WorldWideScience

Sample records for sub-picosecond time structure

  1. Sub-picosecond Resolution Time-to-Digital Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratov, Vladimir [Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA (United States); Katzman, Vladimir [Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA (United States); Binkley, Jeb [Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA (United States)

    2006-03-30

    Time-to-digital converters with sub-picosecond resolutions are needed to satisfy the requirements of time-on-flight measurements of the next generation of high energy and nuclear physics experiments. The converters must be highly integrated, power effective, low cost, and feature plug-and-play capabilities to handle the increasing number of channels (up to hundreds of millions) in future Department of Energy experiments. Current state-off-the-art time-to-digital converter integrated circuits do not have the sufficient degree of integration and flexibility to fulfill all the described requirements. During Phase I, the Advanced Science and Novel Technology Company in cooperation with the nuclear physics division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the architecture of a novel time-to-digital converter with multiple channels connected to an external processor through a special interfacing block and synchronized by clock signals generated by an internal phase-locked loop. The critical blocks of the system including signal delay lines and delay-locked loops with proprietary differential delay cells, as well as the required digital code converter and the clock period counter have been designed and simulated using the advanced SiGe120 BiCMOS technological process. The results of investigations demonstrate a possibility to achieve the digitization accuracy within 1ps. ADSANTEC has demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed concept in computer simulations. The proposed system will be a critical component for the next generation of NEP experiments.

  2. Note: Solid state photon counters with sub-picosecond timing stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2013-04-01

    We are reporting on a design, construction, and performance of photon counting detector packages based on solid state sensors. These photon counting devices have been optimized for extremely high stability of their detection delay. The detectors have been designed for applications in fundamental metrology and optical time transfer. The single photon avalanche diode structure manufactured on silicon using the K14 technology is used as a sensor. The active area of the sensor is circular with a diameter of 100 or 200 μm. The sensor is operated in an active quenching and gating mode. The photon detection efficiency exceeds 40% in a wavelength range spanning from 500 to 800 nm. The timing resolution is better than 20 ps rms. Its detection delay is stable within ±600 fs over several days of operation, in a sense of time deviation the detection delay stability of 150 fs has been achieved. The temperature change of the detection delay is as low as 280 fs/K. This timing performance is preserved even under extremely high background photon fluxes exceeding 100 Mc/s. The detectors have been qualified for operation in space missions.

  3. Sub-picosecond timing fluctuation suppression in laser-based atmospheric transfer of microwave signal using electronic phase compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shijun; Sun, Fuyu; Bai, Qingsong; Chen, Dawei; Chen, Qiang; Hou, Dong

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrated a timing fluctuation suppression in outdoor laser-based atmospheric radio-frequency transfer over a 110 m one-way free-space link using an electronic phase compensation technique. Timing fluctuations and Allan Deviation are both measured to characterize the instability of transferred frequency incurred during the transfer process. With transferring a 1 GHz microwave signal over a timing fluctuation suppressed transmission link, the total root-mean-square (rms) timing fluctuation was measured to be 920 femtoseconds in 5000 s, with fractional frequency instability on the order of 1 × 10-12 at 1 s, and order of 2 × 10-16 at 1000 s. This atmospheric frequency transfer scheme with the timing fluctuation suppression technique can be used to fast build an atomic clock-based frequency free-space transmission link since its stability is superior to a commercial Cs and Rb clock.

  4. Sub-picosecond dynamics in liquid Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, S [Institut fuer Physikalische-, Kern-, und Makromolekulare Chemie, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Pilgrim, W-C [Institut fuer Physikalische-, Kern-, und Makromolekulare Chemie, Philipps Universitaet Marburg, D-35032 Marburg (Germany); Kawakita, Y [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Ohshima, K [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Takeda, S [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Ishikawa, D [SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tsutsui, S [SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Tanaka, Y [SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Baron, A Q R [SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2003-10-15

    We are the first group to succeed in measuring the dynamic structure factor S(Q,{omega}) of liquid Si close to melting using high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering. The spectra clearly demonstrate the existence of propagating short wavelength modes in the melt with a Q-{omega} relation similar to those in other liquid metal systems. A specific variation of the quasi-elastic line shape with increasing Q is observed close to the structure factor maximum. This observation is related to the onset of atomic correlations on the sub-picosecond timescale in the vicinity of a metal-to-insulator transition. Such observations have been made previously only in computer simulations of metallic systems with increasing covalent character. Our data provide the first experimental evidence for these ultrashort density correlations. (letter to the editor)

  5. Sub-picosecond time resolved infrared spectroscopy of high-spin state formation in Fe(II) spin crossover complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Anders Rørbæk; Wolf, Matthias M. N.; Gross, Ruth

    2008-01-01

      The photoinduced low-spin (S = 0) to high-spin (S = 2) transition of the iron(II) spin-crossover systems [Fe(btpa)](PF6)2 and [Fe(b(bdpa))](PF6)2 in solution have been studied for the first time by means of ultrafast transient infrared spectroscopy at room temperature. Negative and positive...... infrared difference bands between 1000 and 1065 cm-1 that appear within the instrumental system response time of 350 fs after excitation at 387 nm display the formation of the vibrationally unrelaxed and hot high-spin 5T2 state. Vibrational relaxation is observed and characterized by the time constants 9.......4 ± 0.7 ps for [Fe(btpa)](PF6)2/acetone and 12.7 ± 0.7 ps for both [Fe(btpa)](PF6)2/acetonitrile and [Fe(b(bdpa)](PF6)2/acetonitrile. Vibrational analysis has been performed via DFT calculations of the low-spin and high-spin state normal modes of both compounds as well as their respective infrared...

  6. A New Possibility for Production of Sub-picosecond X-ray Pulses using a Time Dependent Radio Frequency Orbit Deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01

    It is shown that two radio frequency deflecting cavities with slightly different frequencies can be used to produce time-dependent orbit deflection to a few special electron bunches while keeping the majority of the electron bunches unaffected. These special bunches produce an x-ray pulse in which transverse position or angle, or both, are correlated with time. The x-ray pulses are then shortened, either with an asymmetrically cut crystal that acts as a pulse compressor, or with an angular aperture such as a narrow slit positioned downstream. The implementation of this technique creates a highly flexible environment for synchrotrons in which users of most beamlines will be able to easily select between the x-rays originated by the standard electron bunches and the short x-ray pulses originated by the special electron bunches carrying a time-dependent transverse correlation.

  7. High resolution time-to-space conversion of sub-picosecond pulses at 1.55µm by non-degenerate SFG in PPLN crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayovitz, Dror; Herrmann, Harald; Sohler, Wolfgang; Ricken, Raimund; Silberhorn, Christine; Marom, Dan M

    2012-11-19

    We demonstrate high resolution and increased efficiency background-free time-to-space conversion using spectrally resolved non-degenerate and collinear SFG in a bulk PPLN crystal. A serial-to-parallel resolution factor of 95 and a time window of 42 ps were achieved. A 60-fold increase in conversion efficiency slope compared with our previous work using a BBO crystal [D. Shayovitz and D. M. Marom, Opt. Lett. 36, 1957 (2011)] was recorded. Finally the measured 40 GHz narrow linewidth of the output SFG signal implies the possibility to extract phase information by employing coherent detection techniques.

  8. Sub-picosecond optical switching with a negative index metamaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dani, Keshav M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Upadhya, Prashant C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zahyum, Ku [CHTM-UNM

    2009-01-01

    Development of all-optical signal processing, eliminating the performance and cost penalties of optical-electrical-optical conversion, is important for continu,ing advances in Terabits/sec (Tb/s) communications.' Optical nonlinearities are generally weak, traditionally requiring long-path, large-area devicesl,2 or very high-Q, narrow-band resonator structures.3 Optical metamaterials offer unique capabilities for optical-optical interactions. Here we report 600 femtosecond (fs) all-optical modulation using a fIShnet (2D-perforated metallamorphous-Si (a-Si)/metal film stack) negative-index meta material with a structurally tunable broad-band response near 1.2 {micro}m. Over 20% modulation (experimentally limited) is achieved in a path length of only 116 nm by photo-excitation of carriers in the a-Si layer. This has the potential for Tb/s aU-optical communication and will lead to other novel, compact, tunable sub-picosecond (ps) photonic devices.

  9. Sub-picosecond snapshots of fast electrons from high intensity laser-matter interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, R; Anania, M P; Bisesto, F; Botton, M; Castellano, M; Chiadroni, E; Cianchi, A; Curcio, A; Ferrario, M; Galletti, M; Henis, Z; Petrarca, M; Schleifer, E; Zigler, A

    2016-12-26

    The interaction of a high-intensity short-pulse laser with thin solid targets produces electron jets that escape the target and positively charge it, leading to the formation of the electrostatic potential that in turn governs the ion acceleration. The typical timescale of such phenomena is on the sub-picosecond level. Here we show, for the first time, temporally-resolved measurements of the first released electrons that escaped from the target, so-called fast electrons. Their total charge, energy and temporal profile are provided by means of a diagnostics based on Electro-Optical Sampling with temporal resolution below 100 fs.

  10. Measurement of Sub-Picosecond Electron Bunches via Electro-Optic Sampling of Coherent Transition Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, Timothy John [Northern Illinois U.

    2012-01-01

    Future collider applications as well as present high-gradient laser plasma wakefield accelerators and free-electron lasers operating with picosecond bunch durations place a higher demand on the time resolution of bunch distribution diagnostics. This demand has led to significant advancements in the field of electro-optic sampling over the past ten years. These methods allow the probing of diagnostic light such as coherent transition radiation or the bunch wakefields with sub-picosecond time resolution. We present results on the single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of coherent transition radiation from bunches generated at the Fermilab A0 photoinjector laboratory. A longitudinal double-pulse modulation of the electron beam is also realized by transverse beam masking followed by a transverse-to-longitudinal phase-space exchange beamline. Live profile tuning is demonstrated by upstream beam focusing in conjunction with downstream monitoring of single-shot electro-optic spectral decoding of the coherent transition radiation.

  11. Sub-picosecond x-ray streak camera development for laser fusion diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieber, A.J.; Sutphin, H.D.; Webb, C.B.; Williams, A.H.

    1976-01-01

    In laser-fusion interactions the effectiveness of coupling laser energy into target compression can be followed by obtaining spatial and temporal information on x-radiation emitted by the target. Microballoon targets now used require temporal resolution of better than a few picoseconds to track accurately target collapse and disassembly. Instabilities of two picoseconds or less are predicted for the process. Most streak cameras are based upon a sector-focused streak tube, which in the design limit is capable of only about 10 ps x-ray resolution. Therefore, a new tube, based upon the proximity-focused or wafer intensifier was developed as a laser-fusion diagnostic capable in the design limit of delivering truly sub-picosecond x-ray resolution. A new power supply was also developed to drive the streak tube. Together, a camera has resulted with true picosecond capability, small size, high sensitivity, broad dynamic range, high spatial resolution, and very low jitter. The system has proved 98 percent reliable in over 300 laser shots providing data on the collapse of microballoons when irradiated by a dual beam Nd:YAG laser. Theoretical predictions of 2.5 to 3 ps resolution are consistent with experimental data. A visible variant of the design now under construction is expected to give sub-picosecond resolution with advantages similar to the x-ray system.

  12. Correlation of the dynamics of native human acetylcholinesterase and its inhibited huperzine A counterpart from sub-picoseconds to nanoseconds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, M.; Tehei, M.; Trovaslet, M.; Nachon, F.; Martinez, N.; Koza, M. M.; Weik, M.; Masson, P.; Peters, J.

    2014-01-01

    It is a long debated question whether catalytic activities of enzymes, which lie on the millisecond timescale, are possibly already reflected in variations in atomic thermal fluctuations on the pico- to nanosecond timescale. To shed light on this puzzle, the enzyme human acetylcholinesterase in its wild-type form and complexed with the inhibitor huperzine A were investigated by various neutron scattering techniques and molecular dynamics simulations. Previous results on elastic neutron scattering at various timescales and simulations suggest that dynamical processes are not affected on average by the presence of the ligand within the considered time ranges between 10 ps and 1 ns. In the work presented here, the focus was laid on quasi-elastic (QENS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These techniques give access to different kinds of individual diffusive motions and to the density of states of collective motions at the sub-picoseconds timescale. Hence, they permit going beyond the first approach of looking at mean square displacements. For both samples, the autocorrelation function was well described by a stretched-exponential function indicating a linkage between the timescales of fast and slow functional relaxation dynamics. The findings of the QENS and INS investigation are discussed in relation to the results of our earlier elastic incoherent neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:24872501

  13. High-intensity coherent FIR radiation from sub-picosecond electron bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, P.H.; Lihn, Hung-chi; Wiedemann, H.; Bocek, D.

    1994-01-01

    A facility to generate high-intensity, ultra-short pulses of broad-band far-infrared radiation has been assembled and tested at Stanford. The device uses sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches to generate coherent radiation through transition or synchrotron radiation in the far-infrared (FIR) regime between millimeter waves and wavelengths of about 100 {mu}m and less. Experimental results show a peak radiation power of greater than 0.33 MW within a micro-bunch and an average FIR radiation power of 4 mW. The average bunch length of 2856 micro-bunches within a 1 {mu}sec macro-pulse is estimated to be about 480 sec. Simulations experimental setup and results will be discussed.

  14. Sub-picosecond pulse break-up in an InGaAsP optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, Francis Pascal

    For high-speed optical communication systems with data speed higher than 200 Gb/s sub-picosecond pulse dynamics, coherent effects become important. We have, experimentally and theoretically, investigated the pulse distortion of a 150 fs pulse due to amplification in a 250 μm long InGaAsP ridge...... broadening and eventual break-up for input pulse energies on the order of picoJoules. This break-up is present in the gain region (6-14 dB), while for absorption (-6 dB9 and transparency, pulse narrowing by a factor of two is evidenced. We observe that not only the amplitude is modulated, but also the linear...

  15. Sub-picosecond pulse break-up in an InGaAsP optical amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romstad, Francis Pascal

    1999-01-01

    For high speed optical communication system with data speed higher than 200 Gb/s sub-picosecond pulse dynamics, coherent effects become important.We have, experimentally and theoretically, investigated the pulse distortion of an 150 fs pulse due to amplification in a 250 ìm long InGaAsP ridge...... broadening and eventual break-up for input pulse energies on the order of picoJoules. This break-up is present in the gain region (6-14 dB), while for absorption (-6 dB) and transparency, pulse narrowing by a factor of two is evidenced. We observe that not only the amplitude is modulated, but also the linear...

  16. Observation of coherently enhanced tunable narrow-band terahertz transition radiation from a relativistic sub-picosecond electron bunch train

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, P. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sun, Y. -E [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Maxwell, T. J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ruan, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Rihaoui, M. M. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Thurman-Keup, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2011-06-27

    We experimentally demonstrate the production of narrow-band (δf/f ~ =20% at f ~ = 0.5 THz) THz transition radiation with tunable frequency over [0.37, 0.86] THz. The radiation is produced as a train of sub-picosecond relativistic electron bunches transits at the vacuum-aluminum interface of an aluminum converter screen. In addition, we show a possible application of modulated beams to extend the dynamical range of a popular bunch length diagnostic technique based on the spectral analysis of coherent radiation.

  17. A passively mode-locked sub-picosecond Ho3+,Pr3+-doped fluoride fiber laser operating at 2.86 µm(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, Sergei; Jackson, Stuart D.; Withford, Michael J.; Fürbach, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate a passively mode-locked holmium-praseodymium co-doped ring fiber laser that produces an estimated 950 fs pulsewidth and peak power of 4.3 kW at a pulse repetition rate of 74 MHz. The measured center wavelength was 2.86 µm which overlaps more strongly with liquid water whilst better avoiding atmospheric water vapor which overlaps more strongly with previously reported ultrafast Er3+ fiber lasers operating at 2.8. Thus the present system should display better long term stability compared to the Er3+-based system and at the same time, be a more practical tool for interaction with biological tissues. The laser was constructed using a 1.2 m long double-clad fluoride fiber doped with Ho3+ and Pr3+ ions and arranged into a unidirectional ring resonator that was resistant to instabilities associated with back reflections. Two semiconductor 1150 nm laser diodes with the maximum combined output of 7.5 W were used to pump the fiber. Mode-locking was achieved using the combination of two techniques: sub-picosecond pulses were produced by nonlinear polarization evolution after longer pulses were initially obtained using an in-cavity GaAs saturable absorber having a modulation depth of 90% and a relaxation time of 10 ps. A standard arrangement employing two waveplates and an optical isolator was introduced into the resonator to carry out nonlinear polarization rotation. The average power of the mode-locked laser reached 350 mW after the 50% outcoupling mirror. The RF signal-to-noise ratio reached 67 dB for the first peak at the resolution bandwidth of 10 kHz.

  18. Measuring sub-picosecond optical propagation delay changes on optical fibre using photonics and radio frequency components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julie, Roufurd P. M.; Abbott, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    To synchronise the elements of a radio interferometer array, a phase stable reference frequency from a central clock is disseminated to the different elements of array. The reference frequency is modulated onto an optical carrier and transported over optical fibre over a distance of up to 12 km. For radio interferometric efficiency, the propagation delay of the transferred reference frequency is required to be stable to less than 3 picoseconds (ps) over 20 minutes. To enable this, the optical fibre transmission line is thermally shielded to minimise length changes due to thermal expansion and contraction on the optical fibre. A test setup and procedure, that measures propagation delay changes to the required accuracy and precision, is required to verify the efficiency of the thermal shielding on the installed optical fibre. This paper describes a method using photonic and radio frequency (RF) components together with an RF vector network analyser (VNA) and post-processing to measure changes in propagation delay on the optical fibre link to sub-picosecond levels. The measurement system has been tested to a stability of < 200 femtoseconds (fs) and a resolution of < 10 fs.

  19. Large optical nonlinearity of ITO nanorods for sub-picosecond all-optical modulation of the full-visible spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peijun; Schaller, Richard D; Ocola, Leonidas E; Diroll, Benjamin T; Ketterson, John B; Chang, Robert P H

    2016-09-29

    Nonlinear optical responses of materials play a vital role for the development of active nanophotonic and plasmonic devices. Optical nonlinearity induced by intense optical excitation of mobile electrons in metallic nanostructures can provide large-amplitude, dynamic tuning of their electromagnetic response, which is potentially useful for all-optical processing of information and dynamic beam control. Here we report on the sub-picosecond optical nonlinearity of indium tin oxide nanorod arrays (ITO-NRAs) following intraband, on-plasmon-resonance optical pumping, which enables modulation of the full-visible spectrum with large absolute change of transmission, favourable spectral tunability and beam-steering capability. Furthermore, we observe a transient response in the microsecond regime associated with slow lattice cooling, which arises from the large aspect-ratio and low thermal conductivity of ITO-NRAs. Our results demonstrate that all-optical control of light can be achieved by using heavily doped wide-bandgap semiconductors in their transparent regime with speed faster than that of noble metals.

  20. Large optical nonlinearity of ITO nanorods for sub-picosecond all-optical modulation of the full-visible spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peijun; Schaller, Richard D.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Ketterson, John B.; Chang, Robert P. H.

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear optical responses of materials play a vital role for the development of active nanophotonic and plasmonic devices. Optical nonlinearity induced by intense optical excitation of mobile electrons in metallic nanostructures can provide large-amplitude, dynamic tuning of their electromagnetic response, which is potentially useful for all-optical processing of information and dynamic beam control. Here we report on the sub-picosecond optical nonlinearity of indium tin oxide nanorod arrays (ITO-NRAs) following intraband, on-plasmon-resonance optical pumping, which enables modulation of the full-visible spectrum with large absolute change of transmission, favourable spectral tunability and beam-steering capability. Furthermore, we observe a transient response in the microsecond regime associated with slow lattice cooling, which arises from the large aspect-ratio and low thermal conductivity of ITO-NRAs. Our results demonstrate that all-optical control of light can be achieved by using heavily doped wide-bandgap semiconductors in their transparent regime with speed faster than that of noble metals.

  1. Dynamic characterization and amplification of sub-picosecond pulses in fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Rishøj, Lars Søgaard

    2013-01-01

    We show a first-time demonstration of amplification of 400 fs pulses in a fiber optical parametric amplifier. The 400 fs signal is stretched in time, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs. A significant broadening of the pulses is experimentally shown due to dispersion and limited gain...... bandwidth both in saturated and unsaturated gain regimes....

  2. Fiber Optical Parametric Chirped Pulse Amplification of Sub-Picosecond Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cristofori, Valentina; Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Da Ros, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs.......We demonstrate experimentally, for the first time to our knowledge, fiber optical parametric chirped pulse amplification of 400-fs pulses. The 400-fs signal is stretched, amplified by 26 dB and compressed back to 500 fs....

  3. Fiber-Optical Parametric Amplification of Sub-Picosecond Pulses for High-Speed Optical Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lali-Dastjerdi, Zohreh; Cristofori, Valentina; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews recent results of amplification of short optical pulses using fiber-optical parametric amplifiers. This includes chirped-pulse amplification of 400 fs pulses, error-free amplification of a 640-Gbit/s optical time-division multiplexed signal with less than a 1-dB power penalty...

  4. Cavity-less sub-picosecond pulse generation for the demultiplexing of a 640 Gbaud OTDM signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Deming; Guan, Pengyu; Hu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    A 703 fs cavity-less pulse source based on pulse carving and pulse compression is demonstrated and utilized for demultiplexing a 640 Gbaud OTDM signal. Timing jitter is found to be the main limiting factor.......A 703 fs cavity-less pulse source based on pulse carving and pulse compression is demonstrated and utilized for demultiplexing a 640 Gbaud OTDM signal. Timing jitter is found to be the main limiting factor....

  5. Observation of neutron spectrum from deuterated plastic irradiated by 100 picosecond and sub-picosecond ultra-intense laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, N.; Miyoshi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Habara, H.; Kodama, R.; Sentoku, S.; Fujita, H.; Kitagawa, Y.; Katou, Y.; Mima, K.; Tanaka, K. A.

    1998-11-01

    For understanding of the fundamental physics of the fast ignition, it is crucial to investigate the fast ion production in a high density plasma irradiated by an ultra-intense laser. The energy spectrum of the neutrons produced in the deuterated target reflects the energy spectrum of fast deuterons accelerated in the interacting region. Due to high penetration ability of fast neutron, the neutron spectra directly bring out the information of the hot ions from the high density plasma. We have observed 10^6 of the DD neutrons produced in a deuterated polystyrene (C8D8)x target irradiated by the 500-fs intense laser (up to 10^19 W/cm^2). The fast neutron spectra were measured by multi-channel time-of-flight neutron spectrometer (MANDALA) at the GEKKO XII laser facility of Osaka University. The spectrometer has two sets of 421 channel detector arrays which were located at 90 and 54.7 degrees with respect to the irradiation axis. The observed spectral width of DD neutrons were 1.35 MeV in full width of half maximum. This spectrum result from the fusion reaction created by accelerated ions which have energy about 300 keV. We report the details of the experimental results and the quantitative analysis using particle in cell code.

  6. Space-time structure

    CERN Document Server

    Schrödinger, Erwin

    1985-01-01

    In response to repeated requests this classic book on space-time structure by Professor Erwin Schrödinger is now available in the Cambridge Science Classics series. First published in 1950, and reprinted in 1954 and 1960, this lucid and profound exposition of Einstein's 1915 theory of gravitation still provides valuable reading for students and research workers in the field.

  7. A far-infrared broadband (8.5-37 mu m) autocorrelator with sub-picosecond time resolution based on cadmium telluride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Knippels, G.M.H.; Oepts, D.; van der Meer, A. F. G.

    2001-01-01

    A background-free autocorrelator has been developed for measuring the duration of far-infrared laser pulses in the spectral range from 8.5 to 37 mum by using an 840-mum-long wedged cadmium telluride crystal as the second-harmonic generator. Typical intensity second-harmonic autocorrelation traces

  8. Time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy in a parallel-plate waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2009-01-01

    Time-resolved THz spectroscopy is a powerful tool to investigate photoconductivity dynamics in a wide variety of materials with sub-picosecond resolution, all without applying contacts to the material. This technique uses coherently detected and broadband pulses of far-infrared light, known as TH...

  9. Invited article: a test-facility for large-area microchannel plate detector assemblies using a pulsed sub-picosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bernhard; Chollet, Matthieu; Elagin, Andrey; Oberla, Eric; Vostrikov, Alexander; Wetstein, Matthew; Obaid, Razib; Webster, Preston

    2013-06-01

    The Large Area Picosecond Photodetector Collaboration is developing large-area fast photodetectors with time resolution detector systems. The facility consists of a pulsed Ti:Sapphire laser with a pulse duration ≈100 fs, an optical system allowing the laser to be scanned in two dimensions, and a computer-controlled data-acquisition system capable of reading out 60 channels of anode signals with a sampling rate of over 10 GS/s. The laser can scan on the surface of a sealed large-area photodetector, or can be introduced into a large vacuum chamber for tests on bare 8 in.-square MCP plates or into a smaller chamber for tests on 33-mm circular substrates. We present the experimental setup, detector calibration, data acquisition, analysis tools, and typical results demonstrating the performance of the test facility.

  10. MWIR optical modulation using structured silicon membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakar, A.; Park, S. J.; Zerova, V.; Kaplan, A.; Canham, Leigh T.; Lewis, K. L.; Burgess, C. D.

    2016-10-01

    We have used near IR pump - Mid IR probe techniques to compare the feasibility and potential of using free standing nano-porous and micro-porous silicon (ordered hole arrays) as optically controlled modulators operating in the Mid-Wave Infrared (MWIR) covering the range from 3.3-5 μm. We employed 800 nm pumping pulses with the duration of 60 fs to reduce 4 μm light transmission modulation to about 25% and 45% for both silicon structures, respectively, at excitation powers of 50mW (4 mJ=cm2). However, at 5 μm both structures shown similar contrast of about 60%. The time resolved measurements revealed a fast sub-picosecond rise time for both structures suggesting that the optically generated carriers are a dominant mechanism for the modulation. However, the measurements demonstrated a significant difference in the relaxation dynamics. The nanoporous silicon demonstrated recovery as fast as a few tens of picoseconds and a possibility to effectively work in the GHz regime, while hole arrays shown almost three orders of magnitude slower response making it suitable for the MHz regime.

  11. Relationship between time structure and procrastination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodanovich, S J; Seib, H M

    1997-02-01

    The relationship between time structure and procrastination was investigated among 115 Irish undergraduate students. Significant negative zero-order correlations were found among scores for all five subscales of time structure and procrastination. A follow-up stepwise multiple regression indicated a significant multiple correlation (R = .61) between all five time structure subscale scores and procrastination. Significant predictors of procrastination were scores on the Time Structure subscales of Effective Organization followed by Sense of Purpose. These results suggest that strategies focusing on time management in conjunction with existential approaches of psychotherapy may be an effective intervention for reducing procrastination.

  12. Concurrent Data Structures Linked in Time

    OpenAIRE

    Delbianco, G. A.; Sergey, I.; Nanevski, A.; Banerjee, A.

    2017-01-01

    Arguments about correctness of a concurrent data structure are typically carried out by using the notion of linearizability and specifying the linearization points of the data structure's procedures. Such arguments are often cumbersome as the linearization points' position in time can be dynamic (depend on the interference, run-time values and events from the past, or even future), non-local (appear in procedures other than the one considered), and whose position in the execution trace may on...

  13. Real Time Structured Light and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob

    Structured light scanning is a versatile method for 3D shape acquisition. While much faster than most competing measurement techniques, most high-end structured light scans still take in the order of seconds to complete. Low-cost sensors such as Microsoft Kinect and time of flight cameras have made...

  14. Time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation time structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeard, N; Silly, M G; Krizmancic, D; Chauvet, C; Guzzo, M; Ricaud, J P; Izquierdo, M; Stebel, L; Pittana, P; Sergo, R; Cautero, G; Dufour, G; Rochet, F; Sirotti, F

    2011-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation time structure is becoming a common tool for studying dynamic properties of materials. The main limitation is often the wide time domain the user would like to access with pump-probe experiments. In order to perform photoelectron spectroscopy experiments over time scales from milliseconds to picoseconds it is mandatory to measure the time at which each measured photoelectron was created. For this reason the usual CCD camera-based two-dimensional detection of electron energy analyzers has been replaced by a new delay-line detector adapted to the time structure of the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation source. The new two-dimensional delay-line detector has a time resolution of 5 ns and was installed on a Scienta SES 2002 electron energy analyzer. The first application has been to characterize the time of flight of the photoemitted electrons as a function of their kinetic energy and the selected pass energy. By repeating the experiment as a function of the available pass energy and of the kinetic energy, a complete characterization of the analyzer behaviour in the time domain has been obtained. Even for kinetic energies as low as 10 eV at 2 eV pass energy, the time spread of the detected electrons is lower than 140 ns. These results and the time structure of the SOLEIL filling modes assure the possibility of performing pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy experiments with the time resolution given by the SOLEIL pulse width, the best performance of the beamline and of the experimental station.

  15. Network structure and travel time perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathi, Pavithra; Levinson, David; Hochmair, Hartwig

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to test the systematic variation in the perception of travel time among travelers and relate the variation to the underlying street network structure. Travel survey data from the Twin Cities metropolitan area (which includes the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul) is used for the analysis. Travelers are classified into two groups based on the ratio of perceived and estimated commute travel time. The measures of network structure are estimated using the street network along the identified commute route. T-test comparisons are conducted to identify statistically significant differences in estimated network measures between the two traveler groups. The combined effect of these estimated network measures on travel time is then analyzed using regression models. The results from the t-test and regression analyses confirm the influence of the underlying network structure on the perception of travel time.

  16. Network structure of multivariate time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasa, Lucas; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Latora, Vito

    2015-10-01

    Our understanding of a variety of phenomena in physics, biology and economics crucially depends on the analysis of multivariate time series. While a wide range tools and techniques for time series analysis already exist, the increasing availability of massive data structures calls for new approaches for multidimensional signal processing. We present here a non-parametric method to analyse multivariate time series, based on the mapping of a multidimensional time series into a multilayer network, which allows to extract information on a high dimensional dynamical system through the analysis of the structure of the associated multiplex network. The method is simple to implement, general, scalable, does not require ad hoc phase space partitioning, and is thus suitable for the analysis of large, heterogeneous and non-stationary time series. We show that simple structural descriptors of the associated multiplex networks allow to extract and quantify nontrivial properties of coupled chaotic maps, including the transition between different dynamical phases and the onset of various types of synchronization. As a concrete example we then study financial time series, showing that a multiplex network analysis can efficiently discriminate crises from periods of financial stability, where standard methods based on time-series symbolization often fail.

  17. Structural Time Domain Identification Toolbox User's Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Brincker, Rune

    This manual describes the Structural Time Domain Identification toolbox for use with MA TLAB. This version of the tool box has been developed using the PC-based MA TLAB version 4.2c, but is compatible with prior versions of MATLAB and UNIX-based versions. The routines of the toolbox are the so...

  18. TIME, CAPITAL AND THE STRUCTURE OF PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IFRIM MIHAELA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The doctrinal monopolizing of the modern economic theory by supporters of Monetarism and Keynesism deprived it by one of its essential components- the capital theory. Emphasising the role of monetary and fiscal policies has diverted the concerns for real economy and its productive structures. It was constantly overlooked that any fluctuation in the monetary economy is soon translated into fluctuations in the real economy, in its structure of production.This reality requires the inclusion, in any serious analysis of the cyclical fluctuations, of the capital theory and of the role of time in the processes of production. The paper aims to highlight how the structure of production responds to interest rate cuts by extending, simultaneous, investment and consumption. We obtain the picture of an economy that works beyond the limits imposed by its resources, which justifies the emergence of economic crises and depressions.

  19. Outlier Detection in Structural Time Series Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marczak, Martyna; Proietti, Tommaso

    investigate via Monte Carlo simulations how this approach performs for detecting additive outliers and level shifts in the analysis of nonstationary seasonal time series. The reference model is the basic structural model, featuring a local linear trend, possibly integrated of order two, stochastic seasonality......Structural change affects the estimation of economic signals, like the underlying growth rate or the seasonally adjusted series. An important issue, which has attracted a great deal of attention also in the seasonal adjustment literature, is its detection by an expert procedure. The general...... and a stationary component. Further, we apply both kinds of indicator saturation to detect additive outliers and level shifts in the industrial production series in five European countries....

  20. Time Domain Diffraction by Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Frongillo, Marcello

    2017-04-01

    Time domain (TD) diffraction problems are receiving great attention because of the widespread use of ultra wide band (UWB) communication and radar systems. It is commonly accepted that, due to the large bandwidth of the UWB signals, the analysis of the wave propagation mechanisms in the TD framework is preferable to the frequency domain (FD) data processing. Furthermore, the analysis of transient scattering phenomena is also of importance for predicting the effects of electromagnetic pulses on civil structures. Diffraction in the TD framework represents a challenging problem and numerical discretization techniques can be used to support research and industry activities. Unfortunately, these methods become rapidly intractable when considering excitation pulses with high frequency content. This contribution deals with the TD diffraction phenomenon related to composite structures containing a dielectric wedge with arbitrary apex angle when illuminated by a plane wave. The approach is the same used in [1]-[3]. The transient diffracted field originated by an arbitrary function plane wave is evaluated via a convolution integral involving the TD diffraction coefficients, which are determined in closed form starting from the knowledge of the corresponding FD counterparts. In particular, the inverse Laplace transform is applied to the FD Uniform Asymptotic Physical Optics (FD-UAPO) diffraction coefficients available for the internal region of the structure and the surrounding space. For each observation domain, the FD-UAPO expressions are obtained by considering electric and magnetic equivalent PO surface currents located on the interfaces. The surface radiation integrals using these sources is assumed as starting point and manipulated for obtaining integrals able to be solved by means of the Steepest Descent Method and the Multiplicative Method. [1] G. Gennarelli and G. Riccio, "Time domain diffraction by a right-angled penetrable wedge," IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., Vol

  1. Pulse timing and neutron star structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandkumar, R.

    1985-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis, the author explores the extent to which the pulsar glitches, postglitch behavior and timing noise may be understood in terms of the dynamical processes associated with the pinned crustal superfluid in neutron stars. He finds that the vortex creep theory proposed by Alpar, Anderson, Pines, and Shaham to explain the Vela pulsar glitches also explains satisfactorily the postglitch behavior following both the glitches in the Crab pulsar, and the glitch in the much older and slower pulsar PSR 0525 + 21. Under the assumption that both Crab and Vela pulsars have neutron stars with similar structure and pinning parameters, he deduces the internal temperature of the Crab pulsar. The temperatures inferred for these two pulsars provides a constraint on the cooling calculations of neutron stars. In the second part of the thesis, he calculates the electrical and thermal conductivities and the shear viscosity. He takes into account the effect of ionic correlations by using the results of liquid structure factors of the one component plasma obtained from numerical simulations, as well as the effects of screening of the electron-ion interaction. At densities so high that screening is unimportant, results for the thermal and electrical conductivities agree to within 10% with the earlier ones by Takovlev and Urpin.

  2. Ultrafast electron diffraction optimized for studying structural dynamics in thin films and monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Badali

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A compact electron source specifically designed for time-resolved diffraction studies of free-standing thin films and monolayers is presented here. The sensitivity to thin samples is achieved by extending the established technique of ultrafast electron diffraction to the “medium” energy regime (1–10 kV. An extremely compact design, in combination with low bunch charges, allows for high quality diffraction in a lensless geometry. The measured and simulated characteristics of the experimental system reveal sub-picosecond temporal resolution, while demonstrating the ability to produce high quality diffraction patterns from atomically thin samples.

  3. Space time manifolds and contact structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Duggal

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A new class of contact manifolds (carring a global non-vanishing timelike vector field is introduced to establish a relation between spacetime manifolds and contact structures. We show that odd dimensional strongly causal (in particular, globally hyperbolic spacetimes can carry a regular contact structure. As examples, we present a causal spacetime with a non regular contact structure and a physical model [Gödel Universe] of Homogeneous contact manifold. Finally, we construct a model of 4-dimensional spacetime of general relativity as a contact CR-submanifold.

  4. Stochastic time models of syllable structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jason A; Gafos, Adamantios I

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on phonology research within the generative linguistics tradition, stochastic methods, and notions from complex systems, we develop a modelling paradigm linking phonological structure, expressed in terms of syllables, to speech movement data acquired with 3D electromagnetic articulography and X-ray microbeam methods. The essential variable in the models is syllable structure. When mapped to discrete coordination topologies, syllabic organization imposes systematic patterns of variability on the temporal dynamics of speech articulation. We simulated these dynamics under different syllabic parses and evaluated simulations against experimental data from Arabic and English, two languages claimed to parse similar strings of segments into different syllabic structures. Model simulations replicated several key experimental results, including the fallibility of past phonetic heuristics for syllable structure, and exposed the range of conditions under which such heuristics remain valid. More importantly, the modelling approach consistently diagnosed syllable structure proving resilient to multiple sources of variability in experimental data including measurement variability, speaker variability, and contextual variability. Prospects for extensions of our modelling paradigm to acoustic data are also discussed.

  5. Stochastic Time Models of Syllable Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jason A.; Gafos, Adamantios I.

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on phonology research within the generative linguistics tradition, stochastic methods, and notions from complex systems, we develop a modelling paradigm linking phonological structure, expressed in terms of syllables, to speech movement data acquired with 3D electromagnetic articulography and X-ray microbeam methods. The essential variable in the models is syllable structure. When mapped to discrete coordination topologies, syllabic organization imposes systematic patterns of variability on the temporal dynamics of speech articulation. We simulated these dynamics under different syllabic parses and evaluated simulations against experimental data from Arabic and English, two languages claimed to parse similar strings of segments into different syllabic structures. Model simulations replicated several key experimental results, including the fallibility of past phonetic heuristics for syllable structure, and exposed the range of conditions under which such heuristics remain valid. More importantly, the modelling approach consistently diagnosed syllable structure proving resilient to multiple sources of variability in experimental data including measurement variability, speaker variability, and contextual variability. Prospects for extensions of our modelling paradigm to acoustic data are also discussed. PMID:25996153

  6. Timing Characteristics of Large Area Picosecond Photodetectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Elagin, Andrey L.; Frisch, H.; Obaid, Razib; Oberla, E; Vostrikov, Alexander; Wagner, Robert G.; Wang, Jingbo; Wetstein, Matthew J.; Northrop, R

    2015-09-21

    The LAPPD Collaboration was formed to develop ultralast large-area imaging photodetectors based on new methods for fabricating microchannel plates (MCPs). In this paper we characterize the time response using a pulsed, sub picosecond laser. We observe single photoelectron time resolutions of a 20 cm x 20 cm MCP consistently below 70 ps, spatial resolutions of roughly 500 pm, and median gains higher than 10(7). The RMS measured at one particular point on an LAPPD detector is 58 ps, with in of 47 ps. The differential time resolution between the signal reaching the two ends of the delay line anode is measured to be 5.1 ps for large signals, with an asymptotic limit falling below 2 ps as noise-over-signal approaches zero.

  7. Femtosecond Timing Distribution Using Optical Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, A; Winter, A

    2005-01-01

    Fourth-generation light sources, such as the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) require timing signals distributed over distances of several kilometers with a stability in the order of femtoseconds. A promising approach is the use of a mode-locked laser that generates sub-picosecond pulses which are distributed in timing stabilized optical fiber links. A good candidate for a laser master oscillator (LMO) is a mode-locked Erbium-doped fiber laser, featuring extremely low phase noise far from the carrier. Results on the development of the LMO locked to an external reference microwave oscillator to suppress low frequency jitter, the distribution via timing stabilized optical fiber links and the reconversion of the optical pulses to a low phase noise microwave RF signals with overall femtosecond stability are presented.

  8. Structure and interpretation of rhythm and timing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    Rhythm, as it is performed and perceived, is only sparingly addressed in music theory. Existing theories of rhythmic structure are often restricted to music as notated in a score, and as a result are bound to refrain from making statements about music as it is perceived and appreciated by listeners.

  9. Time series modelling of overflow structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, J.; Harremoës, P.

    1997-01-01

    to the overflow structures. The capacity of a pump draining the storage pipe has been estimated for two rain events, revealing that the pump was malfunctioning during the first rain event. The grey-box modelling approach is applicable for automated on-line surveillance and control. (C) 1997 IAWQ. Published...

  10. Detecting structural breaks in time series via genetic algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerr, Benjamin; Fischer, Paul; Hilbert, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Detecting structural breaks is an essential task for the statistical analysis of time series, for example, for fitting parametric models to it. In short, structural breaks are points in time at which the behaviour of the time series substantially changes. Typically, no solid background knowledge ...

  11. Real-Time, Single-Shot Temporal Measurements of Short Electron Bunches, Terahertz CSR and FEL Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Berden, G; Van der Meer, A F G

    2005-01-01

    Electro-optic detection of the Coulomb field of electron bunches is a promising technique for single-shot measurements of the bunch length and shape in the sub-picosecond time domain. This technique has been applied to the measurement of 50 MeV electron bunches in the FELIX free electron laser, showing the longitudinal profile of single bunches of around 650 fs FWHM [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 114802 (2004)]. The method is non-destructive and real-time, and therefore ideal for online monitoring of the longitudinal shape of single electron bunches. At FELIX we have used it for real-time optimization of sub-picosecond electron bunches. Electro-optic detection has also been used to measure the electric field profiles of far-infrared (or terahertz) optical pulses generated by the relativistic electrons. We have characterised the far-infrared output of the free electron laser, and more recently, we have measured the temporal profile of terahertz optical pulses generated at one of the bending magnets.

  12. Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) Toolbox for Use with MATLAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune

    1997-01-01

    The Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) toolbox for use with MATLABTM is developed at Aalborg University, Denmark, based on the system identification research performed during recent years. By now, a reliable set of functions offers a wide spectrum of services for all the important steps...... of multivariate time domain system identification of time-variant as well as time-invariant civil engineering structures from ambient testing data. A graphical user interface (GUI) is also developed to make the toolbox more user friendly....

  13. Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) Toolbox for Use with MATLAB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Andersen, P.; Brincker, Rune

    The Structural Time Domain Identification (STDI) toolbox for use with MATLABTM is developed at Aalborg University, Denmark, based on the system identification research performed during recent years. By now, a reliable set of functions offers a wide spectrum of services for all the important steps...... of multivariate time domain system identification of time-variant as well as time-invariant civil engineering structures from ambient testing data. A graphical user interface (GUI) is also developed to make the toolbox more user friendly....

  14. Watching proteins function with time-resolved x-ray crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Šrajer, Vukica; Schmidt, Marius

    2017-08-22

    Macromolecular crystallography was immensely successful in the last two decades. To a large degree this success resulted from use of powerful third generation synchrotron x-ray sources. An expansive database of more than 100 000 protein structures, of which many were determined at resolution better than 2 Å, is available today. With this achievement, the spotlight in structural biology is shifting from determination of static structures to elucidating dynamic aspects of protein function. A powerful tool for addressing these aspects is time-resolved crystallography, where a genuine biological function is triggered in the crystal with a goal of capturing molecules in action and determining protein kinetics and structures of intermediates (Schmidt et al 2005a Methods Mol. Biol. 305 115–54, Schmidt 2008 Ultrashort Laser Pulses in Biology and Medicine (Berlin: Springer) pp 201–41, Neutze and Moffat 2012 Curr. Opin. Struct. Biol. 22 651–9, Šrajer 2014 The Future of Dynamic Structural Science (Berlin: Springer) pp 237–51). In this approach, short and intense x-ray pulses are used to probe intermediates in real time and at room temperature, in an ongoing reaction that is initiated synchronously and rapidly in the crystal. Time-resolved macromolecular crystallography with 100 ps time resolution at synchrotron x-ray sources is in its mature phase today, particularly for studies of reversible, light-initiated reactions. The advent of the new free electron lasers for hard x-rays (XFELs; 5–20 keV), which provide exceptionally intense, femtosecond x-ray pulses, marks a new frontier for time-resolved crystallography. The exploration of ultra-fast events becomes possible in high-resolution structural detail, on sub-picosecond time scales (Tenboer et al 2014 Science 346 1242–6, Barends et al 2015 Science 350 445–50, Pande et al 2016 Science 352 725–9). We review here state-of-the-art time-resolved crystallographic experiments both at synchrotrons and XFELs. We

  15. Method for Real-Time Model Based Structural Anomaly Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy A. (Inventor); Urnes, James M., Sr. (Inventor); Reichenbach, Eric Y. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system and methods for real-time model based vehicle structural anomaly detection are disclosed. A real-time measurement corresponding to a location on a vehicle structure during an operation of the vehicle is received, and the real-time measurement is compared to expected operation data for the location to provide a modeling error signal. A statistical significance of the modeling error signal to provide an error significance is calculated, and a persistence of the error significance is determined. A structural anomaly is indicated, if the persistence exceeds a persistence threshold value.

  16. Beyond coherence: Recovering structured time-frequency representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Lasse; Gribonval, Rémi; Nielsen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of recovering a structured sparse representation of a signal in an overcomplete time-frequency dictionary with a particular structure. For infinite dictionaries that are the union of a nice wavelet basis and a Wilson basis, sufficient conditions are given for the basis...

  17. Beyond coherence: Recovering structured time-frequency represenatations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Lasse; Gribonval, Rémi; Nielsen, Morten

    We consider the problem of recovering a structured sparse representation of a signal in an overcomplete time-frequency dictionary with a particular structure. For infinite dictionaries that are the union of a nice wavelet basis and a Wilson basis, sufficient conditions are given for the Basis...

  18. Issues in the representation of time and structure in music

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the issues in the design of a representational system for music. Following decisions as to the primitives of such a system, their time structure and general structuring is discussed. Most of the issues are presented as controversies, using extremes to clarify the underlying

  19. Stability and the structure of continuous-time economic models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuis, H.J.; Schoonbeek, L.

    In this paper we investigate the relationship between the stability of macroeconomic, or macroeconometric, continuous-time models and the structure of the matrices appearing in these models. In particular, we concentrate on dominant-diagonal structures. We derive general stability results for models

  20. Short- and Long- Time Transport Structures in a Three Dimensional Time Dependent Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Chabreyrie, Rodolphe

    2014-01-01

    Lagrangian transport structures for three-dimensional and time-dependent fluid flows are of great interest in numerous applications, particularly for geophysical or oceanic flows. In such flows, chaotic transport and mixing can play important environmental and ecological roles, for examples in pollution spills or plankton migration. In such flows, where simulations or observations are typically available only over a short time, understanding the difference between short-time and long-time transport structures is critical. In this paper, we use a set of classical (i.e. Poincar\\'e section, Lyapunov exponent) and alternative (i.e. finite time Lyapunov exponent, Lagrangian coherent structures) tools from dynamical systems theory that analyze chaotic transport both qualitatively and quantitatively. With this set of tools we are able to reveal, identify and highlight differences between short- and long-time transport structures inside a flow composed of a primary horizontal contra-rotating vortex chain, small later...

  1. Time-varying correlation and common structures in volatility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    This thesis studies time series properties of the covariance structure of multivariate asset returns. First, the time-varying feature of correlation is investigated at the intraday level with a new correlation model incorporating the intraday correlation dynamics. Second, the thesis develops a

  2. Robust time-optimal control of uncertain structural dynamic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wie, Bong; Sinha, Ravi; Liu, Qiang

    1993-01-01

    A time-optimal open-loop control problem of flexible spacecraft in the presence of modeling uncertainty has been investigated. The results indicate that the proposed approach significantly reduces the residual structural vibrations caused by modeling uncertainty. The results also indicate the importance of proper jet placement for practical tradeoffs among the maneuvering time, fuel consumption, and performance robustness.

  3. Modeling Microwave Structures in Time Domain Using Laguerre Polynomials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Raida

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on time domain modeling of microwave structures by the method of moments. Two alternative schemes with weighted Laguerre polynomials are presented. Thanks to their properties, these schemes are free of late time oscillations. Further, the paper is aimed to effective and accurate evaluation of Green's functions integrals within these schemes. For this evaluation, a first- and second-order polynomial approximation is developed. The last part of the paper deals with modeling microstrip structures in the time domain. Conditions of impedance matching are derived, and the proposed approach is verified by modeling a microstrip filter.

  4. Memory Efficient Data Structures for Explicit Verification of Timed Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taankvist, Jakob Haahr; Srba, Jiri; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2014-01-01

    Timed analysis of real-time systems can be performed using continuous (symbolic) or discrete (explicit) techniques. The explicit state-space exploration can be considerably faster for models with moderately small constants, however, at the expense of high memory consumption. In the setting of timed......-arc Petri nets, we explore new data structures for lowering the used memory: PTries for efficient storing of configurations and time darts for semi-symbolic description of the state-space. Both methods are implemented as a part of the tool TAPAAL and the experiments document at least one order of magnitude...... of memory savings while preserving comparable verification times....

  5. Time-dependent reliability analysis and condition assessment of structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellingwood, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Structures generally play a passive role in assurance of safety in nuclear plant operation, but are important if the plant is to withstand the effect of extreme environmental or abnormal events. Relative to mechanical and electrical components, structural systems and components would be difficult and costly to replace. While the performance of steel or reinforced concrete structures in service generally has been very good, their strengths may deteriorate during an extended service life as a result of changes brought on by an aggressive environment, excessive loading, or accidental loading. Quantitative tools for condition assessment of aging structures can be developed using time-dependent structural reliability analysis methods. Such methods provide a framework for addressing the uncertainties attendant to aging in the decision process.

  6. Correction of Motion Artifacts for Real-Time Structured Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    While the problem of motion is often mentioned in conjunction with structured light imaging, few solutions have thus far been proposed. A method is demonstrated to correct for object or camera motion during structured light 3D scene acquisition. The method is based on the combination of a suitable...... pattern strategy with fast phase correlation image registration. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated on motion corrupted data of a real-time structured light system, and it is shown that it improves the quality of surface reconstructions visually and quantitively....

  7. Membrane transporter research in times of countless structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Markus A

    2018-04-01

    Structural biology has advanced our understanding of membrane proteins like no other scientific discipline in the past two decades and the number of high resolution membrane transporter structures solved by X-ray crystallography has increased exponentially over this time period. Currently, single particle cryo-EM is in full swing due to a recent resolution revolution and permits for structural insights of proteins that were refractory to crystallization. It is foreseeable that multiple structures of many human transporters will be solved in the coming five years. Nevertheless, many scientifically important questions remain unanswered despite of available structures, as is illustrated in this article at the example of multidrug efflux pumps and ABC transporters. Structure-function studies likely continue to be a supporting pillar of membrane transporter research. However, there is a trend towards the "integrated structural biologist", whose research focusses on a biological question and who closely collaborates with other research groups specialized in spectroscopy techniques or molecular dynamics simulation. Future membrane protein research requires joint efforts from specialists of various disciplines to finally work towards a molecular understanding of membrane transport in the context of the living cell. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane Proteins edited by Ute Hellmich, Rupak Doshi and Benjamin McIlwain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Coping with Unemployment: Personality, Role Demands, and Time Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoye, Greet; Lootens, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    Time structure has been found to be an important coping mechanism for dealing with the negative effects of unemployment on psychological well-being. This study extends the literature by investigating personality (openness to experience, conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism, and proactivity) and role demands (marital status, being the only…

  9. Time-domain seismic reliability of nonlinear structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A novel reliability analysis technique is presented to estimate the reli- ability of real structural systems. Its unique feature is that the dynamic loadings can be applied in time domain. It is a nonlinear stochastic finite element logarithm combined with the response surface method (RSM). It generates the response sur-.

  10. Inferring synaptic structure in presence of neural interaction time scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Capone

    Full Text Available Biological networks display a variety of activity patterns reflecting a web of interactions that is complex both in space and time. Yet inference methods have mainly focused on reconstructing, from the network's activity, the spatial structure, by assuming equilibrium conditions or, more recently, a probabilistic dynamics with a single arbitrary time-step. Here we show that, under this latter assumption, the inference procedure fails to reconstruct the synaptic matrix of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons when the chosen time scale of interaction does not closely match the synaptic delay or when no single time scale for the interaction can be identified; such failure, moreover, exposes a distinctive bias of the inference method that can lead to infer as inhibitory the excitatory synapses with interaction time scales longer than the model's time-step. We therefore introduce a new two-step method, that first infers through cross-correlation profiles the delay-structure of the network and then reconstructs the synaptic matrix, and successfully test it on networks with different topologies and in different activity regimes. Although step one is able to accurately recover the delay-structure of the network, thus getting rid of any a priori guess about the time scales of the interaction, the inference method introduces nonetheless an arbitrary time scale, the time-bin dt used to binarize the spike trains. We therefore analytically and numerically study how the choice of dt affects the inference in our network model, finding that the relationship between the inferred couplings and the real synaptic efficacies, albeit being quadratic in both cases, depends critically on dt for the excitatory synapses only, whilst being basically independent of it for the inhibitory ones.

  11. Time-Darts: A Data Structure for Verification of Closed Timed Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Srba

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Symbolic data structures for model checking timed systems have been subject to a significant research, with Difference Bound Matrices (DBMs still being the preferred data structure in several mature verification tools. In comparison, discretization offers an easy alternative, with all operations having linear-time complexity in the number of clocks, and yet valid for a large class of closed systems. Unfortunately, fine-grained discretization causes itself a state-space explosion. We introduce a new data structure called time-darts for the symbolic representation of state-spaces of timed automata. Compared with the complete discretization, a single time-dart allows to represent an arbitrary large set of states, yet the time complexity of operations on time-darts remain linear in the number of clocks. We prove the correctness of the suggested reachability algorithm and perform several experiments in order to compare the performance of time-darts and the complete discretization. The main conclusion is that in all our experiments the time-dart method outperforms the complete discretization and it scales significantly better for models with larger constants.

  12. Syllable and phrase structure effects on consonant sequence timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Dani; Choi, Susie

    2005-09-01

    Both syllable and phrasal structure are known to influence articulatory timing in consonant sequences. For example, onset clusters have been reported as less overlapped and more stable in their intergestural timing than coda clusters [e.g., Byrd, J. Phonetics (1996)]. Also, consonants spanning a phrasal boundary have been observed to be less overlapped than those spanning only a word boundary [Byrd et al., LabPhon (2003)]. However, interactions between these two types of structure are less well understood; for example, it is unclear whether the intergestural timing of word-onset clusters will be perturbed at phrase boundaries, though such perturbations have been predicted [Byrd and Saltzman (2003)]. An articulatory (EMA) investigation of /s/+stop sequences produced by three speakers in a variety of syllable and phrasal positions will present kinematic data on these structural influences. Preliminary data from one speaker indicate that word-onset consonant clusters are more sensitive to prosodic context than segmentally identical coda clusters, having less overlap at successively larger boundaries. Further, while coda and onset clusters do not show a mean difference in overlap for this speaker, onset clusters do exhibit more timing stability within each phrasal context compared to corresponding coda clusters. [Work supported by NIH.

  13. Time resolved optical Bloch oscillations in porous silicon superlattice structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghulinyan, Mher; Gaburro, Zeno; Pavesi, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, University of Trento and INFM, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Oton, Claudio J. [Department of Physics, University of Trento and INFM, 38050 Povo (Trento) (Italy); Department of Fundamental Physics, University of La Laguna, La Laguna 38204 Tenerife (Spain); Sapienza, Riccardo; Costantino, Paola; Wiersma, Diederik S. [European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy and INFM, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Florence) (Italy)

    2005-06-01

    We report on the observation of time resolved Bloch oscillations of light waves in optical superlattice structures. The structures are series of coupled microcavities, which are grown in porous silicon with high control of optical parameters. A controlled linear gradient of refractive index along the growth direction was maintained to tilt the photonic band gap of the superlattice. This is in perfect analogy to the tilted electronic miniband structure of a semiconductor in an electric field. In this way an optical Wannier-Stark ladder of equidistant optical modes was formed. Their frequency separation defines the period of the photon Bloch oscillations. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with transfer matrix calculations. The observed phenomenon is the optical counterpart of the well known electronic Bloch oscillations. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Time-frequency methods for structural health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyayt, Alexander L; Kozionov, Alexey P; Mokhov, Ilya I; Lang, Bernhard; Meijer, Robert J; Krzhizhanovskaya, Valeria V; Sloot, Peter M A

    2014-03-12

    Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and concrete dams) using sensor data. We present a robust data-driven anomaly detection method that combines time-frequency feature extraction, using wavelet analysis and phase shift, with one-sided classification techniques to identify the onset of failure anomalies in real-time sensor measurements. The methodology has been successfully tested at three operational levees. We detected a dam leakage in the retaining dam (Germany) and "strange" behaviour of sensors installed in a Boston levee (UK) and a Rhine levee (Germany).

