed for the 1077 workers with an initial mean age of 32.4 years (standard deviation (SD: 6.2 years, including 565 RSW workers (52%. Results: The initial MSCDs were 1.26 and 1.12 (p = 0.06 for DW and RSW workers, respectively; after 5 years, the increments of MSCD for DW and RSW workers were 0.10 and 0.39, respectively (p < 0.01. By performing multivariate logistic regression analyses, and comparing with DW co-workers, final results indicated that the workers exposed to RSW have 1.7-fold increased risk of elevated MSCD (95% confidence interval (CI: 1.28–2.25, p < 0.01; and are 38% less likely (adjusted rate ratio (aRR 0.62, 95% CI: 0.45–0.86, p < 0.01 to attain decreased MSCD. Conclusions: These observations demonstrate that changes of MSCD are significantly different between DW and RSW workers, and are increasingly associated with RSW exposure. In conclusion, MSCD can represent the general metabolic health conditions of a given employee group; MSC, MSCD and their transitional changes can be applied as simple and standardized tools for monitoring metabolic health risk profiles when managing employee health

  19. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Tempelaere

    Full Text Available MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases.Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI.The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear and without tears (tendinopathy (p = 0.012. The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm than in normals (3.4mm (p = 0.02. The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm and tendinopathy (4.8mm shoulders (p = 0.05.The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; 'Looseness', i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position.

  20. Evidence that central sensitisation is present in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome and influences the outcome after surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwilym, S E; Oag, H C L; Tracey, I; Carr, A J

    2011-04-01

    Impingement syndrome in the shoulder has generally been considered to be a clinical condition of mechanical origin. However, anomalies exist between the pathology in the subacromial space and the degree of pain experienced. These may be explained by variations in the processing of nociceptive inputs between different patients. We investigated the evidence for augmented pain transmission (central sensitisation) in patients with impingement, and the relationship between pre-operative central sensitisation and the outcomes following arthroscopic subacromial decompression. We recruited 17 patients with unilateral impingement of the shoulder and 17 age- and gender-matched controls, all of whom underwent quantitative sensory testing to detect thresholds for mechanical stimuli, distinctions between sharp and blunt punctate stimuli, and heat pain. Additionally Oxford shoulder scores to assess pain and function, and PainDETECT questionnaires to identify 'neuropathic' and referred symptoms were completed. Patients completed these questionnaires pre-operatively and three months post-operatively. A significant proportion of patients awaiting subacromial decompression had referred pain radiating down the arm and had significant hyperalgesia to punctate stimulus of the skin compared with controls (unpaired t-test, p shoulder pain associated with impingement. Also, if patients had relatively high levels of central sensitisation pre-operatively, as indicated by higher levels of punctate hyperalgesia and/or referred pain, the outcome three months after subacromial decompression was significantly worse.

  1. Comparison of the Efficacy of Local Corticosteroid Injection and Physical Therapy on Pain Severity, Joint Range of Motion and Muscle Strength in Patients with Shoulder Impingement Syndrome Referred to Rasool-e-Akram Medical Center from April 2008 to September 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Farahini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Subacromial impingement is a common cause of shoulder pain and many patients with this condition recover with conservative management. The most commonly used modalities of nonoperative treatment include activity modification, anti-inflammatory medication and subacromial injection of steroid and ultrasound and physical therapy programs. This study assessed the value of physiotherapy versus subacromial corticosteroid injection in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS. Methods: Seventy three patients with SIS enrolled in the study and treated through physiotherapy (n=37 and subacromial corticosteroid injection (n=36. Two follow-up sessions accomplished at the end of 4th week and 3rd month of treatment respectively. Results: Corticosteroid injection caused dramatic improvement in the painful state (p<0.0001 and sleep dysfunction score (p=0.039 in the first follow-up. However, physiotherapy showed significantly better results regarding patients’ pain score (p=0.016 and their shoulder join range of motions (p=0.017 and p=0.029 for the abduction and extension, respectively in their second follow-up. Conclusion: Our study results showed that subacromial corticosteroid injection primarily resulted in more improvement in the impingement symptoms. However, with the long-term follow-up the results were better for the physiotherapy. These results suggest that patients should not undergo surgery before having conservative treatment.

  2. Prevalence of subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis in shoulder pain: an ultrasonographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draghi, Ferdinando; Scudeller, Luigia; Draghi, Anna Guja; Bortolotto, Chandra

    2015-06-01

    The presence of the subacromial-subdeltoid (SASD) bursa inflammation has recently been proposed as a primary radiologic factor predicting persistent limitation and pain in operated patients. The aim of the study was to verify the hypothesis that pain, or increased shoulder pain, could be associated with SASD bursitis not only in operated patients but also in general population. A consecutive series of 1940 shoulder ultrasound examinations were performed by our Department over a 5-year period using linear multi-frequency probes. All reports of examination executed for shoulder pain were reviewed. The video clips were independently reviewed by two radiologists: effusion in the SASD bursa and the presence of other pathological conditions were evaluated and confirmed. A total of 1147 shoulder video clips were re-evaluated, and 1587 pathologies were detected; 65.5 % of patients had only one pathology, 30.4 % had two and 4.1 % presented three pathologies. The difference between the group with and without effusion is statistically significant for acromioclavicular joint arthritis, supraspinatus tendon calcific tendinopathy, full-thickness and superficial tear of the supraspinatus, traumas and rheumatoid arthritis with a p value <0.01. Our study shows that the effusion in the SASD bursa is frequently associated with shoulder pain often independently from the underlying pathology; further studies are needed to confirm the statistical significance of this relationship by clarifying possible confounding factors.

  3. Relationship between acromial morphological variation and subacromial impingement: A three-dimensional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyu; Xu, Wei; Hu, Ning; Liang, Xi; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Dianming; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the association of acromial morphology and subacromial impingement. Bilateral shoulder computed tomography was performed in 138 patients who received shoulder arthroscopy. Measured parameters included: acromial tilt (AT), modified acromial tilt (mAT), acromial slope (AS), acromiohumeral interval (AHI), lateral acromial angle (LAA), acromial index (AI), critical shoulder angle (CSA), acromial anterior protrusion (AAP), and acromial inferior protrusion (AIP). Acromial morphological characteristics were compared between groups. Side-to-side differences were assessed between affected and non-affected shoulders. Intra- and inter-observer agreements for each parameter were calculated. AT (25.90 vs. 29.41°), mAT (18.88 vs. 22.64°), and AHI (5.46 vs. 6.47 mm) were significantly smaller in impinged patients. The impingement group demonstrated significantly larger AI (63.50 vs. 59.84%), CSA (31.78 vs. 28.74°), AAP (7.13 vs. 5.32 mm), and AIP (5.51 vs. 4.04 mm). Regarding side-to-side comparison, the acromial morphology was significantly different between the affected and non-affected shoulders in impinged patients, while the difference was slight and insignificant in control patients. All, except AS and LAA, measured parameters demonstrated good intra- and inter-observer agreements. Three-dimensional reconstructed CT scan is a reliable method to measure shoulder morphology. The acromial morphological variation is related with sub acromial impingement, however, the causal relationship of them should be further explored.

  4. Electrotherapy modalities for rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Matthew J; Green, Sally; Mrocki, Marshall A; Surace, Stephen J; Deitch, Jessica; McBain, Brodwen; Lyttle, Nicolette; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2016-06-10

    Management of rotator cuff disease may include use of electrotherapy modalities (also known as electrophysical agents), which aim to reduce pain and improve function via an increase in energy (electrical, sound, light, or thermal) into the body. Examples include therapeutic ultrasound, low-level laser therapy (LLLT), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF). These modalities are usually delivered as components of a physical therapy intervention. This review is one of a series of reviews that form an update of the Cochrane review, 'Physiotherapy interventions for shoulder pain'. To synthesise available evidence regarding the benefits and harms of electrotherapy modalities for the treatment of people with rotator cuff disease. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2015), Ovid EMBASE (January 1980 to March 2015), CINAHL Plus (EBSCOhost, January 1937 to March 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP clinical trials registries up to March 2015, unrestricted by language, and reviewed the reference lists of review articles and retrieved trials, to identify potentially relevant trials. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials, including adults with rotator cuff disease (e.g. subacromial impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tendinitis, calcific tendinitis), and comparing any electrotherapy modality with placebo, no intervention, a different electrotherapy modality or any other intervention (e.g. glucocorticoid injection). Trials investigating whether electrotherapy modalities were more effective than placebo or no treatment, or were an effective addition to another physical therapy intervention (e.g. manual therapy or exercise) were the main comparisons of interest. Main outcomes of interest were overall pain, function, pain on motion, patient-reported global assessment of treatment success

  5. Efectividad del tratamiento invasivo de los puntos gatillo miofasciales en la mejora del dolor y el ROM en pacientes diagnosticados de síndrome de pinzamiento subacromial.

    OpenAIRE

    Ropero Tena, Eric

    2015-01-01

    ¿Es el tratamiento invasivo de punción seca una intervención eficaz en el síndrome de pinzamiento subacromial para disminuir el dolor y aumentar el rango de movilidad articular? Objetivos: Valorar la efectividad a corto y largo plazo del tratamiento invasivo de los PGM en pacientes diagnosticados de síndrome de pinzamiento subacromial con más de 6 meses de persistencia de los síntomas. Metodología: Se realizará un estudio experimental de tipo ensayo clínico aleatorio controlado y de cie...

  6. Estudio sobre la eficacia de la educación y los ejercicios terapéuticos en el tratamiento del síndrome subacromial.

    OpenAIRE

    Vidal Prat, Núria

    2014-01-01

    OBJETIVO: Valorar la eficacia de la educación y los ejercicios terapéuticos en el síndrome subacromial. MATERIAL Y METODOS: Se realizará un estudio en sujetos diagnosticados de síndrome subacromial entre 35 y 70 años de edad, derivados al servicio de rehabilitación del Hospital Santa Maria de Lleida. Ensayo controlado aleatorio, con muestreo consecutivo de duración de 6 meses. El programa de intervención con un periodo de duración de 3 semanas, estará compuesto por un grupo control que per...

  7. Lidocaine Test Increases the Success Rates of Corticosteroid Injection in Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Jun; Lee, Hyo Sun

    2016-10-01

    To determine whether lidocaine test injections would increase the success rate of corticosteroid injection for treatment of impingement syndrome. Two hundred thirty-nine patients diagnosed with impingement syndrome were allocated to the lidocaine test (LC) group (N = 139) and the subacromial (SA) group (N = 100). The LC group received 1 ml of 1% lidocaine injection into the subacromial bursa under ultrasound guidance and a second injection of the steroid solution into the subacromial bursa or glenohumeral joint according to the response. The SA group received the same amount of steroid injection into the subacromial bursa without a prior lidocaine injection. Categorical outcomes were utilized and subjects were grouped based on percentage pain relief. Clinical improvement was expressed in terms of the patient's global impression of change (PGIC) as 'not improved,' 'slightly improved,' and 'much improved. In the LC group, 76 of the 139 patients (54% [95 CI 46-63%]) showed '50-80% improvement' and 15 (11% [95% CI 6.6-17%]) patients showed 'more than 80% improvement' at 3 weeks after the injection. While in the SA group, 29 of the 100 patient (29% [95% CI 21-39%]) showed '50-80% improvement' and 13 (13% [95% CI 7.7-21%]) showed 'more than 80% 3 weeks after the injection (χ 2  = 15.073, P = 0.001). This difference persisted at 3 months (χ 2  =   8.015, P = 0.018). The chi-square test of PGIC at 3 weeks also showed significant differences (P lidocaine pre-injection increases the success rate of steroid injection in patients suspected of having impingement syndrome. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Clinical anatomy of the subacromial and related shoulder bursae: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Marion S; Nicholson, Helen D; Woodley, Stephanie J

    2017-03-01

    The subacromial bursa (SAB) is the main bursa of the shoulder. It facilitates normal movement and is also commonly involved in shoulder disorders. Other shoulder bursae have been described but their anatomy has not been well studied. Anatomical variation of shoulder bursae has been suggested and this has implications for clinical practice. This article reviews current knowledge of the normal anatomy of the SAB and related shoulder bursae. A systematic review of the English and German literature was conducted using databases and a hand search of reference lists focusing on the clinical anatomy of the SAB, coracobrachial and subcoracoid bursae and subtendinous bursa of subscapularis. Twenty-four original sources and 13 textbooks were identified. Fifteen studies described the general morphology of the shoulder bursae using cadaveric specimens, eight examined innervation, and one provided information about the blood supply of the SAB. The literature agrees that the SAB is consistent and well innervated with a lateral subdeltoid part and a variable subcoracoid portion. There is variability regarding the consistency, location, and communications of the coracobrachial and subcoracoid bursae and the superior part of the subtendinous bursa of subscapularis, and little information on their nerve and blood supply. Several bursae are present around the shoulder joint. Further research is warranted to understand the precise attachments, dimensions, and communications of the bursae, as well as their nerve and blood supply. This information will improve understanding of the clinical relevance of these bursae and inform appropriate assessment and treatment. Clin. Anat. 30:213-226, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Distribution of the axillary nerve to the subacromial bursa and the area around the long head of the biceps tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasu, H; Nimura, A; Yamaguchi, K; Akita, K

    2015-09-01

    Patients with a shoulder disorder often complain of pain on the anterior or lateral aspect of the shoulder. Such pain has been thought to originate from the suprascapular nerve. However, taking into consideration the distinctive course of the axillary nerve, the axillary nerve is likely to supply branches to the structure around the shoulder joint. This study was conducted to clarify the division, course, and distribution of the branches which originate from the axillary nerve and innervate structures around the shoulder joint. The division, course, and distribution of the branches which originate from the axillary nerve and innervate structures around the shoulder joint were examined macroscopically by dissecting 20 shoulders of 10 adult Japanese cadavers. The thin branches from the anterior branch of the axillary nerve were distributed to the subacromial bursa and the area around the long head of the biceps tendon. The branches from the main trunk of the axillary nerve or the branch to the teres minor muscle were distributed to the infero-posterior part of the shoulder joint. The pain on the anterior or lateral aspect of the shoulder, which has been thought to originate from the suprascapular nerve, might be related to the thin branches which originate from the axillary nerve and innervate the subacromial bursa and the area around the long head of the biceps tendon. These results would be useful to consider the cause of the shoulder pain or to prevent the residual pain after the biceps tenodesis.

  10. A randomised controlled feasibility study investigating the use of eccentric and concentric strengthening exercises in the treatment of rotator cuff tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Bateman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To conduct a feasibility study to compare concentric and eccentric rotator cuff strengthening exercises for rotator cuff tendinopathy. Methods: A total of 11 patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy who were on the waiting list for arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery were randomised to perform eccentric rotator cuff strengthening exercises, concentric strengthening exercises or no exercises. Patients were evaluated in terms of levels of pain and function using the Oxford Shoulder Score and a Visual Analogue Scale initially, at 4 weeks and at 8 weeks. Results: The study design was found to be acceptable to patients and achieved a high level of 86% compliance. The drop-out rate was 0%. Two patients performing eccentric strengthening exercises improved sufficiently to cancel their planned surgery. Conclusion: Further research in this area is recommended. The study design was feasible and power calculations have been conducted to aid future research planning.

  11. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Prevention and Wellness Exercise and Fitness Injury Rehabilitation Rotator Cuff Exercises Rotator Cuff Exercises Share Print Rotator Cuff ... Best Rotator Cuff ExercisesNational Institutes of Health: MedlinePlus, ... and WellnessTags: Exercise Prescription, prevention, Shoulder Problems, ...

  12. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF SHOULDER IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME IN ONE-DAY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mikek

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Arthroscopic subacromial decompression is the method of choice in operative treatment of subacromial rotator cuff impingement. In General Hospital Novo mesto the procedure is performed on a basis of one-day surgery.Methods. We present a prospective analysis of results of operative treatment of shoulder impingement in 36 patients. In all patients functional shoulder scores according to Constant, SST and UCLA were recorded before the operative procedure and again at least three months after the index procedure.Results. According to acromial morphology in the observed group there were three patients with type I acromion (8%, 22 patients had type II acromion (61% and 11 had acromion type III (31%. The average Constant score improved from 21 (SD ± 15 before the operation to 78 (SD ± 12 after the operation and average SST score improved from 4,7 (SD ± 2 to 7,5 (SD ± 1.4 and average UCLA score from 11 (SD ± 3 to 26 (SD ± 3.Conclusions. We conclude that arthroscopic subacromial decompression in properly selected patients enables attainment of good or excellent results in over 90% of patients. Because of minimal invasivness the procedure can be safely performed as one-day surgery.

