WorldWideScience

Sample records for styles ballet jazz

  1. Problems with Ballet: Steps, Style and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Geraldine

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to instigate a debate about the way in which professional ballet dancers are trained and the content of that training. The literature on the teaching of ballet has always focused on two areas: ballet vocabulary and training. The former is treated as both a fixed and autonomous form, and, for the latter, methods of…

  2. Valuing Cultural Context and Style: Strategies for Teaching Traditional Jazz Dance from the Inside Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Karen W.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an approach to teaching that acknowledges the history and style of authentic jazz dance; also known as traditional jazz dance. Described for students on the first class-day as "...your great-grandparents' jazz..." the course is an introduction to the stylistic characteristics of an indigenous U.S. form evolved primarily from…

  3. Jazz Style and Articulation: How to Get Your Band or Choir to Swing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Jerry

    2012-01-01

    The interpretation of jazz style is crucial to the element of swing in any jazz ensemble performance. Today, many charts for both large and small instrumental and vocal jazz ensembles are well marked with articulations and expression markings. However, in some cases, there is nothing to guide the musician. This article addresses some common jazz…

  4. VLADIMIR AXIONOV — RESEARCHER OF THE MUSIC STYLE OF MOLDOVAN BALLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOROLIOVA ELFRIDA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers V. Axionov’s long-term perspective ideas about the style of musical works and the possibility of using the given ideas in the analysis of ballet productions. In the article there are examples about the interconnection between the music style and the stage treatment of the performance in the ballets „Old Story” by V. Poleakov, produced by Iu. Sidorenko and „Cross-roads” by V. Zagorsky, staged by C. Rusu.

  5. Jazz: An Afro-American Art Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Marie P.

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of roots of jazz--form of art music which originated in United States through confrontation of blacks with European music--highlights jazz styles and stylists, blues, ragtime, dixieland, big bands, bop, cool jazz, modern jazz, jazz recording, jazz discography, and jazz collection in the library. Thirty-four references are cited. (EJS)

  6. Describing different styles of singing: a comparison of a female singer's voice source in "Classical", "Pop", "Jazz" and "Blues".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalén, M; Sundberg, J

    2001-01-01

    The voice is apparently used in quite different manners in different styles of singing. Some of these differences concern the voice source, which varies considerably with loudness, pitch, and mode of phonation. We attempt to describe voice source differences between Classical, Pop, Jazz and Blues styles of singing as produced in a triad melody pattern by a professional female singer in soft, middle and loud phonation. An expert panel was asked to identify these triads as examples of either Classical, Pop, Jazz or Blues. The voice source was analysed by inverse filtering. Subglottal pressure Ps, closed quotient QClosed, glottal compliance (ratio between the air volume contained in a voice pulse and Ps), and the level difference between the two lowest source spectrum partials were analysed in the styles and in four modes of phonation: breathy, flow, neutral, and pressed. The same expert panel rated the degree of pressedness in the entire material. Averages across pitch were calculated for each mode and style and related to their total range of variation in the subject. The glottogram data showed a high correlation with the ratings of pressedness. Based on these correlations a pressedness factor was computed from the glottogram data. A phonation map was constructed with the axes representing mean adduction factor and mean Ps, respectively. In this map Classical was similar to flow phonation, Pop and Jazz to neutral and flow phonation, and Blues to pressed phonation.

  7. Dynamism of Ballet in Isan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirimongkol Natayakul

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Isan is a region with diverse dancing art forms, such as Fon (Northertern-Thai-style-dance, Serng (Northestern-Thai-style-dance, and Ram (Central-Thai-style-dance which are attached to important traditions associated with Buddhism and spiritual beliefs. Ballet is a unique cross-cultural dance that has spread into Isan society over a long period of time. This qualitative research aims to study the history of ballet in Isan from 1976 to 2012 and the factors that have led to the dynamism of ballet in Isan. Research methods used for data collection include document study, fieldwork and researcher experience. In this study, the population and area samples are in seven provinces: Khon Kaen, Nakhon Ratchasima, Udon Thani, Ubon Ratchathani, Maha Sarakham, Chaiyaphum and Buriram. Ballet first appeared in Isan in 1976 when Khunying Genevieve Damon, a French national, Ekachai Kaikaew and Kanoknat Homasawin set up as ballet teachers. Ballet schools are found in 12 public schools, 21 private schools and one school of the local administrative organization. Ballet shows take two forms, which are either Conventional Ballet and Non-Conventional Ballet. Seven factors affect the dynamism of ballet in Isan: government policy, education, economy, ballet teachers, parents of ballet students, communications and overseas organizations. Ballet teachers have a multidimensional role in educational society and are thus very important to the ballet shows in the Isan area. Moreover, ballet teachers in the Northeast also create, design, choreograph and direct the shows. The dynamism of education and economy are the second and the third most important factors

  8. 爵士乐%Jazz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹

    2003-01-01

    @@ 1. When was Jazz born? The music called Jazz was born sometime around 1895 in New Orleans. It combined elements (元素) of Ragtime (雷格泰姆旋律), marching band music and Blues. What differentiated(区分) Jazz from these earlier styles was the widespread use of improvisation (即席演奏), often by more than one player at a time.

  9. JazzDanmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harsløf, Olav

    2009-01-01

    Artikel om genreorganisationen JazzDanmarks udvikling fra Dansk Jazz Forbund til JazzDanmark Udgivelsesdato: April-maj......Artikel om genreorganisationen JazzDanmarks udvikling fra Dansk Jazz Forbund til JazzDanmark Udgivelsesdato: April-maj...

  10. Positioning Ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassing, Gayle, Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A series of articles discusses the development of ballet instruction in secondary and higher education, beginning ballet in high school and in college, teaching techniques, ballet for visually handicapped students, and methods for the prevention of injuries in beginning students. (JN)

  11. The History of Jazz Music

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔荣斌

    2004-01-01

    "Is jazz a kind of folk music? Is it a performing style? How is it different from other kinds of music?" There is no simple answer to these questions, because the most important quality (特性,品质) of jazz comes from its unique combination (独特的组合) of different musical sources over a period of almost dO0 years.

  12. Ballet, why and how? On the role of classical ballet in dance education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, D.D.; Vos, M.

    2013-01-01

    Classical ballet is no longer the sole stimulus for today's audiences, as a fluid fusion of everything from ballet to Bollywood and from breakdancing to Latin represents how dance is consumed today. With the emergence of modern choreographers and new teaching styles, debate on the benefits of

  13. Mechanics of jazz shoes and their effect on pointing in child dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong Yan, Alycia; Smith, Richard; Vanwanseele, Benedicte; Hiller, Claire

    2012-07-01

    There has been little scientific investigation of the impact of dance shoes on foot motion or dance injuries. The pointed (plantar-flexed) foot is a fundamental component of both the technical requirements and the traditional aesthetic of ballet and jazz dancing. The aims of this study were to quantify the externally observed angle of plantar flexion in various jazz shoes compared with barefoot and to compare the sagittal plane bending stiffness of the various jazz shoes. Sixteen female recreational child dancers were recruited for 3D motion analysis of active plantar flexion. The jazz shoes tested were a split-sole jazz shoe, full-sole jazz shoe, and jazz sneaker. A shoe dynamometer measured the stiffness of the jazz shoes. The shoes had a significant effect on ankle plantar flexion. All jazz shoes significantly restricted the midfoot plantar flexion angle compared with the barefoot condition. The split-sole jazz shoe demonstrated the least restriction, whereas the full-sole jazz shoe the most midfoot restriction. A small restriction in metartarsophalangeal plantar flexion and a greater restriction at the midfoot joint were demonstrated when wearing stiff jazz shoes. These restrictions will decrease the aesthetic of the pointed foot, may encourage incorrect muscle activation, and have an impact on dance performance.

  14. Sur des erres de jazz

    OpenAIRE

    Daverat, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Une opinion commune considère que le jazz vivrait une période de dépérissement ou de ressassement. Cette conception est d’abord basée sur une erreur qui consiste à croire que le jazz évolue uniquement au travers de relèves entre les générations, de substitutions complètes de nouveaux styles à des formes d’expression qui se démoderaient aussitôt, d’instaurations systématiques de nouveaux langages opposés à ceux qui les ont précédés. Au contraire, les caractéristiques de chaque style s’imbrique...

  15. Use Jazz to Teach Your String Students Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Standards 3 and 9 of the National Standards for Music Education charge teachers to teach improvisation as well as music of diverse cultures. Jazz is a musical style that is perfect to cover both content areas. Until now, however, jazz repertoire and improvisation have not played a major role in the education of string students. One reason is that…

  16. LEP Celebration : Groupe de Jazz "Wolfgang & The Werewolves"

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2000-01-01

    At 14:00: Groupe de Jazz "Wolfgang & The Werewolves" . The official programme begins at 15:00 with an introduction from the Director General, and Professor Martinus Veltman will give the keynote speech. Heads of national delegations represented at ministerial level will then make their speeches, following which a commemorative plaque will be unveiled. A specially commissioned ballet by Maurice Béjart will bring the ceremony to a close.

  17. Ballet as a Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, David Earl

    1976-01-01

    A reorganization and reanalysis of data gathered by Ronald Charles Frederico--who interviewed 146 dancers belonging to 12 ballet companies in the U.S.--to investigate the structural features of ballet as a profession. Four possibilities exist for a more general interpretative scheme for understanding ballet: social structural, phenomenological,…

  18. Psychosocial stressors in the lives of great jazz musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalano, F

    1997-02-01

    Brief biographical information on four great jazz tenor saxophone players of the past is presented to illustrate the similar psychosocial stressors these men seemed to experience, namely, severe substance abuse, haphazard working conditions, lack of acceptance of their art form in the United States, marital and family discord, and a vagabond life style. Ages at death of 80 great jazz musicians may indicate that the stressful life style of jazz musicians may be reflected in a shortened life span, but a control group is needed.

  19. The Exceptional Art of Hank Mobley's 1955-1970 Jazz Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Russell M.

    2009-01-01

    Hank Mobley had profound influence on the East coast style of jazz. As a composer, he was a major contributor to the development of the specific style of East Coast jazz known as hard bop. Between the years of 1955 and 1970, Hank Mobley recorded one hundred-forty two original compositions. Due to the lack of published transcriptions and analyses…

  20. Selected Jazz Haiku

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Emanuel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Jazz AirlinesJAZZ Airlines! Bestest,Firstest with Mostest. ALWAYSPrettiest-Hostessed.Brown BananaBrown banana, JAZZ,peels for touch. Come  close. Closer,till music’s too-oo much.JA-A-ZZ fruit, banana,browned to please, suntan music(goes naked with ease.Count BasieLast-chance dance! Her cheekwarms his chest. “One O’clock Jump”swings jitterbugs best.Lester YoungHowdja do it, “Prez”(stay nice, cool, when all that jazzchose another school?His Volkswagen jazz,classic, never rocked ’n’ rolled--ro...

  1. Jazz v sloveniji

    OpenAIRE

    Petek, Lara

    2017-01-01

    Jazz je glasba z dolgo in bogato zgodovino. Njegove korenine prihajajo iz Afrike, ki so se pozneje združile z vplivi iz Evrope. V osnovi gre za združitev afriških črnskih ritmov z evropskimi harmonijami. Za predhodnike jazza označujemo duhovno pesem, blues in ragtime. Skozi zgodovino pa so se izoblikovali različni stili jazza, kot so new orleans, dixieland, chicago, swing, bebop, cool jazz, free jazz, electric jazz. Za to so bili odgovorni različni najvidnejši izvajalci jazzovske glasbe, ki s...

  2. Private Speech in Ballet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Dale

    2006-01-01

    Authoritarian teaching practices in ballet inhibit the use of private speech. This paper highlights the critical importance of private speech in the cognitive development of young ballet students, within what is largely a non-verbal art form. It draws upon research by Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky and contemporary socioculturalists, to…

  3. Jazz en Chile: su historia y función social Jazz in Chile: its history and social function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Menanteau

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta una visión general de la historia del jazz en Chile que destaca la función social de esta música y el cambio que tuvo a través del tiempo. Estos cambios se relacionaron con diferentes valoraciones de la práctica jazzística local. En un principio el jazz fue música popular masiva. Posteriormente fue valorado estéticamente por un segmento de élite, quienes eran profesionales en áreas no musicales y en muchos casos eran instrumentistas aficionados. En una tercera etapa, músicos profesionales asumieron la práctica del jazz como una plataforma para fusionar el lenguaje jazzístico con recursos tomados de la música tradicional chilena. Este tránsito del jazz en Chile está cruzado por factores socioeconómicos y estéticos, que se analizan en el trabajo.The article presents an overview of the history of jazz in Chile on the basis of the social function of jazz and the changes it has underwent over the years in terms of the valúes it has represented for Chilean society. Initially jazz was considered as mass popular music. Afterwards it was valued in aesthetic terms by a group belonging to the élite of Chilean society. Many of them belonged to non-music professions and in some cases were amateur musicians. Most recently professional musicians took up jazz as the basis for combining the jazz style with elements belonging to traditional music of Chile. This process in Chile is also influenced by social, economic and aesthetic aspects which are explored in this article.

  4. Ballet Body Belief: Perceptions of an Ideal Ballet Body from Young Ballet Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Angela

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores what is perceived and believed to be an ideal ballet body by young ballet dancers. Such bodily belief becomes, in Pierre Bourdieu's terms, a core part of a ballet dancer's habitus. A four year longitudinal, ethnographic, empirical study of the experiences of 12 young ballet dancers, six boys and six girls, aged between 10 and…

  5. Learning with Jazz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renwick, Lucille

    2002-01-01

    Describes how teachers at three different elementary schools use jazz to teach students to read, write, and sing. In each case, jazz is used to enrich standard curricula and raise students' appreciation of this music form widely recognized for its rich heritage rooted in African American culture. Literature resources and relevant Web sites are…

  6. Teaching as Jazz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Carol Ann; Germundson, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Tomlinson and Germundson compare teaching well to playing jazz well. Excellent teaching involves a blend of techniques and theory; expressiveness; syncopation; call and response, and, frequently, improvisation. Weaving in analogies to jazz, the authors delineate four elements of such teaching: curriculum that helps students connect to big ideas,…

  7. Profiling the Jazz Singer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents new data extracted from the National Survey of Jazz Instrumentalists and Vocalists. The survey was administered to 209 professional jazz musicians who resided and performed in Australia during 2009-2010. Presented here are five statistically significant characteristics which differentiate vocalists' experiences from other jazz…

  8. Monts Jura Jazz Festival

    CERN Multimedia

    Jazz Club

    2012-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Monts Jura Jazz Festival" that will take place on September 21st and 22nd 2012 at the Esplanade du Lac in Divonne-les-Bains. This festival is organized by the "CERN Jazz Club" with the support of the "CERN Staff Association". This festival is a major musical event in the French/Swiss area and proposes a world class program with jazz artists such as D.Lockwood and D.Reinhardt. More information on http://www.jurajazz.com.

  9. Monts Jura Jazz Festival

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Monts Jura Jazz Festival" will take place at the Esplanade du Lac in Divonne-les-Bains, France on September 21 and 22. This festival organized by the CERN Jazz Club and supported by the CERN Staff Association is becoming a major musical event in the Geneva region. International Jazz artists like Didier Lockwood and David Reinhardt are part of this year outstanding program. Full program and e-tickets are available on the festival website. Don't miss this great festival!

  10. Injuries in classical ballet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Coutinho de Azevedo Guimarães

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to elucidate what injuries are most likely to occur due to classical ballet practice. The research used national and international bibliography. The bibliography analysis indicated that technical and esthetical demands lead to a practice of non-anatomical movements, causing the ballet dancer to suffer from a number of associated lesions. Most of the injuries are caused by technical mistakes and wrong training. Troubles in children are usually due to trying to force external rotation at hip level and to undue use of point ballet slippers. The commonest lesions are in feet and ankles, followed by knees and hips. The rarest ones are in the upper limbs. These injuries are caused by exercise excess, by repetitions always in the same side and by wrong and early use of point slippers. The study reached the conclusion that incorrect application of classical ballet technique predisposes the dancers to characteristic injuries.

  11. Les mots du jazz

    OpenAIRE

    Roueff, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    L’ouvrage d’André Schaeffner constitue la première analyse savante du jazz (1926). Il a marqué une étape importante dans le processus de réinvention du jazz en France en contribuant notamment, par sa réception et les polémiques qu’il a suscitées, à transformer l’identification du jazz d’une musique « américaine » à une musique « noire-américaine » (c’est-à-dire aux « racines » africaines). Les analyses proposées dans cet ouvrage, alors qu’elles désignaient des musiques que la critique de jazz...