  15. Dynamic time warping for temperature compensation in structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Alexander; Harley, Joel B.

    2017-02-01

    Guided wave structural health monitoring uses ultrasonic waves to identify changes in structures. To identify these changes, most guided wave methods require a pristine baseline measurement with which other measurements are compared. Damage signatures arise when there is a deviation between the baseline and the recorded measurement. However, temperature significantly complicates this analysis by creating misalignment between the baseline and measurements. This leads to false alarms of damage and significantly reduces the reliability of these systems. Several methods have been created to account for these temperature perturbations. Yet, most of these compensation methods fail in harsh, highly variable temperature conditions or require a prohibitive amount of prior data. In this paper, we use an algorithm known as dynamic time warping to compensate for temperature in these harsh conditions. We demonstrate that dynamic time warping is able to account for temperature variations whereas the more traditional baseline signal stretch method is unable to resolve damage under high temperature fluctuations.

  16. Time-Frequency Methods for Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Pyayt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and concrete dams using sensor data. We present a robust data-driven anomaly detection method that combines time-frequency feature extraction, using wavelet analysis and phase shift, with one-sided classification techniques to identify the onset of failure anomalies in real-time sensor measurements. The methodology has been successfully tested at three operational levees. We detected a dam leakage in the retaining dam (Germany and “strange” behaviour of sensors installed in a Boston levee (UK and a Rhine levee (Germany.

  17. Cooling of the Building Structure by Night-time Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artmann, Nikolai

    seen as a promising passive cooling concept. Many successful examples of passively cooled buildings demonstrate the possibility of providing good thermal comfort conditions without the need for energy-intensive air conditioning systems. However, due to uncertainties in the prediction of thermal comfort......, architects and engineers are still hesitant to apply passive cooling techniques. The basic concept of night-time ventilation involves cooling the building structure overnight in order to provide a heat sink during the occupancy period. As this requires a sufficiently high temperature difference between...... the ambient air and the building structure, the efficiency of night cooling is highly sensitive to climatic conditions and hence also to climate warming. In the first part of this PhD study, the potential for passive cooling of buildings by night-time ventilation was evaluated by analysing climatic data...

  18. Lagrangian structures in time-periodic vortical flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Kostrykin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lagrangian trajectories of fluid particles are experimentally studied in an oscillating four-vortex velocity field. The oscillations occur due to a loss of stability of a steady flow and result in a regular reclosure of streamlines between the vortices of the same sign. The Eulerian velocity field is visualized by tracer displacements over a short time period. The obtained data on tracer motions during a number of oscillation periods show that the Lagrangian trajectories form quasi-regular structures. The destruction of these structures is determined by two characteristic time scales: the tracers are redistributed sufficiently fast between the vortices of the same sign and much more slowly transported into the vortices of opposite sign. The observed behavior of the Lagrangian trajectories is quantitatively reproduced in a new numerical experiment with two-dimensional model of the velocity field with a small number of spatial harmonics. A qualitative interpretation of phenomena observed on the basis of the theory of adiabatic chaos in the Hamiltonian systems is given. The Lagrangian trajectories are numerically simulated under varying flow parameters. It is shown that the spatial-temporal characteristics of the Lagrangian structures depend on the properties of temporal change in the streamlines topology and on the adiabatic parameter corresponding to the flow. The condition for the occurrence of traps (the regions where the Lagrangian particles reside for a long time is obtained.

  19. Piezoelectric paint sensor for real-time structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfeng

    2005-05-01

    Sensors, which collect data for further information processing, are core component of any viable structural health monitoring system. Continuous on-line structural health monitoring can be achieved through the use of advanced sensors developed for real-time structural health monitoring applications. To overcome the problems associated with traditional piezoelectric ceramics, a polymer-based piezoelectric paint material has been developed and recently used for sensors. The piezoelectric paint is composed of tiny piezoelectric particles mixed within polymer matrix and therefore belongs to "0-3" piezoelectric composite. Because of the electro-mechanical coupling properties of piezoelectric paint, the dynamic responses of host structures can be monitored by measuring the output voltage signals from the piezoelectric paint sensor. Piezoelectric paint sensors hold a great potential for dynamic strain sensing applications due to the ease with which their mechanical properties can be adjusted, low fabrication cost, ease of implementation, and conformability to curved surface Additionally, a novel surface crack detection technique has been conceived and validated experimentally, in which cracks of the host structure is detected by observing the measured signals from an piezoelectric paint sensor with multi-electrode configuration. This paper presents this piezoelectric paint-based crack monitoring method as well as validation test data. The piezoelectric paint sensor is ideal for surface crack detection in locations with complex geometry, such as welded joints, which conventional sensors are ill equipped to do.

  20. Identification of Time Varying Civil Engineering Structures using Multivariate Recursive Time Domain Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Skjærbæk, P. S.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    with the smoothed quanties which have been obtained from SARCOF. The results show the usefulness of the technique for identification of a time varying civil engineering structure. It is found that all the techniques give reliable estiates of the frequencies of the two lowest modes and the first mode shape. Only...

  1. Family structure as a predictor of screen time among youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel McMillan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The family plays a central role in the development of health-related behaviors among youth. The objective of this study was to determine whether non-traditional parental structure and shared custody arrangements predict how much time youth spend watching television, using a computer recreationally, and playing video games. Participants were a nationally representative sample of Canadian youth (N = 26,068 in grades 6–10 who participated in the 2009/10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey. Screen time in youth from single parent and reconstituted families, with or without regular visitation with their non-residential parent, was compared to that of youth from traditional dual-parent families. Multiple imputation was used to account for missing data. After multiple imputation, the relative odds of being in the highest television, computer use, video game, and total screen time quartiles were not different in boys and girls from non-traditional families by comparison to boys and girls from traditional dual-parent families. In conclusion, parental structure and child custody arrangements did not have a meaningful impact on screen time among youth.

  2. Extremal inversion of lunar travel time data. [seismic velocity structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, N.; Jackson, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    The tau method, developed by Bessonova et al. (1974), of inversion of travel times is applied to lunar P-wave travel time data to find limits on the velocity structure of the moon. Tau is the singular solution to the Clairaut equation. Models with low-velocity zones, with low-velocity zones at differing depths, and without low-velocity zones, were found to be consistent with data and within the determined limits. Models with and without a discontinuity at about 25-km depth have been found which agree with all travel time data to within two standard deviations. In other words, the existence of the discontinuity and its size and location have not been uniquely resolved. Models with low-velocity channels are also possible.

  3. Structure and Hierarchy in Real-Time Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Michael Oliver

    that have the potential to reduce time and memory consumption drastically. The first technique makes use of structural information, in particular loops, to exploit regularities in the reachable state space. Via shortcut-like additions to the model we avoid repetition of similar states during an exhaustive...... an assumption on the progress of time. We incorporate this assumption by means of limiting the behavior of the model with respect to delay steps. For a next-free temporal logic, this modification does not change the set of valid properties. We supplement our research with experimental run-time data. This data...... is gathered via prototype implementations on top of the model checking tools UPPAAL and MOCHA....

  4. Nucleon structure functions in noncommutative space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiei, A.; Rezaei, Z.; Mirjalili, A. [Yazd University, Physics Department, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In the context of noncommutative space-time we investigate the nucleon structure functions which play an important role in identifying the internal structure of nucleons. We use the corrected vertices and employ new vertices that appear in two approaches of noncommutativity and calculate the proton structure functions in terms of the noncommutative tensor θ{sub μν}. To check our results we plot the nucleon structure function (NSF), F{sub 2}(x), and compare it with experimental data and the results from the GRV, GJR and CT10 parametrization models. We show that with the new vertex that arises the noncommutativity correction will lead to a better consistency between theoretical results and experimental data for the NSF. This consistency will be better for small values of the Bjorken variable x. To indicate and confirm the validity of our calculations we also act conversely. We obtain a lower bound for the numerical values of Λ{sub NC} scale which correspond to recent reports. (orig.)

  5. Analysis of the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect for ultrafast magnetization dynamics in ferromagnetic thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razdolski, I.; Alekhin, A.; Martens, U.; Bürstel, D.; Diesing, D.; Münzenberg, M.; Bovensiepen, U.; Melnikov, A.

    2017-05-01

    We discuss fundamental aspects of laser-induced ultrafast demagnetization probed by the time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). Studying thin Fe films on MgO substrate in the absence of electronic transport, we demonstrate how to disentangle pump-induced variations of magnetization and magneto-optical coefficients. We provide a mathematical formalism for retrieving genuine laser-induced magnetization dynamics and discuss its applicability in real experimental situations. We further stress the importance of temporal resolution achieved in the experiments and argue that measurements of both time-resolved MOKE rotation and ellipticity are needed for the correct assessment of magnetization dynamics on sub-picosecond timescales. The framework developed here sheds light onto the details of the time-resolved MOKE technique and contributes to the understanding of the interplay between ultrafast laser-induced optical and magnetic effects.

  6. Non-Linear Optical Phenomena in Detecting Materials as a Possibility for Fast Timing in Detectors of Ionizing Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Korjik, M. V.; Buganov, O.; Fedorov, A. A.; Emelianchik, I.; Griesmayer, E.; Mechinsky, V.; Nargelas, S.; Sidletskiy, O.; Tamulaitis, G.; Tikhomirov, S. N.; Vaitkevicius, A.

    2016-01-01

    The time resolution of the detectors currently in use is limited by 50-70 ps due to the spontaneous processes involved in the development of the response signal, which forms after the relaxation of carriers generated during the interaction. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of exploiting sub-picosecond phenomena occurring after the interaction of scintillator material with ionizing radiation by probing the material with ultra-short laser pulses. One of the phenomena is the elastic polarization due to the local lattice distortion caused by the displacement of electrons and holes generated by ionization. The key feature of the elastic polarization is its short response time, which makes it prospective for using as an optically detectable time mark. The nonlinear optical absorption of femtosecond light pulses of appropriate wavelength is demonstrated to be a prospective tool to form the mark. This study was aimed at searching for inorganic crystalline media combining scintillation properties and non-...

  7. Visual Timing of Structured Dance Movements Resembles Auditory Rhythm Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Huang Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal mechanisms for processing auditory musical rhythms are well established, in which a perceived beat is beneficial for timing purposes. It is yet unknown whether such beat-based timing would also underlie visual perception of temporally structured, ecological stimuli connected to music: dance. In this study, we investigated whether observers extracted a visual beat when watching dance movements to assist visual timing of these movements. Participants watched silent videos of dance sequences and reproduced the movement duration by mental recall. We found better visual timing for limb movements with regular patterns in the trajectories than without, similar to the beat advantage for auditory rhythms. When movements involved both the arms and the legs, the benefit of a visual beat relied only on the latter. The beat-based advantage persisted despite auditory interferences that were temporally incongruent with the visual beat, arguing for the visual nature of these mechanisms. Our results suggest that visual timing principles for dance parallel their auditory counterparts for music, which may be based on common sensorimotor coupling. These processes likely yield multimodal rhythm representations in the scenario of music and dance.

  8. Soft Time-Suboptimal Controlling Structure for Mechanical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulczycki, Piotr; Wisniewski, Rafal; Kowalski, Piotr

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents conception of a soft control structure based on the time-optimal approach. Its parameters are selected in accordance with the rules of the statistical decision theory and additionally it allows to eliminate rapid changes in control values. The object is a basic mechanical system......, with uncertain (also non-stationary) mass treated as a stochastic process. The methodology proposed here is of a universal nature and may easily be applied with respect to other uncertainty elements of timeoptimal controlled mechanical systems....

  9. Harnessing data structure for recovery of randomly missing structural vibration responses time history: Sparse representation versus low-rank structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongchao; Nagarajaiah, Satish

    2016-06-01

    Randomly missing data of structural vibration responses time history often occurs in structural dynamics and health monitoring. For example, structural vibration responses are often corrupted by outliers or erroneous measurements due to sensor malfunction; in wireless sensing platforms, data loss during wireless communication is a common issue. Besides, to alleviate the wireless data sampling or communication burden, certain accounts of data are often discarded during sampling or before transmission. In these and other applications, recovery of the randomly missing structural vibration responses from the available, incomplete data, is essential for system identification and structural health monitoring; it is an ill-posed inverse problem, however. This paper explicitly harnesses the data structure itself-of the structural vibration responses-to address this (inverse) problem. What is relevant is an empirical, but often practically true, observation, that is, typically there are only few modes active in the structural vibration responses; hence a sparse representation (in frequency domain) of the single-channel data vector, or, a low-rank structure (by singular value decomposition) of the multi-channel data matrix. Exploiting such prior knowledge of data structure (intra-channel sparse or inter-channel low-rank), the new theories of ℓ1-minimization sparse recovery and nuclear-norm-minimization low-rank matrix completion enable recovery of the randomly missing or corrupted structural vibration response data. The performance of these two alternatives, in terms of recovery accuracy and computational time under different data missing rates, is investigated on a few structural vibration response data sets-the seismic responses of the super high-rise Canton Tower and the structural health monitoring accelerations of a real large-scale cable-stayed bridge. Encouraging results are obtained and the applicability and limitation of the presented methods are discussed.

  10. Luminescence rise time in self-activated PbWO4 and Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 scintillation crystals

    CERN Document Server

    E. Auffray; A. Borisevich; V. Gulbinas; A. Fedorov; M. Korjik; M.T. Lucchini; V. Mechinsky; S. Nargelas; E. Songaila; G. Tamulaitis; A. Vaitkevičius; S. Zazubovich

    2016-01-01

    The time resolution of scintillation detectors of ionizing radiation is one of the key parameters sought for in the current and future high-energy physics experiments. This study is encouraged by the necessity to find novel detection methods enabling a sub-10-ps time resolution in scintillation detectors and is focused on the exploitation of fast luminescence rise front. Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques have been used to study two promising scintillators: self-activated lead tungstate (PWO, PbWO4) and Ce-doped gadolinium aluminum gallium garnet (GAGG, Gd3Al2Ga3O12). A sub-picosecond PL rise time is observed in PWO, while longer processes in the PL response in GAGG:Ce are detected and studied. The mechanisms responsible for the PL rise time in self-activated and doped scintillators are under discussion.

  11. LHCb: Time structure analysis of the LHCb Online network

    CERN Multimedia

    Antichi, G; Campora Perez, D H; Liu, G; Neufeld, N; Giordano, S; Owezarski, P; Moore, A

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb Online Network is a real time high performance network, in which 350 data sources send data over a Gigabit Ethernet LAN to more than 1500 receiving nodes. The aggregated throughput of the application, called Event Building, is more than 60 GB/s. The protocol employed by LHCb makes the sending nodes transmit simultaneously portions of events to one receiving node at a time, which is selected using a credit-token scheme. The resulting traffic is very bursty and sensitive to irregularities in the temporal distribution of packet-bursts to the same destination or region of the network. In order to study the relevant properties of such a dataflow, a non-disruptive monitoring setup based on a networking capable FPGA (NetFPGA) has been deployed. The NetFPGA allows order of hundred nano-second precise time-stamping of packets. We study in detail the timing structure of the Event Building communication, and we identify potential effects of micro-bursts like buffer packet drops or jitter.

  12. Exploiting time-multiplexing structured light with picoprojectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, Mario Valerio; Farinella, Giovanni M.; Battiato, Sebastiano; Guarnera, Mirko

    2015-03-01

    When a picture is shot all the information about the distance between the object and the camera gets lost. Depth estimation from a single image is a notable issue in computer vision. In this work we present a hardware and software framework to accomplish the task of 3D measurement through structured light. This technique allows to estimate the depth of the objects, by projecting specific light patterns on the measuring scene. The potentialities of the structured light are well-known in both scientific and industrial contexts. Our framework uses a picoprojector module provided by STMicroelectronics, driven by the designed software projecting time- multiplexing Gray code light patterns. The Gray code is an alternative method to represent binary numbers, ensuring that the hamming distance between two consecutive numbers is always one. Because of this property, this binary coding gives better results for depth estimation task. Many patterns are projected at different time instants, obtaining a dense coding for each pixel. This information is then used to compute the depth for each point in the image. In order to achieve better results, we integrate the depth estimation with the inverted Gray code patterns as well, to compensate projector-camera synchronization problems as well as noise in the scene. Even though our framework is designed for laser picoprojectors, it can be used with conventional image projectors and we present the results for this case too.

  13. Structured report compliance: effect on audio dictation time, report length, and total radiologist study time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Tarek N; Shekhani, Haris; Maddu, Kiran; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Zhengjia; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine structured template use among emergency radiologists, and if this influences audio dictation time, radiology report length, or total radiologist study time. Retrospective data collection of consecutive occurrences of seven common imaging examinations interpreted by a dedicated emergency radiology division over a 2-month period yielded 3449 reports. Templates had been in place for >3 years. For each examination, we documented the individual audio dictation time (ADT), total words, and total time the radiologist spent on a study from report creation until final signing. In 81.2 % (n = 2772) of all cases, a basic template was used. In 2.8 % (n = 78) of these template-use cases, the radiologist removed key elements from the structured template. Of the 3417 reports with complete data, mean ADT was 37.3 s, mean word length was 132.3 (of which, on average, 64 were dictated), and total radiologist time per study (TRT) was 349.7 s. Study type was significantly associated with ADT, total words, and TRT (p < 0.001). Template usage decreased ADT (p < 0.001) by 47 %, but did not affect total word length or TRT. Parameters varied by individual attending (p < 0.001): 20 % (2/10) of attendings had differences in report length when using versus not using templates (p < 0.001). With long-term template usage, compliance with structured templates is high, and few radiologists significantly alter the templates. Template use decreases ADT and for a small fraction of radiologists impacts total word length and has a mixed impact on TRT.

  14. MODELLING GASOLINE DEMAND IN GHANA: A STRUCTURAL TIME SERIES ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishmael Ackah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concerns about the role of energy consumption in global warming have led to policy designs that seek to reduce fossil fuel consumption or find a less polluting alternative especiallyfor the transport sector. This study seeks to estimate the elasticities of price, income, education and technology on transport gasoline demand sector inGhana. The Structural Time Series Model reports a short-run price and income elasticities of -0.0088 and 0.713. Total factor productivity is -0.408 whilstthe elasticity for education is 2.33. In the long run, the reported price and income elasticities are -0.065 and 5.129 respectively. The long run elasticityfor productivity is -2.935. The study recommends that in order to enhanceefficiency in gasoline consumption in the transport sector, there should beinvestment in productivity.

  15. Spatial structure increases the waiting time for cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martens, Erik Andreas; Kostadinov, Rumen; Maley, Carlo C

    2011-01-01

    epithelial tissues. In this study, we propose a novel model of cancer progression that considers a spatially structured cell population where clones expand via adaptive waves. This model is used to asses two different paradigms of asexual evolution that have been suggested to delineate the process of cancer...... progression. The standard scenario of periodic selection assumes that driver mutations are accumulated strictly sequentially over time. However, when the mutation supply is sufficiently high, clones may arise simultaneously on distinct genetic backgrounds, and clonal adaptation waves interfere with each other......Cancer results from a sequence of genetic and epigenetic changes which lead to a variety of abnormal phenotypes including increased proliferation and survival of somatic cells, and thus, to a selective advantage of pre-cancerous cells. The notion of cancer progression as an evolutionary process has...

  16. Multivariate time series with linear state space structure

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive study of multivariate time series with linear state space structure. The emphasis is put on both the clarity of the theoretical concepts and on efficient algorithms for implementing the theory. In particular, it investigates the relationship between VARMA and state space models, including canonical forms. It also highlights the relationship between Wiener-Kolmogorov and Kalman filtering both with an infinite and a finite sample. The strength of the book also lies in the numerous algorithms included for state space models that take advantage of the recursive nature of the models. Many of these algorithms can be made robust, fast, reliable and efficient. The book is accompanied by a MATLAB package called SSMMATLAB and a webpage presenting implemented algorithms with many examples and case studies. Though it lays a solid theoretical foundation, the book also focuses on practical application, and includes exercises in each chapter. It is intended for researchers and students wor...

  17. Enceladus Plume Structure and Time Variability: Comparison of Cassini Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teolis, Ben D; Perry, Mark E; Hansen, Candice J; Waite, J Hunter; Porco, Carolyn C; Spencer, John R; Howett, Carly J A

    2017-09-01

    During three low-altitude (99, 66, 66 km) flybys through the Enceladus plume in 2010 and 2011, Cassini's ion neutral mass spectrometer (INMS) made its first high spatial resolution measurements of the plume's gas density and distribution, detecting in situ the individual gas jets within the broad plume. Since those flybys, more detailed Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) imaging observations of the plume's icy component have been reported, which constrain the locations and orientations of the numerous gas/grain jets. In the present study, we used these ISS imaging results, together with ultraviolet imaging spectrograph stellar and solar occultation measurements and modeling of the three-dimensional structure of the vapor cloud, to constrain the magnitudes, velocities, and time variability of the plume gas sources from the INMS data. Our results confirm a mixture of both low and high Mach gas emission from Enceladus' surface tiger stripes, with gas accelerated as fast as Mach 10 before escaping the surface. The vapor source fluxes and jet intensities/densities vary dramatically and stochastically, up to a factor 10, both spatially along the tiger stripes and over time between flyby observations. This complex spatial variability and dynamics may result from time-variable tidal stress fields interacting with subsurface fissure geometry and tortuosity beyond detectability, including changing gas pathways to the surface, and fluid flow and boiling in response evolving lithostatic stress conditions. The total plume gas source has 30% uncertainty depending on the contributions assumed for adiabatic and nonadiabatic gas expansion/acceleration to the high Mach emission. The overall vapor plume source rate exhibits stochastic time variability up to a factor ∼5 between observations, reflecting that found in the individual gas sources/jets. Key Words: Cassini at Saturn-Geysers-Enceladus-Gas dynamics-Icy satellites. Astrobiology 17, 926-940.

  18. Pre-Big Bang, space-time structure, asymptotic Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres Luis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Planck and other recent data in Cosmology and Particle Physics can open the way to controversial analyses concerning the early Universe and its possible ultimate origin. Alternatives to standard cosmology include pre-Big Bang approaches, new space-time geometries and new ultimate constituents of matter. Basic issues related to a possible new cosmology along these lines clearly deserve further exploration. The Planck collaboration reports an age of the Universe t close to 13.8 Gyr and a present ratio H between relative speeds and distances at cosmic scale around 67.3 km/s/Mpc. The product of these two measured quantities is then slightly below 1 (about 0.95, while it can be exactly 1 in the absence of matter and cosmological constant in patterns based on the spinorial space-time we have considered in previous papers. In this description of space-time we first suggested in 1996-97, the cosmic time t is given by the modulus of a SU(2 spinor and the Lundmark-Lemaître-Hubble (LLH expansion law turns out to be of purely geometric origin previous to any introduction of standard matter and relativity. Such a fundamental geometry, inspired by the role of half-integer spin in Particle Physics, may reflect an equilibrium between the dynamics of the ultimate constituents of matter and the deep structure of space and time. Taking into account the observed cosmic acceleration, the present situation suggests that the value of 1 can be a natural asymptotic limit for the product H t in the long-term evolution of our Universe up to possible small corrections. In the presence of a spinorial space-time geometry, no ad hoc combination of dark matter and dark energy would in any case be needed to get an acceptable value of H and an evolution of the Universe compatible with observation. The use of a spinorial space-time naturally leads to unconventional properties for the space curvature term in Friedmann-like equations. It therefore suggests a major modification of

  19. Linking Bedrock Groundwater, Landscape Structure and Mean Transit Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, C.; McDonnell, J.; Morgenstern, U.; Stewart, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    Contributions from hydrologically active bedrock have been shown to influence rainfall-runoff relationships, biogeochemical fluxes and mean transit times in headwater catchments. Yet, we still lack a complete understanding of the role of bedrock groundwater in the catchment storage-release relationship—arguably a key descriptor of catchment function. Here we explore the role of bedrock groundwater in runoff generation in a small temperate forested catchment. We focus on three questions: What is the link between landscape structure and bedrock groundwater dynamics? What is the role of the larger bedrock groundwater aquifer in stream flow and hydrochemistry? and, How does bedrock groundwater control mean transit time and the storage-discharge relationship? Streamflow and precipitation were measured for a 1 year period, along with soil and bedrock groundwater dynamics from an array of 60 wells strategically located in hillslope, hollow and riparian zones across the 4.5 ha Maimai M8 experimental watershed in New Zealand. We used water table and stable isotope data, combined with extensive aquifer testing to characterize groundwater contributions to catchment runoff. Tritium-based groundwater ages were determined for 23 wells and regressed against groundwater and streamwater silica concentrations. Vertical head gradients showed groundwater flux remained downward throughout all wetness conditions in all hillslope and most hollow and riparian locations, indicating minimal surface water-groundwater interaction. Thin soils and low-permeability unfractured hillslope bedrock acted to shunt vertically infiltrating soil-water laterally downslope at the soil-bedrock interface. This resulted in minimal bedrock groundwater recharge, high runoff ratios and a runoff regime characterized by both extremely high and extremely low flows due to minimal soil-water storage capacity. Catchment mean transit times were generally young (0.3 - 2.5 yrs), despite much older (12-23 yrs) bedrock

  20. Time-resolved demagnetization of Co{sub 2}MnSi observed using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and an ultrafast streak camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opachich, Y P; Young, A T; Scholl, A; Feng, J; Engelhorn, K; Padmore, H A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8099 (United States); Comin, A; Reiss, G [Italian Institute of Technology, Nanophys, 16163 Genova GE (Italy); Bartelt, A F [Department of Materials for Photovoltaics, Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Schmalhorst, J [Department of Physics, Bielefeld University, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Shin, H J [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Risbud, S H, E-mail: YPOpachich@gmail.co [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2010-04-21

    The demagnetization dynamics of the Heusler alloy Co{sub 2}MnSi was studied using picosecond time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. The sample was excited using femtosecond laser pulses. In contrast to the sub-picosecond demagnetization of the metal ferromagnet Ni, substantially slower demagnetization with a time constant of 3.5 +- 0.5 ps was measured. This could be explained by a spin-dependent band gap inhibiting the spin-flip scattering of hot electrons in Co{sub 2}MnSi, which is predicted to be half-metallic. A universal demagnetization time constant was measured across a range of pump power levels.

  1. An Empirical Study on Market Timing Theory of Capital Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignatius Rony Setyawan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The theory of capital structure has advanced remarkably. This development began as many firms had options to consider various external factors determining the composition of debt and equity. Not only the asymmetric information or the conflict among bondholders and shareholders initiated the Pecking Order Theory and the Static Trade-off Theory respectively but also the overvalued or undervalued of stock price had to be taken as a determinant factor for identifying the ideal debt-equity mix. The author maintains these factors as they were pioneers to this theory on Market Timing Theory (MTT introduced by Baker and Wurgler (2002. The essence of this theory is described when stock prices are overvalued, firms will finance projects through debts, otherwise the firms will be undervalued and be relied on equity financing. Using the methodology introduced by Baker and Wurgler (2002, the author selected only samples of IPOs of firms during 2008-2009 to limit the scope of this study. The main objective of this study is to test the hypothèses of Market Timing Theory formulated by Dahlan (2004 and by Kusumawati and Danny (2006 which have been proven by the GLS model, and the OLS model-like as in Baker and Wurgler (2002, Susilawati (2008 and Saad (2010. This study concludes that the market-to-book ratio has a negative effect on the market leverage. The implication is that when firms achieve certain level of earnings growth, the stock price will be overvalued, so it would be the right timing for firms to proceed equity financing. Under the robustness test with GLS Random Effect, the hypothèses of MTT is supported.

  2. Real-time structured light patterns coding with subperfect submaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Xavier; Graebling, Pierre; Doignon, Christophe

    2010-05-01

    Coded structured light is a technique that allows the 3-D reconstruction of poorly or non-textured scene areas. The codes, uniquely associated with visual primitives of the projected pattern, allow to solve the correspondence problem using local information only with robustness against pertubations like high curvatures, occlusions, out of field of view, out-of-focus. Real-time 3-D reconstruction is possible with pseudo-random arrays, where the encoding is done in a single pattern using spatial neighbourhood. Ensuring a higher Hamming distance between all the used codewords, will allow to correct more mislabeled primitives and thus ensure patterns globally more robust.1 Up to now, the proposed coding schemes ensured the Hamming distance between all the primitives of the pattern which was generated offline, beforehand, producing Perfect SubMaps (PSM). But knowing the epipolar geometry of the projector-camera system, one can ensure the Hamming distance only between primitives that will project along nearby epipolar lines, because these only can produce correspondence ambiguity during the decoding process. As for such a new coding scheme, the Hamming distance have to be checked only in subsets of the pattern primitives, the patterns are globally far less constrained and therefore can be generated at a video framerate. We call such a new pattern coding as SubPerfect SubMaps (SPSM).

  3. Short-time variability in scalar structure parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, M.; Moene, A.F.; Beyrich, F.

    2012-01-01

    The structure parameter of refractive index of air (Cn2) is the basic parameter derived from the scintillometer data. It can be linked via the structure parameter of temperature (CT2), humidity (Cq2) and the cross structure parameter of temperature and humidity (CTq) to a path averaged surface

  4. Time-History Analysis of Frictionally Damped Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Ştefancu, Andrei-Ionuţ; Budescu, Mihai; Păluleţ-Crăiniceanu, Fideliu

    2011-01-01

    During major seismic actions, a significant amount of energy is induced to structures. The means by which this energy is dissipated, determines the level of structural degradation. Special emphasis is placed on avoiding loss of human lives due to the earthquake action. In order to achieve this, the structures are designed ductile so that energy is dissipated by the system’s elements by bending, twisting or degradation. This dissipative mechanism involves significant degradation of the structu...

  5. Time-frequency Methods for Structural Health Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pyayt, A.L.; Kozionov, A.P.; Mokhov, I.I.; Lang, B.; Meijer, R.J.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and

  6. Time-frequency methods for structural health monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pyayt, A.L.; Kozionov, A.P.; Mokhov, I.I.; Lang, B.; Meijer, R.J.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of early warning signals for the imminent failure of large and complex engineered structures is a daunting challenge with many open research questions. In this paper we report on novel ways to perform Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) of flood protection systems (levees, earthen dikes and

  7. Timed Transfer : An Evaluation of Its Structure, Performance and Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    Timed transfer is a transit operating strategy in which vehicles from different routes are routed and scheduled to meet simultaneously at common stops to facilitate no-wait or minimum-wait passenger transfers. Timed transfers are being used primarily...

  8. Real time digital control and controlled structures experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Michael J.; Knowles, Gareth J.; Rauch, Frank

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs covering the following topics are given: controlled structures technology at Grumman Corporate Research Center, active and passive control technology, experiment plans, and vacuum chamber test experiment objectives and setup.

  9. Space-time-matter analytic and geometric structures

    CERN Document Server

    Brüning, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    At the boundary of mathematics and mathematical physics, this monograph explores recent advances in the mathematical foundations of string theory and cosmology. The geometry of matter and the evolution of geometric structures as well as special solutions, singularities and stability properties of the underlying partial differential equations are discussed.

  10. Effects of reduction time on the structural, electrical and thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    catalyst support in direct methanol fuel cell. Therefore, in this paper, the RGO nanosheets were prepared via highly efficient chemical reduction reaction of exfoliated GO nanosheets using sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4) as the reduc- ing agent. Extensive characterizations have been conducted in terms of structural, thermal ...

  11. Impact of Structured Movement Time on Preschoolers' Physical Activity Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Kara K.; Matsuyama, Abigail L.; Robinson, Leah E.

    2017-01-01

    Preschool-aged children are not meeting national physical activity recommendations. This study compares preschoolers' physical activity engagement during two different physical activity opportunities: outdoor free play or a structured movement session. Eighty-seven children served as participants: 40 children participated in outdoor free play and…

  12. Dependency Structures in Differentially Coded Cardiovascular Time Series

    OpenAIRE

    Tatjana Tasic; Sladjana Jovanovic; Omer Mohamoud; Tamara Skoric; Nina Japundzic-Zigon; Dragana Bajic

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. This paper analyses temporal dependency in the time series recorded from aging rats, the healthy ones and those with early developed hypertension. The aim is to explore effects of age and hypertension on mutual sample relationship along the time axis. Methods. A copula method is applied to raw and to differentially coded signals. The latter ones were additionally binary encoded for a joint conditional entropy application. The signals were recorded from freely moving male Wistar ra...

  13. Dependency Structures in Differentially Coded Cardiovascular Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Tasic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This paper analyses temporal dependency in the time series recorded from aging rats, the healthy ones and those with early developed hypertension. The aim is to explore effects of age and hypertension on mutual sample relationship along the time axis. Methods. A copula method is applied to raw and to differentially coded signals. The latter ones were additionally binary encoded for a joint conditional entropy application. The signals were recorded from freely moving male Wistar rats and from spontaneous hypertensive rats, aged 3 months and 12 months. Results. The highest level of comonotonic behavior of pulse interval with respect to systolic blood pressure is observed at time lags τ=0, 3, and 4, while a strong counter-monotonic behavior occurs at time lags τ=1 and 2. Conclusion. Dynamic range of aging rats is considerably reduced in hypertensive groups. Conditional entropy of systolic blood pressure signal, compared to unconditional, shows an increased level of discrepancy, except for a time lag 1, where the equality is preserved in spite of the memory of differential coder. The antiparallel streams play an important role at single beat time lag.

  14. Dependency Structures in Differentially Coded Cardiovascular Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasic, Tatjana; Jovanovic, Sladjana; Mohamoud, Omer; Skoric, Tamara; Japundzic-Zigon, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. This paper analyses temporal dependency in the time series recorded from aging rats, the healthy ones and those with early developed hypertension. The aim is to explore effects of age and hypertension on mutual sample relationship along the time axis. Methods. A copula method is applied to raw and to differentially coded signals. The latter ones were additionally binary encoded for a joint conditional entropy application. The signals were recorded from freely moving male Wistar rats and from spontaneous hypertensive rats, aged 3 months and 12 months. Results. The highest level of comonotonic behavior of pulse interval with respect to systolic blood pressure is observed at time lags τ = 0, 3, and 4, while a strong counter-monotonic behavior occurs at time lags τ = 1 and 2. Conclusion. Dynamic range of aging rats is considerably reduced in hypertensive groups. Conditional entropy of systolic blood pressure signal, compared to unconditional, shows an increased level of discrepancy, except for a time lag 1, where the equality is preserved in spite of the memory of differential coder. The antiparallel streams play an important role at single beat time lag. PMID:28127384

  15. Community Structure in Time-Dependent, Multiscale, and Multiplex Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Mucha, Peter J; Richardson, Thomas; Macon, Kevin; Porter, Mason A.; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2009-01-01

    Network science is an interdisciplinary endeavor, with methods and applications drawn from across the natural, social, and information sciences. A prominent problem in network science is the algorithmic detection of tightly-connected groups of nodes known as communities. We developed a generalized framework of network quality functions that allowed us to study the community structure of arbitrary multislice networks, which are combinations of individual networks coupled through links that con...

  16. Time domain Rankine-Green panel method for offshore structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhifu; Ren, Huilong; Liu, Riming; Li, Hui

    2017-02-01

    To solve the numerical divergence problem of the direct time domain Green function method for the motion simulation of floating bodies with large flare, a time domain hybrid Rankine-Green boundary element method is proposed. In this numerical method, the fluid domain is decomposed by an imaginary control surface, at which the continuous condition should be satisfied. Then the Rankine Green function is adopted in the inner domain. The transient free surface Green function is applied in the outer domain, which is used to find the relationship between the velocity potential and its normal derivative for the inner domain. Besides, the velocity potential at the mean free surface between body surface and control surface is directly solved by the integration scheme. The wave exciting force is computed through the convolution integration with wave elevation, by introducing the impulse response function. Additionally, the nonlinear Froude-Krylov force and hydrostatic force, which is computed under the instantaneous incident wave free surface, are taken into account by the direct pressure integration scheme. The corresponding numerical computer code is developed and first used to compute the hydrodynamic coefficients of the hemisphere, as well as the time history of a ship with large flare; good agreement is obtained with the analytical solutions as well as the available numerical results. Then the hydrodynamic properties of a FPSO are studied. The hydrodynamic coefficients agree well with the results computed by the frequency method; the influence of the time interval and the truncated time is investigated in detail.

  17. Terahertz Time Domain Spectroscopy for Structure-II Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeya, Kei; Zhang, Caihong; Kawayama, Iwao

    2009-01-01

    For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has a charact......For the nondestructive inspection of gas hydrates, terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) was applied to tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate and propane hydrate. The absorption of propane hydrate monotonically increases with frequency, similar to the case of ice, while THF hydrate has...

  18. Short-term Time Structure of Food-related Emotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Gerry

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary emotion theories have come to conceptualize emotions as multicomponent and dynamic phenomena. Central to this dynamical perspective is that emotions are viewed as a series of dynamic and recursive events that unfold over time, rather than single discrete responses. This chapter

  19. Noncommutative geometry, symmetries and quantum structure of space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindarajan, T R [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India); Gupta, Kumar S [Theory Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Harikumar, E [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Meljanac, S, E-mail: trg@imsc.res.in, E-mail: kumars.gupta@saha.ac.in, E-mail: harisp@uohyd.ernet.in, E-mail: meljanac@irb.hr [Rudjer Botkovic Institute, Bijenicka c.54, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-07-08

    We discuss how space-time noncommutativity affects the symmetry groups and particle statistics. Assuming that statistics is superselected under a symmetry transformation, we argue that the corresponding flip operator must be twisted. It is argued that the twisted statistics naturally leads to a deformed oscillator algebra for scalar fields in such a background.

  20. Highly comparative time-series analysis: the empirical structure of time series and their methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Ben D.; Little, Max A.; Jones, Nick S.

    2013-01-01

    The process of collecting and organizing sets of observations represents a common theme throughout the history of science. However, despite the ubiquity of scientists measuring, recording and analysing the dynamics of different processes, an extensive organization of scientific time-series data and analysis methods has never been performed. Addressing this, annotated collections of over 35 000 real-world and model-generated time series, and over 9000 time-series analysis algorithms are analysed in this work. We introduce reduced representations of both time series, in terms of their properties measured by diverse scientific methods, and of time-series analysis methods, in terms of their behaviour on empirical time series, and use them to organize these interdisciplinary resources. This new approach to comparing across diverse scientific data and methods allows us to organize time-series datasets automatically according to their properties, retrieve alternatives to particular analysis methods developed in other scientific disciplines and automate the selection of useful methods for time-series classification and regression tasks. The broad scientific utility of these tools is demonstrated on datasets of electroencephalograms, self-affine time series, heartbeat intervals, speech signals and others, in each case contributing novel analysis techniques to the existing literature. Highly comparative techniques that compare across an interdisciplinary literature can thus be used to guide more focused research in time-series analysis for applications across the scientific disciplines. PMID:23554344

  1. Temporal Relations and Structures in Real-Time Operating Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    0l A.2 Non-Convex Interval Relations ......................... 44 13 2 Distribution/ _ Ivallability Codes Avail and/or Dist Speolal L 1 Introduction...7: Laxity Interaction of Overlapping Time Constraints If the context swiching can be regarded as negligible, then one can allocate a resource portion...City, State, and ZIP Code ) 7b. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code ) Dept. of Computor Science 800 North Quincy St. University of Maryland Arlington

  2. Time Structure of a Mass Extinction: The Cretaceous- Tertiary Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, H. J.; Rasmussen, K. L.; Gwozdz, R.; Walaszczyk, K. I.

    1992-07-01

    The uppermost Cretaceous chalk series is well exposed in Central Poland and its magnetostratigraphy has been established (Hansen et al. 1990). In the field 2.5-cm-diameter plugs were drilled spaced at 5-cm intervals (i.e., 20 plugs per meter corresponding to almost 50% coverage). All plugs were measured for their magnetic susceptibility and plotted against stratigraphic depth. The resultant curve from the Cretaceous part of magnetochron 29R corresponds to a time interval around 400 ky (Berggren et al. 1985). Magnetochron 29R has ben assigned a duration of 570-800 ky and contains the K/T boundary, where 2/3 of the time interval is earlier than the K/T boundary. In Fig. 1A two different periodicities are present. The larger peaks correspond to roughly 100 ky while the smaller corresponds to ca. 20 ky. No other frequencies are found. We suggest that the pulses correspond to the ellipse-precession complex in the Milankovitch band (compare Fisher and Bottjer 1991). Eight samples were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation. Four samples were from a pulse maximum and four from the neighboring trough. The results show a trace element doubling in the peak relative to the trough. By contrast the CaCO3 showed a decrease of 7% in the peak along with an increase in Sr of 4.2%. The drop in CaCO3 is much too low to account for the differences in trace elements. We suggest that the change is caused by variations in the early supply of terrigenuous material, mainly clay, related to variations in precipitation. We made a parallel study of the uppermost Maastrichtian red paleosoils with dinosaur nests from the region of Aix-en- Provence, South France. It disclosed the same pattern in susceptibility signal as that found in Poland (Fig. 1B). Here the magnetostratigraphy is also known (Hansen et al. 1989). We are thus dealing with a pattern common to both shallow water marine chalk and paleosoils. The interference pattern between the 100- and 20-ky cycles are in agreement in the

  3. Physical relativity: space-time structure from a dynamical perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Harvey R

    2005-01-01

    ... relativity, there was nonetheless a vein of doubt running through his writings- culminating in his 1949 Autobiographical Notes- concerning the way he formulated the theory in 1905. It is clear, to me at least, that Einstein was fully conscious right from the beginning that there were two routes to relativistic kinematics, and that as time went on the appropriateness of the route he had chosen, which he felt he had to choose in 1905, was increasingly open to question. In his acclaimed 1982 scientific biogr...

  4. High impact ionization rate in silicon by sub-picosecond THz electric field pulses (Conference Presentation)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Hirori, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Summary form only given. Metallic antenna arrays fabricated on high resistivity silicon are used to localize and enhance the incident THz field resulting in high electric field pulses with peak electric field strength reaching several MV/cm on the silicon surface near the antenna tips. In such hi...... carrier dynamics in other semiconductors....

  5. Time of creep fracture of axisymmetrically loaded structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banshchikova, I. A.; Lubashevskaya, I. V.

    2017-10-01

    A stress-strain state and a time duration up to fracture are calculated with allowance for two-stage behavior of a rotating disk under creep conditions. The duration of the stages is investigated depending on the choice of the version of the creep kinetic theory and the geometric dimensions of the disk. The first stage is the accumulation of damage and the beginning of fracture in some area of the body, where the accumulated damage reaches a critical value. The second stage is the spread of the fracture front and the complete destruction of the body. A calculation method has been developed which reduces the solution of the unsteady-state creep problem to the solution of an analogous steady-state problem.

  6. THE URBAN STRUCTURE OF ROME BETWEEN HISTORY AND MODERN TIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Cianci

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of computer technologies in projects involving the acquisition, documentation and communication of cultural heritage has led to a fast and ever more high demands of standards and methodologies in order to create best practices models. In the past years, in Europe it has been recorded a considerable interest in the digitization of Cultural Heritage and the creation of databases shared on the network (EUROPEANA, CARARE, 3D Icons, in the implementation of policies for the identification of shared global standards (EPOCH, MINERVA and in the application of Web Gis (MAPPA, Mapping Gothic France. The research we project suits with this debate by proposing an innovative methodology for the investigation of the urban heritage. It should be able to document and represent the transformations that the city had during the time and the aim is to experiment a new methodology of knowledge and representation of the city.

  7. Rate and time dependent failure of structural adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, H. F.; Renieri, M. P.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Studies on two adhesives (Metlbond 1113 and 1113-2) identified as having important applications in the bonding of composite materials are presented. A testing program to ascertain stress-strain, strain-rate, time, yield, and/or failure behavior of these materials in bulk form using uniaxial tensile constant strain-rate, creep, and relaxation tests is described. The stress-strain behavior of each material is shown to be significantly rate dependent. A rate dependent stress whitening (crazing) phenomenon occurs prior to either yield or fracture. A region of linear elasticity, a region of viscoelasticity, and the onset of yielding are identified in the stress-strain behavior. The linear elastic limit and the yield point are shown to be rate dependent and agree well with an empirical equation proposed by Ludwik. A creep to failure phenomenon is shown to exist and is correlated with a delayed yield equation proposed by Crochet. Analytical predictions based on a modified Bingham model are shown to agree well with experimental stress-strain strain-rate data. Analytical predictions based on a modified Ramberg-Osgood equation are also shown for comparison purposes.

  8. Analysis of time-dependent reliability of degenerated reinforced concrete structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hongping

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Durability deterioration of structure is a highly random process. The maintenance of degenerated structure involves the calculation of the reliability of time-dependent structure. This study introduced reinforced concrete structure resistance decrease model and related statistical parameters of uncertainty, analyzed resistance decrease rules of corroded bending element of reinforced concrete structure, and finally calculated timedependent reliability of the corroded bending element of reinforced concrete structure, aiming to provide a specific theoretical basis for the application of time-dependent reliability theory.

  9. Finite-time rotation number: A fast indicator for chaotic dynamical structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szezech, J.D., E-mail: jds98@fisica.ufpr.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84033-240, Ponta Grossa, Paraná (Brazil); Schelin, A.B., E-mail: schelin@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, 80230-901, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Caldas, I.L., E-mail: ibere@if.usp.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 5315-970, São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Lopes, S.R., E-mail: lopes@fisica.ufpr.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Morrison, P.J., E-mail: morrison@physics.utexas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Viana, R.L., E-mail: rlv640@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil)

    2013-02-04

    Lagrangian coherent structures are effective barriers, sticky regions, that separate chaotic phase space regions of different dynamical behavior. The usual way to detect such structures is by calculating finite-time Lyapunov exponents. We show that similar results can be obtained for time-periodic systems by calculating finite-time rotation numbers, which are faster to compute. We illustrate our claim by considering examples of continuous- and discrete-time dynamical systems of physical interest.

  10. Cluster Analysis of Time-Dependent Crystallographic Data: Direct Identification of Time-Independent Structural Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, Konstantin S.; Moffat, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The initial output of a time-resolved macromolecular crystallography experiment is a time-dependent series of difference electron density maps that displays the time-dependent changes in underlying structure as a reaction progresses. The goal is to interpret such data in terms of a small number of crystallographically refinable, time-independent structures, each associated with a reaction intermediate; to establish the pathways and rate coefficients by which these intermediates interconvert; and thereby to elucidate a chemical kinetic mechanism. One strategy toward achieving this goal is to use cluster analysis, a statistical method that groups objects based on their similarity. If the difference electron density at a particular voxel in the time-dependent difference electron density (TDED) maps is sensitive to the presence of one and only one intermediate, then its temporal evolution will exactly parallel the concentration profile of that intermediate with time. The rationale is therefore to cluster voxels with respect to the shapes of their TDEDs, so that each group or cluster of voxels corresponds to one structural intermediate. Clusters of voxels whose TDEDs reflect the presence of two or more specific intermediates can also be identified. From such groupings one can then infer the number of intermediates, obtain their time-independent difference density characteristics, and refine the structure of each intermediate. We review the principles of cluster analysis and clustering algorithms in a crystallographic context, and describe the application of the method to simulated and experimental time-resolved crystallographic data for the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein. PMID:21244840

  11. Time transfer capability of standard small form factor pluggable laser modules based on photon counting approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanek, Pavel; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef

    2017-05-01

    We are reporting on timing parameters of commonly used standard Small Form Factor Pluggable (SFP) laser modules using single photon counting method. Photon counting is a promising approach for laser time transfer via optical fiber communication hardware. The sub-picosecond precision and stability may be achieved. We have performed several experiments with the aim to measure main parameters of the modules, such as time delay precision, time stability and temperature stability, all being critical for optical time transfer applications. Two standard 16 and 10 Gbit/s at 850 nm SFP modules were examined. The ultimate precision of possible time transfer of 800 fs for averaging times of hours was achieved. The modules together with their driving circuits exhibited very good temperature stability. The temperature drift as low as 300+/-200 fs/K was measured. The achieved timing parameters will enable to use the standard SFP modules for a new method of two way time transfer where the time differences between two distant time scales are measured in parallel to data transfer on existing optical data links without any communication interference.

  12. [Introduction to] : "Sustainability of constructions : integrated approach to life-time structural engineering"

    OpenAIRE

    Bragança, L.; Koukkari, Heli; Blok, Rijk; Gervásio, H.; Veljkovic, Milan, ed. lit.; Plewako, Zbigniew; Landolfo, Raffaele; Ungureanu, Viorel

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the COST Action C25 ‘Sustainability of Constructions: Integrated Approach lo Life-time Structural Engineering” is to promote science-based developments in sustainable construction in Europe through the collection and collaborative analysis of scientific results concerning life-time structural engineering and especially integration of environmental assessment methods and tolls of structural engineering. Sustainability of Construction, European Science Foundation : Cost...

  13. Ultrafast time-resolved transient structures of solids and liquids by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Ivan V; Rentzepis, Peter M

    2004-01-23

    Detection of ultrafast transient structures and the evolution of ultrafast structural intermediates during the course of reactions has been a long standing goal of chemists and biologists. This article will be restricted to nanosecond, picosecond and shorter time-resolved extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies, its aim being to present the progress and problems encounter in measurements and understanding the structure of transients. The recent advances in source technology has stimulated a wide variety of novel experiments using both synchrotrons and smaller laboratory size systems. With more efficient X-ray lenses and detectors many of the previously difficult experiments to perform, because of the exposure time required and weak signals, will now be easily performed. The experimental system for the detection of ultrafast, time-resolved EXAFS spectra of molecules in liquids is described and the method for the analysis of EXAFS spectra to yield transient structures is given. We believe that utilizing our table-top ultrafast X-ray source and the polycapillary optics in conjunction with dispersive spectrometer and charge coupled devices (CCD) we will be able to determine the structure of many reaction intermediates and excited states of chemical and biological molecules in solid and liquid state.

  14. Energy-Aware Scheduling of FIR Filter Structures using a Timed Automata Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wognsen, Erik Ramsgaard; Hansen, Rene Rydhof; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    2016-01-01

    structures where we initially derive data flow graphs and precedence graphs using the Synchronous Data Flow (SDF) notation. Based on actual measurements on the Altera Cyclone IV FPGA, we derive power and timing estimates for addition and multiplication, including idling power consumption. We next model...... the FIR structures in UPPAAL CORA and employ model checking to find energyoptimal solutions in linearly priced timed automata. In conclusion we state that there are significant energy-versus-time differences between the four structures when we experiment with varying numbers of adders and multipliers...

  15. JiTTree: A Just-in-Time Compiled Sparse GPU Volume Data Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Labschutz, Matthias

    2015-08-12

    Sparse volume data structures enable the efficient representation of large but sparse volumes in GPU memory for computation and visualization. However, the choice of a specific data structure for a given data set depends on several factors, such as the memory budget, the sparsity of the data, and data access patterns. In general, there is no single optimal sparse data structure, but a set of several candidates with individual strengths and drawbacks. One solution to this problem are hybrid data structures which locally adapt themselves to the sparsity. However, they typically suffer from increased traversal overhead which limits their utility in many applications. This paper presents JiTTree, a novel sparse hybrid volume data structure that uses just-in-time compilation to overcome these problems. By combining multiple sparse data structures and reducing traversal overhead we leverage their individual advantages. We demonstrate that hybrid data structures adapt well to a large range of data sets. They are especially superior to other sparse data structures for data sets that locally vary in sparsity. Possible optimization criteria are memory, performance and a combination thereof. Through just-in-time (JIT) compilation, JiTTree reduces the traversal overhead of the resulting optimal data structure. As a result, our hybrid volume data structure enables efficient computations on the GPU, while being superior in terms of memory usage when compared to non-hybrid data structures.

  16. Time Reversal Acoustic Structural Health Monitoring Using Array of Embedded Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time Reversal Acoustic (TRA) structural health monitoring with an embedded sensor array represents a new approach to in-situ nondestructive evaluation of air-space...

  17. Real-Time Structural Overload Control via Control Allocation Optimization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This control methodology utilizes real-time vehicle structural load and shape measurements to actively respond to and protect against vehicle damage due to...

  18. Nonlinear Aerodynamics-Structure Time Simulation for HALE Aircraft Design/Analysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time simulation of a nonlinear aerodynamics model (NA) developed at Virginia Tech coupled with a nonlinear structure model (NS) is proposed as a design/analysis...

  19. Multiscale Poincar? plots for visualizing the structure of heartbeat time series

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, Teresa S.; Mariani, Sara; Burykin, Anton; Rodrigues, Filipa; Silva, Tiago F.; Goldberger, Ary L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Poincar? delay maps are widely used in the analysis of cardiac interbeat interval (RR) dynamics. To facilitate visualization of the structure of these time series, we introduce multiscale Poincar? (MSP) plots. Methods Starting with the original RR time series, the method employs a coarse-graining procedure to create a family of time series, each of which represents the system?s dynamics in a different time scale. Next, the Poincar? plots are constructed for the original and the coa...

  20. Making News by Structuring Time: A Temporal Analysis on Infographic Production in News Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Pai-Lin Cheng

    2016-01-01

    How can organization be able to accomplish its mission of gathering information just in time? As a temporal organization, news media employ temporal structuring strategies to integrate institutional and individual efforts to have the work done before the deadline. This researcher conducted a field research on infographic designers of daily newspapers to observe: (1) how temporal structures of regulate the infographic designers; (2) how designers interact the temporal structures and develo...

  1. Compact attractors for time-periodic age-structured population models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Magal

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the existence of compact attractors for time-periodic age-structured models. So doing we investigate the eventual compactness of a class of abstract non-autonomous semiflow (non necessarily periodic. We apply this result to non-autonomous age-structured models. In the time periodic case, we obtain the existence of a periodic family of compact subsets that is invariant by the semiflow, and attract the solutions of the system.

  2. Identification of a Maximum Softening Damage Indicator of RC-Structures Using Time-Frequency Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Micaletti, R. C.

    This paper considers estimation of the Maximum Damage Indicator (MSDI) by using time-frequency system identification techniques for an RC-structure subjected to earthquake excitation. The MSDI relates the global damage state of the RC-structure to the relative decrease of the fundamental...

  3. Time scale defined by the fractal structure of the price fluctuations in foreign exchange markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yoshiaki

    2010-04-01

    In this contribution, a new time scale named C-fluctuation time is defined by price fluctuations observed at a given resolution. The intraday fractal structures and the relations of the three time scales: real time (physical time), tick time and C-fluctuation time, in foreign exchange markets are analyzed. The data set used is trading prices of foreign exchange rates; US dollar (USD)/Japanese yen (JPY), USD/Euro (EUR), and EUR/JPY. The accuracy of the data is one minute and data within a minute are recorded in order of transaction. The series of instantaneous velocity of C-fluctuation time flowing are exponentially distributed for small C when they are measured by real time and for tiny C when they are measured by tick time. When the market is volatile, for larger C, the series of instantaneous velocity are exponentially distributed.

  4. [Real time virtual sonography: a new approach in the evaluation of fetal cerebral structures?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur-Daudruy, M; Diguet, A; Dacher, J-N; Verspyck, E

    2014-05-01

    If ultrasonography is the first intention exam in the evaluation of fetal cerebral structures, MR is the second intention exam the indications of which are well defined. Both techniques are complementary but still independent and the retrospective synthesis of these exams allows optimal analysis of fetal cerebral anomalies. Real time virtual sonography can synchronize a sonographic image and MRI multiplanar image of the same section in real time. This technique can be performed in the evaluation of fetal cerebral structures and synchronous recognition of anatomic structures and has many advantages especially on the pedagogic plan. However, this technique is currently limited to the research area. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  5. Scattering analysis of periodic structures using finite-difference time-domain

    CERN Document Server

    ElMahgoub, Khaled; Elsherbeni, Atef Z

    2012-01-01

    Periodic structures are of great importance in electromagnetics due to their wide range of applications such as frequency selective surfaces (FSS), electromagnetic band gap (EBG) structures, periodic absorbers, meta-materials, and many others. The aim of this book is to develop efficient computational algorithms to analyze the scattering properties of various electromagnetic periodic structures using the finite-difference time-domain periodic boundary condition (FDTD/PBC) method. A new FDTD/PBC-based algorithm is introduced to analyze general skewed grid periodic structures while another algor

  6. Time-of-Flight Adjustment Procedure for Acoustic Measurements in Structural Timber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danbiel F. Llana; Guillermo Iñiguez-Gonzalez; Francisco Arriaga; Xiping Wang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of timber length on time-of-flight acoustic longitudinal measurements was investigated on the structural timber of four Spanish species: radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), laricio pine (Pinus nigra Arn.), and maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.). Time-of-flight longitudinal measurements were conducted on 120 specimens of...