  13. Assessment of dynamic humeral centering in shoulder pain with impingement syndrome: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudreuil, Johann; Lasbleiz, Sandra; Richette, Pascal; Seguin, Gérard; Rastel, Christine; Aout, Mounir; Vicaut, Eric; Cohen-Solal, Martine; Lioté, Frédéric; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Bardin, Thomas; Orcel, Philippe

    2011-09-01

    Treatment for degenerative rotator cuff disease of the shoulder includes physiotherapy. Dynamic humeral centering (DHC) aims at preventing subacromial impingement, which contributes to the disease. The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of DHC. 69 patients with shoulder pain and impingement syndrome were prospectively included in a single-centre randomised trial with a 12-month follow-up. Patients and assessor were blinded to the study hypothesis and treatment, respectively. DHC and non-specific mobilisation as control were performed for 6 weeks, in 15 supervised individual outpatient sessions, and patients performed daily home exercises. The planned primary outcome was the Constant score including subscores for pain, activity, mobility and strength at 3 months. Secondary outcomes were the Constant score and subscores at 12 months, and medication use for pain at 3 and 12 months. The DHC group did not differ from the control group in the total Constant score at 3 months. However, the DHC group showed a higher Constant subscore for pain (12.2 (SD 2.8) vs 9.9 (2.9), least square means difference 2.1, 95% CI 0.7 to 3.5, p=0.004). At 3 months, the DHC group also showed a higher rate of no medication use (96.7% vs 71%, proportional difference 25.7, 95% CI 3.7 to 51.9, p=0.012). There was no other intergroup difference. There was no difference in the total Constant score between DHC and controls. However, pain was improved at 3 months after DHC. The differences found in subscores for pain should be explored in future studies. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT 01022775.

  14. Assessment of the Postoperative Appearance of the Rotator Cuff Tendon Using Serial Sonography After Arthroscopic Repair of a Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Choi, Ja-Young; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kang, Yusuhn; Park, Jina; Kim, Sae Hoon; Kang, Heung Sik

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate serial changes in sonographic findings of a rotator cuff tendon after rotator cuff repair. Sixty-five arthroscopically repaired rotator cuff tears (43 full-thickness tears and 22 partial-thickness tears) were retrospectively included in this study. Serial sonographic examinations were performed at 5 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. The sonographic findings of the repaired tendon were assessed for a recurrent tear, tendon thickness, morphologic tendon characteristics, vascularity, and bursitis at each time point. Four recurrent tears occurred within 3 months of surgery. The postoperative tendon thickness decreased from 5 weeks to 6 months after surgery (P = .001). There were significant changes in the morphologic tendon characteristics, including the echo texture, fibrillar pattern, and surface irregularity of the repaired tendon, from 5 weeks to 6 months after surgery (P subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis and the vascularity of the repaired tendon decreased postoperatively over time. Serial sonography after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was useful for monitoring the postoperative changes in a repaired tendon. The morphologic appearance of the repaired tendon and peritendinous soft tissue changes improved over time and nearly normalized within 6 months of surgery. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  15. Treatments for Shoulder Impingement Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Goost, Hans; Lin, Xiang-Bo; Burger, Christof; Paul, Christian; Wang, Zeng-Li; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Jiang, Zhi-Chao; Welle, Kristian; Kabir, Koroush

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Many treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) are available in clinical practice; some of which have already been compared with other treatments by various investigators. However, a comprehensive treatment comparison is lacking. Several widely used electronic databases were searched for eligible studies. The outcome measurements were the pain score and the Constant–Murley score (CMS). Direct comparisons were performed using the conventional pair-wise meta-analysis method, while a network meta-analysis based on the Bayesian model was used to calculate the results of all potentially possible comparisons and rank probabilities. Included in the meta-analysis procedure were 33 randomized controlled trials involving 2300 patients. Good agreement was demonstrated between the results of the pair-wise meta-analyses and the network meta-analyses. Regarding nonoperative treatments, with respect to the pain score, combined treatments composed of exercise and other therapies tended to yield better effects than single-intervention therapies. Localized drug injections that were combined with exercise showed better treatment effects than any other treatments, whereas worse effects were observed when such injections were used alone. Regarding the CMS, most combined treatments based on exercise also demonstrated better effects than exercise alone. Regarding surgical treatments, according to the pain score and the CMS, arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) together with treatments derived from it, such as ASD combined with radiofrequency and arthroscopic bursectomy, showed better effects than open subacromial decompression (OSD) and OSD combined with the injection of platelet-leukocyte gel. Exercise therapy also demonstrated good performance. Results for inconsistency, sensitivity analysis, and meta-regression all supported the robustness and reliability of these network meta-analyses. Exercise and other exercise-based therapies, such as kinesio taping

  16. Rotating Cavitation Supression Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a rotating cavitation (RC) suppressor for liquid rocket engine turbopump inducers. Cavitation instabilities, such as rotating cavitation,...

  17. Surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to intensities of occupational mechanical exposures across 10-year exposure time windows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbøge, Annett; Frost, Poul; Andersen, Johan Hviid

    2017-01-01

    if exposure to hand-arm vibration (HAV) is an independent risk factor. METHODS: We used data from a register-based cohort study of the entire Danish working population (n=2 374 403). During follow-up (2003-2008), 14 118 first-time events of surgery for SIS occurred. For each person, we linked register......-based occupational codes (1993-2007) to a general population job exposure matrix to obtain year-by-year exposure intensities on measurement scales for force, upper arm elevation >90° and repetition and expert rated intensities of exposure to HAV. For 10-year exposure time windows, we calculated the duration...... intensities for repetition. Any intensities of force and upper arm elevation >90° above minimal implied an increased risk across 10-year exposure time windows. No independent associations were found for HAV....

  18. Risk of surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome in relation to neck-shoulder complaints and occupational biomechanical exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Susanne Wulff; Dalbøge, Annett; Andersen, JH

    2013-01-01

    at the Danish Ramazzini Centre. We linked baseline questionnaire information from 1993-2004 on neck-shoulder complaints, job titles, psychosocial work factors, body mass index, and smoking with register information on first-time surgery for SIS from 1996-2008. Biomechanical exposure measures were obtained from...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of muscle usage associated with three exercises for rotator cuff rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrigan, J M; Shellock, F G; Mink, J H; Deutsch, A L

    1999-10-01

    Methods of determining muscle usage for exercises involving rotator cuff muscles are limited. Therefore, this investigation used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the effect of three different exercises used for rehabilitation of the rotator cuff. Five normal volunteer subjects (3 men, 2 women, mean age 31.4 yr) were studied. The exercises were scaption with internal rotation (SIR), military press (MP), and side-lying 45 degrees abduction (SLA). MR imaging was performed immediately before and after exercise using a "fast" spin echo STIR sequence and oblique coronal plane imaging. Changes in signal intensity pre- and post-exercise were measured at comparable section locations for the MR images of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, subscapularis, deltoid, and trapezius. The SLA showed the greatest increase in signal intensity in all the muscles (percent change, P < 0.01) except for the trapezius, which was used more by the MP and SIR. None of the exercises activated the teres minor (percent change, P = not significant). These findings have important implications in efficacy of physical rehabilitation of the rotator cuff and avoidance of subacromial impingement exercise motions.

  20. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Subacromial Bursa: Potential for Cell Based Tendon Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Na; Armstrong, April D.; Li, Feng; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are a common clinical problem either as a result of overuse or aging. Biological approaches to tendon repair that involve use of scaffolding materials or cell-based approaches are currently being investigated. The cell-based approaches are focused on applying multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) mostly harvested from bone marrow. In the present study, we focused on characterizing cells harvested from tissues associated with rotator cuff tendons based on an assumption that these cells would be more appropriate for tendon repair. We isolated MSCs from bursa tissue associated with rotator cuff tendons and characterized them for multilineage differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Human bursa was obtained from patients undergoing rotator cuff surgery and cells within were isolated using collagenase and dispase digestion. The cells isolated from the tissues were characterized for osteoblastic, adipogenic, chondrogenic, and tenogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that the cells isolated from bursa tissue exhibited MSCs characteristics as evidenced by the expression of putative cell surface markers attributed to MSCs. The cells exhibited high proliferative capacity and differentiated toward cells of mesenchymal lineages with high efficiency. Bursa-derived cells expressed markers of tenocytes when treated with bone morphogenetic protein-12 (BMP-12) and assumed aligned morphology in culture. Bursa cells pretreated with BMP-12 and seeded in ceramic scaffolds formed extensive bone, as well as tendon-like tissue in vivo. Bone formation was demonstrated by histological analysis and immunofluorescence for DMP-1 in tissue sections made from the scaffolds seeded with the cells. Tendon-like tissue formed in vivo consisted of parallel collagen fibres typical of tendon tissues. Bursa-derived cells also formed a fibrocartilagenous tissue in the ceramic scaffolds. Taken together, the results demonstrate a new source of MSCs with a

  1. Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Cortico-steroid Injections for Pain Relief and Functional Improvement in Shoulder Impingement Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramappa, Arun; Walley, Kempland C; Herder, Lindsay M; Iyer, Sravisht; Zurakowski, David; Hall, Amber; DeAngelis, Joseph P

    Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Treatment options for SIS include conservative modalities such as use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physical therapy, and subacromial corticosteroid injections (CSIs). Although studies have found improvement in pain, function, and range of motion after CSI, the effect of injection route (anterior or posterior) on shoulder pain in patients with SIS has not been investigated. In the study reported here, patients were randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups: anterior CSI and posterior CSI. Pain was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS) and function with the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE). Patients were evaluated before injection (baseline) and 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. Of the 55 patients enrolled, 25 received anterior CSI and 30 received posterior CSI. The 2 groups showed no significant difference in VAS pain at baseline or 1, 3, or 6 months after injection. SANE scores were statistically different at 3 months. Each group had significantly less pain and better function 1, 3, and 6 months after injection than at baseline. Age, sex, and body mass index did not significantly affect the efficacy of anterior or posterior CSIs. In patients with SIS, subacromial CSI reduces pain and improves function for up to 6 months. These effects are no different for anterior and posterior injection routes. As a result, clinicians should rely on their clinical acumen when selecting injection routes, as anterior and posterior are both beneficial.

  2. Reverse Fosbury Flop Tear of the Rotator Cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Tirefort

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. “Fosbury flop” tear is an avulsion of the posterosuperior rotator cuff from the bone with reversal healing on its medial bursal-side. This case report describes a unique variant of Fosbury flop tear with a lesion of the musculotendinous junction that healed, for its tendon part, on the anterior humerus and coracoid process. Case Presentation. A 62-year-old man developed a posttraumatic painful shoulder with active loss of range of motion. Magnetic resonance arthrography demonstrated a lesion of the musculotendinous junction of the supraspinatus with healing of the tendon on the above-mentioned structures (reverse Fosbury flop. During arthroscopic evaluation, tendon repair was not possible and a debridement to avoid subacromial and anterior impingement associated with a tenotomy of the long head of the biceps were carried out. One year postoperatively, the patient had complete range of motion and was satisfied with the clinical results. Discussion and Conclusion. Different Fosbury flop tears exist. Radiologists and orthopedic surgeons should be aware of these tear patterns as failure to recognize them may lead to inadequate treatment.

  3. The quadrilateral space syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okino, S; Miyaji, H; Matoba, M

    1995-05-01

    We describe a 21-year-old woman with left shoulder pain increased by desk work. Left subclavian angiography disclosed occlusion of the posterior circumflex humeral artery on abduction and external rotation of the arm, compatible with the previous reports of the quadrilateral space syndrome. This syndrome should be considered in patients with shoulder pain of unknown aetiology.

  4. Effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injections combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Fusaro, Isabella; Galletti, Stefano; Volini, Silvia; Benedetti, Maria Grazia

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the association of exercises for the shoulder with ultrasound-guided injection into the bursa significantly improves the treatment outcome in adhesive bursitis. Two groups of 35 patients, one treated with ultrasound-guided injection (UGI) and the other one with ultrasound-guided injection and home exercise program (UGI-exercise) for 1 month, were assessed for pain and shoulder function before treatment, 1 and 3 months post-treatment. Fourteen patients in UGI group and 23 patients in the UGI-exercises group were completely free of pain after 1 month (p = 0.031). At 3 months' follow-up, patients in the UGI-exercise group showed a significant improvement with respect to the other group (p = 0.005). No differences were found in function assessment. The UGI combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis is effective to ensure a more frequent complete pain relief in the medium term.

  5. Unusual lesions mimicking impingement syndrome in the shoulder joint - Think medially

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Singh

    2016-09-01

    These are unusual causes that should be considered when investigating classical impingement syndrome and particularly those who may have failed to respond to decompression surgery. They highlight the potential value of looking beyond the sub-acromial space for causal lesions and in these cases, at a time when limited ultrasound investigation has become increasingly popular; MRI has clearly played an important and was essential in planning surgery as these lesions would not have been identified on USS. Even though the symptoms were classical.

  6. [Chilaidity syndrome. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Stefano; Candela, Giancarlo; Di Libero, Lorenzo; Argano, Francesco; Romano, Ornella; Iannella, Iolanda

    2012-01-01

    Chilaidity syndrome is a mal position by bowel mal rotation o malfissation. It is more common in right side expecially in obese people. If asyimptomatic, the syndrome is an occasional comparison by radiology, surgical exploration by laparoscopy or autopsy, otherwise, if symptomatic, there are obstructive symptoms,abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distension, flatulence, breath, constipation and anorexia. Diagnosis is radiological. We present a rare case of this syndrome in a man with serious obstructive symptoms.

  7. Rotational Preference in Gymnastics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heinen, Thomas; Jeraj, Damian; Vinken, Pia M; Velentzas, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    In gymnastics, most skills incorporate rotations about one or more body axes. At present, the question remains open if factors such as lateral preference and/or vestibulo-spinal asymmetry are related to gymnast's rotational preference...

  8. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    1999-01-01

    In this article two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very offten the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...... approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherient in the least squares estimation. Keywords: averaging rotations, Riemannian metric, matrix, quaternion...

  9. MRI of the rotator cuff and internal derangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opsha, Oleg; Malik, Archana; Baltazar, Romulo; Primakov, Denis; Beltran, Salvador; Miller, Theodore T; Beltran, Javier

    2008-10-01

    Disease to the rotator cuff is the most common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. The anatomy and physiology of the rotator cuff is complex and interconnected to other muscle groups in the shoulder. One must take the anatomic status of the rotator cuff tendons into account when planning the treatment of the rotator cuff injury. Diagnostic imaging of the rotator cuff, performed by MRI, provides valuable information about the nature of the injury. In this article, we will review the various types and causes of rotator cuff injuries, normal MR anatomy, function, patho-anatomy, and the biomechanics of the rotator cuff. We will also review shoulder impingement syndromes.

  10. MRI of the rotator cuff and internal derangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opsha, Oleg [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: oopsha@hotmail.com; Malik, Archana [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: dr.armal@gmail.com; Baltazar, Romulo [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: rbaltazar@gmail.com; Primakov, Denis [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States)], E-mail: dgprim@yahoo.com; Beltran, Salvador [Dr. Ramon Marti, 2 Albons, Ginrona 17136 (Spain); Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: MillerTT@hss.edu; Beltran, Javier [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: jbeltran46@msn.com

    2008-10-15

    Disease to the rotator cuff is the most common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. The anatomy and physiology of the rotator cuff is complex and interconnected to other muscle groups in the shoulder. One must take the anatomic status of the rotator cuff tendons into account when planning the treatment of the rotator cuff injury. Diagnostic imaging of the rotator cuff, performed by MRI, provides valuable information about the nature of the injury. In this article, we will review the various types and causes of rotator cuff injuries, normal MR anatomy, function, patho-anatomy, and the biomechanics of the rotator cuff. We will also review shoulder impingement syndromes.