  12. Psychosocial stressors and the short life spans of legendary jazz musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalano, F

    2000-04-01

    Mean age at death of 168 legendary jazz musicians and 100 renowned classical musicians were compared to examine whether psychosocial stressors such as severe substance abuse, haphazard working conditions, lack of acceptance of jazz as an art form in the United States, marital and family discord, and a vagabond life style may have contributed to shortened life spans for the jazz musicians. Analysis indicated that the jazz musicians died at an earlier age (57.2 yr.) than the classical musicians (73.3 yr.).

  13. Is Punk the New Jazz?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    In the 1920s, jazz was widely condemned as "the devil's music," and "Ladies' Home Journal" warned its readers that young people were being morally corrupted as they danced along to "the abominable jazz orchestra with its voodoo-born minors and its direct appeal to the sensory center." But within a few decades, jazz was fully absorbed into the…

  14. Jazz-Philosophy Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Tartaglia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I describe and provide a justification for the fusion of jazz music and philosophy which I have developed; the justification is provided from the perspectives of both jazz and philosophy. I discuss two of my compositions, based on philosophical ideas presented by Schopenhauer and Derek Parfit respectively; links to sound files are provided. The justification emerging from this discussion is that philosophy produces ‘non-argumentative effects’ which provide suitable material for artistic expression and exploration. These effects – which are often emotional – are under-recognised in philosophy, but they do important philosophical work in demarcating the kinds of truths we want to discover, and in sustaining our search for them. Jazz-Philosophy Fusion can help to increase metaphilosophical self-consciousness about these effects, while also helping to counteract any undue persuasive force they may achieve. Jazz is a particularly suitable medium because it has independently developed a concern with philosophical ideas; because of strong parallels between jazz and philosophy which explain their mutual openness to fusions, and because improvisation very effectively facilitates the direct audience engagement essential to inducing these effects.

  15. Jazz som transnational populærkultur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Tore; Knudsen, Knud

    2013-01-01

    Jazz as Transnational Popular Culture. The Perspective of a Local Biotope In the article, we explore the "diaspora of jazz", inspired by Bruce Johnson's critique of traditional historiography of jazz, portraying it solely as a history of the musical development of jazz. The argument is that jazz...

  16. Jazz: A Beginner's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliniak, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Introducing jazz music to elementary and middle school students can open a multitude of creative doors--provided that teachers know how and where to start. This article presents a sample of what Christine Nowmos teaches to her kindergarten-through-fourth-grade classrooms over the course of two months. During January and February each year, she has…

  17. Jazz Up Your Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Janine

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the Jazz Workshop, a unique blend of collaboration and constructivist learning using videoconferencing and Web 2.0 tools. Each summer it draws about 400 participants--mostly teachers, technology facilitators, teacher librarians, and videoconferencing coordinators--who convene in 20 locations across three…

  18. Transformasi dalam Ranah Jazz Yogyakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oki Rahadianto Sutopo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article tries to show the transformation of jazz music as a cultural product in Yogyakarta. This transformation is, according to Baumann, fluid, contradictory, and ambivalent. In the origin, this music became a symbol of resistance by the lower class, whereas in Indonesia jazz became the upper middle class consumption. However, in its development, some jazz musicians try to restore the original meaning by combining local elements and bring a hybrid genre of jazz, although this was not last long. The traditional elements can not survive to bring the spirit of resistance because this new genre of jazz eventually entered the music industry as a pop culture. Local elements in the end are commodified. The impact is then the reduction of the meaning of jazz and locality itself.

  19. Corps de ballet: the case of the injured ballet dancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bryan S; Wainwright, Steven P

    2003-05-01

    This paper contributes to debate on social constructionism in the sociology of health and illness through a study of injury among ballet dancers. In this empirical study of classical ballet dancers, we outline a phenomenology of the injured and ageing body in terms of a critical commentary on constructionism. We explore dancers' experiences of embodiment to illustrate our critique of recent interpretations of dance as a textual practice. Those forms of social constructionism that define the body as a text provide a forceful attack on discourses of authority and legitimation, but we argue that they are problematic as epistemologies and ontologies of embodiment. Through a phenomenological understanding of the experiences of embodiment, we observe how injury and ageing disrupt the practical accomplishments that underpin the ballet habitus and the dancer's identity. Although ballet injuries can terminate a dancing career, they are accepted as an inevitable part of the vocation of ballet. Our aim is to understand the interaction between injuries, dancers' experiences of discomfort and the social support that emerges from the ballet dancers as a social group. We draw on the concepts of social solidarity and collective consciousness in Emile Durkheim to show that injury is mediated through the social bonding of dancers into a professional ballet company, where injury is accepted as a sign of vocational commitment, and suggest that this 'collective effervescence' gives a novel meaning to the idea of a corps de ballet.

  20. Jazz et tourisme

    OpenAIRE

    Guedj, Pauline

    2013-01-01

    Depuis quinze ans, la scène jazz du quartier de Harlem à New York connaît une renaissance populaire et médiatique. Dans les clubs, l’audience se compose de plus en plus de touristes, venus des quatre coins des États-Unis, de l’Europe mais aussi du Japon. À Harlem, ceux-ci cherchent à découvrir le jazz « authentique », témoignage d’une culture noire américaine dont l’histoire et les origines pourraient se chercher aujourd’hui dans l’Uptown new-yorkais. Cet article, résultat d’un travail en cou...

  1. Goltsman Ballet hakkab lapsi õpetama

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2014-01-01

    Tantsutrupp Goltsman Ballet asutaja, kunstilise juhi ja tänapäevase balletikunsti pedagoog Maria Goltsmani sõnul hakkab tantsutrupp andma tantsutunde 5-7-aastastele lastele, esialgu Tallinnas. Detsembri lõpus esitles Goltsman Ballet uut tantsuetendust "Blue", lavastajaks Krista Köster

  2. Using Jazz to Teach Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Jon

    2007-01-01

    Improvising has been around since the dawn of music. Most music in the world is improvised to some extent, and the idea of performing notes on the page "as written" is a fairly young development in music's history. One genre that does heavily stress improvisation from the start is jazz. Since jazz ethic is based on improvised performances,…

  3. Jazz and the ‘Art’ of Medicine: Improvisation in the Medical Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidet, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Improvisation is an important aspect of patient-physician communication. It is also a defining feature of jazz music performance. This essay uses examples from jazz to illustrate principles of improvisation that relate to an individual communication act (ie, building space into one’s communication), a physician’s communicative style (ie, developing one’s voice), and the communicative process of the medical encounter (ie, achieving ensemble). At all 3 levels, the traditions of jazz improvisation can inform efforts to research and teach medical interviewing by fostering a contextualized view of patient-physician communication. PMID:17389542

  4. Jazz and the 'art' of medicine: improvisation in the medical encounter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidet, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Improvisation is an important aspect of patient-physician communication. It is also a defining feature of jazz music performance. This essay uses examples from jazz to illustrate principles of improvisation that relate to an individual communication act (ie, building space into one's communication), a physician's communicative style (ie, developing one's voice), and the communicative process of the medical encounter (ie, achieving ensemble). At all 3 levels, the traditions of jazz improvisation can inform efforts to research and teach medical interviewing by fostering a contextualized view of patient-physician communication.

  5. Overuse Injuries in Professional Ballet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, Francisco José; de la Cuadra, Crótida; Guillén, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite overuse injuries being previously described as the most frequent in ballet, there are no studies on professional dancers providing the specific clinical diagnoses or type of injury based on the discipline. Hypothesis Overuse injuries are the most frequent injuries in ballet, with differences in the type and frequency of injuries based on discipline. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study performed between January 1, 2005, and October 10, 2010, on injuries occurring in professional dancers from leading Spanish dance companies who practiced disciplines such as classical, neoclassical, contemporary, and Spanish ballet. Data, including type of injury, were obtained from specialized medical services at the Trauma Service, Fremap, Madrid, Spain. Results A total of 486 injuries were evaluated, a significant number of which were overuse disorders (P ballet (82.60%). Injuries were more frequent among female dancers (75.90%) and classical ballet (83.60%). A statistically significant prevalence of patellofemoral pain syndrome was found in the classical discipline (P = .007). Injuries of the adductor muscles of the thigh (P = .001) and of the low back facet (P = .02) in the Spanish ballet discipline and lateral snapping hip (P = .02) in classical and Spanish ballet disciplines were significant. Conclusion Overuse injuries were the most frequent injuries among the professional dancers included in this study. The prevalence of injuries was greater for the most technically demanding discipline (classical ballet) as well as for women. Patellofemoral pain syndrome was the most prevalent overuse injury, followed by Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy, and mechanical low back pain. Clinical Relevance Specific clinical diagnoses and injury-based differences between the disciplines are a key factor in ballet. PMID:26665100

  6. Overuse Injuries in Professional Ballet

    OpenAIRE

    Sobrino, Francisco Jos?; de la Cuadra, Cr?tida; Guill?n, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite overuse injuries being previously described as the most frequent in ballet, there are no studies on professional dancers providing the specific clinical diagnoses or type of injury based on the discipline. Hypothesis Overuse injuries are the most frequent injuries in ballet, with differences in the type and frequency of injuries based on discipline. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods This was a descriptive cross-sectional study performed betwe...

  7. Physiological characteristics of classical ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schantz, P G; Astrand, P O

    1984-10-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic energy yield during professional training sessions ("classes") of classical ballet as well as during rehearsed and performed ballets has been studied by means of oxygen uptake, heart rate, and blood lactate concentration determinations on professional ballet dancers from the Royal Swedish Ballet in Stockholm. The measured oxygen uptake during six different normal classes at the theatre averaged about 35-45% of the maximal oxygen uptake, and the blood lactate concentration averaged 3 mM (N = 6). During 10 different solo parts of choreographed dance (median length = 1.8 min) representative for moderately to very strenuous dance, an average oxygen uptake (measured during the last minute) of 80% of maximum and blood lactate concentration of 10 mM was measured (N = 10). In addition, heart rate registrations from soloists in different ballets during performance and final rehearsals frequently indicated a high oxygen uptake relative to maximum and an average blood lactate concentration of 11 mM (N = 5). Maximal oxygen uptake, determined in 1971 (N = 11) and 1983 (N = 13) in two different groups of dancers, amounted to on the average 51 and 56 ml X min-1 X kg-1 for the females and males, respectively. In conclusion, classical ballet is a predominantly intermittent type of exercise. In choreographed dance each exercise period usually lasts only a few minutes, but can be very demanding energetically, while during the dancers' basic training sessions, the energy yield is low.

  8. The American Jazz Music Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Harold

    This publication reports the findings of research carried out in recognition of the need for an in-depth analysis of the U.S. jazz music audience in order to identify and assess ways to shape the future of jazz as part of the "Survey of Public Participation in The Arts" conducted in 1982. The research problem was to learn the size,…

  9. Effects of Style, Tempo, and Performing Medium on Children's Music Preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Albert

    1981-01-01

    Fifth-graders listened to a tape incorporating fast and slow vocal and instrumental excerpts within the generic styles of rock/pop, country, older jazz, newer jazz, art music, and band music. A preference hierarchy emerged favoring the popular styles. Across pooled styles, faster tempos and instrumentals were slightly preferred. (Author/SJL)

  10. Globalization Goes Local: Nationalism in Indonesian Jazz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wishnoebroto Wishnoebroto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Article presented how Jazz, as a product of American popular culture, can be very local in Indonesia. Nationalism, in this case, refers to how Indonesian jazz artists translate and create a kind of ‘dialogue’ between jazz and local Indonesian culture. The study used library research by finding what values that jazz had in order to create such dialogue, and how Indonesian nationalism could be transformed in jazz. The evolution of Jazz in Indonesia and the attitude of Indonesian jazz audience were discussed to see the position of jazz in Indonesian popular culture mainstream. It can be concluded that Jazz seems to deconstruct the common notion that music should be understood to be enjoyed. In jazz,  the irrational and sometimes absurd combination between jazz and other indigenous culture, has created a specific kinds of the music itself. Jazz in Indonesia has gone through its own cycle of evolution where the western and the eastern culture has created its own art and nobody knows the direction of jazz in the future.  

  11. Relationships among Vocal Jazz Improvisation Achievement, Jazz Theory Knowledge, Imitative Ability, Musical Experience, Creativity, and Gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, Patrice Dawn

    1996-01-01

    Reports on a study that examined the nature of vocal jazz improvisation and the factors that influence achievement in improvisation. Participating subjects performed two jazz improvisation tasks that were measured for tonal, rhythmic, and expressive items. Correlating independent variables included jazz theory knowledge, jazz experience, and…

  12. A History of Women in Jazz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susanna L.

    1991-01-01

    The history of women jazz performers and composers, namely African Americans, in the United States is traced from its beginnings to contemporary artists. Women have played an integral role in jazz development. Separate women's festivals showcase many female talents, demonstrating that the future is very promising for women in jazz. (SLD)

  13. Style

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösing, Lilian Munk

    2017-01-01

    Defined as the tropes, figures, and grammar of the text, style is quite concrete, quite analyzable. Pure detection and identification of the tropes and figures of a text is not very interesting to literary studies, though, unless it is combined with interpretation, that is, unless you ask: What i...

  14. Jazz Listening Activities: Children's Literature and Authentic Music Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Nan L.; Fisher, Douglas; Helzer, Rick

    2002-01-01

    Describes a unit that is appropriate for upper elementary and middle school students that focuses on jazz music using biographies about jazz musicians. Discusses the five sections of the unit. Includes a list of "Suggested Jazz Listening Samples," jazz videos, and a bibliography of resources related to jazz music. (CMK)

  15. Jazzing up the Psychological Contract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Nell Tabor

    2010-01-01

    Helping students and practitioners to understand and utilize the Psychological Contract is often a difficult task. Unlike fault-finding research, this paper presents the PC as a positive, vibrant and valuable tool. In an effort to make the concept less elusive, the paper draws upon the metaphor of jazz. The metaphor is an accepted tool of…

  16. Humanizing the Deities of Jazz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppesen, Scott

    2017-01-01

    As musicians, we have been taught to idolize certain figures in music history. These individuals are considered untouchable, unassailable, and unquestionably brilliant. This practice is increasingly evident in jazz. Figures like Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Charlie Parker, and Miles Davis have all undergone a virtual apotheosis. While there is…

  17. SmAll That Jazz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluemel, Dina

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how Viktor Schreckengost's work had been a learning experience for the students of Grant Elementary School. Viktor's most famous work, "Jazz Bowl," was the focus of the author's curriculum. Viktor created this punch bowl for Eleanor Roosevelt in the 1930s. The bowl was so popular that a series of them were produced. The…

  18. Seeing Futures in Ballet: The Storylines of Four Student Ballet Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the storylines of four student ballet dancers who attend a specialist performing arts secondary school and who, in differing ways, envisage futures which "look straight at ballet". When decisions about schooling intermingle with long-held imaginings of futures in ballet, thought is provoked about ways the young…

  19. Brilliant Corners: Approaches to Jazz and Comics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pillai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The call for papers Brilliant Corners: Approaches to Jazz and Comics was published on 30 July 2015. In it, the editors made a public invitation for scholarship that proposed meeting points between the disciplines of jazz studies and comics studies. This editorial discusses the motivations for the collection, the editorial methodology, and the research articles included. Finally, the editors suggest some areas in which jazz studies and comics scholarship might address under-researched and fertile topics.