  7. Impact of Stock Market Structure on Intertrade Time and Price Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Yuen, Ainslie; Perakakis, Pandelis

    2014-01-01

    We analyse times between consecutive transactions for a diverse group of stocks registered on the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, and we relate the dynamical properties of the intertrade times with those of the corresponding price fluctuations. We report that market structure strongly impacts the scale-invariant temporal organisation in the transaction timing of stocks, which we have observed to have long-range power-law correlations. Specifically, we find that, compared to NYSE stocks, stocks registered on the NASDAQ exhibit significantly stronger correlations in their transaction timing on scales within a trading day. Further, we find that companies that transfer from the NASDAQ to the NYSE show a reduction in the correlation strength of transaction timing on scales within a trading day, indicating influences of market structure. We also report a persistent decrease in correlation strength of intertrade times with increasing average intertrade time and with corresponding decrease in companies' market capitalization–a trend which is less pronounced for NASDAQ stocks. Surprisingly, we observe that stronger power-law correlations in intertrade times are coupled with stronger power-law correlations in absolute price returns and higher price volatility, suggesting a strong link between the dynamical properties of intertrade times and the corresponding price fluctuations over a broad range of time scales. Comparing the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, we demonstrate that the stronger correlations we find in intertrade times for NASDAQ stocks are associated with stronger correlations in absolute price returns and with higher volatility, suggesting that market structure may affect price behavior through information contained in transaction timing. These findings do not support the hypothesis of universal scaling behavior in stock dynamics that is independent of company characteristics and stock market structure. Further, our results have implications for utilising transaction timing

  8. Impact of stock market structure on intertrade time and price dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plamen Ch Ivanov

    Full Text Available We analyse times between consecutive transactions for a diverse group of stocks registered on the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, and we relate the dynamical properties of the intertrade times with those of the corresponding price fluctuations. We report that market structure strongly impacts the scale-invariant temporal organisation in the transaction timing of stocks, which we have observed to have long-range power-law correlations. Specifically, we find that, compared to NYSE stocks, stocks registered on the NASDAQ exhibit significantly stronger correlations in their transaction timing on scales within a trading day. Further, we find that companies that transfer from the NASDAQ to the NYSE show a reduction in the correlation strength of transaction timing on scales within a trading day, indicating influences of market structure. We also report a persistent decrease in correlation strength of intertrade times with increasing average intertrade time and with corresponding decrease in companies' market capitalization-a trend which is less pronounced for NASDAQ stocks. Surprisingly, we observe that stronger power-law correlations in intertrade times are coupled with stronger power-law correlations in absolute price returns and higher price volatility, suggesting a strong link between the dynamical properties of intertrade times and the corresponding price fluctuations over a broad range of time scales. Comparing the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, we demonstrate that the stronger correlations we find in intertrade times for NASDAQ stocks are associated with stronger correlations in absolute price returns and with higher volatility, suggesting that market structure may affect price behavior through information contained in transaction timing. These findings do not support the hypothesis of universal scaling behavior in stock dynamics that is independent of company characteristics and stock market structure. Further, our results have implications for utilising

  9. Impact of stock market structure on intertrade time and price dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Yuen, Ainslie; Perakakis, Pandelis

    2014-01-01

    We analyse times between consecutive transactions for a diverse group of stocks registered on the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, and we relate the dynamical properties of the intertrade times with those of the corresponding price fluctuations. We report that market structure strongly impacts the scale-invariant temporal organisation in the transaction timing of stocks, which we have observed to have long-range power-law correlations. Specifically, we find that, compared to NYSE stocks, stocks registered on the NASDAQ exhibit significantly stronger correlations in their transaction timing on scales within a trading day. Further, we find that companies that transfer from the NASDAQ to the NYSE show a reduction in the correlation strength of transaction timing on scales within a trading day, indicating influences of market structure. We also report a persistent decrease in correlation strength of intertrade times with increasing average intertrade time and with corresponding decrease in companies' market capitalization-a trend which is less pronounced for NASDAQ stocks. Surprisingly, we observe that stronger power-law correlations in intertrade times are coupled with stronger power-law correlations in absolute price returns and higher price volatility, suggesting a strong link between the dynamical properties of intertrade times and the corresponding price fluctuations over a broad range of time scales. Comparing the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, we demonstrate that the stronger correlations we find in intertrade times for NASDAQ stocks are associated with stronger correlations in absolute price returns and with higher volatility, suggesting that market structure may affect price behavior through information contained in transaction timing. These findings do not support the hypothesis of universal scaling behavior in stock dynamics that is independent of company characteristics and stock market structure. Further, our results have implications for utilising transaction timing

  10. Less-structured time in children's daily lives predicts self-directed executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Jane E; Semenov, Andrei D; Michaelson, Laura; Provan, Lindsay S; Snyder, Hannah R; Munakata, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) in childhood predict important life outcomes. Thus, there is great interest in attempts to improve EFs early in life. Many interventions are led by trained adults, including structured training activities in the lab, and less-structured activities implemented in schools. Such programs have yielded gains in children's externally-driven executive functioning, where they are instructed on what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. However, it is less clear how children's experiences relate to their development of self-directed executive functioning, where they must determine on their own what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. We hypothesized that time spent in less-structured activities would give children opportunities to practice self-directed executive functioning, and lead to benefits. To investigate this possibility, we collected information from parents about their 6-7 year-old children's daily, annual, and typical schedules. We categorized children's activities as "structured" or "less-structured" based on categorization schemes from prior studies on child leisure time use. We assessed children's self-directed executive functioning using a well-established verbal fluency task, in which children generate members of a category and can decide on their own when to switch from one subcategory to another. The more time that children spent in less-structured activities, the better their self-directed executive functioning. The opposite was true of structured activities, which predicted poorer self-directed executive functioning. These relationships were robust (holding across increasingly strict classifications of structured and less-structured time) and specific (time use did not predict externally-driven executive functioning). We discuss implications, caveats, and ways in which potential interpretations can be distinguished in future work, to advance an understanding of this fundamental aspect of growing up.

  11. Less-structured time in children’s daily lives predicts self-directed executive functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Elizabeth Barker

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Executive functions in childhood predict important life outcomes. Thus, there is great interest in attempts to improve executive functions early in life. Many interventions are led by trained adults, including structured training activities in the lab, and less-structured activities implemented in schools. Such programs have yielded gains in children’s externally-driven executive functioning, where they are instructed on what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. However, it is less clear how children’s experiences relate to their development of self-directed executive functioning, where they must determine on their own what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. We hypothesized that time spent in less-structured activities would give children opportunities to practice self-directed executive functioning, and lead to benefits. To investigate this possibility, we collected information from parents about their 6-7 year-old children’s daily, annual, and typical schedules. We categorized children’s activities as structured or less-structured based on categorization schemes from prior studies on child leisure time use. We assessed children’s self-directed executive functioning using a well-established verbal fluency task, in which children generate members of a category and can decide on their own when to switch from one subcategory to another. The more time that children spent in less-structured activities, the better their self-directed executive functioning. The opposite was true of structured activities, which predicted poorer self-directed executive functioning. These relationships were robust (holding across increasingly strict classifications of structured and less-structured time and specific (time use did not predict externally-driven executive functioning. We discuss implications, caveats, and ways in which potential interpretations can be distinguished in future work, to advance an understanding of this fundamental

  12. Time-frequency and space-wavenumber analysis for damage inspection of thin-walled structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, P. Frank; Sundaresan, Mannur J.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a dynamics-based methodology for accurate damage inspection of thin-walled structures by combining a boundary-effect evaluation method (BEEM) for space-wavenumber analysis of measured operational deflection shapes (ODSs) and a conjugate-pair decomposition (CPD) method for time-frequency analysis of time traces of measured points. BEEM is for locating and estimating small structural damage by processing ODSs measured by a full-field measurement system (e.g., a scanning laser vibrometer or a camera-based motion measurement system). BEEM is a nondestructive spatial-domain method based on area-by-area processing of ODSs and it works without using any structural model or historical data for comparison. Similar to the short-time Fourier transform and wavelet transform, CPD uses adaptive windowed regular harmonics and function orthogonality to perform time-frequency analysis of time traces by extracting time-localized regular and/or distorted harmonics. Both BEEM and CPD are local spectral analysis based on local, adaptive curve fitting. The first estimation of the wavenumber for BEEM and the frequency for CPD is obtained by using a four-point Teager-Kaiser algorithm based on the use of finite difference. Numerical simulations and experimental results show that the combination of BEEM and CPD for space-wavenumber and time-frequency analysis provides an accurate tool for damage inspection of thin-walled structures.

  13. Dynamical Performances of a Vibration Absorber for Continuous Structure considering Time-Delay Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuting Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear effect incurred by time delay in vibration control is investigated in this study via a vibration absorber coupled with a continuous beam structure. The stability of the vibration absorber coupled structure system with time-delay coupling is firstly studied, which provides a general guideline for the potential time delay to be introduced to the system. Then it is shown that there is a specific region for the time delay which can bring bifurcation modes to the dynamic response of the coupling system, and the vibration energy at low frequencies can be transferred or absorbed due to the bifurcation mode and the vibration in the corresponding frequency range is thus suppressed. The nonlinear mechanism of this vibration suppression incurred by the coupling time delay is discussed in detail, which provides a novel and alternative approach to the analysis, design, and control of vibration absorbers in engineering practice.

  14. DOES MARKET TIMING DRIVE CAPITAL STRUCTURE? EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE FROM AN EMERGING MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Çelik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to test how equity market timing affects capital structure from the perspective of IPO (Initial Public Offering event in ISE for the period between 1999-2008. Our dataset comprises of all firms (75 firms that went public from the period of January 1999 to December 2008 in Turkey that are available in ISE database. We analyse the market timing theory by applying cross sectional regression method. For this purpose, first, we test the impact of market timing on the amount of equity issued by IPO firms. Second we examine the impact of market timing on capital structure. We conclude that market timing theory is not valid for Turkey.

  15. SLStudio: Open-source framework for real-time structured light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    An open-source framework for real-time structured light is presented. It is called “SLStudio”, and enables real-time capture of metric depth images. The framework is modular, and extensible to support new algorithms for scene encoding/decoding, triangulation, and aquisition hardware. It is the aim...... that this software makes real-time 3D scene capture more widely accessible and serves as a foundation for new structured light scanners operating in real-time, e.g. 20 depth images per second and more. The use cases for such scanners are plentyfull, however due to the computational constraints, all public...... implementations so far are limited to offline processing. With “SLStudio”, we are making a platform available which enables researchers from many different fields to build application specific real time 3D scanners. The software is hosted at http://compute.dtu.dk/~jakw/slstudio....

  16. Variation in LOV Photoreceptor Activation Dynamics Probed by Time Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Iuliano, James N.

    2017-12-14

    The light, oxygen, voltage (LOV) domain proteins are blue light photoreceptors that utilize a non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN) cofactor as the chromophore. The modular nature of these proteins has led to their wide adoption in the emerging fields of optogenetics and optobiology, where the LOV domain has been fused to a variety of output domains leading to novel light-controlled applications. In the present work, we extend our studies of the sub-picosecond to several hundred microsecond transient infrared spectroscopy of the isolated LOV domain AsLOV2 to three full-length photoreceptors in which the LOV domain is fused to an output domain: the LOV-STAS protein, YtvA, the LOV-HTH transcription factor, EL222, and the LOV-histidine kinase, LovK. Despite differences in tertiary structure, the overall pathway leading to cysteine adduct formation from the FMN triplet state is highly conserved, although there are slight variations in rate. However significant differences are observed in the vibrational spectra and kinetics after adduct formation, which are directly linked to the specific output function of the LOV domain. While the rate of adduct formation varies by only 3.6-fold amongst the proteins, the subsequent large-scale structural changes in the full-length LOV photoreceptors occur over the micro- to sub-millisecond timescales and vary by orders of magnitude depending on the different output function of each LOV domain.

  17. Toward Unified Correction of Regional Phases for Amplitude and Travel Time Effects of Heterogeneous Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-04

    and J. R. Murphy (1971), Seismic characteristics of underground nuclear detonaions, Part I, Seismic spectrum scaling, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am., 61(6...ABSTRACT We analyze variability of the Pn seismic phase associated with regionally varying seismic velocity structure, seeking to establish self...synthetics for structures in Eurasia based on RSTT (Regional Seismic Travel Time) models and empirically based models that match the observed Pn spreading

  18. Toward Unified Corrections of Regional Phases for Amplitude and Travel Time Effects of Heterogeneous Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-04

    and J. R. Murphy (1971), Seismic characteristics of underground nuclear detonaions, Part I, Seismic spectrum scaling, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am., 61(6...ABSTRACT We analyze variability of the Pn seismic phase associated with regionally varying seismic velocity structure, seeking to establish self...synthetics for structures in Eurasia based on RSTT (Regional Seismic Travel Time) models and empirically based models that match the observed Pn spreading

  19. Generation time, net reproductive rate, and growth in stage-age-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Major insights into the relationship between life-history features and fitness have come from Lotka's proof that population growth rate is determined by the level (expected amount) of reproduction and the average timing of reproduction of an individual. But this classical result is limited...... to age-structured populations. Here we generalize this result to populations structured by stage and age by providing a new, unique measure of reproductive timing (Tc) that, along with net reproductive rate (R0), has a direct mathematical relationship to and approximates growth rate (r). We use simple...... features of the life history determine population growth rate r and reveal a complex interplay of trait dynamics, timing, and level of reproduction. Our results contribute to a new framework of population and evolutionary dynamics in stage-and-age-structured populations....

  20. A quantitative measure of the structure of gamma-ray burst time profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestrade, John P.; Fishman, G.; Horack, J.; Meegan, C.; Moore, P.; Paciesas, W.; Wilson, R.

    1992-01-01

    A cursory examination of cosmic gamma-ray burst time profiles indicates an inhomogeneous distribution of structure. In the first approximation, there seem to be two types of profiles; smooth ones with little structure and highly variable ones with lots of structure. To put this observation to the test, we have examined the statistical nature of the profile derivative to choose which parameter might best be called the burst 'spikiness'. We have found that a good estimator is given by a count of the number of 'spikes' (defined by a specific numerical recipe) and not by the rms deviations from either a pre-burst background or any type of moving average background. The application of this parameter to 30 burst time histories shows it to be consistent over a wide range of profile types. The analysis also reveals a preferred average time between spikes of approximately 1.5 seconds.

  1. Real-time vibration-based structural damage detection using one-dimensional convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Kiranyaz, Serkan; Gabbouj, Moncef; Inman, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) and vibration-based structural damage detection have been a continuous interest for civil, mechanical and aerospace engineers over the decades. Early and meticulous damage detection has always been one of the principal objectives of SHM applications. The performance of a classical damage detection system predominantly depends on the choice of the features and the classifier. While the fixed and hand-crafted features may either be a sub-optimal choice for a particular structure or fail to achieve the same level of performance on another structure, they usually require a large computation power which may hinder their usage for real-time structural damage detection. This paper presents a novel, fast and accurate structural damage detection system using 1D Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) that has an inherent adaptive design to fuse both feature extraction and classification blocks into a single and compact learning body. The proposed method performs vibration-based damage detection and localization of the damage in real-time. The advantage of this approach is its ability to extract optimal damage-sensitive features automatically from the raw acceleration signals. Large-scale experiments conducted on a grandstand simulator revealed an outstanding performance and verified the computational efficiency of the proposed real-time damage detection method.

  2. Lagrangian coherent structures and the smallest finite-time Lyapunov exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, George; Sapsis, Themistoklis

    2011-06-01

    We point out that local minimizing curves, or troughs, of the smallest finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) field computed over a time interval [t0, t] and graphed over trajectory positions at time t mark attracting Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) at t. For two-dimensional area-preserving flows, we conclude that computing the largest forward-time FTLE field by itself is sufficient for locating both repelling LCSs at t0 and attracting LCSs at t. We illustrate our results on analytic examples, as well as on a two-dimensional experimental velocity field measured near a swimming jellyfish.

  3. Cosmological special relativity the large scale structure of space, time and velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmeli, Moshe

    1997-01-01

    This book deals with special relativity theory and its application to cosmology. It presents Einstein's theory of space and time in detail, and describes the large scale structure of space, time and velocity as a new cosmological special relativity. A cosmological Lorentz-like transformation, which relates events at different cosmic times, is derived and applied. A new law of addition of cosmic times is obtained, and the inflation of the space at the early universe is derived, both from the cosmological transformation. The book will be of interest to cosmologists, astrophysicists, theoretical

  4. Cosmological special relativity the large scale structure of space, time and velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Carmeli, Moshe

    2002-01-01

    This book presents Einstein's theory of space and time in detail, and describes the large-scale structure of space, time and velocity as a new cosmological special relativity. A cosmological Lorentz-like transformation, which relates events at different cosmic times, is derived and applied. A new law of addition of cosmic times is obtained, and the inflation of the space at the early universe is derived, both from the cosmological transformation. The relationship between cosmic velocity, acceleration and distances is given. In the appendices gravitation is added in the form of a cosmological g

  5. Mapping Carrier Dynamics on Material Surfaces in Space and Time using Scanning Ultrafast Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jingya

    2016-02-25

    Selectively capturing the ultrafast dynamics of charge carriers on materials surfaces and at interfaces is crucial to the design of solar cells and optoelectronic devices. Despite extensive research efforts over the past few decades, information and understanding about surface-dynamical processes, including carrier trapping and recombination remains extremely limited. A key challenge is to selectively map such dynamic processes, a capability that is hitherto impractical by time-resolved laser techniques, which are limited by the laser’s relatively large penetration depth and consequently they record mainly bulk information. Such surface dynamics can only be mapped in real space and time by applying four-dimensional (4D) scanning ultrafast electron microscopy (S-UEM), which records snapshots of materials surfaces with nanometer spatial and sub-picosecond temporal resolutions. In this method, the secondary electron (SE) signal emitted from the sample’s surface is extremely sensitive to the surface dynamics and is detected in real time. In several unique applications, we spatially and temporally visualize the SE energy gain and loss, the charge carrier dynamics on the surface of InGaN nanowires and CdSe single crystals and its powder film. We also provide the mechanisms for the observed dynamics, which will be the foundation for future potential applications of S-UEM to a wide range of studies on material surfaces and device interfaces.

  6. Speeding up the solution process for the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows using structural information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    Two ideas for using structural information for solving the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows (VRPTW) is presented. The VRPTW is a generalization of the well known capacity constrained Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP). Both techniques are based on solving the VRPTW using a Branch-and-Price ap......Two ideas for using structural information for solving the Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows (VRPTW) is presented. The VRPTW is a generalization of the well known capacity constrained Vehicle Routing Problem (VRP). Both techniques are based on solving the VRPTW using a Branch...

  7. Optical and x-ray time resolved study of the structural transition in mixed valence manganites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Q. X.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved optical reflectivity and x-ray diffraction techniques are employed to study the laser-induced structural response in two charge and orbitally ordered manganites. Optical data indicate a non-thermal nature of the laser-triggered phase transition via the disappearance of an optical phonon related to the charge and orbitally ordered phase. The x-ray diffraction measurements on superlattice reflections confirm the non-thermal time scale of the initial step of this phase transition but also show that the complete change of structural symmetry is not instantaneous.

  8. ARMA modelled time-series classification for structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Carden, E.; Brownjohn, James M. W.

    2008-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is the subject of a great deal of ongoing research leading to the capability that reliable remote monitoring of civil infrastructure would allow a shift from schedule-based to condition-based maintenance strategies. The first stage in such a system would be the indication of an extraordinary change in the structure's behaviour. A statistical classification algorithm is presented here which is based on analysis of a structure's response in the time domain. The time-series responses are fitted with Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) models and the ARMA coefficients are fed to the classifier. The classifier is capable of learning in an unsupervised manner and of forming new classes when the structural response exhibits change. The approach is demonstrated with experimental data from the IASC-ASCE benchmark four-storey frame structure, the Z24 bridge and the Malaysia-Singapore Second Link bridge. The classifier is found to be capable of identifying structural change in all cases and of forming distinct classes corresponding to different structural states in most cases.

  9. Influence of container structures and content solutions on dispensing time of ophthalmic solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Keiji; Yamada, Hiroshi

    2010-05-25

    To investigate the influence of container structures and content solutions on the time of dispensing from eye dropper bottles. Eye dropper bottle models, solution models (filtrate water/surfactant solution) and a dispensing time measuring apparatus were prepared to measure the dispensing time. With filtrate water and pressure thrust load of 0.3 MPa, the dispensing time significantly increased from 1.1 +/- 0.5 seconds to 4.6 +/- 1.1 seconds depending on the decrease of inner aperture diameters from 0.4 mm to 0.2 mm (P bottle models with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger, the dispensing time became constant. The dispensing time using surfactant solution showed the same tendency as above. When pressure thrust load was large (0.07 MPa), the solution flew out continuously with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger and the dispensing time could not be measured. The inner aperture diameter most strongly explained the variation of the dispensing time in both the content solutions in the multiple linear regression analysis (filtrate water: 46%, R(2) = 0.462, surfactant solution: 56%, R(2) = 0.563). Among content solutions and container structures, the dispensing time was mostly influenced by the diameter of the inner aperture of bottles.

  10. Chemical dynamics in time and energy space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, James Douglas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-04-01

    The development of a versatile picosecond ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet temporal spectrometer and its potential use for measuring internal energy redistribution in isolated molecules are described in detail. A detailed description of the double-pass Nd:YAG amplifier and the dye amplifiers is given with the pulse energies achieved in the visible, ultraviolet, and vacuum ultraviolet. The amplified visible pulses are shown to be of sub-picosecond duration and near transform limited. The instrument`s temporal response (≤10 ps) is derived from an instrument limited measurement of the dissociation lifetime of methyl iodide at 266 nm. The methyl iodide experiment is used to discuss the various sources of noise and background signals that are intrinsic to this type of experiment. Non-time-resolved experiments measuring the branching ratio and kinetic energy distributions of products from the 193 nm photodissociation of cyclopentadiene and thiophene are presented. These studies were done using the molecular beam Photofragment Translational Spectroscopy (PTS) technique. The results from the cyclopentadiene experiment confirm that H atom elimination to yield the cyclopentadienyl radical is the dominant dissociation channel. A barrier of ≥5 kcal/mol can be understood in terms of the delocalization of the radical electron of the cyclopentadienyl fragment. A concerted elimination yielding cyclopropene and acetylene was also observed and is proposed to occur via a bicyclo-[2.1.0]pent-2-ene intermediate. Two other channels, yielding acetylene plus the CH2CHCH triplet carbene, and CH2 plus 1-buten-3-yne, are postulated to occur via ring opening. The implications of the experimental results for bulk thermal oxidation and pyrolysis models are discussed. The thiophene experiment shows six competing dissociation channels. The postulated intermediates for the various thiophene dissociation channels include bicyclo, ring opened, and possibly ring contracted

  11. Insensitivity of synchronization to network structure in chaotic pendulum systems with time-delay coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Chenggui; Zhan, Meng; Shuai, Jianwei; Ma, Jun; Kurths, Jürgen

    2017-12-01

    It has been generally believed that both time delay and network structure could play a crucial role in determining collective dynamical behaviors in complex systems. In this work, we study the influence of coupling strength, time delay, and network topology on synchronization behavior in delay-coupled networks of chaotic pendulums. Interestingly, we find that the threshold value of the coupling strength for complete synchronization in such networks strongly depends on the time delay in the coupling, but appears to be insensitive to the network structure. This lack of sensitivity was numerically tested in several typical regular networks, such as different locally and globally coupled ones as well as in several complex networks, such as small-world and scale-free networks. Furthermore, we find that the emergence of a synchronous periodic state induced by time delay is of key importance for the complete synchronization.

  12. The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in Highly Granular Calorimeters with Tungsten and Steel Absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Chefdeville, M.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S.T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A.P.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, D.R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Arfaoui, A.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Münnich, A.; Poss, S.; Ribon, A.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Carloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Ebrahimi, A.; Falley, G.; Feege, N.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Fagot, A.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch.; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D.H.; Kong, D.J.; Oh, Y.D.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G.W.; Kawagoe, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Sudo, Y.; Ueno, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P.D.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Baulieu, G.; Calabria, P.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Della Negra, R.; Ete, R.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J-C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Vander Donckt, M.; Zoccarato, Y.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kozlov, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Popova, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M.S.; Bonis, J.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Cornebise, P.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; van der Kolk, N.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouene, J.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J-C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T.H.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch.; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Uozumi, S.; Chai, J.S.; Song, H.S.; Lee, S.H.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic time structure of hadronic showers influences the timing capability and the required integration time of hadronic calorimeters in particle physics experiments, and depends on the active medium and on the absorber of the calorimeter. With the CALICE T3B experiment, a setup of 15 small plastic scintillator tiles read out with Silicon Photomultipliers, the time structure of showers is measured on a statistical basis with high spatial and temporal resolution in sampling calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers. The results are compared to GEANT4 (version 9.4 patch 03) simulations with different hadronic physics models. These comparisons demonstrate the importance of using high precision treatment of low-energy neutrons for tungsten absorbers, while an overall good agreement between data and simulations for all considered models is observed for steel.

  13. Space-time structure of particle production in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuka, Naohiko; Ohnishi, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Nara, Yasushi; Maruyama, Tomoyuki

    1998-07-01

    Space-Time structure of freeze-out of produced particles in relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the framework of two different cascade models, either with or without higher baryonic resonances. While higher excited baryonic resonances do not influence the spatial source size of freeze-out point, the freeze-out time distribution is shifted to be later by these resonances. (author)

  14. Effects of sentence-structure complexity on speech initiation time and disfluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiamtsiouris, Jim; Cairns, Helen Smith

    2013-03-01

    There is general agreement that stuttering is caused by a variety of factors, and language formulation and speech motor control are two important factors that have been implicated in previous research, yet the exact nature of their effects is still not well understood. Our goal was to test the hypothesis that sentences of high structural complexity would incur greater processing costs than sentences of low structural complexity and these costs would be higher for adults who stutter than for adults who do not stutter. Fluent adults and adults who stutter participated in an experiment that required memorization of a sentence classified as low or high structural complexity followed by production of that sentence upon a visual cue. Both groups of speakers initiated most sentences significantly faster in the low structural complexity condition than in the high structural complexity condition. Adults who stutter were over-all slower in speech initiation than were fluent speakers, but there were no significant interactions between complexity and group. However, adults who stutter produced significantly more disfluencies in sentences of high structural complexity than in those of low complexity. After reading this article, the learner will be able to: (a) identify integral parts of all well-known models of adult sentence production; (b) summarize the way that sentence structure might negatively influence the speech production processes; (c) discuss whether sentence structure influences speech initiation time and disfluencies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. JPL control/structure interaction test bed real-time control computer architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1989-01-01

    The Control/Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts - such as active structure - and new tools - such as combined structure and control optimization algorithm - and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. A focus mission spacecraft was designed based upon a space interferometer and is the basis for design of the ground test article. The ground test bed objectives include verification of the spacecraft design concepts, the active structure elements and certain design tools such as the new combined structures and controls optimization tool. In anticipation of CSI technology flight experiments, the test bed control electronics must emulate the computation capacity and control architectures of space qualifiable systems as well as the command and control networks that will be used to connect investigators with the flight experiment hardware. The Test Bed facility electronics were functionally partitioned into three units: a laboratory data acquisition system for structural parameter identification and performance verification; an experiment supervisory computer to oversee the experiment, monitor the environmental parameters and perform data logging; and a multilevel real-time control computing system. The design of the Test Bed electronics is presented along with hardware and software component descriptions. The system should break new ground in experimental control electronics and is of interest to anyone working in the verification of control concepts for large structures.

  16. Increased Activity in Unstructured Versus Structured Gym Time in an After-School Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Matthew A; Schaeffer, Rachel; Holm, Richard; Specker, Bonny

    2016-12-01

    More than 10 million American youth engage in after-school programs that provide an opportunity to increase physical activity. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that children in unstructured gym time (free) would have greater activity than both structured gym time (structured) and when increased screen time was available. Three interventions were compared in a nested design, with each two-week intervention preceded and followed by a two-week control period. Seventy-four children aged 6 to 12 years were enrolled and wore pedometers during the interventions. Mean pedometer counts were higher during free than structured gym time (p=0.01), which was more apparent in boys (p=0.02) than girls (p=0.24). Neither age nor habitual activity was associated with pedometer counts. Body mass index (BMI) was inversely correlated with counts during free gym time (r=-0.314) in boys and girls combined. Accident rates did not differ among interventions. After-school programs may be appropriate environments to increase activity levels, but greatest increases were observed in children with the lowest BMIs and may not be as effective in girls as boys. Future research should focus on identifying where children at risk of overweight spend their time and how to implement a program designed at increasing activity levels within those spaces.

  17. Using machine learning to identify structural breaks in single-group interrupted time series designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Ariel; Yarnold, Paul R

    2016-12-01

    Single-group interrupted time series analysis (ITSA) is a popular evaluation methodology in which a single unit of observation is being studied, the outcome variable is serially ordered as a time series and the intervention is expected to 'interrupt' the level and/or trend of the time series, subsequent to its introduction. Given that the internal validity of the design rests on the premise that the interruption in the time series is associated with the introduction of the treatment, treatment effects may seem less plausible if a parallel trend already exists in the time series prior to the actual intervention. Thus, sensitivity analyses should focus on detecting structural breaks in the time series before the intervention. In this paper, we introduce a machine-learning algorithm called optimal discriminant analysis (ODA) as an approach to determine if structural breaks can be identified in years prior to the initiation of the intervention, using data from California's 1988 voter-initiated Proposition 99 to reduce smoking rates. The ODA analysis indicates that numerous structural breaks occurred prior to the actual initiation of Proposition 99 in 1989, including perfect structural breaks in 1983 and 1985, thereby casting doubt on the validity of treatment effects estimated for the actual intervention when using a single-group ITSA design. Given the widespread use of ITSA for evaluating observational data and the increasing use of machine-learning techniques in traditional research, we recommend that structural break sensitivity analysis is routinely incorporated in all research using the single-group ITSA design. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Inferring the mesoscale structure of layered, edge-valued, and time-varying networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Tiago P.

    2015-10-01

    Many network systems are composed of interdependent but distinct types of interactions, which cannot be fully understood in isolation. These different types of interactions are often represented as layers, attributes on the edges, or as a time dependence of the network structure. Although they are crucial for a more comprehensive scientific understanding, these representations offer substantial challenges. Namely, it is an open problem how to precisely characterize the large or mesoscale structure of network systems in relation to these additional aspects. Furthermore, the direct incorporation of these features invariably increases the effective dimension of the network description, and hence aggravates the problem of overfitting, i.e., the use of overly complex characterizations that mistake purely random fluctuations for actual structure. In this work, we propose a robust and principled method to tackle these problems, by constructing generative models of modular network structure, incorporating layered, attributed and time-varying properties, as well as a nonparametric Bayesian methodology to infer the parameters from data and select the most appropriate model according to statistical evidence. We show that the method is capable of revealing hidden structure in layered, edge-valued, and time-varying networks, and that the most appropriate level of granularity with respect to the additional dimensions can be reliably identified. We illustrate our approach on a variety of empirical systems, including a social network of physicians, the voting correlations of deputies in the Brazilian national congress, the global airport network, and a proximity network of high-school students.

  19. Long-term real-time structural health monitoring using wireless smart sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Shinae; Mensah-Bonsu, Priscilla O.; Li, Jingcheng; Dahal, Sushil

    2013-04-01

    Improving the safety and security of civil infrastructure has become a critical issue for decades since it plays a central role in the economics and politics of a modern society. Structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure using wireless smart sensor network has emerged as a promising solution recently to increase structural reliability, enhance inspection quality, and reduce maintenance costs. Though hardware and software framework are well prepared for wireless smart sensors, the long-term real-time health monitoring strategy are still not available due to the lack of systematic interface. In this paper, the Imote2 smart sensor platform is employed, and a graphical user interface for the long-term real-time structural health monitoring has been developed based on Matlab for the Imote2 platform. This computer-aided engineering platform enables the control, visualization of measured data as well as safety alarm feature based on modal property fluctuation. A new decision making strategy to check the safety is also developed and integrated in this software. Laboratory validation of the computer aided engineering platform for the Imote2 on a truss bridge and a building structure has shown the potential of the interface for long-term real-time structural health monitoring.

  20. Emergence and space–time structure of lump solution to the (2 1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wei Tan

    2017-10-31

    Oct 31, 2017 ... Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12043-017-1474-0. Emergence and space–time structure of lump solution to the. (2+1)-dimensional generalized KP equation. WEI TAN1 , HOUPING DAI1, ZHENGDE DAI2,∗ and WENYONG ZHONG1. 1College of Mathematics and Statistics, Jishou University, ...

  1. Time-Bounded Reachability in Tree-Structured QBDs by Abstraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klink, Daniel; Remke, Anne Katharina Ingrid; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Katoen, Joost P.

    This paper studies quantitative model checking of infinite tree-like (continuous-time) Markov chains. These tree-structured quasi-birth death processes are equivalent to probabilistic pushdown automata and recursive Markov chains and are widely used in the field of performance evaluation. We

  2. Time-bounded reachability in tree-structured QBDs by abstraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klink, Daniel; Remke, Anne Katharina Ingrid; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Katoen, Joost P.

    This paper studies quantitative model checking of infinite tree-like (continuous-time) Markov chains. These tree-structured quasi-birth death processes are equivalent to probabilistic pushdown automata and recursive Markov chains and are widely used in the field of performance evaluation. We

  3. Evolutionary Algorithms for the Detection of Structural Breaks in Time Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerr, Benjamin; Fischer, Paul; Hilbert, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    series under consideration is available. Therefore, a black-box optimization approach is our method of choice for detecting structural breaks. We describe a evolutionary algorithm framework which easily adapts to a large number of statistical settings. The experiments on artificial and real-world time...

  4. Location, Timing, and Social Structure Patterns Related to Physical Activity Participation in Weight Loss Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Jennifer L.; Trevarthen, Grace

    2013-01-01

    Less than half of the adults in the United States meet national guidelines for physical activity. Physical activity programs can induce short-term improvements in physical activity. To develop effective interventions, researchers and practitioners should consider the timing, location, and social structure patterns of participants. Using a pretest,…

  5. Simulating population recovery of an aquatic isopod: Effects of timing of stress and landscape structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galic, N.G.; Baveco, J.M.; Hengeveld, G.M.; Thorbek, P.; Bruns, E.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2012-01-01

    In agroecosystems, organisms may regularly be exposed to anthropogenic stressors, e.g. pesticides. Species' sensitivity to stress depends on toxicity, life-history, and landscape structure. We developed an individual-based model of an isopod, Asellus aquaticus, to explore how timing of stress events

  6. Probing space–time structure of new physics with polarized beams ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 69; Issue 5. Probing space-time structure of new physics with polarized beams at the international linear collider. B Ananthanarayan. New Physics at TeV Scale and Electroweak Precision Test Volume 69 Issue 5 November 2007 pp 849-854 ...

  7. Nutritional care; do process and structure indicators influence malnutrition prevalence over time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, Judith M M; Tan, Frans; Schols, Jos M G A; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2014-06-01

    To date, no information is available about the effect of structural and process factors of nutritional care on the prevalence of malnutrition over time in the long-term care sector. This study analyzes the trend of malnutrition prevalence rates between 2007 and 2011 in the long-term care sector, and the related effects of(1) process indicators such as nutritional screening and treatment and 2) structural indicators (guideline, protocol or nutritional screening policy). From 2007 to 2011, the Dutch National Prevalence Measurement of Care Problems (LPZ) was performed in Dutch long-term care organizations using a standardized questionnaire involving measurements at institutional, ward and resident level. The data were analyzed by mixed-linear regression for longitudinal data. Presence of malnutrition was assessed by BMI, undesired weight loss and nutritional intake. Seventy-four care homes were included (26,101 residents). The malnutrition prevalence trend significantly decreased (P malnutrition prevalence rates over time. Structural indicators had no impact on the malnutrition prevalence over time. In conclusion, over time a lower prevalence of malnutrition is associated with a higher degree of nutritional screening. As might be expected, a higher prevalence of malnutrition is associated with higher use of ONS. Structural nutritional screening is an important intervention to tackle the problem of malnutrition in the long term care sector. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  8. Real-time monitoring and structural control of a wind turbine using a rocking system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caterino, Nicola; Spizzuoco, Mariacristina; Georgakis, Christos T.

    2016-01-01

    . A special control algorithm has been properly designed to drive MR dampers. It requires the tower is equipped with sensors for measurement of displacements and stresses. The real-time monitoring of the tower response is needed in order to make the SA system works in the sense of mitigating the structural...

  9. Variation in the structure of a time-dependent SRS spectrum in microfiltered water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, V. A.; Bunkin, N. F.; Sychev, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    The time-dependent stimulated Raman scattering of light in water subjected to structural transformation by track membrane microfiltration is investigated. It is shown that the probability of SRS at the frequency of the ice spectral component in the band of stretching OH vibrations of water molecules decreases as a result of water filtration.

  10. The Time Structure of Hadronic Showers in Calorimeters with Scintillator and with Gas Readout

    CERN Document Server

    Szalay, M

    2015-01-01

    The time structure of hadronic showers is characterized by apromptcomponent from relativistic particles and by late components predominantly connected to neutrons in the cascade.The sensitivity to this late component thus depends on the choice of the active medium for hadronic calorimeters.

  11. Calibration of Tests for Time-Dilation in GRB Pulse Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Scargle, J. D.; Cuzzi, Jeffery N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursts are at cosmological distances, then not only their constituent pulses but also the intervals between pulses should be time-dilated. Unlike time-dilation measures of pulse emission, intervals would appear to require less "K-correction" for redshift of narrower temporal structure from higher energy into the band of observation. However, stretching of pulse intervals is intrinsically difficult to measure without incurring a timescale-dependent bias since, as time profiles are stretched, more structure can appear at the limit of resolution. This problem is compounded in dimmer bursts since identification of significant structures is problematic. We have attempted to minimize brightness bias problems by equalizing the signal-to-noise level of all bursts. Then, analyzing wavelet-denoised profiles binned to several resolutions, we identify significant (3 - 4 sigma) fluctuations between pulse structures and interjacent valleys. When bursts are ranked by peak flux, an interval time-dilation signature is evident, but its measure is dependent upon choice of temporal resolution. This result appears to tentatively and qualitatively confirm the work of Davis, who found such a signature using a pulse fitting approach.

  12. Road safety forecasts in five European countries using structural time series models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Constantinos; Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Yannis, George

    2014-01-01

    Modeling road safety development is a complex task and needs to consider both the quantifiable impact of specific parameters as well as the underlying trends that cannot always be measured or observed. The objective of this research is to apply structural time series models for obtaining reliable medium- to long-term forecasts of road traffic fatality risk using data from 5 countries with different characteristics from all over Europe (Cyprus, Greece, Hungary, Norway, and Switzerland). Two structural time series models are considered: (1) the local linear trend model and the (2) latent risk time series model. Furthermore, a structured decision tree for the selection of the applicable model for each situation (developed within the Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis [DaCoTA] research project, cofunded by the European Commission) is outlined. First, the fatality and exposure data that are used for the development of the models are presented and explored. Then, the modeling process is presented, including the model selection process, introduction of intervention variables, and development of mobility scenarios. The forecasts using the developed models appear to be realistic and within acceptable confidence intervals. The proposed methodology is proved to be very efficient for handling different cases of data availability and quality, providing an appropriate alternative from the family of structural time series models in each country. A concluding section providing perspectives and directions for future research is presented.

  13. Expansion dynamics of supercritical water probed by picosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladytz, Thomas; Abel, Bernd; Siefermann, Katrin R

    2015-02-21

    Vibrational excitation of liquid water with femtosecond laser pulses can create extreme states of water. Yet, the dynamics directly after initial sub-picosecond delocalization of molecular vibrations remain largely unclear. We study the ultrafast expansion dynamics of an accordingly prepared supercritical water phase with a picosecond time resolution. Our experimental setup combines vacuum-compatible liquid micro-jet technology and a table top High Harmonic light source driven by a femtosecond laser system. An ultrashort laser pulse centered at a wavelength of 2900 nm excites the OH-stretch vibration of water molecules in the liquid. The deposited energy corresponds to a supercritical phase with a temperature of about 1000 K and a pressure of more than 1 GPa. We use a time-delayed extreme ultraviolet pulse centered at 38.6 eV, and obtained via High Harmonic generation (HHG), to record valence band photoelectron spectra of the expanding water sample. The series of photoelectron spectra is analyzed with noise-corrected target transform fitting (cTTF), a specifically developed multivariate method. Together with a simple fluid dynamics simulation, the following picture emerges: when a supercritical phase of water expands into vacuum, temperature and density of the first few nanometers of the expanding phase drop below the critical values within a few picoseconds. This results in a supersaturated phase, in which condensation seeds form and grow from small clusters to large clusters on a 100 picosecond timescale.

  14. Pairwise analysis can account for network structures arising from spike-timing dependent plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baktash Babadi

    Full Text Available Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP modifies synaptic strengths based on timing information available locally at each synapse. Despite this, it induces global structures within a recurrently connected network. We study such structures both through simulations and by analyzing the effects of STDP on pair-wise interactions of neurons. We show how conventional STDP acts as a loop-eliminating mechanism and organizes neurons into in- and out-hubs. Loop-elimination increases when depression dominates and turns into loop-generation when potentiation dominates. STDP with a shifted temporal window such that coincident spikes cause depression enhances recurrent connections and functions as a strict buffering mechanism that maintains a roughly constant average firing rate. STDP with the opposite temporal shift functions as a loop eliminator at low rates and as a potent loop generator at higher rates. In general, studying pairwise interactions of neurons provides important insights about the structures that STDP can produce in large networks.

  15. Geometrical Complexity vs. Homogenization Time of Flow Structures Generated by Mixing of Magmas in Lava Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, M.; Perugini, D.; Poli, G.

    2003-04-01

    Structures produced by mixing of magmas occurring in a lava flow cropping out on the island of Lesbos (Greece) are studied in order to investigate the relationships between the time of homogenization of such structures by chemical diffusion and their geometrical complexity. Several mixing structures having different geometries have been extracted from pictures acquired by a digital camera installed on a petrographical microscope using plane polarized light. All pictures have been acquired utilizing a fixed magnification so that mixing structures have comparable length scales and measure 1.0×1.0 cm^2. Digital images have been converted from color to grayscale and subsequently they have been processed applying a threshold filter to generate binary images in which the mixing structures appear black whereas the image background is white. A number of numerical simulations have been performed to estimate the time required to reach the homogenization of the magma mixing structures by diffusion. The numerical scheme that has been utilized to simulate the diffusion process is a typical finite difference scheme based on the classical binary diffusion protocol. Each black and white image containing mixing structures has been considered as the initial configuration of the magmatic system so that the initial condition of the simulations is determined by the geometry of mixing structures. In order to develop models free from dimensional constraints the simulations have been made dimensionless using a series of scaling factors. The parameter used to quantify the degree of homogenization of mixing structures is the Degree of Homogenization (DH). DH is defined as the ratio between the mean composition of a mixing structure at a given time and the theoretical hybrid composition calculated for the same structure. DH can vary between zero and 1.0; the more DH approaches to 1.0, the more the structures has been homogenized. In order to quantify the geometrical complexity of the mixing

  16. Inferring the mesoscale structure of layered, edge-valued and time-varying networks

    CERN Document Server

    Peixoto, Tiago P

    2015-01-01

    Many network systems are composed of interdependent but distinct types of interactions, which cannot be fully understood in isolation. These different types of interactions are often represented as layers, attributes on the edges or as a time-dependence of the network structure. Although they are crucial for a more comprehensive scientific understanding, these representations offer substantial challenges. Namely, it is an open problem how to precisely characterize the large or mesoscale structure of network systems in relation to these additional aspects. Furthermore, the direct incorporation of these features invariably increases the effective dimension of the network description, and hence aggravates the problem of overfitting, i.e. the use of overly-complex characterizations that mistake purely random fluctuations for actual structure. In this work, we propose a robust and principled method to tackle these problems, by constructing generative models of modular network structure, incorporating layered, attr...

  17. Flexible structure control experiments using a real-time workstation for computer-aided control engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieber, Michael E.

    1989-01-01

    A Real-Time Workstation for Computer-Aided Control Engineering has been developed jointly by the Communications Research Centre (CRC) and Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (RUB), West Germany. The system is presently used for the development and experimental verification of control techniques for large space systems with significant structural flexibility. The Real-Time Workstation essentially is an implementation of RUB's extensive Computer-Aided Control Engineering package KEDDC on an INTEL micro-computer running under the RMS real-time operating system. The portable system supports system identification, analysis, control design and simulation, as well as the immediate implementation and test of control systems. The Real-Time Workstation is currently being used by CRC to study control/structure interaction on a ground-based structure called DAISY, whose design was inspired by a reflector antenna. DAISY emulates the dynamics of a large flexible spacecraft with the following characteristics: rigid body modes, many clustered vibration modes with low frequencies and extremely low damping. The Real-Time Workstation was found to be a very powerful tool for experimental studies, supporting control design and simulation, and conducting and evaluating tests withn one integrated environment.

  18. Time-Dependent Variations in Structure of Sheep Wool Irradiated by Electron Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Hanzlíková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wool scoured in tap water with no special degreasing and containing a balanced humidity responding to usual laboratory conditions was irradiated by accelerated electron beam in the range of 0–350 kGy dose. Time variations of the wool structure were measured using FTIR, Raman, and EPR spectroscopy. The aim was to determine whether preexposure treatment of the wool, as well as postexposure time, affects the properties of the irradiated wool. Reactive products such as S-sulfonate, cystine monoxide, cystine dioxide, cysteic acid, disulphides, and carboxylates displayed a considerable fluctuation in quantity depending on both the absorbed dose and time. Mutual transformations of S-oxidized products into cysteic acid appeared to be faster than those in dry and degreased wool assuming that the present humidity inside the fibres is decisive as an oxygen source. EPR results indicated a longer lifetime for free radicals induced by lower doses compared with the radicals generated by higher ones. The pattern of the conformational composition of the secondary structure (α-helix, β-sheet, random, and residual conformations also showed a large variability depending on absorbed dose as well as postexposure time. The most stable secondary structure was observed in nonirradiated wool but even this showed a small but observable change after a longer time, too.

  19. Real-Time Structural Damage Assessment Using Artificial Neural Networks and Antiresonant Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Meruane

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main problem in damage assessment is the determination of how to ascertain the presence, location, and severity of structural damage given the structure's dynamic characteristics. The most successful applications of vibration-based damage assessment are model updating methods based on global optimization algorithms. However, these algorithms run quite slowly, and the damage assessment process is achieved via a costly and time-consuming inverse process, which presents an obstacle for real-time health monitoring applications. Artificial neural networks (ANN have recently been introduced as an alternative to model updating methods. Once a neural network has been properly trained, it can potentially detect, locate, and quantify structural damage in a short period of time and can therefore be applied for real-time damage assessment. The primary contribution of this research is the development of a real-time damage assessment algorithm using ANN and antiresonant frequencies. Antiresonant frequencies can be identified more easily and more accurately than mode shapes, and they provide the same information. This research addresses the setup of the neural network parameters and provides guidelines for the selection of these parameters in similar damage assessment problems. Two experimental cases validate this approach: an 8-DOF mass-spring system and a beam with multiple damage scenarios.

  20. GOOD AND EVIL AS VECTORS OF FREE WILL IN THE STRUCTURE OF ANTHROPIC TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Khanzhy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The work is aimed at comprehending good and evil as vectors of free will in the structure of anthropic time. Methodology. The study is based on: 1 the general theory of systems (A. I. Uyomov, A. Yu. Tsofnas, L. N. Terentyeva – while justifying the possibility of representing the anthropic time as a system in general; 2 synergetics – while considering the anthropic time as a complex self-organizing system; 3 the concept of «а whole in a whole» (I. V. Yershova-Babenko – while identifying the optimal principle of correlation of the time units, taking into attention their ethical multi-vectority. Originality. In the context of the reconstruction of the concept of anthropic time: 1 the authors revealed ethical vectors of expansion of free will as the driving principle of human temporality (the vectors of «freedom for good» and «freedom for evil»; 2 the authors justified the optimality of using the principle of complementarity in solving the problem of harmonizing the coexistence of units of anthropic time («matryoshkas of time». Conclusion. 1 In a line with the tradition of anthropologization of the problem of good and evil, these intentions of human activity are interpreted as vectors of free will in the structure of anthropic time; 2 the paper represented anthropic time as a system in general (based on the general theory of systems and as a complex self-organizing system in particular (based on a synergetic methodology; 3 constituting of the system of anthropic time by the existential-actionable concept allowed to overcome the position of the one-vectored time, i.e.to reveal the ethical binarity of the anthropic time vectors prepared by the duality of expansion of free will as its driving principle; 4 formulation of the problem of discrepancy between the intentions of different temporal systems showed the optimality of the complementarity principle in solving the question how to harmonize the relations of anthropic time

  1. Structural and Optical Properties of Chemical Bath Deposited Silver Oxide Thin Films: Role of Deposition Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Nwanya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver oxide thin films were deposited on glass substrates at a temperature of 50°C by chemical bath deposition technique under different deposition times using pure AgNO3 precursor and triethanolamine as the complexing agent. The chemical analysis based on EDX technique shows the presence of Ag and O at the appropriate energy levels. The morphological features obtained from SEM showed that the AgxO structures varied as the deposition time changes. The X-ray diffraction showed the peaks of Ag2O and AgO in the structure. The direct band gap and the refractive index increased as the deposition time increased and was in the range of 1.64–1.95 eV and 1.02–2.07, respectively. The values of the band gap and refractive index obtained indicate possible applications in photovoltaic and photothermal systems.

  2. The quiet time structure of energetic /35-560 keV/ radiation belt electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, L. R.; Williams, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Detailed Explorer 45 observations of quiet time pitch angle distributions and equatorial radial profiles of energetic radiation belt electrons are presented. The observed pitch angle distributions in the slot region and the outer regions of the plasmasphere are found to agree with the values expected from resonant interactions with the plasmaspheric whistler mode wave band, and Coulomb collisions are found to be the dominant electron loss mechanism in the inner zone. The overall structure of quiet time radial profiles is shown to agree with the equilibrium structure expected to result from a balance between pitch angle scattering losses and radial diffusion from an outer zone source, and this agreement suggests that the dominant quiet time source and loss mechanisms have been correctly identified. Electron fluxes in the inner plasmasphere are found to remain nearly constant during the quiet periods due to their decoupling from magnetic activity variations in the outer plasmasphere.

  3. Time-Sliced Perturbation Theory for Large Scale Structure I: General Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Blas, Diego; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a new analytic approach to describe large scale structure formation in the mildly non-linear regime. The central object of the method is the time-dependent probability distribution function generating correlators of the cosmological observables at a given moment of time. Expanding the distribution function around the Gaussian weight we formulate a perturbative technique to calculate non-linear corrections to cosmological correlators, similar to the diagrammatic expansion in a three-dimensional Euclidean quantum field theory, with time playing the role of an external parameter. For the physically relevant case of cold dark matter in an Einstein--de Sitter universe, the time evolution of the distribution function can be found exactly and is encapsulated by a time-dependent coupling constant controlling the perturbative expansion. We show that all building blocks of the expansion are free from spurious infrared enhanced contributions that plague the standard cosmological perturbation theory. This pave...

  4. Influence of container structures and content solutions on dispensing time of ophthalmic solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Yoshikawa

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Keiji Yoshikawa1, Hiroshi Yamada21Yoshikawa Eye Clinic, Tokyo, Japan; 2Santen Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Osaka, JapanPurpose: To investigate the influence of container structures and content solutions on the time of dispensing from eye dropper bottles.Methods: Eye dropper bottle models, solution models (filtrate water/surfactant solution and a dispensing time measuring apparatus were prepared to measure the dispensing time.Results: With filtrate water and pressure thrust load of 0.3 MPa, the dispensing time significantly increased from 1.1 ± 0.5 seconds to 4.6 ± 1.1 seconds depending on the decrease of inner aperture diameters from 0.4 mm to 0.2 mm (P < 0.0001. When using the bottle models with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger, the dispensing time became constant. The dispensing time using surfactant solution showed the same tendency as above. When pressure thrust load was large (0.07 MPa, the solution flew out continuously with inner aperture diameters of 0.4 mm or larger and the dispensing time could not be measured. The inner aperture diameter most strongly explained the variation of the dispensing time in both the content solutions in the multiple linear regression analysis (filtrate water: 46%, R2 = 0.462, surfactant solution: 56%, R2 = 0.563.Conclusions: Among content solutions and container structures, the dispensing time was mostly influenced by the diameter of the inner aperture of bottles.Keywords: dispensing time, model eye dropper bottle, model ophthalmic solution, nozzle internal space volume, nozzle inner aperture diameter

  5. Spike Train Auto-Structure Impacts Post-Synaptic Firing and Timing-Based Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Bertram; Castellano, Marta; Vicente, Raul; Pipa, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Cortical neurons are typically driven by several thousand synapses. The precise spatiotemporal pattern formed by these inputs can modulate the response of a post-synaptic cell. In this work, we explore how the temporal structure of pre-synaptic inhibitory and excitatory inputs impact the post-synaptic firing of a conductance-based integrate and fire neuron. Both the excitatory and inhibitory input was modeled by renewal gamma processes with varying shape factors for modeling regular and temporally random Poisson activity. We demonstrate that the temporal structure of mutually independent inputs affects the post-synaptic firing, while the strength of the effect depends on the firing rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory inputs. In a second step, we explore the effect of temporal structure of mutually independent inputs on a simple version of Hebbian learning, i.e., hard bound spike-timing-dependent plasticity. We explore both the equilibrium weight distribution and the speed of the transient weight dynamics for different mutually independent gamma processes. We find that both the equilibrium distribution of the synaptic weights and the speed of synaptic changes are modulated by the temporal structure of the input. Finally, we highlight that the sensitivity of both the post-synaptic firing as well as the spike-timing-dependent plasticity on the auto-structure of the input of a neuron could be used to modulate the learning rate of synaptic modification. PMID:22203800

  6. Nonlinear time-domain soil–structure interaction analysis of embedded reactor structures subjected to earthquake loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solberg, Jerome M., E-mail: solberg2@llnl.gov [Methods Development Group, Lawrence Livermore Nat’l Lab, P.O. Box 808, Mailstop L-125, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Hossain, Quazi, E-mail: hossain1@llnl.gov [Structural and Applied Mechanics Group, Lawrence Livermore Nat’l Lab, P.O. Box 808, Mailstop L-129, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Mseis, George, E-mail: george.mseis@gmail.com [Structural and Applied Mechanics Group, Lawrence Livermore Nat’l Lab, P.O. Box 808, Mailstop L-129, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • Derived modified version of Bielak’s SSI method for nonlinear time-domain analysis. • Utilized a Ramberg–Osgood material with parameters that can be fit to EPRI data. • Matched vertically propagating shear wave results from CARES. • Applied this technique to a representative SMR, compared well with SASSI. • The technique is extensible to other material models and nonlinear effects. - Abstract: A generalized time-domain method for soil–structure interaction analysis is developed, based upon an extension of the work of the domain reduction method of Bielak et al. The methodology is combined with the use of a simple hysteretic soil model based upon the Ramberg–Osgood formulation and applied to a notional Small Modular Reactor. These benchmark results compare well (with some caveats) with those obtained by using the industry-standard frequency-domain code SASSI. The methodology provides a path forward for investigation of other sources of nonlinearity, including those associated with the use of more physically-realistic material models incorporating pore-pressure effects, gap opening/closing, the effect of nonlinear structural elements, and 3D seismic inputs.