  11. Acute Calcific Bursitis After Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Barbotage of Rotator Cuff Calcific Tendinopathy: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Bo-Sung; Lee, Seung Hak; Cho, Yung; Chung, Sun Gun

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous barbotage is an effective treatment for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy, providing rapid and substantial pain relief. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with aggravated pain early after ultrasound-guided barbotage of a large calcific deposit in the supraspinatus tendon. Subsequent examination revealed a thick calcification spreading along the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa space, suggesting acute calcific bursitis complicated by barbotage. Additional barbotage alleviated her pain completely. Therefore, a high index of suspicion for acute calcific bursitis is required in patients with unresolved or aggravated pain after barbotage. Repeated barbotage could be effective for this condition. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Galaxy cluster's rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolopoulou, M.; Plionis, M.

    2017-03-01

    We study the possible rotation of cluster galaxies, developing, testing, and applying a novel algorithm which identifies rotation, if such does exist, as well as its rotational centre, its axis orientation, rotational velocity amplitude, and, finally, the clockwise or counterclockwise direction of rotation on the plane of the sky. To validate our algorithms we construct realistic Monte Carlo mock rotating clusters and confirm that our method provides robust indications of rotation. We then apply our methodology on a sample of Abell clusters with z ≲ 0.1 with member galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR10 spectroscopic data base. After excluding a number of substructured clusters, which could provide erroneous indications of rotation, and taking into account the expected fraction of misidentified coherent substructure velocities for rotation, provided by our Monte Carlo simulation analysis, we find that ∼23 per cent of our clusters are rotating under a set of strict criteria. Loosening the strictness of the criteria, on the expense of introducing spurious rotation indications, we find this fraction increasing to ∼28 per cent. We correlate our rotation indicators with the cluster dynamical state, provided either by their Bautz-Morgan type or by their X-ray isophotal shape and find for those clusters showing rotation within 1.5 h^{-1}_{70} Mpc that the significance of their rotation is related to the dynamically younger phases of cluster formation but after the initial anisotropic accretion and merging has been completed. Finally, finding rotational modes in galaxy clusters could lead to the necessity of correcting the dynamical cluster mass calculations.

  13. Rotating Stars in Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stergioulas Nikolaos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on the equilibrium properties and on the nonaxisymmetric instabilities in f-modes and r-modes have been updated and several new sections have been added on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity.

  14. The spatial rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan; Hahn, Ute; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new local volume estimator, the spatial rotator, which is based on measurements on a virtual 3D probe, using computer assisted microscopy. The basic design of the probe builds upon the rotator principle which requires only a few manual intersection markings, thus making...... the spatial rotator fast to use. Since a 3D probe is involved, it is expected that the spatial rotator will be more efficient than the the nucleator and the planar rotator, which are based on measurements in a single plane. An extensive simulation study shows that the spatial rotator may be more efficient...... than the traditional local volume estimators. Furthermore, the spatial rotator can be seen as a further development of the Cavalieri estimator, which does not require randomization of sectioning or viewing direction. The tissue may thus be sectioned in any arbitrary direction, making it easy...

  15. Rilonacept in the treatment of subacromial bursitis: A randomized, non-inferiority, unblinded study versus triamcinolone acetonide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Matthew B; Motley, Spencer A; Wohlford, Susanna; Ramsey, Bryan C

    2015-12-01

    Subacromial bursitis is caused by inflammation of the bursa that separates the superior surface of the supraspinatus tendon from the overlying coraco-acromial ligament and acromion. While multiple cytokines are implicated, interleukin-1 beta appears to play a prominent role. Rilonacept, an interleukin-1 trap, may be an alternative to corticosteroid injection for the management of this condition. This single center, randomized, non-inferiority, unblinded study recruited 33 subjects over 9 months. Twenty subjects received 160mg intrabursal injection of rilonacept and 13 received a 6mL mixture of lidocaine, bupivacaine, and 80mg triamcinolone acetonide. QuickDASH, subject reported pain, and adverse events were recorded at time of injection, 2 days later, 2 weeks later, and 4 weeks later. Primary outcome was improvement in QuickDASH 4 weeks post-injection. Secondary outcomes were improvement in subject reported pain and occurrence of adverse events at 4 weeks. Both study groups were equally matched for age, gender, ethnicity, and site of bursa injection. Both medications demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in QuickDASH 4 weeks post-injection, but triamcinolone acetonide injection offered greater improvement (P=0.004). Both medications demonstrated improvement in subject reported pain but between group comparison at 4 weeks showed that triamcinolone was superior (P=0.044). No statistically significant differences in adverse events were noted between groups, but subjects who received rilonacept experienced more episodes of diarrhea and headache. While improvement in QuickDASH and pain was noted with a single intrabursal injection of rilonacept at 4 weeks, injection with triamcinolone acetonide was more efficacious. This trial was registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01830699). Copyright © 2015 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. The relationship between subacromial bursa thickness on ultrasound and shoulder pain in open water endurance swimmers over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couanis, G; Breidahl, W; Burnham, S

    2015-07-01

    To help clinicians understand the clinical relevance of subacromial bursa (SAB) thickness on ultrasound investigations in marathon swimmers. A prospective, observational cohort study. Twenty two open-water marathon swimmers entered in a 19.7km open-water event received comprehensive, bilateral, shoulder ultrasounds on three occasions: 4 months prior to the race, 2 weeks prior to the race and within 1 week after the race. The SAB thickness was measured in the longitudinal plane of supraspinatus, with other abnormailities also recorded. The swimmers completed questionnaires detailing presence and severity of shoulder pain, volume of swimming completed that week and their breathing pattern. SAB thickness increased with season progression: mean of 1.55 (± 0.68) 4 months prior to the race, 1.63 (± 0.68) 2 weeks prior to the race and 1.86 (± 0.69) 1 week after the race. SAB thickness is significantly (p=0.05) correlated (β=0.11) with kilometres swum in the pool in the preceding week. SAB thickness was not significantly correlated with pain when measured prior to the race. However, at 1 week post race, SAB thickness of shoulders with pain were significantly greater than those without pain, p-value=0.032. SAB thickness increases with increasing swimming training. Commonly, this increase is not correlated to pain, suggestive of a painless adaptive process. The significant correlation between pain and SAB thickness soon after an exacerbating event suggests that painful acute SAB thickening is a different entity to chronic, painless adaptive SAB thickening. These two entities can only be differentiated by clinical history and examination. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. US guided corticosteroid injection into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa: Technique and approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molini, L; Mariacher, S; Bianchi, S

    2012-02-01

    Local injection of cortisone derivatives, sometimes combined with local anesthetics, is frequently administered in rheumatology as the treatment of choice in para-articular diseases or as an adjuvant to systemic therapy in the treatment of arthritis.One of the most frequent local corticosteroid injections administered in daily clinical practice by rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons, physiatrists, sports medicine doctors and general practitioners is injection into the subacromialsubdeltoid bursa in the treatment of bursitis and anterior superior impingement syndrome of the shoulder.Before local corticosteroid injection is administered, it is important to identify possible contraindications and to examine the documentation provided by the patient. Absolute contraindications or those related to the procedure should be evaluated by the prescribing physician but also the physician performing the corticosteroid injection should evaluate possible contraindications to make sure that corticosteroid injection is feasible. The present paper describes the ultrasound (US) guided local corticosteroid injection procedure with particular attention to the equipment required, the position of the patient and the examiner as well as the approach. The main advantage of US guidance during corticosteroid injection is the possibility to identify vascular structures, nerves and tendons situated in the needle path in order to avoid these structures and be sure to inject the drug into the appropriate location. When all rules are complied with and the corticosteroid injection is carried out by an experienced physician, it is virtually painless and is performed in just a few minutes.

  18. US guided corticosteroid injection into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa: Technique and approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molini, L.; Mariacher, S.; Bianchi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Local injection of cortisone derivatives, sometimes combined with local anesthetics, is frequently administered in rheumatology as the treatment of choice in para-articular diseases or as an adjuvant to systemic therapy in the treatment of arthritis. One of the most frequent local corticosteroid injections administered in daily clinical practice by rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons, physiatrists, sports medicine doctors and general practitioners is injection into the subacromialsubdeltoid bursa in the treatment of bursitis and anterior superior impingement syndrome of the shoulder. Before local corticosteroid injection is administered, it is important to identify possible contraindications and to examine the documentation provided by the patient. Absolute contraindications or those related to the procedure should be evaluated by the prescribing physician but also the physician performing the corticosteroid injection should evaluate possible contraindications to make sure that corticosteroid injection is feasible. The present paper describes the ultrasound (US) guided local corticosteroid injection procedure with particular attention to the equipment required, the position of the patient and the examiner as well as the approach. The main advantage of US guidance during corticosteroid injection is the possibility to identify vascular structures, nerves and tendons situated in the needle path in order to avoid these structures and be sure to inject the drug into the appropriate location. When all rules are complied with and the corticosteroid injection is carried out by an experienced physician, it is virtually painless and is performed in just a few minutes. PMID:23396761

  19. Faraday rotation measure synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brentjens, MA; de Bruyn, AG

    2005-01-01

    We extend the rotation measure work of Burn ( 1966, MNRAS, 133, 67) to the cases of limited sampling of lambda(2) space and non-constant emission spectra. We introduce the rotation measure transfer function (RMTF), which is an excellent predictor of n pi ambiguity problems with the lambda(2)

  20. CONTROL ROD ROTATING MECHANISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgarten, A.; Karalis, A.J.

    1961-11-28

    A threaded rotatable shaft is provided which rotates in response to linear movement of a nut, the shaft being surrounded by a pair of bellows members connected to either side of the nut to effectively seal the reactor from leakage and also to store up energy to shut down the reactor in the event of a power failure. (AEC)

  1. Units of rotational information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuxiang; Chiribella, Giulio; Hu, Qinheping

    2017-12-01

    Entanglement in angular momentum degrees of freedom is a precious resource for quantum metrology and control. Here we study the conversions of this resource, focusing on Bell pairs of spin-J particles, where one particle is used to probe unknown rotations and the other particle is used as reference. When a large number of pairs are given, we show that every rotated spin-J Bell state can be reversibly converted into an equivalent number of rotated spin one-half Bell states, at a rate determined by the quantum Fisher information. This result provides the foundation for the definition of an elementary unit of information about rotations in space, which we call the Cartesian refbit. In the finite copy scenario, we design machines that approximately break down Bell states of higher spins into Cartesian refbits, as well as machines that approximately implement the inverse process. In addition, we establish a quantitative link between the conversion of Bell states and the simulation of unitary gates, showing that the fidelity of probabilistic state conversion provides upper and lower bounds on the fidelity of deterministic gate simulation. The result holds not only for rotation gates, but also to all sets of gates that form finite-dimensional representations of compact groups. For rotation gates, we show how rotations on a system of given spin can simulate rotations on a system of different spin.

  2. Deconstructing Mental Rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Axel

    2014-01-01

    A random walk model of the classical mental rotation task is explored in two experiments. By assuming that a mental rotation is repeated until sufficient evidence for a match/mismatch is obtained, the model accounts for the approximately linearly increasing reaction times (RTs) on positive trials...

  3. SMAP Faraday Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, David

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is a change in the polarization as signal propagates through the ionosphere. At L-band it is necessary to correct for this change and measurements are made on the spacecraft of the rotation angle. These figures show that there is good agreement between the SMAP measurements (blue) and predictions based on models (red).

  4. Rotating stars in relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Stergioulas, Nikolaos

    2017-01-01

    Rotating relativistic stars have been studied extensively in recent years, both theoretically and observationally, because of the information they might yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are considered to be promising sources of gravitational waves. The latest theoretical understanding of rotating stars in relativity is reviewed in this updated article. The sections on equilibrium properties and on nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in f -modes and r -modes have been updated. Several new sections have been added on equilibria in modified theories of gravity, approximate universal relationships, the one-arm spiral instability, on analytic solutions for the exterior spacetime, rotating stars in LMXBs, rotating strange stars, and on rotating stars in numerical relativity including both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic studies of these objects.

  5. Rapidly rotating red giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehan, Charlotte; Mosser, Benoît; Michel, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Stellar oscillations give seismic information on the internal properties of stars. Red giants are targets of interest since they present mixed modes, wich behave as pressure modes in the convective envelope and as gravity modes in the radiative core. Mixed modes thus directly probe red giant cores, and allow in particular the study of their mean core rotation. The high-quality data obtained by CoRoT and Kepler satellites represent an unprecedented perspective to obtain thousands of measurements of red giant core rotation, in order to improve our understanding of stellar physics in deep stellar interiors. We developed an automated method to obtain such core rotation measurements and validated it for stars on the red giant branch. In this work, we particularly focus on the specific application of this method to red giants having a rapid core rotation. They show complex spectra where it is tricky to disentangle rotational splittings from mixed-mode period spacings. We demonstrate that the method based on the identification of mode crossings is precise and efficient. The determination of the mean core rotation directly derives from the precise measurement of the asymptotic period spacing ΔΠ1 and of the frequency at which the crossing of the rotational components is observed.

  6. Reliability of diagnostic tests in rotator cuff muscle pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sadenbergh

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several tests to assist it in the diagnoses of rota-tor cuff impairment have been described in the literature but controversystill exists as to the accuracy of these tests. A study was therefore conducted to determine the reliability of the rotator cuff muscle tests (empty can, full can, lift off and external rotation as a diagnostic tool.Methodology: Fifty three patients experiencing shoulder pain were assessedusing manual muscle tests (empty can; full can; lift off and external rotationtests. Both pain and weakness were recorded using numerical scales adapted from tests performed by Itoi et al, (1999. These results were compared to ultrasonic diagnoses made by a surgeon. Informed consent was obtained and anonymity was ensured for all participants.Results: A test was false positive when ultrasonic diagnosis indicated no tear in the muscle (although oedema or calcification may have been present, but the manual muscle test was positive regarding pain and weakness. A test on the other hand was false negative when the ultrasonic diagnosis indicated a muscle tear but the manual muscle tests indicated no pain or muscle weakness. Reliability was tested using sensitivity and specificity tests. The sensitivity of all four tests was high (80%, but the specificity was low (20% to 40%, implying that a large number of false positive diagnoses can be made. The major contributors to the false positive results were sub-acromial sub-deltoid bursitis and a decreased acromio-humeral space. When considering pain alone for a positive result the correlation increased a  little, however, taking both pain and muscle weakness into account, the correlation increased even more.Conclusion: The manual muscle tests were not as reliable as expected, but concurrent pathologies may be the main factor influencing the results of the tests. The combination of muscle strength and pain could be recommendedas criteria for a positive test. The empty can and full can

  7. Rotating Stars in Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Stergioulas

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of the information they can yield about the equation of state of matter at extremely high densities and because they are one of the more possible sources of detectable gravitational waves, rotating relativistic stars have been receiving significant attention in recentyears. We review the latest theoretical and numerical methods for modeling rotating relativistic stars, including stars with a strong magnetic field and hot proto-neutron stars. We also review nonaxisymmetric oscillations and instabilities in rotating stars and summarize the latest developments regarding the gravitational wave-driven (CFS instability in both polar and axial quasi-normal modes.

  8. A rotating quantum vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenci, V.A. de; Svaiter, N.F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1996-11-01

    It was investigated which mapping has to be used to compare measurements made in a rotating frame to those made in an inertial frame. Using a non-Galilean coordinate transformation, the creation-annihilation operators of a massive scalar field in the rotating frame are not the same as those of an inertial observer. This leads to a new vacuum state(a rotating vacuum) which is a superposition of positive and negative frequency Minkowski particles. Polarization effects in circular accelerators in the proper frame of the electron making a connection with the inertial frame point of view were analysed. 65 refs.

  9. Uso del taping en el manejo clínico de sujetos con pinzamiento sub-acromial: revisión sistemática

    OpenAIRE

    R. A. Aguilera Eguía; E. O. Zafra Santos; F. A. Araya Quintanilla; L. E. Gómez Carreño; J. X. Soto Aliaga; A. Vargas Varga; C. J. Cofré Bolados; A. R. Espinoza Salinas; G. A. Pavez von Martens; T. Aguilera Eguía; M. Di Santo

    2014-01-01

    El pinzamiento sub-acromial (SPS) es el trastorno músculo-esquelético más frecuente de las patologías de hombro. El taping se ha transformado en una indicación relativamente nueva y bastante común en los últimos años. Se realizará una síntesis de la evidencia a través de una revisión sistemática (RS) de ensayos clínicos aleatorizados que hayan comparado el uso del taping para el manejo de estos pacientes. El objetivo de esta revisión es determinar el efecto del taping sobre el dolor en sujeto...