  20. Motivating and Evaluating Growth in Ballet Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Julie Hammond

    2012-01-01

    In teaching young dancers ballet, the utilization of effective assessments in partnership with supportive and creative teaching strategies can transform not only the learning experience, but the dancer as well. In this article, the author shares a "growth grade rubric" that specifically addresses three areas in ballet training: (1) skills and…

  1. Rhythmic Patterns in Ragtime and Jazz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odekerken, Daphne; Volk, A.; Koops, Hendrik Vincent

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a corpus-based study on rhythmic patterns in ragtime and jazz. Ragtime and jazz are related genres, but there are open questions on what specifies the two genres. Earlier studies revealed that variations of a particular syncopation pattern, referred to as 121, are among the most

  2. Jazz: The Serious Music of Black Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Daphne Duval

    1978-01-01

    Racism has been a major factor in determining the role and stature of jazz and the musicians who play it. Jazz has been denied its artistic due because it emerged from Black people who have been systematically denied their social and civil rights. (Author/GC)

  3. Middle Level Leadership... and All That Jazz!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Patti; Tomlin, Dru

    2013-01-01

    Much like a Jazz group, successful middle level schools are also founded on elements of improvisation, collaboration, teamwork, and responsive communication. Just as the director of the jazz group must have a solid foundation of music theory, the skills to bring out the best in the players, and an attitude that allows others to shine, those who…

  4. What Research Reveals about School Jazz Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Chad

    2015-01-01

    Though jazz has been a part of many school music programs for more than 40 years, relatively little research on jazz education exists. Despite this scarcity, a comprehensive examination of the extant literature could serve to inform practice and guide future studies. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to analyze and synthesize the extant…

  5. Leading teaming: Evidence from Jazz

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, Francisco Maria Trigo da Roza Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    A Work Project, presented as part of the requirements for the Award of a Masters Degree in Management from the NOVA – School of Business and Economics In this research we conducted qualitative analysis to study the team dynamics of jazz combos in order to explore deeper the leadership behaviors in a creative environment where teaming occurs. We found evidence of a dual leader, one that shifts his/her role between ‘leader as leader’ and ‘leader as member’, embracing both leaderfulness an...

  6. Y. Laberge on Jazz Icons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available (Various artists, Jazz Icons: Series 4. Reelin' In The Years Productions and Naxos, 2.108003. Box Set (8 DVDs, 2009, 10 hours. B&W. All regions (no DVD zone. 1. Coleman Hawkins- Live in '62 & '64- (w/ Sweets Edison and Jo Jones 2. Art Blakey- Live in '65- (w/ Freddie Hubbard 3.  Erroll Garner - Live in '63 & '64 4.  Jimmy Smith- Live in '69 5.  Woody Herman- Live in '64 6.  Anita O'Day- Live In '63 & '70 7.  Art Farmer- Live In '64- (w/ Jim Hall 8. Bonus performances, including excerpts...

  7. Defining Jazz Revisited - Taking a social constructionist approach to the characterisation of jazz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Ole Izard

    2017-01-01

    the concept of jazz from a social constructionist perspective and examines how constructions of a genre formation of jazz are characterised by ideas about the social. It is argued that ‘characterisations of jazz’ are central to such genre-definitions and are as tightly bound to social context......This article reconsiders the definition of jazz as a case study in relation to how a musical genre is constituted through narratives of culture and identity in musical culture. Rethinking the definition of jazz as a way of characterisation through a social constructionist approach, this article...

  8. "Doctor Jazz": Lessons that medical professionals can learn from jazz musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ark, Allard E; Wijnen-Meijer, Marjo

    2018-04-24

    The worlds of a physician and a jazz musician seem entirely different. Various studies, however, relating the concepts behind jazz music to medical practice and education, have been published. The aim of this essayistic review is to summarize previously described concepts behind jazz music and its required artistic skills that could be translated to medicine, encouraging doctors, medical students and medical educators to see their professional environment from a different perspective. A systematic search was conducted using PubMed, Embase, and ERIC databases, combining keywords with regard to jazz, medicine and medical education. Background information concerning jazz music and several jazz musicians was retrieved through an additional nonsystematic search using Google Scholar. Lessons with regard to improvisational skills, both in communication with patients and in a technical context, communication skills, leadership, interprofessional teamwork and coping with errors are presented. Doctors and medical students could learn various lessons from jazz music performance and jazz musicians. The potential and the possibilities of implementing jazz into the medical curriculum, in order to contribute to the development of professional skills and attitudes of medical students, could be explored further.

  9. Anthropometry, somatotypes, and aerobic power in ballet, contemporary dance, and dancesport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liiv, Helena; Wyon, Matthew A; Jürimäe, Toivo; Saar, Meeli; Mäestu, Jarek; Jürimäe, Jaak

    2013-12-01

    This study compared anthropometric variables, somatotypes, and aerobic capacity between three groups of dancers: classical ballet dancers (M 33, F 56), contemporary dancers (M 28, F 109), and dancesport dancers (M 30, F 30). The assumption was that different functional requirements should produce differences in the anthropometric and aerobic capacity variables among the three groups. Anthropometric data for body mass index (BMI) and somatotypes were measured. Body fat percentage was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Maximal oxygen consumption and aerobic power were measured during an incremental treadmill test until exhaustion. Dancesport athletes were taller compared with same gender contemporary dancers (pballet dancers had a lower body mass and BMI compared with their contemporary dance and dancesport equivalents (pballet counterparts, while dancesport dancers are taller and heavier, less muscular, with slightly greater adioposity compared to the classical ballet dancers. Ballet dancers had the lowest body fat percentage, weight, and BMI values. Dancesport dancers had greater aerobic capacity than the ballet dancers. Based on this study, we conclude that dancers in these three styles differ in some aspects of anthropometric variables, somatotypes, and aerobic capacity, but we cannot say is it because of the training or selection or both.

  10. Differences of Ballet Turns ("Pirouette") Performance between Experienced and Novice Ballet Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Chen, Shing-Jye; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Hong-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the different postural control strategies exhibited by experienced and novice dancers in ballet turns ("pirouettes"). Method: Thirteen novice and 13 experienced dancers performed ballet turns with dominant-leg support. The peak push force was measured in the double-leg support phase. The inclination…

  11. Ballet as Somatic Practice: A Case Study Exploring the Integration of Somatic Practices in Ballet Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    This case study explores one teacher's integration of Alexander Technique and the work of neuromuscular retrainer Irene Dowd in ballet pedagogy to establish a somatic approach to teaching, learning, and performing ballet technique. This case study highlights the teacher's unique teaching method called IMAGE TECH for dancers (ITD) and offers…

  12. How to Stage a Jazz Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantz, Bart

    1982-01-01

    Describes how to organize a successful college jazz festival. The author discusses how to find funding, the importance of getting good musical clinicians and star attractions, and the use of media to promote the festival. (AM)

  13. Konkurss "Sony Jazz Stage" otsib uusi talente

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    The Contemporary Music Centre'i korraldatavast konkursist "Sony Jazz Stage 2006". Võistlus toimub vokaali ja bassi (basskitarri või kontrabassi) kategoorias (The Contemporary Music Centre'i posti-või meiliaadress - vt. www.jazzkaar.ee)

  14. IMPROVING STUDENTS‟ PRONUNCIATION USING JAZZ CHANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primanda Dewanti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As a habit, language needs to be used repeatedly. Jazz chants provides repeated and rhythmical words and sentences which are easily memorized. Due to the fact mentioned, Jazz chants can be considered to be used in conducting the activities enhancing the students‘ pronunciation accuracy. This study aims to analyze (1 whether Jazz chants can improve students‘ pronunciation accuracy, and (2 the advantages of the Jazz chants implementation to improve students‘ pronunciation. This research was conducted in the first semester students of Diploma 3 of Economy and Business Faculty of a university in Surakarta. The action research was conducted in two cycles comprising three meetings in each cycle. The research procedures used in this research are planning, acting, observing, and reflecting. The writer applied observation, interview, questionnaire, and test to collect the data. The quantitative data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, while the qualitative ones by Interactive Model. The research results in the conclusions, including: (1 Jazz chants could improve students‘ pronunciation in terms of stress, intonation, and connected speech and (2 Jazz chants is beneficial that it stimulates the class to be more active, improves motivation, and supports students‘ memory.

  15. Neurological problems of jazz legends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L

    2009-08-01

    A variety of neurological problems have affected the lives of giants in the jazz genre. Cole Porter courageously remained prolific after severe leg injuries secondary to an equestrian accident, until he succumbed to osteomyelitis, amputations, depression, and phantom limb pain. George Gershwin resisted explanations for uncinate seizures and personality change and herniated from a right temporal lobe brain tumor, which was a benign cystic glioma. Thelonious Monk had erratic moods, reflected in his pianism, and was ultimately mute and withdrawn, succumbing to cerebrovascular events. Charlie Parker dealt with mood lability and drug dependence, the latter emanating from analgesics following an accident, and ultimately lived as hard as he played his famous bebop saxophone lines and arpeggios. Charles Mingus hummed his last compositions into a tape recorder as he died with motor neuron disease. Bud Powell had severe posttraumatic headaches after being struck by a police stick defending Thelonious Monk during a Harlem club raid.

  16. The Effect of Conceptual Advancement in Jazz Music Selections and Jazz Experience on Musicians' Aesthetic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggiola, John C.

    2004-01-01

    This study is an investigation of what musicians consider to be their aesthetic experience with jazz music selections that vary in level of conceptual advancement (melodic complexity during improvised solos). Music major participants (N = 128) were assigned to either the jazz musician (n = 64) or nonjazz musician (n = 64) group. Data were gathered…

  17. Living Jazz, Learning Jazz: Thoughts on a Responsive Pedagogy of Early Childhood Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custodero, Lori A.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, jazz music is used as a lens through which early childhood music pedagogy is viewed, specifically thinking about swing and improvisation--the listening and responding to what is heard and seen, and the openness to possibility. These two concepts are defined by prominent jazz musicians and are traced in the child development…

  18. Professional Notes: Creativity in the Jazz Ensemble--Let's Get away from the Written Jazz Solo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Performing jazz offers students the opportunity to participate in a unique group activity where notated passages are blended with exciting moments of improvisation. Expectations have risen over the years as middle and high school jazz ensembles have proved that they can perform at a very high level. This expectation however, has led to the…

  19. High-Speed Imaging Analysis of Register Transitions in Classically and Jazz-Trained Male Voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippold, Sebastian; Voigt, Daniel; Richter, Bernhard; Echternach, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Little data are available concerning register functions in different styles of singing such as classically or jazz-trained voices. Differences between registers seem to be much more audible in jazz singing than classical singing, and so we hypothesized that classically trained singers exhibit a smoother register transition, stemming from more regular vocal fold oscillation patterns. High-speed digital imaging (HSDI) was used for 19 male singers (10 jazz-trained singers, 9 classically trained) who performed a glissando from modal to falsetto register across the register transition. Vocal fold oscillation patterns were analyzed in terms of different parameters of regularity such as relative average perturbation (RAP), correlation dimension (D2) and shimmer. HSDI observations showed more regular vocal fold oscillation patterns during the register transition for the classically trained singers. Additionally, the RAP and D2 values were generally lower and more consistent for the classically trained singers compared to the jazz singers. However, intergroup comparisons showed no statistically significant differences. Some of our results may support the hypothesis that classically trained singers exhibit a smoother register transition from modal to falsetto register. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. "Whole" Ballet Education: Exploring Direct and Indirect Teaching Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Euichang; Kim, Na-ye

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teaching methods for whole ballet in Korean ballet education. This study built upon a first phase of research that identified the educational content of "whole" ballet. Four dimensions were identified as the educational content: "physical," "cognitive," "emotional"…

  1. Negotiating the Gay Male Stereotype in Ballet and Modern Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polasek, Katherine M.; Roper, Emily A.

    2011-01-01

    Dance, ballet and modern in particular, is culturally defined as a feminine activity in the United States. The purpose of the present study was to examine the experiences of professional male modern and ballet dancers in the United States. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 current professional ballet and modern dancers. We examined…

  2. Laban Movement Analysis Approach to Classical Ballet Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittier, Cadence

    2006-01-01

    As a Certified Laban Movement Analyst and a classically trained ballet dancer, I consistently weave the Laban Movement Analysis/Bartenieff Fundamentals (LMA/BF) theories and philosophies into the ballet class. This integration assists in: (1) Identifying the qualitative movement elements both in the art of ballet and in the students' dancing…

  3. Male Ballet Dancers and Their Performances of Heteromasculinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltom, Trenton M.; Worthen, Meredith G. F.

    2014-01-01

    Although previous research has investigated men in feminized sports, we took a different approach in this study and examined men in ballet. Because ballet is one of the most highly gendercodified sports, male ballet dancers must negotiate their identities as men while performing a dance form that is highly stigmatized as effeminate. We…

  4. Feasibility Study for Ballet E-Learning: Automatic Composition System for Ballet "Enchainement" with Online 3D Motion Data Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umino, Bin; Longstaff, Jeffrey Scott; Soga, Asako

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on "Web3D dance composer" for ballet e-learning. Elementary "petit allegro" ballet steps were enumerated in collaboration with ballet teachers, digitally acquired through 3D motion capture systems, and categorised into families and sub-families. Digital data was manipulated into virtual reality modelling language (VRML) and fit…

  5. Toward a Feminist Ballet Pedagogy: Teaching Strategies for Ballet Technique Classes in the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterowitz, Gretchen

    2014-01-01

    Classical ballet technique is commonly taught through the use of authoritarian practices and normalizing aesthetic values, but the construction of the ballet dancer as a docile subject in opposition to an all-knowing instructor might impede ballet's progression. In this article I explore my development of a feminist or democratic ballet…

  6. Overuse Injuries in Professional Ballet: Injury-Based Differences Among Ballet Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, Francisco José; de la Cuadra, Crótida; Guillén, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Despite overuse injuries being previously described as the most frequent in ballet, there are no studies on professional dancers providing the specific clinical diagnoses or type of injury based on the discipline. Overuse injuries are the most frequent injuries in ballet, with differences in the type and frequency of injuries based on discipline. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study performed between January 1, 2005, and October 10, 2010, on injuries occurring in professional dancers from leading Spanish dance companies who practiced disciplines such as classical, neoclassical, contemporary, and Spanish ballet. Data, including type of injury, were obtained from specialized medical services at the Trauma Service, Fremap, Madrid, Spain. A total of 486 injuries were evaluated, a significant number of which were overuse disorders (P ballet (82.60%). Injuries were more frequent among female dancers (75.90%) and classical ballet (83.60%). A statistically significant prevalence of patellofemoral pain syndrome was found in the classical discipline (P = .007). Injuries of the adductor muscles of the thigh (P = .001) and of the low back facet (P = .02) in the Spanish ballet discipline and lateral snapping hip (P = .02) in classical and Spanish ballet disciplines were significant. Overuse injuries were the most frequent injuries among the professional dancers included in this study. The prevalence of injuries was greater for the most technically demanding discipline (classical ballet) as well as for women. Patellofemoral pain syndrome was the most prevalent overuse injury, followed by Achilles tendinopathy, patellar tendinopathy, and mechanical low back pain. Specific clinical diagnoses and injury-based differences between the disciplines are a key factor in ballet.

  7. Peer Mentoring in a High School Jazz Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The use of peer mentoring in a successful high school jazz band was explored during one academic year of instruction using ethnographic techniques. Participants included primary informants (student jazz band members, director, assistant director, adult mentors) and secondary informants (guidance counselor, principal, parents, non-jazz band member…

  8. Creativity and Learning Jazz: The Practice of "Listening"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Steven P.

    2008-01-01

    This article is about interaction, culture, and creativity. The ethnographic setting is a set of jazz performance classes at a California university. Although I write about jazz music, the reader need not have a background in studying or performing jazz (or music in general) to understand this article. In the title of the article, the term…

  9. Perceptions of Jazz Improvisation among Pennsylvania Music Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Jason Robert

    2010-01-01

    Jazz education has been a part of school music programs in the United States in both extracurricular and curricular settings since the 1920's. An enormous growth in the popularity of stage bands and jazz ensembles was experienced between the 1940's and 1980's resulting in a vibrant, widespread acceptance of jazz in the music curriculum (Luty,…

  10. Understanding the Experiences of Women in Jazz: A Suggested Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Jazz has long been recognized as a male-dominated field, with females traditionally having only limited acceptance, often in the roles of singer and pianist. Researchers have explored sources of the gender imbalance in the field of jazz and jazz education, but there is no theory or framework to organize such findings. This directed content…

  11. Birth of the School: Discursive Methodologies in Jazz Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyton, Tony

    2006-01-01

    Over recent years, jazz as an academic discipline has grown in volume and stature--indeed, jazz studies now plays a significant role in a number of higher education music programmes within the university and conservatoire sector. The proliferation of jazz education programmes has, inevitably, brought about the publication of specific pedagogical…

  12. Practiced musical style shapes auditory skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuust, Peter; Brattico, Elvira; Seppänen, Miia; Näätänen, Risto; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2012-04-01

    Musicians' processing of sounds depends highly on instrument, performance practice, and level of expertise. Here, we measured the mismatch negativity (MMN), a preattentive brain response, to six types of musical feature change in musicians playing three distinct styles of music (classical, jazz, and rock/pop) and in nonmusicians using a novel, fast, and musical sounding multifeature MMN paradigm. We found MMN to all six deviants, showing that MMN paradigms can be adapted to resemble a musical context. Furthermore, we found that jazz musicians had larger MMN amplitude than all other experimental groups across all sound features, indicating greater overall sensitivity to auditory outliers. Furthermore, we observed a tendency toward shorter latency of the MMN to all feature changes in jazz musicians compared to band musicians. These findings indicate that the characteristics of the style of music played by musicians influence their perceptual skills and the brain processing of sound features embedded in music. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Dinamika Kekuasaan dalam Komunitas Jazz Yogyakarta 2002-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oki Rahadianto Sutopo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies about jazz in Indonesia tend to generalize and hold a bias against narration from the mainstream, they do not see the different narration from micro scope. Using Yogyakarta jazz community as an entry point, this study shows that jazz community is not a single entity, rather, it involved various identities including educational as well as social background. This paper also indicates contestation among different jazz community in Yogyakarta wich eventually shape the colour of jazz music in the city.