  7. Nonlinear Time Domain Seismic Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI) Deep Soil Site Methodology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spears, Robert Edward [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Currently the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear industry perform seismic soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis using equivalent linear numerical analysis tools. For lower levels of ground motion, these tools should produce reasonable in-structure response values for evaluation of existing and new facilities. For larger levels of ground motion these tools likely overestimate the in-structure response (and therefore structural demand) since they do not consider geometric nonlinearities (such as gaping and sliding between the soil and structure) and are limited in the ability to model nonlinear soil behavior. The current equivalent linear SSI (SASSI) analysis approach either joins the soil and structure together in both tension and compression or releases the soil from the structure for both tension and compression. It also makes linear approximations for material nonlinearities and generalizes energy absorption with viscous damping. This produces the potential for inaccurately establishing where the structural concerns exist and/or inaccurately establishing the amplitude of the in-structure responses. Seismic hazard curves at nuclear facilities have continued to increase over the years as more information has been developed on seismic sources (i.e. faults), additional information gathered on seismic events, and additional research performed to determine local site effects. Seismic hazard curves are used to develop design basis earthquakes (DBE) that are used to evaluate nuclear facility response. As the seismic hazard curves increase, the input ground motions (DBE’s) used to numerically evaluation nuclear facility response increase causing larger in-structure response. As ground motions increase so does the importance of including nonlinear effects in numerical SSI models. To include material nonlinearity in the soil and geometric nonlinearity using contact (gaping and sliding) it is necessary to develop a nonlinear time domain methodology. This

  8. Synchrotron radiation-based quasi-elastic scattering using time-domain interferometry with multi-line gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Makina; Masuda, Ryo; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Seto, Makoto

    2017-10-02

    We developed a multi-line time-domain interferometry (TDI) system using 14.4 keV Mössbauer gamma rays with natural energy widths of 4.66 neV from 57Fe nuclei excited using synchrotron radiation. Electron density fluctuations can be detected at unique lengths ranging from 0.1 nm to a few nm on time scales from several nanoseconds to the sub-microsecond order by quasi-elastic gamma-ray scattering (QGS) experiments using multi-line TDI. In this report, we generalize the established expression for a time spectrum measured using an identical single-line gamma-ray emitter pair to the case of a nonidentical pair of multi-line gamma-ray emitters by considering the finite energy width of the incident synchrotron radiation. The expression obtained illustrates the unique characteristics of multi-line TDI systems, where the finite incident energy width and use of a nonidentical emitter pair produces further information on faster sub-picosecond-scale dynamics in addition to the nanosecond dynamics; this was demonstrated experimentally. A normalized intermediate scattering function was extracted from the spectrum and its relaxation form was determined for a relaxation time of the order of 1 μs, even for relatively large momentum transfer of ~31 nm-1. The multi-line TDI method produces a microscopic relaxation picture more rapidly and accurately than conventional single-line TDI.

  9. Thermal loads identification technique for materials and structures in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifenov, Oleg M.; Gejadze, Igor Yu.

    In experimental development of thermal protection materials and thermally stressed structures of flight vehicles the necessity arises to monitor the transient thermal loads and heat transfer parameters on the heated surfaces in real time. Usually, this is connected with control of heating intensity of the material specimens or structure samples during tests to simulate heat transfer rate time-dependencies predicted for a real flight, as well as temperature monitoring of the materials and structures in the most heated zones to avoid local overheating. The technique of aerothermo-dynamic parameter estimation is based on solving the corresponding inverse heat conduction problems (IHCPs) when the required parameters of external heat transfer are calculated from data of thermocouples imbedded in the thermal protection or structural materials. A new technique of high response has been developed that reconstructs transient heat fluxes at the surrace of structural members from solving an IHCP. An algorithm is suggested for solving a nonlinear IHCP based on the formation of an unknown heat flux as a sequence of point estimates obtained in the result of solving a nonlinear boundary-retrospective problem in the sliding local time interval, where the initial temperature distribution is also considered along with the boundary condition as an unknown function. The solution of nonlinear boundary-retrospective problem is reduced to a sequence of corresponding linear problems. The solution of a linear IHCP is recorded in the explicit form via a regularized operator of the inverse problem. A special rule for sampling of a regularization parameter value in case of short observation intervals and a rule for terminating the iterative process are suggested. The estimates of response time and accuracy for this technique as well as the fields of its practical application are given. The solution results of model problems solving and experimental data processing are presented.

  10. Highly amplified light transmission in a parity-time symmetric multilayered structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Jyoti Prasad; Sarma, Amarendra K

    2018-02-10

    We propose a parity-time symmetric dielectric-nano-film-dielectric multilayered structure that could facilitate highly amplified transmission of optical power in the infrared spectrum. We have theoretically studied our model using the transfer-matrix formalism. The reflection and the transmission coefficients of the S-matrix are evaluated. The theoretical results are validated by FDTD numerical simulation. We have shown how the thickness of the layers and the gain/loss coefficient of the active layers could generate spectral singularities in the S-matrix and how these singularities could be exploited to achieve amplified transmission of a single wavelength through the structure.

  11. Time-Resolved Soft X-ray Diffraction Reveals Transient Structural Distortions of Ternary Liquid Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Mann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Home-based soft X-ray time-resolved scattering experiments with nanosecond time resolution (10 ns and nanometer spatial resolution were carried out at a table top soft X-ray plasma source (2.2–5.2 nm. The investigated system was the lyotropic liquid crystal C16E7/paraffin/glycerol/formamide/IR 5. Usually, major changes in physical, chemical, and/or optical properties of the sample occur as a result of structural changes and shrinking morphology. Here, these effects occur as a consequence of the energy absorption in the sample upon optical laser excitation in the IR regime. The liquid crystal shows changes in the structural response within few hundred nanoseconds showing a time decay of 182 ns. A decrease of the Bragg peak diffracted intensity of 30% and a coherent macroscopic movement of the Bragg reflection are found as a response to the optical pump. The Bragg reflection movement is established to be isotropic and diffusion controlled (1 μs. Structural processes are analyzed in the Patterson analysis framework of the time-varying diffraction peaks revealing that the inter-lamellar distance increases by 2.7 Å resulting in an elongation of the coherently expanding lamella crystallite. The present studies emphasize the possibility of applying TR-SXRD techniques for studying the mechanical dynamics of nanosystems.

  12. Effect of reduction time on the structure and properties of porous graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoping; Zhang, Chenhui; Zhang, Tianfu; Xia, Min; Luo, Yunjun

    2017-07-01

    Porous graphene with nanoscaled pores on the sheets was prepared by a carbon thermal reduction method, in which the molybdenum oxide nanoparticles generated from the thermal decomposition of molybdate were used as the etching reagent, and the pores were formed on the surface of the reduced graphene oxide under the conditions of 650 °C and a nitrogen atmosphere. The morphology of pores on the graphene sheets may affect their potential applications in various fields, especially in the enhancement of mass transfer. Previous studies have shown that the reduction temperature and the amount of metal oxide are the key factors affecting the morphology of porous graphene, but in fact the reduction time is a more important affecting factor according to the present study. The results of SEM/TEM showed that a disordered large sheet-like structure with wrinkles was obtained at 120 min in the carbon-thermal reaction. The structural integrity of the PG was further destroyed after the reaction time of 140 min, in which the edge exhibited slightly crush and significant fold. The PG exhibited a hollow rod-like structure at the reaction time of 180 min. FTIR, Raman, XRD, and XPS studies were performed to characterize the morphology of porous graphene prepared at different reduction times.

  13. Real-time kinematic PPP GPS for structure monitoring applied on the Severn Suspension Bridge, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xu; Roberts, Gethin Wyn; Li, Xingxing; Hancock, Craig Matthew

    2017-09-01

    GPS is widely used for monitoring large civil engineering structures in real time or near real time. In this paper the use of PPP GPS for monitoring large structures is investigated. The bridge deformation results estimated using double differenced measurements is used as the truth against which the performance of kinematic PPP in a real-time scenario for bridge monitoring is assessed. The towers' datasets with millimetre level movement and suspension cable dataset with centimetre/decimetre level movement were processed by both PPP and DD data processing methods. The consistency of tower PPP time series indicated that the wet tropospheric delay is the major obstacle for small deflection extraction. The results of suspension cable survey points indicate that an ionospheric-free linear measurement is competent for bridge deformation by PPP kinematic model, the frequency domain analysis yields very similar results using either PPP or DD. This gives evidence that PPP can be used as an alternative method to DD for large structure monitoring when DD is difficult or impossible because of large baseline lengths, power outages or natural disasters. The PPP residual tropospheric wet delays can be applied to improve the capacity of small movement extraction.

  14. Transfer-matrix approach for finite-difference time-domain simulation of periodic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deinega, Alexei; Belousov, Sergei; Valuev, Ilya

    2013-11-01

    Optical properties of periodic structures can be calculated using the transfer-matrix approach, which establishes a relation between amplitudes of the wave incident on a structure with transmitted or reflected waves. The transfer matrix can be used to obtain transmittance and reflectance spectra of finite periodic structures as well as eigenmodes of infinite structures. Traditionally, calculation of the transfer matrix is performed in the frequency domain and involves linear algebra. In this work, we present a technique for calculation of the transfer matrix using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and show the way of its implementation in FDTD code. To illustrate the performance of our technique we calculate the transmittance spectra for opal photonic crystal slabs consisting of multiple layers of spherical scatterers. Our technique can be used for photonic band structure calculations. It can also be combined with existing FDTD methods for the analysis of periodic structures at an oblique incidence, as well as for modeling point sources in a periodic environment.

  15. Temporal variation in bat-fruit interactions: Foraging strategies influence network structure over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Mesa, Natalya; Montoya-Bustamante, Sebastián; Murillo-García, Oscar E.

    2017-11-01

    Mutualistic interactions, such as seed dispersal, are important for the maintenance of structure and stability of tropical communities. However, there is a lack of information about spatial and temporal variation in plant-animal interaction networks. Thus, our goal was to assess the effect of bat's foraging strategies on temporal variation in the structure and robustness of bat-fruit networks in both a dry and a rain tropical forest. We evaluated monthly variation in bat-fruit networks by using seven structure metrics: network size, average path length, nestedness, modularity, complementary specialization, normalized degree and betweenness centrality. Seed dispersal networks showed variations in size, species composition and modularity; did not present nested structures and their complementary specialization was high compared to other studies. Both networks presented short path lengths, and a constantly high robustness, despite their monthly variations. Sedentary bat species were recorded during all the study periods and occupied more central positions than nomadic species. We conclude that foraging strategies are important structuring factors that affect the dynamic of networks by determining the functional roles of frugivorous bats over time; thus sedentary bats are more important than nomadic species for the maintenance of the network structure, and their conservation is a must.

  16. Optimization of Time Structures in Manufacturing Management by using Scheduling Software Lekin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Balog

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In each manufacturing plant it is one of the basic requirements to produce the largest quantity of products in the shortest time and at the lowest price. In performance of these requirements used are diverse modern methods, technologies and software which ensure the efficiency improvement of manufacturing, costs minimization, production time minimization etc. Presented article is focused on time structures optimization of real manufacturing process of engineering component by using scheduling software Lekin. It is based on theoretical scientific knowledge on which is afterwards found the optimal layout of the manufacturing process in practice. The optimal layout it created by construction and analysis of Gantt charts in scheduling software Lekin with minimum production time condition.

  17. Detecting deviations from metronomic timing in music: effects of perceptual structure on the mental timekeeper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repp, B H

    1999-04-01

    The detectability of a deviation from metronomic timing--of a small local increment in interonset interval (IOI) duration--in a musical excerpt is subject to positional biases, or "timing expectations," that are closely related to the expressive timing (sequence of IOI durations) typically produced by musicians in performance (Repp, 1992b, 1998c, 1998d). Experiment 1 replicated this finding with some changes in procedure and showed that the perception-performance correlation is not the result of formal musical training or availability of a musical score. Experiments 2 and 3 used a synchronization task to examine the hypothesis that participants' perceptual timing expectations are due to systematic modulations in the period of a mental timekeeper that also controls perceptual-motor coordination. Indeed, there was systematic variation in the asynchronies between taps and metronomically timed musical event onsets, and this variation was correlated both with the variations in IOI increment detectability (Experiment 1) and with the typical expressive timing pattern in performance. When the music contained local IOI increments (Experiment 2), they were almost perfectly compensated for on the next tap, regardless of their detectability in Experiment 1, which suggests a perceptual-motor feedback mechanism that is sensitive to subthreshold timing deviations. Overall, the results suggest that aspects of perceived musical structure influence the predictions of mental timekeeping mechanisms, thereby creating a subliminal warping of experienced time.

  18. Direct and real time probe of photoinduced structure transition in colossal magnetoresistive material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junjie [Physics Department, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Wang, Xuan [Institute of physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 603, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhou, Haidong [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Zhou, Jun; Cao, Jianming, E-mail: jcao@magnet.fsu.edu [Physics Department, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Cheng, J. G. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    We report a direct and real time measurement of photoinduced structure phase transition in single crystal La{sub 0.84}Sr{sub 0.16}MnO{sub 3} using femtosecond electron diffraction. The melting of orthorhombic lattice ordering under femtosecond optical excitation is found involving two distinct processes with different time scales, an initial fast melting of orthorhombic phase in about 4 ps and a subsequent slower transformation in 90 ps and longer timescales. The fast process is designated as the initial melting of orthorhombic phase induced by the Mn-O bond change that is most likely driven by the quenching of the dynamic Jahn-Teller distortion following the photo-excitation. The slow process is attributed to the growing of newly formed structure domain from the photo-excited sites to the neighboring non-excited orthorhombic sites.

  19. Time-resolved ARPES at LACUS: Band Structure and Ultrafast Electron Dynamics of Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaldi, Alberto; Roth, Silvan; Gatti, Gianmarco; Arrell, Christopher A; Ojeda, José; van Mourik, Frank; Bugnon, Philippe; Magrez, Arnaud; Berger, Helmuth; Chergui, Majed; Grioni, Marco

    2017-05-31

    The manipulation of the electronic properties of solids by light is an exciting goal, which requires knowledge of the electronic structure with energy, momentum and temporal resolution. Time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (tr-ARPES) is the most direct probe of the effects of an optical excitation on the band structure of a material. In particular, tr-ARPES in the extreme ultraviolet (VUV) range gives access to the ultrafast dynamics over the entire Brillouin zone. VUV tr-ARPES experiments can now be performed at the ASTRA (ARPES Spectrometer for Time-Resolved Applications) end station of Harmonium, at LACUS. Its capabilities are illustrated by measurements of the ultrafast electronic response of ZrSiTe, a novel topological semimetal characterized by linearly dispersing states located at the Brillouin zone boundary.

  20. Implicit leadership theories in applied settings: factor structure, generalizability, and stability over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epitropaki, Olga; Martin, Robin

    2004-04-01

    The present empirical investigation had a 3-fold purpose: (a) to cross-validate L. R. Offermann, J. K. Kennedy, and P. W. Wirtz's (1994) scale of Implicit Leadership Theories (ILTs) in several organizational settings and to further provide a shorter scale of ILTs in organizations; (b) to assess the generalizability of ILTs across different employee groups, and (c) to evaluate ILTs' change over time. Two independent samples were used for the scale validation (N1 = 500 and N2 = 439). A 6-factor structure (Sensitivity, Intelligence, Dedication, Dynamism, Tyranny, and Masculinity) was found to most accurately represent ELTs in organizational settings. Regarding the generalizability of ILTs, although the 6-factor structure was consistent across different employee groups, there was only partial support for total factorial invariance. Finally, evaluation of gamma, beta, and alpha change provided support for ILTs' stability over time.

  1. Time-resolved PEEM measurements on single-crystalline Fe-structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Alexander; Wiemann, Carsten; Cramm, Stefan; Schneider, Claus M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung IFF-9, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Time-resolved photo-electron emission microscopy (TR-PEEM) provides a method for investigating the spatial and temporal magnetodynamics of micron-sized magnetic elements. By the use of e-beam evaporation thin films of (100)-oriented Iron in bcc-structure can be epitaxially grown on GaAs substrates with a Silver buffer layer. Due to their single-crystallinity the films exhibit a four-fold in-plane magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The films have been microstructured by lithographic techniques and the micromagnetic response on a short magnetic field pulse was investigated by the TR-PEEM technique. Compared to well-studied polycrystalline Permalloy samples the magnetocrystalline anisotropy gives rise to additional terms in the effective magnetic field, leading to different magnetodynamic behaviour. Results of the time-resolved measurements are presented and compared to those of anisotropy-free Permalloy structures.

  2. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  3. Real-Time Probing of Structural Dynamics by Interaction between Chromophores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Rasmus Y.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Sølling, Theis Ivan

    2011-01-01

    We present an investigation of structural dynamics in excited-state cations probed in real-time by femtosecond timeresolved ion photofragmentation spectroscopy. From photoelectron spectroscopy data on 1,3-dibromopropane we conclude that the pump pulse ionizes the molecule, populating an excited...... of the cation in 1.6 ps. The real-time probing of the excited-state dynamics is made possible by exploiting the interaction between the two bromine chromophores and its dependence on molecular conformation. This experiment therefore illustrates the applicability of the concept of probing ultrafast molecular...... dynamics using the intramolecular interaction between two chromophores....

  4. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress

    OpenAIRE

    de Mello Luvielmo, Márcia; Borges,Caroline Dellinghausen; de Oliveira Toyama, Daniela; Vendruscolo, Claire Tondo; Scamparini,Adilma Regina Pippa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95. Although greater xanthan production was observed after a 24 h-alkali stress process, a lower viscosity was observed when compared to the alkali stress-free gum, regardless of the alkali stress time. However, this outcome is not conclusive as further studies on g...

  5. Identification of time-varying structural dynamic systems - An artificial intelligence approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, B. J.; Hanagud, S.

    1992-01-01

    An application of the artificial intelligence-derived methodologies of heuristic search and object-oriented programming to the problem of identifying the form of the model and the associated parameters of a time-varying structural dynamic system is presented in this paper. Possible model variations due to changes in boundary conditions or configurations of a structure are organized into a taxonomy of models, and a variant of best-first search is used to identify the model whose simulated response best matches that of the current physical structure. Simulated model responses are verified experimentally. An output-error approach is used in a discontinuous model space, and an equation-error approach is used in the parameter space. The advantages of the AI methods used, compared with conventional programming techniques for implementing knowledge structuring and inheritance, are discussed. Convergence conditions and example problems have been discussed. In the example problem, both the time-varying model and its new parameters have been identified when changes occur.

  6. From structure to structural dynamics: Ahmed Zewail's legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed Chergui

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this brief tribute to Ahmed Zewail, we highlight and place in the historical context, several of the major achievements that he and his colleagues have made in Femtochemistry (of which he was the principal instigator and his introduction of ultrafast electron scattering, diffraction, microscopy and spectroscopy. By achieving a sub-picosecond temporal resolution, coupled with a picometer spatial resolution, he revolutionised our understanding of the corpus of chemical, physical, biological and materials science systems.

  7. Experimental and Empirical Time to Corrosion of Reinforced Concrete Structures under Different Curing Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Abouhussien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinforced concrete structures, especially those in marine environments, are commonly subjected to high concentrations of chlorides, which eventually leads to corrosion of the embedded reinforcing steel. The total time to corrosion of such structures may be divided into three stages: corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods. This paper evaluates, both empirically and experimentally, the expected time to corrosion of reinforced concrete structures. The tested reinforced concrete samples were subjected to ten alternative curing techniques, including hot, cold, and normal temperatures, prior to testing. The corrosion initiation, cracking, and damage periods in this investigation were experimentally monitored by an accelerated corrosion test performed on reinforced concrete samples. Alternatively, the corrosion initiation time for counterpart samples was empirically predicted using Fick’s second law of diffusion for comparison. The results showed that the corrosion initiation periods obtained experimentally were comparable to those obtained empirically. The corrosion initiation was found to occur at the first jump of the current measurement in the accelerated corrosion test which matched the half-cell potential reading of around −350 mV.

  8. Scaling laws of diffusion and time intermittency generated by coherent structures in atmospheric turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Paradisi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the time intermittency of turbulent transport associated with the birth-death of self-organized coherent structures in the atmospheric boundary layer. We apply a threshold analysis on the increments of turbulent fluctuations to extract sequences of rapid acceleration events, which is a marker of the transition between self-organized structures.

    The inter-event time distributions show a power-law decay ψ(τ ~ 1/τμ, with a strong dependence of the power-law index μ on the threshold.

    A recently developed method based on the application of event-driven walking rules to generate different diffusion processes is applied to the experimental event sequences. At variance with the power-law index μ estimated from the inter-event time distributions, the diffusion scaling H, defined by ⟨ X2⟩ ~ t2H, is independent from the threshold.

    From the analysis of the diffusion scaling it can also be inferred the presence of different kind of events, i.e. genuinely transition events and spurious events, which all contribute to the diffusion process but over different time scales. The great advantage of event-driven diffusion lies in the ability of separating different regimes of the scaling H. In fact, the greatest H, corresponding to the most anomalous diffusion process, emerges in the long time range, whereas the smallest H can be seen in the short time range if the time resolution of the data is sufficiently accurate.

    The estimated diffusion scaling is also robust under the change of the definition of turbulent fluctuations and, under the assumption of statistically independent events, it corresponds to a self-similar point process with a well-defined power-law index μD ~ 2.1, where D denotes that μD is derived from the diffusion scaling. We argue that

  9. Scaling laws of diffusion and time intermittency generated by coherent structures in atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, P.; Cesari, R.; Donateo, A.; Contini, D.; Allegrini, P.

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the time intermittency of turbulent transport associated with the birth-death of self-organized coherent structures in the atmospheric boundary layer. We apply a threshold analysis on the increments of turbulent fluctuations to extract sequences of rapid acceleration events, which is a marker of the transition between self-organized structures. The inter-event time distributions show a power-law decay ψ(τ) ~ 1/τμ, with a strong dependence of the power-law index μ on the threshold. A recently developed method based on the application of event-driven walking rules to generate different diffusion processes is applied to the experimental event sequences. At variance with the power-law index μ estimated from the inter-event time distributions, the diffusion scaling H, defined by ⟨ X2⟩ ~ t2H, is independent from the threshold. From the analysis of the diffusion scaling it can also be inferred the presence of different kind of events, i.e. genuinely transition events and spurious events, which all contribute to the diffusion process but over different time scales. The great advantage of event-driven diffusion lies in the ability of separating different regimes of the scaling H. In fact, the greatest H, corresponding to the most anomalous diffusion process, emerges in the long time range, whereas the smallest H can be seen in the short time range if the time resolution of the data is sufficiently accurate. The estimated diffusion scaling is also robust under the change of the definition of turbulent fluctuations and, under the assumption of statistically independent events, it corresponds to a self-similar point process with a well-defined power-law index μD ~ 2.1, where D denotes that μD is derived from the diffusion scaling. We argue that this renewal point process can be associated to birth and death of coherent structures and to turbulent transport near the ground, where the contribution of turbulent coherent structures becomes dominant.

  10. Fathers' Involvement with Their Preschool-Age Children: How Fathers Spend Time with Their Children in Different Family Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halme, Nina; Astedt-Kurki, Paivi; Tarkka, Marja-Terttu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how fathers (n = 263) spent time with their preschool-age children and to compare it in different family structures. Data were gathered by structured questionnaires. The instrument included five categories of variables for the time spent: the quantity of time, physical activities, fathers' attitude towards…

  11. Uncertainty in Earthquake Source Imaging Due to Variations in Source Time Function and Earth Structure

    KAUST Repository

    Razafindrakoto, H. N. T.

    2014-03-25

    One way to improve the accuracy and reliability of kinematic earthquake source imaging is to investigate the origin of uncertainty and to minimize their effects. The difficulties in kinematic source inversion arise from the nonlinearity of the problem, nonunique choices in the parameterization, and observational errors. We analyze particularly the uncertainty related to the choice of the source time function (STF) and the variability in Earth structure. We consider a synthetic data set generated from a spontaneous dynamic rupture calculation. Using Bayesian inference, we map the solution space of peak slip rate, rupture time, and rise time to characterize the kinematic rupture in terms of posterior density functions. Our test to investigate the effect of the choice of STF reveals that all three tested STFs (isosceles triangle, regularized Yoffe with acceleration time of 0.1 and 0.3 s) retrieve the patch of high slip and slip rate around the hypocenter. However, the use of an isosceles triangle as STF artificially accelerates the rupture to propagate faster than the target solution. It additionally generates an artificial linear correlation between rupture onset time and rise time. These appear to compensate for the dynamic source effects that are not included in the symmetric triangular STF. The exact rise time for the tested STFs is difficult to resolve due to the small amount of radiated seismic moment in the tail of STF. To highlight the effect of Earth structure variability, we perform inversions including the uncertainty in the wavespeed only, and variability in both wavespeed and layer depth. We find that little difference is noticeable between the resulting rupture model uncertainties from these two parameterizations. Both significantly broaden the posterior densities and cause faster rupture propagation particularly near the hypocenter due to the major velocity change at the depth where the fault is located.

  12. Watching ultrafast responses of structure and magnetism in condensed matter with momentum-resolved probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Johnson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a non-comprehensive review of some representative experimental studies in crystalline condensed matter systems where the effects of intense ultrashort light pulses are probed using x-ray diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopy. On an ultrafast (sub-picosecond time scale, conventional concepts derived from the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium must often be modified in order to adequately describe the time-dependent changes in material properties. There are several commonly adopted approaches to this modification, appropriate in different experimental circumstances. One approach is to treat the material as a collection of quasi-thermal subsystems in thermal contact with each other in the so-called “N-temperature” models. On the other extreme, one can also treat the time-dependent changes as fully coherent dynamics of a sometimes complex network of excitations. Here, we present examples of experiments that fall into each of these categories, as well as experiments that partake of both models. We conclude with a discussion of the limitations and future potential of these concepts.

  13. Impact localization on composite structures using time difference and MUSIC approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yongteng; Xiang, Jiawei

    2017-05-01

    1-D uniform linear array (ULA) has the shortcoming of the half-plane mirror effect, which does not allow discriminating between a target placed above the array and a target placed below the array. This paper presents time difference (TD) and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) based omni-directional impact localization on a large stiffened composite structure using improved linear array, which is able to perform omni-directional 360° localization. This array contains 2M+3 PZT sensors, where 2M+1 PZT sensors are arranged as a uniform linear array, and the other two PZT sensors are placed above and below the array. Firstly, the arrival times of impact signals observed by the other two sensors are determined using the wavelet transform. Compared with each other, the direction range of impact source can be decided in general, 0°to 180° or 180°to 360°. And then, two dimensional multiple signal classification (2D-MUSIC) based spatial spectrum formula using the uniform linear array is applied for impact localization by the general direction range. When the arrival times of impact signals observed by upper PZT is equal to that of lower PZT, the direction can be located in x axis (0°or 180°). And time difference based MUSIC method is present to locate impact position. To verify the proposed approach, the proposed approach is applied to a composite structure. The localization results are in good agreement with the actual impact occurring positions.

  14. Fast and non-destructive pore structure analysis using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markl, Daniel; Bawuah, Prince; Ridgway, Cathy; van den Ban, Sander; Goodwin, Daniel J; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Gane, Patrick; Peiponen, Kai-Erik; Zeitler, J Axel

    2017-12-13

    Pharmaceutical tablets are typically manufactured by the uni-axial compaction of powder that is confined radially by a rigid die. The directional nature of the compaction process yields not only anisotropic mechanical properties (e.g. tensile strength) but also directional properties of the pore structure in the porous compact. This study derives a new quantitative parameter, Sa, to describe the anisotropy in pore structure of pharmaceutical tablets based on terahertz time-domain spectroscopy measurements. The Sa parameter analysis was applied to three different data sets including tablets with only one excipient (functionalised calcium carbonate), samples with one excipient (microcrystalline cellulose) and one drug (indomethacin), and a complex formulation (granulated product comprising several excipients and one drug). The overall porosity, tablet thickness, initial particle size distribution as well as the granule density were all found to affect the significant structural anisotropies that were observed in all investigated tablets. The Sa parameter provides new insights into the microstructure of a tablet and its potential was particularly demonstrated for the analysis of formulations comprising several components. The results clearly indicate that material attributes, such as particle size and granule density, cause a change of the pore structure, which, therefore, directly impacts the liquid imbibition that is part of the disintegration process. We show, for the first time, how the granule density impacts the pore structure, which will also affect the performance of the tablet. It is thus of great importance to gain a better understanding of the relationship of the physical properties of material attributes (e.g. intragranular porosity, particle shape), the compaction process and the microstructure of the finished product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation on vibration excitation of debonded sandwich structures using time-average digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Binu P; Annamala Pillai, S; Narayanamurthy, C S

    2017-05-01

    Sandwich structures, in the modern aerospace industry, are more sought after due to their high strength to stiffness ratio resulting in significant weight gains. Optical techniques like time-average holography and shearography are preferred in industries for inspection of huge sandwich and composite panels because of whole-field (full coverage) inspection in a lesser time leading to large savings in cost. These techniques conventionally use sinusoidal frequency sweep to capture the local resonance of defective regions. This paper highlights the difficulties with the conventional approach of time-average digital holography (TADH) and proposes a novel defect identification strategy through square wave excitation. The proposed method enhances the speed and accuracy of inspection; thereby it saves cost and increases confidence level. Extensive experiments have been carried out using honeycomb sandwich panels to demonstrate the methodology.

  16. Time Delayed Stage-Structured Predator-Prey Model with Birth Pulse and Pest Control Tactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normally, chemical pesticides kill not only pests but also their natural enemies. In order to better control the pests, two-time delayed stage-structured predator-prey models with birth pulse and pest control tactics are proposed and analyzed by using impulsive differential equations in present work. The stability threshold conditions for the mature prey-eradication periodic solutions of two models are derived, respectively. The effects of key parameters including killing efficiency rate, pulse period, the maximum birth effort per unit of time of natural enemy, and maturation time of prey on the threshold values are discussed in more detail. By comparing the two threshold values of mature prey-extinction, we provide the fact that the second control tactic is more effective than the first control method.

  17. A novel method for determining residence time distribution in intricately structured microreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Sebastian; Kohnen, Boris Terje; Janasek, Dirk; Dittrich, Petra Stephanie; Franzke, Joachim; Agar, David William

    2008-03-01

    A precise characterisation of microreactors can be achieved by determining the residence time distribution as one of the most important flow characteristics. An approach specially designed for microreactor applications was developed, which employs a tracer 'injection' using the optical activation of a caged fluorescent dye. Furthermore, the effect of the laminar flow on the determination of the residence time distribution in microreactors has been taken into account during the measurements and their interpretation to fulfill the requirements of the so-called 'mixing-cup-problem' on the microscale. Residence time distributions for an intricately structured thin microreactor were determined for different velocities. The ideality of the stimulus signal generated by the newly introduced technique is demonstrated for an analytically well-defined straight channel and compared with a signal derived from deconvolution of non-ideal input signals.

  18. Scaling collapse and structure functions: identifying self-affinity in finite length time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Chapman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical determination of the scaling properties and exponents of time series presents a formidable challenge in testing, and developing, a theoretical understanding of turbulence and other out-of-equilibrium phenomena. We discuss the special case of self affine time series in the context of a stochastic process. We highlight two complementary approaches to the differenced variable of the data: i attempting a scaling collapse of the Probability Density Functions which should then be well described by the solution of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation and ii using structure functions to determine the scaling properties of the higher order moments. We consider a method of conditioning that recovers the underlying self affine scaling in a finite length time series, and illustrate it using a Lévy flight.

  19. Self-structure and postpartum dejection in first-time mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Warren A; Silbert-Mazzarella, Beth A; Spence, Jennifer A; Siegel, Harold I

    2005-09-01

    Twenty-nine first-time mothers completed the Beck Depression Inventory (A. T. Beck, C. H. Ward, M. Mendelson, J. Mock, & J. Erbaugh, 1961) at Time 1 (3rd trimester) and at Time 2 (3-6 months after delivery). At Time 1, women described each of 20 self-aspects by repeatedly selecting from a list of 36 traits; they also reported the size of their social support network in a structured interview. At Time 2, the new mothers completed a short measure of mother role stress and described postpartum difficulties to an interviewer. The authors used HIerarchical CLASses (HICLAS; P. De Boeck & S. Rosenberg, 1988) to idiographically model each woman's self-descriptive data and to identify the class that contained each woman's most superordinate (cardinal) traits, which were then coded either as agentic or social-emotional. Postpartum difficulty predicted Time 2 dejection, but mother role stress and social network size did not. However, the content of the most superordinate trait class moderated the latter two effects. New mothers coded as agentic were more dejected than were new mothers coded as social-emotional when there was high mother role stress and when there was a large social support network.

  20. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia de Mello Luvielmo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95. Although greater xanthan production was observed after a 24 h-alkali stress process, a lower viscosity was observed when compared to the alkali stress-free gum, regardless of the alkali stress time. However, this outcome is not conclusive as further studies on gum purification are required to remove excess sodium, verify the efficiency loss and the consequent increase in the polymer viscosity. Alkali stress altered the structure of xanthan gum from a polygon-like shape to a star-like form. At the end of the fermentation, early structural changes in the bacterium were observed. After alkali stress, marked structural differences were observed in the cells. A more vacuolated cytoplasm and discontinuities in the membrane cells evidenced the cell lysis. Xanthan was observed in the form of concentric circles instead of agglomerates as observed prior to the alkali stress.

  1. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvielmo, Márcia de Mello; Borges, Caroline Dellinghausen; Toyama, Daniela de Oliveira; Vendruscolo, Claire Tondo; Scamparini, Adilma Regina Pippa

    2016-01-01

    The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95. Although greater xanthan production was observed after a 24h-alkali stress process, a lower viscosity was observed when compared to the alkali stress-free gum, regardless of the alkali stress time. However, this outcome is not conclusive as further studies on gum purification are required to remove excess sodium, verify the efficiency loss and the consequent increase in the polymer viscosity. Alkali stress altered the structure of xanthan gum from a polygon-like shape to a star-like form. At the end of the fermentation, early structural changes in the bacterium were observed. After alkali stress, marked structural differences were observed in the cells. A more vacuolated cytoplasm and discontinuities in the membrane cells evidenced the cell lysis. Xanthan was observed in the form of concentric circles instead of agglomerates as observed prior to the alkali stress. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimizing the De-Noise Neural Network Model for GPS Time-Series Monitoring of Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosbeh R. Kaloop

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Global Positioning System (GPS is recently used widely in structures and other applications. Notwithstanding, the GPS accuracy still suffers from the errors afflicting the measurements, particularly the short-period displacement of structural components. Previously, the multi filter method is utilized to remove the displacement errors. This paper aims at using a novel application for the neural network prediction models to improve the GPS monitoring time series data. Four prediction models for the learning algorithms are applied and used with neural network solutions: back-propagation, Cascade-forward back-propagation, adaptive filter and extended Kalman filter, to estimate which model can be recommended. The noise simulation and bridge’s short-period GPS of the monitoring displacement component of one Hz sampling frequency are used to validate the four models and the previous method. The results show that the Adaptive neural networks filter is suggested for de-noising the observations, specifically for the GPS displacement components of structures. Also, this model is expected to have significant influence on the design of structures in the low frequency responses and measurements’ contents.

  3. Clonal structure through space and time: High stability in the holothurianStichopus chloronotus(Echinodermata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirog, Agathe; Gélin, Pauline; Bédier, Alexandre; Bianchetti, Grégoire; Georget, Stéphane; Frouin, Patrick; Magalon, Hélène

    2017-09-01

    Sea cucumbers are increasingly exploited for human consumption and for their curative properties, and many wild populations are now depleted or in danger of extinction. While aquaculture is seen as an alternative to fisheries and as a mean to restore wild populations, more knowledge is needed on their reproductive strategies to render this practice efficient, notably for fissiparous holothurians, which are some of the mobile animals able of asexual reproduction by transverse fission. Little information is available on their population genetic diversity and structure. Here, the clonal structure of populations of the fissiparous sea cucumber Stichopus chloronotus has been investigated using nine microsatellite loci and a random sampling, at different spatial (intra-reef and inter-reef) and temporal (inter-season and inter-year) scales. Our findings highlight the importance of asexual reproduction in maintaining these populations, and the prevalence of the "initial seedling recruitment" strategy (ISR), leading to a high stability of clonal composition over seasons and years. It also seemed that clonal propagation was limited to the reef scale (<10 km) while reefs were connected by sexual dispersal. This is the first time that clonal structure in sea cucumbers has been studied at such a fine scale, with a specific sampling strategy. It provides key findings on the genetic diversity and structure of fissiparous sea cucumbers, which will be useful for the management of wild populations and aquaculture.

  4. Exploring possible DNA structures in real-time polymerase kinetics using Pacific Biosciences sequencer data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, Sterling; Boocock, James; Black, Michael A; Gemmell, Neil J

    2015-01-28

    Pausing of DNA polymerase can indicate the presence of a DNA structure that differs from the canonical double-helix. Here we detail a method to investigate how polymerase pausing in the Pacific Biosciences sequencer reads can be related to DNA sequences. The Pacific Biosciences sequencer uses optics to view a polymerase and its interaction with a single DNA molecule in real-time, offering a unique way to detect potential alternative DNA structures. We have developed a new way to examine polymerase kinetics data and relate it to the DNA sequence by using a wavelet transform of read information from the sequencer. We use this method to examine how polymerase kinetics are related to nucleotide base composition. We then examine tandem repeat sequences known for their ability to form different DNA structures: (CGG)n and (CG)n repeats which can, respectively, form G-quadruplex DNA and Z-DNA. We find pausing around the (CGG)n repeat that may indicate the presence of G-quadruplexes in some of the sequencer reads. The (CG)n repeat does not appear to cause polymerase pausing, but its kinetics signature nevertheless suggests the possibility that alternative nucleotide conformations may sometimes be present. We discuss the implications of using our method to discover DNA sequences capable of forming alternative structures. The analyses presented here can be reproduced on any Pacific Biosciences kinetics data for any DNA pattern of interest using an R package that we have made publicly available.

  5. Detecting Changes in Forest Structure over Time with Bi-Temporal Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Melkas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes to stems caused by natural forces and timber harvesting constitute an essential input for many forestry-related applications and ecological studies, especially forestry inventories based on the use of permanent sample plots. Conventional field measurement is widely acknowledged as being time-consuming and labor-intensive. More automated and efficient alternatives or supportive methods are needed. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS has been demonstrated to be a promising method in forestry field inventories. Nevertheless, the applicability of TLS in recording changes in the structure of forest plots has not been studied in detail. This paper presents a fully automated method for detecting changes in forest structure over time using bi-temporal TLS data. The developed method was tested on five densely populated forest plots including 137 trees and 50 harvested trees in point clouds. The present study demonstrated that 90 percent of tree stem changes could be automatically located from single-scan TLS data. These changes accounted for 92 percent of the changed basal area. The results indicate that the processing of TLS data collected at different times to detect tree stem changes can be fully automated.

  6. Investigation of Time Series Representations and Similarity Measures for Structural Damage Pattern Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjia Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the time series representation methods and similarity measures for sensor data feature extraction and structural damage pattern recognition. Both model-based time series representation and dimensionality reduction methods are studied to compare the effectiveness of feature extraction for damage pattern recognition. The evaluation of feature extraction methods is performed by examining the separation of feature vectors among different damage patterns and the pattern recognition success rate. In addition, the impact of similarity measures on the pattern recognition success rate and the metrics for damage localization are also investigated. The test data used in this study are from the System Identification to Monitor Civil Engineering Structures (SIMCES Z24 Bridge damage detection tests, a rigorous instrumentation campaign that recorded the dynamic performance of a concrete box-girder bridge under progressively increasing damage scenarios. A number of progressive damage test case datasets and damage test data with different damage modalities are used. The simulation results show that both time series representation methods and similarity measures have significant impact on the pattern recognition success rate.

  7. A comparison of Anopheles gambiae and Plasmodium falciparum genetic structure over space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prugnolle, Franck; Durand, Patrick; Jacob, Koella; Razakandrainibe, Fabien; Arnathau, Céline; Villarreal, Diana; Rousset, François; de Meeûs, Thierry; Renaud, François

    2008-03-01

    Population genetic structure and subdivision are key factors affecting the evolution of organisms. In this study, we analysed and compared the population genetic structure of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and its mosquito vector Anopheles gambiae over space and time in the Nianza Province, near Victoria Lake in Kenya. The parasites were collected from mosquitoes caught in six villages separated by up to 68 km in 2002 and 2003. A total of 545 oocysts were dissected from 122 infected mosquitoes and genotyped at seven microsatellite markers. Five hundred and forty-seven mosquitoes, both infected and uninfected, were genotyped at eight microsatellites. For the parasite and the vector, the analysis revealed no (or very little) genetic differentiation among villages. This may be explained by high local population sizes for the parasite and the mosquito. The small level of genetic differentiation observed between populations may explain the speed at which antimalarial drug resistance and insecticide resistance spread into the African continent.

  8. Time Domain Simulations of the CLIC PETS (Power Extraction and Transfer Structure) with GdfidL

    CERN Document Server

    Syratchev, I V

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) PETS is required to produce about 0.5 GW RF power per metre in the 30 GHz CLIC decelerator when driven by the high current beam (~ 270 A). To avoid beam break-up in the decelerator it is necessary to provide strong damping of the transverse deflecting modes. A PETS geometry with a level of damping consistent with stable drive beam operation has been designed, using the frequency domain code HFSS. A verification of the overall performance of this structure has been made recently using the code GdfidL, which permits a very fine mesh analysis of a full-length structure in the time domain. This paper gives the results of this analysis.

  9. Evaluation of Waveform Structure Features on Time Domain Target Recognition under Cross Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selver, M. A.; Seçmen, M.; Zoral, E. Y.

    2016-08-01

    Classification of aircraft targets from scattered electromagnetic waves is a challenging application, which suffers from aspect angle dependency. In order to eliminate the adverse effects of aspect angle, various strategies were developed including the techniques that rely on extraction of several features and design of suitable classification systems to process them. Recently, a hierarchical method, which uses features that take advantage of waveform structure of the scattered signals, is introduced and shown to have effective results. However, this approach has been applied to the special cases that consider only a single planar component of electric field that cause no-cross polarization at the observation point. In this study, two small scale aircraft models, Boeing-747 and DC-10, are selected as the targets and various polarizations are used to analyse the cross-polarization effects on system performance of the aforementioned method. The results reveal the advantages and the shortcomings of using waveform structures in time-domain target identification.

  10. Structural Causes of Right Bundle Branch Block—Time for a Closer Look?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ker, James

    2010-01-01

    Right bundle branch block is an electrocardiographic phenomenon with specific criteria. Currently, two specific forms of right bundle branch block are acknowledged, a proximal and a distal variant. A vast array of pathologies can cause proximal, distal or even combined forms of right bundle branch block. In this study it is suggested that a third type of right bundle branch block exist: one caused by a subaortic muscular tendon in the left ventricle, leading to an increased velocity of conduction in the left ventricle, with a resultant “relative” right bundle branch block. It is concluded that it is necessary (and time) to take a closer look at endoventricular structures in the assessment of structural causes of right bundle branch block. PMID:20386615

  11. The structuring process of the macroparasite community of an experimental population of cichlasoma urophthalmus through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Martinez; Kennedy; Aguirre-Macedo

    1998-09-01

    The structuring process of the macroparasite community of caged Cichlasoma urophthalmus was studied over time using sentinel fish. Three thousand uninfected cichlids were stocked in floating cages introduced into a quarry in which a wild population of the same species was present. Caged and wild cichlids were sampled monthly over 6 and 7 months, respectively. Seventeen macroparasite species were found in the wild C. urophthalmus population, ten of which were detected in the caged population after 6 months. Early infections were by those species that were more frequent and abundant in the wild population, while helminths with a low prevalence and abundance in the wild appeared later in the caged fish population. The results suggested that the structuring process of the macroparasite community of caged C. urophthalmus followed a predictable pattern, in which those species that were most frequent and abundant in the wild were the first to establish in sentinel fish.

  12. Stochastic models for structured populations scaling limits and long time behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Meleard, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution, several probabilistic tools to study population dynamics are developed. The focus is on scaling limits of qualitatively different stochastic individual based models and the long time behavior of some classes of limiting processes. Structured population dynamics are modeled by measure-valued processes describing the individual behaviors and taking into account the demographic and mutational parameters, and possible interactions between individuals. Many quantitative parameters appear in these models and several relevant normalizations are considered, leading  to infinite-dimensional deterministic or stochastic large-population approximations. Biologically relevant questions are considered, such as extinction criteria, the effect of large birth events, the impact of  environmental catastrophes, the mutation-selection trade-off, recovery criteria in parasite infections, genealogical properties of a sample of individuals. These notes originated from a lecture series on Structured P...

  13. Use of Time- and Frequency-Domain Approaches for Damage Detection in Civil Engineering Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. H. Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to apply both time- and frequency-domain-based approaches on real-life civil engineering structures and to assess their capability for damage detection. The methodology is based on Principal Component Analysis of the Hankel matrix built from output-only measurements and of Frequency Response Functions. Damage detection is performed using the concept of subspace angles between a current (possibly damaged state and a reference (undamaged state. The first structure is the Champangshiehl Bridge located in Luxembourg. Several damage levels were intentionally created by cutting a growing number of prestressed tendons and vibration data were acquired by the University of Luxembourg for each damaged state. The second example consists in reinforced and prestressed concrete panels. Successive damages were introduced in the panels by loading heavy weights and by cutting steel wires. The illustrations show different consequences in damage identification by the considered techniques.

  14. Chromatographic Retention Times of Polychlorinated Biphenyls: from Structural Information to Property Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea V. Diudea

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a unitary approach of the use of a Molecular DescriptorsFamily in structure-property/activity relationships, particularly in modelling thechromatographic retention times of polychlorinated biphenyls. Starting from molecularstructure, viewed as a graph, and considering the bonds and bond types, atom types andoften the 3D geometry of the molecule, a huge family of molecular descriptors called MDFwas calculated. A preliminary selection of MDF members was done by simple linearregression (LR against the measured property. The best fitted MDF subset is thensubmitted to multivariate linear regression (MLR analysis in order to find the best pairs ofMDF members that produce a reliable QSPR (Quantitative Structure-PropertyRelationship model. The predictive capability was finally tested by randomly splitting ofdata into training and test sets. The best obtained models are presented and the results arediscussed.

  15. Improvement of training set structure in fusion data cleaning using Time-Domain Global Similarity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Lan, T.; Qin, H.

    2017-10-01

    Traditional data cleaning identifies dirty data by classifying original data sequences, which is a class-imbalanced problem since the proportion of incorrect data is much less than the proportion of correct ones for most diagnostic systems in Magnetic Confinement Fusion (MCF) devices. When using machine learning algorithms to classify diagnostic data based on class-imbalanced training set, most classifiers are biased towards the major class and show very poor classification rates on the minor class. By transforming the direct classification problem about original data sequences into a classification problem about the physical similarity between data sequences, the class-balanced effect of Time-Domain Global Similarity (TDGS) method on training set structure is investigated in this paper. Meanwhile, the impact of improved training set structure on data cleaning performance of TDGS method is demonstrated with an application example in EAST POlarimetry-INTerferometry (POINT) system.

  16. Time-Dependent Tree-Structured Survival Analysis with Unbiased Variable Selection through Permutation Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Incorporating time-dependent covariates into tree-structured survival analysis (TSSA) may result in more accurate prognostic models than if only baseline values are used. Available time-dependent TSSA methods exhaustively test every binary split on every covariate; however, this approach may result in selection bias towards covariates with more observed values. We present a method that uses unbiased significance levels from newly proposed permutation tests to select the time-dependent or baseline covariate with the strongest relationship with the survival outcome. The specific splitting value is identified using only the selected covariate. Simulation results show that the proposed time-dependent TSSA method produces tree models of equal or greater accuracy as compared to baseline TSSA models, even with high censoring rates and large within-subject variability in the time-dependent covariate. To illustrate, the proposed method is applied to data from a cohort of bipolar youth to identify subgroups at risk for self-injurious behavior. PMID:25043382

  17. Probing the time structure of the quark-gluon plasma with top quarks arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Apolinário, Liliana; Salam, Gavin P.; Salgado, Carlos A.

    The tiny droplets of Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) created in high-energy nuclear collisions experience fast expansion and cooling with a lifetime of some $\\text{fm}/c$. Despite the information provided by probes such as jet quenching and quarkonium suppression, and the excellent description by hydrodynamical models, direct access to the time evolution of the system remains elusive. We point out that the study of hadronically-decaying $W$ bosons in events with a top-antitop quark pair can provide unique insight into the time structure of the QGP. This is because of the finite lifetimes of the top and $W$ particles, and a time-delay in the interaction of the (colour-singlet) $W$-boson's decay products with the medium. All three times are correlated with the kinematics of the top quark, allowing the approximate determination of the time at which the interaction with the QGP begins. We carry out a simple Monte Carlo feasibility study and find that the LHC has the potential to bring first, limited information on the t...

  18. Lake Erie Yellow perch age estimation based on three structures: Precision, processing times, and management implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergoot, C.S.; Bur, M.T.; Powell, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    Yellow perch Perca flavescens support economically important recreational and commercial fisheries in Lake Erie and are intensively managed. Age estimation represents an integral component in the management of Lake Erie yellow perch stocks, as age-structured population models are used to set safe harvest levels on an annual basis. We compared the precision associated with yellow perch (N = 251) age estimates from scales, sagittal otoliths, and anal spine sections and evaluated the time required to process and estimate age from each structure. Three readers of varying experience estimated ages. The precision (mean coefficient of variation) of estimates among readers was 1% for sagittal otoliths, 5-6% for anal spines, and 11-13% for scales. Agreement rates among readers were 94-95% for otoliths, 71-76% for anal spines, and 45-50% for scales. Systematic age estimation differences were evident among scale and anal spine readers; less-experienced readers tended to underestimate ages of yellow perch older than age 4 relative to estimates made by an experienced reader. Mean scale age tended to underestimate ages of age-6 and older fish relative to otolith ages estimated by an experienced reader. Total annual mortality estimates based on scale ages were 20% higher than those based on otolith ages; mortality estimates based on anal spine ages were 4% higher than those based on otolith ages. Otoliths required more removal and preparation time than scales and anal spines, but age estimation time was substantially lower for otoliths than for the other two structures. We suggest the use of otoliths or anal spines for age estimation in yellow perch (regardless of length) from Lake Erie and other systems where precise age estimates are necessary, because age estimation errors resulting from the use of scales could generate incorrect management decisions. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  19. Discrete-time variable structure system synthesis for plants with nonminimum phase zeros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskrenović-Momčilović Olivera I.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes a discrete variable structure system for control n-th order plants with nonminimum phase zeros in the input-output transfer function. The problem is solved by using the technique of stable system center. The first is a discrete mathematical model of the system in the normal canonical form for a given system. Then the synthesis of state generator and discrete 'time controller using the center of a stable system. The theoretical results are demonstrated in a numerical example.

  20. Analysis of the time structure of synchronization in multidimensional chaotic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarenko, A. V., E-mail: avm.science@mail.ru [Constructive Cybernetics Research Group (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    A new approach is proposed to the integrated analysis of the time structure of synchronization of multidimensional chaotic systems. The method allows one to diagnose and quantitatively evaluate the intermittency characteristics during synchronization of chaotic oscillations in the T-synchronization mode. A system of two identical logistic mappings with unidirectional coupling that operate in the developed chaos regime is analyzed. It is shown that the widely used approach, in which only synchronization patterns are subjected to analysis while desynchronization areas are considered as a background signal and removed from analysis, should be regarded as methodologically incomplete.

  1. Theoretical foundations of cosmology introduction to the global structure of space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The book's principal aim is to clarify fundamental concepts, decipher mathematical structures used to model space-time and relativistic worlds, and to disclose their physical meaning. After each chapter, philosophical implications of the presented material are commented upon.Both special and general theories of relativity are presented in the book with the stress on their global aspects. Although global mathematical methods are extensively used throughout the book, the definitions of new concepts, short comments and examples make reading smooth without the need to consult other textbooks or re

  2. Three Dimensional Structure and Time Development of Radio Emission from Solar Active Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-15

    04 t4 - - N to ,-44 *.~. O~i 4 4J-4 - 4 0 4 -4:.- 0 0 (v 4 -4 00 H1 H1 - - 00 "o 0 -0 I 4.) _Ik 41 *.-4 40 ponding to the 0 VIII, Ne IX and Mg XI...shown in Figure 19. The contours of the I maps mark levels of equal brightness temperature corres- ponding to 0.2, 0.4 ..... 1.0 times the maximum...relation to coronal sagneti structures, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Utrecht, The Netherlands. 121. Gold, T. and Hoyle , F. (1960), On the origin of solar

  3. A Real-Time All-Atom Structural Search Engine for Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Hannigan, Brett; DeGrado, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new “designabilit...

  4. A real-time all-atom structural search engine for proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Gonzalez; Brett Hannigan; DeGrado, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new "designabilit...

  5. Terahertz Induced Electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strikwerda, Andrew; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    We report the first observation of THz-field-induced electromigration in subwavelength metallic gap structures after exposure to intense single-cycle, sub-picosecond electric field transients of amplitude up to 400 kV/cm....

  6. Terahertz Induced Electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strikwerda, Andrew; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof

    We report the first observation of THz-field-induced electromigration in subwavelength metallic gap structures after exposure to intense single-cycle, sub-picosecond electric field transients of amplitude up to 400 kV/cm....

  7. Terahertz field induced electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strikwerda, Andrew; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof

    We report the first observation of THz-field-induced electromigration in sub-wavelength metallic gap structures after exposure to intense single-cycle, sub-picosecond electric field transients of amplitude up to 400 kV/cm....

  8. Classification of cardiovascular time series based on different coupling structures using recurrence networks analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Ávila, Gonzalo Marcelo; Gapelyuk, Andrej; Marwan, Norbert; Walther, Thomas; Stepan, Holger; Kurths, Jürgen; Wessel, Niels

    2013-08-28

    We analyse cardiovascular time series with the aim of performing early prediction of preeclampsia (PE), a pregnancy-specific disorder causing maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. The analysis is made using a novel approach, namely the ε-recurrence networks applied to a phase space constructed by means of the time series of the variabilities of the heart rate and the blood pressure (systolic and diastolic). All the possible coupling structures among these variables are considered for the analysis. Network measures such as average path length, mean coreness, global clustering coefficient and scale-local transitivity dimension are computed and constitute the parameters for the subsequent quadratic discriminant analysis. This allows us to predict PE with a sensitivity of 91.7 per cent and a specificity of 68.1 per cent, thus validating the use of this method for classifying healthy and preeclamptic patients.

  9. Effects of Network Structure, Competition and Memory Time on Social Spreading Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, James P.; O'Sullivan, Kevin P.; Baños, Raquel A.; Moreno, Yamir

    2016-04-01

    Online social media has greatly affected the way in which we communicate with each other. However, little is known about what fundamental mechanisms drive dynamical information flow in online social systems. Here, we introduce a generative model for online sharing behavior that is analytically tractable and that can reproduce several characteristics of empirical micro-blogging data on hashtag usage, such as (time-dependent) heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity. The presented framework constitutes a null model for social spreading phenomena that, in contrast to purely empirical studies or simulation-based models, clearly distinguishes the roles of two distinct factors affecting meme popularity: the memory time of users and the connectivity structure of the social network.

  10. Effects of Network Structure, Competition and Memory Time on Social Spreading Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Gleeson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Online social media has greatly affected the way in which we communicate with each other. However, little is known about what fundamental mechanisms drive dynamical information flow in online social systems. Here, we introduce a generative model for online sharing behavior that is analytically tractable and that can reproduce several characteristics of empirical micro-blogging data on hashtag usage, such as (time-dependent heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity. The presented framework constitutes a null model for social spreading phenomena that, in contrast to purely empirical studies or simulation-based models, clearly distinguishes the roles of two distinct factors affecting meme popularity: the memory time of users and the connectivity structure of the social network.

  11. Monitoring in situ in real time of resin infusion for thermoset composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faci, A.; Wang, P.; Cochrane, C.; Koncar, V.

    2017-10-01

    The presented work investigates changes in electrical resistance of embedded sensory yarns as a method to monitor the resin flow front position and curing degree of resin during manufacturing of composite structures by vacuum infusion technology. The sensor concept is based on Piezo-resistive sensors integrated to the flax fabric, having almost identical propriety and dimensions as the flax threads used for the production of reinforcements. In the first time sensors have been characterized and first measures of the resin infusion have been realized in order to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach. Then, the measures in real time were realized with fibrous sensors added to the flax fabric (green composites) to monitor the flow front of resin. A large amount of data recorded, filtered, examined, analysed and processed in order to understand and to optimize the infusion and polymerization process.

  12. Optical detection system using time structure of UVSOR for combined laser-SR experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Azuma, J; Tsujibayashi, T; Itoh, M; Watanabe, M; Arimoto, O; Nakanishi, S; Itoh, H; Kamada, M

    2001-01-01

    A new TAC-MCA detection system has been developed for combined laser-SR spectroscopy such as two-photon excitation or pump-probe experiments in the VUV region. In order to improve the signal to noise ratio, the time structure under partial-filling operation of UVSOR is utilized together with this detection system. In our experiment, where the two-photon excitation efficiency of laser and SR is more important than the time resolution, a pulse stretching technique using optical fiber is applied to the output pulse of a CW mode-locked Ti : sapphire laser. The usefulness of the present system is successfully demonstrated by observing luminescence signals from the two-photon-excited core state in BaF sub 2 crystals.