  10. Efectividad del kinesiotape como tratamiento complementario a un programa de ejercicio físico en el Síndrome del pinzamiento subacromial secundario a discinesias escapulares

    OpenAIRE

    Nadal Zuferri, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Aquest projecte té com a objectiu valorar l'efectivitat del kinesiotape com una tècnica complementària dins d’un programa d'exercici físic, en la funcionalitat dels treballadors, que utilitzen els seus braços per sobre del cap, d'entre 18-65 anys diagnosticats de síndrome del pinçament subacromial secundari a discinèsies escapulars. Per l’assoliment d’aquest objectiu es realitzarà un estudi multicèntric controlat i aleatoritzat amb doble cec sobre una mostra de 225 subjectes. En l'estudi hi h...

  11. Ultrasound-guided versus blind subacromial-subdeltoid bursa injection in adults with shoulder pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Song, Hai Xin; Dong, Yan; Li, Jian Hua

    2015-12-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to assess the effectiveness of ultrasound-guided (USG) versus blind (landmark-guided, LMG) corticosteroid subacromial-subdeltoid bursa injection in adults with shoulder pain. The searches were performed on PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Ovid CochraneCENTRAL, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus from database inception through March 27, 2015. Studies were included trials comparing USG versus LSG injections for the treatment of adults with subacromial-subdeltoid bursitis. Two reviewers independently performed data extraction and appraisal of the studies. The outcome measures collected were the decreased VAS and SDQ scores, the increased shoulder function scores and shoulder abduction motion range, and the effective rate at 6 weeks after injection. Seven papers including 445 patients were reviewed; 224 received LMG injections and 221 received USG injections. There was a statistically significant difference in favor of USG for pain score [MD = 1.19, 95% CI (0.39, 1.98), P = 0.003] and SDQ score [MD = 5.01, 95% CI (1.82, 8.19), P = 0.02] at 6 weeks after injection. Also there was a statistically significant difference between the groups, with greater improvement reported of shoulder function scores [SMD = 0.89, 95% CI (0.56, 1.23), P < 0.001] and shoulder abduction motion range [MD 32.69, 95% CI (14.82, 50.56), P < 0.001] in the USG group. More effective rate was also reported with USG group and the difference was statistically significant [risk ratio = 1.6, 95% CI (1.02, 2.50), P = 0.04]. Ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injections potentially offer a significantly greater clinical improvement over blind SASD bursitis injections in adults with shoulder pain. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Rotator Cuff Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cuff are common. They include tendinitis, bursitis, and injuries such as tears. Rotator cuff tendons can become ... cuff depends on age, health, how severe the injury is, and how long you've had the ...

  13. Rotator cuff repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... presentations/100229.htm Rotator cuff repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  14. The Earth's rotation problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, V. A.; Ivanova, T. V.

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the present paper is to find the trigonometric solution of the equations of the Earth's rotation around its centre of mass in the form of polynomial trigonometric series (Poisson series) without secular and mixed therms. For that the techniques of the General Planetary Theory (GPT) ( Brumberg, 1995) and the Poisson Series Processor (PSP) (Ivanova, 1995) are used. The GPT allows to reduce the equations of the translatory motion of the major planets and the Moon and the equations of the Earth's rotation in Euler parameters to the secular system describing the evolution of the planetary and lunar orbits (independent of the Earth's rotation) and the evolution of the Earth's rotation (depending on the planetary and lunar evolution).

  15. On Averaging Rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Claus

    2001-01-01

    In this paper two common approaches to averaging rotations are compared to a more advanced approach based on a Riemannian metric. Very often the barycenter of the quaternions or matrices that represent the rotations are used as an estimate of the mean. These methods neglect that rotations belong...... to a non-linear manifold and re-normalization or orthogonalization must be applied to obtain proper rotations. These latter steps have been viewed as ad hoc corrections for the errors introduced by assuming a vector space. The article shows that the two approximative methods can be derived from natural...... approximations to the Riemannian metric, and that the subsequent corrections are inherent in the least squares estimation....

  16. Rotating Workforce Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Granfeldt, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Several industries use what is called rotating workforce scheduling. This often means that employees are needed around the clock seven days a week, and that they have a schedule which repeats itself after some weeks. This thesis gives an introduction to this kind of scheduling and presents a review of previous work done in the field. Two different optimization models for rotating workforce scheduling are formulated and compared, and some examples are created to demonstrate how the addition of...

  17. Ipsilateral Rotational Autokeratoplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Yesim Altay

    2016-01-01

    Corneal opacity is a leading cause of monocular blindness, and corneal transplantation is the most commonly performed solid organ transplantation in the world. Keratoplasty techniques for corneal opacities include lamellar allokeratoplasty and penetrating allokeratoplasty. Ipsilateral rotational autokeratoplasty can be an effective alternative to penetrating allokeratoplasty for some patients with corneal scars. This procedure involves a rotation of the patient%u2019s own cornea to move opaci...

  18. Electromagnetic rotational actuation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Alexander Lee

    2010-08-01

    There are many applications that need a meso-scale rotational actuator. These applications have been left by the wayside because of the lack of actuation at this scale. Sandia National Laboratories has many unique fabrication technologies that could be used to create an electromagnetic actuator at this scale. There are also many designs to be explored. In this internship exploration of the designs and fabrications technologies to find an inexpensive design that can be used for prototyping the electromagnetic rotational actuator.

  19. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilal, Sadek K.; Sampson, William B.; Leonard, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  20. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  1. The prevalence of neovascularity in patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raza Syed A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder dysfunction is common and pathology of the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa are considered to be a major cause of pain and morbidity. Although many hypotheses exist there is no definitive understanding as to the origin of the pain arising from these structures. Research investigations from other tendons have placed intra-tendinous neovascularity as a potential mechanism of pain production. The prevalence of neovascularity in patients with a clinical diagnosis of rotator cuff tendinopathy is unknown. As such the primary aim of this pilot study was to investigate if neovascularity could be identified and to determine the prevalence of neovascularity in the rotator cuff tendons and subacromial bursa in subjects with unilateral shoulder pain clinically assessed to be rotator cuff tendinopathy. The secondary aims were to investigate the association between the presence of neovascularity and pain, duration of symptoms, and, neovascularity and shoulder function. Methods Patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral rotator cuff tendinopathy referred for a routine diagnostic ultrasound (US scan in a major London teaching hospital formed the study population. At referral patients were provided with an information document. On the day of the scan (on average, at least one week later the patients agreeing to participate were taken through the consent process and underwent an additional clinical examination prior to undergoing a bilateral grey scale and colour Doppler US examination (symptomatic and asymptomatic shoulder using a Philips HDI 5000 Sono CT US machine. The ultrasound scans were performed by one of two radiologists who recorded their findings and the final assessment was made by a third radiologist blinded both to the clinical examination and the ultrasound examination. The findings of the radiologists who performed the scans and the blinded radiologist were compared and any disagreements were resolved

  2. Manual therapy and exercise for rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Matthew J; Green, Sally; McBain, Brodwen; Surace, Stephen J; Deitch, Jessica; Lyttle, Nicolette; Mrocki, Marshall A; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2016-06-10

    43 trials. We were unable to perform any meta-analyses because of clinical heterogeneity or incomplete outcome reporting. One trial compared manual therapy and exercise with placebo (inactive ultrasound therapy) in 120 participants with chronic rotator cuff disease (high quality evidence). At 22 weeks, the mean change in overall pain with placebo was 17.3 points on a 100-point scale, and 24.8 points with manual therapy and exercise (adjusted mean difference (MD) 6.8 points, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.70 to 14.30 points; absolute risk difference 7%, 1% fewer to 14% more). Mean change in function with placebo was 15.6 points on a 100-point scale, and 22.4 points with manual therapy and exercise (adjusted MD 7.1 points, 95% CI 0.30 to 13.90 points; absolute risk difference 7%, 1% to 14% more). Fifty-seven per cent (31/54) of participants reported treatment success with manual therapy and exercise compared with 41% (24/58) of participants receiving placebo (risk ratio (RR) 1.39, 95% CI 0.94 to 2.03; absolute risk difference 16% (2% fewer to 34% more). Thirty-one per cent (17/55) of participants reported adverse events with manual therapy and exercise compared with 8% (5/61) of participants receiving placebo (RR 3.77, 95% CI 1.49 to 9.54; absolute risk difference 23% (9% to 37% more). However adverse events were mild (short-term pain following treatment).Five trials (low quality evidence) found no important differences between manual therapy and exercise compared with glucocorticoid injection with respect to overall pain, function, active shoulder abduction and quality of life from four weeks up to 12 months. However, global treatment success was more common up to 11 weeks in people receiving glucocorticoid injection (low quality evidence). One trial (low quality evidence) showed no important differences between manual therapy and exercise and arthroscopic subacromial decompression with respect to overall pain, function, active range of motion and strength at six and

  3. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder rotator cuff lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira-Barbosa Marcello Henrique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder rotator cuff tendon tears were evaluated with ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical or arthroscopical correlation were available in 25 cases. Overall costs were also considered. Shoulder impingement syndrome diagnosis was done on a clinical basis. Surgery or arthroscopy was considered when conservative treatment failure for 6 months, or when rotator cuff repair was indicated. Ultrasound was performed in 22 patients and MRI in 17 of the 25 patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80%, 100% and 90.9% for US and 90%, 100% and 94.12% for MRI, respectively. In 16 cases both US and MRI were obtained and in this subgroup statistical correlation was excellent (p< 0.001. We concluded that both methods are reliable for rotator cuff full thickness tear evaluation. Since US is less expensive, it could be considered as the screening method when rotator cuff integrity is the main question, and when well trained radiologists and high resolution equipment are available.

  4. Deltoid muscular flap transfer for the treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus Gille

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of deltoid muscle flap transfer for the treatment of irreparable rotator cuff tears. In a retrospective study 20 consecutive patients were evaluated. The index procedure took place between 2000 and 2003. Fifteen patients were male, mean age was 62 years. Inclusion criterion was a rotator cuff defect Bateman grade IV. Exclusion criteria were smaller defects, shoulder instability and fractures of the injured shoulder. An open reconstruction with acromioplasty and a pedicled delta flap was performed. Follow up period was mean 42 months. Follow-up included clinical examination, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI and the Constant and Simple (CS shoulder tests. According to the Constant shoulder test the results were good in 13 patients, fair in 5 and unsatisfactory in 2. The pre-operative Constant Score improved from mean 25.7 points (±5.3 to 72.3 (±7.8 at follow-up. The mean values for the subcategories of CS increased significantly from 3.9 to 14.4 points for pain and from 4.2 to 15.9 points for activities daily routine (p0.05. Results of the Simple Shoulder Test showed a significant increase of the mean values from pre-operative 4.3 to 14.7 points post-operatively. MRI showed a subacromial covering of the defect in all cases, all flaps where intact on MRI but always the flap showed marked fatty degeneration. In conclusion, the delta flap is a simple method for the repair of large defects of the rotator cuff leading to satisfying medium results.

  5. Vibrations of rotating machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Osami; Kanki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Keogh, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This book opens with an explanation of the vibrations of a single degree-of-freedom (dof) system for all beginners. Subsequently, vibration analysis of multi-dof systems is explained by modal analysis. Mode synthesis modeling is then introduced for system reduction, which aids understanding in a simplified manner of how complicated rotors behave. Rotor balancing techniques are offered for rigid and flexible rotors through several examples. Consideration of gyroscopic influences on the rotordynamics is then provided and vibration evaluation of a rotor-bearing system is emphasized in terms of forward and backward whirl rotor motions through eigenvalue (natural frequency and damping ratio) analysis. In addition to these rotordynamics concerning rotating shaft vibration measured in a stationary reference frame, blade vibrations are analyzed with Coriolis forces expressed in a rotating reference frame. Other phenomena that may be assessed in stationary and rotating reference frames include stability characteristic...

  6. Ipsilateral Rotational Autokeratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim Altay

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Corneal opacity is a leading cause of monocular blindness, and corneal transplantation is the most commonly performed solid organ transplantation in the world. Keratoplasty techniques for corneal opacities include lamellar allokeratoplasty and penetrating allokeratoplasty. Ipsilateral rotational autokeratoplasty can be an effective alternative to penetrating allokeratoplasty for some patients with corneal scars. This procedure involves a rotation of the patient%u2019s own cornea to move opacity out of the visual axis. An important consideration when selecting cases for rotational autokeratoplasty is the dimensions of the corneal scar. Although ipsilateral autokeratoplasty may not provide as good a quality of vision as penetrating allokeratoplasty because of higher astigmatism and reduced corneal pupillary clear zone, these disadvantages are often outweighed when the risk of allograft rejection is high, as in pediatric patients and those with vascularised corneas. This technique would at least partially resolve the issue of scarcity of donor corneal tissue in developing countries.

  7. The optical rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tandrup, T; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Jensen, Eva B. Vedel

    1997-01-01

    further discuss the methods derived from this principle and present two new local volume estimators. The optical rotator benefits from information obtained in all three dimensions in thick sections but avoids over-/ underprojection problems at the extremes of the cell. Using computer-assisted microscopes......The optical rotator is an unbiased, local stereological principle for estimation of cell volume and cell surface area in thick, transparent slabs, The underlying principle was first described in 1993 by Kieu Jensen (T. Microsc. 170, 45-51) who also derived an estimator of length, In this study we...... the extra measurements demand minimal extra effort and make this estimator even more efficient when it comes to estimation of individual cell size than many of the previous local estimators, We demonstrate the principle of the optical rotator in an example (the cells in the dorsal root ganglion of the rat...

  8. Rotation of Giant Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissin, Yevgeni; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-07-01

    The internal rotation of post-main sequence stars is investigated, in response to the convective pumping of angular momentum toward the stellar core, combined with a tight magnetic coupling between core and envelope. The spin evolution is calculated using model stars of initial mass 1, 1.5, and 5 {M}⊙ , taking into account mass loss on the giant branches. We also include the deposition of orbital angular momentum from a sub-stellar companion, as influenced by tidal drag along with the excitation of orbital eccentricity by a fluctuating gravitational quadrupole moment. A range of angular velocity profiles {{Ω }}(r) is considered in the envelope, extending from solid rotation to constant specific angular momentum. We focus on the backreaction of the Coriolis force, and the threshold for dynamo action in the inner envelope. Quantitative agreement with measurements of core rotation in subgiants and post-He core flash stars by Kepler is obtained with a two-layer angular velocity profile: uniform specific angular momentum where the Coriolis parameter {Co}\\equiv {{Ω }}{τ }{con}≲ 1 (here {τ }{con} is the convective time), and {{Ω }}(r)\\propto {r}-1 where {Co}≳ 1. The inner profile is interpreted in terms of a balance between the Coriolis force and angular pressure gradients driven by radially extended convective plumes. Inward angular momentum pumping reduces the surface rotation of subgiants, and the need for a rejuvenated magnetic wind torque. The co-evolution of internal magnetic fields and rotation is considered in Kissin & Thompson, along with the breaking of the rotational coupling between core and envelope due to heavy mass loss.

  9. Short-Term Outcome of Combined Corticosteriod and Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    treatment consists of physical therapy, rest and oral anti-inflammatory drugs2. Some other conditions causing painful shoulder are subacromial bursitis, degeneration of acromioclavicular joint, tendonitis, adhesive capsulitis, impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears. Lack of appropriate examination and inadequate.