  14. Da den moderne jazz kom til Danmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Ole Izard; Nielsen, Anders H.U.

    som tog over, deriblandt Erik Moseholm, Bent Axen og Jørn Elniff. Denne bog forklarer, hvordan den moderne jazz kom til Danmark, og hvordan den udviklede det danske jazzmiljø. Den inddrager faktorer som udenlandske musikeres besøg, koncerter og efterfølgende jazzsessions. Hvilken betydning havde disse...... for den danske jazzudvikling? Hvor blev musikken spillet, og hvordan blev den behandlet af medierne og af samfundet? Sammen med beskrivelser af de vigtigste moderne jazzmusikere fra perioden, analyseres og beskrives en række indspilninger af moderne dansk jazz for at undersøge hvornår, og hvilke af de nye...

  15. Degenerative joint disease in female ballet dancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; Lim, L. S.; Poortman, A.; Strübbe, E. H.; Marti, R. K.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between long-term ballet dancing and eventual arthrosis of the hip, ankle, subtalar, and first metatarsophalangeal joint was examined in 19 former professional female dancers, aged 50 to 70 years. The dancers were compared with pair-matched controls. All 38 women underwent medical

  16. African Retentions in Blues and Jazz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Eddie S.

    1979-01-01

    The perseverance of African musical characteristics among American Blacks is an historic reality. African retentions have been recorded in Black music of the antebellum period. Various African scales and rhythms permeate Black American music today as evidenced in the retentions found in blues and jazz. (RLV)

  17. American Jazz Cathedra Enters into Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    <正> On the evening of 25 June, 2003, an American Music Cathedra was held in the In ternational Friendship Hall of Beijing Jintai Art Museum. And its theme is "a form of American Art-Jazz". The Economic Department, Press Department of American Embassy and Beijing Jueshi Culture Development Co.Ltd. sponsored the activity.

  18. Imagem corporal e bailarinas profissionais Body image of professional ballet dancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Nogueira Haas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A imagem corporal é um tema que sempre está em evidência quando se aborda a dança em suas diferentes modalidades. A busca da imagem corporal ideal em bailarinas vai além dos parâmetros da população em geral e, na medida em que elas se tornam profissionais, a necessidade de manter o peso adequado vai aumentando. Este estudo tem como objetivo verificar o nível de satisfação de bailarinas de balé clássico e de dança jazz com sua imagem corporal, identificando as diferenças e semelhanças entre os dois grupos. Pretende-se ainda identificar semelhanças e diferenças no nível de satisfação com a imagem corporal de bailarinas clássicas de países diferentes. Trata-se de uma pesquisa de campo descritiva. A amostra foi composta por 15 bailarinas adultas profissionais de balé clássico e 16 bailarinas de dança jazz de Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil, e por nove bailarinas adultas profissionais radicadas em Nova Iorque, Estados Unidos. O instrumento utilizado para avaliar o nível de satisfação com a imagem corporal foi o Questionário de Imagem Corporal - BSQ, que mede o grau de preocupação com a forma do corpo, a autodepreciação devido à aparência física e a sensação de estar gordo. Os dados foram analisados com auxílio do programa estatístico SPSS 15.0. Para a comparação dos dados foram aplicados os testes Qui-quadrado e Anova, sendo considerados significativos valores de p Body image is an issue that is always in evidence when addressing different types of dance. The search for the ideal body image among dancers goes beyond the parameters of the general population and, as they become professionals, the need to maintain the appropriate weight increases. This study aims to verify the level of satisfaction of classical ballet dancers and jazz dancers with their body image, identifying differences and similarities between the two groups. Furthermore, similarities and differences in the level of satisfaction with body image of

  19. Goltsman Ballet avab oma hooaja Jõhvis / Irina Kiviselg

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kiviselg, Irina, 1961-

    2013-01-01

    Tantsutrupp Goltsman Ballet avab oma teise hooaja Jõhvi kontserdimajas tantsuetendusega "Siddhartha", mille idee toetub Hermann Hesse samanimelisele romaanile. Tantsutrupi juhendaja on Maria Goltsman

  20. Automatic Assessment of Acoustic Parameters of the Singing Voice: Application to Professional Western Operatic and Jazz Singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Claudia; Barbagallo, Davide; Baracca, Giovanna; Orlandi, Silvia; Bandini, Andrea; Dejonckere, Philippe H

    2015-07-01

    The obvious perceptual differences between various singing styles like Western operatic and jazz rely on specific dissimilarities in vocal technique. The present study focuses on differences in vibrato acoustics and in singer's formant as analyzed by a novel software tool, named BioVoice, based on robust high-resolution and adaptive techniques that have proven its validity on synthetic voice signals. A total of 48 professional singers were investigated (29 females; 19 males; 29 Western operatic; and 19 jazz). They were asked to sing "a cappella," but with artistic expression, a well-known musical phrase from Gershwin's Porgy and Bess, in their own style: either operatic or jazz. A specific sustained note was extracted for detailed vibrato analysis. Beside rate (s(-1)) and extent (cents), duration (seconds) and regularity were computed. Two new concepts are introduced: vibrato jitter and vibrato shimmer, by analogy with the traditional jitter and shimmer of voice signals. For the singer's formant, on the same sustained tone, the ratio of the acoustic energy in formants 1-2 to the energy in formants 3, 4, and 5 was automatically computed, providing a quality ratio (QR). Vibrato rates did not differ among groups. Extent was significantly larger in operatic singers, particularly females. Vibrato jitter and vibrato shimmer were significantly smaller in operatic singers. Duration of vibrato was also significantly longer in operatic singers. QR was significantly lower in male operatic singers. Some vibrato characteristics (extent, regularity, and duration) very clearly differentiate the Western operatic singing style from the jazz singing style. The singer's formant is typical of male operatic singers. The new software tool is well suited to provide useful feedback in a pedagogical context. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Schooling the Dancer: The Evolution of an Identity as a Ballet Dancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how young ballet dancers' bodies are constructed and narrated through their desire to become performing ballet dancers. The schooling of the balletic body engages the young dancer in embodying the discipline of ballet and in developing a particular belief in a performing body. The embodied set of acquired dispositions that are…

  2. Freedom Now! Radical Jazz and Social Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Pluciński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Music is obviously not only an aesthetic phenomenon. It is embeddedin a dense network of social relations. However, its social involvementis rather ambiguous, particularly since the second half of the twentiethcentury. On the one hand, music is one of the main elements of culturalcapitalism and a part of the system of domination. On the other hand,music provokes, (coproduces or possibly strengthens and coexists witha number of counterdiscourses and social projects of counterhegemoniccharacter.The main objective of the paper is to examine relationships between both, revolutionary jazz and revolutionary social movements, namely the civil rights movement, but above all radical movements, especially black power movement. The crucial questions I am interested in are problems of selforganization, performative social practices, as well as alternatives elaborated by radical-oriented jazz circles in various social dimensions, for instance economic or symbolic.

  3. Musculoskeletal injuries in young ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanderson, Charlotte; Leanderson, Johan; Wykman, Anders; Strender, Lars-Erik; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Sundquist, Kristina

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries, site and type of injury, and the most common injury diagnoses in young ballet dancers at the Royal Swedish Ballet School, a public school in Stockholm. This retrospective study of 476 students (297 girls and 179 boys) aged 10-21 years was based on medical records for the period August 1988 to June 1995. Data on diagnosis, site of injury and type of injury were collected, and the injuries were classified as traumatic or due to overuse. In total, 438 injuries were recorded. The injury incidence rate was 0.8 per 1,000 dance hours in both female and male dancers and tended to increase with increasing age. Most injuries occurred as the result of overuse. Seventy-six per cent of all injuries occurred in the lower extremities. Ankle sprain was the most common traumatic diagnosis, while the most common overuse-related diagnosis was tendinosis pedis. A few gender differences were noted. The findings of this study suggest that there is a need to apply primary injury prevention in young ballet dancers. Future studies could aim to identify (1) injury risk factors and (2) injury prevention programmes that are effective at reducing injury rates in young dancers.

  4. Jazz talks: representations & self-representations of African American music and its musicians from bebop to free jazz

    OpenAIRE

    Mazman, Alper

    2010-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is the representation of jazz music and its musicians, and the ways in which American (black and white) critics, novelists, and musicians interpret this music from the development of bebop to free jazz. My aim is to reveal the complexities of the dialogue between white and black representations of jazz, as well as among the self-representations of African American musicians. To this end, I discuss the discourses of jazz that are embedded within the broader cultur...

  5. Empathy, Self-Esteem and Creativity among Junior Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalliopuska, Mirja

    This study examined the effect of the active pursuit of ballet as a hobby on personality. The study group consisted of 62 members of the junior ballet of the Finnish National Opera, ranging in age from 9 to 17 with the majority under 14. The dancers were given four self-esteem questionnaires which measured empathy, creativity, and other…

  6. Precision Teaching, Frequency-Building, and Ballet Dancing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokke, Gunn E. H.; Lokke, Jon A.; Arntzen, Erick

    2008-01-01

    This article reports the effectiveness of a brief intervention aimed at achieving fluency in basic ballet moves in a 9-year-old Norwegian girl by use of frequency-building and Precision Teaching procedures. One nonfluent ballet move was pinpointed, and instructional and training procedures designed to increase the frequency of accurate responding…

  7. Jazz Chants 到 China Chants——Jazz Chants教学法初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乐金马; 韩天霖

    2005-01-01

    @@ 约30年前,纽约大学Carolyn Graham教授创建了英语作为第二语言和外语(ESL/EFL)的教学方法:Jazz Chants.①自1978年以来,Graham出版了多本以Jazz Chants教学法为指导而编写的教材,她的chants还出现在其他许多著名英语教材和词典里.

  8. Novel Music Segmentation Interface and the Jazz Tune Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez López, M.E.; Bountouridis, D.; Volk, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present MOSSA, an easy-to-use interface for mobile devices, developed to annotate the segment structure of music. Moreover, we present the jazz tune collection (JTC), a database of 125 Jazz melodies annotated using MOSSA, and developed specifically for benchmarking of computational

  9. Relationships among Selected Practice Behaviours and Achievement in Jazz Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the practice strategies that collegiate music majors chose to employ in preparing for a jazz improvisation performance, and the relationships among selected practice behaviours and achievement in instrumental jazz improvisation. Participants for the study (N = 62) were enrolled as music majors…

  10. Memorization by a Jazz Musician: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noice, Helga; Jeffrey, John; Noice, Tony; Chaffin, Roger

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the memory strategies of jazz musicians, we videotaped an experienced jazz pianist as he learned a new bebop piece. He had not previously heard a recording of the selection, nor had he seen the written music. The pianist provided detailed reports of the musical structure and the types of cues he used as landmarks to guide his…

  11. Jazz Leader Helps a Band Take Giant Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelderman, Eric

    2008-01-01

    This article profiles Neil Slater, the longtime leader of the jazz program at the University of North Texas who encouraged both musical perfection and artistic freedom among his star pupils. Standards are high at North Texas, which has become a Camelot where aspiring jazz musicians have come to hone their skills since 1947, when it offered one of…

  12. Jazz Researchers: Riding the Dissonance of Pedagogy and Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozenski, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing from a two-year ethnographic study, this article establishes jazz as an epistemological metaphor for critical participatory action research. The author juxtaposes the tensions inherent in jazz music and critical participatory research methodologies to provide a framework for understanding how dissonance can become a productive element for…

  13. Development of a Rubric for Collegiate Jazz Improvisation Performance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kendall Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a jazz improvisation rubric for the evaluation of collegiate jazz improvisation. To create this measure, research objectives were devised to investigate the aurally-observed performer-controlled components of improvisation, which aurally-observed components should be evaluated in an improvisatory…

  14. Generating Ideas in Jazz Improvisation: Where Theory Meets Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Idea generation is an integral component of jazz improvising. This article merges theoretical origins and practical experiences through the examination of two seminal works from Pressing and Sudnow. A comparative analysis yields three common sources with distinct characteristics. The greater body of jazz literature supports this potential link…

  15. Cosmic Ballet or Devil's Mask?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Stars like our Sun are members of galaxies, and most galaxies are themselves members of clusters of galaxies. In these, they move around among each other in a mostly slow and graceful ballet. But every now and then, two or more of the members may get too close for comfort - the movements become hectic, sometimes indeed dramatic, as when galaxies end up colliding. ESO PR Photo 12/04 shows an example of such a cosmic tango. This is the superb triple system NGC 6769-71, located in the southern Pavo constellation (the Peacock) at a distance of 190 million light-years. This composite image was obtained on April 1, 2004, the day of the Fifth Anniversary of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT). It was taken in the imaging mode of the VIsible Multi-Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on Melipal, one of the four 8.2-m Unit Telescopes of the VLT at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). The two upper galaxies, NGC 6769 (upper right) and NGC 6770 (upper left), are of equal brightness and size, while NGC 6771 (below) is about half as bright and slightly smaller. All three galaxies possess a central bulge of similar brightness. They consist of elderly, reddish stars and that of NGC 6771 is remarkable for its "boxy" shape, a rare occurrence among galaxies. Gravitational interaction in a small galaxy group NGC 6769 is a spiral galaxy with very tightly wound spiral arms, while NGC 6770 has two major spiral arms, one of which is rather straight and points towards the outer disc of NGC 6769. NGC 6770 is also peculiar in that it presents two comparatively straight dark lanes and a fainter arc that curves towards the third galaxy, NGC 6771 (below). It is also obvious from this new VLT photo that stars and gas have been stripped off NGC 6769 and NGC 6770, starting to form a common envelope around them, in the shape of a Devil's Mask. There is also a weak hint of a tenuous bridge between NGC 6769 and NGC 6771. All of these features testify to strong gravitational interaction between the three galaxies

  16. Development and Validation of a Rating Scale for Wind Jazz Improvisation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derek T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct and validate a rating scale for collegiate wind jazz improvisation performance. The 14-item Wind Jazz Improvisation Evaluation Scale (WJIES) was constructed and refined through a facet-rational approach to scale development. Five wind jazz students and one professional jazz educator were asked to record…

  17. Race, history, and black British jazz

    OpenAIRE

    Toynbee, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article traces the history of black British jazz across five moments from 1920 to the present. It also makes a theoretical argument about the nature of race and its connection both with music and belonging to the nation. Race is indeed a musical-discursive construction, as has been argued in the literature about culture and ethnicity over the last thirty years or so. But it is a social structure too, and the contradictions that result are key to understanding the race-music relationship.

  18. Jazz improvisers’ shared understanding: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Schober

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To what extent and in what arenas do collaborating musicians need to understand what they are doing in the same way? Two experienced jazz musicians who had never previously played together played three improvisations on a jazz standard (It Could Happen to You on either side of a visual barrier. They were then immediately interviewed separately about the performances, their musical intentions, and their judgments of their partner’s musical intentions, both from memory and prompted with the audiorecordings of the performances. Statements from both (audiorecorded interviews as well as statements from an expert listener were extracted and anonymized. Two months later, the performers listened to the recordings and rated the extent to which they endorsed each statement. Performers endorsed statements they themselves had generated more often than statements by their performing partner and the expert listener; their overall level of agreement with each other was greater than chance but moderate to low, with disagreements about the quality of one of the performances and about who was responsible for it. The quality of the performances combined with the disparities in agreement suggest that, at least in this case study, fully shared understanding of what happened is not essential for successful improvisation. The fact that the performers endorsed an expert listener’s statements more than their partner’s argues against a simple notion that performers’ interpretations are always privileged relative to an outsider’s.