  13. Partially persistent data structures of bounded degree with constant update time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting

    1996-01-01

    The problem of making bounded in-degree and out-degree data structures partially persistent is considered. The node copying method of Driscoll et al. is extended so that updates can be performed in worst-case constant time on the pointer machine model. Previously it was only known to be possible...... in amortised constant time.The result is presented in terms of a new strategy for Dietz and Raman's dynamic two player pebble game on graphs.It is shown how to implement the strategy and the upper bound on the required number of pebbles is improved from 2b+2d+O(√b) to d+2b. where b is the bound of the in...

  14. Identification of frequency domain and time domain aeroelastic parameters for flutter analysis of flexible structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Arindam Gan

    Flutter analysis of structures is usually done in frequency domain. Alternately, time-domain methods have been suggested. For frequency-domain flutter analysis, flutter derivatives are used that can be identified from section model testing in the wind tunnel. In time-domain analysis, the frequency-dependent aerodynamic self-excited forces expressed in flutter derivatives acting on the structure can be approximated in the Laplace domain by Rational functions. The art of efficient extraction of these aeroelastic parameters requires an elastic suspension system to capture coupled displacement and aerodynamic force time histories from wind tunnel testing of section models. A novel three-degree-of-freedom (DOF) suspension system has been developed for the wind-tunnel section model study of wind-excited vibrations of flexible structures. The extraction of flutter derivatives becomes more challenging when the number of DOF of section model increases from two to three. Since the work in the field of identifying all eighteen flutter derivatives has been limited, it has motivated the development of a new system identification method (Iterative least squares method or ILS method) to efficiently extract the flutter derivatives using a section model suspended by the three-DOF elastic suspension system. All eighteen flutter derivatives for a streamlined bridge deck and an airfoil section model were identified by using ILS approach. Flutter derivatives related to the lateral DOF were emphasized. For time-domain flutter analysis, Rational function approximation (RFA) approach involves approximation of the experimentally obtained flutter derivatives through 'multilevel linear and nonlinear optimization' procedure. This motivated the formulation of a system identification technique (Experimental extraction of Rational function coefficients or E2RFC) to directly extract the Rational function coefficients from wind tunnel testing. The current formulation requires testing of the model

  15. Training and learning robotic surgery, time for a more structured approach: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuder, H W R; Wolswijk, R; Zweemer, R P; Schijven, M P; Verheijen, R H M

    2012-01-01

    Robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery is growing rapidly and there is an increasing need for a structured approach to train future robotic surgeons. To review the literature on training and learning strategies for robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. A systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library and the Journal of Robotic Surgery was performed. We included articles concerning training, learning, education and teaching of robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery in any specialism. Two authors independently selected articles to be included. We categorised the included articles into: training modalities, learning curve, training future surgeons, curriculum design and implementation. We included 114 full text articles. Training modalities such as didactic training, skills training (dry lab, virtual reality, animal or cadaver models), case observation, bedside assisting, proctoring and the mentoring console can be used for training in robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. Several training programmes in general and specific programmes designed for residents, fellows and surgeons are described in the literature. We provide guidelines for development of a structured training programme. Robotic surgical training consists of system training and procedural training. System training should be formally organised and should be competence based, instead of time based. Virtual reality training will play an import role in the near future. Procedural training should be organised in a stepwise approach with objective assessment of each step. This review aims to facilitate and improve the implementation of structured robotic surgical training programmes. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.

  16. Time-resolved footprinting for the study of the structural dynamics of DNA-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclavi, Bianca

    2008-08-01

    Transcription is often regulated at the level of initiation by the presence of transcription factors or nucleoid proteins or by changing concentrations of metabolites. These can influence the kinetic properties and/or structures of the intermediate RNA polymerase-DNA complexes in the pathway. Time-resolved footprinting techniques combine the high temporal resolution of a stopped-flow apparatus with the specific structural information obtained by the probing agent. Combined with a careful quantitative analysis of the evolution of the signals, this approach allows for the identification and kinetic and structural characterization of the intermediates in the pathway of DNA sequence recognition by a protein, such as a transcription factor or RNA polymerase. The combination of different probing agents is especially powerful in revealing different aspects of the conformational changes taking place at the protein-DNA interface. For example, hydroxyl radical footprinting, owing to their small size, provides a map of the solvent-accessible surface of the DNA backbone at a single nucleotide resolution; modification of the bases using potassium permanganate can reveal the accessibility of the bases when the double helix is distorted or melted; cross-linking experiments report on the formation of specific amino acid-DNA contacts, and DNase I footprinting results in a strong signal-to-noise ratio from DNA protection at the binding site and hypersensitivity at curved or kinked DNA sites. Recent developments in protein footprinting allow for the direct characterization of conformational changes of the proteins in the complex.

  17. The family and family structure classification redefined for the current times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The family is a basic unit of study in many medical and social science disciplines. Definitions of family have varied from country to country, and also within country. Because of this and the changing realities of the current times, there is a felt need for redefining the family and the common family structure types, for the purpose of study of the family as a factor in health and other variables of interest. A redefinition of a ′′family′′ has been proposed and various nuances of the definition are also discussed in detail. A classification scheme for the various types of family has also been put forward. A few exceptional case scenarios have been envisaged and their classification as per the new scheme is discussed, in a bid to clarify the classification scheme further. The proposed scheme should prove to be of use across various countries and cultures, for broadly classifying the family structure. The unique scenarios of particular cultures can be taken into account by defining region or culture-specific subtypes of the overall types of family structure.

  18. What could the LHC teach us on the structure of space-time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantaphyllou George

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Collision energies of proton beams now available at the LHC increase the probability of discovering the inner works of the Brout-Englert-Higgs (BEH mechanism within the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, they are still several orders of magnitude below the scale where a possible non-trivial structure of space-time would be detectable. Apart from remaining completely silent on the issue of the fundamental nature of elementary particles and the space in which they propagate, one may try to speculate on this matter by carefully extrapolating existing scientific methods and knowledge to Planck energies. In this talk, an effort is made to logically link some potential discoveries at the LHC with specific space-time structures. Since such links are inevitably weak due to the huge energy hierarchy between the electro-weak and the Planck scales, our goal does not exceed a mere presentation of naturalness and self-consistency arguments in favor of some of the possible outcomes, placing particular emphasis on the scenario of the mirror world.

  19. Observing microscopic structures of a relativistic object using a time-stretch strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, E; Evain, C; Le Parquier, M; Szwaj, C; Bielawski, S; Manceron, L; Brubach, J-B; Tordeux, M-A; Ricaud, J-P; Cassinari, L; Labat, M; Couprie, M-E; Roy, P

    2015-05-28

    Emission of light by a single electron moving on a curved trajectory (synchrotron radiation) is one of the most well-known fundamental radiation phenomena. However experimental situations are more complex as they involve many electrons, each being exposed to the radiation of its neighbors. This interaction has dramatic consequences, one of the most spectacular being the spontaneous formation of spatial structures inside electrons bunches. This fundamental effect is actively studied as it represents one of the most fundamental limitations in electron accelerators, and at the same time a source of intense terahertz radiation (Coherent Synchrotron Radiation, or CSR). Here we demonstrate the possibility to directly observe the electron bunch microstructures with subpicosecond resolution, in a storage ring accelerator. The principle is to monitor the terahertz pulses emitted by the structures, using a strategy from photonics, time-stretch, consisting in slowing-down the phenomena before recording. This opens the way to unpreceeded possibilities for analyzing and mastering new generation high power coherent synchrotron sources.

  20. Reproducing the energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during quiet times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, J. F.; Reeves, G. D.; Santolik, O.; Cunningham, G.; Loridan, V.; Denton, M.; Kurth, W. S.; Turner, D. L.; Kletzing, C.; Henderson, M. G.; Ukhorskiy, S.

    2016-12-01

    We present and discuss dynamic simulations of energy-dependent losses in the radiation belt "slot region" and the formation of the two-belt structure for the quiet days after the 1 March storm. The simulations combine radial diffusion with a realistic scattering model, based data-driven spatially and temporally resolved whistler-mode hiss wave observations from the Van Allen Probes satellites. We will describe how the latter is generated from massively parallel computations of pitch angle diffusion at a scale never achieved in the past. The simulations reproduce Van Allen Probes observations for all energies and L shells (2-6) including (a) the strong energy dependence to the radiation belt dynamics (b) an energy-dependent outer boundary to the inner zone that extends to higher L shells at lower energies and (c) an "S-shaped" energy-dependent inner boundary to the outer zone that results from the competition between diffusive radial transport and losses. We find that the characteristic energy-dependent structure of the radiation belts and slot region is dynamic and can be formed gradually in 15 days, although the "S shape" can also be reproduced by assuming equilibrium conditions. But we will show that equilibrium states are usually not reachable as it requires very long times for most energy electrons and L-shells. The highest-energy electrons (E>300 keV) of the inner region of the outer belt (L 4-5) also constantly decay, demonstrating that hiss wave scattering affects the outer belt during times of extended plasmasphere. Through these simulations, we explain the full structure in energy and L shell of the belts and the slot formation by hiss scattering during storm recovery. We show the power and complexity of looking dynamically at the effects over all energies and L shells and the need for using data-driven and event-specific conditions.

  1. Identification of structural breaks in hydrological maxima time series in Paraguay River, Pantanal Region, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marcus; Lima, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    The hydrological time series of the Paraguay River located in the Pantanal region of Brazil exhibits a complex and interesting behavior, which includes long memory characteristics, monotonic trends, multiple breaks and strong seasonality. Particularly, several abrupt changes from low to high flows and vice versa have been observed on annual maxima time series and have been responsible for the major flood damages in the region, even more significant than the largest floods that occurred in the period post 1974. The year of 1974 is historically known as the year of the most significant flood impact in region, especially on agriculture and cattle. Therefore, the identification and attribution of such step changes in the series is of particular interest to improve the flood management systems across the region. Here we apply the cumulative sum (CUSUM) procedure to identify the timing of the abrupt changes. Preliminary results for the Ladario streamflow gauge reveal multiple structural changes in 1936 (high flows to low flows), 1961 (high/low), 1974 (low/high) and 1999 (high/low). Rainfall records were also analyzed and the results obtained suggest that the Paraguay River basin in its upper reach, monitored by Caceres gauging station (32,400 km²) and Cuiabá river basin (23,500 km²) are the factors that most contribute to low frequencies oscillations in the Ladario maxima time series (253,000 km²). These sub-basins are both located in the northern part of the catchment along with the boundary of the Amazon River basin, where the average rainfall is more expressive. In both basins the rainfall records show a structural break in 1973. Simple linear regression using rainfall and flow records in those sub-basins show that the rainfall data accounts for around 70% of the flow variance, indicating that the internal dynamics of the catchment plays a minor role on the streamflow variability. Low frequency variability is also observed in both rainfall series and may be the

  2. Linking Environmental Régimes, Space and Time: Interpretations of Structural and Functional Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, J.; Ibrahim, T. G.; Lexartza-Artza, I.; Turnbull, L.

    2008-12-01

    variables are the flow direction and the seasonality of biotic patterns, superimposed on the flow heterogeneity. When considering slope-channel interactions, the distribution of landscape elements is crucial. It is necessary to consider at the same time the rôle of natural events and human-induced disturbances and the responses of the system to these inputs, as the feedbacks among these structural and functional elements will determine the behaviour of the transfer processes. In the case of semi-arid land degradation, as the ecosystem starts to degrade there are important feedbacks between structural and functional connectivity, leading to increases in the connectivity of runoff-generating areas, and thus to a more connected hydrological response, and a change in the connectivity of sediment and nutrient transport which further re-enforce the structural conectivity at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

  3. Dynamic Absorbers Used to Reduce Transient Time of Spacecraft Structural Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Kotsur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of the dynamic absorber effect on damping of low frequency transient processes, which occur when a spacecraft  (SC performs scheduled maneuvers.Transient time is analysed to define the effectiveness of using dynamic absorbers in the SC with non-rigid large-sized structural members. The Spacecraft “Kondor” is considered as a prototype.Two dynamical models of the SC in question are built and analyzed, namely the first one without absorbers and the other one with mounted absorbers. The both models represent a combination of point masses, connected with each other by viscoelastic coupling. The motion equations in modal coordinates are deduced using the Lagrange equation of the second kind.The prototype data chosen from the open publications are used as initial data for the model. The absorber parameters are iteratively selected without solving optimization problem.As a transient model, is used an initial displacement of four particular degrees of freedom, which correspond to the main non-rigid structural members (antenna module, solar panels.The result obtained shows that the use of dynamic absorbers allows us to decrease the time of particular transient process under consideration totally by 55%.The main utility of the proposed method is that it can be used at the front end engineering design stage of a newly designed SC to prevent arising spurious modes. The model can also be useful for an existing SC, which for various reasons does not meet requirements of the transient process time.The paper clearly shows the positive effect of dynamic absorbers available in the SC construction.

  4. Time scales and structures of wave interaction exemplified with water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartashova, Elena

    2013-05-01

    Presently two models for computing energy spectra in weakly nonlinear dispersive media are known: kinetic wave turbulence theory, using a statistical description of an energy cascade over a continuous spectrum (K-cascade), and the D-model, describing resonant clusters and energy cascades (D-cascade) in a deterministic way as interaction of distinct modes. In this letter we give an overview of these structures and their properties and a list of criteria about which model of energy cascade should be used in the analysis of a given experiment, using water waves as an example. Applying the time scale analysis to weakly nonlinear wave systems modeled by the focusing nonlinear Schödinger equation, we demonstrate that K-cascade and D-cascade are not competing processes but rather two processes taking place at different time scales, at different characteristic levels of nonlinearity and based on different physical mechanisms. Applying those criteria to data known from experiments with surface water waves we find that the energy cascades observed occur at short characteristic times compatible only with a D-cascade. The only pre-requisite for a D-cascade being a focusing nonlinear Schödinger equation, the same analysis may be applied to existing experiments with wave systems appearing in hydrodynamics, nonlinear optics, electrodynamics, plasma, convection theory, etc.

  5. Numerical modeling of general circulation, thermohaline structure, and residence time in Gorgan Bay, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Hassan; Hadjizadeh Zaker, Nasser

    2017-11-01

    Gorgan Bay is a semi-enclosed basin located in the southeast of the Caspian Sea, Iran. The bay is recognized as a resting place for migratory birds as well as a spawning habitat for native fish. However, apparently, no detailed research on its physical processes has previously been conducted. In this study, a 3D coupled hydrodynamic and solute transport model was used to investigate general circulation, thermohaline structure, and residence time in Gorgan Bay. Model outputs were validated against a set of field observations. Bottom friction and attenuation coefficient of light intensity were tuned in order to achieve optimum agreement with the observations. Results revealed that, due to the interaction between bathymetry and prevailing winds, a barotropic double-gyre circulation, dominating the general circulation, existed during all seasons in Gorgan Bay. Furthermore, temperature and salinity fluctuations in the bay were seasonal, due to the seasonal variability of atmospheric fluxes. Results also indicated that under the prevailing winds, the domain-averaged residence time in Gorgan Bay would be approximately 95 days. The rivers discharging into Gorgan Bay are considered as the main sources of nutrients in the bay. Since their mouths are located in the area with a residence time of over 100 days, Gorgan Bay could be at risk of eutrophication; it is necessary to adopt preventive measures against water quality degradation.

  6. Bacterial diversity and community structure in lettuce soil are shifted by cultivation time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiqian; Chang, Qing; Guo, Xu; Yi, Xinxin

    2017-08-01

    Compared with cereal production, vegetable production usually requires a greater degree of management and larger input of nutrients and irrigation, but these systems are not sustainable in the long term. This study aimed to what extent lettuce determine the bacterial community composition in the soil, during lettuce cultivation, pesticides and fertilizers were not apply to soil. Soil samples were collected from depths of 0-20cm and 20-40cm. A highthroughput sequencing approach was employed to investigate bacterial communities in lettuce-cultivated soil samples in a time-dependent manner. The dominant bacteria in the lettuce soil samples were mainly Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Chloroflexi, Nitrospirae, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia, Planctomycetes, Gemmatimo nadetes, Cyanobacteria. Proteobacteria was the most abundant phylum in the 6 soil samples. The relative abundance of Acidobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Verrucomicrobia and Cyanobacteria decreased through time of lettuce cultivation, but the relative abundance of Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes, Chloroflexi, Planctomycetes and Nitrospirae increased over time. In the 0-20cm depth group and the 20-40cm depth soil, a similar pattern was observed that the percentage number of only shared OTUs between the early and late stage was lower than that between the early and middle stage soil, the result showed that lettuce growth can affect structure of soil bacterial communities.

  7. Near Real-time Waveform Inversion for Finite-source Rupture in 3D Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, M. C.; Zhao, L.; Ji, C.; Ma, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Advances in observational and computational technologies in the past two decades have made it possible for automatic, real-time solutions of the focal mechanisms of earthquake point sources. However, seismic wave radiations from moderate and large earthquakes often exhibit complex directivity behavior that can only be explained by rupture processes that are finite in both space and time. We develop an efficient and effective approach to determining the finite-rupture models of moderate and large earthquakes by fitting synthetic and recorded broadband waveforms. A Green tensor database is established which enables rapid calculations of accurate synthetic seismograms in three-dimensional structural models with realistic surface topography without the need for high-performance computing. A three-step process is used in solving for a finite-source model: A point-source focal mechanism is determined in the first step. Then, the two nodal planes in the point-source solution are used as trial candidates to solve for an average finite-rupture model and identify the actual fault plane. In the final step, a finite-fault slip distribution inversion is carried out based on the identified fault plane. Applications to moderate events (MW≈6) in Taiwan show that our source inversion technique is effective for semi-automatic, near real-time determinations of finite-source parameters for seismic hazard mitigation purposes.

  8. Numerical modeling of general circulation, thermohaline structure, and residence time in Gorgan Bay, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Hassan; Hadjizadeh Zaker, Nasser

    2018-01-01

    Gorgan Bay is a semi-enclosed basin located in the southeast of the Caspian Sea, Iran. The bay is recognized as a resting place for migratory birds as well as a spawning habitat for native fish. However, apparently, no detailed research on its physical processes has previously been conducted. In this study, a 3D coupled hydrodynamic and solute transport model was used to investigate general circulation, thermohaline structure, and residence time in Gorgan Bay. Model outputs were validated against a set of field observations. Bottom friction and attenuation coefficient of light intensity were tuned in order to achieve optimum agreement with the observations. Results revealed that, due to the interaction between bathymetry and prevailing winds, a barotropic double-gyre circulation, dominating the general circulation, existed during all seasons in Gorgan Bay. Furthermore, temperature and salinity fluctuations in the bay were seasonal, due to the seasonal variability of atmospheric fluxes. Results also indicated that under the prevailing winds, the domain-averaged residence time in Gorgan Bay would be approximately 95 days. The rivers discharging into Gorgan Bay are considered as the main sources of nutrients in the bay. Since their mouths are located in the area with a residence time of over 100 days, Gorgan Bay could be at risk of eutrophication; it is necessary to adopt preventive measures against water quality degradation.

  9. Prediction of low-frequency structure-borne sound in concrete structures using the finite-difference time-domain method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, T; Ishizuka, T; Miyajima, T; Toyoda, M; Sakamoto, S

    2014-09-01

    Due to limitations of computers, prediction of structure-borne sound remains difficult for large-scale problems. Herein a prediction method for low-frequency structure-borne sound transmissions on concrete structures using the finite-difference time-domain scheme is proposed. The target structure is modeled as a composition of multiple plate elements to reduce the dimensions of the simulated vibration field from three-dimensional discretization by solid elements to two-dimensional discretization. This scheme reduces both the calculation time and the amount of required memory. To validate the proposed method, the vibration characteristics using the numerical results of the proposed scheme are compared to those measured for a two-level concrete structure. Comparison of the measured and simulated results suggests that the proposed method can be used to simulate real-scale structures.

  10. Time domain numerical calculations of the short electron bunch wakefields in resistive structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakanian, Andranik

    2010-10-15

    The acceleration of electron bunches with very small longitudinal and transverse phase space volume is one of the most actual challenges for the future International Linear Collider and high brightness X-Ray Free Electron Lasers. The exact knowledge on the wake fields generated by the ultra-short electron bunches during its interaction with surrounding structures is a very important issue to prevent the beam quality degradation and to optimize the facility performance. The high accuracy time domain numerical calculations play the decisive role in correct evaluation of the wake fields in advanced accelerators. The thesis is devoted to the development of a new longitudinally dispersion-free 3D hybrid numerical scheme in time domain for wake field calculation of ultra short bunches in structures with walls of finite conductivity. The basic approaches used in the thesis to solve the problem are the following. For materials with high but finite conductivity the model of the plane wave reflection from a conducting half-space is used. It is shown that in the conductive half-space the field components perpendicular to the interface can be neglected. The electric tangential component on the surface contributes to the tangential magnetic field in the lossless area just before the boundary layer. For high conducting media, the task is reduced to 1D electromagnetic problem in metal and the so-called 1D conducting line model can be applied instead of a full 3D space description. Further, a TE/TM (''transverse electric - transverse magnetic'') splitting implicit numerical scheme along with 1D conducting line model is applied to develop a new longitudinally dispersion-free hybrid numerical scheme in the time domain. The stability of the new hybrid numerical scheme in vacuum, conductor and bound cell is studied. The convergence of the new scheme is analyzed by comparison with the well-known analytical solutions. The wakefield calculations for a number of

  11. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dell'Angela

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001. We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  12. Vacuum space charge effects in sub-picosecond soft X-ray photoemission on a molecular adsorbate layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Angela, M; Anniyev, T; Beye, M; Coffee, R; Föhlisch, A; Gladh, J; Kaya, S; Katayama, T; Krupin, O; Nilsson, A; Nordlund, D; Schlotter, W F; Sellberg, J A; Sorgenfrei, F; Turner, J J; Öström, H; Ogasawara, H; Wolf, M; Wurth, W

    2015-03-01

    Vacuum space charge induced kinetic energy shifts of O 1s and Ru 3d core levels in femtosecond soft X-ray photoemission spectra (PES) have been studied at a free electron laser (FEL) for an oxygen layer on Ru(0001). We fully reproduced the measurements by simulating the in-vacuum expansion of the photoelectrons and demonstrate the space charge contribution of the high-order harmonics in the FEL beam. Employing the same analysis for 400 nm pump-X-ray probe PES, we can disentangle the delay dependent Ru 3d energy shifts into effects induced by space charge and by lattice heating from the femtosecond pump pulse.

  13. Sub-picosecond pulse and terahertz optical frequency comb generation by monolithically integrated linear mode-locked laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Mu-Chieh; Guzmán, Robinson; Ali, Muhsin; Santos, Rui; Augustin, Luc; Carpintero, Guillermo

    2017-05-01

    We report on a record broad 3-dB bandwidth of 14 nm ( 1.8 THz around 1532 nm) optical frequency comb generated from a passively mode-locked quantum-well (QW) laser in the form of photonic integrated circuits through an InP generic photonic integration technology platform. This 21.5-GHz colliding-pulse mode-locked laser cavity is defined by two on-chip reflectors incorporating intracavity phase modulators followed by an out-of-cavity SOA as booster. Under certain operating conditions, an ultra-wide spectral bandwidth is achieved along with an autocorrelation trace confirming the mode locking nature exhibiting a pulse width of 0.35 ps. The beat note RF spectrum has a linewidth of sub-MHz and 35-dB SNR.

  14. Amyloid–β peptides time-dependent structural modifications: AFM and voltammetric characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Chiorcea-Paquim, Ana-Maria; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria, E-mail: brett@ci.uc.pt

    2016-07-05

    The human amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, Aβ{sub 1-40} and Aβ{sub 1-42}, structural modifications, from soluble monomers to fully formed fibrils through intermediate structures, were investigated, and the results were compared with those obtained for the inverse Aβ{sub 40-1} and Aβ{sub 42-1}, mutant Aβ{sub 1-40}Phe{sup 10} and Aβ{sub 1-40}Nle{sup 35}, and rat Aβ{sub 1-40}Rat peptide sequences. The aggregation was followed at a slow rate, in chloride free media and room temperature, and revealed to be a sequence-structure process, dependent on the physicochemical properties of each Aβ peptide isoforms, and occurring at different rates and by different pathways. The fibrilization process was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), via changes in the adsorption morphology from: (i) initially random coiled structures of ∼0.6 nm height, corresponding to the Aβ peptide monomers in random coil or in α-helix conformations, to (ii) aggregates and protofibrils of 1.5–6.0 nm height and (iii) two types of fibrils, corresponding to the Aβ peptide in a β-sheet configuration. The reactivity of the carbon electrode surface was considered. The hydrophobic surface induced rapid changes of the Aβ peptide conformations, and differences between the adsorbed fibrils, formed at the carbon surface (beaded, thin, <2.0 nm height) or in solution (long, smooth, thick, >2.0 nm height), were detected. Differential pulse voltammetry showed that, according to their primary structure, the Aβ peptides undergo oxidation in one or two steps, the first step corresponding to the tyrosine amino acids oxidation, and the second one to the histidine and methionine amino acids oxidation. The fibrilization process was electrochemically detected via the decrease of the Aβ peptide oxidation peak currents that occurred in a time dependent manner. - Highlights: • The Aβ peptide fibrilization process was followed by AFM and DP voltammetry. • The human Aβ{sub 1-40} and Aβ{sub 1

  15. Real-Time Simulation of Ship-Structure and Ship-Ship Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Ole; Glimberg, Stefan Lemvig; Bingham, Harry B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives the status of the development of a ship-hydrodynamic model for real-time ship-wave calculation and ship-structure and ship-ship interaction in a full mission marine simulator. The hydrodynamic model is based on potential flow theory, linear or non-linear free surface boundary...... condition and higher-order accurate numerical approximations. The equations presented facilitate both Neumann-Kelvin and double-body linearizations. The body boundary condition on the ship hull is approximated by a static and dynamic moving pressure distribution. The pressure distribution method is used......, because it is simple, easy to implement and computationally efficient. Multiple many-core graphical processing units (GPUs) are used for parallel execution and the model is implemented using a combination of C/C++, CUDA and MPI. Two ship hydrodynamic cases are presented: Kriso Container Carrier at steady...

  16. Full-wave finite-difference time-domain simulation of electromagnetic cloaking structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Argyropoulos, Christos; Hao, Yang

    2008-04-28

    This paper proposes a radial dependent dispersive finite-difference time-domain method for the modeling of electromagnetic cloaking structures. The permittivity and permeability of the cloak are mapped to the Drude dispersion model and taken into account in dispersive FDTD simulations. Numerical simulations demonstrate that under ideal conditions, objects placed inside the cloak are 'invisible' to external electromagnetic fields. However for the simplified cloak based on linear transformations, the back scattering has a similar level to the case of a PEC cylinder without any cloak, rendering the object still being 'visible'. It is also demonstrated numerically that the simplified cloak based on high-order transformations can indeed improve the cloaking performance.

  17. Servo-controlling structure of five-axis CNC system for real-time NURBS interpolating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangji; Guo, Guangsong; Li, Huiying

    2017-07-01

    NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline) is widely used in CAD/CAM (Computer-Aided Design / Computer-Aided Manufacturing) to represent sculptured curves or surfaces. In this paper, we develop a 5-axis NURBS real-time interpolator and realize it in our developing CNC(Computer Numerical Control) system. At first, we use two NURBS curves to represent tool-tip and tool-axis path respectively. According to feedrate and Taylor series extension, servo-controlling signals of 5 axes are obtained for each interpolating cycle. Then, generation procedure of NC(Numerical Control) code with the presented method is introduced and the method how to integrate the interpolator into our developing CNC system is given. And also, the servo-controlling structure of the CNC system is introduced. Through the illustration, it has been indicated that the proposed method can enhance the machining accuracy and the spline interpolator is feasible for 5-axis CNC system.

  18. Uncovering Gene Regulatory Networks from Time-Series Microarray Data with Variational Bayesian Structural Expectation Maximization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yufei

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate in this paper reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks from time-series microarray data. We apply dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs for modeling cell cycle regulations. In developing a network inference algorithm, we focus on soft solutions that can provide a posteriori probability (APP of network topology. In particular, we propose a variational Bayesian structural expectation maximization algorithm that can learn the posterior distribution of the network model parameters and topology jointly. We also show how the obtained APPs of the network topology can be used in a Bayesian data integration strategy to integrate two different microarray data sets. The proposed VBSEM algorithm has been tested on yeast cell cycle data sets. To evaluate the confidence of the inferred networks, we apply a moving block bootstrap method. The inferred network is validated by comparing it to the KEGG pathway map.

  19. Time and the structuring of ritual performance in the xenotransplantation debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, Julia; Mather, Charles; Fleising, Usher

    2005-07-01

    Advancements in biotechnology provoke fundamental questions about the relationship of humans to the natural world. A crisis arises as the knowledge, practice, and policies concerning biotechnology grow further out of step with each other. This paper examines the role of ritual performance as a means of resolving this crisis, uniting the organic with the socio-moral aspects of science, technology and regulatory policy. Ritual performance is evident in the public discussions of the United States' Secretary's Advisory Committee on Xenotransplantation (SACX). In an attempt to understand the cultural responses to new knowledge, this paper examines the transcripts of several SACX meetings for its ritual elements and references to authority. We find that time is used by scientists to structure ritual performance in a way that guides public policy and attitudes toward xenotransplantation.

  20. Ocellar structure is driven by the mode of locomotion and activity time in Myrmecia ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendra, Ajay; Ribi, Willi A

    2017-12-01

    Insects have exquisitely adapted their compound eyes to suit the ambient light intensity in the different temporal niches they occupy. In addition to the compound eye, most flying insects have simple eyes known as ocelli, which assist in flight stabilisation, horizon detection and orientation. Among ants, typically the flying alates have ocelli while the pedestrian workers lack this structure. The Australian ant genus Myrmecia is one of the few ant genera in which both workers and alates have three ocellar lenses. Here, we studied the variation in the ocellar structure in four sympatric species of Myrmecia that are active at different times of the day. In addition, we took advantage of the walking and flying modes of locomotion in workers and males, respectively, to ask whether the type of movement influences the ocellar structure. We found that ants active in dim light had larger ocellar lenses and wider rhabdoms compared with those in bright-light conditions. In the ocellar rhabdoms of workers active in dim-light habitats, typically each retinula cell contributed microvilli in more than one direction, probably destroying polarisation sensitivity. The organisation of the ocellar retina in the day-active workers and the males suggests that in these animals some cells are sensitive to the pattern of polarised skylight. We found that the night-flying males had a tapetum that reflects light back to the rhabdom, increasing their optical sensitivity. We discuss the possible functions of ocelli to suit the different modes of locomotion and the discrete temporal niches that animals occupy. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Bryophyte species richness on retention aspens recovers in time but community structure does not.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Oldén

    Full Text Available Green-tree retention is a forest management method in which some living trees are left on a logged area. The aim is to offer 'lifeboats' to support species immediately after logging and to provide microhabitats during and after forest re-establishment. Several studies have shown immediate decline in bryophyte diversity after retention logging and thus questioned the effectiveness of this method, but longer term studies are lacking. Here we studied the epiphytic bryophytes on European aspen (Populus tremula L. retention trees along a 30-year chronosequence. We compared the bryophyte flora of 102 'retention aspens' on 14 differently aged retention sites with 102 'conservation aspens' on 14 differently aged conservation sites. We used a Bayesian community-level modelling approach to estimate the changes in bryophyte species richness, abundance (area covered and community structure during 30 years after logging. Using the fitted model, we estimated that two years after logging both species richness and abundance of bryophytes declined, but during the following 20-30 years both recovered to the level of conservation aspens. However, logging-induced changes in bryophyte community structure did not fully recover over the same time period. Liverwort species showed some or low potential to benefit from lifeboating and high potential to re-colonise as time since logging increases. Most moss species responded similarly, but two cushion-forming mosses benefited from the logging disturbance while several weft- or mat-forming mosses declined and did not re-colonise in 20-30 years. We conclude that retention trees do not function as equally effective lifeboats for all bryophyte species but are successful in providing suitable habitats for many species in the long-term. To be most effective, retention cuts should be located adjacent to conservation sites, which may function as sources of re-colonisation and support the populations of species that require old

  2. Bryophyte species richness on retention aspens recovers in time but community structure does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldén, Anna; Ovaskainen, Otso; Kotiaho, Janne S; Laaka-Lindberg, Sanna; Halme, Panu

    2014-01-01

    Green-tree retention is a forest management method in which some living trees are left on a logged area. The aim is to offer 'lifeboats' to support species immediately after logging and to provide microhabitats during and after forest re-establishment. Several studies have shown immediate decline in bryophyte diversity after retention logging and thus questioned the effectiveness of this method, but longer term studies are lacking. Here we studied the epiphytic bryophytes on European aspen (Populus tremula L.) retention trees along a 30-year chronosequence. We compared the bryophyte flora of 102 'retention aspens' on 14 differently aged retention sites with 102 'conservation aspens' on 14 differently aged conservation sites. We used a Bayesian community-level modelling approach to estimate the changes in bryophyte species richness, abundance (area covered) and community structure during 30 years after logging. Using the fitted model, we estimated that two years after logging both species richness and abundance of bryophytes declined, but during the following 20-30 years both recovered to the level of conservation aspens. However, logging-induced changes in bryophyte community structure did not fully recover over the same time period. Liverwort species showed some or low potential to benefit from lifeboating and high potential to re-colonise as time since logging increases. Most moss species responded similarly, but two cushion-forming mosses benefited from the logging disturbance while several weft- or mat-forming mosses declined and did not re-colonise in 20-30 years. We conclude that retention trees do not function as equally effective lifeboats for all bryophyte species but are successful in providing suitable habitats for many species in the long-term. To be most effective, retention cuts should be located adjacent to conservation sites, which may function as sources of re-colonisation and support the populations of species that require old-growth forests.

  3. Structured parallel therapy with parents in time-limited psychotherapy with children experiencing difficult family situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugvik, Marianne

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how parallel therapy work with parents can be structured to achieve the goals of therapy with their children. Time-limited psychotherapy with children is a structured therapeutic method, where the goal and the number of sessions are contracted together with the child and parents. In this study, we focus on parallel parental therapy for three separate families whose children are experiencing difficult family situations. Six main themes emerge from our interviews with the parents and an analysis of session notes: The parents expressed positive experiences with the therapy; their perspectives about the family situation changed; they reported positive changes on behalf of the children, and they reported an increasing number of factors to explain these changes. In addition, a number of positive changes in the family situation itself were reported, and the parents were increasingly concerned with understanding their children's expressions. Our findings indicate that this therapy method gives parents an opportunity for reflection and mentalization, which is found to be crucial to the child's mental health. Based on these findings, we suggest some guidelines for effectively engaging in therapy work with parents.

  4. Microsatellite Length Scoring by Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing - Effects of Sequence Structure and PCR Regime.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Meyn Liljegren

    Full Text Available Microsatellites are DNA sequences consisting of repeated, short (1-6 bp sequence motifs that are highly mutable by enzymatic slippage during replication. Due to their high intrinsic variability, microsatellites have important applications in population genetics, forensics, genome mapping, as well as cancer diagnostics and prognosis. The current analytical standard for microsatellites is based on length scoring by high precision electrophoresis, but due to increasing efficiency next-generation sequencing techniques may provide a viable alternative. Here, we evaluated single molecule real time (SMRT sequencing, implemented in the PacBio series of sequencing apparatuses, as a means of microsatellite length scoring. To this end we carried out multiplexed SMRT sequencing of plasmid-carried artificial microsatellites of varying structure under different pre-sequencing PCR regimes. For each repeat structure, reads corresponding to the target length dominated. We found that pre-sequencing amplification had large effects on scoring accuracy and error distribution relative to controls, but that the effects of the number of amplification cycles were generally weak. In line with expectations enzymatic slippage decreased proportionally with microsatellite repeat unit length and increased with repetition number. Finally, we determined directional mutation trends, showing that PCR and SMRT sequencing introduced consistent but opposing error patterns in contraction and expansion of the microsatellites on the repeat motif and single nucleotide level.

  5. A generative spike train model with time-structured higher order correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eTrousdale

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Emerging technologies are revealing the spiking activity in ever larger neural ensembles. Frequently, this spiking is far from independent, with correlations in the spike times of different cells. Understanding how such correlations impact the dynamics and function of neural ensembles remains an important open problem.Here we describe a new, generative model for correlated spike trains that can exhibit many of the features observed in data. Extending prior work in mathematical finance, this generalized thinning and shift (GTaS model creates marginally Poisson spike trains with diverse temporal correlation structures.We give several examples which highlight the model's flexibility and utility. For instance, we use it to examine how a neural network responds to highly structured patterns of inputs.We then show that the GTaS model is analytically tractable, and derive cumulant densities of all orders in terms of model parameters. The GTaS framework can therefore be an important tool in the experimental and theoretical exploration of neural dynamics.

  6. Predicting complex syntactic structure in real time: Processing of negative sentences in Russian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanina, Nina

    2017-11-01

    In Russian negative sentences the verb's direct object may appear either in the accusative case, which is licensed by the verb (as is common cross-linguistically), or in the genitive case, which is licensed by the negation (Russian-specific "genitive-of-negation" phenomenon). Such sentences were used to investigate whether case marking is employed for anticipating syntactic structure, and whether lexical heads other than the verb can be predicted on the basis of a case-marked noun phrase. Experiment 1, a completion task, confirmed that genitive-of-negation is part of Russian speakers' active grammatical repertoire. In Experiments 2 and 3, the genitive/accusative case manipulation on the preverbal object led to shorter reading times at the negation and verb in the genitive versus accusative condition. Furthermore, Experiment 3 manipulated linear order of the direct object and the negated verb in order to distinguish whether the abovementioned facilitatory effect was predictive or integrative in nature, and concluded that the parser actively predicts a verb and (otherwise optional) negation on the basis of a preceding genitive-marked object. Similarly to a head-final language, case-marking information on preverbal noun phrases (NPs) is used by the parser to enable incremental structure building in a free-word-order language such as Russian.

  7. Time-domain separation of optical properties from structural transitions in resonantly bonded materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldecker, Lutz; Miller, Timothy A; Rudé, Miquel; Bertoni, Roman; Osmond, Johann; Pruneri, Valerio; Simpson, Robert E; Ernstorfer, Ralph; Wall, Simon

    2015-10-01

    The extreme electro-optical contrast between crystalline and amorphous states in phase-change materials is routinely exploited in optical data storage and future applications include universal memories, flexible displays, reconfigurable optical circuits, and logic devices. Optical contrast is believed to arise owing to a change in crystallinity. Here we show that the connection between optical properties and structure can be broken. Using a combination of single-shot femtosecond electron diffraction and optical spectroscopy, we simultaneously follow the lattice dynamics and dielectric function in the phase-change material Ge2Sb2Te5 during an irreversible state transformation. The dielectric function changes by 30% within 100 fs owing to a rapid depletion of electrons from resonantly bonded states. This occurs without perturbing the crystallinity of the lattice, which heats with a 2-ps time constant. The optical changes are an order of magnitude larger than those achievable with silicon and present new routes to manipulate light on an ultrafast timescale without structural changes.

  8. Crustal seismic structure beneath the Deccan Traps area (Gujarat, India), from local travel-time tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Srichand; Kukarina, Ekaterina; Mishra, Santosh

    2016-03-01

    The Gujarat region in western India is known for its intra-plate seismic activity, including the Mw 7.7 Bhuj earthquake, a reverse-faulting event that reactivated normal faults of the Mesozoic Kachchh rift zone. The Late Cretaceous Deccan Traps, one of the largest igneous provinces on the Earth, cover the southern part of Gujarat. This study is aimed at bringing light to the crustal rift zone structure and likely origin of the Traps based on the velocity structure of the crust beneath Gujarat. Tomographic inversion of the Gujarat region was done using the non-linear, passive-source tomographic algorithm, LOTOS. We use high-quality arrival times of 22,280 P and 22,040 S waves from 3555 events recorded from August 2006 to May 2011 at 83 permanent and temporary stations installed in Gujarat state by the Institute of Seismological Research (ISR). We conclude that the resulting high-velocity anomalies, which reach down to the Moho, are most likely related to intrusives associated with the Deccan Traps. Low velocity anomalies are found in sediment-filled Mesozoic rift basins and are related to weakened zones of faults and fracturing. A low-velocity anomaly in the north of the region coincides with the seismogenic zone of the reactivated Kachchh rift system, which is apparently associated with the channel of the outpouring of Deccan basalt.

  9. A real-time all-atom structural search engine for proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Hannigan, Brett; DeGrado, William F

    2014-07-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new "designability"-inspired approach to protein design where the designer searches for and interactively incorporates native-like fragments from proven protein structures. We demonstrate the use of Suns to interactively build protein motifs, tertiary interactions, and to identify scaffolds compatible with hot-spot residues. The official web site and installer are located at http://www.degradolab.org/suns/ and the source code is hosted at https://github.com/godotgildor/Suns (PyMOL plugin, BSD license), https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-cmd (command line client, BSD license), and https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-search (search engine server, GPLv2 license).

  10. Accuracy analysis for triangulation and tracking based on time-multiplexed structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Benjamin; Stüber, Patrick; Wissel, Tobias; Bruder, Ralf; Schweikard, Achim; Ernst, Floris

    2014-08-01

    The authors' research group is currently developing a new optical head tracking system for intracranial radiosurgery. This tracking system utilizes infrared laser light to measure features of the soft tissue on the patient's forehead. These features are intended to offer highly accurate registration with respect to the rigid skull structure by means of compensating for the soft tissue. In this context, the system also has to be able to quickly generate accurate reconstructions of the skin surface. For this purpose, the authors have developed a laser scanning device which uses time-multiplexed structured light to triangulate surface points. The accuracy of the authors' laser scanning device is analyzed and compared for different triangulation methods. These methods are given by the Linear-Eigen method and a nonlinear least squares method. Since Microsoft's Kinect camera represents an alternative for fast surface reconstruction, the authors' results are also compared to the triangulation accuracy of the Kinect device. Moreover, the authors' laser scanning device was used for tracking of a rigid object to determine how this process is influenced by the remaining triangulation errors. For this experiment, the scanning device was mounted to the end-effector of a robot to be able to calculate a ground truth for the tracking. The analysis of the triangulation accuracy of the authors' laser scanning device revealed a root mean square (RMS) error of 0.16 mm. In comparison, the analysis of the triangulation accuracy of the Kinect device revealed a RMS error of 0.89 mm. It turned out that the remaining triangulation errors only cause small inaccuracies for the tracking of a rigid object. Here, the tracking accuracy was given by a RMS translational error of 0.33 mm and a RMS rotational error of 0.12°. This paper shows that time-multiplexed structured light can be used to generate highly accurate reconstructions of surfaces. Furthermore, the reconstructed point sets can be

  11. Time line cell tracking for the approximation of lagrangian coherent structures with subgrid accuracy

    KAUST Repository

    Kuhn, Alexander

    2013-12-05

    Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) have become a widespread and powerful method to describe dynamic motion patterns in time-dependent flow fields. The standard way to extract LCS is to compute height ridges in the finite-time Lyapunov exponent field. In this work, we present an alternative method to approximate Lagrangian features for 2D unsteady flow fields that achieve subgrid accuracy without additional particle sampling. We obtain this by a geometric reconstruction of the flow map using additional material constraints for the available samples. In comparison to the standard method, this allows for a more accurate global approximation of LCS on sparse grids and for long integration intervals. The proposed algorithm works directly on a set of given particle trajectories and without additional flow map derivatives. We demonstrate its application for a set of computational fluid dynamic examples, as well as trajectories acquired by Lagrangian methods, and discuss its benefits and limitations. © 2013 The Authors Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Differential time scales of change to learning frequency structures of isometric force tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studenka, Breanna E; King, Adam C; Newell, Karl M

    2014-08-01

    Multiple processes support the persistent (learning) and transient (adaptive) change in behavior over time. We investigated whether practice and rest influence similarly the learning and adaptation of slow and fast frequency structures in isometric force tracking of pathways that varied in their regularity. Participants practiced 25 trials on each of 5 days in either a constant force target or 1 with the 1/f distributional properties of brown or pink noise. There was a reduction in root mean squared error (RMSE) as well as an increasing positive correlation between force output and the target pathway for all noise conditions over days. The spectral frequency analysis of force output and RMSE revealed task dependent outcomes of learning and adaptation as a function of the relatively slow (0-4 Hz) and fast (8-12 Hz) oscillatory time scales. These contrasting findings show that the persistent and transient properties of learning occur across different timescales and dimensions of behavior (force output and outcome-RMSE).

  13. T3B - An Experiment to measure the Time Structure of Hadronic Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Simon,F; Weuste,L

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the T3B experiment is the measurement of the time structure of hadronic showers with nanosecond precision and high spatial resolution together with the CALICE hadron calorimeter prototypes, with a focus on the use of tungsten as absorber medium. The detector consists of a strip of 15 scintillator cells individually read out by silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and fast oscilloscopes with a PC-controlled data acquisition system. The data reconstruction uses an iterative subtraction technique which provides a determination of the arrival time of each photon on the light sensor with sub-nanosecond precision. The calibration is based on single photonequivalent dark pulses constantly recorded during data taking, automatically eliminating the temperature dependence of the SiPM gain. In addition, a statistical correction for SiPM afterpulsing is demonstrated. To provide the tools for a comparison of T3B data with GEANT4 simulations, a digitization routine, which accounts for the detector response to energ...

  14. Time-resolved structural studies of protein reaction dynamics: a smorgasbord of X-ray approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenhoff, Sebastian; Nazarenko, Elena; Malmerberg, Erik; Davidsson, Jan; Katona, Gergely; Neutze, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Proteins undergo conformational changes during their biological function. As such, a high-resolution structure of a protein's resting conformation provides a starting point for elucidating its reaction mechanism, but provides no direct information concerning the protein's conformational dynamics. Several X-ray methods have been developed to elucidate those conformational changes that occur during a protein's reaction, including time-resolved Laue diffraction and intermediate trapping studies on three-dimensional protein crystals, and time-resolved wide-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption studies on proteins in the solution phase. This review emphasizes the scope and limitations of these complementary experimental approaches when seeking to understand protein conformational dynamics. These methods are illustrated using a limited set of examples including myoglobin and haemoglobin in complex with carbon monoxide, the simple light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, and the superoxide scavenger superoxide reductase. In conclusion, likely future developments of these methods at synchrotron X-ray sources and the potential impact of emerging X-ray free-electron laser facilities are speculated upon.

  15. Real-time visual feedback of COM and COP motion properties differentially modifies postural control structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilby, Melissa C; Molenaar, Peter C M; Slobounov, Semyon M; Newell, Karl M

    2017-01-01

    The experiment was setup to investigate the control of human quiet standing through the manipulation of augmented visual information feedback of selective properties of the motion of two primary variables in postural control: center of pressure (COP) and center of mass (COM). Five properties of feedback information were contrasted to a no feedback dual-task (watching a movie) control condition to determine the impact of visual real-time feedback on the coordination of the joint motions in postural control in both static and dynamic one-leg standing postures. The feedback information included 2D COP or COM position and macro variables derived from the COP and COM motions, namely virtual time-to-contact (VTC) and the COP-COM coupling. The findings in the static condition showed that the VTC and COP-COM coupling feedback conditions decreased postural motion more than the 2D COP or COM positional information. These variables also induced larger sway amplitudes in the dynamic condition showing a more progressive search strategy in exploring the stability limits. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) found that COP-COM coupling contributed less than the other feedback variables to the redundancy of the system reflected in the common variance between joint motions and properties of sway motion. The COP-COM coupling had the lowest weighting of the motion properties to redundancy under the feedback conditions but overall the qualitative pattern of the joint motion structures was preserved within the respective static and dynamic balance conditions.

  16. Quantitative structure-retention relationship modeling of gas chromatographic retention times based on thermodynamic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi-Najafabadi, Heshmatollah; McGinitie, Teague M; Harynuk, James J

    2014-09-05

    Thermodynamic parameters of ΔH(T0), ΔS(T0), and ΔCP for 156 compounds comprising alkanes, alkyl halides and alcohols were determined for a 5% phenyl 95% methyl stationary phase. The determination of thermodynamic parameters relies on a Nelder-Mead simplex optimization to rapidly obtain the parameters. Two methodologies of external and leave one out cross validations were applied to assess the robustness of the estimations of thermodynamic parameters. The largest absolute errors in predicted retention time across all temperature ramps and all compounds were 1.5 and 0.3s for external and internal sets, respectively. The possibility of an in silico extension of the thermodynamic library was tested using a quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) methodology. The estimated thermodynamic parameters were utilized to develop QSRR models. Individual partial least squares (PLS) models were developed for each of the three classes of the molecules. R(2) values for the test sets of all models across all temperature ramps were larger than 0.99 and the average of relative errors in retention time predictions of the test sets for alkanes, alcohols, and alkyl halides were 1.8%, 2.4%, and 2.5%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling microbial community structure and functional diversity across time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peter E; Gibbons, Sean M; Gilbert, Jack A

    2012-07-01

    Microbial communities exhibit exquisitely complex structure. Many aspects of this complexity, from the number of species to the total number of interactions, are currently very difficult to examine directly. However, extraordinary efforts are being made to make these systems accessible to scientific investigation. While recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have improved accessibility to the taxonomic and functional diversity of complex communities, monitoring the dynamics of these systems over time and space - using appropriate experimental design - is still expensive. Fortunately, modeling can be used as a lens to focus low-resolution observations of community dynamics to enable mathematical abstractions of functional and taxonomic dynamics across space and time. Here, we review the approaches for modeling bacterial diversity at both the very large and the very small scales at which microbial systems interact with their environments. We show that modeling can help to connect biogeochemical processes to specific microbial metabolic pathways. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Understanding characteristics in multivariate traffic flow time series from complex network structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Zhang, Shen; Tang, Jinjun; Wang, Xiaofei

    2017-07-01

    Discovering dynamic characteristics in traffic flow is the significant step to design effective traffic managing and controlling strategy for relieving traffic congestion in urban cities. A new method based on complex network theory is proposed to study multivariate traffic flow time series. The data were collected from loop detectors on freeway during a year. In order to construct complex network from original traffic flow, a weighted Froenius norm is adopt to estimate similarity between multivariate time series, and Principal Component Analysis is implemented to determine the weights. We discuss how to select optimal critical threshold for networks at different hour in term of cumulative probability distribution of degree. Furthermore, two statistical properties of networks: normalized network structure entropy and cumulative probability of degree, are utilized to explore hourly variation in traffic flow. The results demonstrate these two statistical quantities express similar pattern to traffic flow parameters with morning and evening peak hours. Accordingly, we detect three traffic states: trough, peak and transitional hours, according to the correlation between two aforementioned properties. The classifying results of states can actually represent hourly fluctuation in traffic flow by analyzing annual average hourly values of traffic volume, occupancy and speed in corresponding hours.

  19. Estimates of User Interest Using Timing Structures between Proactive Content-Display Updates and Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Takatsugu; Dodane, Jean-Baptiste; Kawashima, Hiroaki; Matsuyama, Takashi

    People are being inundated under enormous volumes of information and they often dither about making the right choices from these. Interactive user support by information service system such as concierge services will effectively assist such people. However, human-machine interaction still lacks naturalness and thoughtfulness despite the widespread utilization of intelligent systems. The system needs to estimate user's interest to improve the interaction and support the choices. We propose a novel approach to estimating the interest, which is based on the relationship between the dynamics of user's eye movements, i.e., the endogenous control mode of saccades, and machine's proactive presentations of visual contents. Under a specially-designed presentation phase to make the user express the endogenous saccades, we analyzed the timing structures between the saccades and the presentation events. We defined resistance as a novel time-delay feature representing the duration a user's gaze remains fixed on the previously presented content regardless of the next event. In experimental results obtained from 10 subjects, we confirmed that resistance is a good indicator for estimating the interest of most subjects (75% success in 28 experiments on 7 subjects). This demonstrated a higher accuracy than conventional estimates of interest based on gaze duration or frequency.

  20. A multi-decade time series of kelp forest community structure at San Nicolas Island, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Kenner, Michael C.; Estes, James A.; Tinker, M. Tim; Bodkin, James L.; Cowen, Robert K.; Harrold, Christopher; Novak, Mark; Rassweiler, Andrew; Reed, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    San Nicolas Island is surrounded by broad areas of shallow subtidal habitat, characterized by dynamic kelp forest communities that undergo dramatic and abrupt shifts in community composition. Although these reefs are fished, the physical isolation of the island means that they receive less impact from human activities than most reefs in Southern California, making San Nicolas an ideal place to evaluate alternative theories about the dynamics of these communities. Here we present monitoring data from seven sampling stations surrounding the island, including data on fish, invertebrate, and algal abundance. These data are unusual among subtidal monitoring data sets in that they combine relatively frequent sampling (twice per year) with an exceptionally long time series (since 1980). Other outstanding qualities of the data set are the high taxonomic resolution captured and the monitoring of permanent quadrats and swaths where the history of the community structure at specific locations has been recorded through time. Finally, the data span a period that includes two of the strongest ENSO events on record, a major shift in the Pacific decadal oscillation, and the reintroduction of sea otters to the island in 1987 after at least 150 years of absence. These events provide opportunities to evaluate the effects of bottom-up forcing, top-down control, and physical disturbance on shallow rocky reef communities.

  1. Changes in the Fine Structure of Stochastic Distributions as a Consequence of Space-Time Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shnoll S. E.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey of the fine structure stochastic distributions in measurements obtained by me over 50 years. It is shown: (1 The forms of the histograms obtained at each geographic point (at each given moment of time are similar with high probability, even if we register phenomena of completely different nature --- from biochemical reactions to the noise in a gravitational antenna, or alpha-decay. (2 The forms of the histograms change with time. The iterations of the same form have the periods of the stellar day (1.436 min, the solar day (1.440 min, the calendar year (365 solar days, and the sidereal year (365 solar days plus 6 hours and 9 min. (3 At the same instants of the local time, at different geographic points, the forms of the histograms are the same, with high probability. (4 The forms of the histograms depend on the locations of the Moon and the Sun with respect to the horizon. (5 All the facts are proof of the dependance of the form of the histograms on the location of the measured objects with respect to stars, the Sun, and the Moon. (6 At the instants of New Moon and the maxima of solar eclipses there are specific forms of the histograms. (7 It is probable that the observed correlations are not connected to flow power changes (the changes of the gravity force --- we did not find the appropriate periods in changes in histogram form. (8 A sharp anisotropy of space was discovered, registered by alpha-decay detectors armed with collimators. Observations at 54 North (the collimator was pointed at the Pole Star showed no day-long periods, as was also the case for observations at 82 North, near the Pole. Histograms obtained by observations with an Easterly-directed collimator were determined every 718 minutes (half stellar day and with observations using a Westerly-directed collimator. (9 Collimators rotating counter-clockwise, in parallel with the celestial equator, gave the probability of changes in histograms as the number of the

  2. Changes in the Fine Structure of Stochastic Distributions as a Consequence of Space-Time Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shnoll S. E.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This is a survey of the fine structure stochastic distributions in measurements obtained by me over 50 years. It is shown: (1 The forms of the histograms obtained at each geographic point (at each given moment of time are similar with high probability, even if we register phenomena of completely different nature — from biochemical reactions to the noise in a gravitational antenna, or α-decay. (2 The forms of the histograms change with time. The iterations of the same form have the periods of the stellar day (1.436 min, the solar day (1.440 min, the calendar year (365 solar days, and the sidereal year (365 solar days plus 6 hours and 9 min. (3 At the same instants of the local time, at different geographic points, the forms of the histograms are the same, with high probability. (4 The forms of the histograms depend on the locations of the Moon and the Sun with respect to the horizon. (5 All the facts are proof of the dependance of the form of the histograms on the location of the measured objects with respect to stars, the Sun, and the Moon. (6 At the instants of New Moon and the maxima of solar eclipses there are specific forms of the histograms. (7 It is probable that the observed correlations are not connected to flow power changes (the changes of the gravity force — we did not find the appropriate periods in changes in histogram form. (8 A sharp anisotropy of space was discovered, registered by α-decay detectors armed with collimators. Observations at 54◦ North (the collimator was pointed at the Pole Star showed no day-long periods, as was also the case for observations at 82◦ North, near the Pole. Histograms obtained by observations with an Easterly-directed collimator were determined every 718 minutes (half stellar day and with observations using a Westerly-directed collimator. (9 Collimators rotating counter-clockwise, in parallel with the celestial equator, gave the probability of changes in histograms as the number of the

  3. Efficient scattering of electrons below few keV by Time Domain Structures around injection fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, I.; Agapitov, O. V.; Mozer, F.; Artemyev, A.; Krasnoselskikh, V.