  10. Usefulness of rehabilitation in patients with rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy after ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Michele; Schiavone, Cosima; Salini, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a specific rehabilitation program for patients in whom ultrasound-guided percutaneous treatment (UGPT) was performed for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy (RCCT). In this prospective observational study, 86 patients (22 males and 64 females) with shoulder calcific tendinopathy treated with UGPT were enrolled. At the end of the procedure, a corticosteroid injection into the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa was performed. The patients were then asked to follow a specific rehabilitation protocol (2 times/week for 5 weeks) that focused on mobility, strength and function. At baseline and after 6 weeks, clinical parameters, visual analog scale (VAS) and Constant-Murley scale (CMS) scores and ultrasound (US) features were collected. The mean age of the patients was 48.9 ± 8.4 years and their mean BMI was 22.7 ± 2.1. Considering the whole cohort, the treatment was effective, with a significant decrease in the VAS score and an improvement in the CMS score. Thereafter, on the basis of the compliance to the rehabilitation program (by self-report), 53 and 33 patients were included in the rehabilitation group (Rehab group; performed exercises ≥2 times/week) and the No Rehab group (performed exercises rehabilitation program, was an effective treatment for RCCT. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. From the RSNA refresher courses: US of the rotator cuff: pitfalls, limitations, and artifacts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.C.M.; Jager, G.J.; Blickman, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (US) has gained increasing popularity as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the soft tissues in shoulder impingement syndrome. US is a powerful and accurate method for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and other rotator cuff abnormalities, provided the examiner has a

  12. From the RSNA refresher courses - US of the rotator cuff : Pitfalls, limitations, and artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Matthieu J. C. M.; Jager, Gerrit J.; Blickman, Johan G.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (US) has gained increasing popularity as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the soft tissues in shoulder impingement syndrome. US is a powerful and accurate method for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and other rotator cuff abnormalities, provided the examiner has a

  13. The effect of coracoacromial ligament excision and acromioplasty on the amount of rotator cuff force production necessary to restore intact glenohumeral biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budoff, Jeffrey E; Lin, Cheng-Li; Hong, Chih-Kai; Chiang, Florence L; Su, Wei-Ren

    2016-06-01

    Coracoacromial ligament (CAL) excision and acromioplasty increase superior and anterosuperior glenohumeral translation. It is unknown how much of an increase in rotator cuff force production is required to re-establish intact glenohumeral biomechanics after these surgical procedures. We hypothesized that, after CAL excision and acromioplasty, an increase in rotator cuff force production would not be necessary to reproduce the anterosuperior and superior translations of the intact specimens. Nine cadaveric shoulders were subjected to loading in the superior and anterosuperior directions in the intact state after CAL excision, acromioplasty, and recording of the translations. The rotator cuff force was then increased to normalize glenohumeral biomechanics. After CAL excision at 150 and 200 N of loading, an increase in the rotator cuff force by 25% decreased anterosuperior translation to the point where there was no significant difference from the intact specimen's translation. After acromioplasty (and CAL excision) at 150 and 200 N, an increase in the rotator cuff force of 25% and 30%, respectively, decreased superior translation to the point where there was no significant difference from the intact specimen's translation. At 150 to 200 N of loading, CAL excision and acromioplasty increase the rotator cuff force required to maintain normal glenohumeral biomechanics by 25% to 30%. After a subacromial decompression, the rotator cuff has an increased force production requirement to maintain baseline glenohumeral mechanics. Under many circumstances, in vivo force requirements may be even greater after surgical attenuation of the coracoacromial arch. Basic Science Study; Biomechanics. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Shoulder surface temperature and bone scintigraphy findings in patients with rotator cuff tears

    OpenAIRE

    Koike, Yoichi; Sano, Hirotaka; Kinjyo, Takeshi; Imamura, Itaru; Masahiro, Onuma; Goto, Masako; Ooyama, Masamizu; Kita, Atushi; Itoi, Eiji

    2011-01-01

    Background Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is one of the serious complications after surgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear. Both a measurement of body surface temperature and bone scintigraphy have been used as diagnostic tools for the early phase of CRPS.Unfortunately, few studies have been carried out that applied these methods to the patients after rotator cuff repair. Purposes To clarify both shoulder surface temperature and bone scintigraphy findings in patients with rotator cu...

  15. Comorbidities in rotator cuff disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titchener, Andrew G; White, Jonathan J E; Hinchliffe, Sally R; Tambe, Amol A; Hubbard, Richard B; Clark, David I

    2014-09-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a common condition in the general population, but relatively little is known about its associated risk factors. We have undertaken a large case-control study using The Health Improvement Network database to assess and to quantify the relative contributions of some constitutional and environmental risk factors for rotator cuff disease in the community. Our data set included 5000 patients with rotator cuff disease who were individually matched with a single control by age, sex, and general practice (primary care practice). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years (interquartile range, 44-65 years). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors associated with rotator cuff disease were Achilles tendinitis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.78), trigger finger (OR = 1.99), lateral epicondylitis (OR = 1.71), and carpal tunnel syndrome (OR = 1.55). Oral corticosteroid therapy (OR = 2.03), oral antidiabetic use (OR = 1.66), insulin use (OR = 1.77), and "overweight" body mass index of 25.1 to 30 (OR = 1.15) were also significantly associated. Current or previous smoking history, body mass index of greater than 30, any alcohol intake, medial epicondylitis, de Quervain syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis were not found to be associated with rotator cuff disease. We have identified a number of comorbidities and risk factors for rotator cuff disease. These include lateral epicondylitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger finger, Achilles tendinitis, oral corticosteroid use, and diabetes mellitus. The findings should alert the clinician to comorbid pathologic processes and guide future research into the etiology of this condition. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  17. Rotational waves in geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerus, Artyom; Vikulin, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The rotation model of a geoblock with intrinsic momentum was constructed by A.V. Vikulin and A.G. Ivanchin [9, 10] to describe seismicity within the Pacific Ocean margin. It is based on the idea of a rotational motion of geoblocks as the parts of the rotating body of the Earth that generates rotary deformation waves. The law of the block motion was derived in the form of the sine-Gordon equation (SG) [5, 9]; the dimensionless form of the equation is: δ2θ δ2θ δξ2 - δη2 = sinθ, (1) where θ = β/2, ξ = k0z and η = v0k0t are dimensionless coordinates, z - length of the chain of masses (blocks), t - time, β - turn angle, ν0 - representative velocity of the process, k0 - wave number. Another case analyzed was a chain of nonuniformly rotating blocks, with deviation of force moments from equilibrium positions μ, considering friction forces α along boundaries, which better matched a real-life seismic process. As a result, the authors obtained the law of motion for a block in a chain in the form of the modified SG equation [8]: δ2θ δ2θ δθ- δξ2 - δ η2 = sin θ+ α δη + μδ(ξ)sin θ (2)

  18. The Spatiale Rotator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusson, Allan

    2009-01-01

    The inherent demand for unbiasedness for some stereological estimators imposes a demand of not only positional uniform randomness but also isotropic randomness, i.e. directional uniform randomness. In order to comply with isotropy, one must perform a random rotation of the object of interest before...

  19. Repair of the rotator cuff. Mini-open and arthroscopic repairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, F B; Field, L D; Savoie, F H

    2000-01-01

    The repair of rotator cuff tears by traditional open subacromial decompression and rotator cuff tendon reapproximation has proved successful in restoring function and decreasing pain, but open rotator cuff repair has some inherent disadvantages. Postoperative detachment of the deltoid repair has been reported and results in significant morbidity. The open technique may also require a longer period of limited motion resulting in greater stiffness. Arthroscopically assisted mini-open repairs and, more recently, completely arthroscopic repairs of the rotator cuff have been developed and increasingly are being applied. Both techniques avoid detachment of the deltoid. The mini-open and arthroscopic approaches to rotator cuff repair have the added benefit of arthroscopic evaluation of the glenohumeral joint. The mini-open technique has the advantage of allowing the direct visualization of the cuff repair and allows surgeons to place the stitches in an open fashion, which is familiar to all surgeons. The mini-open technique also allows the placement of tension-absorbing stitches in the rare cases that they are needed. Mini-open techniques also allow the choice of bone anchors or osseous tunnels for fixation. The completely arthroscopic cuff repair has several potential advantages over the open and mini-open cuff repair techniques; first is the decreased disruption of the soft tissues, which may result in less scarring and adhesions. The procedure is the most cosmetically appealing of the techniques. Reduced postoperative pain is also cited as an advantage but has been demonstrated only in a single, nonrandomized study. Finally, if technical difficulties arise, the conversion to a mini-open repair can be done easily. In a few studies, arthroscopic cuff repair techniques have shown promise as an alternative to mini-open or open repair, but these results have been at the hands of a few surgeons who have extensive experience in arthroscopy of the shoulder. In contrast, the

  20. Strain effects on rotational property in nanoscale rotation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianzhang; Han, Qiang

    2018-01-11

    This paper presents a study of strain effects on nanoscale rotation system consists of double-walls carbon nanotube and graphene. It is found that the strain effects can be a real-time controlling method for nano actuator system. The strain effects on rotational property as well as the effect mechanism is studied systematically through molecular dynamics simulations, and it obtains valuable conclusions for engineering application of rotational property management of nanoscale rotation system. It founds that the strain effects tune the rotational property by influencing the intertube supporting effect and friction effect of double-walls carbon nanotube, which are two critical factors of rotational performance. The mechanism of strain effects on rotational property is investigated in theoretical level based on analytical model established through lattice dynamics theory. This work suggests great potentials of strain effects for nanoscale real-time control, and provides new ideas for design and application of real-time controllable nanoscale rotation system.

  1. Wave-driven Rotation in Supersonically Rotating Mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    Supersonic rotation in mirrors may be produced by radio frequency waves. The waves produce coupled diffusion in ion kinetic and potential energy. A population inversion along the diffusion path then produces rotation. Waves may be designed to exploit a natural kinetic energy source or may provide the rotation energy on their own. Centrifugal traps for fusion and isotope separation may benefit from this wave-driven rotation.

  2. Rotational spectrum of tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, M. Eugenia, E-mail: maria.sanz@kcl.ac.uk; Cabezas, Carlos, E-mail: ccabezas@qf.uva.es; Mata, Santiago, E-mail: santiago.mata@uva.es; Alonso, Josè L., E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Parque Científico Uva, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-05-28

    The rotational spectrum of the natural amino acid tryptophan has been observed for the first time using a combination of laser ablation, molecular beams, and Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. Independent analysis of the rotational spectra of individual conformers has conducted to a definitive identification of two different conformers of tryptophan, with one of the observed conformers never reported before. The analysis of the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants is of particular significance since it allows discrimination between structures, thus providing structural information on the orientation of the amino group. Both observed conformers are stabilized by an O–H···N hydrogen bond in the side chain and a N–H···π interaction forming a chain that reinforce the strength of hydrogen bonds through cooperative effects.

  3. Rotational Baroclinic Adjustment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtegård Nielsen, Steen Morten

    the reciprocal of the socalled Coriolis parameter, and the length scale, which is known as the Rossby radius. Also, because of their limited width currents influenced by rotation are quite persistent. The flow which results from the introduction of a surface level discontinuity across a wide channel is discussed...... of the numerical model a mechanism for the generation of along-frontal instabilities and eddies is suggested. Also, the effect of an irregular bathymetry is studied.Together with observations of wind and water levels some of the oceanographical observations from the old lightvessels are used to study...... with the horizontal extent of many other parts of the Danish inland waters implies that the dynamics of these should also be discussed in terms of rotational effects....

  4. Marginal deformations & rotating horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Anous, Tarek; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito

    2017-12-01

    Motivated by the near-horizon geometry of four-dimensional extremal black holes, we study a disordered quantum mechanical system invariant under a global SU(2) symmetry. As in the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model, this system exhibits an approximate SL(2, ℝ) symmetry at low energies, but also allows for a continuous family of SU(2) breaking marginal deformations. Beyond a certain critical value for the marginal coupling, the model exhibits a quantum phase transition from the gapless phase to a gapped one and we calculate the critical exponents of this transition. We also show that charged, rotating extremal black holes exhibit a transition when the angular velocity of the horizon is tuned to a certain critical value. Where possible we draw parallels between the disordered quantum mechanics and charged, rotating black holes.

  5. Isotropic stochastic rotation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbauer, Sebastian; Strobl, Severin; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2017-12-01

    Stochastic rotation dynamics (SRD) is a widely used method for the mesoscopic modeling of complex fluids, such as colloidal suspensions or multiphase flows. In this method, however, the underlying Cartesian grid defining the coarse-grained interaction volumes induces anisotropy. We propose an isotropic, lattice-free variant of stochastic rotation dynamics, termed iSRD. Instead of Cartesian grid cells, we employ randomly distributed spherical interaction volumes. This eliminates the requirement of a grid shift, which is essential in standard SRD to maintain Galilean invariance. We derive analytical expressions for the viscosity and the diffusion coefficient in relation to the model parameters, which show excellent agreement with the results obtained in iSRD simulations. The proposed algorithm is particularly suitable to model systems bound by walls of complex shape, where the domain cannot be meshed uniformly. The presented approach is not limited to SRD but is applicable to any other mesoscopic method, where particles interact within certain coarse-grained volumes.

  6. The Rotation of Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrard, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical theory of the rotation of Europa the Galilean satellite of Jupiter. The theory is semi-analytical in the sense that it is based on a synthetic theory of the orbit of Europa developed by Lainey. The theory is developed in the framework of Hamiltonian mechanics, using Andoyer variables and assumes that Europa is a rigid body. We consider this theory as a first step toward the modelization of a non rigid Europa covered by an ocean.

  7. Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    2014-06-01

    The past decade has seen several major technology advances in electronics operating at microwave frequencies making it possible to develop a new generation of spectrometers for molecular rotational spectroscopy. High-speed digital electronics, both arbitrary waveform generators and digitizers, continue on a Moore's Law-like development cycle that started around 1993 with device bandwidth doubling about every 36 months. These enabling technologies were the key to designing chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectrometers which offer significant sensitivity enhancements for broadband spectrum acquisition in molecular rotational spectroscopy. A special feature of the chirped-pulse spectrometer design is that it is easily implemented at low frequency (below 8 GHz) where Balle-Flygare type spectrometers with Fabry-Perot cavity designs become technologically challenging due to the mirror size requirements. The capabilities of CP-FTMW spectrometers for studies of molecular structure will be illustrated by the collaborative research effort we have been a part of to determine the structures of water clusters - a project which has identified clusters up to the pentadecamer. A second technology trend that impacts molecular rotational spectroscopy is the development of high power, solid state sources in the mm-wave/THz regions. Results from the field of mm-wave chirped-pulse Fourier transform spectroscopy will be described with an emphasis on new problems in chemical dynamics and analytical chemistry that these methods can tackle. The third (and potentially most important) technological trend is the reduction of microwave components to chip level using monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC) - a technology driven by an enormous mass market in communications. Some recent advances in rotational spectrometer designs that incorporate low-cost components will be highlighted. The challenge to the high-resolution spectroscopy community - as posed by Frank De

  8. Method for Design Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    central composite design and give the orthogonal matrix that yields the rotation, but they do not discuss how the orthogonal matrix was found. Doehlert ... Doehlert and Klee (1972) was to start with a known orthogonal matrix of simple form and then augment the matrix with additional rows and columns to get a...larger region, a symmetric treatment of the factors, or both. 114. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Orthogonal matrix Response surface design 27

  9. Bioreactor rotating wall vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells.

  10. Stimulation of Rotator Cuff Repair by Sustained Release of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-7 Using a Gelatin Hydrogel Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabuto, Yukichi; Morihara, Toru; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Kida, Yoshikazu; Oda, Ryo; Arai, Yuji; Sawada, Koshiro; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) promotes not only osteogenesis but also matrix production in chondrocytes and tenocytes. However, because of its short half-life, maintaining local concentrations of BMP-7 is difficult. We examined the use of a gelatin hydrogel sheet (GHS) for the sustained release of BMP-7 in stimulating rotator cuff repair at the tendon-to-bone insertion. Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Radiolabeled BMP-7 ((125)I-BMP-7) was injected into the subacromial bursa in the (125)I-BMP-7 group, whereas a GHS impregnated with (125)I-BMP-7 was implanted on the tendon attached to the tendon-to-bone insertion in the (125)I-BMP-7+GHS group. Levels of (125)I-BMP-7 in the tendon-to-bone insertion were assessed at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 21 postoperative days. The BMP-7 concentrations were significantly higher in the (125)I-BMP-7+GHS group than in the (125)I-BMP-7 group. Next, the bilateral supraspinatus tendons were resected and sutured to the greater tuberosity of the humerus using the Mason-Allen technique. Treatment groups were created as follows: either phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or BMP-7 was injected into the subacromial bursa in the PBS and BMP-7 groups, whereas a GHS impregnated with either PBS or BMP-7 was implanted on the repaired tendon attached to the tendon-to-bone insertion in the PBS+GHS and BMP-7+GHS groups. The resected specimens were stained at 2, 4, and 8 postoperative weeks with hematoxylin and eosin as well as Safranin O, and tissue repair was evaluated histologically by using the tendon-to-bone maturing score. Tissue repair was assessed biomechanically at 4 and 8 postoperative weeks. The BMP-7+GHS group at 8 postoperative weeks demonstrated a favorable cartilage matrix production and tendon orientation; moreover, the tendon-to-bone maturing score and the ultimate force-to-failure were the highest in this group. The ability of GHS to provide controlled release of various growth factors has been previously reported. We