  19. Jazz improvisers' shared understanding: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Michael F; Spiro, Neta

    2014-01-01

    To what extent and in what arenas do collaborating musicians need to understand what they are doing in the same way? Two experienced jazz musicians who had never previously played together played three improvisations on a jazz standard ("It Could Happen to You") on either side of a visual barrier. They were then immediately interviewed separately about the performances, their musical intentions, and their judgments of their partner's musical intentions, both from memory and prompted with the audiorecordings of the performances. Statements from both (audiorecorded) interviews as well as statements from an expert listener were extracted and anonymized. Two months later, the performers listened to the recordings and rated the extent to which they endorsed each statement. Performers endorsed statements they themselves had generated more often than statements by their performing partner and the expert listener; their overall level of agreement with each other was greater than chance but moderate to low, with disagreements about the quality of one of the performances and about who was responsible for it. The quality of the performances combined with the disparities in agreement suggest that, at least in this case study, fully shared understanding of what happened is not essential for successful improvisation. The fact that the performers endorsed an expert listener's statements more than their partner's argues against a simple notion that performers' interpretations are always privileged relative to an outsider's.

  20. Lumbosacral pain in ballet school students. Pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drężewska, Marlena; Śliwiński, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    The unique biomechanical demands placed on ballet students predispose to injury and pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of lumbosacral pain in ballet school students and to identify possible risk factors for the pain. The study group comprised 71 ballet school students, including 45 females and 26 males, aged 15-18 years (mean 16.5 years). In order to identify possible risk factors for pain, a survey was conducted, the angle of sacral bone inclination was measured using a mechanical inclinometer and the BMI was calculated. A VAS scale was used for a subjective assessment of pain intensity. Low back pain was reported by 44 patients (62%). A comparison of sacral inclination angles in a position with the feet placed parallel and in the turnout position showed statistically significant changes in the angle among respondents reporting pain (p ballet school stu dents can increase the risk of lumbosacral pain.

  1. Premature Growth Plate Closure in a Ballet Dancer en Pointe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Selina

    2017-09-01

    A 13-year-old ballet dancer who had been dancing en pointe (on the tips of the toes) since 10 years presented to the clinic with a shortened right second toe. She had no previous history of pain or trauma. She was diagnosed with premature growth arrest of the second metatarsal head physes resulting in a shortened metatarsal. This is the first reported case of premature growth arrest in a ballet dancer as a result of dancing en pointe.

  2. Differences of ballet turns (pirouette) performance between experienced and novice ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Chen, Shing-Jye; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Hong-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Feng

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the different postural control strategies exhibited by experienced and novice dancers in ballet turns (pirouettes). Thirteen novice and 13 experienced dancers performed ballet turns with dominant-leg support. The peak push force was measured in the double-leg support phase. The inclination angles of rotation axis with respect to vertical axis were calculated in the early single-leg support phase as well as the initiation sequence of ankle, knee, and hip joints on the supporting leg. Moreover, the anchoring index of the head was computed in the transverse plane during turning. The novice dancers applied a greater push force, an increased inclination angle of rotation axis, and an insufficient proximal-to-distal extension sequence pattern. The novice dancers also had a smaller head-anchoring index compared with experienced dancers, which meant novice dancers were not using a space target as a stability reference. A poorer performance in novice dancers could result from higher push force in propulsion, lack of a "proximal-to-distal extension sequence" pattern, and lack of visual spotting for postural stability. Training on sequential initiation of lower-extremity joints and rehearsal of visual spotting are essential for novice dancers to obtain better performance on ballet turns.

  3. Les mots du jazz. Retour(s) sur Le Jazz, d'André Schaeffner et André Coeuroy

    OpenAIRE

    Roueff , Olivier

    2001-01-01

    International audience; Le Jazz by André Schaeffner and André Cœuroy (1926), the first learned analysis of jazz, signaled an important phase in the reinvention of this music in France, since, through the debates it sparked at the time, it helped change jazz’s identity from an « American » to a « Black American » music with African « roots ». Cœuroy and Schaeffner referred to sorts of music that jazz criticism would have throw out of its pantheon, but their analyses would form the major grids ...

  4. Epidemiological Review of Injury in Pre-Professional Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Dennis; Goodwin, Brett J; Caine, Caroline G; Bergeron, Glen

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to provide an epidemiological review of the literature concerning ballet injuries affecting pre-professional ballet dancers. The literature search was limited to published peer-reviewed reports and involved an extensive examination of Scopus, SPORTDiscus, and CINAHL. The following search terms were used in various combinations: ballet, injury, epidemiology, risk factor, pre-professional, and intervention. Additional citations were located using the ancestry approach. Unlike some other athletic activities that have been the focus of recent intervention research, there is a paucity of intervention and translational research in pre-professional ballet, and sample sizes have often been small and have not accounted for the multivariate nature of ballet injury. Exposure-based injury rates in this population appear similar to those reported for professional ballet dancers and female gymnasts. A preponderance of injuries affect the lower extremity of these dancers, with sprains and strains being the most frequent type of injury reported. The majority of injuries appear to be overuse in nature. Injury risk factors have been tested in multiple studies and indicate a variety of potential injury predictors that may provide useful guidance for future research.

  5. Book review: Musical echoes: South African women thinking in jazz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Title: Musical echoes: South African women thinking in jazz. Author: Muller, Carol and Sathima, Bea Benjamin. Publisher: Duke University Press. Publication year: 2011. ISBN 978-0-8223-4914-3 ...

  6. A generative representation for the evolution of jazz solos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäckman, Kjell; Dahlstedt, Palle

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a system developed to create computer based jazz improvisation solos. The generation of the improvisation material uses interactive evolution, based on a dual genetic representation: a basic melody line representation, with energy constraints ("rubber band") and a hierarchic...... developed for this specific type of music. This is the first published part of an ongoing research project in generative jazz, based on probabilistic and evolutionary strategies....

  7. WORKING WITH JAZZ PERCUSSIONISTS IN THE VIBRAPHONE CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BEREZOVICOVA TATIANA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article approaches some aspects of teaching students whose major is light music and jazz instruments (percus­sion instruments in the vibraphone class. The authors examine problems specific to studying the vibraphone by the percussion­ist that work in the field of light music and jazz such as setting the interpretative apparatus, forming the repertoire, overcoming some technical difficulties in the process of assimilating the instructive-didactic programme etc.

  8. "Telling a Story." On the Dramaturgy of Monophonic Jazz Solos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Frieler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The metaphor of storytelling is widespread among jazz performers and jazz researchers. However, little is known about the precise meaning of this metaphor on an analytical level. The present paper attempts to shed light on the connected semantic field of the metaphor and relate it to its musical basis by investigating time courses of selected musical elements and features in monophonic jazz improvisations. Three explorative studies are carried out using transcriptions of 299 monophonic jazz solos from the Weimar Jazz Database. The first study inspects overall trends using fits of quadratic polynomials onto loudness and pitch curves. The second study does the same using selected features related to intensity, tension and variability over the course of phrases in the solos. The third study examines the distribution of the relative positions of various improvisational ideas in a subset of 116 solos. Results show that certain trends can be found, but not to a large extent. Significant trends most often display arch-shaped curves as expected from classical dramatic models. This is also in accordance with the fact that expressive improvisational ideas are more often found in the last part of a solo, while more relaxed ideas occur earlier. All in all, jazz improvisations show a wide range of variation and no single overarching dramatic model could be identified.

  9. Creativity and personality in classical, jazz and folk musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, Mathias; Borovnjak, Barbara; Neubauer, Aljoscha C; Kruse-Weber, Silke

    2014-06-01

    The music genre of jazz is commonly associated with creativity. However, this association has hardly been formally tested. Therefore, this study aimed at examining whether jazz musicians actually differ in creativity and personality from musicians of other music genres. We compared students of classical music, jazz music, and folk music with respect to their musical activities, psychometric creativity and different aspects of personality. In line with expectations, jazz musicians are more frequently engaged in extracurricular musical activities, and also complete a higher number of creative musical achievements. Additionally, jazz musicians show higher ideational creativity as measured by divergent thinking tasks, and tend to be more open to new experiences than classical musicians. This study provides first empirical evidence that jazz musicians show particularly high creativity with respect to domain-specific musical accomplishments but also in terms of domain-general indicators of divergent thinking ability that may be relevant for musical improvisation. The findings are further discussed with respect to differences in formal and informal learning approaches between music genres.

  10. Mihail Jora, creator of Romanian ballet prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lava BRATU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea to use in the ballet performances topics related to the Romanian music and life came through Mihail Jora’s creations: „La piaţă” (1928, „Demoazela Măriuţa” (1940, „Curtea Veche” (1948, „Când strugurii se coc” (1953, „Întoarcerea din adâncuri” (1959, „Hanul Dulcineea” (1966. His works are characterized by creative force, subtlety and staging gift that have turned the trivial into art. The dramatic sense, the picturesque force, the complex rhythm, the harmonious coloring, the conducting talent and the gentle use of sounds as well as the modern aesthetic vision - all speak about an artistic personality of an extraordinary originality.

  11. Eating disorders among classic ballet dancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayara Freitas Monteiro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the prevalence of eating disorders symptoms among classical ballet dancers. Methods: This is an analytical, observational, cross-sectional study, conducted in 2009, that investigated eating disorder symptoms using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 and Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh (BITE. The body image of the study population was assessed by the Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ. In addition, the anthropometric assessment was performed – measurement of weight, height and skin folds, calculation of body mass index (BMI and body fat percentage. Results: Of all the 139 emale adolescents assessed, 4.4% (n=6 had nutrition problems and 23% (n=23 presented abnormal values of body fat. The analysis of the EAT concluded that 12.3% (n=17 of the girls presented positive results for anorexia nervosa (AN. The BITE results showed that 13.7% (n=19 ofthe girls had unusual eating habits and 6.5% (n=9 presented subclinical bulimia nervosa (BN. As for severity, 3.6% (n=5 of the girls presented clinically significant results and 1.4% (n=2 were diagnosed with high severity. Concerning the results of the BSQ, 15.7% (n=21 of the girls were slightly concerned about body image; 5.2% (n=7 were moderately worried, and 6.7% (n=9 were severely concerned about it. Conclusion: This study did not diagnose the occurrence of eating disorders but found symptoms of AN (Anorexia Nervosa and BN (Bulimia Nervosa. Its main purpose was to alert about the prevalence of the possible development of eating disorders due to the influences of the environment where the teenagers are inserted – under a model defined by the classic ballet dance and the psychological turmoil of adolescence. doi:10.5020/18061230.2013.p396

  12. The Influences of an Exemplary Ballet Teacher on Students' Motivation: "The Finnish Way"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Joey

    2017-01-01

    This ethnographic case story aims to illuminate the instructional practices and decisions of an exemplary ballet teacher, Minna Stenvall at the Finnish National Opera Ballet School. Minna is considered to be exemplary in her field because she received the Best Ballet Pedagogue Award in 2014. Spurred on by the literature on the significant role…

  13. Reflective Practice in the Ballet Class: Bringing Progressive Pedagogy to the Classical Tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    This research seeks to broaden the dialogue on progressive ballet pedagogy through an examination of reflective practices in the ballet class. Ballet's traditional model of instruction has long required students to quietly comply with the pedagogue's directives, and it has thus become notorious for promoting student passivity. Despite strong…

  14. 'Disease is unrhythmical': jazz, health, and disability in 1920s America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Russell L

    2011-01-01

    The 1920s in the United States are commonly remembered as the Jazz Age. Although historians have focused on the African American origins of the music, another theme was also prominent in the public discourse surrounding jazz: disability. Critics saw jazz and its associated dances as defective, causing both mental and physical impairments in their devotees. In other words, jazz music and dance were disabled and disabling. Proponents of jazz responded in kind, asserting that jazz did not cause impairments, it cured them; similarly, jazz was not defective music or dance, but a revitalisation of the art forms. On the one hand, these reactions might have been expected, given the long history of belief in a relationship between music and health. However, the importance of health issues such as eugenics and rehabilitation in the 1920s also clearly influenced the responses of opinion leaders, politicians, academics, music professionals, and others to jazz music and dance.

  15. Om beatlitteraturens repræsentationer af jazz: Bidrag til en rekonstruktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Fabian

    2004-01-01

    Jazz, rock, litteratur, populærkultur, raceidentitet, kulturteori, beargenerationen, Jack Kerouac, Charlie Parker, Bob Dylan......Jazz, rock, litteratur, populærkultur, raceidentitet, kulturteori, beargenerationen, Jack Kerouac, Charlie Parker, Bob Dylan...

  16. "Tallinn Jazz Weekend" tõi kultuuripealinna Euroopa jazzielu korraldajad / Marje Ingel, Joosep Sang

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ingel, Marje

    2011-01-01

    Jazziorganisatsioonist Europe Jazz Network ja selle aastakonverentsist Tallinnas ning J. Sang selle raames Von Krahli teatris toimunud Tallinn Jazz Weekendi eesti jazzmuusika showcase-festivalist lühidalt

  17. Will Jazz Survive? Thoughts on the State of the Great American Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Playthell

    1983-01-01

    Jazz is undoubtedly the great North American contribution to art, yet this art form is undermined by the White music elite which chooses instead to support institutions that perpetuate European music. When jazz is given attention in the mass media, both its Black origins and the great Black jazz artists are largely ignored. (GC)

  18. Beyond borders : broadening the artistic palette of (composing) improvisers in jazz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de D.P.

    2017-01-01

    In this on-line dissertation, jazz saxophonist Dick de Graaf investigates a variety of compositional and improvisational models and techniques in contemporary jazz and Western art music, and discusses possible applications of these materials in current jazz practices. The study includes

  19. Charting Future Directions for Research in Jazz Pedagogy: Implications of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kevin E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper surveys and evaluates extant empirical research in jazz pedagogy. Investigations in the following areas are addressed: (a) variables that predict achievement in jazz improvisation; (b) content analyses of published instructional materials; (c) effectiveness of pedagogical methods; (d) construction and evaluation of jazz improvisation…

  20. The Occupational Aspirations and Expectations of College Students Majoring in Jazz Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devroop, Karendra

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the occupational aspirations and occupational expectations of college students majoring in jazz studies in the United States. Participants included the population of jazz studies majors (N = 211) at a large mid-southern university known for its prestigious and internationally recognized jazz program. A…

  1. Instrumental Jazz Improvisation Development: Characteristics of Novice, Intermediate, and Advanced Improvisers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, C. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the role aural imitation ability, jazz theory knowledge, and personal background variables play in the development of jazz improvisation achievement. Participants (N = 70) included 26 high school and 44 college instrumentalists with varying degrees of jazz improvisation experience. Data were…

  2. BALLET FOR CHILDREN AT THE SERBIAN NATIONAL THEATRE IN NOVI SAD (1972-2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenka Savić

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ballets for children have been recognized as a unique genre of the dance art. From the point of children ballet production of the Yugoslav ballet assembly very little was documented, and this particularly referred to the Serbian production. Children‘s ballets aim to provide an experience for young people, to educate on dance art and to attract, engage and sustain children as an audience for major ballet houses. They challenge a whole range of difficultes and problems that have to be solved by the choreographers and dancers. For example, the first major challenge in taking children to the ballet is that the story is told entirely through dance, and many children find this aspect of the ballet difficult to appreciate. The author examined the representations of the ballet body and analyzed how this and some other difficulties have been solved in children‘s ballet production of the Serbian National Theatre Ballet (SNP in Novi Sad during the long period of forty five years, from the first performances in 1972 up to now, namely to 2017. In addition, the author has made an inventory by listing repertoir, choreografies, and stories. She was tracking the number of performances for each production and the number of audience to conclude on the impact of the children‘s ballet. The implication of the paper is that the possibile solutions referred to in the paper could be seen as a suggestion for the future opportunities of the production, particularly in the case of the future premieres.