    2016-12-01

    Van Allen Probes observations show an abundance of non-linear large-amplitude electrostatic spikes around injection fronts in the outer radiation belt. These spikes referred to as Time Domain Structures (TDS) include electron holes, double layers and more complicated solitary waves. The electron scattering driven by TDS may not be evaluated via the standard quasi-linear theory, since TDS are in principle non-linear plasma modes. In this paper we analyze the scattering of electrons by three-dimensional TDS (with non-negligible perpendicular electric field) around injection fronts. We derive the analytical formulas describing the local scattering by single TDS and show that the most efficiently scattered electrons are those in the first cyclotron resonance (electrons crossing TDS on a time scale comparable with their gyroperiod). The analytical formulas are verified via the test-particle simulation. We compute the bounce-averaged diffusion coefficients and demonstrate their dependence on the TDS spatial distribution, individual TDS parameters and L shell. We show that TDS are able to provide the pitch-angle scattering of electrons at rate 10-2-10-4 s-1 and, thus, can be responsible for driving loss of electrons out of injections fronts on a time scale from few minutes to few hours. TDS can be, thus, responsible for driving diffuse aurora precipitations conjugated to injection fronts. We show that the pitch-angle scattering rates driven by TDS are comparable with those due to chorus waves and exceed those due to electron cyclotron harmonics. For injections fronts with no significant wave activity in the frequency range corresponding to chorus waves, TDS can be even dominant mechanism for losses of below few keV electrons.

  4. Logistic Avalanche Processes, Elementary Time Structures, and Frequency Distributions in Solar Flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Dennis, Brian R.; Benz, Arnold O.

    1998-04-01

    We analyze the elementary time structures (on timescales of ~0.1-3.0 s) and their frequency distributions in solar flares using hard X-ray (HXR) data from the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) and radio data from the radio spectrometers of Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zurich. The four analyzed data sets are gathered from over 600 different solar flares and include about (1) 104 HXR pulses at >=25 and >=50 keV, (2) 4000 radio type III bursts, (3) 4000 pulses of decimetric quasi-periodic broadband pulsation events, and (4) 104 elements of decimetric millisecond spike events. The time profiles of resolved elementary time structures have a near-Gaussian shape and can be modeled with the logistic equation, which provides a quantitative measurement of the exponential growth time τG and the nonlinear saturation energy level WS of the underlying instability. Assuming a random distribution (Poisson statistics) of saturation times tS (with an e-folding constant tSe), the resulting frequency distribution of saturation energies WS or peak energy dissipation rates FS = (dW/dt)t=tS has the form of a power-law function, i.e., N(FS)~F-αS, where the power-law index α is directly related to the number of e-folding amplifications by the relation α = (1 + τG/tSe). The same mathematical formalism is used to generate power-law distributions, as in Rosner & Vaiana, but the distribution of energies released in elementary flare instabilities is not related to the global energy storage process. We assume Poissonian noise for the unamplified energy levels in unstable flare cells, implying an exponential frequency distribution of avalanche energies WS or fluxes FS in the absence of coherent amplifications. Also, in the case of coherent amplification, the Poissonian noise introduces exponential rollovers of the power law at the low and high ends of the frequency distributions. We fit both power-law and exponential functions to the observed frequency distributions of

  5. Using Time-Structured Data to Estimate Evolutionary Rates of Double-Stranded DNA Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Cadhla; Kitchen, Andrew; Shapiro, Beth; Suchard, Marc A.; Holmes, Edward C.; Rambaut, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds) DNA viruses are often described as evolving through long-term codivergent associations with their hosts, a pattern that is expected to be associated with low rates of nucleotide substitution. However, the hypothesis of codivergence between dsDNA viruses and their hosts has rarely been rigorously tested, even though the vast majority of nucleotide substitution rate estimates for dsDNA viruses are based upon this assumption. It is therefore important to estimate the evolutionary rates of dsDNA viruses independent of the assumption of host-virus codivergence. Here, we explore the use of temporally structured sequence data within a Bayesian framework to estimate the evolutionary rates for seven human dsDNA viruses, including variola virus (VARV) (the causative agent of smallpox) and herpes simplex virus-1. Our analyses reveal that although the VARV genome is likely to evolve at a rate of approximately 1 × 10−5 substitutions/site/year and hence approaching that of many RNA viruses, the evolutionary rates of many other dsDNA viruses remain problematic to estimate. Synthetic data sets were constructed to inform our interpretation of the substitution rates estimated for these dsDNA viruses and the analysis of these demonstrated that given a sequence data set of appropriate length and sampling depth, it is possible to use time-structured analyses to estimate the substitution rates of many dsDNA viruses independently from the assumption of host-virus codivergence. Finally, the discovery that some dsDNA viruses may evolve at rates approaching those of RNA viruses has important implications for our understanding of the long-term evolutionary history and emergence potential of this major group of viruses. PMID:20363828

  6. Dynamic Chemical and Structural Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Observed in Real Time: From Catalysis-Induced Fluxionality to Catalytic Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-26

    Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Observed in Real Time: From Catalysis -Induced Fluxionality to Catalytic Cycles” (FA9550-12-1-0204) Robert M. Rioux...report The results from “Dynamic Chemical and Structural Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Observed in Real Time: From Catalysis -Induced...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0321 Dynamic Chemical and Structural Changes of Heterogeneous Catalysts Robert Rioux PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY Final Report

  7. Stability analysis of a time-periodic 2-dof MEMS structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniffka, Till Jochen; Welte, Johannes; Ecker, Horst

    2012-11-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are becoming important for all kinds of industrial applications. Among them are filters in communication devices, due to the growing demand for efficient and accurate filtering of signals. In recent developments single degree of freedom (1-dof) oscillators, that are operated at a parametric resonances, are employed for such tasks. Typically vibration damping is low in such MEM systems. While parametric excitation (PE) is used so far to take advantage of a parametric resonance, this contribution suggests to also exploit parametric anti-resonances in order to improve the damping behavior of such systems. Modeling aspects of a 2-dof MEM system and first results of the analysis of the non-linear and the linearized system are the focus of this paper. In principle the investigated system is an oscillating mechanical system with two degrees of freedom x = [x1x2]T that can be described by Mx+Cx+K1x+K3(x2)x+Fes(x,V(t)) = 0. The system is inherently non-linear because of the cubic mechanical stiffness K3 of the structure, but also because of electrostatic forces (1+cos(ωt))Fes(x) that act on the system. Electrostatic forces are generated by comb drives and are proportional to the applied time-periodic voltage V(t). These drives also provide the means to introduce time-periodic coefficients, i.e. parametric excitation (1+cos(ωt)) with frequency ω. For a realistic MEM system the coefficients of the non-linear set of differential equations need to be scaled for efficient numerical treatment. The final mathematical model is a set of four non-linear time-periodic homogeneous differential equations of first order. Numerical results are obtained from two different methods. The linearized time-periodic (LTP) system is studied by calculating the Monodromy matrix of the system. The eigenvalues of this matrix decide on the stability of the LTP-system. To study the unabridged non-linear system, the bifurcation software ManLab is employed

  8. Direct-seismogram inversion for receiver-side structure with uncertain source-time functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Jan; Dosso, Stan E.; Bodin, Thomas; Stipčević, Josip; Cummins, Phil R.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents direct-seismogram inversion (DSI) for receiver-side structure which treats the source signal incident from below (the effective source-time function-STF) as a vector of unknown parameters in a Bayesian framework. As a result, the DSI method developed here does not require deconvolution by observed seismogram components as typically applied in receiver-function inversion and avoids the problematic issue of choosing subjective tuning parameters in this deconvolution. This results in more meaningful inversion results and uncertainty estimation compared to classic receiver-function inversion. A rigorous derivation is presented of the likelihood function required for unbiased inversion results. The STF is efficiently inferred by a maximum-likelihood closed-form expression that does not require deconvolution by noisy waveforms. Rather, deconvolution is only by predicted impulse responses for the unknown environment (considered to be a 1-D, horizontally stratified medium). For a given realization of the parameter vector which describes the medium below the station, data predictions are computed as the convolution of the impulse response and the maximum-likelihood source estimate for that medium. Therefore, the assumption of a Gaussian pulse with specified parameters, typical for the prediction of receiver functions, is not required. Directly inverting seismogram components has important consequences for the noise on the data. Since the signal processing does not require filtering and deconvolution, data errors are less correlated and more straightforward to model than those for receiver functions. This results in better inversion results (parameter values and uncertainties), since assumptions made in the derivation of the likelihood function are more likely to be met by the inversion process. The DSI method is demonstrated for simulated waveforms and then applied to data for station Hyderabad on the Indian craton. The measured data are inverted with

  9. Microscopic observation of carrier-transport dynamics in quantum-structure solar cells using a time-of-flight technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toprasertpong, Kasidit; Fujii, Hiromasa; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki [School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Kasamatsu, Naofumi; Kada, Tomoyuki; Asahi, Shigeo; Kita, Takashi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Wang, Yunpeng; Watanabe, Kentaroh [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan)

    2015-07-27

    In this study, we propose a carrier time-of-flight technique to evaluate the carrier transport time across a quantum structure in an active region of solar cells. By observing the time-resolved photoluminescence signal with a quantum-well probe inserted under the quantum structure at forward bias, the carrier transport time can be efficiently determined at room temperature. The averaged drift velocity shows linear dependence on the internal field, allowing us to estimate the quantum structure as a quasi-bulk material with low effective mobility containing the information of carrier dynamics. We show that this direct and real-time observation is more sensitive to carrier transport than other conventional techniques, providing better insights into microscopic carrier transport dynamics to overcome a device design difficulty.

  10. Structured printed referral letter (form letter; saves time and improves communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.P.J.C. Ramanayake

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Referral of patients to hospitals, specialists and other institutions is an essential part of primary health care. Patients are referred to specialists when investigation or therapeutic options are exhausted in primary care or when opinion or advice is needed from them. Referral has considerable implications for patients, health care system and health care costs. Good communication between primary and secondary care is essential for the smooth running of any health care system. Referral and reply letters are the sole means of communication between doctors most of the time and breakdown in communication could lead to poor continuity of care, delayed diagnoses, polypharmacy, increased litigation risk and unnecessary testing. A referral letter also helps to avoid patient dissatisfaction and loss of confidence in family physician. Studies of referral letters have reported that specialists are dissatisfied with their quality and content. Inclusion of letter writing skills in the medical curriculum, peer assessment and feedback have shown to improve the quality of referral letters. . Form letters have shown to enhance information content and communication in referral process. In Sri Lanka referral letters are usually hand written and frequent complaints are that these letters do not contain adequate information and retrieval of information is a problem due to poor legibility and clarity. Sometimes Primary care doctors refer patients to hospitals and specialists with only verbal instructions. To address these short comings this form letter was introduced. Based on the guidelines and systematic review of published articles, items of information to be included were decided. Printed forms of the letter are kept in the practice and the doctor has to just fill up relevant information under each heading. The objectives of introducing this structured referral letter was to improve the quality and standard of referral letters and save time for both general

  11. Structural integrity of callosal midbody influences intermanual transfer in a motor reaction-time task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzano, Laura; Tacchino, Andrea; Roccatagliata, Luca; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Abbruzzese, Giovanni; Bove, Marco

    2011-02-01

    Training one hand on a motor task results in performance improvements in the other hand, also when stimuli are randomly presented (nonspecific transfer). Corpus callosum (CC) is the main structure involved in interhemispheric information transfer; CC pathology occurs in patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and is related to altered performance of tasks requiring interhemispheric transfer of sensorimotor information. To investigate the role of CC in nonspecific transfer during a pure motor reaction-time task, we combined motor behavior with diffusion tensor imaging analysis in PwMS. Twenty-two PwMS and 10 controls, all right-handed, were asked to respond to random stimuli with appropriate finger opposition movements with the right (learning) and then the left (transfer) hand. PwMS were able to improve motor performance reducing response times with practice with a trend similar to controls and preserved the ability to transfer the acquired motor information from the learning to the transfer hand. A higher variability in the transfer process, indicated by a significantly larger standard deviation of mean nonspecific transfer, was found in the PwMS group with respect to the control group, suggesting the presence of subtle impairments in interhemispheric communication in some patients. Then, we correlated the amount of nonspecific transfer with mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values, indicative of microstructural damage, obtained in five CC subregions identified on PwMS's FA maps. A significant correlation was found only in the subregion including posterior midbody (Pearson's r = 0.74, P = 0.003), which thus seems to be essential for the interhemispheric transfer of information related to pure sensorimotor tasks. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Rock Slope Monitoring from 4D Time-Lapse Structure from Motion Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, Ryan; Abellan, Antonio; Chyz, Alex; Hutchinson, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry has become an important tool for studying earth surface processes because of its flexibility, ease of use, low cost and its capability of producing high quality 3-D surface models. A major benefit of SfM is that model accuracy is fit for purpose and surveys can be designed to meet a large range of spatial and temporal scales. In the Earth sciences, research in time-lapse SfM photogrammetry or videogrammetry is an area that is difficult to undertake due to complexities in acquiring, processing and managing large 4D datasets and represents an area with significant advancement potential (Eltner et al. 2016). In this study, we investigate the potential of 4D time-lapse SfM to monitor unstable rock slopes. We tested an array of statically mounted cameras collecting time-lapse photos of a limestone rock slope located along a highway in Canada. Our setup consisted of 8 DSLR cameras with 50 mm prime lenses spaced 2-3 m apart at a distance of 10 m from the slope. The portion of the rock slope monitored was 20 m wide and 6 m high. We collected data in four phases, each having 50 photographs taken simultaneously by each camera. The first phase of photographs was taken of the stable slope. In each successive phase, we gradually moved small, discrete blocks within the rock slope by 5-15 mm, simulating pre-failure deformation of rockfall. During the last phase we also removed discrete rock blocks, simulating rockfall. We used Agisoft Photoscan's 4D processing functionality and timeline tools to create 3D point clouds from the time-lapse photographs. These tools have the benefit of attaining better accuracy photo alignments as a greater number of photos are used. For change detection, we used the 4D filtering and calibration technique proposed by Kromer et al. (2015), which takes advantage of high degrees of spatial and temporal point redundancy to decrease measurement uncertainty. Preliminary results show that it is possible to attain

  13. Circadian Time Structure of Circulating Plasma Lipid Components in Healthy Indians of Different Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ranjana; Sharma, Sumita; Singh, Raj K; Cornelissen, Germaine

    2016-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of human circulating lipid components was studied under nearnormal tropical conditions in 162 healthy volunteers (103 males and 59 females; 7 to 75 years of age). They followed a diurnal activity from about 06:00 to about 22:00 and nocturnal rest. These volunteers were divided into four groups: Group A (7-20 years), Group B (21-40 years), Group C (41-60 years) and Group D (61-75 years), comprising 42, 60, 35 and 25 participants, respectively. A marked circadian rhythm was demonstrated for each studied variable in each group by population-mean cosinor analysis (almost invariably p groups by parameter tests and regressed as a function of age, separately for males and females. A second-order polynomial characterized the MESOR of HDL cholesterol, phospholipids and total lipids, as well as the 24-h amplitude of total cholesterol and phospholipids. The 24-h amplitude of total lipids decreased linearly with age. The 24-h acrophase of the oldest age group (Group D) was advanced in the case of total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and total lipids, whereas that of phospholipids was delayed. Mapping the circadian rhythm (an important component of the broader time structure or chronome, which includes a. o., trends with age and extra-circadian components) of lipid components is needed to explore their role in the aging process in health.

  14. Interpretive Structural Modeling Of Implementation Enablers For Just In Time In ICPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Upadhye

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Indian Corrugated Packaging Industries (ICPI have built up tough competition among the industries in terms of product cost, quality, product delivery, flexibility, and finally customer’s demand. As their customers, mostly OEMs are asking Just in Time deliveries, ICPI must implement JIT in their system. The term "JIT” as, it denotes a system that utilizes less, in terms of all inputs, to create the same outputs as those created by a traditional mass production system, while contributing increased varieties for the end customer. (Womack et al. 1990 "JIT" focuses on abolishing or reducing Muda (“Muda", the Japanese word for waste and on maximizing or fully utilizing activities that add value from the customer's perspective. There is lack of awareness in identifying the right enablers of JIT implementation. Therefore, this study has tried to find out the enablers from the literature review and expert’s opinions from corrugated packaging industries and developed the relationship matrix to see the driving power and dependence between them. In this study, modeling has been done in order to know the interrelationships between the enablers with the help of Interpretive Structural Modeling and Cross Impact Matrix Multiplication Applied to Classification (MICMAC analysis for the performance of Indian corrugated packaging industries.

  15. Crustal velocity structure of the Apennines (Italy from P-wave travel time tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Amato

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we provide P-wave velocity images of the crust underneath the Apennines (Italy, focusing on the lower crustal structure and the Moho topography. We inverted P-wave arrival times of earthquakes which occurred from 1986 to 1993 within the Apenninic area. To overcome inversion instabilities due to noisy data (we used bulletin data we decided to resolve a minimum number of velocity parameters, inverting for only two layers in the crust and one in the uppermost mantle underneath the Moho. A partial inversion of only 55% of the overall dataset yields velocity images similar to those obtained with the whole data set, indicating that the depicted tomograms are stable and fairly insensitive to the number of data used. We find a low-velocity anomaly in the lower crust extending underneath the whole Apenninic belt. This feature is segmented by a relative high-velocity zone in correspondence with the Ortona-Roccamonfina line, that separates the northern from the southern Apenninic arcs. The Moho has a variable depth in the study area, and is deeper (more than 37 km in the Adriatic side of the Northern Apennines with respect to the Tyrrhenian side, where it is found in the depth interval 22-34 km.

  16. Structural monitoring and modal properties of a real time bridge and lab tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, R.P.; Koenders, E.A.B.

    2014-01-01

    For understanding the actual state of durability of concrete structures, it is important to know its response due to external loading. This response mainly depends on the actual structural and material properties of the structure, while loaded. Mechanical and chemical degradation are the main

  17. Determination of Cell Doubling Times from the Return-on-Investment Time of Photosynthetic Vesicles Based on Atomic Detail Structural Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Andrew; Hunter, C Neil; Sener, Melih

    2017-04-20

    Cell doubling times of the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides during photosynthetic growth are determined experimentally and computationally as a function of illumination. For this purpose, energy conversion processes in an intracytoplasmic membrane vesicle, the chromatophore, are described based on an atomic detail structural model. The cell doubling time and its illumination dependence are computed in terms of the return-on-investment (ROI) time of the chromatophore, determined computationally from the ATP production rate, and the mass ratio of chromatophores in the cell, determined experimentally from whole cell absorbance spectra. The ROI time is defined as the time it takes to produce enough ATP to pay for the construction of another chromatophore. The ROI time of the low light-growth chromatophore is 4.5-2.6 h for a typical illumination range of 10-100 μmol photons m -2 s -1 , respectively, with corresponding cell doubling times of 8.2-3.9 h. When energy expenditure is considered as a currency, the benefit-to-cost ratio computed for the chromatophore as an energy harvesting device is 2-8 times greater than for photovoltaic and fossil fuel-based energy solutions and the corresponding ROI times are approximately 3-4 orders of magnitude shorter for the chromatophore than for synthetic systems.

  18. Physics-based structural health monitoring using the time-frequency analysis of electro-mechanical impedance signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, Farshad; Huang, Haiying

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, a self-diagnosis technique is introduced for structural health monitoring based on the timefrequency analysis of electromechanical impedance (EMI) signatures. It is first shown that the EMI signature is essentially a pulse-echo signal represented in the frequency domain, and it can be converted into time domain using the convolution theorem. The time-frequency plot is then generated from the recovered time domain signals to cover a wide range of excitation frequencies and provide a more comprehensive damage detection capability. Presenting the EMI signal in the time and the time-frequency domains provides the physical insights that explain how different factors influence the EMI signature. As such, the time domain signal acquired from the EMI is divided into "resonant phase" and "echo phase". The resonant phase includes the immediate response of the sensor to the excitation and is used to monitor the sensor bonding layer condition, while the echo phase only includes wave reflections from structural damages and boundaries, and is implemented for the structural damage detection. Finally, the proposed method is implemented on a beam structure to detect and localize structural damage in the presence of a damage in the sensor bonding layer.

  19. Large-amplitude spin dynamics driven by a THz pulse in resonance with an electromagnon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubacka, T; Johnson, J A; Hoffmann, M C; Vicario, C; de Jong, S; Beaud, P; Grübel, S; Huang, S-W; Huber, L; Patthey, L; Chuang, Y-D; Turner, J J; Dakovski, G L; Lee, W-S; Minitti, M P; Schlotter, W; Moore, R G; Hauri, C P; Koohpayeh, S M; Scagnoli, V; Ingold, G; Johnson, S L; Staub, U

    2014-03-21

    Multiferroics have attracted strong interest for potential applications where electric fields control magnetic order. The ultimate speed of control via magnetoelectric coupling, however, remains largely unexplored. Here, we report an experiment in which we drove spin dynamics in multiferroic TbMnO3 with an intense few-cycle terahertz (THz) light pulse tuned to resonance with an electromagnon, an electric-dipole active spin excitation. We observed the resulting spin motion using time-resolved resonant soft x-ray diffraction. Our results show that it is possible to directly manipulate atomic-scale magnetic structures with the electric field of light on a sub-picosecond time scale.

  20. Market-based control strategy for long-span structures considering the multi-time delay issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongnan; Song, Jianzhu; Li, Gang

    2017-01-01

    To solve the different time delays that exist in the control device installed on spatial structures, in this study, discrete analysis using a 2 N precise algorithm was selected to solve the multi-time-delay issue for long-span structures based on the market-based control (MBC) method. The concept of interval mixed energy was introduced from computational structural mechanics and optimal control research areas, and it translates the design of the MBC multi-time-delay controller into a solution for the segment matrix. This approach transforms the serial algorithm in time to parallel computing in space, greatly improving the solving efficiency and numerical stability. The designed controller is able to consider the issue of time delay with a linear controlling force combination and is especially effective for large time-delay conditions. A numerical example of a long-span structure was selected to demonstrate the effectiveness of the presented controller, and the time delay was found to have a significant impact on the results.

  1. Real-Time Ultrasound Segmentation, Analysis and Visualisation of Deep Cervical Muscle Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Ryan J; Harding, Peter J; Loram, Ian D

    2017-02-01

    Despite widespread availability of ultrasound and a need for personalised muscle diagnosis (neck/back pain-injury, work related disorder, myopathies, neuropathies), robust, online segmentation of muscles within complex groups remains unsolved by existing methods. For example, Cervical Dystonia (CD) is a prevalent neurological condition causing painful spasticity in one or multiple muscles in the cervical muscle system. Clinicians currently have no method for targeting/monitoring treatment of deep muscles. Automated methods of muscle segmentation would enable clinicians to study, target, and monitor the deep cervical muscles via ultrasound. We have developed a method for segmenting five bilateral cervical muscles and the spine via ultrasound alone, in real-time. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and ultrasound data were collected from 22 participants (age: 29.0±6.6, male: 12). To acquire ultrasound muscle segment labels, a novel multimodal registration method was developed, involving MRI image annotation, and shape registration to MRI-matched ultrasound images, via approximation of the tissue deformation. We then applied polynomial regression to transform our annotations and textures into a mean space, before using shape statistics to generate a texture-to-shape dictionary. For segmentation, test images were compared to dictionary textures giving an initial segmentation, and then we used a customized Active Shape Model to refine the fit. Using ultrasound alone, on unseen participants, our technique currently segments a single image in [Formula: see text] to over 86% accuracy (Jaccard index). We propose this approach is applicable generally to segment, extrapolate and visualise deep muscle structure, and analyse statistical features online.

  2. Foraging in space and time structure an African small mammal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Baker, Mohammad A; Brown, Joel S

    2014-06-01

    We used live-trapping and foraging to test for the effect of habitat selection and diet on structuring a community of six small mammals and one bird within the Soutpansberg, South Africa. We established grids that straddled adjacent habitats: woodland, rocky hillside, and grassland. Trapping and foraging were used to estimate abundance, habitat use, and species-specific foraging costs. The species with the highest abundance and foraging activity in a habitat, activity time, or food was considered the most efficient and presumed to have a competitive advantage. All species exhibited distinct patterns of spatial and temporal habitat preference which provided the main mechanism of coexistence, followed by diet selection. The study species were organized into three assemblages (α diversity): grassland, Rhabdomys pumilio, Dendromus melanotis, and Mus minutoides.; woodland, Aethomys ineptus and Micaelamys namaquensis; and rock-dwelling, M. namaquensis and Elephantulus myurus. Francolinus natalensis foraged in open rocky areas and under wooded islands within the grassland. Species organization across the habitats suggested that feeding opportunities are available within all habitats; however, distinct habitat preferences resulted from differing foraging aptitudes and efficiencies of the competing species. At Lajuma, species distribution and coexistence are promoted through distinct habitat preferences that were shaped by competition and species-specific foraging costs. The combination of trapping and foraging provided a mechanistic approach that integrates behavior into community ecology by 'asking' the animal to reveal its perspective of the environment. Using spatial and temporal foraging decisions-as behavioral indicators-enables us to guide our understanding for across-taxa species coexistence.

  3. Direct-seismogram inversion for receiver-side structure with unknown source-time functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, J.; Dosso, S. E.; Bodin, T.; Stipcevic, J.; Cummins, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    This work presents direct-seismogram inversion for receiver-side structure which treats the source signal incident from below (the effective source-time function, STF) as a vector of unknown parameters in a Bayesian framework. As a result, direct-seismogram inversion does not require deconvolution by observed seismogram components as typically applied in receiver-function inversion, and avoids the problematic issue of choosing subjective tuning parameters in the deconvolution. This results in more meaningful inversion results and uncertainty estimation (compared to classic receiver function inversion). A rigorous likelihood function is derived for unbiased inversion results and the STF is efficiently inferred by a maximum-likelihood closed form expression that does not require deconvolution by noisy waveforms. Rather, deconvolution is only by predicted impulse responses for the unknown environment. For a given realization of the parameter vector which describes the medium below the station, data predictions are computed as the convolution of the impulse response and the maximum-likelihood source estimate for that medium. Therefore, the assumption of a Gaussian pulse with specified parameters, typical for the prediction of receiver functions, is not required. Directly inverting seismogram components has important consequences for the noise on the data. Since the signal processing does not require filtering and deconvolution, data errors (including measurement and theory errors) appear to be less correlated and more straightforward to model than those for receiver functions. The direct-seismogram inversion is demonstrated for simulated waveforms and applied to teleseismic data recorded for station Hyderabad on the Indian craton.

  4. Isotopic metrics for structure, connectivity, and residence time in urban water supply systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Gabriel; Kennedy, Casey; Good, Stephen; Ehleringer, James

    2014-05-01

    Public water supply systems are the life-blood of urban areas, accessing, managing, and distributing water from an often complex array of sources to provide on-demand access to safe, potable water at the point-of-use. Water managers are faced with a wide range of potential threats, ranging from climate change to infrastructure failure to supply contamination. Information on the structure of supply and conveyance systems, connectivity within these systems, and links between the point-of-use and environmental water sources are thus critical to assessing the stability of water supplies and responding efficiently and effectively to water supply threats. We report datasets documenting stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of public supply water in cities of the United States across a range of scales. The data show a wide range of spatial and temporal variability that can be attributed to a combination of regional hydroclimate and water supply characteristics. Comparisons of public supply waters with model-based estimates of the isotopic composition of regional water sources suggests that major factors reflected in the tap water data include the degree of fragmentation of natural and man-made storage and conveyance systems, inter-basinal transfer of water, evaporative losses, and the total residence time of the natural and artificial systems being exploited. Because each of these factors contributes to determining the sustainability of water supply systems and their sensitivity to environmental disturbance, we propose a set of isotope-based metrics that can be used to efficiently assess and monitor the characteristics of public-supply systems in water security assessments and in support of management, planning, and outreach activities.

  5. Characterization and Simulation of Time-Dependent Response of Structural Materials for Aero Structures and Turbine Engines (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    were empirically based; relying on accelerated test methods, extensive amounts of test data, and mathematical fits to that data. More recent research...a shift from empirical descriptions of time-dependent material behavior to more mechanistic-based models that capture the physics of failure is...domains were empirically based; relying on accelerated test methods, extensive amounts of test data, and mathematical fits to that data. More recent

  6. Analysis of Airspace Structure and Capacity for Decentralized Separation Using Fast-Time Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunil, E.; Ellerbroek, J.; Hoekstra, J.M.; Arntzen, M.

    2017-01-01

    The workthat is presented in this paper is part of an ongoing study on the relationshipbetween airspace structure and capacity. The present paper investigates thedegree of structuring needed to maximize capacity for decentralized en-routeairspace. To this end, four

  7. Different types of Lagrangian coherent structures formed by solid particles in three-dimensional time-periodic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Denis E.; Shevtsova, Valentina

    2017-04-01

    Modeling of the experments on formation of coherent structures (also called particle accumulation structures, or PAS) in a three-dimensional time-periodic flow in a finite-size liquid column driven by a combined effect of thermocapillary stress and buoyancy was performed. The exact experimental conditions were studied. We considered particles 1% denser than the fluid. Aiming at reproducing the observed variety of PAS, double-loop (SL-II) and asymmetric single-loop (ASL-I) structures were obtained along with a "conventional" symmetric single-loop PAS (SL-I). The observations are perfectly in line with the experiments. It is shown that the limit trajectory of a particle is not only a matter of the particle's inertia but also of its initial location. We developed a method to calculate the formation time of a structure. The obtained values are very close to those experimentally measured.

  8. Evaluating the coefficient of thermal expansion using time periods of minimal thermal gradient for a temperature driven structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J.; Abdel-Jaber, H.; Yarnold, M.; Glisic, B.

    2017-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring aims to characterize the performance of a structure from a combination of recorded sensor data and analytic techniques. Many methods are concerned with quantifying the elastic response of the structure, treating temperature changes as noise in the analysis. While these elastic profiles do demonstrate a portion of structural behavior, thermal loads on a structure can induce comparable strains to elastic loads. Understanding this relationship between the temperature of the structure and the resultant strain and displacement can provide in depth knowledge of the structural condition. A necessary parameter for this form of analysis is the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE). The CTE of a material relates the amount of expansion or contraction a material undergoes per degree change in temperature, and can be determined from temperature-strain relationship given that the thermal strain can be isolated. Many times with concrete, the actual amount of expansion with temperature in situ varies from the given values for the CTE due to thermally generated elastic strain, which complicates evaluation of the CTE. To accurately characterize the relationship between temperature and strain on a structure, the actual thermal behavior of the structure needs to be analyzed. This rate can vary for different parts of a structure, depending on boundary conditions. In a case of unrestrained structures, the strain in the structure should be linearly related to the temperature change. Thermal gradients in a structure can affect this relationship, as they induce curvature and deplanations in the cross section. This paper proposes a method that addresses these challenges in evaluating the CTE.

  9. Asymptotic structure of space-time with a positive cosmological constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavan, Aruna

    In general relativity a satisfactory framework for describing isolated systems exists when the cosmological constant Lambda is zero. The detailed analysis of the asymptotic structure of the gravitational field, which constitutes the framework of asymptotic flatness, lays the foundation for research in diverse areas in gravitational science. However, the framework is incomplete in two respects. First, asymptotic flatness provides well-defined expressions for physical observables such as energy and momentum as 'charges' of asymptotic symmetries at null infinity, [special character omitted] +. But the asymptotic symmetry group, called the Bondi-Metzner-Sachs group is infinite-dimensional and a tensorial expression for the 'charge' integral of an arbitrary BMS element is missing. We address this issue by providing a charge formula which is a 2-sphere integral over fields local to the 2-sphere and refers to no extraneous structure. The second, and more significant shortcoming is that observations have established that Lambda is not zero but positive in our universe. Can the framework describing isolated systems and their gravitational radiation be extended to incorporate this fact? In this dissertation we show that, unfortunately, the standard framework does not extend from the Lambda = 0 case to the Lambda > 0 case in a physically useful manner. In particular, we do not have an invariant notion of gravitational waves in the non-linear regime, nor an analog of the Bondi 'news tensor', nor positive energy theorems. In addition, we argue that the stronger boundary condition of conformal flatness of intrinsic metric on [special character omitted]+, which reduces the asymptotic symmetry group from Diff([special character omitted]) to the de Sitter group, is insufficient to characterize gravitational fluxes and is physically unreasonable. To obtain guidance for the full non-linear theory with Lambda > 0, linearized gravitational waves in de Sitter space-time are analyzed in

  10. Wakefield Simulation of CLIC PETS Structure Using Parallel 3D Finite Element Time-Domain Solver T3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic time-domain code T3P. Higher-order Finite Element methods on conformal unstructured meshes and massively parallel processing allow unprecedented simulation accuracy for wakefield computations and simulations of transient effects in realistic accelerator structures. Applications include simulation of wakefield damping in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) power extraction and transfer structure (PETS).

  11. People, Place, and Time: How Structural Fieldwork Helps World-Systems Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul K. Gellert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Some of the most insightful work in the political economy of the world-system area has been produced by researchers whose extensive fieldwork offers them deep familiarity with people and locales. Few other methods are as useful to understand the impacts of structural change on daily life and the ways agents resist, alter, and shape emerging structures. Yet such structural fieldwork is marginalized by the over-reliance of pedagogical materials on social constructionist, social psychological, or interactionist perspectives and also in world-systems research and writing by the privileging of long durée historical or quantitative cross-national methods. This paper introduces the concept of structural fieldwork to describe a qualitative field methodology in which the researcher is self-consciously guided by considerations emerging out of macro-sociological theories. We identify four advantages of structural fieldwork: the illumination of power’s multiple dimensions; examination of agency and its boundaries or limitations within broad political and economic structures; attention to nuances of change and durability, spatial and temporal specificities, and processes of change and durability; and challenging and extending social theory. These advantages are illustrated in select examples from existing literature and by discussion of the two author’s fieldwork-based research. The paper concludes that explicit attention to fieldwork may strengthen political economy and world-systems research and also de-marginalize political economy informed by structural fieldwork.

  12. Guided Waves in Structures for SHM The Time - domain Spectral Element Method

    CERN Document Server

    Ostachowicz, Wieslaw; Krawczuk, Marek; Zak, Arkadiusz

    2011-01-01

    Presents the state of the art in the modelling, analysis and experimental investigation of elastic wave propagation using a technique of rapidly increasing interest and development Addressing an important issue in the field of guided-wave-based damage identification and structural health monitoring,Guided Waves in Structures for SHM presents the modelling, analysis and experimental investigation of elastic wave propagation in engineering structures made of isotropic or composite materials. The authors begin by summarising present-day knowledge on elastic wave propagation in solids, focusing on

  13. Probing the structural details of xylan degradation by real-time NMR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent O.; Lok, Finn; Meier, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    fraction of cereal cell wall polysaccharides consists of arabinoxylans. Arabinoxylan and its degradation products are therefore present in a variety of agro-industrial residues and products. Here, we undertook to track the structural details of wheat arabinoxylan degradation with high resolution NMR...... and in products. Reaction progress was visualized for the biodegradation of arabinoxylan by different crude microbial enzyme preparations. The direct observation of structural details in complex mixtures containing arabinoxylan fragments is significant, as such structural details reportedly modulate the health......-promoting functions of arabinoxylan fragments....

  14. Real-time in situ study of femtosecond-laser-induced periodic structures on metals by linear and nonlinear optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jihua; He, Yizhuo; Lam, Billy; Guo, Chunlei

    2017-08-21

    Femtosecond-laser surface structuring on metals is investigated in real time by both fundamental and second harmonic generation (SHG) signals. The onset of surface modification and its progress can be monitored by both the fundamental and SHG probes. However, the dynamics of femtosecond-laser-induced periodic surface structures (FLIPSSs) formation can only be revealed by SHG but not fundamental because of the higher sensitivity of SHG to structural geometry on metal. Our technique provides a simple and effective way to monitor the surface modification and FLIPSS formation thresholds and allows us to obtain the optimal FLIPSS for SHG enhancement.

  15. Real-time photoacoustic tomograpghy using linear array probe and detection of line structure using Hough transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung-Won; Park, Jaebyung; Shin, Dong Ho; Song, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Kyeong-Seop

    2015-01-01

    A real-time photoacoustic tomography (PAT) system is developed using a linear array probe and phantom images are acquired with a pattern of line structure. Moreover, it is attempted to detect line structures from the acquired images by Hough transform. This effort leads to the measurement of a process of magenta passing through a tube and acquisition of images at a speed of about 2 frame/sec. Besides, it is confirmed that the Hough transform applied on the acquired PAT images has the detection rate of about 50% for delineating a line structure.

  16. A novel self-supporting GEM-based amplification structure for a Time Projection Chamber at the ILC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, T.; Diener, R.; Rosemann, C.; Steder, L.

    2013-12-01

    Modern Time Projection Chambers are increasingly based on micro-pattern gas detector readout systems. In this paper a self-supporting method used to mount Gas Electron Multiplier foils is presented. It is based on light weight ceramic grids, and promises to cover large readout areas with minimum dead zones and material, while ensuring a flat and mechanically stable mounting. The structure has been tested in a Time Projection Chamber prototype, using cosmic muon tracks. The impact of the mounting structure on the charge measurement, the track reconstruction and the single point resolution is quantified.

  17. Structure of xanthan gum and cell ultrastructure at different times of alkali stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marcia Demello Luvielmo; Caroline Dellinghausen Borges; Daniela Deoliveira Toyama; Claire Tondo Vendruscolo; Adilma Regina Pippa Scamparini

    2016-01-01

      The effect of alkali stress on the yield, viscosity, gum structure, and cell ultrastructure of xanthan gum was evaluated at the end of fermentation process of xanthan production by Xanthomonas campestris pv. manihotis 280-95...

  18. Feasibility Study of the Electromagnetic Damper for Cable Structures Using Real-Time Hybrid Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Yeon Jung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cable structure is a major component of long-span bridges, such as cable-stayed and suspension bridges, and it transfers the main loads of bridges to the pylons. As these cable structures are exposed to continuous external loads, such as vehicle and wind loads, vibration control and continuous monitoring of the cable are required. In this study, an electromagnetic (EM damper was designed and fabricated for vibration control and monitoring of the cable structure. EM dampers, also called regenerative dampers, consist of permanent magnets and coils. The electromagnetic force due to the relative motion between the coil and the permanent magnet can be used to control the vibration of the structure. The electrical energy can be used as a power source for the monitoring system. The effects of the design parameters of the damper were numerically analyzed and the damper was fabricated. The characteristics of the damper were analyzed with various external load changes. Finally, the vibration-control and energy-harvesting performances of the cable structure were evaluated through a hybrid simulation. The vibration-control and energy-harvesting performances for various loads were analyzed and the applicability to the cable structure of the EM damper was evaluated.

  19. Feasibility Study of the Electromagnetic Damper for Cable Structures Using Real-Time Hybrid Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ho-Yeon; Kim, In-Ho; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2017-10-31

    Cable structure is a major component of long-span bridges, such as cable-stayed and suspension bridges, and it transfers the main loads of bridges to the pylons. As these cable structures are exposed to continuous external loads, such as vehicle and wind loads, vibration control and continuous monitoring of the cable are required. In this study, an electromagnetic (EM) damper was designed and fabricated for vibration control and monitoring of the cable structure. EM dampers, also called regenerative dampers, consist of permanent magnets and coils. The electromagnetic force due to the relative motion between the coil and the permanent magnet can be used to control the vibration of the structure. The electrical energy can be used as a power source for the monitoring system. The effects of the design parameters of the damper were numerically analyzed and the damper was fabricated. The characteristics of the damper were analyzed with various external load changes. Finally, the vibration-control and energy-harvesting performances of the cable structure were evaluated through a hybrid simulation. The vibration-control and energy-harvesting performances for various loads were analyzed and the applicability to the cable structure of the EM damper was evaluated.

  20. Dynamics of spin valves investigated using Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Christopher; Paul, Jagannath; Dey, Prasenjit; Miller, Casey; McGill, Stephen; Karaiskaj, Denis

    Through an all-optical approach, we are investigating the spin dynamics in different spin torque based structures. Using pump-probe Time-Resolved Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (TR-MOKE) spectroscopy, we are able to monitor the ultrafast magnon propagation on a sub-picosecond timescale as well as the longer lived oscillations and demagnetization. This represents a recent efforts to realize magnon induced spin torque using an all optical method. This research at USF is supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems under Grant Number: 1231929. The work was done in part at the NHMFL, Tallahassee, FSU under Grants: DMR-1229217, DMR-1157490.

  1. Time-varying effect moderation using the structural nested mean model: estimation using inverse-weighted regression with residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Daniel; Griffin, Beth Ann; McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Ramchand, Rajeev; Yuen, Robert A.; Murphy, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the problem of examining time-varying causal effect moderation using observational, longitudinal data in which treatment, candidate moderators, and possible confounders are time varying. The structural nested mean model (SNMM) is used to specify the moderated time-varying causal effects of interest in a conditional mean model for a continuous response given time-varying treatments and moderators. We present an easy-to-use estimator of the SNMM that combines an existing regression-with-residuals (RR) approach with an inverse-probability-of-treatment weighting (IPTW) strategy. The RR approach has been shown to identify the moderated time-varying causal effects if the time-varying moderators are also the sole time-varying confounders. The proposed IPTW+RR approach provides estimators of the moderated time-varying causal effects in the SNMM in the presence of an additional, auxiliary set of known and measured time-varying confounders. We use a small simulation experiment to compare IPTW+RR versus the traditional regression approach and to compare small and large sample properties of asymptotic versus bootstrap estimators of the standard errors for the IPTW+RR approach. This article clarifies the distinction between time-varying moderators and time-varying confounders. We illustrate the methodology in a case study to assess if time-varying substance use moderates treatment effects on future substance use. PMID:23873437

  2. Modal Vibration Control in Periodic Time-Varying Structures with Focus on Rotor Blade Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    to be overcome. Among others it is necessary, that the control scheme is capable to cope with non-linear time-varying dynamical system behaviour. However, rotating at constant speed the mathematical model becomes periodic time-variant. In this framework the present paper gives a contribution to design procedures...... to demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the technique. The results obtained shows that the control design technique is capable to cope with the time periodicity of this class of systems....

  3. Modal Vibration Control in Periodic Time-Varying Structures with Focus on Rotor-Blade Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rene Hardam; Santos, Ilmar

    2003-01-01

    to be overcome. Among others it is necessary, that the control scheme is capable to cope with non-linear time-varying dynamical system behaviour. However, rotating at constant speed the mathematical model becomes periodic time-variant. In this framework the present paper gives a contribution to design procedures...... to demonstrate the applicability and effectiveness of the technique. The results obtained shows that the control design technique is capable to cope with the time periodicity of this class of systems....

  4. Sparse Regression Based Structure Learning of Stochastic Reaction Networks from Single Cell Snapshot Time Series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Klimovskaia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic chemical reaction networks constitute a model class to quantitatively describe dynamics and cell-to-cell variability in biological systems. The topology of these networks typically is only partially characterized due to experimental limitations. Current approaches for refining network topology are based on the explicit enumeration of alternative topologies and are therefore restricted to small problem instances with almost complete knowledge. We propose the reactionet lasso, a computational procedure that derives a stepwise sparse regression approach on the basis of the Chemical Master Equation, enabling large-scale structure learning for reaction networks by implicitly accounting for billions of topology variants. We have assessed the structure learning capabilities of the reactionet lasso on synthetic data for the complete TRAIL induced apoptosis signaling cascade comprising 70 reactions. We find that the reactionet lasso is able to efficiently recover the structure of these reaction systems, ab initio, with high sensitivity and specificity. With only 6000 possible reactions and over 102000 network topologies. In conjunction with information rich single cell technologies such as single cell RNA sequencing or mass cytometry, the reactionet lasso will enable large-scale structure learning, particularly in areas with partial network structure knowledge, such as cancer biology, and thereby enable the detection of pathological alterations of reaction networks. We provide software to allow for wide applicability of the reactionet lasso.

  5. Opportunities and challenges for time-resolved studies of protein structural dynamics at X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard

    2014-07-17

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are revolutionary X-ray sources. Their time structure, providing X-ray pulses of a few tens of femtoseconds in duration; and their extreme peak brilliance, delivering approximately 10(12) X-ray photons per pulse and facilitating sub-micrometre focusing, distinguish XFEL sources from synchrotron radiation. In this opinion piece, I argue that these properties of XFEL radiation will facilitate new discoveries in life science. I reason that time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering are promising areas of scientific investigation that will be advanced by XFEL capabilities, allowing new scientific questions to be addressed that are not accessible using established methods at storage ring facilities. These questions include visualizing ultrafast protein structural dynamics on the femtosecond to picosecond time-scale, as well as time-resolved diffraction studies of non-cyclic reactions. I argue that these emerging opportunities will stimulate a renaissance of interest in time-resolved structural biochemistry.

  6. Integrative, dynamic structural biology at atomic resolution--it's about time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bedem, Henry; Fraser, James S

    2015-04-01

    Biomolecules adopt a dynamic ensemble of conformations, each with the potential to interact with binding partners or perform the chemical reactions required for a multitude of cellular functions. Recent advances in X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and other techniques are helping us realize the dream of seeing--in atomic detail--how different parts of biomolecules shift between functional substates using concerted motions. Integrative structural biology has advanced our understanding of the formation of large macromolecular complexes and how their components interact in assemblies by leveraging data from many low-resolution methods. Here, we review the growing opportunities for integrative, dynamic structural biology at the atomic scale, contending there is increasing synergistic potential between X-ray crystallography, NMR and computer simulations to reveal a structural basis for protein conformational dynamics at high resolution.

  7. Integrative, Dynamic Structural Biology at Atomic Resolution—It’s About Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bedem, Henry; Fraser, James S.

    2015-01-01

    Biomolecules adopt a dynamic ensemble of conformations, each with the potential to interact with binding partners or perform the chemical reactions required for a multitude of cellular functions. Recent advances in X-ray crystallography, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and other techniques are helping us realize the dream of seeing—in atomic detail—how different parts of biomolecules exchange between functional sub-states using concerted motions. Integrative structural biology has advanced our understanding of the formation of large macromolecular complexes and how their components interact in assemblies by leveraging data from many low-resolution methods. Here, we review the growing opportunities for integrative, dynamic structural biology at the atomic scale, contending there is increasing synergistic potential between X-ray crystallography, NMR, and computer simulations to reveal a structural basis for protein conformational dynamics at high resolution. PMID:25825836

  8. Inertia and gravitation the fundamental nature and structure of space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Pfister, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on the phenomena of inertia and gravitation, one objective being to shed some new light on the basic laws of gravitational interaction and the fundamental nature and structures of spacetime. Chapter 1 is devoted to an extensive, partly new analysis of the law of inertia. The underlying mathematical and geometrical structure of Newtonian spacetime is presented from a four-dimensional point of view, and some historical difficulties and controversies - in particular the concepts of free particles and straight lines - are critically analyzed, while connections to projective geometry are also explored. The relativistic extensions of the law of gravitation and its intriguing consequences are studied in Chapter 2. This is achieved, following the works of Weyl, Ehlers, Pirani and Schild, by adopting a point of view of the combined conformal and projective structure of spacetime. Specifically, Mach’s fundamental critique of Newton’s concepts of ‘absolute space’ and ‘absolute time’ was a d...

  9. Analysis of shell-type structures subjected to time-dependent mechanical and thermal loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simitses, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to develop a general mathematical model and solution methodologies for analyzing structural response of thin, metallic shell-type structures under large transient, cyclic, or static thermomechanical loads. Among the system responses, which are associated with these load conditions, are thermal buckling, creep buckling, and racheting. Thus, geometric as well as material-type nonlinearities (of high order) can be anticipated and must be considered in the development of the mathematical model. Furthermore, this must also be accommodated in the solution procedures.

  10. Temporal structure in cooperative interactions: what does the timing of cheating tell us about its cost?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, Jessie; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2016-01-01

    . Focusing on between-species cooperation (mutualism), we hypothesize that the temporal sequence in which exploitation occurs relative to cooperation affects its net costs and argue that this can help explain when and where control mechanisms are observed in nature. Our principal prediction is that when...... readily be extended to cases in which individuals exhibit mixed cooperative-exploitative strategies. We demonstrate that temporal structure should be considered alongside spatial structure as an important process affecting the evolution of cooperation. We also provide testable predictions to guide future...

  11. Identification of structural stiffness and excitation forces in time domain using noncontact vision-based displacement measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dongming; Feng, Maria Q.

    2017-10-01

    The emerging noncontact vision-based displacement sensor system offers a promising alternative to the conventional sensors for quantitative structural integrity assessment. Significant advantages of the noncontact vision-based sensor include its low cost, ease of operation, and flexibility to extract structural displacement responses at multiple points. This study aims to link the measured displacement data to the quantification of the structural health condition, by validating the feasibility of simultaneous identification of structural stiffness and unknown excitation forces in time domain using output-only vision-based displacement measurement. Numerical analysis are first carried out to investigate the accuracy, convergence and robustness of identified results to different noise levels, sensor numbers, and initial estimates of structural parameters. Then, experiment on a laboratory scaled beam structure is conducted. Results show that the global stiffness of the beam specimen as well as external hammer excitation forces can be successfully and accurately identified from displacement measurement at two points using one camera. The proposed output-only time-domain identification procedure utilizing vision-based displacement measurement represents a low-cost method for either periodic or long-term bridge performance assessment.

  12. Study of stratified dielectric slab medium structures using pseudo-spectral time domain (PSTD) algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Lu, Y.; Chen, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A planar stratified dielectric slab medium, which is an interesting problem in optics and geophysics, is studied using a pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) algorithm. Time domain electric fields and frequency domain propagation characteristics of both single and periodic dielectric slab...

  13. A general structure for a time-domain model of the cochlea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duifhuis, H; Wada, H; Takasaka, T; Ikeda, K; Koike, T

    2000-01-01

    This study presents an implementation of our basic ideas about a time-domain nonlinear model of the cochlea. The time-domain approach is considered necessary because it allows implementation of nonlinearity in general and of a proper temporal analysis of natural transient responses in particular. It

  14. Differences between intra- and extra-cavity pulse time structure in a hole-coupled free-electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weits, H. H.; Knippels, G.M.H.; van Werkhoven, G. H. C.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1997-01-01

    In the strong-slippage regime of a free-electron laser, the optical pulse inside the resonator is composed of a series of subsequently growing and decaying subpulses due to a limit-cycle oscillation. The picosecond time structure of the outcoupled pulses can be quite different from that of the

  15. Arid landscape dynamics along a precipitation gradient: addressing vegetation - landscape structure - resource interactions at different time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buis, E.

    2008-01-01

    This research is entitled ‘Arid landscape dynamics along a precipitation gradient: addressing vegetation – landscape structure – resource interactions at different time scales’ with as subtitle ‘A case study for the Northern Negev Desert of Israel’. Landscape dynamics describes the interactions

  16. Group-Based Modeling of Time Spent in Structured Activity Trajectories from Middle Childhood into Early Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Andrea D.; van Dulmen, Manfred H. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated trajectories of time spent in structured activities from middle childhood to early adolescence by using data from the National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care. We used latent class growth analyses and identified five trajectories (stable low, increasing high, decreasing low,…

  17. Dynamic thermal wave response and propagation through building structures using infinite elements in time and frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Konstantin S.; Stoynova, Iliana Y.

    2017-07-01

    This paper is devoted to a new approach the dynamic termal response and the factor of termal wave propagation through of complex building structure to be evaluated using infinite elements. The far field of such structures is discretized by decay or mapped infinite elements. These elements are appropriate for complex building structures, subjected to termal wave propagation and solved in time or frequency domain. Such infinite elements can be treated as new modified forms of the recently proposed by the first author infinite elements with united shape functions. In the research the time domain form of the equations is demonstrated and used in the numerical example. Only 2D horizontal type infinite elements is used, but by similar techniques 2D vertical and 2D corner infinite elements can also be formulated. The application of the proposed elements in the Finite element method is demonstrated in brief.

  18. Training and learning robotic surgery, time for a more structured approach: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, H. W. R.; Wolswijk, R.; Zweemer, R. P.; Schijven, M. P.; Verheijen, R. H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery is growing rapidly and there is an increasing need for a structured approach to train future robotic surgeons. Objectives To review the literature on training and learning strategies for robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. Search strategy A

  19. A marginal structural model for recurrent events in the presence of time-dependent confounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Aksel K. G.; Ravn, Henrik; Sørup, Signe

    2016-01-01

    Using a Danish register-based study on childhood vaccination and hospitalisation as motivation, a marginal structural model for recurrent events is studied. The model addresses a number of challenges which may be seen more generally in large register-based cohort studies. One is to adjust...

  20. The plasma processes of some solar radio burst and their fine structures on the time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Z.-J.; Lu, Q.-K.; Fu, Q.-J.; Yan, Y.

    2003-04-01

    We present three special solar radio bursts or fine structures on the frequency band of 1.00-7.60Ghz. Firstly, we study the type III burst pair, which was recorded by spectrometer 1.00-2.00GHz at National Astronomical Observatory of China on Jan. 05, 1994. A plausible model might be thought that this event could be the observational evidence of two electron beams traveling bi-directions simultanuously due to the acceleration of magnetic reconnection in the corona. Secondly, a fine structure of microwave type IV bursts is microwave type M-burst on May 03 1999. Partial N-burst, which is a fine structure of solar III-V bursts recorded on August 251999 by both separated spectrometers 4.50-7.50 GHz at Purple Mountain observatory and 5.20-7.60GHz at NAO respectively, is the third phenomenon studied here. As the N-burst documented before, the last two fine structures are thought to the new observational evidences of electron beam reflected by magnetic mirror in the corona.

  1. Start Time and Duration Distribution Estimation in Semi-Structured Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wombacher, Andreas; Iacob, Maria Eugenia

    Semi-structured processes are business workflows, where the execution of the workflow is not completely controlled by a workflow engine, i.e., an implementation of a formal workflow model. Examples are workflows where actors potentially have interaction with customers reporting the result of the

  2. Time-domain simulations for metallic nano-structures - a Krylov-subspace approach beyond the limitations of FDTD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Michael [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics (KSOP), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Niegemann, Jens; Tkeshelashvili, Lasha; Busch, Kurt [Institut fuer Theoretische Festkoerperphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); DFG Forschungszentrum Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany); Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics (KSOP), Universitaet Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Numerical simulations of metallic nano-structures are crucial for the efficient design of plasmonic devices. Conventional time-domain solvers such as FDTD introduce large numerical errors especially at metallic surfaces. Our approach combines a discontinuous Galerkin method on an adaptive mesh for the spatial discretisation with a Krylov-subspace technique for the time-stepping procedure. Thus, the higher-order accuracy in both time and space is supported by unconditional stability. As illustrative examples, we compare numerical results obtained with our method against analytical reference solutions and results from FDTD calculations.

  3. A Discrete-time Variable Structure Disturbance Observer for Compensating Cutting Load Disturbances in CNC AC Servo Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eun, Y.E.; Kim, K.S.; Cho, D.I. [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    This paper develops an AC motor controller for CNC applications. The AC motor controller design is based on the variable structure system method; particularly, it adds a variable structure disturbance observer to a standard variable structure controller. The combined variable structure controller and disturbance observer approach is formulated in the discrete time to maximize the controller performance in digital implementation. In order to guarantee robust stability, a new separation principle that decouples the observer dynamics from the tracking error dynamics is derived. The designed controller is installed on the z-axis of a CNC machining center and milling experiments were performed. The results show excellent disturbance estimation properties, and improved performance on both position and speed tracking, when compared to the factory-designed servo controller. (author). refs., figs., tabs.

  4. Real-time 3D measurement based on structured light illumination considering camera lens distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shijie; Chen, Qian; Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Yu, ShiLing

    2014-12-01

    Optical three-dimensional (3-D) profilometry is gaining increasing attention for its simplicity, flexibility, high accuracy, and non-contact nature. Recent advances in imaging sensors and digital projection technology further its progress in high-speed, real-time applications, enabling 3-D shapes reconstruction of moving objects and dynamic scenes. In traditional 3-D measurement system where the processing time is not a key factor, camera lens distortion correction is performed directly. However, for the time-critical high-speed applications, the time-consuming correction algorithm is inappropriate to be performed directly during the real-time process. To cope with this issue, here we present a novel high-speed real-time 3-D coordinates measuring technique based on fringe projection with the consideration of the camera lens distortion. A pixel mapping relation between a distorted image and a corrected one is pre-determined and stored in computer memory for real-time fringe correction. And a method of lookup table (LUT) is introduced as well for fast data processing. Our experimental results reveal that the measurement error of the in-plane coordinates has been reduced by one order of magnitude and the accuracy of the out-plane coordinate been tripled after the distortions being eliminated. Moreover, owing to the merit of the LUT, the 3-D reconstruction can be achieved at 92.34 frames per second.