  11. Three-mode orthomax rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, Henk A.L.

    1997-01-01

    Factor analysis and principal components analysis (PCA) are often followed by an orthomax rotation to rotate a loading matrix to simple structure. The simple structure is usually defined in terms of the simplicity of the columns of the loading matrix. In Three-made PCA, rotational freedom of the so

  12. [Influence of Operative and Conservative Therapy on the Ability to Work of Patients With Subacromial Impingement: A Prospective Clinical Comparative Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Christoph; Köhler, Hans Christian; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Gutcke, André; Tischer, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    Background Subacromial impingement is a common reason for pain in the shoulder. Treatment is difficult and patients are not able to work for a long time. An increasing number of operative treatments can be observed although conservative treatment is effective, too. There is no study that observed how operative and conservative treatment influence ability to work. Methods 86 persons were included in this prospective study. Surgery was performed with an arthroscopy of the shoulder. Conservative treatment was carried out by a physiotherapist under control of the physician. Reevaluation was conducted 3 and 6 months after the initial contact. Here we observed the time the participant was not able to work, Constant Score and pain on the numeric rating scale. Results Both therapies were able to improve pain and function. During conservative treatment, improvement was faster than under operative care. Time without ability to work was 7 ± 5 weeks longer after operative treatment than under conservative therapy (p Bursitis subacromialis detected in the MRI was a predictor of faster recovery. Conclusion Conservative and operative treatment improved pain and function significantly. Properly carried out conservative therapy enables patients to get back to work earlier. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Acute pulmonary embolism after arthroscopic glenoid labral repair and subacromial decompression: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnatovsky, Michelle; Dai, Amos Z; Zacchilli, Michael; Jazrawi, Laith M

    2018-02-01

    This report describes the case of a 29 year-old female with a history of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and on combined oral contraceptives who presents with an acute, CT confirmed pulmonary embolus of the right lower lobe, one week following arthroscopic labral repair of the right shoulder. This patient's relevant risk factors including obesity, oral contraceptive use, PCOS, and surgical positioning are discussed. Literature surrounding venous thromboembolism (VTE) following shoulder arthroscopy is also reviewed.

  14. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, ...

  15. CISM Course on Rotating Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    1992-01-01

    The volume presents a comprehensive overview of rotation effects on fluid behavior, emphasizing non-linear processes. The subject is introduced by giving a range of examples of rotating fluids encountered in geophysics and engineering. This is then followed by a discussion of the relevant scales and parameters of rotating flow, and an introduction to geostrophic balance and vorticity concepts. There are few books on rotating fluids and this volume is, therefore, a welcome addition. It is the first volume which contains a unified view of turbulence in rotating fluids, instability and vortex dynamics. Some aspects of wave motions covered here are not found elsewhere.

  16. On general Earth's rotation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumberg, V.; Ivanova, T.

    2009-09-01

    This paper dealing with the general problem of the rigid-body rotation of the three-axial Earth represents a straightforward extension of (Brumberg and Ivanova, 2007) where the simplified Poisson equations of rotation of the axially symmetrical Earth have been considered. The aim of the present paper is to reduce the equations of the translatory motion of the major planets and the Moon and the equations of the Earth's rotation around its centre of mass to the secular system describing the evolution of the planetary and lunar orbits (independent of the Earth's rotation) and the evolution of the Earth's rotation (depending on the planetary and lunar evolution).

  17. The Floating-Harbor syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, F; Lenard, H G

    1991-02-01

    We describe the seventh patient with the Floating-Harbor syndrome. Similar to previous cases in the literature this girl presented with proportionate intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, normocephaly, triangular face with bulbous nose, long eyelashes, short upper lip, small vermilion border of upper lip, dorsally rotated ears, deep nuchal hair line, hirsutism, and clinodactyly of little fingers. She exhibited mental retardation and retarded speech development. Clinical symptoms and differential diagnosis of this rare syndrome are briefly discussed.

  18. Optical fiber rotation sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, William K; Kelley, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Optical Fiber Rotation Sensing is the first book devoted to Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyros (IFOG). This book provides a complete overview of IFOGs, beginning with a historical review of IFOG development and including a fundamental exposition of basic principles, a discussion of devices and components, and concluding with industry reports on state-of-the-art activity. With several chapters contributed by principal developers of this solid-state device, the result is an authoritative work which will serve as the resource for researchers, students, and users of IFOGs.* * State-of-t

  19. Rotating electrical machines

    CERN Document Server

    Le Doeuff, René

    2013-01-01

    In this book a general matrix-based approach to modeling electrical machines is promulgated. The model uses instantaneous quantities for key variables and enables the user to easily take into account associations between rotating machines and static converters (such as in variable speed drives).   General equations of electromechanical energy conversion are established early in the treatment of the topic and then applied to synchronous, induction and DC machines. The primary characteristics of these machines are established for steady state behavior as well as for variable speed scenarios. I

  20. ROTATING PLASMA DEVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, K.; Hammel, J.E.; Longmire, C.L.; Nagle, D.E.; Ribe, F.L.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-10-24

    ABS>A method and device are described for obtaining fusion reactions. The basic concept is that of using crossed electric and magnetic fields to induce a plasma rotation in which the ionized particles follow a circumferential drift orbit on wldch a cyclotron mode of motion is superimposed, the net result being a cycloidal motion about the axis of symmetry. The discharge tube has a radial electric field and a longitudinal magnetic field. Mirror machine geometry is utilized. The device avoids reliance on the pinch effect and its associated instability problems. (AEC)

  1. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  2. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  3. Milwaukee shoulder syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Somashekar SA

    2014-01-01

    Milwaukee shoulder syndrome or rapid destructive arthritis of the shoulder is a very rare rheumatological condition characterized by the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals. The figure 1 shows the shoulder image of a 67-year-old female with a history of bilateral shoulder pain and swelling since 2 years and knee pain since 6 months. Physical examination revealed restriction in shoulder movements. No neurological deficit was reported. X-ray of the right shoulder indicated rotator cuff disrup...

  4. Milwaukee shoulder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewachter, L; Aerts, P; Crevits, I; De Man, R

    2012-01-01

    Milwaukee shoulder syndrome or rapid destructive arthropathy of the shoulder is a rare form of arthropathy that mainly affects elderly women. It is characterized by a rapid destruction of the glenohumeral joint and the rotator cuff and by an important noninflammatory joint effusion containing hydroxyapatite crystals. Radiography plays an important role in the evaluation of patients with articular disease. However, magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for assessing the full extent of osseous, chondral, and soft-tissue involvement.

  5. Tratamiento del hombro doloroso en un servicio de rehabilitación y medicina física : estudio sobre los efectos de las ondas de choque y los ultrasonidos en el tratamiento del síndrome subacromial.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Fernández, Juan Reyes

    2013-01-01

    Objetivos del estudio: establecer los efectos de ultrasonidos y ondas de choque radiales en el síndrome subacromial, determinar la posible influencia del sexo y analizar la rentabilidad de ambas técnicas. Realizamos un estudio en veinticuatro pacientes repartidos en dos grupos: un grupo recibió ondas de choque y el otro ultrasonidos. Los pacientes fueron evaluados mediante la escala DASH, Constant&Murley, UCLA, SF-36 y EVA, antes del tratamiento, al mes, a los tres meses y a los seis...

  6. Rotating Wheel Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Jean-Eloi; Xu, Hui; Moxey, Dave; Sherwin, Spencer

    2016-11-01

    For open wheel race-cars, such as Formula One, or IndyCar, the wheels are responsible for 40 % of the total drag. For road cars, drag associated to the wheels and under-carriage can represent 20 - 60 % of total drag at highway cruise speeds. Experimental observations have reported two, three or more pairs of counter rotating vortices, the relative strength of which still remains an open question. The near wake of an unsteady rotating wheel. The numerical investigation by means of direct numerical simulation at ReD =400-1000 is presented here to further the understanding of bifurcations the flow undergoes as the Reynolds number is increased. Direct numerical simulation is performed using Nektar++, the results of which are compared to those of Pirozzoli et al. (2012). Both proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition, as well as spectral analysis are leveraged to gain unprecedented insight into the bifurcations and subsequent topological differences of the wake as the Reynolds number is increased.

  7. Rotational Spectrum of Saccharine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Elena R.; Mata, Santiago; Alonso, José L.

    2017-06-01

    A significant step forward in the structure-activity relationships of sweeteners was the assignment of the AH-B moiety in sweeteners by Shallenberger and Acree. They proposed that all sweeteners contain an AH-B moiety, known as glucophore, in which A and B are electronegative atoms separated by a distance between 2.5 to 4 Å. H is a hydrogen atom attached to one of the electronegative atom by a covalent bond. For saccharine, one of the oldest artificial sweeteners widely used in food and drinks, two possible B moieties exist ,the carbonyl oxygen atom and the sulfoxide oxygen atom although there is a consensus of opinion among scientists over the assignment of AH-B moieties to HN-SO. In the present work, the solid of saccharine (m.p. 220°C) has been vaporized by laser ablation (LA) and its rotational spectrum has been analyzed by broadband CP-FTMW and narrowband MB-FTMW Fourier transform microwave techniques. The detailed structural information extracted from the rotational constants and ^{14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants provided enough information to ascribe the glucophore's AH and B sites of saccharine. R. S. Shallenberger, T. E. Acree. Nature 216, 480-482 Nov 1967. R. S. Shallenberger. Taste Chemistry; Blackie Academic & Professional, London, (1993).

  8. Pure Nano-Rotation Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Yeon Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We developed and tested a novel rotation scanner for nano resolution and accurate rotary motion about the rotation center. The scanner consists of circular hinges and leaf springs so that the parasitic error at the center of the scanner in the X and Y directions is minimized, and rotation performance is optimized. Each sector of the scanner's system was devised to have nano resolution by minimizing the parasitic errors of the rotation center that arise due to displacements other than rotation. The analytic optimal design results of the proposed scanner were verified using finite element analyses. The piezoelectric actuators were used to attain nano-resolution performances, and a capacitive sensor was used to measure displacement. A feedback controller was used to minimize the rotation errors in the rotation scanner system under practical conditions. Finally, the performance evaluation test results showed that the resonance frequency was 542 Hz, the resolution was 0.09 μrad, and the rotation displacement was 497.2 μrad. Our test results revealed that the rotation scanner exhibited accurate rotation about the center of the scanner and had good nano precision.

  9. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ...

  10. Wormholes immersed in rotating matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hoffmann

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that rotating matter sets the throat of an Ellis wormhole into rotation, allowing for wormholes which possess full reflection symmetry with respect to the two asymptotically flat spacetime regions. We analyze the properties of this new type of rotating wormholes and show that the wormhole geometry can change from a single throat to a double throat configuration. We further discuss the ergoregions and the lightring structure of these wormholes.

  11. Isovector rotational model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nojarov, R. (Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Tuebingen (Germany))

    1994-04-18

    The explicit form of the canonical angle operator is found and the isovector rotor is quantized in canonical relative variables ensuring the exact separation of the spurious mode. The main characteristics of the resulting joint mode, together with the low- and high-frequency parts of the split mode are obtained. It is found that the isovector rotational mode exhausts all the non-spurious M1 strength at low and high energy, providing a strong support for the interpretation of all the orbital 1[sup +] excitations as a scissors mode. Self-consistent residual interactions do not change the non-spurious restoring force of the deformed potential. Simple numerical estimates, derived from a schematic deformed oscillator, are in a good qualitative agreement with microscopic RPA results. Relationships with the results of the two-rotor model and the microscopic realization of the scissors state are established. (orig.)

  12. Earth's variable rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hide, Raymond; Dickey, Jean O.

    1991-01-01

    Recent improvements in geodetic data and practical meteorology have advanced research on fluctuations in the earth's rotation. The interpretation of these fluctuations is inextricably linked with studies of the dynamics of the earth-moon system and dynamical processes in the liquid metallic core of the earth (where the geomagnetic field originates), other parts of the earth's interior, and the hydrosphere and atmosphere. Fluctuations in the length of the day occurring on decadal time scales have implications for the topographay of the core-mantle boundary and the electrical, magnetic, ande other properties of the core and lower mantle. Investigations of more rapid fluctuations bear on meteorological studies of interannual, seasonal, and intraseasonal variations in the general circulation of the atmosphere and the response of the oceans to such variations.

  13. Asteroid Ida Rotation Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This montage of 14 images (the time order is right to left, bottom to top) shows Ida as it appeared in the field of view of Galileo's camera on August 28, 1993. Asteroid Ida rotates once every 4 hours, 39 minutes and clockwise when viewed from above the north pole; these images cover about one Ida 'day.' This sequence has been used to create a 3-D model that shows Ida to be almost croissant shaped. The earliest view (lower right) was taken from a range of 240,000 kilometers (150,000 miles), 5.4 hours before closest approach. The asteroid Ida draws its name from mythology, in which the Greek god Zeus was raised by the nymph Ida.

  14. Jacobsen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattina, Teresa; Perrotta, Concetta Simona; Grossfeld, Paul

    2009-03-07

    Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears). Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from approximately 7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia) and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be very severe

  15. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  16. Prediction of post-operative pain following arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery: an observational study [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/9s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Davis

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arthroscopic shoulder surgery is increasingly performed as a day case procedure. Optimal post-operative pain relief remains a challenge due to considerable variations in the level of pain experienced between individuals. Our aim was to examine whether the preoperative electrical pain threshold was a strong predictor of elevated postoperative pain levels following arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD surgery. Methods: Forty consenting patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA grade 1-2 presenting for elective ASD surgery were recruited. Patients’ electrical pain thresholds were measured preoperatively using a PainMatcher® (Cefar Medical AB, Lund, Sweden device. Following surgery under general anaesthesia, the maximum pain experienced at rest and movement was recorded using a visual analogue scale until the end of postoperative day four. Results: In univariate analyses (t-test, the postoperative pain experienced (Area Under Curve was significantly greater in patients with a low pain threshold as compared with a high pain threshold at both rest (mean 12.5, S.E. 1.7 v mean 6.5, S.E.1.2. P=0.008 and on movement (mean 18.7, S.E. 1.5 v mean 14.1, S.E.1.4. P=0.031. In multivariate analyses, adjusting for additional extra analgesia, the pain experienced postoperatively was significantly greater in the low pain threshold group both at rest (mean difference 4.9, 95% CI 1.5 to 8.4, P=0.007 and on movement (mean difference 4.1, 95%CI 0.03 to 8.2, P=0.049. Conclusions: Preoperative pain threshold can predict postoperative pain level following ASD of the shoulder. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01351363 Level of Evidence: II

  17. Rotations, quaternions, and double groups

    CERN Document Server

    Altmann, Simon L

    2005-01-01

    This self-contained text presents a consistent description of the geometric and quaternionic treatment of rotation operators, employing methods that lead to a rigorous formulation and offering complete solutions to many illustrative problems.Geared toward upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, the book begins with chapters covering the fundamentals of symmetries, matrices, and groups, and it presents a primer on rotations and rotation matrices. Subsequent chapters explore rotations and angular momentum, tensor bases, the bilinear transformation, projective representations, and the g

  18. Surface dimpling on rotating work piece using rotation cutting tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhapkar, Rohit Arun; Larsen, Eric Richard

    2015-03-31

    A combined method of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece and a tool assembly that is capable of machining and applying a surface texture to a work piece are disclosed. The disclosed method includes machining portions of an outer or inner surface of a work piece. The method also includes rotating the work piece in front of a rotating cutting tool and engaging the outer surface of the work piece with the rotating cutting tool to cut dimples in the outer surface of the work piece. The disclosed tool assembly includes a rotating cutting tool coupled to an end of a rotational machining device, such as a lathe. The same tool assembly can be used to both machine the work piece and apply a surface texture to the work piece without unloading the work piece from the tool assembly.