  3. Jazz musicians reveal role of expectancy in human creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przysinda, Emily; Zeng, Tima; Maves, Kellyn; Arkin, Cameron; Loui, Psyche

    2017-12-01

    Creativity has been defined as the ability to produce work that is novel, high in quality, and appropriate to an audience. While the nature of the creative process is under debate, many believe that creativity relies on real-time combinations of known neural and cognitive processes. One useful model of creativity comes from musical improvisation, such as in jazz, in which musicians spontaneously create novel sound sequences. Here we use jazz musicians to test the hypothesis that individuals with training in musical improvisation, which entails creative generation of musical ideas, might process expectancy differently. We compare jazz improvisers, non-improvising musicians, and non-musicians in the domain-general task of divergent thinking, as well as the musical task of preference ratings for chord progressions that vary in expectation while EEGs were recorded. Behavioral results showed for the first time that jazz musicians preferred unexpected chord progressions. ERP results showed that unexpected stimuli elicited larger early and mid-latency ERP responses (ERAN and P3b), followed by smaller long-latency responses (Late Positivity Potential) in jazz musicians. The amplitudes of these ERP components were significantly correlated with behavioral measures of fluency and originality on the divergent thinking task. Together, results highlight the role of expectancy in creativity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Jazz with the cosmos | CERN at the Montreux Jazz Festival | 12 July

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    CERN will be participating in the Montreux Jazz Festival again this year with "The Physics of Music and the Music of Physics" at the Petit Palais on 12 July. The event, which is also part of CERN's 60th anniversary schedule, brings the music of the LHC, the Higgs boson, and the distant cosmos.   The Physics of Music and the Music of Physics Petit Palais, Montreux Jazz Festival Saturday 12 July 2014 - 5.00 p.m.  Free Entrance - for more information, visit the event site You may not realise it but energetic cosmic rays are passing through your body every second. They are produced by the collision of high-energy charged particles with the Earth’s upper atmosphere. The particles come from events occurring all over our Universe, some of which happened billions of years ago. A little over 100 years ago, scientists started detecting these ‘cosmic rays’, finding that there were many more particles in our Universe than we originally th...

  5. Comparison of postural stability between injured and uninjured ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Lee, I-Jung; Liao, Jung-Hsien; Wu, Hong-Wen; Su, Fong-Chin

    2011-06-01

    Ballet movements require a limited base of support; thus, ballet dancers require a high level of postural control. However, postural stability in ballet dancers is still unclear and needs to be understood. To evaluate ballet dancers' postural stability in performing single-leg standing, the en pointe task, and the first and fifth positions and to determine differences in task performance among healthy nondancers, healthy dancers, and dancers with ankle sprains. Controlled laboratory study. Injured dancers, uninjured dancers, and nondancers were recruited for this study (N = 33 age-matched participants; n= 11 per group). The tasks tested were single-leg standing with eyes open and closed, first position, fifth position, and en pointe. Center of pressure parameters were calculated from the ground-reaction force collected with 1 force plate. Analysis of variance was used to assess the differences of center of pressure parameters among 3 groups in single-leg standing; independent t test was used to examine the differences of center of pressure parameters between injured and uninjured dancers. During single-leg standing, injured dancers had significantly greater maximum displacement in the medial-lateral direction and total trajectory of center of pressure, compared with the uninjured dancers and nondancers. During the first and fifth positions, the injured dancers demonstrated significantly greater standard deviation of center of pressure position in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions, compared with the uninjured dancers. During en pointe, the injured dancers had significantly greater maximum displacement in the medial-lateral direction and the anterior-posterior direction, compared with the uninjured dancers. The injured and uninjured dancers demonstrated differences in postural stability in the medial-lateral direction during single-leg standing and the ballet postures. Although the injured dancers received ballet training, their postural stability

  6. High notes: the role of drugs in the making of Jazz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Merrill; Mirhej, Greg

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the role played by illicit drugs, especially marijuana and heroin, in the historic development and evolution of Jazz in the United States during the twentieth century. In addition to an assessment of the extent of drug use and kinds of drugs used by Jazz musicians and singers, the impact and costs of drug use on the lives of people in Jazz, and the changing patterns of drug use during several eras of Jazz production, the paper contextualizes drug use among Jazz performers and societal response to it in light of prevailing ethnic inequalities and critical medical anthropological theory.

  7. Playing off the beat: Applying the jazz paradigm to psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David Read

    2018-02-01

    A jazz paradigm is applied to traditional psychotherapy practice, illuminating the links between psychotherapy and the Romantic aesthetic tradition, primarily in the centrality of concepts such as attunement. Modernist disruptions of realism during the early 20 th century, such as jazz, elaborated dissonant and improvisational artistic impulses that brought new vitality to their art forms. The psychotherapeutic relationship also has potential avenues for multilevel and discrepant communication that open possibilities of freedom. However, the limitations imposed by the single channel nature of comprehended language, compared with the capacity of artistic media to express multiple sensory information simultaneously, remain the most significant obstacle to dimensionalizing the psychotherapeutic dialogue. Psychotherapy may have much to gain from embracing some of the concepts underlying the jazz aesthetic. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nuclear power in the WEC partitions: Jazz and symphony - 5404

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncomble, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    The World Energy Council (WEC) has built two scenarios typified by characteristics, which, each from their own perspective, may comprehensively describe large parts of the world in 2050: the more consumer-driven Jazz scenario and the more voter-driven Symphony scenario. While scenarios are 'music based', they are completely different in nature. As an energy scenario, Jazz has a focus on energy equity with priority given to achieving individual access and affordability of energy through economic growth. As an energy scenario, Symphony has a focus on achieving environmental sustainability through internationally coordinated policies and practices. These scenarios are designed to help a range of stakeholders address the 'energy tri-lemma' of achieving environmental sustainability, energy security, and energy equity. The energy landscape we expect to see in 2050 will be quite different from how it looks today. Meeting future energy demand will be a key challenge. The world's population will increase from approximately 7 billion in 2013 to approximately 8.7 billion in the Jazz scenario and approximately 9.4 billion in the Symphony scenario in 2050, which is equal to a 26% increase (36% respectively). The WEC estimates that total primary energy supply (equal to consumption) will increase globally from 546 EJ (152 PWh) in 2010 to 879 EJ (144 PWh) in the Jazz scenario and 696 EJ (193 PWh) in the Symphony scenario in 2050. This corresponds to an increase of 61% in Jazz and 27% in Symphony. In WEC Scenarios to 2050, nuclear energy will contribute approximately 4% of total primary energy supply in Jazz in 2050 and 11% in Symphony - compared to 6% in 2010. More precisely, there is an increase of nuclear capacity (even in Jazz, thanks to demand increase) from 373 GW in 2010 to 481 GW (Jazz) or 884 GW (Symphony) in 2050. Electricity generation from renewable sources (RES-E) will increase around 4 to 5 times by 2050 in comparison to 2010

  9. Noise exposure of musicians of a ballet orchestra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Liang Qian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With over 70 dancers and its own orchestra, The National Ballet of Canada ranks amongst the world′s top dance companies. It performs three seasons annually: fall, winter and summer, plus many shows of Tchaikovsky′s Nutcracker. The 70-strong orchestra plays an average of 360 hours/year including rehearsals and performances. Rehearsals are held at two locations: one in a ballet rehearsal room with little or no absorption, and the other in an acoustically treated location. Performances are held in the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts in Toronto. The present survey was done at the request of the National Ballet, since the musicians complained of excessive sound levels and were concerned about possible hearing losses. The survey was performed using five dosimeters Quest Mod 300 during 10 performances of the ballet Romeo and Juliet by Sergei Prokofiev, deemed as the noisiest in the whole repertoire. Results of the survey indicate that the noise exposure levels from only the orchestra′s activities do not present risk of hearing loss. Exposure due to other musical activities was, however, not included.

  10. Stravinsky: Symphonies, Concertos, Ballets and other works / David S. Gutman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Gutman, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Stravinsky: Symphonies, Concertos, Ballets and other works. Gabriele Schnaut (sop), Peter Svensson (ten), Franz Grundheber (bar), Günther von Kannen (bass), Jean Piat (narr), Lydia Mordkovitch (vn), Geoffrey Tozer, Boris Berman (pfs), Suisse Romande Chamber Choir, Lausanne Pro Arte Choir, Brassus Choral Society, Suisse Romande Ochestra, Neeme Järvi. Chandos CD CHAN 9240

  11. Influences and Inspirations: The Ballet Designs of Sophie Fedorovitch

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Sophie Fedorovitch (1893-1953) had a formative influence on the designs of English ballet as it developed during the 1930s and 1940s. Trained as a painter, she was a Polish-born Russian who adopted England as her homeland. Reticent by nature, little is documented about Fedorovitch's life and work. This paper examines her sources of influence,…

  12. The Body as a Tool: Professional Classical Ballet Dancers' Embodiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexias, George; Dimitropoulou, Elina

    2011-01-01

    This article is a qualitative study, which adopts the approach of social construction in order to comprehend the role played by the body in the formation of social behaviour. Using the concept of embodiment, professional ballet dancers have been chosen in order to investigate the particular attitude they form towards their bodies. The use of their…

  13. The Ballet Dancing Profession: A Career Transition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncaglia, Irina

    2008-01-01

    What type of emotional transition is experienced by professional dancers who face the end of their career? What does this journey imply? This article discusses the transition experiences of two case studies out of a total sample of fourteen (N = 14) international professional ballet dancers who left their careers between the ages of 21 and 49…

  14. Lower-limb proprioceptive awareness in professional ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Adam W; Riley, Michael A; Shockley, Kevin; Sitton, Candace A; Hewett, Timothy E; Cummins-Sebree, Sarah; Haas, Jacqui G

    2013-09-01

    Enhanced proprioceptive feedback strengthens synergistic muscle groups and stabilizes the coordination of limbs, thus contributing to the movement efficiency of ballet dancers. The present study compared lower-limb proprioceptive awareness in professional ballet dancers to matched controls who had no dance training. Two assessment methods were used to test the hypothesis that ballet dancers would demonstrate increased proprioceptive awareness in the ankle, knee, and hip: 1. a joint-position matching task to assess static proprioceptive joint awareness, and 2. an eyes-closed, quiet standing task to assess both static and dynamic proprioceptive awareness through measures of center of pressure (COP) variability. Results of the matching task indicated that the dancers exhibited greater proprioceptive awareness than controls for all three joints (p 0.05), whereas controls were less aware of their ankle position compared to their knee and hip joints (p 0.05). This indicates that quiet stance may have limited value as a means for evaluating proprioception. These findings provide preliminary evidence that enhanced proprioceptive awareness of lower limb joints should be considered as an evaluative criterion for dancers' ability to learn complex ballet skills. They also indicate that quiet standing tasks may not provide sufficient challenge for dancers' enhanced proprioceptive awareness to manifest.

  15. Calf Endurance and Achilles Tendon Structure in Classical Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellers, Jennifer A; van Ostrand, Katrina; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2017-06-15

    Optimal lower leg function is critical for ballet dancers to meet their occupational requirements. Achilles tendon injury is particularly detrimental to ballet dancers. While standardized measures have been validated and incorporated into clinical practice for use in people with Achilles tendon injury, normative ranges specific to the dancer population have not been described. The purpose of this pilot study was to observe the performance of pre-professional ballet students and professional ballet dancers on a well-established test battery for lower leg functional performance as well as ultra-sonographic evaluation of the structure of their Achilles tendons. The dancers in this study had significantly shorter Achilles tendons than non-dancers (p = 0.016). Dancers demonstrated significantly higher maximum heel-rise height on the heel-rise test for calf endurance (p < 0.001) but performed significantly less work than non-dancers (p = 0.014). The results of this study support the use of the heel-rise test as a tool for screening and to guide rehabilitation.

  16. Differentials in Turnout Among Professional Classical Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Isobel; Mayes, Susan; Ganderton, Charlotte; Pizzari, Tania

    2016-09-01

    Screening and training of professional dancers is commonly based around beliefs that a large range of turnout is more advantageous in the ballet industry. This belief leads dancers who have limited hip external rotation to compensate by forcing turnout at the knee and ankle, which has been linked to injury. To examine if there is a difference in degree of turnout between three levels of dancers (corps, soloist, principal) in a professional classical ballet company. An additional aim was to establish average values for the range of turnout and hip rotation present in the dancers. Forty-five professional dancers from The Australian Ballet (25 female, 20 male) participated in the study. Active and passive hip external rotation (hip ER) was measured in supine using inclinometers, and functional turnout in ballet first position (lower limb external rotation, LLER) was measured using foot traces utilising bony landmarks. Below-hip external rotation (BHER) was also calculated. No relationship was found among level of dancer and passive hip ER, active hip ER, LLER, and BHER. Professional dancers had on average 50.2° of passive hip ER range, 35.2° of active hip ER, and 133.6° of functional turnout position. In addition, no correlation was found between LLER and hip ER, but significant correlations were found between LLER and BHER. Hip rotation range of motion is similar across all levels of professional dancers. Average values for passive and active hip ER and functional turnout were established.

  17. Artistry or Mere Technique? The Value of the Ballet Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Geraldine

    2008-01-01

    In recent years there has been a remarkable proliferation of ballet competitions. This prompts a number of questions, in particular how much are they affecting current training and performance practice and, more fundamentally, whether the notion of competition may be antithetical to dance as art. Underlying these questions is the issue of…

  18. Anorexia athletica in pre-professional ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbrich, Laura; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Schneider, Nora

    2011-08-01

    Competitive sport has been under increasing discussion as a possible favourable factor in the development of eating disorders among children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of sport-specific eating disorders, in line with the concept of anorexia athletica. This prospective field study included one experimental group and two control groups (disease and healthy). Fifty-two pre-professional ballet dancers aged 13-20 years were tested for clinical eating disorders, anorexia athletica criteria, eating disorder related psychopathology and self-concept, and were compared with 52 patients with anorexia nervosa and 44 non-athletic controls of the same age. The study was conducted using semi-structured interviews as well as self-report questionnaires. A clinical eating disorder diagnosis was made in 1.9% of the ballet dancers versus 0% of the high school students; anorexia athletica was diagnosed in 5.8% of the dancers versus 2.3% of the students. Ballet dancers scored lower than patients with anorexia nervosa with regard to eating disorder related psychopathology and higher than the patients with regard to self-concept. We conclude that more sensitive tools to differentiate between sport-specific (eating) patterns, anorexia athletica and clinically relevant eating disorders are needed, especially for aesthetic sports such as ballet. It remains an important goal to identify athletes with symptoms of anorexia athletica irrespective of their physique and/or sport.

  19. Public Participation in Classical Ballet: A Special Analysis of the Ballet Data Collected in the 1982 and 1985 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Carol

    The 1982 and 1985 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) produced a national audience profile for classical ballet and explored factors that predispose participation in this art form. This monograph analyzed data from these surveys in terms of: (1) audience size and composition for live ballet performances; (2) television's role in…

  20. Incidence and Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injury in Ballet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Preston J.; Gerrie, Brayden J.; Varner, Kevin E.; McCulloch, Patrick C.; Lintner, David M.; Harris, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most published studies on injuries in the ballet dancer focus on the lower extremity. The rigors of this activity require special training and care. By understanding prevalence and injury pattern to the musculoskeletal system, targeted prevention and treatment for this population can be developed. Purpose To determine the incidence and prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries in ballet. Study Design Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods A systematic review registered with PROSPERO was performed using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Level 1 through 4 evidence studies reporting incidence of musculoskeletal injuries in male and female ballet dancers were included, with the numbers and types of injuries extracted from each. Injury rates were recorded and calculated based on professional status, sex, and nature of injury. Incidence was defined as number of injuries sustained over a specific time. Prevalence was defined as proportion of subjects with an injury at a given point in time. Results The studies analyzed reported injury incidence or prevalence in more than 1365 amateur and 900 professional dancers. The mean age was 16.2 years among amateur and 27.0 years among professional dancers. The incidence of injury among amateur dancers was 0.99 and 1.09 injuries per 1000 dance hours in males and females, respectively; 75% of injuries were overuse, with similar rates among males and females. In professional dancers, the incidence of injury was 1.06 and 1.46 injuries per 1000 dance hours in males and females, respectively, and 64% of female injuries were overuse, compared with 50% in males (P ballet dancers is 0.97 and 1.24 injuries per 1000 dance hours, respectively. The majority are overuse in both amateur and professional dancers, with amateur ballet dancers showing a higher proportion of overuse injuries than professionals (P < .001). Male professional dancers show a higher proportion of

  1. Using Jazz as a Metaphor to Teach Improvisational Communication Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Haidet

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Metaphor helps humans understand complex concepts by “mapping” them onto accessible concepts. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of using jazz as a metaphor to teach senior medical students improvisational communication skills, and to understand student learning experiences. The authors designed a month-long course that used jazz to teach improvisational communication. A sample of fourth-year medical students (N = 30 completed the course between 2011 and 2014. Evaluation consisted of quantitative and qualitative data collected pre- and post-course, with comparison to a concurrent control group on some measures. Measures included: (a Student self-reports of knowledge and ability performing communicative tasks; (b blinded standardized patient assessment of students’ adaptability and quality of listening; and (c qualitative course evaluation data and open-ended interviews with course students. Compared to control students, course students demonstrated statistically significant and educationally meaningful gains in adaptability and listening behaviors. Students’ course experiences suggested that the jazz components led to high engagement and creativity, and provided a model to guide application of improvisational concepts to their own communication behaviors. Metaphor proved to be a powerful tool in this study, partly through enabling increased reflection and decreased resistance to behaviors that, on the surface, tended to run counter to generally accepted norms. The use of jazz as a metaphor to teach improvisational communication warrants further refinement and investigation.