  5. Space, time and aliens: charting the dynamic structure of Galápagos pollination networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traveset, Anna; Chamorro, Susana; Olesen, Jens M; Heleno, Ruben

    2015-06-23

    Oceanic archipelagos are threatened by the introduction of alien species which can severely disrupt the structure, function and stability of native communities. Here we investigated the pollination interactions in the two most disturbed Galápagos Islands, comparing the three main habitats and the two seasons, and assessing the impacts of alien plant invasions on network structure. We found that the pollination network structure was rather consistent between the two islands, but differed across habitats and seasons. Overall, the arid zone had the largest networks and highest species generalization levels whereas either the transition between habitats or the humid habitat showed lower values. Our data suggest that alien plants integrate easily into the communities, but with low impact on overall network structure, except for an increase in network selectiveness. The humid zone showed the highest nestedness and the lowest modularity, which might be explained by the low species diversity and the higher incidence of alien plants in this habitat. Both pollinators and plants were also more generalized in the hot season, when networks showed to be more nested. Alien species (both plants and pollinators) represented a high fraction (∼56 %) of the total number of interactions in the networks. It is thus likely that, in spite of the overall weak effect we found of alien plant invasion on pollination network structure, these introduced species influence the reproductive success of native ones, and by doing so, they affect the functioning of the community. This certainly deserves further investigation. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  6. Drying of concrete. Part II: The drying time of concrete structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Christensen, Søren Lolk

    1998-01-01

    The composition of a concrete mix has a significant influence on the drying time to reach a given relative humidity in the concrete pores. Knowledge of the influence on the drying of a specific component in the concrete makes it possible to design a concrete mix having a predetermined drying time....... In the paper the effects of the air content and the silica fume content on the drying time are investigated on two concrete mixes having different water/cement ratios. One concrete represents a normal concrete and the other represents a selfdesiccation concrete....

  7. Structural Changes in PEO-PPO-PEO Gels Induced by Methylparaben and Dexamethasone Observed Using Time-Resolved SAXS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meznarich, Norman A.K.; Juggernauth, K Anne; Batzli, Kiersten M; Love, Brian J [Michigan

    2011-11-17

    Aqueous solutions of polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene-polyoxyethylene (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymers (commercially available as Pluronic surfactants) micellize and structurally arrange into cubic quasicrystalline lattices as their temperature is raised. This structural evolution is seen macroscopically as a gelation, and the presence of these ordered phases can be controlled through both polymer concentration and temperature. The presence of added solutes within the dispersions can also affect the onset and kinetics of structure formation. Here we investigate the structures formed in Pluronic F127 solutions ranging from 20 to 30% with two pharmaceutical additives [methylparaben (MP) and dexamethasone (DX)] using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We observe both the progressive evolution and breakdown of these structures as the temperature is increased from 0 to 80 °C. Additionally, we conducted time-resolved SAXS measurements to elucidate the kinetics of the structural evolution. On the basis of the evolution of scattering peaks as the samples were being heated, we suggest that added MP changes the nucleation behavior of fcc phases within the sample from a heterogeneous process to a more homogeneous distribution of nucleated species. MP and DX also stabilize the micelle lattices, allowing them to persevere at higher temperatures. We observed the unusual result that the presence of DX caused the primary peaks of the structure factor to be suppressed, while preserving the higher order peaks. The primary peaks reappeared at the highest temperatures tested.

  8. Analysis of Modal Travel Time Variability Due to Mesoscale Ocean Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Amy

    1997-01-01

    .... First, for an open ocean environment away from strong boundary currents, the effects of randomly phased linear baroclinic Rossby waves on acoustic travel time are shown to produce a variable overall...

  9. Multiscale Space-Time Computational Methods for Fluid-Structure Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-13

    the flapping wing aerodynamics of Micro Air Vehicles (MAV), aerodynamics of Unmanned Air Vehicles ( UAV ), Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems (MEMS...Anthony Puntel, Nikolay Kostov, Tayfun E. Tezduyar. Space–time techniques for computational aerodynamics modeling of flapping wings of an actual...Tezduyar, Spenser McIntyre, Nikolay Kostov, Ryan Kolesar, Casey Habluetzel. Space–time VMS computation of wind-turbine rotor and tower aerodynamics

  10. Observation of 1-D time dependent non-propagating laser plasma structures using fluid and PIC codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Deepa; Bera, Ratan Kumar; Kumar, Atul; Patel, Bhavesh; Das, Amita

    2017-12-01

    The manuscript reports the observation of time dependent localized and non-propagating structures in the coupled laser plasma system through 1-D fluid and Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations. It is reported that such structures form spontaneously as a result of collision amongst certain exact solitonic solutions. They are seen to survive as coherent entities for a long time up to several hundreds of plasma periods. Furthermore, it is shown that such time dependence can also be artificially recreated by significantly disturbing the delicate balance between the radiation and the density fields required for the exact non-propagating solution obtained by Esirkepov et al., JETP 68(1), 36-41 (1998). The ensuing time evolution is an interesting interplay between kinetic and field energies of the system. The electrostatic plasma oscillations are coupled with oscillations in the electromagnetic field. The inhomogeneity of the background and the relativistic nature, however, invariably produces large amplitude density perturbations leading to its wave breaking. In the fluid simulations, the signature of wave breaking can be discerned by a drop in the total energy which evidently gets lost to the grid. The PIC simulations are observed to closely follow the fluid simulations till the point of wave breaking. However, the total energy in the case of PIC simulations is seen to remain conserved throughout the simulations. At the wave breaking, the particles are observed to acquire thermal kinetic energy in the case of PIC. Interestingly, even after wave breaking, compact coherent structures with trapped radiation inside high-density peaks continue to exist both in PIC and fluid simulations. Although the time evolution does not exactly match in the two simulations as it does prior to the process of wave breaking, the time-dependent features exhibited by the remnant structures are characteristically similar.

  11. Dynamics of a physiologically structured population in a time-varying environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilmann, Irene Louise Torpe; Starke, Jens; Andersen, Ken Haste

    2016-01-01

    Physiologically structured population models have become a valuable tool to model the dynamics of populations. In a stationary environment such models can exhibit equilibrium solutions as well as periodic solutions. However, for many organisms the environment is not stationary, but varies more...... or less regularly. In order to understand the interaction between an external environmental forcing and the internal dynamics in a population, we examine the response of a physiologically structured population model to a periodic variation in the food resource. We explore the addition of forcing in two...... with the oscillations of the unforced system, and both periodic and irregular (quasi-periodic or chaotic) solutions occur. In both cases the periodic solutions include one and multiple period cycles, and each cycle can have several reproduction pulses....

  12. The timing of language learning shapes brain structure associated with articulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berken, Jonathan A; Gracco, Vincent L; Chen, Jen-Kai; Klein, Denise

    2016-09-01

    We compared the brain structure of highly proficient simultaneous (two languages from birth) and sequential (second language after age 5) bilinguals, who differed only in their degree of native-like accent, to determine how the brain develops when a skill is acquired from birth versus later in life. For the simultaneous bilinguals, gray matter density was increased in the left putamen, as well as in the left posterior insula, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and left and right occipital cortex. For the sequential bilinguals, gray matter density was increased in the bilateral premotor cortex. Sequential bilinguals with better accents also showed greater gray matter density in the left putamen, and in several additional brain regions important for sensorimotor integration and speech-motor control. Our findings suggest that second language learning results in enhanced brain structure of specific brain areas, which depends on whether two languages are learned simultaneously or sequentially, and on the extent to which native-like proficiency is acquired.

  13. Einstein equations and conformal structure: Existence of Anti-de Sitter-type space-times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Helmut

    1995-10-01

    We discuss Einstein's equations in the context of normal conformal Cartan connections, derive a new conformal representation of the equations, and express the equations in a conformally invariant gauge. The resulting formulation of the equations is used to show the existence of asymptotically simple solutions to Einstein's equations with a positive cosmological constant. The solutions are characterized by Cauchy data on a space-like slice and by the intrinsic conformal structure on the conformal boundary at space-like and null infinity.

  14. Statistical analysis of the time and fatigue strength of aircraft wing structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Hans W

    1941-01-01

    The results from stress measurements in flight operation afford data for analyzing the frequency of appearance of certain parts of the static breaking strength during a specified number of operating hours. Appropriate frequency evaluations furnish data for the prediction of the required strength under repeated stress in the wing structures of aircraft of the different stress categories for the specified number of operating hours demanded during the life of a component.

  15. Space-Time Fluid-Structure Interaction Computation of Flapping-Wing Aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    can add heave, sway , surge , roll, pitch, and yaw, and in- vestigate their effect on the forces generated by the MAV, assuming that the MAV somehow...dt2 + η dy dt − f s ) −∇ · σs = 0, (2.3) where ρs, y, η, f s and σs are the material density, structural displacement, damping coefficient, external

  16. The Impact of Divergence Time on the Nature of Population Structure: An Example from Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alkes L.; Helgason, Agnar; Palsson, Snaebjorn; Stefansson, Hreinn; St. Clair, David; Andreassen, Ole A.; Reich, David; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-01-01

    The Icelandic population has been sampled in many disease association studies, providing a strong motivation to understand the structure of this population and its ramifications for disease gene mapping. Previous work using 40 microsatellites showed that the Icelandic population is relatively homogeneous, but exhibits subtle population structure that can bias disease association statistics. Here, we show that regional geographic ancestries of individuals from Iceland can be distinguished using 292,289 autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We further show that subpopulation differences are due to genetic drift since the settlement of Iceland 1100 years ago, and not to varying contributions from different ancestral populations. A consequence of the recent origin of Icelandic population structure is that allele frequency differences follow a null distribution devoid of outliers, so that the risk of false positive associations due to stratification is minimal. Our results highlight an important distinction between population differences attributable to recent drift and those arising from more ancient divergence, which has implications both for association studies and for efforts to detect natural selection using population differentiation. PMID:19503599

  17. A Time-Domain Structural Damage Detection Method Based on Improved Multiparticle Swarm Coevolution Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Fei Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization techniques have been applied to structural health monitoring and damage detection of civil infrastructures for two decades. The standard particle swarm optimization (PSO is easy to fall into the local optimum and such deficiency also exists in the multiparticle swarm coevolution optimization (MPSCO. This paper presents an improved MPSCO algorithm (IMPSCO firstly and then integrates it with Newmark’s algorithm to localize and quantify the structural damage by using the damage threshold proposed. To validate the proposed method, a numerical simulation and an experimental study of a seven-story steel frame were employed finally, and a comparison was made between the proposed method and the genetic algorithm (GA. The results show threefold: (1 the proposed method not only is capable of localization and quantification of damage, but also has good noise-tolerance; (2 the damage location can be accurately detected using the damage threshold proposed in this paper; and (3 compared with the GA, the IMPSCO algorithm is more efficient and accurate for damage detection problems in general. This implies that the proposed method is applicable and effective in the community of damage detection and structural health monitoring.

  18. Structural dynamics of membrane proteins - time-resolved and surface-enhanced IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Joachim

    2013-03-01

    Membrane proteins are the target of more than 50% of all drugs and are encoded by about 30% of the human genome. Electrophysiological techniques, like patch-clamp, unravelled many functional aspects of membrane proteins but suffer from structural sensitivity. We have developed Surface Enhanced Infrared Difference Absorption Spectroscopy (SEIDAS) to probe potential-induced structural changes of a protein on the level of a monolayer. A novel concept is introduced to incorporate membrane proteins into solid supported lipid bilayers in an orientated manner via the affinity of the His-tag to the Ni-NTA terminated gold surface. General applicability of the methodological approach is shown by tethering photosystem II to the gold surface. In conjunction with hydrogenase, the basis is set towards a biomimetic system for hydrogen production. Recently, we succeeded to record IR difference spectra of a monolayer of sensory rhodopsin II under voltage-clamp conditions. This approach opens an avenue towards mechanistic studies of voltage-gated ion channels with unprecedented structural and temporal sensitivity. Initial vibrational studies on the novel light-gated channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) will be presented. ChR2 represents a versatile tool in the new field of optogenetics where physiological reactions are controlled by light.

  19. Development of a real-time bridge structural monitoring and warning system: a case study in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemapech, I.; Sansrimahachai, W.; Toachoodee, M.

    2017-04-01

    Regarded as one of the physical aspects under societal and civil development and evolution, engineering structure is required to support growth of the nation. It also impacts life quality and safety of the civilian. Despite of its own weight (dead load) and live load, structural members are also significantly affected by disaster and environment. Proper inspection and detection are thus crucial both during regular and unsafe events. An Enhanced Structural Health Monitoring System Using Stream Processing and Artificial Neural Network Techniques (SPANNeT) has been developed and is described in this paper. SPANNeT applies wireless sensor network, real-time data stream processing and artificial neural network based upon the measured bending strains. Major contributions include an effective, accurate and energy-aware data communication and damage detection of the engineering structure. Strain thresholds have been defined according to computer simulation results and the AASHTO (American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials) LRFD (Load and Resistance Factor Design) Bridge Design specifications for launching several warning levels. SPANNeT has been tested and evaluated by means of computer-based simulation and on-site levels. According to the measurements, the observed maximum values are 25 to 30 microstrains during normal operation. The given protocol provided at least 90% of data communication reliability. SPANNeT is capable of real-time data report, monitoring and warning efficiently conforming to the predefined thresholds which can be adjusted regarding user's requirements and structural engineering characteristics.

  20. Geostatistical Spatio-Time model of crime in el Salvador: Structural and Predictive Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welman Rosa Alvarado

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Today, to study a geospatial and spatio-temporal phenomena requires searching statistical tools that enable the analysis of the dependency of space, time and interactions. The science that studies this kind of subjects is the Geoestatics which the goal is to predict spatial phenomenon. This science is considered the base for modeling phenomena that involves interactions between space and time. In the past 10 years, the Geostatistic had seen a great development in areas like the geology, soils, remote sensing, epidemiology, agriculture, ecology, economy, etc. In this research, the geostatistic had been apply to build a predictive map about crime in El Salvador; for that the variability of space and time together is studied to generate crime scenarios: crime hot spots are determined, crime vulnerable groups are identified, to improve political decisions and facilitate to decision makers about the insecurity in the country.

  1. The effect of alkaline treatments soaking time on oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizi, M. K.; Shahriman, A. B.; Majid, M. S. Abdul; Ahmad, Z. A.; Shamsul, B. M. T.; Ng, Y. G.

    2017-10-01

    The primary objective of this work was to study the effect of different soaking time in an alkaline solution for oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre. For this purpose, the OPEFB fibres were treated with the sodium hydroxide (NaOH) at 5% concentration for ½ hour, 1-hour, 3-hour, 5-hour, 7-hour and 24-hours. The single tests of treated and untreated fibre were then performed in accordance with the ASTM D3822-07 standard. Next, the surfaces of the fibres prior and after the treatment were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) TM3000. The result shows that at 7 hours of soaking time exhibits the highest tensile strength compared to the other soaking time and untreated fibre.

  2. Time needed to board an airplane: a power law and the structure behind it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frette, Vidar; Hemmer, Per C

    2012-01-01

    A simple model for the boarding of an airplane is studied. Passengers have reserved seats but enter the airplane in arbitrary order. Queues are formed along the aisle, as some passengers have to wait to reach the seats for which they have reservation. We label a passenger by the number of his or her reserved seat. In most cases the boarding process is much slower than for the optimal situation, where passenger and seat orders are identical. We study this dynamical system by calculating the average boarding time when all permutations of N passengers are given equal weight. To first order, the boarding time for a given permutation (ordering) of the passengers is given by the number s of sequences of monotonically increasing values in the permutation. We show that the distribution of s is symmetric on [1,N], which leads to an average boarding time (N+1)/2. We have found an exact expression for s and have shown that the full distribution of s approaches a normal distribution as N increases. However, there are significant corrections to the first-order results, due to certain correlations between passenger ordering and the substrate (seat ordering). This occurs for some cases in which the sequence of the seats is partially mirrored in the passenger ordering. These cases with correlations have a boarding time that is lower than predicted by the first-order results. The large number of cases with reduced boarding times have been classified. We also give some indicative results on the geometry of the correlations, with sorting into geometry groups. With increasing N, both the number of correlation types and the number of cases belonging to each type increase rapidly. Using enumeration we find that as a result of these correlations the average boarding time behaves like N(α), with α≃0.69, as compared with α=1.0 for the first-order approximation. © 2012 American Physical Society

  3. Synthesis of ferrofluids based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Influence of reaction time on structural, morphological and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirabadizadeh, Ahmad; Salighe, Zohre; Sarhaddi, Reza; Lotfollahi, Zahra

    2017-07-01

    In this work, for first time the ferrofluids based on the cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation method at different reaction times (0.5-6.5 h). Crystal structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids based on the nanoparticles were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD patterns of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles synthesized at different reaction times indicated that all samples are single phase in accordance with inverse cubic spinel structure with space group Fd-3m, and no impurity phase was observed. By increasing the reaction time to 3.5 h, the lattice parameter and the average crystallites size increased and then afterwards decreased by increasing the reaction time. The microscopic studies indicated the formation of nanosized particles with nearly spherical in shape, whereas the average particle size for all samples is found to be less than 50 nm. The results of VSM also showed that the saturation magnetization and coercivity field of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids were influenced by reaction time, whereas the ferrofluids have lower values of magnetic parameters than that of nanoparticles.

  4. Wide-range-tunable Dirac-cone band structure in a chiral-time-symmetric non-Hermitian system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S.; Song, Z.

    2017-11-01

    We establish a connection between an arbitrary Hermitian tight-binding model with chiral (C ) symmetry and its non-Hermitian counterpart with chiral-time (CT ) symmetry. We show that such a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian is pseudo-Hermitian. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian can be easily obtained from those of its parent Hermitian Hamiltonian. It provides a way to generate a class of non-Hermitian models with a tunable full real band structure by means of additional imaginary potentials. We also present an illustrative example that could achieve a cone structure from the energy band of a two-layer Hermitian square lattice model.

  5. Time-sequenced and spectrally filtered Rayleigh imaging of shock wave and boundary layer structure for inlet characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkey, Joseph; Cogne, Sandrine; Smits, Alexander; Bogdonoff, Seymour; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.

    1993-01-01

    Multiple pulsed Rayleigh imaging and filtered Rayleigh scattering are used to generate images of a complex boundary layer structure, shock wave/boundary layer interactions, and crossing shock waves. Time-sequenced Rayleigh images taken with a visible, double-pulsed laser system show the evolution of boundary layer structure of the internal flow in a generic cross-shock inlet. The images taken in the inlet give insight into 3D effects caused by the inlet geometry and may be used for modeling the complex flows.

  6. Evolution of structural and magnetic phases in Nd doped BiFeO3 multiferroics with sintering time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ompal; Agarwal, Ashish; Das, Amitabh; Sanghi, Sujata; Jindal, Anju

    2017-11-01

    The effect of sintering time on the evolution of structural and magnetic phases has been studied in Bi0.8Nd0.2FeO3 multiferroic. These multiferroics were prepared by normal solid state reaction technique. XRD, NPD and VSM characterizations were performed to explore the structural and magnetic properties and correlation between these. The refinement of the XRD patterns using FullProf program show, mixed phase having rhombohedral (R3c) + orthorhombic (Pnma) symmetry in sample sintered for 1 h. For sample sintered for two hours, crystal structure was found to be mixed phase with rhombohedral (R3c) + orthorhombic (Pbam) symmetry and the sample sintered for three hours, it crystallized in pure orthorhombic (Pbam) symmetry. The octahedral tilting is thus found to be changing systematically with the variation of sintering time. The refinement of the neutron diffractions patterns confirms the XRD results of structural evolution with sintering time. The magnetic moment undergoes change in the direction of their preferential alignment from c-axis to along a-axis in the 3 h sintered sample. The M-H loops shows significant enhancement in magnetization from 0.17455 emu/g to 0.35872 emu/g with increase in sintering time from 1 to 3 h. The enhancement in the magnetization is attributed to increase in the canting angle between magnetic spins. Also, the observation of exchange bias effect with discontinuous variation in exchange bias field indicates the presence of magnetic anisotropy. The magnetic moments obtained through the magnetic refinement of NPD patterns are found to decrease from 4.6 μB to 3.8 μB with increase in sintering time from 1 to 3 h.

  7. Household governance and time allocation : Structures and processes of social control in Dutch households

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wotschack, Philip

    2005-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of ‘household governance’ and investigates empirical differences in governance practices among Dutch households. It stresses informal household rules and conflict-handling strategies of cohabiting couples as important means to govern daily time allocation. The

  8. A place for time: the spatiotemporal structure of neural dynamics during natural audition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, G.J.; Honey, C.J.; Hasson, U.

    2013-01-01

    We use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to analyze neural responses to natural auditory stimuli. We characterize the fMRI time series through the shape of the voxel power spectrum and find that the timescales of neural dynamics vary along a spatial gradient, with faster dynamics in early

  9. Time-evolving collagen-like structural fibers in soft tissues: biaxial loading and spherical inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topol, Heiko; Demirkoparan, Hasan; Pence, Thomas J.; Wineman, Alan

    2017-02-01

    This work considers a previously developed constitutive theory for the time dependent mechanical response of fibrous soft tissue resulting from the time dependent remodeling of a collagen fiber network that is embedded in a ground substance matrix. The matrix is taken to be an incompressible nonlinear elastic solid. The remodeling process consists of the continual dissolution of existing fibers and the creation of new fibers. Motivated by experimental reports on the enzyme degradation of collagen fibers, the remodeling is governed by first order chemical kinetics such that the dissolution rate is dependent upon the fiber stretch. The resulting time dependent mechanical response is sensitive to the natural configuration of the fibers when they are created, and different assumptions on the nature of the fiber's stress free state are considered here. The response under biaxial loading, a type of loading that has particular significance for the characterization of biological materials, is studied. The inflation of a spherical membrane is then analyzed in terms of the equal biaxial stretch that occurs in the membrane approximation. Different assumptions on the natural configuration of the fibers, combined with their time dependent dissolution and reforming, are shown to emulate alternative forms of creep and relaxation response. This formal similarity to viscoelastic phenomena occurs even though the underlying mechanisms are fundamentally different from the mechanism of macromolecular reconfiguration that one typically associates with viscoelastic response.

  10. Energy transduction on the nanosecond time scale : early structural events in a xanthopsin photocycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perman, B; Srajer, V; Ren, Zhaochun; Teng, T Y; Pradervand, C; Ursby, T; Bourgeois, Dominique; Schotte, Friedrich; Wulff, Michael; Kort, R; Hellingwerf, K; Moffat, K.

    1998-01-01

    Photoactive yellow protein (PYP) is a member of the xanthopsin family of eubacterial blue-light photoreceptors. On absorption of light, PYP enters a photocycle that ultimately transduces the energy contained in a light signal into an altered biological response. Nanosecond time-resolved x-ray

  11. Structure dynamics of the proton in liquid water probed with terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielrooij, K.J.; Timmer, R.L.A.; Bakker, H.J.; Bonn, M.

    2009-01-01

    We study the hydration of protons in liquid water using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and polarization-resolved femtosecond midinfrared pump-probe spectroscopy. We observe that the addition of protons leads to a very strong decrease of the dielectric response of liquid water that corresponds to

  12. Bayesian Inference of C-AR(1) time series model with structural break

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simulation study has been carried out to validate the theoretical results, and then the same implemented on the monthly REER time series of SAARC countries. Both studies, empirical and simulation justify our findings. A unit root hypothesis is also tested for the model under study and gets satisfactory result. Keywords: ...

  13. Short-Time Events, Coherence, and Structural Dynamics in Photochemistry of Aqueous Halogenated Transition Metal Dianions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascher T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy, time-resolved x-ray absorption, and computational photochemistry elucidate the photochemical pathway of hexabromoplatinate dianions that propagates through distortions of nascent penta-bromoplatinate anions caused by Jahn-Teller conical intersections and terminates at aquated product complexes.

  14. A geo-computational algorithm for exploring the structure of diffusion progression in time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Wei-Chien-Benny; Wen, Tzai-Hung; Sabel, Clive E; Wang, I-Hsiang

    2017-10-03

    A diffusion process can be considered as the movement of linked events through space and time. Therefore, space-time locations of events are key to identify any diffusion process. However, previous clustering analysis methods have focused only on space-time proximity characteristics, neglecting the temporal lag of the movement of events. We argue that the temporal lag between events is a key to understand the process of diffusion movement. Using the temporal lag could help to clarify the types of close relationships. This study aims to develop a data exploration algorithm, namely the TrAcking Progression In Time And Space (TaPiTaS) algorithm, for understanding diffusion processes. Based on the spatial distance and temporal interval between cases, TaPiTaS detects sub-clusters, a group of events that have high probability of having common sources, identifies progression links, the relationships between sub-clusters, and tracks progression chains, the connected components of sub-clusters. Dengue Fever cases data was used as an illustrative case study. The location and temporal range of sub-clusters are presented, along with the progression links. TaPiTaS algorithm contributes a more detailed and in-depth understanding of the development of progression chains, namely the geographic diffusion process.

  15. Bridging the Gap Between Time- and Structure-Based Navigation in Web Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Robert; Brusilovsky, Peter; Vornberger, Oliver; Ishchenko, Sergey

    2009-01-01

    Typical web lectures consist of two different kinds of media linked together: an audio- or video-recording and the corresponding slides or desktop recording. Both media are synchronized so that the slide or image shown corresponds to the position currently played in the time-based media stream. Web lectures are thus composite media consisting of a…

  16. Characterizing the self-system over time in adolescence : Internal structure and associations with internalizing symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, S.J.; Klimstra, T.A.; Luyckx, K.; Hale, W.W.; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    The longitudinal effects among self and identity processes, and between these processes and internalizing symptoms, are not well understood. As a result, the present study was designed to ascertain the over-time effects among identity commitment, reconsideration of commitments, and self-concept

  17. The time varying structure of a river plume: Observations with an autonomous glider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, R. J.; Glenn, S. M.; Gong, D.

    2004-12-01

    During the 2004 LaTTE (Lagrangian Transport and Transformation Experiment) pilot study we deployed a Slocum Autonomous glider on a 10-day mission to run repeated transects across the Hudson River Plume in the vicinity of Sandy Hook. The glider completed 13 cross-plume surveys during the mission with horizontal resolution of approximately 100 meters. Wind forcing was highly variable and fluctuated between upwelling and downwelling conditions at 1-2 day intervals. Tidal forcing decreased markedly from spring to neap tide conditions and river discharge averaged approximately 500 m3/s during the survey. The plume responded rapidly to the variable wind forcing. During upwelling conditions the plume thinned and extended over 30 km from shore, while during downwelling winds the plume thickened and was compressed at the shore. However, during both upwellling and downwelling conditions the plume remained detached from the bottom. The cross-sectional area of the plume also tended to vary with the wind forcing. However, a significant increase in the plume's area during the last half of the mission does not appear to be related to either wind forcing or river discharge. Instead, we suggest that the plumes structure could be impacted by spring neap variability which is known to control stratification and freshwater fluxes out of the Hudson River Estuary. This presentation will relate the structure of the plume to wind forcing, river flow and the spring/neap cycle.

  18. Real-Time Monitoring of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Concentration Using a Novel Electromagnetic Sensors Microfluidic Cell Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakey, Richard; Nakouti, Ismini; Korostynska, Olga; Mason, Alex; Al-Shamma'a, Ahmed

    2013-12-01

    This study demonstrates an electromagnetic wave-based sensor embedded within a fluidic cell for the purposes of quantifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa in real time, which implies it could be applied for provision of point-of-care diagnostics. The sensors operates through the interaction of the electromagnetic field with the analyte flowing through the fluidic system, and via the sensor head which has a specifically designed planar pattern to maximize the sensor sensitivity for the given bacteria type. The sensor is demonstrated to respond linearly (R(2) = 0.9942) to OD(550) 25 × 10(-3) - 1.0 bacteria concentration through changing resonant frequency and peak quality factor. This innovative approach is expected to contribute to better provision of healthcare services, minimizing the need for hospital visits through real-time point-of-care diagnostics as opposed to lengthy laboratory assays.

  19. Electronic structure and time-dependent description of rotational predissociation of LiH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasik, P.; Sienkiewicz, J. E.; Domsta, J.

    2017-01-01

    The adiabatic potential energy curves of the 1Σ+ and 1Π states of the LiH molecule were calculated. They correlate asymptotically to atomic states, such as 2s + 1s, 2p + 1s, 3s + 1s, 3p + 1s, 3d + 1s, 4s + 1s, 4p + 1s and 4d + 1s. A very good agreement was found between our calculated spectroscopic...... parameters and the experimental ones. The dynamics of the rotational predissociation process of the 11Π state were studied by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The classical experiment of Velasco [Can. J. Phys., 1957, 35, 1204] on dissociation in the 11Π state is explained for the first time...

  20. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    -of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure...... constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND...... enables studies of samples that can be both larger in size and made of heavier elements. Moreover, ToF 3DND facilitates the use of complicated sample environments. The basic ToF 3DND setup, utilizing an imaging detector with high spatial and temporal resolution, can easily be implemented at a time...

  1. Late-time structure of the Bunch-Davies de Sitter wavefunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anninos, Dionysios; Anous, Tarek; Freedman, Daniel Z.; Konstantinidis, George

    2015-11-01

    We examine the late time behavior of the Bunch-Davies wavefunction for interacting light fields in a de Sitter background. We use perturbative techniques developed in the framework of AdS/CFT, and analytically continue to compute tree and loop level contributions to the Bunch-Davies wavefunction. We consider self-interacting scalars of general mass, but focus especially on the massless and conformally coupled cases. We show that certain contributions grow logarithmically in conformal time both at tree and loop level. We also consider gauge fields and gravitons. The four-dimensional Fefferman-Graham expansion of classical asymptotically de Sitter solutions is used to show that the wavefunction contains no logarithmic growth in the pure graviton sector at tree level. Finally, assuming a holographic relation between the wavefunction and the partition function of a conformal field theory, we interpret the logarithmic growths in the language of conformal field theory.

  2. An Assessment of Milling Time on the Structure and Properties of a Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy (NFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDomizio, Richard; Huang, Shenyan; Dial, Laura; Ilavsky, Jan; Larsen, Mike

    2014-11-01

    The tensile properties of a 14 wt pct chromium nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) are assessed as a function of attrition time. Small angle X-ray scattering results show quantitatively that the number density of precipitated oxides increases as a function of milling time. This difference in oxide density alone is not enough to describe the tensile behavior of the NFA as a function of temperature. As a result, a previously proposed root mean square strengthening model is applied to the current study where direct dispersion strengthening, grain boundary strengthening, dislocation forest hardening, and matrix hardening are all considered. When an optimization routine is conducted, the fitting results suggest that the precipitated oxides are soft obstacles to dislocation motion.

  3. Time-of-Flight Three Dimensional Neutron Diffraction in Transmission Mode for Mapping Crystal Grain Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cereser, Alberto; Strobl, Markus; Hall, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    constituting the material. This article presents a new non-destructive 3D technique to study centimeter-sized bulk samples with a spatial resolution of hundred micrometers: time-of-flight three-dimensional neutron diffraction (ToF 3DND). Compared to existing analogous X-ray diffraction techniques, ToF 3DND...... enables studies of samples that can be both larger in size and made of heavier elements. Moreover, ToF 3DND facilitates the use of complicated sample environments. The basic ToF 3DND setup, utilizing an imaging detector with high spatial and temporal resolution, can easily be implemented at a time......-of-flight neutron beamline. The technique was developed and tested with data collected at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of the Japan Proton Accelerator Complex (J-PARC) for an iron sample. We successfully reconstructed the shape of 108 grains and developed an indexing procedure...

  4. Structural System-Level Testing of Embedded Real-Time Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sundmark, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    People make mistakes. Software engineers are no exception to this fact. When software engineers make mistakes, these manifest in the form of buggy software - a major problem in today's industry. The existence of bugs is commonly detected using testing, the process of executing the software and checking if its behaviour complies with the specification. As limitations in time make testing of the entire software behaviour impracticable, testers need to make informed decisions on how to test the ...

  5. Structure and Randomness of Continuous-Time, Discrete-Event Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzen, Sarah E.; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-10-01

    Loosely speaking, the Shannon entropy rate is used to gauge a stochastic process' intrinsic randomness; the statistical complexity gives the cost of predicting the process. We calculate, for the first time, the entropy rate and statistical complexity of stochastic processes generated by finite unifilar hidden semi-Markov models—memoryful, state-dependent versions of renewal processes. Calculating these quantities requires introducing novel mathematical objects (ɛ -machines of hidden semi-Markov processes) and new information-theoretic methods to stochastic processes.

  6. A Time-Resolved Dynamic Stall Investigation Based On Coherent Structure Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mulleners, Karen; Raffel, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic stall on an airfoil comprises a series of complex aerodynamic phenomena in response to an unsteady change of the angle of attack. It is accompanied by a lift overshoot and delayed massive flow separation with respect to static stall. The classical hallmark of the dynamic stall phenomenon is the dynamic stall vortex. The flow over an oscillating OA209 airfoil under dynamic stall conditions was investigated by means of unsteady surface pressure measurements and time-resolved particle im...

  7. Simple Models for Positive-Valued and Discrete-Valued Time Series with ARMA Correlation Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-11-01

    1; E~~~ Th flSC RE I E!A WED TIME U) U _ _ ___ LL~EL$’NPS55—78-033NAVAL POSTGRADUAT E SC HOO L ; . .. Montere y, California C.3 SIMPLE MODELS FOR...Er4GINEERING• - • UNIVE R SITY CF CALIFORNI A -: BERKELEYCA 94720 PRCF. I ROBIN • SCHOOL OF ENG INEERI NG AND A PPLIEC SCIENCE LNIVF.RSITY OF CAL IFCRNIA

  8. Prenatal alcohol exposure pattern and timing and minor structural malformations and growth deficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Sawada, Glenda Haruna

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to alcohol is associated with a spectrum of abnormalities, referred to as the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD). Alcohol measurement issues have created many challenges in understanding the patterns of alcohol exposure that result in FASD. Knowledge about prenatal alcohol volume and timing of exposure in relationship to fetal outcomes improves our understanding of the magnitude of risk with various patterns of drinking. Using data on 992 subjects collected prospectivel...

  9. Details Matter: Noise and Model Structure Set the Relationship between Cell Size and Cell Cycle Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Barber

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Organisms across all domains of life regulate the size of their cells. However, the means by which this is done is poorly understood. We study two abstracted “molecular” models for size regulation: inhibitor dilution and initiator accumulation. We apply the models to two settings: bacteria like Escherichia coli, that grow fully before they set a division plane and divide into two equally sized cells, and cells that form a bud early in the cell division cycle, confine new growth to that bud, and divide at the connection between that bud and the mother cell, like the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In budding cells, delaying cell division until buds reach the same size as their mother leads to very weak size control, with average cell size and standard deviation of cell size increasing over time and saturating up to 100-fold higher than those values for cells that divide when the bud is still substantially smaller than its mother. In budding yeast, both inhibitor dilution or initiator accumulation models are consistent with the observation that the daughters of diploid cells add a constant volume before they divide. This “adder” behavior has also been observed in bacteria. We find that in bacteria an inhibitor dilution model produces adder correlations that are not robust to noise in the timing of DNA replication initiation or in the timing from initiation of DNA replication to cell division (the C+D period. In contrast, in bacteria an initiator accumulation model yields robust adder correlations in the regime where noise in the timing of DNA replication initiation is much greater than noise in the C + D period, as reported previously (Ho and Amir, 2015. In bacteria, division into two equally sized cells does not broaden the size distribution.

  10. Estimating time-based instantaneous total mortality rate based on the age-structured abundance index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingbin; Jiao, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The instantaneous total mortality rate ( Z) of a fish population is one of the important parameters in fisheries stock assessment. The estimation of Z is crucial to fish population dynamics analysis, abundance and catch forecast, and fisheries management. A catch curve-based method for estimating time-based Z and its change trend from catch per unit effort (CPUE) data of multiple cohorts is developed. Unlike the traditional catch-curve method, the method developed here does not need the assumption of constant Z throughout the time, but the Z values in n continuous years are assumed constant, and then the Z values in different n continuous years are estimated using the age-based CPUE data within these years. The results of the simulation analyses show that the trends of the estimated time-based Z are consistent with the trends of the true Z, and the estimated rates of change from this approach are close to the true change rates (the relative differences between the change rates of the estimated Z and the true Z are smaller than 10%). Variations of both Z and recruitment can affect the estimates of Z value and the trend of Z. The most appropriate value of n can be different given the effects of different factors. Therefore, the appropriate value of n for different fisheries should be determined through a simulation analysis as we demonstrated in this study. Further analyses suggested that selectivity and age estimation are also two factors that can affect the estimated Z values if there is error in either of them, but the estimated change rates of Z are still close to the true change rates. We also applied this approach to the Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua) fishery of eastern Newfoundland and Labrador from 1983 to 1997, and obtained reasonable estimates of time-based Z.

  11. Nonparametric analysis of the time structure of seismicity in a geographic region

    OpenAIRE

    A. Quintela-del-Río; H. L. Cimadevila; G. Estévez-Pérez

    2002-01-01

    As an alternative to traditional parametric approaches, we suggest nonparametric methods for analyzing temporal data on earthquake occurrences. In particular, the kernel method for estimating the hazard function and the intensity function are presented. One novelty of our approaches is that we take into account the possible dependence of the data to estimate the distribution of time intervals between earthquakes, which has not been considered in most statistics studies on seismicity. Kernel e...

  12. Two-Dimensional, Time-Dependent Plasma Structures of a Hall Effect Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This ultra-high speed imaging capability provides a two-dimensional description of the plasma field with time-resolved information. Moreover, this...47 3.7 Relative spectral response of the Shimadzu HPV -2 ultra-high speed camera taken from Shimadzu HPV -2 Spectral Response . 48 3.8 Sample...magnetic field. Operational characteristics of the thruster, such as a description of the parts and the fuel types, will also be discussed. Chapter II will

  13. Mixing times towards demographic equilibrium in insect populations with temperature variable age structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damos, Petros

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we use entropy related mixing rate modules to measure the effects of temperature on insect population stability and demographic breakdown. The uncertainty in the age of the mother of a randomly chosen newborn, and how it is moved after a finite act of time steps, is modeled using a stochastic transformation of the Leslie matrix. Age classes are represented as a cycle graph and its transitions towards the stable age distribution are brought forth as an exact Markov chain. The dynamics of divergence, from a non equilibrium state towards equilibrium, are evaluated using the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy. Moreover, Kullback-Leibler distance is applied as information-theoretic measure to estimate exact mixing times of age transitions probabilities towards equilibrium. Using empirically data, we show that on the initial conditions and simulated projection's trough time, that population entropy can effectively be applied to detect demographic variability towards equilibrium under different temperature conditions. Changes in entropy are correlated with the fluctuations of the insect population decay rates (i.e. demographic stability towards equilibrium). Moreover, shorter mixing times are directly linked to lower entropy rates and vice versa. This may be linked to the properties of the insect model system, which in contrast to warm blooded animals has the ability to greatly change its metabolic and demographic rates. Moreover, population entropy and the related distance measures that are applied, provide a means to measure these rates. The current results and model projections provide clear biological evidence why dynamic population entropy may be useful to measure population stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tomographic reconstruction of melanin structures of optical coherence tomography via the finite-difference time-domain simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Hao; Wang, Shiang-Jiu; Tseng, Snow H.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides high resolution, cross-sectional image of internal microstructure of biological tissue. We use the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method (FDTD) to analyze the data acquired by OCT, which can help us reconstruct the refractive index of the biological tissue. We calculate the refractive index tomography and try to match the simulation with the data acquired by OCT. Specifically, we try to reconstruct the structure of melanin, which has complex refractive indices and is the key component of human pigment system. The results indicate that better reconstruction can be achieved for homogenous sample, whereas the reconstruction is degraded for samples with fine structure or with complex interface. Simulation reconstruction shows structures of the Melanin that may be useful for biomedical optics applications.

  15. Comment on "Time needed to board an airplane: a power law and the structure behind it".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Noam

    2012-08-01

    Frette and Hemmer [Phys. Rev. E 85, 011130 (2012)] recently showed that for a simple model for the boarding of an airplane, the mean time to board scales as a power law with the number of passengers N and the exponent is less than 1. They note that this scaling leads to the prediction that the "back-to-front" strategy, where passengers are divided into groups from contiguous ranges of rows and each group is allowed to board in turn from back to front once the previous group has found their seats, has a longer boarding time than would a single group. Here I extend their results to a larger number of passengers using a sampling approach and explore a scenario where the queue is presorted into groups from back to front, but allowed to enter the plane as soon as they can. I show that the power law dependence on passenger numbers is different for large N and that there is a boarding time reduction for presorted groups, with a power law dependence on the number of presorted groups.

  16. Proposal for an MRPC system with high-precision timing in the LVD structure

    CERN Document Server

    Zichichi, A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a project in order to verify -without the need of knowing the distance CERN-Gran Sasso- the discovery made by the OPERA Collaboration concerning the speed of the CERN neutrinos. The project consists of two parts. A simple one and a less simple one. Both have the great advantage of being totally independent of the knowledge of the distance, 732 km, between the two Labs, CERN and LNGS, where the neutrinos are produced and detected, respectively. The simple version of this project is based on the high-energy horizontal cosmic muons, which traverse LVD and OPERA detectors, thus allowing to cross-calibrate the timing systems of both experiments in a way which is totally independent of the TOF measurements of CNGS. This component of the project is being studied in collaboration with the OPERA group, as the time stabilities of both experiments are needed. In fact it is since a long time that the two groups are engaged with this problem. In this paper we will present and discus...

  17. A paperless course on structural engineering programming: investing in educational technology in the times of the Greek financial recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sextos, Anastasios G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the structure of an undergraduate course entitled 'programming techniques and the use of specialised software in structural engineering' which is offered to the fifth (final) year students of the Civil Engineering Department of Aristotle University Thessaloniki in Greece. The aim of this course is to demonstrate the use of new information technologies in the field of structural engineering and to teach modern programming and finite element simulation techniques that the students can in turn apply in both research and everyday design of structures. The course also focuses on the physical interpretation of structural engineering problems, in a way that the students become familiar with the concept of computational tools without losing perspective from the engineering problem studied. For this purpose, a wide variety of structural engineering problems are studied in class, involving structural statics, dynamics, earthquake engineering, design of reinforced concrete and steel structures as well as data and information management. The main novelty of the course is that it is taught and examined solely in the computer laboratory ensuring that each student can accomplish the prescribed 'hands-on' training on a dedicated computer, strictly on a 1:1 student over hardware ratio. Significant effort has also been put so that modern educational techniques and tools are utilised to offer the course in an essentially paperless mode. This involves electronic educational material, video tutorials, student information in real time and exams given and assessed electronically through an ad hoc developed, personalised, electronic system. The positive feedback received from the students reveals that the concept of a paperless course is not only applicable in real academic conditions but is also a promising approach that significantly increases student productivity and engagement. The question, however, is whether such an investment in educational technology is indeed

  18. Dependencies of photoelectric properties of SiC/Si structures grown by the method of atoms substitution on synthesis time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grashchenko, A. S.; Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.; Feoktistov, N. A.

    2017-07-01

    This paper is dedicated to an exploration of the photoelectric properties of Si-SiC structures grown by the substitution method on silicon substrates of (001) orientation. For the samples with the synthesis times of 40, 60, 90, 120 and 900 s, magnitudes of the saturation currents are determined and the coefficients of efficiency are calculated. The obtained dependencies of the photoelectric characteristics on the synthesis time are explained using the theory of formation of dilatation dipoles during the synthesis by the method of atoms substitution.

  19. Dependence of atmospheric refractive index structure parameter (Cn2) on the residence time and vertical distribution of aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, N; Satheesh, S K; Krishna Moorthy, K

    2017-07-15

    Effects of absorbing atmospheric aerosols in modulating the tropospheric refractive index structure parameter (Cn2) are estimated using high resolution radiosonde and multi-satellite data along with a radiative transfer model. We report the influence of variations in residence time and vertical distribution of aerosols in modulating Cn2 and why the aerosol induced atmospheric heating needs to be considered while estimating a free space optical communication link budget. The results show that performance of the link is seriously affected if large concentrations of absorbing aerosols reside for a long time in the atmospheric path.

  20. Factor structure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms in trauma-exposed adolescents: Examining stability across time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Cao, Xing; Cao, Chengqi; Fang, Ruojiao; Yang, Haibo; Elhai, Jon D

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the latent structure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms using two-wave longitudinal data collected from a sample of adolescents exposed to an explosion accident. Two waves of surveys were conducted approximately 3 and 8 months after the accident, respectively. A total of 836 students completed the baseline survey, and 762 students completed the follow-up survey. The results of confirmatory factor analyses(CFA) indicated that a seven-factor hybrid model composed of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behaviors, anxious arousal and dysphoric arousal factors yielded significantly better data fit at both waves than the other models including the DSM-5 four-factor model, the six-factor anhedonia and externalizing behaviors models. Furthermore, the results of CFA invariance tests supported the longitudinal invariance of the model. Implications and limitations in terms of these results are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Time Allocation in Social Networks: Correlation Between Social Structure and Human Communication Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miritello, Giovanna; Lara, Rubén; Moro, Esteban

    Recent research has shown the deep impact of the dynamics of human interactions (or temporal social networks) on the spreading of information, opinion formation, etc. In general, the bursty nature of human interactions lowers the interaction between people to the extent that both the speed and reach of information diffusion are diminished. Using a large database of 20 million users of mobile phone calls we show evidence this effect is not homogeneous in the social network but in fact, there is a large correlation between this effect and the social topological structure around a given individual. In particular, we show that social relations of hubs in a network are relatively weaker from the dynamical point than those that are poorer connected in the information diffusion process. Our results show the importance of the temporal patterns of communication when analyzing and modeling dynamical process on social networks.

  2. Multiple actor-critic structures for continuous-time optimal control using input-output data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ruizhuo; Lewis, Frank; Wei, Qinglai; Zhang, Hua-Guang; Jiang, Zhong-Ping; Levine, Dan

    2015-04-01

    In industrial process control, there may be multiple performance objectives, depending on salient features of the input-output data. Aiming at this situation, this paper proposes multiple actor-critic structures to obtain the optimal control via input-output data for unknown nonlinear systems. The shunting inhibitory artificial neural network (SIANN) is used to classify the input-output data into one of several categories. Different performance measure functions may be defined for disparate categories. The approximate dynamic programming algorithm, which contains model module, critic network, and action network, is used to establish the optimal control in each category. A recurrent neural network (RNN) model is used to reconstruct the unknown system dynamics using input-output data. NNs are used to approximate the critic and action networks, respectively. It is proven that the model error and the closed unknown system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Simulation results demonstrate the performance of the proposed optimal control scheme for the unknown nonlinear system.

  3. Time allocation in social networks: correlation between social structure and human communication dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Miritello, Giovanna; Moro, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has shown the deep impact of the dynamics of human interactions (or temporal social networks) on the spreading of information, opinion formation, etc. In general, the bursty nature of human interactions lowers the interaction between people to the extent that both the speed and reach of information diffusion are diminished. Using a large database of 20 million users of mobile phone calls we show evidence this effect is not homogeneous in the social network but in fact, there is a large correlation between this effect and the social topological structure around a given individual. In particular, we show that social relations of hubs in a network are relatively weaker from the dynamical point than those that are poorer connected in the information diffusion process. Our results show the importance of the temporal patterns of communication when analyzing and modeling dynamical process on social networks.

  4. An alternate method of measuring seafloor structural orientations: A post-cruise means to boost ROV bottom-time efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popham, C. T.; Pockalny, R. A.; Larson, R. L.

    2005-12-01

    Existing in situ methods of measuring orientations of accretion-related structures on the seafloor with ROVs are time consuming, require bulky instrumentation, and limit the efficiency of near-bottom surveys. As an alternative, we present a method of estimating structural orientation using ROV video that addresses these problems. A simple compass and dip-surface apparatus is used in conjunction with video from the ROV Jason's forward-looking light bar camera. This camera is fixed to the Jason frame and aligned with ROV heading, enabling the compass to be oriented to the environment and strike and dip to be measured directly from screen during or after the ROV lowering. The primary benefit of this method is the ability to obtain a large number of orientations from recorded video without any loss of ROV bottom time. The accuracy of this method is tested using 3D block models of known orientation measured with the same compass apparatus. Our results show a significant but quantifiable bias for shallow and steeply dipping structures, which may be removed from the raw orientation set to obtain measurements of both strike and dip to within approximately 10 degrees. A limitation of this method is that structures striking at high angles to the camera viewing direction are difficult to measure consistently. This technique, however, appears viable if care is taken to view structures parallel to strike. A valuable ground-truth of this method would be to compare orientations measured visually with structures measured with an in situ apparatus such as the Geocompass.

  5. Influence of Sintering Time on the Structure Formation of Al-ZrW2O8 Pseudo Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrin, V. S.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    Al - ZrW2O8 pseudo alloys were synthesized by free sintering of Al - ZrW2O8 powder mixture. Influence of sintering time on the structure formation of the pseudo alloys obtained was investigated. It has been shown that during sintering process zirconium tungstate decomposes into constituent oxides and re-synthesis of zirconium tungstate proceeds through intermediate stage - formation of WAl12 and ZrAl3 intermetallic compounds.

  6. Effect of deposition times on structure of Ga-doped ZnO thin films as humidity sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalid, Faridzatul Shahira; Awang, Rozidawati [School of Applied Physics, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Gallium doped zinc oxide (GZO) has good electrical property. It is widely used as transparent electrode in photovoltaic devices, and sensing element in gas and pressure sensors. GZO thin film was prepared using magnetron sputtering. Film deposition times were set at 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 minutes to get samples of different thickness. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to determine the structure of GZO thin films. Structure for GZO thin film is hexagonal wurtzite structure. Morphology and thickness of GZO thin films was observed from FESEM micrographs. Grain size and thickness of thin films improved with increasing deposition times. However, increasing the thickness of thin films occur below 25 minutes only. Electrical properties of GZO thin films were studied using a four-point probe technique. The changes in the structure of the thin films lead to the changed of their electrical properties resulting in the reduction of the film resistance. These thin films properties significantly implying the potential application of the sample as a humidity sensor.

  7. Functional connectivity dynamically evolves on multiple time-scales over a static structural connectome: Models and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Joana; Kringelbach, Morten L; Deco, Gustavo

    2017-03-23

    Over the last decade, we have observed a revolution in brain structural and functional Connectomics. On one hand, we have an ever-more detailed characterization of the brain's white matter structural connectome. On the other, we have a repertoire of consistent functional networks that form and dissipate over time during rest. Despite the evident spatial similarities between structural and functional connectivity, understanding how different time-evolving functional networks spontaneously emerge from a single structural network requires analyzing the problem from the perspective of complex network dynamics and dynamical system's theory. In that direction, bottom-up computational models are useful tools to test theoretical scenarios and depict the mechanisms at the genesis of resting-state activity. Here, we provide an overview of the different mechanistic scenarios proposed over the last decade via computational models. Importantly, we highlight the need of incorporating additional model constraints considering the properties observed at finer temporal scales with MEG and the dynamical properties of FC in order to refresh the list of candidate scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of deposition times on structure of Ga-doped ZnO thin films as humidity sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Faridzatul Shahira; Awang, Rozidawati

    2014-09-01

    Gallium doped zinc oxide (GZO) has good electrical property. It is widely used as transparent electrode in photovoltaic devices, and sensing element in gas and pressure sensors. GZO thin film was prepared using magnetron sputtering. Film deposition times were set at 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 minutes to get samples of different thickness. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to determine the structure of GZO thin films. Structure for GZO thin film is hexagonal wurtzite structure. Morphology and thickness of GZO thin films was observed from FESEM micrographs. Grain size and thickness of thin films improved with increasing deposition times. However, increasing the thickness of thin films occur below 25 minutes only. Electrical properties of GZO thin films were studied using a four-point probe technique. The changes in the structure of the thin films lead to the changed of their electrical properties resulting in the reduction of the film resistance. These thin films properties significantly implying the potential application of the sample as a humidity sensor.

  9. Quantitative analysis of diet structure by real-time PCR, reveals different feeding patterns by two dominant grasshopper species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xunbing; Wu, Huihui; McNeill, Mark Richard; Qin, Xinghu; Ma, Jingchuan; Tu, Xiongbing; Cao, Guangchun; Wang, Guangjun; Nong, Xiangqun; Zhang, Zehua

    2016-08-26

    Studies on grasshopper diets have historically employed a range of methodologies, each with certain advantages and disadvantages. For example, some methodologies are qualitative instead of quantitative. Others require long experimental periods or examine population-level effects, only. In this study, we used real-time PCR to examine diets of individual grasshoppers. The method has the advantage of being both fast and quantitative. Using two grasshopper species, Oedaleus asiaticus and Dasyhippus barbipes, we designed ITS primer sequences for their three main host plants, Stipa krylovii, Leymus chinensis and Cleistogenes squarrosa and used real-time PCR method to test diet structure both qualitatively and quantitatively. The lowest detection efficiency of the three grass species was ~80% with a strong correlation between actual and PCR-measured food intake. We found that Oedaleus asiaticus maintained an unchanged diet structure across grasslands with different grass communities. By comparison, Dasyhippus barbipes changed its diet structure. These results revealed why O. asiaticus distribution is mainly confined to Stipa-dominated grassland, and D. barbipes is more widely distributed across Inner Mongolia. Overall, real-time PCR was shown to be a useful tool for investigating grasshopper diets, which in turn offers some insight into grasshopper distributions and improved pest management.

  10. How does landscape structure influence catchment transit time across different geomorphic provinces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetzlaff, D.; Seibert, J.; McGuire, K.J.; Laudon, H.; Burns, Douglas A.; Dunn, S.M.; Soulsby, C.

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increasing number of empirical investigations of catchment transit times (TTs), virtually all are based on individual catchments and there are few attempts to synthesize understanding across different geographical regions. Uniquely, this paper examines data from 55 catchments in five geomorphic provinces in northern temperate regions (Scotland, United States of America and Sweden). The objective is to understand how the role of catchment topography as a control on the TTs differs in contrasting geographical settings. Catchment inverse transit time proxies (ITTPs) were inferred by a simple metric of isotopic tracer damping, using the ratio of standard deviation of ??18O in streamwater to the standard deviation of ??18O in precipitation. Quantitative landscape analysis was undertaken to characterize the catchments according to hydrologically relevant topographic indices that could be readily determined from a digital terrain model (DTM). The nature of topographic controls on transit times varied markedly in different geomorphic regions. In steeper montane regions, there are stronger gravitational influences on hydraulic gradients and TTs tend to be lower in the steepest catchments. In provinces where terrain is more subdued, direct topographic control weakened; in particular, where flatter areas with less permeable soils give rise to overland flow and lower TTs. The steeper slopes within this flatter terrain appear to have a greater coverage of freely draining soils, which increase sub-surface flow, therefore increasing TTs. Quantitative landscape analysis proved a useful tool for intercatchment comparison. However, the critical influence of sub-surface permeability and connectivity may limit the transferability of predictive tools of hydrological function based on topographic parameters alone. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Factor structure of paediatric timed motor examination and its relationship with IQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARTIN, REBECCA; TIGERA, CASSIE; DENCKLA, MARTHA B; MAHONE, E MARK

    2012-01-01

    AIM Brain systems supporting higher cognitive and motor control develop in a parallel manner, dependent on functional integrity and maturation of related regions, suggesting neighbouring neural circuitry. Concurrent examination of motor and cognitive control can provide a window into neurological development. However, identification of performance-based measures that do not correlate with IQ has been a challenge. METHOD Timed motor performance from the Physical and Neurological Examination of Subtle Signs and IQ were analysed in 136 children aged 6 to 16 (mean age 10y 2.6mo, SD 2y 6.4mo; 98 female, 38male) attending an outpatient neuropsychology clinic and 136 right-handed comparison individuals aged 6 to 16 (mean age 10y 3.1mo, SD 2y 6.1mo; 98 female, 38male). Timed activities – three repetitive movements (toe tapping, hand patting, finger tapping) and three sequenced movements (heel–toe tap, hand pronate/supinate, finger sequencing) each performed on the right and left – were included in exploratory factor analyses. RESULTS Among comparison individuals, factor analysis yielded two factors – repetitive and sequenced movements – with the sequenced factor significantly predictive of Verbal IQ (VIQ) (ΔR2=0.018, p=0.019), but not the repetitive factor (ΔR2=0.004, p=0.39). Factor analysis within the clinical group yielded two similar factors (repetitive and sequenced), both significantly predictive of VIQ, (ΔR2=0.028, p=0.015; ΔR2=0.046, p=0.002 respectively). INTERPRETATION Among typical children, repetitive timed tasks may be independent of IQ; however, sequenced tasks share more variance, implying shared neural substrates. Among neurologically vulnerable populations, however, both sequenced and repetitive movements covary with IQ, suggesting that repetitive speed is more indicative of underlying neurological integrity. PMID:20412260

  12. Spectrally Efficient OFDMA Lattice Structure via Toroidal Waveforms on the Time-Frequency Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Aldirmaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the performance of frequency division multiplexed (FDM signals, where multiple orthogonal Hermite-Gaussian carriers are used to increase the bandwidth efficiency. Multiple Hermite-Gaussian functions are modulated by a data set as a multicarrier modulation scheme in a single time-frequency region constituting toroidal waveform in a rectangular OFDMA system. The proposed work outperforms in the sense of bandwidth efficiency compared to the transmission scheme where only single Gaussian pulses are used as the transmission base. We investigate theoretical and simulation results of the proposed methods.