  19. Rotational energy surfaces of molecules exhibiting internal rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigoso, Juan; Hougen, Jon T.

    1994-08-01

    Rotational energy surfaces [W. G. Harter and C. W. Patterson, J. Chem. Phys. 80, 4241 (1984)] for a molecule with internal rotation are constructed. The study is limited to torsional states at or below the top of the barrier to internal rotation, where the extra (torsional) degree of freedom can be eliminated by expanding eigenvalues of the torsion-K-rotation Hamiltonian as a Fourier series in the rotational degree of freedom. For acetaldehyde, considered as an example, this corresponds to considering vt=0, 1, and 2 (below the barrier) and vt=3 (just above the barrier). The rotational energy surfaces are characterized by locating their stationary points (maxima, minima, and saddles) and separatrices. Rather complicated catastrophe histories describing the creation and annihilation of pairs of stationary points as a function of J are found at moderate J for given torsional quantum number (vt) and symmetry species (A,E). Trajectories on the rotational energy surface which quantize the action are examined, and changes from rotational to vibrational trajectories caused by changes in the separatrix structure are found as a function of J for vt=2. The concept of a ``best'' quantization axis for the molecule-fixed component of the total angular momentum is examined from a classical point of view, and it is shown that labeling ambiguities encountered in the literature for torsion-rotation energy levels, calculated numerically in the rho-axis system, can be eliminated by reprojecting basis-set K values onto an axis passing through an appropriate stationary point on the rotational energy surface.

  20. High-Current Rotating Contactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, David W.; Wolff, Edwin D.

    1996-01-01

    Rotating electrical contactor capable of carrying 1,000 amperes of current built for use in rotating large workpiece in electroplating bath. Electrical contact made by use of 24 automotive starter motor brushes adapted to match inside diameter of shell electrode.

  1. Rotation of the planet mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, W H

    1966-04-08

    The equations of motion for the rotation of Mercury are solved for the general case by an asymptotic expansion. The findings of Liu and O'Keefe, obtained by numerical integration of a special case, that it is possible for Mercury's rotation to be locked into a 2:3 resonance with its revolution, are confirmed in detail. The general solution has further applications.

  2. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R., E-mail: renan@dfte.ufrn.br [Departamento de Física Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Campus Universitário, Natal RN (Brazil)

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  3. Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burgt Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Noonan Syndrome (NS is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care.

  4. Advances in Rotational Seismic Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Robert [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Laughlin, Darren [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brune, Robert [Applied Technology Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Rotational motion is increasingly understood to be a significant part of seismic wave motion. Rotations can be important in earthquake strong motion and in Induced Seismicity Monitoring. Rotational seismic data can also enable shear selectivity and improve wavefield sampling for vertical geophones in 3D surveys, among other applications. However, sensor technology has been a limiting factor to date. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and Applied Technology Associates (ATA) are funding a multi-year project that is now entering Phase 2 to develop and deploy a new generation of rotational sensors for validation of rotational seismic applications. Initial focus is on induced seismicity monitoring, particularly for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with fracturing. The sensors employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles with broadband response, improved noise floors, robustness, and repeatability. This paper presents a summary of Phase 1 results and Phase 2 status.

  5. Bidirectional optical rotation of cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyi Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Precise and controlled rotation manipulation of cells is extremely important in biological applications and biomedical studies. Particularly, bidirectional rotation manipulation of a single or multiple cells is a challenge for cell tomography and analysis. In this paper, we report an optical method that is capable of bidirectional rotation manipulation of a single or multiple cells. By launching a laser beam at 980 nm into dual-beam tapered fibers, a single or multiple cells in solutions can be trapped and rotated bidirectionally under the action of optical forces. Moreover, the rotational behavior can be controlled by altering the relative distance between the two fibers and the input optical power. Experimental results were interpreted by numerical simulations.

  6. Rotational superradiance in fluid laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Vitor; Richartz, Mauricio; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Rotational superradiance has been predicted theoretically decades ago, and is the chief responsible for a number of important effects and phenomenology in black hole physics. However, rotational superradiance has never been observed experimentally. Here, with the aim of probing superradiance in the lab, we investigate the behaviour of sound and surface waves in fluids resting in a circular basin at the center of which a rotating cylinder is placed. We show that with a suitable choice for the material of the cylinder, surface and sound waves are amplified. By confining the superradiant modes near the rotating cylinder, an instability sets in. Our findings are experimentally testable in existing fluid laboratories and hence offer experimental exploration and comparison of dynamical instabilities arising from rapidly rotating boundary layers in astrophysical as well as in fluid dynamical systems.

  7. Rotation periods and photometric variability of rapidly rotating ultracool dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles-Páez, P. A.; Pallé, E.; Zapatero Osorio, M. R.

    2017-12-01

    We used the optical and near-infrared imagers located on the Liverpool, the IAC80, and the William Herschel telescopes to monitor 18 M7-L9.5 dwarfs with the objective of measuring their rotation periods. We achieved accuracies typically in the range ±1.5-28 mmag by means of differential photometry, which allowed us to detect photometric variability at the 2σ level in the 50 per cent of the sample. We also detected periodic modulation with periods in the interval 1.5-4.4 h in 9 out of 18 dwarfs that we attribute to rotation. Our variability detections were combined with data from the literature; we found that 65 ± 18 per cent of M7-L3.5 dwarfs with v sin I ≥ 30 km s-1 exhibit photometric variability with typical amplitudes ≤20 mmag in the I band. For those targets and field ultracool dwarfs with measurements of v sin I and rotation period we derived the expected inclination angle of their rotation axis, and found that those with v sin I ≥ 30 km s-1 are more likely to have inclinations ≳40 deg. In addition, we used these rotation periods and others from the literature to study the likely relationship between rotation and linear polarization in dusty ultracool dwarfs. We found a correlation between short rotation periods and large values of linear polarization at optical and near-infrared wavelengths.

  8. Rotational Twin Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2012-10-01

    Two twins settle on a massive spherical planet at a train station S. Let's consider that each twin has an accompanying clock, and the two clocks are synchronized. One twin T1 remains in the train station, while the other twin T2 travels at a uniform high speed with the train around the planet (on the big circle of the planet) until he gets back to the same train station S. Assume the planet is not rotating. Since the planet is massive, we can consider that on a very small part on its surface the train rail road is linear, so the train is in a linear uniform motion. The larger is the planet's radius the more the rail road approaches a linear trajectory. Because the GPS clocks are alleged to be built on the Theory of Relativity, one can consider the twin T2 train's circular trajectory alike the satellite's orbit. In addition, the gravitation is the same for the reference frames of T1 and T2. Each twin sees the other twin as traveling, therefore each twin finds the other one has aged slower than him. Thus herein we have a relativistic symmetry. When T2 returns to train station S, he finds out that he is younger than T1 (therefore asymmetry). Thus, one gets a contradiction between symmetry and asymmetry.

  9. Treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome: a PRISMA systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wei; Goost, Hans; Lin, Xiang-Bo; Burger, Christof; Paul, Christian; Wang, Zeng-Li; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Jiang, Zhi-Chao; Welle, Kristian; Kabir, Koroush

    2015-03-01

    Many treatments for shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) are available in clinical practice; some of which have already been compared with other treatments by various investigators. However, a comprehensive treatment comparison is lacking. Several widely used electronic databases were searched for eligible studies. The outcome measurements were the pain score and the Constant-Murley score (CMS). Direct comparisons were performed using the conventional pair-wise meta-analysis method, while a network meta-analysis based on the Bayesian model was used to calculate the results of all potentially possible comparisons and rank probabilities. Included in the meta-analysis procedure were 33 randomized controlled trials involving 2300 patients. Good agreement was demonstrated between the results of the pair-wise meta-analyses and the network meta-analyses. Regarding nonoperative treatments, with respect to the pain score, combined treatments composed of exercise and other therapies tended to yield better effects than single-intervention therapies. Localized drug injections that were combined with exercise showed better treatment effects than any other treatments, whereas worse effects were observed when such injections were used alone. Regarding the CMS, most combined treatments based on exercise also demonstrated better effects than exercise alone. Regarding surgical treatments, according to the pain score and the CMS, arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) together with treatments derived from it, such as ASD combined with radiofrequency and arthroscopic bursectomy, showed better effects than open subacromial decompression (OSD) and OSD combined with the injection of platelet-leukocyte gel. Exercise therapy also demonstrated good performance. Results for inconsistency, sensitivity analysis, and meta-regression all supported the robustness and reliability of these network meta-analyses. Exercise and other exercise-based therapies, such as kinesio taping, specific

  10. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    A support group can be helpful for emotional support and for giving and receiving practical advice. The following organization provides additional information about Williams Syndrome: Williams Syndrome Association -- www.williams-syndrome.org

  11. WIEDEMANN SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    BILATERAL BENIGN HAEMORRHAGIC ADRENAL CYSTS IN BECKWITH - WIEDEMANN. SYNDROME: CASE REPORT. P. ANOOP and M. A. ANJAY. SUMMARY. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is the most common overgrowth malformation syndrome. The classical features include macrosomia, macroglossia, ...

  12. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  13. Brown Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extraction) have also been linked to acquired Brown syndrome. Inflammation of the tendon-trochlea complex (from adult and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and sinusitis) can be ... syndrome hereditary? Hereditary cases of Brown syndrome are rare. ...

  14. Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Asperger Syndrome Information Page Asperger Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? ... Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Asperger syndrome (AS) is a developmental disorder. It is ...

  15. Surgical repair and rehabilitation of a combined 330° capsulolabral lesion and partial-thickness rotator cuff tear in a professional quarterback: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Kevin E; Macrina, Lonard C; Yenchak, Adrian J; Cain, E Lyle; Andrews, James R

    2013-03-01

    Case report. Traumatic glenohumeral dislocations with concomitant rotator cuff and capsular injuries present a unique and challenging surgical and rehabilitative condition, particularly in the overhead-throwing athlete. Multiple injuries of the shoulder complex create the potential for complications in the course of recovery and place a full return to high-level sport at risk. The purpose of this case report is to present the multiphased rehabilitation approach of an elite professional quarterback after an acute 330° capsulolabral reconstruction and rotator cuff repair as a result of a luxatio erecta injury. A 26-year-old male professional football player, a quarterback, sustained a right luxatio erecta shoulder dislocation while trying to recover a fumble during a regular-season game. The injury occurred when he was hit in the back of his throwing shoulder, which was in an abducted and externally rotated position, while lying on the ground. Five days postinjury, he underwent a 330° capsulolabral repair, with concomitant rotator cuff repair and subacromial decompression. He completed 28 weeks of a multiphased rehabilitation program. The patient returned to play in the National Football League (NFL) 8 months later, for the start of the next season, during which he had his most productive year as a professional quarterback, leading the league in passing yards and finishing third in the league for the number of touchdowns. Since the injury, the patient has played 6 consecutive seasons, starting over 96 consecutive, regular-season games and maintaining a very high level of play. This case report highlights the clinical decision-making process and management of this rare, severe injury.

  16. Conservative treatment preferences and the plausible mechanism of Neer's stage 1 of shoulder impingement in younger people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The interaction of various factors in the vicious cycle (VC) of subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is complex and there are conservative treatment preferences for speedy rehabilitation. The mechanism of SIS is not fully understood and the inappropriate treatment priorities cause delay in rehabilitation. SIS is related to the reduction in the subacromial space (SS). Posterior capsular tightness (PCT) and rotator cuff (RC) dysfunction are the two basic mechanisms in this regard. PCT may cause anterosuperior translation of humeral head (HH) and anterior acromion tipping through scapular dyskinesis, thereby reducing the subacromial space. Alteration in the force couple of muscle secondary to scapular dyskinesis eventually causes injury to subacromial structures. The rotator cuff is important in centring the humeral head in the glenoid cavity and superior translation of humeral head occurs if their function is compromised. Posterior capsular tightness may affect the function of rotator cuff action which leads to early fatigue, dysfunction of these muscles and eventually impingement. Adhesive changes take place in various structures around the shoulder secondary to impingement pain and relative immobility, which further aggravates the problem. To reverse the vicious cycle, conservative intervention should therefore be directed to loosen posterior capsular tightness, restore rotator cuff function through appropriate exercise in a pain-free range through appropriate exercise, mobilisation of adhesion through teraservers friction or pain-free mobilisation or grade I and grade II manipulation. Depending on the level of irritability, pain control intervention could be considered alongside.

  17. Canonical elements of rotational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, T.

    2009-09-01

    We present a new set of canonical variables to describe general rotation of a triaxial rigid body. Explicit are both the forward and backward transformations from the new variables to the Andoyer canonical variables, which are universal. The rotational kinetic energy is expressed as a quadratic monomial of one new momentum. Consequently, the torque-free rotations are expressed as a linear function of time for the conjugate coordinate and constants of time for the rest two coordinates and three momenta. This means that the new canonical variables are universal elements in a broad sense.

  18. Optical wheel-rotation sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeser, L.; Rodriguez, P.; Forman, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Deeter, M. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-05-01

    We describe a fiber-optic rotation sensor based on diffraction of light in a magneto-optic crystal (BIG). Exploitation of this effect permits the construction of a sensor requiring no polarization elements or lenses.

  19. Spontaneous Rotational Inversion in Phycomyces

    KAUST Repository

    Goriely, Alain

    2011-03-01

    The filamentary fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus undergoes a series of remarkable transitions during aerial growth. During what is known as the stagea IV growth phase, the fungus extends while rotating in a counterclockwise manner when viewed from above (stagea IVa) and then, while continuing to grow, spontaneously reverses to a clockwise rotation (stagea IVb). This phase lasts for 24-48Ah and is sometimes followed by yet another reversal (stageAIVc) before the overall growth ends. Here, we propose a continuum mechanical model of this entire process using nonlinear, anisotropic, elasticity and show how helical anisotropy associated with the cell wall structure can induce spontaneous rotation and, under appropriate circumstances, the observed reversal of rotational handedness. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  20. DOWN SYNDROME WITH MOYAMOYA SYNDROME

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohan Makwana; R. K. Vishnoi; Jai Prakash Soni; Kapil Jetha; Suresh Kumar Verma; Pradeep Singh Rathore; Monika Choudhary

    2017-01-01

    ...,” in which the arterial changes are seen among patients with various syndromes or other disease processes- Down syndrome, sickle cell anaemia, neurofibromatosis type-1, congenital heart disease...

  1. Muscle shortening manoeuvre reduces pain and functional impairment in shoulder impingement syndrome: clinical and ultrasonographic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, Daniela; Maresca, Marco; Bracci, Riccardo; Ravaschio, Andrea; Valiensi, Bruno; Casale, Roberto; Bandinelli, Francesca; Candelieri, Antonio; Maddali Bongi, Susanna; Porta, Francesco; Innocenti, Massimo; Carulli, Christian; Matucci Cerinic, Marco

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the short-term efficacy of muscle shortening manoeuvre (MSM), by inducing an increase in strength of the shoulder muscles, for the treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS). Sixty subjects (mean age: 58.6 years) with SIS were assigned to one of 3 different treatment interventions: 1) MSM: a series of fast accelerations in the upward direction was applied to the upper limb that was also submitted to forces acting in the opposite direction (added mass); 2) traditional physiotherapeutic technique: scapulothoracic gliding; 3) simple traction: the added mass was applied to the limb without the series of fast accelerations. Pain intensity, Neer's impingement sign, range of motion and muscle strength were assessed. Ultrasound (US) examination was performed before, immediately after and 30 days after each treatment to study the width of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa, long biceps tendon sheath and acromioclavicular joint. Impingement was evaluated by dynamic examination. After treatment with MSM, pain was significantly reduced (p<0.001), Neer's impingement sign was negative, range of motion and muscle strength were increased. US examination showed that the widths of the subacromial-subdeltoid bursa (p<0.001), long biceps tendon sheath (p<0.001) and acromioclavicular joint (p<0.001) were significantly reduced; impingement was no more detected. After 30 days, improvement in clinical and US findings was maintained. In the two control groups, no significant changes were observed after treatment. Clinical and US findings demonstrate that MSM, by inducing an increase in muscle strength, is effective in the short-term treatment of SIS.