  2. Listeners' and performers' shared understanding of jazz improvisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Schober

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the extent to which a large set of musically experienced listeners share understanding with a performing saxophone-piano duo, and with each other, of what happened in three improvisations on a jazz standard. In an online survey, 239 participants listened to audio recordings of three improvisations and rated their agreement with 24 specific statements that the performers and a jazz-expert commenting listener had made about them. Listeners endorsed statements that the performers had agreed upon significantly more than they endorsed statements that the performers had disagreed upon, even though the statements gave no indication of performers' levels of agreement. The findings show some support for a more-experienced-listeners-understand-more-like-performers hypothesis: Listeners with more jazz experience and with experience playing the performers' instruments endorsed the performers' statements more than did listeners with less jazz experience and experience on different instruments. The findings also strongly support a listeners-as-outsiders hypothesis: Listeners' ratings of the 24 statements were far more likely to cluster with the commenting listener's ratings than with either performer's. But the pattern was not universal; particular listeners even with similar musical backgrounds could interpret the same improvisations radically differently. The evidence demonstrates that it is possible for performers' interpretations to be shared with very few listeners, and that listeners’ interpretations about what happened in a musical performance can be far more different from performers’ interpretations than performers or other listeners might assume.

  3. Correlated microtiming deviations in jazz and rock music.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Sogorski

    Full Text Available Musical rhythms performed by humans typically show temporal fluctuations. While they have been characterized in simple rhythmic tasks, it is an open question what is the nature of temporal fluctuations, when several musicians perform music jointly in all its natural complexity. To study such fluctuations in over 100 original jazz and rock/pop recordings played with and without metronome we developed a semi-automated workflow allowing the extraction of cymbal beat onsets with millisecond precision. Analyzing the inter-beat interval (IBI time series revealed evidence for two long-range correlated processes characterized by power laws in the IBI power spectral densities. One process dominates on short timescales (t < 8 beats and reflects microtiming variability in the generation of single beats. The other dominates on longer timescales and reflects slow tempo variations. Whereas the latter did not show differences between musical genres (jazz vs. rock/pop, the process on short timescales showed higher variability for jazz recordings, indicating that jazz makes stronger use of microtiming fluctuations within a measure than rock/pop. Our results elucidate principles of rhythmic performance and can inspire algorithms for artificial music generation. By studying microtiming fluctuations in original music recordings, we bridge the gap between minimalistic tapping paradigms and expressive rhythmic performances.

  4. "Jazz Ruuler" toob dzhässi Rock Cafesse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Muhu tulevikumuusika festival "Ju jääb" ja Rock Cafe avavad uue dzhässiürituste sarja "Jazz Ruuler", mille raames soovitakse igal kuul Eesti publiku ette tuua mõni maailma dzhässi tuntud artist. Kontserdist 24. jaan. Rock Cafés

  5. Descriptions of Improvisational Thinking by Artist-Level Jazz Musicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Thought processes of seven artist-level jazz musicians, each of whom recorded an improvised solo, were investigated. Immediately after completing their improvisations, participants listened to recordings of their playing and looked at the notation of their solos as they described in a directed interview the thinking processes that led to the…

  6. Exploring an Industry-Based Jazz Education Performance Training Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Derrin; Knight, Bruce Allen

    2010-01-01

    The Central Queensland Conservatorium of Music (CQCM) has maintained a partnership with Hamilton Island Enterprises (HIE) since 2002. As a part of this partnership, the Bachelor of Music (jazz & popular) students visit Hamilton Island (HI), an island resort located off the Australian east coast, four to six times annually to engage in 3 to 10…

  7. Descriptions of Improvisational Thinking by Developing Jazz Improvisers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Research investigating improvisational skill development in adolescent learners is scant. In this study interviews with developing jazz improvisers are used to characterize the skill-building process. The findings were considered in light of two views of skill learning. In one view, students progress through several discrete levels, while in a…

  8. Correlated microtiming deviations in jazz and rock music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogorski, Mathias; Geisel, Theo; Priesemann, Viola

    2018-01-01

    Musical rhythms performed by humans typically show temporal fluctuations. While they have been characterized in simple rhythmic tasks, it is an open question what is the nature of temporal fluctuations, when several musicians perform music jointly in all its natural complexity. To study such fluctuations in over 100 original jazz and rock/pop recordings played with and without metronome we developed a semi-automated workflow allowing the extraction of cymbal beat onsets with millisecond precision. Analyzing the inter-beat interval (IBI) time series revealed evidence for two long-range correlated processes characterized by power laws in the IBI power spectral densities. One process dominates on short timescales (t jazz vs. rock/pop), the process on short timescales showed higher variability for jazz recordings, indicating that jazz makes stronger use of microtiming fluctuations within a measure than rock/pop. Our results elucidate principles of rhythmic performance and can inspire algorithms for artificial music generation. By studying microtiming fluctuations in original music recordings, we bridge the gap between minimalistic tapping paradigms and expressive rhythmic performances.

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Method Books for Class Jazz Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kevin E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare instructional topics and teaching approaches included in selected class method books for jazz pedagogy through content analysis methodology. Frequency counts for the number of pages devoted to each defined instructional content category were compiled and percentages of pages allotted to each…

  10. Migration, Trauma, PTSD: A Gender Study in Morrison's Jazz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Leila Tafreshi; Yahya, Wan Roselezam Wan

    2014-01-01

    Toni Morrison is an acknowledged master of trauma literature, however trauma theory and a gender response to trauma remain largely unaccounted for her migration literature, specifically "Jazz" (1992). In her novel, two migrant women are affected by the same trauma, a crime of passion. But they choose different reactions and coping…

  11. A Proposed Model of Jazz Theory Knowledge Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Charles R.; Russell, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a hypothesized model that proposes a causal relationship between motivation and academic achievement on the acquisition of jazz theory knowledge. A reliability analysis of the latent variables ranged from 0.92 to 0.94. Confirmatory factor analyses of the motivation (standardized root mean square residual…

  12. Using Jazz as a Metaphor to Teach Improvisational Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidet, Paul; Jarecke, Jodi; Yang, Chengwu; Teal, Cayla R; Street, Richard L; Stuckey, Heather

    2017-08-04

    Metaphor helps humans understand complex concepts by "mapping" them onto accessible concepts. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of using jazz as a metaphor to teach senior medical students improvisational communication skills, and to understand student learning experiences. The authors designed a month-long course that used jazz to teach improvisational communication. A sample of fourth-year medical students ( N = 30) completed the course between 2011 and 2014. Evaluation consisted of quantitative and qualitative data collected pre- and post-course, with comparison to a concurrent control group on some measures. Measures included: (a) Student self-reports of knowledge and ability performing communicative tasks; (b) blinded standardized patient assessment of students' adaptability and quality of listening; and (c) qualitative course evaluation data and open-ended interviews with course students. Compared to control students, course students demonstrated statistically significant and educationally meaningful gains in adaptability and listening behaviors. Students' course experiences suggested that the jazz components led to high engagement and creativity, and provided a model to guide application of improvisational concepts to their own communication behaviors. Metaphor proved to be a powerful tool in this study, partly through enabling increased reflection and decreased resistance to behaviors that, on the surface, tended to run counter to generally accepted norms. The use of jazz as a metaphor to teach improvisational communication warrants further refinement and investigation.

  13. Jazz Musicians as Academic Leaders: Improvisation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Jazz musicians are unique individuals who seek to perform from a transcendental state in which tacit knowledge, teamwork, and communication blend to produce an effective performance. Academic leaders are also unique individuals who rely on communication to generate a sense of inclusion within a complex organization that at times epitomizes…

  14. Summer Workshop on Physics, Mathematics, and All That Quantum Jazz

    CERN Document Server

    Bando, Masamitsu; Güngördü, Utkan; Physics, Mathematics, and All That Quantum Jazz

    2014-01-01

    This book is a collection of contributions from a Summer Workshop on Physics, Mathematics, and All That Quantum Jazz . Subjects of the symposium include quantum information theory, quantum annealing, Bose gases, and thermodynamics from a viewpoint of quantum physics. Contributions to this book are prepared in a self-contained manner so that readers with a modest background may understand the subjects.

  15. Listeners' and Performers' Shared Understanding of Jazz Improvisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Michael F; Spiro, Neta

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which a large set of musically experienced listeners share understanding with a performing saxophone-piano duo, and with each other, of what happened in three improvisations on a jazz standard. In an online survey, 239 participants listened to audio recordings of three improvisations and rated their agreement with 24 specific statements that the performers and a jazz-expert commenting listener had made about them. Listeners endorsed statements that the performers had agreed upon significantly more than they endorsed statements that the performers had disagreed upon, even though the statements gave no indication of performers' levels of agreement. The findings show some support for a more-experienced-listeners-understand-more-like-performers hypothesis: Listeners with more jazz experience and with experience playing the performers' instruments endorsed the performers' statements more than did listeners with less jazz experience and experience on different instruments. The findings also strongly support a listeners-as-outsiders hypothesis: Listeners' ratings of the 24 statements were far more likely to cluster with the commenting listener's ratings than with either performer's. But the pattern was not universal; particular listeners even with similar musical backgrounds could interpret the same improvisations radically differently. The evidence demonstrates that it is possible for performers' interpretations to be shared with very few listeners, and that listeners' interpretations about what happened in a musical performance can be far more different from performers' interpretations than performers or other listeners might assume.

  16. Džässiklubis kõlab nu-jazz

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2010-01-01

    12. märtsil esineb Pärnu Endla Jazz-klubis nu-jazzi mängiv Eclectic Stories koosseisus Kristjan Mazurtchak (saksofon), Vladimir Võssotski (klahvpillid, elektroonika), Mihkel Mälgand (bass) ja Boris Hrebtukov (löökpillid)

  17. Reflections on Freirean Pedagogy in a Jazz Combo Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevock, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Paulo Freire was an important figure in adult education whose pedagogy has been used in music education. In this act of praxis (reflection and action upon the world in order to transform it), I share an autoethnography of my teaching of a university-level small ensemble jazz class. The purpose of this autoethnography was to examine my teaching…

  18. Trumpeting through the iron curtain: The breakthrough of jazz in socialist Yugoslavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučetić Radina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the Cold War, jazz became a powerful propaganda weapon in the battle for “hearts and minds”. As early as the 1950s, the American administration began its Cold War “jazz campaign”, by broadcasting the popular jazz radio show Music USA over the Voice of America, and by sending its top jazz artists on world tours. In this specific cultural Cold War, Yugoslavia was, as in its overall politics, in a specific position between the East and the West. The postwar period in Yugoslavia, following the establishment of the new (socialist government, was characterized by strong resistance towards jazz as “decadent” music, until 1948 when “no” to Stalin became “yes” to jazz. From the 1950s, jazz entered Yugoslav institutions and media, and during the following two decades, completely conquered the radio, TV, and record industry, as well as the manifestations such as the Youth Day. On account of the openness of the regime during the 1950s and 1960s, Yugoslavia was frequently visited by the greatest jazz stars, such as Dizzy Gillespie, Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald. In the context of the Cold War, the promotion of jazz in Yugoslavia proved to be beneficial for both sides - by exporting jazz, America also exported its freedom, culture and system of values, while Yugoslavia showed the West to what extent its political system was open and liberal, at least concerning this type of music.

  19. Overuse Injuries in Professional Ballet: Influence of Age and Years of Professional Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Sobrino, Francisco Jos?; Guill?n, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Background: In spite of the high rate of overuse injuries in ballet dancers, no studies have investigated the prevalence of overuse injuries in professional dancers by providing specific diagnoses and details on the differences in the injuries sustained as a function of age and/or years of professional practice. Hypothesis: Overuse injuries are the most prevalent injuries in ballet dancers. Professional ballet dancers suffer different types of injuries depending on their age and years of prof...

  20. Jazz als probleem. Receptie en acceptatie van de jazz in de wederopbouwperiode van Nederland 1945-1952

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinhout, G.W.H.

    2006-01-01

    After the liberation of The Netherlands in 1945 jazz went through a new start because it had been banned from the public sphere and forced to go and stay underground for most of the five years of German occupation. As a consequence of this the young generation was at a loss what to make of popular

  1. Postural adjustments in young ballet dancers compared to age matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iunes, Denise H; Elias, Iara F; Carvalho, Leonardo C; Dionísio, Valdeci C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to use photogrammetry to evaluate the posture of ballet practitioners compared to an age-matched control group. One hundred and eleven 7- to 24-year-old female volunteers were evaluated and were divided into two groups: the ballet practising group (n = 52) and the control group (n = 59), divided into three subgroups according to age and years of ballet experience. Dancers with 1-3 years experience compared to controls of the same age shows alterations in External Rotation Angle (P ballet experience, the Navicular Angle Left is smaller. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. National survey to evaluate musuloskeletal health in retired professional ballet dancers in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T O; de Medici, A; Oduoza, U; Hakim, A; Paton, B; Retter, G; Haddad, F S; Macgregor, A

    2017-01-01

    To explore the musculoskeletal health of retired professional ballet dancers in the United Kingdom (UK). Online national survey. Retired professional ballet dancers living in the UK. The survey explored: what musculoskeletal injuries or diseases are experienced by retired professional ballet dancers; which anatomical regions were affected by musculoskeletal injuries or diseases in retired professional ballet dancers; whether ballet dancers were forced to retire from professional ballet due to musculoskeletal injuries or disease. Forty-six retired ballet dancers responded. Thirty-six percent (n = 17) of respondents reported retiring from ballet due to musculoskeletal injury. The median age when respondents retired from professional ballet was 29 years. The most common issues that caused people to retire were hip and back pain (25%; n = 9 respectively), followed by hamstring injuries, ankle injuries, cervical spine injuries, and anterior knee pain (13% respectively; n = 5). Ninety-one percent (n = 42) reported experiencing muscle and joint pain post-retirement. Musculoskeletal pain and disease was a problem for respondents in this study. Further investigation is needed to define the problem, so management can be examined. Comparing performance and training regimes to injury rates in professional dancers, and then following these cohorts into retirement, would increase knowledge on this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Freedom of Expression and Rhetorical Art: The Problems of Avant-Garde Jazz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesconi, Robert

    Although the success of black jazz has been limited by its lack of recognition in the white-controlled music industry, its rhetorical development as an expression of black consciousness can be traced from the bebop of the 1940s and early 1950s, through the hard bop and free jazz of the 1960s, to the jazz orientation of the disco circuit in the…

  4. A critical reassessment of the reception of early jazz in Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Parsonage, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    The Original Dixieland Jazz Band's visit in 1919–1920 has been well documented as the beginning of jazz in Britain. This article illuminates a more complex evolution of the image and presence of jazz in Britain through consideration of the cultural and musical antecedents of the genre, including minstrel shows and black musical theatre, within the context of musical life in Britain in the late nineteenth to early twentieth centuries. The processes through which this evolution took place are c...