  13. Time-multiplexed structured illumination using a DMD for optical diffraction tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, KyeoReh; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Geon; Shin, Seungwoo; Park, YongKeun

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel illumination control technique for optical diffraction tomography (ODT). Various spatial frequencies of beam illumination were controlled by displaying time-averaged sinusoidal patterns using a digital micromirror device (DMD). Compared to the previous method using binary Lee holograms, the present method eliminates unwanted diffracted beams which may deteriorate the image quality of the ODT. We demonstrated the capability of the present method by reconstructing three-dimensional refractive index (RI) distributions of various samples, with high RI sensitivity (\\sigma_\\Delta n = 3.15 +/- 10-4), and reconstructing 3-D RI tomograms of biological samples, which provided quantitative biochemical and morphological information about the samples.

  14. Real-time tracking of neuronal network structure using data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Franz; Berry, Tyrus; Peixoto, Nathalia; Sauer, Timothy

    2013-11-01

    A nonlinear data assimilation technique is applied to determine and track effective connections between ensembles of cultured spinal cord neurons measured with multielectrode arrays. The method is statistical, depending only on confidence intervals, and requiring no form of arbitrary thresholding. In addition, the method updates connection strengths sequentially, enabling real-time tracking of nonstationary networks. The ensemble Kalman filter is used with a generic spiking neuron model to estimate connection strengths as well as other system parameters to deal with model mismatch. The method is validated on noisy synthetic data from Hodgkin-Huxley model neurons before being used to find network connections in the neural culture recordings.

  15. Channel estimation for space-time trellis coded-OFDM systems based on nonoverlapping pilot structure

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sokoya, O

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available estimation [7], which is based on the pilot data sent at the transmitter and known a-priori at the receiver. The other is called blind channel estimation [8], which explores the statistical information of the channel and certain properties... of the transmitted signals. Though the blind estimation method has no overhead loss, it is only applicable to slowly time varying channel due to its need for long data record and has high complexity. Pilot symbols assisted channel estimation has been shown...

  16. Long-term changes in time spent walking and subsequent cognitive and structural brain changes in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, John R; Rosano, Caterina; Aizenstein, Howard J; Tian, Qu; Boudreau, Robert M; Ayonayon, Hilsa N; Satterfield, Suzanne; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Studenski, Stephanie; Yaffe, Kristine; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that more active older adults have better cognition and brain health based on a variety of structural neuroimaging measures. Nevertheless, the effects of maintaining physical activity (PA) over an extended period of time on future changes in older adults' cognition and brain structure are unknown. Participants were 141 initially well-functioning community-dwelling older adults (aged 70-79 years at baseline; 60% female; 42% black) studied over a 13-year period. PA (self-reported time spent walking) was assessed annually from years 1 to 10. Magnetic resonance imaging with diffusion tensor was performed at years 10 and 13. Time spent walking decreased on average by 8.4% annually from year 1 to year 10. Independent of initial time spent walking, demographics, and APOE e4 status, better maintenance of time spent walking over the decade predicted less reduction in hippocampal volume (p = 0.03), smaller increases in global gray matter mean diffusivity and white matter axial diffusivity (p < 0.01), and maintenance of general cognitive performance (p < 0.01). Maintenance of cognitive performance was associated with smaller increases in white matter axial diffusivity (p < 0.01). PA at baseline and at year 10, as well as changes in PA over a 5-year period, was less predictive of future changes in brain structure and cognition. Thus, how PA levels change over longer periods of aging may be an important contributor to cognitive and neural protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Time of Growth Dependent of ZnO-Nanorods by Self-Assembly Methods and its Structural Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprilia, A.; Bahtiar, A.; Safriani, L.; Ayunita, C. C.; Afifah, N.; Syakir, N.; Risdiana; Saragi, T.; Hidayat, S.; Fitrilawati; Siregar, R. E.

    2017-05-01

    ZnO-nanorods (ZnO-Nrs) have been successfully prepared on glass substrate using self-assembly method by varying deposition time. Zn acetate dehydrate and 2-methoxyethanol was used as raw material and solvent respectively (for ZnO seed layer preparation), meanwhile Zn nitrate hexahydrate and hexametylenetetramine (HMTA) dissolved in deionized water used as solution growth of ZnO-Nanorods (ZnO-Nrs). In this work, deposition times of ZnO-Nrs were varied by 120 min, 150 min, 180 min and 210 minutes at 100°C of annealing temperature. In order to investigate the physical properties of resulting ZnO, several measurements such as x-ray diffraction (XRD), ultra-violet visible spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were carried out. Based on ZnO nanorods SEM image with varying time depositions, seems that increasing deposition time the nanorod size decrease but when the time reach 210 min, the average size of nanorods turned back increase. From XRD measurement, the average grain size and lattice constant (c) which is assemble the nanorod structure and lattice constant (c) was determined by Debye-Scherrer formula and Bragg law’s respectively. The growth process of ZnO nanorod by 180 min time deposition was known as an appropriate time to produce ZnO nanorods with high crystal quality due to sharp peak intensity of XRD spectrum.

  18. Time-Dependent Alterations of MMPs, TIMPs and Tendon Structure in Human Achilles Tendons after Acute Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkwitz, Susann; Schmock, Aysha; Kurtoglu, Alper; Tsitsilonis, Serafeim; Manegold, Sebastian; Wildemann, Britt; Klatte-Schulz, Franka

    2017-10-20

    A balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) is required to maintain tendon homeostasis. Variation in this balance over time might impact on the success of tendon healing. This study aimed to analyze structural changes and the expression profile of MMPs and TIMPs in human Achilles tendons at different time-points after rupture. Biopsies from 37 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture were taken at surgery and grouped according to time after rupture: early (2-4 days), middle (5-6 days), and late (≥7 days), and intact Achilles tendons served as control. The histological score increased from the early to the late time-point after rupture, indicating the progression towards a more degenerative status. In comparison to intact tendons, qRT-PCR analysis revealed a significantly increased expression of MMP-1, -2, -13, TIMP-1, COL1A1, and COL3A1 in ruptured tendons, whereas TIMP-3 decreased. Comparing the changes over time post rupture, the expression of MMP-9, -13, and COL1A1 significantly increased, whereas MMP-3 and -10 expression decreased. TIMP expression was not significantly altered over time. MMP staining by immunohistochemistry was positive in the ruptured tendons exemplarily analyzed from early and late time-points. The study demonstrates a pivotal contribution of all investigated MMPs and TIMP-1, but a minor role of TIMP-2, -3, and -4, in the early human tendon healing process.

  19. Time-Dependent Alterations of MMPs, TIMPs and Tendon Structure in Human Achilles Tendons after Acute Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkwitz, Susann; Schmock, Aysha; Kurtoglu, Alper; Tsitsilonis, Serafeim; Manegold, Sebastian; Klatte-Schulz, Franka

    2017-01-01

    A balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) is required to maintain tendon homeostasis. Variation in this balance over time might impact on the success of tendon healing. This study aimed to analyze structural changes and the expression profile of MMPs and TIMPs in human Achilles tendons at different time-points after rupture. Biopsies from 37 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture were taken at surgery and grouped according to time after rupture: early (2–4 days), middle (5–6 days), and late (≥7 days), and intact Achilles tendons served as control. The histological score increased from the early to the late time-point after rupture, indicating the progression towards a more degenerative status. In comparison to intact tendons, qRT-PCR analysis revealed a significantly increased expression of MMP-1, -2, -13, TIMP-1, COL1A1, and COL3A1 in ruptured tendons, whereas TIMP-3 decreased. Comparing the changes over time post rupture, the expression of MMP-9, -13, and COL1A1 significantly increased, whereas MMP-3 and -10 expression decreased. TIMP expression was not significantly altered over time. MMP staining by immunohistochemistry was positive in the ruptured tendons exemplarily analyzed from early and late time-points. The study demonstrates a pivotal contribution of all investigated MMPs and TIMP-1, but a minor role of TIMP-2, -3, and -4, in the early human tendon healing process. PMID:29053586

  20. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Korean Ginseng Field Soil Are Shifted by Cultivation Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Hoang, Van-An; Subramaniyam, Sathiyamoorthy; Kang, Jong-Pyo; Kang, Chang Ho; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Traditional molecular methods have been used to examine bacterial communities in ginseng-cultivated soil samples in a time-dependent manner. Despite these efforts, our understanding of the bacterial community is still inadequate. Therefore, in this study, a high-throughput sequencing approach was employed to investigate bacterial diversity in various ginseng field soil samples over cultivation times of 2, 4, and 6 years in the first and second rounds of cultivation. We used non-cultivated soil samples to perform a comparative study. Moreover, this study assessed changes in the bacterial community associated with soil depth and the health state of the ginseng. Bacterial richness decreased through years of cultivation. This study detected differences in relative abundance of bacterial populations between the first and second rounds of cultivation, years of cultivation, and health states of ginseng. These bacterial populations were mainly distributed in the classes Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteria. In addition, we found that pH, available phosphorus, and exchangeable Ca+ seemed to have high correlations with bacterial class in ginseng cultivated soil.

  1. Bacterial Diversity and Community Structure in Korean Ginseng Field Soil Are Shifted by Cultivation Time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc-Lan Nguyen

    Full Text Available Traditional molecular methods have been used to examine bacterial communities in ginseng-cultivated soil samples in a time-dependent manner. Despite these efforts, our understanding of the bacterial community is still inadequate. Therefore, in this study, a high-throughput sequencing approach was employed to investigate bacterial diversity in various ginseng field soil samples over cultivation times of 2, 4, and 6 years in the first and second rounds of cultivation. We used non-cultivated soil samples to perform a comparative study. Moreover, this study assessed changes in the bacterial community associated with soil depth and the health state of the ginseng. Bacterial richness decreased through years of cultivation. This study detected differences in relative abundance of bacterial populations between the first and second rounds of cultivation, years of cultivation, and health states of ginseng. These bacterial populations were mainly distributed in the classes Acidobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Deltaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Sphingobacteria. In addition, we found that pH, available phosphorus, and exchangeable Ca+ seemed to have high correlations with bacterial class in ginseng cultivated soil.

  2. Observability of ionospheric space-time structure with ISR: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, John; Semeter, Joshua; Zettergren, Matthew; Erickson, Philip J.

    2017-02-01

    The sources of error from electronically steerable array (ESA) incoherent scatter radar (ISR) systems are investigated both theoretically and with use of an open-source ISR simulator, developed by the authors, called Simulator for ISR (SimISR). The main sources of error incorporated in the simulator include statistical uncertainty, which arises due to nature of the measurement mechanism and the inherent space-time ambiguity from the sensor. SimISR can take a field of plasma parameters, parameterized by time and space, and create simulated ISR data at the scattered electric field (i.e., complex receiver voltage) level, subsequently processing these data to show possible reconstructions of the original parameter field. To demonstrate general utility, we show a number of simulation examples, with two cases using data from a self-consistent multifluid transport model. Results highlight the significant influence of the forward model of the ISR process and the resulting statistical uncertainty on plasma parameter measurements and the core experiment design trade-offs that must be made when planning observations. These conclusions further underscore the utility of this class of measurement simulator as a design tool for more optimal experiment design efforts using flexible ESA class ISR systems.

  3. Learning the Conditional Independence Structure of Stationary Time Series: A Multitask Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    We propose a method for inferring the conditional independence graph (CIG) of a high-dimensional Gaussian vector time series (discrete-time process) from a finite-length observation. By contrast to existing approaches, we do not rely on a parametric process model (such as, e.g., an autoregressive model) for the observed random process. Instead, we only require certain smoothness properties (in the Fourier domain) of the process. The proposed inference scheme works even for sample sizes much smaller than the number of scalar process components if the true underlying CIG is sufficiently sparse. A theoretical performance analysis provides conditions which guarantee that the probability of the proposed inference method to deliver a wrong CIG is below a prescribed value. These conditions imply lower bounds on the sample size such that the new method is consistent asymptotically. Some numerical experiments validate our theoretical performance analysis and demonstrate superior performance of our scheme compared to an existing (parametric) approach in case of model mismatch.

  4. Synthesis of ferrofluids based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Influence of reaction time on structural, morphological and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirabadizadeh, Ahmad; Salighe, Zohre; Sarhaddi, Reza, E-mail: reza.sarhaddi@birjand.ac.ir; Lotfollahi, Zahra

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Ferrofluids based on cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by co-precipitation method. • The crystallite and particle size of cobalt ferrite can be controlled effectively by reaction time. • The ferrofluids have lower values of saturation magnetization and coercivity as compared to nanoparticles. • By increasing the size of nanoparticles, the narrower and sharper spikes of ferrofluids are formed. - Abstract: In this work, for first time the ferrofluids based on the cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation method at different reaction times (0.5–6.5 h). Crystal structure, morphology and magnetic properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids based on the nanoparticles were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD patterns of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles synthesized at different reaction times indicated that all samples are single phase in accordance with inverse cubic spinel structure with space group Fd-3m, and no impurity phase was observed. By increasing the reaction time to 3.5 h, the lattice parameter and the average crystallites size increased and then afterwards decreased by increasing the reaction time. The microscopic studies indicated the formation of nanosized particles with nearly spherical in shape, whereas the average particle size for all samples is found to be less than 50 nm. The results of VSM also showed that the saturation magnetization and coercivity field of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and the ferrofluids were influenced by reaction time, whereas the ferrofluids have lower values of magnetic parameters than that of nanoparticles.

  5. Time-Dependent Wetting Behavior of PDMS Surfaces with Bio-Inspired, Hierarchical Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Mishra, Himanshu

    2015-12-28

    Wetting of rough surfaces involves time-dependent effects, such as surface deformations, non-uniform filling of surface pores within or outside the contact area, and surface chemistries, but the detailed impact of these phenomena on wetting is not entirely clear. Understanding these effects is crucial for designing coatings for a wide range of applications, such as membrane-based oil-water separation and desalination, waterproof linings/windows for automobiles, aircrafts, and naval vessels, and antibiofouling. Herein, we report on time-dependent contact angles of water droplets on a rough polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface that cannot be completely described by the conventional Cassie-Baxter or Wenzel models or the recently proposed Cassie-impregnated model. Shells of sand dollars (Dendraster excentricus) were used as lithography-free, robust templates to produce rough PDMS surfaces with hierarchical, periodic features ranging from 10-7-10-4 m. Under saturated vapor conditions, we found that in the short-term (<1 min), the contact angle of a sessile water droplet on the templated PDMS, θSDT = 140° ± 3°, was accurately described by the Cassie-Baxter model (predicted θSDT = 137°); however, after 90 min, θSDT fell to 110°. Fluorescent confocal microscopy confirmed that the initial reduction in θSDT to 110° (the Wenzel limit) was primarily a Cassie-Baxter to Wenzel transition during which pores within the contact area filled gradually, and more rapidly for ethanol-water mixtures. After 90 min, the contact line of the water droplet became pinned, perhaps caused by viscoelastic deformation of the PDMS around the contact line, and a significant volume of water began to flow from the droplet to pores outside the contact region, causing θSDT to decrease to 65° over 48 h on the rough surface. The system we present here to explore the concept of contact angle time dependence (dynamics) and modeling of natural surfaces provides insights into the design and

  6. Rate and time dependent behavior of structural adhesives. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renieri, M. P.; Herakovich, C. T.; Brinson, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on two adhesives (Metlbond 1113 and 1113-2) identified as having applications in the bonding of composite materials are presented. Constitutive equations capable of describing changes in material behavior with strain rate are derived from various theoretical approaches. It is shown that certain unique relationships exist between these approaches. It is also shown that the constitutive equation derived from mechanical models can be used for creep and relaxation loading. A creep to failure phenomenon is shown to exist and is correlated with a delayed yield equation proposed by Crochet. Loading-unloading results are presented and are shown to correlate well with the proposed form of the loading-unloading equations for the modified Bingham model. Experimental results obtained for relaxation tests above and below the glass transition temperature are presented. It is shown that the adhesives obey the time-temperature superposition principle.

  7. Short-Time Effects on Eigenstate Structure in Sinai Billiards and Related Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, L

    1999-01-01

    There is much latitude between the requirements of Schnirelman's theorem regarding the ergodicity of individual high-energy eigenstates of classically chaotic systems on the one hand, and the extreme requirements of random matrix theory on the other. It seems likely that some eigenstate statistics and long-time transport behavior bear nonrandom imprints of the underlying classical dynamics while simultaneously obeying Schnirelman's theorem. Indeed this was shown earlier in the case of systems which approach classical ergodicity slowly, and is also realized in the scarring of eigenstates, even in the $\\hbar \\to 0$ limit, along unstable periodic orbits and their manifolds. Here we demonstrate the nonrandom character of eigenstates of Sinai-like systems. We show that mixing between channels in Sinai systems is dramatically deficient compared to random matrix theory predictions. The deficit {\\it increases} as $|\\log \\hbar|$ for $\\hbar\\to 0$, and is due to the vicinity of the measure zero set of orbits which never...

  8. Time Structure of Particle Production in the Merit High-Power Target Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Efthymiopoulos, I; Palm, M; Lettry, J; Haug, F; Pereira, H; Pernegger, H; Steerenberg, R; Grudiev, A; Kirk, H G; Park, H; Tsang, T; Mokhov, N; Striganov, S; Carroll, A J; Graves, V B; Spampinato, P T; McDonald, K T; Bennett, J R J; Caretta, O; Loveridge, P

    2010-01-01

    The MERIT experiment is a proof-of-principle test of a target system for high power proton beam to be used as front-end for a neutrino factory complex or amuon collider. The experiment took data in autumn 2007 with the fast extracted beam from the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) to a maximum intensity of about 30 × 1012 protons per pulse. We report results from the portion of the MERIT experiment in which separated beam pulses were delivered to a free mercury jet target with time intervals between pulses varying from 2 to 700 μs. The analysis is based on the responses of particle detectors placed along side and downstream of the target.

  9. Just-in-time - Its Fingerprint on Structures in Production Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Bøhm

    1998-01-01

    s saw JIT at Toyota. This description is hold up agains Hayes and Wheelwright’s ramework with eight decision categories, and by this it is seen where differences exist, and what the implications has been for present days production systems. This paper, though, is only the first half of a complete......In recent years, improvements in production systems have become more and more important. The Just-In-Time philosophy has been an important contributor. But what has happened to JIT since the ‘JIT-crusade’ carried out in the late 1980s in USA. This paper describes how three authors in the early 1980...... study of this subject, so the preliminar conclusions are that JIT in the early 1980s was a philosophy, which now is ‘reduced’ to a number of elements which contains methods to improve certain parts of companies production systems....

  10. Nonparametric analysis of the time structure of seismicity in a geographic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Quintela-del-Río

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to traditional parametric approaches, we suggest nonparametric methods for analyzing temporal data on earthquake occurrences. In particular, the kernel method for estimating the hazard function and the intensity function are presented. One novelty of our approaches is that we take into account the possible dependence of the data to estimate the distribution of time intervals between earthquakes, which has not been considered in most statistics studies on seismicity. Kernel estimation of hazard function has been used to study the occurrence process of cluster centers (main shocks. Kernel intensity estimation, on the other hand, has helped to describe the occurrence process of cluster members (aftershocks. Similar studies in two geographic areas of Spain (Granada and Galicia have been carried out to illustrate the estimation methods suggested.

  11. Adaptive reconstruction of radar reflectivity maps based on their space-time structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shinju; Berenguer, Marc

    2013-04-01

    The production of Radar Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) requires processing the observations to ensure their quality and its conversion into the variable of interest (i.e. precipitation rates). This processing is done through a chain of algorithms applied to mitigate the sources of uncertainty affecting radar observations. Some algorithms involve the reconstruction of the meteorological signal in areas where the signal is lost or strongly contaminated, for instance in areas affected by ground, sea clutter, total beam blockage or severe path attenuation by heavy rain. For post-processing of radar uncorrected moment data, the reconstruction has been done with spatial interpolation after the identification of clutter based on the analysis of statistical properties of radar measurements. The aim of this work has been to develop an improved reconstruction method that adapts to the different rainfall situations by using the information of the time and space variability of the rainfall field. The n-dimensional semi-variogram is formulated to reconstruct the radar fields in a n-Dimensional Ordinary Kriging framework: i.e., (i) the horizontal plane, (ii) the closest non-contaminated PPI, and (iii) the closest radar volume scan in time. The last one takes into account the effect of the motion that is very similar to the extrapolation of reflectivity observations to the future in many nowcasting algorithms. Each formulation of the reconstruction methods and their combinations have been studied. The radar fields have been reconstructed over the areas labeled as clutter (with a fuzzy logic algorithm) under different rainfall situations, including scattered convection, organized convection, and widespread precipitation. Also, the comparison between the reconstructed radar rainfall accumulations and collocated raingauge observations have been used for the evaluation.

  12. Gaussian Mixture Random Coefficient model based framework for SHM in structures with time-dependent dynamics under uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño-Valencia, Luis David; Fassois, Spilios D.

    2017-12-01

    The problem of vibration-based damage diagnosis in structures characterized by time-dependent dynamics under significant environmental and/or operational uncertainty is considered. A stochastic framework consisting of a Gaussian Mixture Random Coefficient model of the uncertain time-dependent dynamics under each structural health state, proper estimation methods, and Bayesian or minimum distance type decision making, is postulated. The Random Coefficient (RC) time-dependent stochastic model with coefficients following a multivariate Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) allows for significant flexibility in uncertainty representation. Certain of the model parameters are estimated via a simple procedure which is founded on the related Multiple Model (MM) concept, while the GMM weights are explicitly estimated for optimizing damage diagnostic performance. The postulated framework is demonstrated via damage detection in a simple simulated model of a quarter-car active suspension with time-dependent dynamics and considerable uncertainty on the payload. Comparisons with a simpler Gaussian RC model based method are also presented, with the postulated framework shown to be capable of offering considerable improvement in diagnostic performance.

  13. Inflation persistence in central and southeastern Europe: Evidence from univariate and structural time series approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Zorica

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to measure inflation persistence in the following countries of Central and Southeastern Europe: Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary, Romania and Serbia. The study sample covers monthly data from January, 1995 to May, 2010 for Poland, Hungary and Slovakia, from January 1994 to May, 2010 for the Czech Republic, and from January, 2002 to June 2010 for Romania. The shortest sample used, from January, 2003 to September, 2010, was for Serbia and is due to the late start in the transition process. The results of this study enriched the existing ones on this topic by extending the sample period to cover even the recent years of relatively higher inflation rates and by including Romania and Serbia, which were not previously considered. The study led to two main findings: first, inflation of moderate to high magnitude persistence in Hungary, Poland, Romania and Serbia, and inflation of smaller order persistence in Slovakia and the Czech Republic was detected within the Markov switching model approach. In addition, the changes in inflation persistence often correspond to changes in variability and mean of inflation. Second, New Keynesian Phillips Curve represents a valid structural approach to describe the inflation dynamics in this region. In all the six cases studied, weights on backward and forward looking behaviors were significant, while the impact of the driving variable was insignificant only once. It is found that significant influence of the economic driving variable can be captured by real gross wage inflation and real broad money growth. The estimates show that the backward-looking term plays an important role in determining the inflation dynamics. Similar conclusions are drawn by using quarterly data in econometric estimations for the selected countries.

  14. Does help structures play a role in reducing the variation of dwell time in IPSA planning for gynaecological brachytherapy application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamema, Swamidas; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Deshpande, Dd; Sharma, Smriti; Shrivastava, Sk

    2011-09-01

    To report our experience of dosimetric comparison of IPSA and manual plans, with a focus on the use of help structures (HS) during optimization. 33 patients who underwent MR image-based HDR intracavitary-brachytherapy for cervix cancer based on GYN-ESTRO recommendations were selected for evaluation. Tandem/ovoid (T/O) and Vienna applicators were used. HS of diameter of 5 mm were drawn around the tandem/needles/ovoid and ring. Three plans were generated: manual optimized plan (MOPT), IPSA without help structures (IPSA_woHS) and IPSA with help structures (IPSA_wHS). Dose-volume parameters and the loading pattern were evaluated. For T/O, the use of HS did not make significant impact in the dose-volume parameters and in the loading of tandem and ovoids, however steep variation was found in the individual dwell time. In case of Vienna applicator, inclusion of HS in the optimization made a significant impact in loading of needles. The percentage ratio of total time of needles to the tandem (T(N/T%)) was found to be 14±2.5, 53±9, 22±6 for MOPT, IPSA_woHS and IPSA_wHS, respectively, which implies that in IPSA_woHS the dwell time in needles were half of the dwell time in the tandem, while in MOPT the needles were loaded only in 14%, and in IPSA_wHS it was 22% of the dwell time of tandem. Inclusion of HS in the optimization has reduced the contribution of dwell time of needle in IPSA_wHS. The individual variation of dwell time was also reduced in IPSA_wHS, however drawing of HS is a time consuming procedure and may not be practical for a routine practice. The role of HS was evaluated for IPSA for T/O and Vienna-applicator, the use of HS may be beneficial in case of combined intracavitary - interstitial approach.

  15. Use of Just in Time Maintenance of Reinforced Concrete Bridge Structures based on Real Historical Data Deterioration Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu-Tair A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the backbone of any developed economy. Concrete can suffer from a large number of deleterious effects including physical, chemical and biological causes. Large owning bridge structures organizations are facing very serious questions when asking for maintenance budgets. The questions range from needing to justify the need for the work, its urgency, to also have to predict or show the consequences of delayed rehabilitation of a particular structure. There is therefore a need for a probabilistic model that can estimate the range of service lives of bridge populations and also the likelihood of level of deteriorations it can reached for every incremental time interval. A model was developed for such estimation based on statistical data from actual inspection records of a large reinforced concrete bridge portfolio. The method used both deterministic and stochastic methods to predict the service life of a bridge, using these service lives in combination with the just in time (JIT principle of management would enable maintenance managers to justify the need for action and the budgets needed, to intervene at the optimum time in the life of the structure and that of the deterioration. The paper will report on the model which is based on a large database of deterioration records of concrete bridges covering a period of over 60 years and include data from over 400 bridge structures. The paper will also illustrate how the service life model was developed and how these service lives combined with the JIT can be used to effectively allocate resources and use them to keep a major infrastructure asset moving with little disruption to the transport system and its users.

  16. Constraints on the crustal structure beneath the Sinai subplate, SE Mediterranean, from analysis of local and regional travel times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed K. Salah

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sinai Peninsula has been recognized as a subplate of the African Plate located at the triple junction of the Gulf of Suez rift, the Dead Sea Transform fault, and the Red Sea rift. The upper and lower crustal structures of this tectonically active, rapidly developing region are yet poorly understood because of many limitations. For this reason, a set of P- and S-wave travel times recorded at 14 seismic stations belonging to the Egyptian National Seismographic Network (ENSN from 111 local and regional events are analyzed to investigate the crustal structures and the locations of the seismogenic zones beneath central and southern Sinai. Because the velocity model used for routine earthquake location by ENSN is one-dimensional, the travel-time residuals will show lateral heterogeneity of the velocity structures and unmodeled vertical structures. Seismic activity is strong along the eastern and southern borders of the study area but low to moderate along the northern boundary and the Gulf of Suez to the west. The crustal Vp/Vs ratio is 1.74 from shallow (depth ≤ 10 km earthquakes and 1.76 from deeper (depth > 10 km crustal events. The majority of the regional and local travel-time residuals are positive relative to the Preliminary Reference Earth Model (PREM, implying that the seismic stations are located above widely distributed, tectonically-induced low-velocity zones. These low-velocity zones are mostly related to the local crustal faults affecting the sedimentary section and the basement complex as well as the rifting processes prevailing in the northern Red Sea region and the ascending of hot mantle materials along crustal fractures. The delineation of these low-velocity zones and the locations of big crustal earthquakes enable the identification of areas prone to intense seismotectonic activities, which should be excluded from major future development projects and large constructions in central and southern Sinai.

  17. The texture, structure and nutrient availability of artificial soil on cut slopes restored with OSSS - Influence of restoration time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiyu; Chen, Jiao; Ai, Xiaoyan; Li, Ruirui; Ai, Yingwei; Li, Wei

    2017-09-15

    Outside soil spray seeding (OSSS) is widely used to restore cut slopes in southwest of China, and artificial soil is often sprayed onto cut slopes to establish a soil layer for revegetation. The stability of artificial soil layer and its supply of water and nutrients for plants is crucial for successful restoration. To evaluate the long-term effectiveness of OSSS, the texture, structure and nutrient availability of artificial soil were studied, various soil samples were obtained from three cut slopes with different restoration time (restored with OSSS in 1996, 2003 and 2007 respectively) and one natural developed slope (NS). The properties measured including soil particle size distribution (PSD), texture, fractal dimension of PSD (Dm), the bias (CS) and peak convex (CE) coefficients of aggregate size distribution, structure failure rate, bulk density, moisture, pH, soil organic carbon (SOC), calcium carbonate content, Available nitrogen (NA), Available phosphorus (PA), and Available potassium (KA). The results showed that different restoration time resulted in significant differences in soil PSD, Dm, CS, CE, structure failure rate, bulk density, moisture, pH, NA, and KA. And these properties improved with increasing restoration age. However, there is still a huge disparity in soil texture, structure, and the availability of nutrients and moisture between the cut slopes and NS over a restoration period of up to 17 years, and this is caused by the little fine particles and the lack of slow release fertilizers and organic fertilizers in the artificial soil, resulting in poorer soil structure stability, retention and availability of moisture and nutrients on the cut slopes. Overall, the OSSS technique shows a long-term effectiveness in southwest of China, but there is still room for improvement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Genetic structure of juvenile cohorts of bicolor damselfish ( Stegastes partitus) along the Mesoamerican barrier reef: chaos through time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, R. I.; Sale, P. F.; Dixon, B.; Heath, Daniel D.

    2009-03-01

    Dispersal in marine systems is a critical component of the ecology, evolution, and conservation of such systems; however, estimating dispersal is logistically difficult, especially in coral reef fish. Juvenile bicolor damselfish ( Stegastes partitus) were sampled at 13 sites along the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System (MBRS), the barrier reefs on the east coast of Central America extending from the Yucatan, Mexico to Honduras, to evaluate genetic structure among recently settled cohorts. Using genotype data at eight microsatellite loci genetic structure was estimated at large and small spatial scales using exact tests for allele frequency differences and hierarchical analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Isolation-by-distance models of divergence were assessed at both spatial scales. Results showed genetic homogeneity of recently settled S. partitus at large geographic scales with subtle, but significant, genetic structure at smaller geographic scales. Genetic temporal stability was tested for using archived juvenile S. partitus collected earlier in the same year (nine sites), and in the previous year (six sites). The temporal analyses indicated that allele frequency differences among sites were not generally conserved over time, nor were pairwise genetic distances correlated through time, indicative of temporal instability. These results indicate that S. partitus larvae undergo high levels of dispersal along the MBRS, and that the structure detected at smaller spatial scales is likely driven by stochastic effects on dispersal coupled with microgeographic effects. Temporal variation in juvenile cohort genetic signature may be a fundamental characteristic of connectivity patterns in coral reef fishes, with various species and populations differing only in the magnitude of that instability. Such a scenario provides a basis for the reconciliation of conflicting views regarding levels of genetic structuring in S. partitus and possibly other coral reef fish species.

  19. Design and Implementation of Real-Time Intelligent Control and Structure Based on Multi-Agent Systems in Microgrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tse Kuo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available By consulting various worldwide definitions of microgrids and distributed energy, this study presents a microgrid-structured multi-agent system and uses Matlab/Simulink to construct a circuit with microgrid features, which enables the changes in each electrical source and load in the microgrid to be monitored and controlled. This multi-agent system adheres to the Java Agent Development Framework (JADE platform specifications of the Foundation for Intelligent Physical Agents (FIPA, facilitating communication, information transfers, and the receipt of real-time information regarding the microgrid and each component in the microgrid. Furthermore, the real-time state in the microgrid can be correspondingly controlled, achieving the most efficient real-time monitoring and control for electrical sources and load management in the microgrid.

  20. Time-resolved structural studies at synchrotrons and X-ray free electron lasers: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard; Moffat, Keith

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are potentially revolutionary X-ray sources because of their very short pulse duration, extreme peak brilliance and high spatial coherence, features that distinguish them from today’s synchrotron sources. We review recent time-resolved Laue diffraction and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) studies at synchrotron sources, and initial static studies at XFELs. XFELs have the potential to transform the field of time-resolved structural biology, yet many challenges arise in devising and adapting hardware, experimental design and data analysis strategies to exploit their unusual properties. Despite these challenges, we are confident that XFEL sources are poised to shed new light on ultrafast protein reaction dynamics. PMID:23021004

  1. Tunable Structures and Properties of Electrospun Regenerated Silk Fibroin Mats Annealed in Water Vapor at Different Times and Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regenerated silk fibroin (SF mats were fabricated using electrospinning technique, followed by mild water vapor annealing to effectively tune the structures and improve the mechanical properties of the mats at different annealing times and temperatures. The breaking strength and the breaking energy of the mats treated with water vapor at 65°C for 12 h reached 6.0 MPa and 171.7 J/kg, respectively. The conformational transition of the SF mats was significantly influenced by the treating temperature, while the influence of time was comparatively limited. The influence is consistent with the time-temperature equivalent principle and would be helpful for the preparation of water-vapor-annealed silk-based biomaterials for various applications.

  2. Cold-Curing Structural Epoxy Resins: Analysis of the Curing Reaction as a Function of Curing Time and Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcione, Carola Esposito; Freuli, Fabrizio; Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2014-09-22

    The curing reaction of a commercial cold-curing structural epoxy resin, specifically formulated for civil engineering applications, was analyzed by thermal analysis as a function of the curing time and the sample thickness. Original and remarkable results regarding the effects of curing time on the glass transition temperature and on the residual heat of reaction of the cold-cured epoxy were obtained. The influence of the sample thickness on the curing reaction of the cold-cured resin was also deeply investigated. A highly exothermal reaction, based on a self-activated frontal polymerization reaction, was supposed and verified trough a suitable temperature signal acquisition system, specifically realized for this measurement. This is one of the first studies carried out on the curing behavior of these peculiar cold-cured epoxy resins as a function of curing time and thickness.

  3. A Contribution to Time-Dependent Damage Modeling of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treasurer, Paul; Poirette, Yann; Perreux, Dominique; Thiebaud, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    The paper presents a new damage model for predicting stiffness loss due to creep loading and cyclic fatigue. The model, developed within a continuum damage mechanics framework, is based on the idea of a time-dependent damage spectrum, some elements of which occur rapidly and others slowly. The use of this spectrum allows a single damage kinematic to model creep and fatigue damage and to take into account the effect of stress amplitude, R ratio, and frequency. The evolution equations are based on similar equation than the one describing the viscoelasticity model and are relatively easy to implement. The new model is compared to the experimental results on carbon fiber/epoxy tubes. Quasi-static, creep and fatigue tests are performed on filament-wound tubular specimens to characterize the elastic, viscoelastic and plastic behavior of the composite material. Varying amounts of damage are observed and discussed depending on stress level and R ratio. The experimental work aims to develop and validate the damage model for predicting stiffness loss due to creep loading and cyclic fatigue.

  4. Fault zone structure determined through the analysis of earthquake arrival times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelini, A.

    1991-10-01

    This thesis develops and applies a technique for the simultaneous determination of P and S wave velocity models and hypocenters from a set of arrival times. The velocity models are parameterized in terms of cubic B-splines basis functions which permit the retrieval of smooth models that can be used directly for generation of synthetic seismograms using the ray method. In addition, this type of smoothing limits the rise of instabilities related to the poor resolving power of the data. V{sub P}/V{sub S} ratios calculated from P and S models display generally instabilities related to the different ray-coverages of compressional and shear waves. However, V{sub P}/V{sub S} ratios are important for correct identification of rock types and this study introduces a new methodology based on adding some coupling (i.e., proportionality) between P and S models which stabilizes the V{sub P}/V{sub S} models around some average preset value determined from the data. Tests of the technique with synthetic data show that this additional coupling regularizes effectively the resulting models.

  5. Real-time imaging, spectroscopy, and structural investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation of molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojadinović, Stevan; Tadić, Nenad; Šišović, Nikola M.; Vasilić, Rastko

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the results of the investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation (CPEO) of molybdenum at 160 V in a mixed solution of borax, water, and ethylene glycol are presented. Real-time imaging and optical emission spectroscopy were used for the characterization of the CPEO. During the process, vapor envelope is formed around the cathode and strong electric field within the envelope caused the generation of plasma discharges. The spectral line shape analysis of hydrogen Balmer line Hβ (486.13 nm) shows that plasma discharges are characterized by the electron number density of about 1.4 × 1021 m-3. The electron temperature of 15 000 K was estimated by measuring molybdenum atomic lines intensity. Surface morphology, chemical, and phase composition of coatings formed by CPEO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The elemental components of CPEO coatings are Mo and O and the predominant crystalline form is MoO3.

  6. Real-time imaging, spectroscopy, and structural investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation of molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojadinović, Stevan, E-mail: sstevan@ff.bg.ac.rs; Tadić, Nenad; Šišović, Nikola M.; Vasilić, Rastko [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-06-21

    In this paper, the results of the investigation of cathodic plasma electrolytic oxidation (CPEO) of molybdenum at 160 V in a mixed solution of borax, water, and ethylene glycol are presented. Real-time imaging and optical emission spectroscopy were used for the characterization of the CPEO. During the process, vapor envelope is formed around the cathode and strong electric field within the envelope caused the generation of plasma discharges. The spectral line shape analysis of hydrogen Balmer line H{sub β} (486.13 nm) shows that plasma discharges are characterized by the electron number density of about 1.4 × 10{sup 21 }m{sup −3}. The electron temperature of 15 000 K was estimated by measuring molybdenum atomic lines intensity. Surface morphology, chemical, and phase composition of coatings formed by CPEO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. The elemental components of CPEO coatings are Mo and O and the predominant crystalline form is MoO{sub 3}.

  7. Simulation studies and implementation of Linsley's EAS time structure method for the primary cosmic ray spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hiroki; Iyono, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Isao; Kohata, Masaki; Okei, Kazuhide; Tsuji, Shuhei; Nakatsuka, Takao; Ochi, Nobuaki

    2010-03-01

    A compact extensive air shower (EAS) array of eight plastic scintillators viewed by HAMAMATSU H7195 photomultiplier tubes covering a total area of 2 m2 is built in the rooftop of the Faculty of Technology building, Okayama University of Science, and operated since April 2006. We have installed a shift register system in our EAS array to record EAS particle arrival time within 5 μs. We have also performed detector simulations based on the database obtained from the AIRES simulator and developed the procedures to estimate the primary cosmic ray energy from Linsley's method. Applying this method to our EAS data and the simulation result, we derived the energy spectrum from 1016 to 1019.5 eV. Consequently, we obtained the power-law index of -3.2(+0.46 -0.8) in the primary energy range of 1016 to 1018.5 eV, and obtained that a change around 1018 eV appeared if not taking account of the zenith angle distribution of primary cosmic rays. We also showed the improvement of energy resolution by applying the restriction of zenith angle of primary cosmic rays in our simulation, as well as the potential of Linsley's method with a mini array.

  8. Fault zone structure determined through the analysis of earthquake arrival times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelini, Alberto [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1991-10-01

    This thesis develops and applies a technique for the simultaneous determination of P and S wave velocity models and hypocenters from a set of arrival times. The velocity models are parameterized in terms of cubic B-splines basis functions which permit the retrieval of smooth models that can be used directly for generation of synthetic seismograms using the ray method. In addition, this type of smoothing limits the rise of instabilities related to the poor resolving power of the data. VP/VS ratios calculated from P and S models display generally instabilities related to the different ray-coverages of compressional and shear waves. However, VP/VS ratios are important for correct identification of rock types and this study introduces a new methodology based on adding some coupling (i.e., proportionality) between P and S models which stabilizes the VP/VS models around some average preset value determined from the data. Tests of the technique with synthetic data show that this additional coupling regularizes effectively the resulting models.

  9. Gist in time: Scene semantics and structure enhance recall of searched objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephs, Emilie L; Draschkow, Dejan; Wolfe, Jeremy M; Võ, Melissa L-H

    2016-09-01

    Previous work has shown that recall of objects that are incidentally encountered as targets in visual search is better than recall of objects that have been intentionally memorized (Draschkow, Wolfe, & Võ, 2014). However, this counter-intuitive result is not seen when these tasks are performed with non-scene stimuli. The goal of the current paper is to determine what features of search in a scene contribute to higher recall rates when compared to a memorization task. In each of four experiments, we compare the free recall rate for target objects following a search to the rate following a memorization task. Across the experiments, the stimuli include progressively more scene-related information. Experiment 1 provides the spatial relations between objects. Experiment 2 adds relative size and depth of objects. Experiments 3 and 4 include scene layout and semantic information. We find that search leads to better recall than explicit memorization in cases where scene layout and semantic information are present, as long as the participant has ample time (2500ms) to integrate this information with knowledge about the target object (Exp. 4). These results suggest that the integration of scene and target information not only leads to more efficient search, but can also contribute to stronger memory representations than intentional memorization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of impregnation pressure and time on the porosity, structure and properties of polyacrylonitrile-fiber based carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopalan, Ramani; Roy, Mainak; Thomas, Susy; Patra, A. K.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites may find applications in critical parts of advanced nuclear reactors. A series of carbon-carbon composites were prepared using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based carbon fibers. The materials were densified by impregnating two-dimensional (2D) preforms with liquid phenol formaldehyde resin at different pressures and for different periods of time and then carbonizing those by slowly heating at 1000 °C. Effects of the processing parameters on the structure of the composites were extensively studied. The study showed conclusively that open porosity decreased with increasing impregnation pressure, whereas impregnation time had lesser effect. Matrix-resin bonding also improved at higher pressure. d002 spacing decreased and ordering along c-axis increased with concomitant increase in sp2-carbon fraction at higher impregnation pressures. The fiber reinforced composites exhibited short range ordering of carbon atoms and satisfied structural conditions (d002 values) of amorphous carbon according to the turbostratic model for non-graphitic carbon materials. The composites had pellet-density of ˜85% of the theoretical value, low thermal expansion and negligible neutron-poisoning. They maintained structural integrity and retained disordered nature even on heat-treatment at ca. 1800 °C.

  11. Linsley's EAS time structure method for the primary cosmic ray spectrum at LAAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyono, A.; Matsumoto, H.; Okei, K.; Tsuji, S.; Ohara, S.; Ochi, N.; Konishi, T.; Takahashi, N.; Yamamoto, I.; Nakatsuka, T.; Nakamura, T.; Ohmori, N.; Saito, K.

    2011-09-01

    We have installed a shift register system of extensive air show (EAS) particles in a compact EAS array built on the rooftop of the Faculty of Engineering building in the campus of Okayama University of Science and being operated since April 2006 as part of Large Area Air Shower (LAAS) experiments , in order to register each arrival time of EAS particles within 5 μs. Detector simulations based on the database obtained from one of the standard cosmic ray propagation simulator in the atmosphere (AIRES) have also been carried out and the procedures to estimate the primary cosmic ray energy from the Linsley's method have been developed and examined. Applying Linsley's method to the EAS data obtained by our EAS arrays and the simulation results, we derived the energy spectrum from 1016 eV to 1019.5 eV. Consequently, we obtained the power-law index of -3.2 (+0.46-0.8) in the primary energy range of 1016 eV to 1018.5 eV, and obtained that a change around 1018 eV appeared if not taking account of the zenith angle distribution of primary cosmic rays. We compared the obtained energy spectrum with other experimental data above 1016 eV energies, and showed the two components of power-law energy spectra well described our data. We also showed the improvement of energy resolution by applying the restriction of zenith angle of primary cosmic rays in our simulation results, as well as the potential of the Linsley's method with a compact EAS array.

  12. Differences in circadian time structure of diastolic blood pressure between diabetes mellitus and essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteucci Elena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal circadian blood pressure patterns have been associated with cardiovascular disease in diabetes mellitus. We have described that the acrophase of diastolic blood pressure (DBP registered in type 1 diabetes (T1D patients was significantly earlier than normal and DBP ecphasia was more pronounced in patients with lower heart rate variability during deep breathing. The aim of this study was to compare the circadian rhythm characteristics of BP among different groups: normotensive (NT control subjects, patients affected by T1D and type 2 diabetes (T2D, and patients with essential hypertension (HT. Findings We retrospectively evaluated ambulatory blood pressure monitoring records in 30 NT, 20 T1D, 20 T2D, 20 HT whose fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c were contemporaneously measured. The four groups were well-matched regarding age, gender, and BMI. Systolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP midline-estimating statistic of rhythm were higher in T1D, T2D, and HT groups. DBP ecphasia was present only in the diabetic individuals: the acrophase of DBP occurred four hours earlier than normal in T1D group, whereas two hours earlier in T2D group. In a multiple regression analysis, only HbA1c and SBP acrophase were statistically significant correlates of DBP acrophase. Conclusions People with diabetes mellitus, both type 1 and type 2, have their circadian acrophase of DBP occurring 2–4 hours earlier than normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Altered circadian timing of DBP, potential trigger of cardiovascular events, seems to be a distinguishing feature of diabetes mellitus and correlates with the previous 2–3 months of glycaemic control.

  13. Variable water column structure of the South Atlantic on glacial-interglacial time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Méndez, Gema; Molyneux, Elizabeth G.; Hall, Ian R.; Zahn, Rainer

    2009-12-01

    The structure of the glacial ocean was significantly different to that of the present day with intermediate to mid-depth waters being notably more δ 13C enriched than deep waters. This contrast was especially pronounced in the South Atlantic suggesting the development of a sharp chemical divide, or 'chemocline', at around 2500 m water depth between upper and lower layers, with implications for deep-ocean carbon storage [ Hodell et al., 2003. Pleistocene vertical carbon isotope and carbonate gradients in the South Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 4(1): doi: 1004 10.1029/2002GC000367.]. We evaluate existing benthic foraminiferal δ 13C, Cd/Ca and derived carbon isotope air-sea exchange signature (δ 13C as) data sets for the Atlantic during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 6 and 8 in order to examine the regional extent of the chemocline in the South Atlantic. Benthic δ 13C data north of the approximate latitude of the LGM Subantarctic Front (LGM-SAF, 43°S) linearly decrease with water depth, indicative of mixing between upper 'well' and lower 'poorly' ventilated water masses, with little evidence of the sharp chemical divide. Conversely, benthic δ 13C data south of the LGM-SAF below 2500 m water depth are uniformly around -0.8‰. The apparent δ 13C gradient across the LGM-SAF suggests enhanced mid-depth ventilation north of the SAF and reduced ventilation to the south. From this pattern we conclude that the regional chemocline in the South Atlantic constituted a dominantly meridional, rather than a vertical gradient, and was developed during at least the past three glacial periods. Benthic Cd/Ca data indicate that the gradient was not nutrient related, although further data from the South Atlantic are needed for a better assessment of this suggestion. The combined benthic δ 13C and Cd/Ca data indicate the source of well-ventilated upper waters in the South Atlantic changed from

  14. Time-Domain Three Dimensional BE-FE Method for Transient Response of Floating Structures Under Unsteady Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. E. S. Ismail

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a direct time-domain three dimensional (3D numerical procedure to simulate the transient response of very large floating structures (VLFS subjected to unsteady external loads as well as moving mass. The proposed procedure employs the Boundary Element and Finite Element methods (FEM-BEM. The floating structure and the surrounding fluid are discretized by 4-node isoparametric finite elements (FE and by 4-node constant boundary elements (BE, respectively. Structural analysis is based on Mindlin's plate theory. The equation of motion is constructed taking into account the effect of inertia loading due to the moving mass. In order to obtain the hydrodynamic forces (added mass and radiation damping, the coupled natural frequencies are first obtained by an iterative method, since hydrodynamic forces become frequency-dependent. Then the Newark integration method is employed to solve the equation of motion for structural system. In order to prove the validity of the present method, a FORTRAN program is developed and numerical examples are carried out to compare its results with those of published experimental results of a scale model of VLFS under a weight drop and airplane landing and takeoff in still water condition. The comparisons show very good agreement.

  15. almaBTE : A solver of the space-time dependent Boltzmann transport equation for phonons in structured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrete, Jesús; Vermeersch, Bjorn; Katre, Ankita; van Roekeghem, Ambroise; Wang, Tao; Madsen, Georg K. H.; Mingo, Natalio

    2017-11-01

    almaBTE is a software package that solves the space- and time-dependent Boltzmann transport equation for phonons, using only ab-initio calculated quantities as inputs. The program can predictively tackle phonon transport in bulk crystals and alloys, thin films, superlattices, and multiscale structures with size features in the nm- μm range. Among many other quantities, the program can output thermal conductances and effective thermal conductivities, space-resolved average temperature profiles, and heat-current distributions resolved in frequency and space. Its first-principles character makes almaBTE especially well suited to investigate novel materials and structures. This article gives an overview of the program structure and presents illustrative examples for some of its uses. PROGRAM SUMMARY Program Title:almaBTE Program Files doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/8tfzwgtp73.1 Licensing provisions: Apache License, version 2.0 Programming language: C++ External routines/libraries: BOOST, MPI, Eigen, HDF5, spglib Nature of problem: Calculation of temperature profiles, thermal flux distributions and effective thermal conductivities in structured systems where heat is carried by phonons Solution method: Solution of linearized phonon Boltzmann transport equation, Variance-reduced Monte Carlo

  16. Altered time structure of neuro-endocrine-immune system function in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carughi Stefano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The onset and the development of neoplastic disease may be influenced by many physiological, biological and immunological factors. The nervous, endocrine and immune system might act as an integrated unit to mantain body defense against this pathological process and reciprocal influences have been evidenced among hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, pineal gland and immune system. In this study we evaluated differences among healthy subjects and subjects suffering from lung cancer in the 24-hour secretory profile of melatonin, cortisol, TRH, TSH, FT4, GH, IGF-1 and IL-2 and circadian variations of lymphocyte subpopulations. Methods In ten healthy male volunteers (age range 45-66 and ten male patients with untreated non small cell lung cancer (age range 46-65 we measured melatonin, cortisol, TRH, TSH, FT4, GH, IGF-1 and IL-2 serum levels and percentages of lymphocyte subpopulations on blood samples collected every four hours for 24 hours. One-way ANOVA between the timepoints for each variable and each group was performed to look for a time-effect, the presence of circadian rhythmicity was evaluated, MESOR, amplitude and acrophase values, mean diurnal levels and mean nocturnal levels were compared. Results A clear circadian rhythm was validated in the control group for hormone serum level and for lymphocyte subsets variation. Melatonin, TRH, TSH, GH, CD3, CD4, HLA-DR, CD20 and CD25 expressing cells presented circadian rhythmicity with acrophase during the night. Cortisol, CD8, CD8bright, CD8dim, CD16, TcRδ1 and δTcS1 presented circadian rhythmicity with acrophase in the morning/at noon. FT4, IGF-1 and IL-2 variation did not show circadian rhythmicity. In lung cancer patients cortisol, TRH, TSH and GH serum level and all the lymphocyte subsubsets variation (except for CD4 showed loss of circadian rhythmicity. MESOR of cortisol, TRH, GH, IL-2 and CD16 was increased, whereas MESOR of TSH, IGF-1, CD8, CD8bright, TcRδ1 and

  17. Time-resolved fine structure mixing of cesium {8}^{2}D induced by helium and argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Ricardo C.; Perram, Glen P.; Eshel, Ben

    2017-11-01

    The rates for fine structure mixing and quenching of the moderately excited 8{}2{D}5/2 and 8{}2{D}3/2 states of cesium under collision with argon and the more impulsive helium have been measured, using two-photon pulsed excitation and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The pressure dependence of the eigenvalues of the rate matrix yields very rapid rate coefficients of 2.6+/- 0.2× {10}-9 {{cm}}3/({{atom}} s) for He and 5.2+/- 0.4× {10}-10 {{cm}}3/({{atom}} s) for Ar, about two–three times faster than for the Cs 7{}2{D}5/2\\rightleftharpoons 7{}2{D}3/2 relaxation. The quenching rates are also rapid, 1.07+/- 0.04× {10}-10 {{cm}}3/({{atom}} s) and 9.5+/- 0.7× {10}-11 {{cm}}3/({{atom}} s) for He and Ar respectively. The rapid fine structure rates are explained by the highly impulsive nature of the collisions, and the large average distance of the valence electron from the nucleus. Quenching rates (intra-multiplet transfer) are likely enhanced by the closely spaced, 9{}2P levels. The observed rates are compared with the predictions from time-dependent perturbation theory.

  18. Dynamic structural changes in microbial membranes in response to high hydrostatic pressure analyzed using time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2013-12-15

    High hydrostatic pressure has a profound physiological impact on lipid membranes, primarily resulting in tighter packing and restriction of acyl-chain motion. To fulfill membrane protein functions in high-pressure environments, deep-sea organisms possess specialized cell membranes. Although the effects of high-pressure on model membranes have been investigated in great detail, high-pressure-induced structural changes in living cell membranes remain to be elucidated. Of the spectroscopic techniques available to date, fluorescence anisotropy measurement is a common useful method that provides information on dynamic membrane properties. This mini-review focuses on pressure-induced changes in natural cell membranes, analyzed by means of high-pressure time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurement (HP-TRFAM). Specifically, the role of eicosapentaenoic acid in deep-sea piezophiles is described in terms of the structural integrity of the membrane under high pressure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Finite-Difference Time-Domain Simulation of Light Propagation in 2D Periodic and Quasi-Periodic Photonic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dadashzadeh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-short pulse is a promising technology for achieving ultra-high data rate transmission which is required to follow the increased demand of data transport over an optical communication system. Therefore, the propagation of such type of pulses and the effects that it may suffer during its transmission through an optical waveguide has received a great deal of attention in the recent years. We provide an overview of recent theoretical developments in a numerical modeling of Maxwell's equations to analyze the propagation of short laser pulses in photonic structures. The process of short light pulse propagation through 2D periodic and quasi-periodic photonic structures is simulated based on Finite-Difference Time-Domain calculations of Maxwell’s equations.

  20. Spanning the scales of mechanical metamaterials using time domain simulations in transformed crystals, graphene flakes and structured soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznavourian, Ronald; Puvirajesinghe, Tania M.; Brûlé, Stéphane; Enoch, Stefan; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2017-11-01

    We begin with a brief historical survey of discoveries of quasi-crystals and graphene, and then introduce the concept of transformation crystallography, which consists of the application of geometric transforms to periodic structures. We consider motifs with three-fold, four-fold and six-fold symmetries according to the crystallographic restriction theorem. Furthermore, we define motifs with five-fold symmetry such as quasi-crystals generated by a cut-and-projection method from periodic structures in higher-dimensional space. We analyze elastic wave propagation in the transformed crystals and (Penrose-type) quasi-crystals with the finite difference time domain freeware SimSonic. We consider geometric transforms underpinning the design of seismic cloaks with square, circular, elliptical and peanut shapes in the context of honeycomb crystals that can be viewed as scaled-up versions of graphene. Interestingly, the use of morphing techniques leads to the design of cloaks with interpolated geometries reminiscent of Victor Vasarely’s artwork. Employing the case of transformed graphene-like (honeycomb) structures allows one to draw useful analogies between large-scale seismic metamaterials such as soils structured with columns of concrete or grout with soil and nanoscale biochemical metamaterials. We further identify similarities in designs of cloaks for elastodynamic and hydrodynamic waves and cloaks for diffusion (heat or mass) processes, as these are underpinned by geometric transforms. Experimental data extracted from field test analysis of soil structured with boreholes demonstrates the application of crystallography to large scale phononic crystals, coined as seismic metamaterials, as they might exhibit low frequency stop bands. This brings us to the outlook of mechanical metamaterials, with control of phonon emission in graphene through extreme anisotropy, attenuation of vibrations of suspension bridges via low frequency stop bands and the concept of transformed