  2. [Biomechanic results in impingement syndrome of the shoulder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuelker, N; Plitz, W; Roetman, B; Rössig, S

    1995-01-01

    Forces underneath the coraco-acromial vault during elevation of the arm were evaluated with a dynamic shoulder model. The deltoid muscle and the rotator cuff muscles were simulated with a hydrodynamic device, in ten autopsy specimens. Controlled cycles of glenohumeral joint motion were initiated with computerised regulation. An ultrasonic device measured the position of the arm in all spatial orientations. Capacitive sensors recorded forces underneath the coraco-acromial vault. The mean force during one cycle of elevation averaged 13.9 Newton +/- 12.5 Newton underneath the coraco-acromial ligament and 3.44 Newton +/- 4.37 Newton underneath the coracoid process. The peak force averaged 37.8 Newton +/- 33.2 Newton underneath the acromion, 3.03 Newton +/- 2.62 Newton underneath the coraco-acromial ligament and 6.93 Newton +/- 7.38 Newton underneath the coracoid process. The force markedly increased at the final stage of arm elevation and during early reverse-elevation in most specimens, corresponding to the painful arc sign. In some specimens, the force under the coracoid process exceeded the force under the acromion. Osteophytes protruding into the subacromial space may lead to a concentration of force and to high regional pressures.

  3. Kindler syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kindler syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder associated with skin fragility. It is characterized by blistering in infancy, photosensitivity and progressive poikiloderma. The syndrome involves the skin and mucous membrane with radiological changes. The genetic defect has been identified on the short arm of chromosome 20. This report describes an 18-year-old patient with classical features like blistering and photosensitivity in childhood and the subsequent development of poikiloderma. The differential diagnosis of Kindler syndrome includes diseases like Bloom syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, epidermolysis bullosa, Rothmund-Thomson syndrome and xeroderma pigmentosum. Our patient had classical cutaneous features of Kindler syndrome with phimosis as a complication.

  4. Full can test: Mechanisms of a positive test in patients with shoulder pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Mark K; Yesilyaprak, Sevgi S; Ericksen, Jeff; Michener, Lori A

    2017-02-01

    The full can test is theorized to produce compressive loads on the supraspinatus tendon within the subacromial space. Characterizing the width of the subacromial outlet, scapular orientation, and shoulder pain during the full can test will improve the mechanistic understanding of the positive full can test. Cross-sectional repeated measures design. Participants with subacromial pain syndrome (n=30) were compared to a matched control group (n=30) during 2 conditions: passive support, and the full can test. The full can test was performed with the arm elevated to 90° in the scapular plane. In both conditions, measurements were taken of acromiohumeral distance with ultrasonography, scapular position using electromagnetic tracking, shoulder strength using a dynamometer, and shoulder pain with the 11-point rating scale. During the full can test, both groups had a decreased acromial humeral distance, scapular upward rotation, posterior tilt, external rotation and clavicular protraction as compared to passive support (ppain group as compared to the control group reported greater shoulder pain (ppain and reduced strength in those with subacromial pain syndrome can be explained additionally by an increase in scapular anterior tilt. These mechanistic changes may lead to tendon compression, but this cannot be verified as direct tendon compression was not measured. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Spline screw multiple rotations mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A system for coupling two bodies together and for transmitting torque from one body to another with mechanical timing and sequencing is reported. The mechanical timing and sequencing is handled so that the following criteria are met: (1) the bodies are handled in a safe manner and nothing floats loose in space, (2) electrical connectors are engaged as long as possible so that the internal processes can be monitored throughout by sensors, and (3) electrical and mechanical power and signals are coupled. The first body has a splined driver for providing the input torque. The second body has a threaded drive member capable of rotation and limited translation. The embedded drive member will mate with and fasten to the splined driver. The second body has an embedded bevel gear member capable of rotation and limited translation. This bevel gear member is coaxial with the threaded drive member. A compression spring provides a preload on the rotating threaded member, and a thrust bearing is used for limiting the translation of the bevel gear member so that when the bevel gear member reaches the upward limit of its translation the two bodies are fully coupled and the bevel gear member then rotates due to the input torque transmitted from the splined driver through the threaded drive member to the bevel gear member. An output bevel gear with an attached output drive shaft is embedded in the second body and meshes with the threaded rotating bevel gear member to transmit the input torque to the output drive shaft.

  6. Critical rotation of general-relativistic polytropic models revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geroyannis, V.; Karageorgopoulos, V.

    2013-09-01

    We develop a perturbation method for computing the critical rotational parameter as a function of the equatorial radius of a rigidly rotating polytropic model in the "post-Newtonia approximation" (PNA). We treat our models as "initial value problems" (IVP) of ordinary differential equations in the complex plane. The computations are carried out by the code dcrkf54.f95 (Geroyannis and Valvi 2012 [P1]; modified Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg code of fourth and fifth order for solving initial value problems in the complex plane). Such a complex-plane treatment removes the syndromes appearing in this particular family of IVPs (see e.g. P1, Sec. 3) and allows continuation of the numerical integrations beyond the surface of the star. Thus all the required values of the Lane-Emden function(s) in the post-Newtonian approximation are calculated by interpolation (so avoiding any extrapolation). An interesting point is that, in our computations, we take into account the complete correction due to the gravitational term, and this issue is a remarkable difference compared to the classical PNA. We solve the generalized density as a function of the equatorial radius and find the critical rotational parameter. Our computations are extended to certain other physical characteristics (like mass, angular momentum, rotational kinetic energy, etc). We find that our method yields results comparable with those of other reliable methods. REFERENCE: V.S. Geroyannis and F.N. Valvi 2012, International Journal of Modern Physics C, 23, No 5, 1250038:1-15.

  7. Rotational Modes in Phononic Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Peng, Pai; Mei, Jun

    2014-03-01

    We propose a lumped model for the rotational modes in two-dimensional phononic crystals comprised of square arrays of solid cylindrical scatterers in solid hosts. The model not only can reproduce the dispersion relations in a certain range with one fitted parameter, but also gives simple analytical expressions for the frequencies of the eigenmodes at the high symmetry points in the Brillouin zone. These expressions provide physical understandings of the rotational modes as well as certain translational and hybrid mode, and predict the presence of accidental degeneracy of the rotational and dipolar modes, which leads to a Dirac-like cone in the Brillouin zone center. Supported by KAUST Baseline Research Fund, National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants No. 10804086 and No. 11274120), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (Grant No. 2012ZZ0077).

  8. Instabilities in coaxial rotating jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanic, Tanja; Foucault, Eric; Pecheux, Jean; Gilard, Virginie

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this study is the characterization of the cylindrical mixing layer resulting from the interaction of two coaxial swirling jets. The experimental part of this study was performed in a cylindrical water tunnel, permitting an independent rotation of two coaxial jets. The rotations are generated by means of 2×36 blades localized in two swirling chambers. As expected, the evolution of the main instability modes presents certain differences compared to the plane-mixing-layer case. Experimental results obtained by tomography showed the existence of vortex rings and streamwise vortex pairs in the near field region. This method also permitted the observation of the evolution and interaction of different modes. PIV velocity measurements realized in the meridian plans and the plans perpendicular to the jet axis show that rotation distorts the typical top-hat axial velocity profile. The transition of the axial velocity profile from jet-like into wake-like is also observed.

  9. The ability of preoperative factors to predict patient-reported disability following surgery for rotator cuff pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollard, Jason D; Bost, James E; Piva, Sara R; Kelley Fitzgerald, G; Rodosky, Mark W; Irrgang, James J

    2017-10-01

    Minimal research has examined the prognostic ability of shoulder examination data or psychosocial factors in predicting patient-reported disability following surgery for rotator cuff pathology. The purpose of this study was to examine these factors for prognostic value in order to help clinicians and patients understand preoperative factors that impact disability following surgery. Sixty-two patients scheduled for subacromial decompression with or without supraspinatus repair were recruited. Six-month follow-up data were available for 46 patients. Patient characteristics, history of the condition, shoulder impairments, psychosocial factors, and patient-reported disability questionnaires were collected preoperatively. Six months following surgery, the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) and global rating of change dichotomized subjects into responders versus nonresponders. Logistic regression quantified prognostic ability and created the most parsimonious model to predict outcome. Being on modified job duty (OR = .17, 95%CI: 0.03-0.94), and having a worker's compensation claim (OR = 0.08, 95%CI: 0.01-0.74) decreased probability of a positive outcome, while surgery on the dominant shoulder (OR = 11.96, 95%CI: 2.91-49.18) increased probability. From the examination, only impaired internal rotation strength was a significant univariate predictor. The Fear-avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ) score (OR = 0.95, 95%CI: 0.91-0.98) and the FABQ_work subscale (OR = 0.92, 95%CI: 0.87-0.97) were univariate predictors. In the final model, surgery on the dominant shoulder (OR = 8.9, 95%CI 1.75-45.7) and FABQ_work subscale score ≤25 (OR = 15.3, 95%CI 2.3-101.9) remained significant. Surgery on the dominant arm resulted in greater improvement in patient-reported disability, thereby increasing the odds of a successful surgery. The predictive ability of the FABQ_work subscale highlights the potential impact of psychosocial factors on patient

  10. Coracoid impingement syndrome due to intensive rock climbing training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, Volker; Schneider, Hans; Küpper, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Overuse and acute injuries to the upper body are common in rock climbing. Such injuries primarily affect the fingers; but shoulder problems are increasingly common, especially among more experienced and older climbers who climb at a high ability level. Such shoulder problems are often due to subacromial impingement, shoulder dislocations with bankart lesions, hyperlaxity, SLAP lesions or irritations of the long biceps tendon. In contrast to these known conditions, we describe a case of an ambitious female rock climber who trained intensively and developed a coracoid impingement caused by hypertrophied subscapularis tendon and muscle following sport-specific training. Diagnosis was made through clinical evaluation and confirmed by magnetic resonance tomography. Coracoid impingement syndrome is a less common cause of shoulder pain and occurs when the subscapularis tendon impinges between the coracoid and the lesser tuberosity of the humerus. The patient was treated successfully with a conservative therapy and returned to full activity within 6 weeks. Copyright © 2011 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Astrogeodynamic Studies of Earth Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, A.; Alonso, E.; Podesta, R.; Actis, E.

    2006-06-01

    From OAFA's Photoelectric Astrolabe Pa II systematic observations of stellar fundamental groups on period 1992 - 2002 we have determined (UT0-UTC) Time Variation Curve corresponding to Earth Rotation and its comparison with data (UT1-UTC) given by International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) We have obtained values of the curve from the average of observations of each night with their respective weights, and have corrected them by Pole Movement. We have also studied the possibility of relations between anomalies on Time Variation (UT0-UTC) and important earthquakes happened on the neighborhood of the Astrolabe.

  12. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); West, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  13. Mercury's rotation axis and period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    Recent measurements made from high-resolution Mariner 10 photography of the planet Mercury yield a rotation period of 58.6461 + or 0.005 days, in excellent agreement with the period required for a precise 2/3 resonance with its orbital period (58.6462 days). The axis of rotation of the planet was calculated to be offset about 2 deg from the perpendicular to its orbital plane within a 50% probability error ellipse of + or - 2.6 deg by + or - 6.5 deg. Dynamical considerations make it most likely that the true displacement from the orbit normal is less than 1 deg.

  14. Relativity on Rotated Graph Paper

    CERN Document Server

    Salgado, Roberto B

    2011-01-01

    We present visual calculations in special relativity using spacetime diagrams drawn on graph paper that has been rotated by 45 degrees. The rotated lines represent lightlike directions in Minkowski spacetime, and the boxes in the grid (called "light-clock diamonds") represent units of measurement modeled on the ticks of an inertial observer's lightclock. We show that many quantitative results can be read off a spacetime diagram by counting boxes, using a minimal amount of algebra. We use the Doppler Effect, in the spirit of the Bondi k-calculus, to motivate the method.

  15. Strongly interacting matter under rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The vorticity-driven effects are systematically studied in various aspects. With AMPT the distributions of vorticity has been investigated in heavy ion collisions with different collision parameters. Taking the rotational polarization effect into account a generic condensate suppression mechanism is discussed and quantitatively studied with NJL model. And in chiral restored phase the chiral vortical effects would generate a new collective mode, i.e. the chiral vortical wave. Using the rotating quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions as a concrete example, we show the formation of induced flavor quadrupole in QGP and estimate the elliptic flow splitting effect for Λ baryons.

  16. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: ROTATING BIOLOGICAL CONTACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotating biological contactors employ aerobic fixed-film treatment to degrade either organic and/or nitrogenous (ammonia-nitrogen) constituents present in aqueous waste streams. ixed-film systems provide a surface to which the biomass can adhere. Treatment is achieved as the wast...

  17. Rotational alignment in soft nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nojarov, R. (Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia. Inst. po Yadrena Fizika i Yadrena Energetika)

    1983-12-08

    It is shown that in transitional odd-A nuclei, where the rotation-aligned coupling scheme usually takes place, the low collective angular momentum states of the decoupled band are not completely aligned due to core softness. This is illustrated on the example of La-nuclei.

  18. Rotational dynamics with geometric algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestenes, D.

    1983-01-01

    A new spinor formulation of rotational dynamics is developed. A general theorem is established reducing the theory of the symmetric top to that of the spherical top. The classical problems of Lagrange and Poinsot are treated in detail, along with a modern application to the theory of magnetic resonance.

  19. Rotational diffusion in dense suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagen, M. H. J.; Frenkel, D.; Lowe, C.P.

    1999-01-01

    We have computed the rotational diffusion coefficient for a suspension of hard spheres. We find excellent agreement with experimental results over a density range up to, and including, the colloidal crystal. However, we find that theories derived to second order in the volume fraction overestimate

  20. Rotating black hole and quintessence

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Sushant G

    2015-01-01

    We discuss spherically symmetric exact solutions of the Einstein equations for quintessential matter surrounding a black hole (BH), which has additional parameters ($\\alpha$ and $\\omega$) due to the quintessential matter, apart from the mass ($M$). In turn, we employ the Newman\\(-\\)Janis complex transformation to this spherical quintessence BH solution and present a rotating counterpart that is identified, for $\\alpha=-e^2 \

  1. Synchrotron Radiation and Faraday Rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heald, George

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation and its degree of linear polarization are powerful tracers of magnetic fields that are illuminated by cosmic ray electrons. Faraday rotation of the linearly polarized radiation is induced by intervening line-of-sight magnetic fields that are embedded in ionized plasmas. For

  2. Dumping Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intestinal Pseudo-obstruction Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in Children Lactose Intolerance Ménétrier’s Disease Microscopic Colitis Ostomy Surgery of the ...

  3. Piriformis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudosciatica; Wallet sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... Sciatica is the main symptom of piriformis syndrome. Other symptoms include: Tenderness or a dull ache in ...

  4. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ...

  5. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ... Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the Liver Galactosemia Gilbert’s Syndrome Diseases of the Liver Glycogen Storage ...

  6. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Zellweger syndrome (ZS, the most severe form), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and Infantile Refsum disease (IRD, the least ... Zellweger syndrome (ZS, the most severe form), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and Infantile Refsum disease (IRD, the least ...

  7. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Criton S

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a hamartomatous disorder characterised by focal overgrowths that can involve any structure of the body. An eleven-year-old girl with Proteus syndrome has been described with clitoromegaly.

  8. Overlap syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuers, Ulrich; Rust, Christian

    2005-01-01

    In hepatology, the term overlap syndrome describes variant forms of the major hepatobiliary autoimmune diseases, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic

  9. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These ... doctors agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  10. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye syndrome is a rare illness that can affect the blood, liver, and brain of someone who has recently ... a viral illness, seek medical attention immediately. Reye syndrome can lead to a coma and brain death, ...

  11. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  12. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete X ... work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  13. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  14. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  15. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body. Many people with Alport syndrome also have hearing problems and abnormalities with their eyes. Other signs and ... and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, hearing and vision problems tend to be more common in males than ...

  16. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye sensitivity; motor delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are ... eye sensitivity; motor delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are ...

  17. Heart and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  18. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  19. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4602 [email protected] Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ... Helpline » Follow us Down Syndrome What Is Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q& ...

  20. Down Syndrome: Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Team Financial Information NDSS History About Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Preferred Language Guide Down Syndrome Facts Down ... Our Team Financial Information NDSS History About Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Down Syndrome Facts Preferred Language Guide Publications ...