  5. The Influence of Injury Definition on Injury Burden in Preprofessional Ballet and Contemporary Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Sarah J; Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; Whittaker, Jackie L; Emery, Carolyn A

    2018-03-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Background Multiple operational definitions of injury exist in dance research. The influence that these different injury definitions have on epidemiological estimations of injury burden among dancers warrants investigation. Objective To describe the influence of injury definition on injury prevalence, incidence, and severity in preprofessional ballet and contemporary dancers. Methods Dancers registered in full-time preprofessional ballet (n = 85; 77 female; median age, 15 years; range, 11-19 years) and contemporary (n = 60; 58 female; median age, 19 years; range, 17-30 years) training completed weekly online questionnaires (modified Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre questionnaire on health problems) using 3 injury definitions: (1) time loss (unable to complete 1 or more classes/rehearsals/performances for 1 or more days beyond onset), (2) medical attention, and (3) any complaint. Physical therapists completed injury report forms to capture dance-related medical attention and time-loss injuries. Percent agreement between injury registration methods was estimated. Injury prevalence (seasonal proportion of dancers injured), incidence rates (count of new injuries per 1000 dance-exposure hours), and severity (total days lost) were examined across each definition, registration method, and dance style. Results Questionnaire response rate was 99%. Agreement between registration methods ranged between 59% (time loss) and 74% (injury location). Depending on definition, registration, and dance style, injury prevalence ranged between 9.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.1%, 17.7%; time loss) and 82.4% (95% CI: 72.5%, 89.8%; any complaint), incidence rates between 0.1 (95% CI: 0.03, 0.2; time loss) and 4.9 (95% CI: 4.1, 5.8; any complaint) injuries per 1000 dance-hours, and days lost between 111 and 588 days. Conclusion Time-loss and medical-attention injury definitions underestimate the injury burden in preprofessional dancers. Accordingly, injury

  6. Musical genre-dependent behavioural and EEG signatures of action planning. A comparison between classical and jazz pianists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, R; Novembre, G; Keller, P E; Villringer, A; Sammler, D

    2018-04-01

    It is well established that musical training induces sensorimotor plasticity. However, there are remarkable differences in how musicians train for proficient stage performance. The present EEG study outlines for the first time clear-cut neurobiological differences between classical and jazz musicians at high and low levels of action planning, revealing genre-specific cognitive strategies adopted in production. Pianists imitated chord progressions without sound that were manipulated in terms of harmony and context length to assess high-level planning of sequence-structure, and in terms of the manner of playing to assess low-level parameter specification of single acts. Jazz pianists revised incongruent harmonies faster as revealed by an earlier reprogramming negativity and beta power decrease, hence neutralising response costs, albeit at the expense of a higher number of manner errors. Classical pianists in turn experienced more conflict during incongruent harmony, as shown by theta power increase, but were more ready to implement the required manner of playing, as indicated by higher accuracy and beta power decrease. These findings demonstrate that specific demands and action focus of training lead to differential weighting of hierarchical action planning. This suggests different enduring markers impressed in the brain when a musician practices one or the other style. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Trumpeting through the iron curtain: The breakthrough of jazz in socialist Yugoslavia

    OpenAIRE

    Vučetić Radina

    2012-01-01

    During the Cold War, jazz became a powerful propaganda weapon in the battle for “hearts and minds”. As early as the 1950s, the American administration began its Cold War “jazz campaign”, by broadcasting the popular jazz radio show Music USA over the Voice of America, and by sending its top jazz artists on world tours. In this specific cultural Cold War, Yugoslavia was, as in its overall politics, in a specific position between the East and the West. The pos...

  8. Impact attenuation properties of jazz shoes alter lower limb joint stiffness during jump landings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong Yan, Alycia; Smith, Richard M; Hiller, Claire E; Sinclair, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    To quantify the impact attenuation properties of the jazz shoes, and to investigate the in-vivo effect of four jazz shoe designs on lower limb joint stiffness during a dance-specific jump. Repeated measures. A custom-built mechanical shoe tester similar to that used by athletic shoe companies was used to vertically impact the forefoot and heel region of four different jazz shoe designs. Additionally, dancers performed eight sautés in second position in bare feet and the shoe conditions. Force platforms and 3D-motion capture were used to analyse the joint stiffness of the midfoot, ankle, knee and hip during the jump landings. Mechanical testing of the jazz shoes revealed significant differences in impact attenuation characteristics among each of the jazz shoe designs. Gross knee and midfoot joint stiffness were significantly affected by the jazz shoe designs in the dancers' jump landings. The tested jazz shoe designs altered the impact attenuating capacity of jump landing technique in dancers. The cushioned jazz shoes are recommended particularly for injured dancers to reduce impact on the lower limb. Jazz shoe design should consider the impact attenuation properties of the forefoot region, due to the toe-strike landing technique in dance movement. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing Readiness for En Pointe in Young Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jeffrey C; Kruse, David W

    2016-01-01

    Children begin ballet lessons as young as age 2 years. The graceful movements of classical ballet require a combination of artistry, flexibility, and strength to perform. During the training and development of a young ballerina, the transition to dancing en pointe ("on the toes") represents a significant milestone and traditionally begins around age 11 or 12 years, assuming the proper training background and dance aspirations. However, current dance medicine literature describes factors such as maturity, proper technique, strength, and postural control as the more significant factors in determining pointe readiness. An in-office evaluation of these factors can be performed by the clinician to assist dancers, their family, and their dance instructor(s) determine pointe readiness. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Ballet injuries: injury incidence and severity over 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nick; Nevill, Alan; Brooks, John; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew

    2012-09-01

    Prospective, descriptive single-cohort study. To assess the incidence and severity of injuries to a professional ballet company over 1 year. Data for an elite-level ballet company of 52 professional dancers were collected by an in-house medical team using a time-loss injury definition. A total of 355 injuries were recorded, with an overall injury incidence of 4.4 injuries per 1000 hours (female, 4.1; male, 4.8; P>.05) and a mean of 6.8 injuries per dancer (female, 6.3; male, 7.3; P>.05). Mean injury severity was 7 days (female, 4; male, 9; P.05); mean severity of injury was 3 days for females and 9 days for males (PSports Phys Ther 2012;42(9):781-790. Epub 19 July 2012. doi:10.2519/jospt.2012.3893.

  11. Kinematic evaluation of the classical ballet step "plié".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontijo, Kaanda Nabilla Souza; Candotti, Cláudia Tarragô; Feijó, Grace Dos Santos; Ribeiro, Lais Paixão; Loss, Jefferson Fagundes

    2015-06-01

    Lack of alignment between the lowerlimb structures, such as the hips, knees, and longitudinal arches of the feet, has been described as an important predisposing factor in musculoskeletal injury among classical ballet dancers. However, no studies were found that analyzed basic ballet movements with quantification of objective criteria of the movements. The purposes of this study were: 1. to establish a methodology to quantify, using kinematic evaluation, the technical criteria that guide the correct execution of all phases of the plié (simultaneous flexion of the hips, knees, and ankle joints); and 2. to explore whether experienced ballet dancers respect those criteria when performing the plié. The technical criteria considered were the following: 1. midfoot stability; 2. pelvic positioning in a neutral alignment; 3. pelvic stability, represented by pelvic angle variation; and 4. vertical alignment of the knee joint with the second toe of the ipsilateral foot. Twenty dancers from Porto Alegre, Brazil, with 18 years of uninterrupted ballet training, were filmed while performing plié using four synchronized cameras. The descriptive statistical analysis involved calculating the median, minimum, and maximum of each of the technical criteria. Results showed that for criterion 1, the 20 dancers showed great stabilization of the midfoot; for criteria 2 and 3, 18 dancers displayed pelvic instability tending toward retroversion throughout execution of the plié; and for criterion 4, 13 dancers presented with medial misalignment of the knees at all phases of the plié. Using these criteria, it was possible to characterize the plié from a kinematic point of view.

  12. Learning Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Coll. of Education.

    Information is provided regarding major learning styles and other factors important to student learning. Several typically asked questions are presented regarding different learning styles (visual, auditory, tactile and kinesthetic, and multisensory learning), associated considerations, determining individuals' learning styles, and appropriate…

  13. JAZZ-800信号处理器

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Miranda推出的JAZZ-800是一个仅1RU的单/双通道通用信号处理器,它结合高性能的信号处理功能和便捷的操作控制,提供了上/下/交叉/ARC和高/标清变换功能,以及数/模之间的转换功能,适合多信号的工作环境。JAZZ-800配备带功能菜单和视频监视的本地控制面板,具备噪音屏蔽的高/标清画面显示,

  14. Attentional Focus in Classical Ballet: A Survey Of Professional Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guss-West, Clare; Wulf, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    Focus of attention and its effects on skilled motor performance has become an important line of research in the motor learning domain. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an external focus of attention (i.e., on the movement effect) enhances motor performance and learning relative to an internal focus (i.e., on body movements). Thus, small differences in the wording of instructions or feedback given by teachers can have a significant impact on the effectiveness and efficiency of motor skill performance. In this paper, we review some of the attentional focus studies that are relevant to ballet performance. In addition, we report the findings of a survey among professional ballet dancers (N = 53) that we conducted to determine their typical attentional focus while performing certain movements. The results showed that the majority adopted internal foci, or combinations of internal and external foci, most of the time. This suggests that there is room for improvement for performance and teaching. We provide examples of how external foci can be promoted in ballet practice.

  15. Physiological profiles of young boys training in ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekkarinen, H; Litmanen, H; Mahlamäki, S

    1989-01-01

    In order to evaluate physiological characteristics in young male ballet dancers, 27 boys (aged 9 to 16 years) who participated in a boys' dance course during the Kuopio Dance and Music Festival in June 1988 were studied. In general, the boys had started dancing at the age of 8.6 years and had been training for 4.1 years. They had, on average, three dancing sessions per week and the mean time spent on dancing was four hours per week. In the study, some anthropometric measurements were taken, the maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) was measured by a cycle ergometer test and the explosive strength and the mechanical power of lower extremities were evaluated by a jumping test. The results indicate that boys who train in ballet are in general moderately lean, have relatively small body size and a high degree of flexibility. The younger boys especially have only moderate aerobic power, but both explosive strength and mechanical power in leg muscles are good in ballet trained boys. PMID:2630002

  16. Frozen Landscapes: A Foucauldian Genealogy of the Ideal Ballet Dancer's Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritenburg, Heather Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the social construction of the "ideal" body of the female ballet dancer in North America. Specifically, the author constructs a Foucauldian genealogy tracing a body shape that came to dominate the principal female dancers of the New York City Ballet, and how this body shape continues to be normalized through…

  17. 'The moment when it al comes together': embodied experiences in ballet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalten, A.

    2004-01-01

    This article is both an elaborated critique on the one-sided analysis of the misogynist nature of ballet as a cultural practice, and a contribution to a more embodied feminist theory. Based on empirical material, that was brought together by observing the body practices in ballet and listening to

  18. 78 FR 18664 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Diaghilev and the Ballets...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... Determinations: ``Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1909-1929: When Art Danced With Music'' SUMMARY: Notice is... objects to be included in the exhibition ``Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1909- 1929: When Art Danced... also determine that the exhibition or display of the exhibit objects at the National Gallery of Art...

  19. The Mind/Body Connection and the Practice of Classical Ballet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Emma

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines two very different approaches to dance training, ballet technique and the somatic discipline of Topf technique ("TT"). It explores and evaluates the application of TT to ballet training. Initially, what is meant by the term "mind/body connection" is discussed, and then the paper examines, in a theoretical and a practical sense,…

  20. Ballet Doesn't Have to Be Boring: Engaging Students in the Creative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheff, Helene

    2005-01-01

    For many years, the author has incorporated creative process into the way she teaches ballet class. The author shares the philosophical, practical, and artistic reasons for the creative process in ballet classes. She also shares the rationale and how this practice developed over time.

  1. My Dance and the Ideal Body: Looking at Ballet Practice from the Inside Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This paper argues for a change of thinking about the "ideal body" in relation to ballet as a dance form and how it is studied. It distinguishes between spectator and practitioner perspectives on ballet, and draws on the practice of established dance artists and that of the author to write about the first-person experience--from the inside out.…

  2. Weighing in on Surveillance: Perception of the Impact of Surveillance on Female Ballet Dancers' Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryburgh, Anne; Fortin, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate professional ballet dancers' perceptions of the impact of surveillance on their psychological and physical health. The theoretical framework was inspired by Foucault's writing, particularly his concepts of surveillance, power, discipline and docile bodies. Fifteen professional ballet dancers…

  3. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    OpenAIRE

    Valenti, Erica E; Valenti, Vitor E; Ferreira, Celso; Vanderlei, Luiz C M; Moura Filho, Oseas F; de Carvalho, Dias T; Tassi, Nadir; Petenusso, Marcio; Leone, Claudio; Fujiki, Edison N; Junior, Hugo M; de Mello Monteiro, Carlos B; Moreno, Isadora L; Gonçalves, Ana C C; de Abreu, Luiz C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Method...

  4. The Presentation of Self in the Classical Ballet Class: Dancing with Erving Goffman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Bethany; Kelly, John

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses the social interactions and behaviours evident within an adult, amateur ballet class in one of Scotland's cities. Using an ethnographic empirical approach, the study utilises Erving Goffman's model of dramaturgy to explore the impression management of participants from the ballet class. Evidence (data) was generated through a…

  5. Images of a Sound: Portraits and Pictures of Jazz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Sparti

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Images of a sound. Portraits and Pictures of Jazz. Davide Sparti [trans. lise hogan] It has always been maintained that jazz reflects the social and urban changes of its times, but little attention has been given to the reversed statement, or rather, that twentieth-century culture reflects jazz, reacting and responding to its presence, and re-elaborating its sounds in visual (as well as textual and choreographic forms. This paper, inspired by an exhibition of jazz album covers, examines the interplay between jazz and the visual arts. Notwithstanding the significant link between image and sound at the referential level of the content (album covers represent a mirror of the era and of its political changes, it is primarily the relationship established through the notion of process, action or operation that is crucial. We live in a videocentric age that greatly emphasizes the defined and completed object, and that has sanctioned the existence of a place for its worship: the museum. But an (improvised performance is above all an action, the action of generating music during the course of a performance. By focusing on the final product of a performance, we risk losing sight of the “phenomenon”: the emergence, sound after sound, of a musical sense. For many painters, precisely because they can take their time deciding what to “express”, the process recedes to the background and what becomes relevant (also for the evaluation of the artwork is what they produce. Yet, dating from the Surrealists and from Pollock, many visual arts exhibitors have been inspired by jazz and have placed the notion of process at the centre of their artistic practice. Les images d'un son. Portraits et tableaux du Jazz Davide Sparti [traduction de lise hogan] On a toujours affirmé que le jazz reflète le changement social et urbain de l'époque, mais peu d'attention a été payé à la déclaration inverse, c'est-à-dire, que la culture du XXe siècle reflète le jazz

  6. CERN Takes a Bow at the Montreux Jazz Festival

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    A year after CERN announced the discovery of a Higgs boson on the world stage, several of the participating scientists found themselves in a new and unfamiliar arena – the renowned Montreux Jazz Festival.   The Canettes Blues Band of the CERN Music Club performing live on the Music In The Park stage at the Montreux Jazz Festival, on 18 July. CERN and the Montreux Jazz Foundation teamed up this summer to host a series of seminars and performances titled “The Physics of Music and the Music of Physics”.  The seminars took place in the historic Petit Palais and included a variety of presentations on the interplay between science and sound. Sound artist Bill Fontana kicked off the series by presenting the concepts and methods behind the creation of  “sound sculptures”.  As the current Collide@CERN artist-in-residence, Fontana has been placing microphones and sensors on accelerators, detectors and other objects at CERN t...

  7. System Attraction of Visual and Iconographic Material as a Development Thrustof Modern Ballet Theater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Portnova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues of artwork impact on ballet artists’ and ballet masters’ creativity – creation of choreographic works based on artworks. Facts (examples demonstrating such borrowing are involved, but more significantly, the range of potential opportunities, which may enrich modern ballet theater, is outlined. The matter of figurative material takes on particular importance, i.e. the issue to what extent a choreographic work reflects the essence of an artwork accurately, deeply, and adequately. The article considers the connection and mutual benefit of the processes of creative interpenetration of graphics, art, sculpture, arts and crafts, and ballet theater. Different techniques of figurative sources are studied: illustration, statement, demonstration, comparison, event localization, generalization, stylistic device, and their visualization by means of choreographic dynamics. It’s concluded the synthetic nature of ballet theatergives rise to new polygenre structures that can intensify both expressive and semantic content of choreographic image, create original stage solutions.

  8. Kinematic analysis of the gait in professional ballet dancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Teplá

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A ballet dance routine places extreme functional demands on the musculoskeletal system and affects the motor behaviour of the dancers. An extreme ballet position places high stress on many segments of the dancer's body and can significantly influence the mobility of the lower limb joints. Objective: The aim of this study was to observe the differences in the gait pattern between ballet dancers and non-dancers. Methods:Thirteen professional ballet dancers (5 males, 8 females; age 24.1 ± 3.8 years; height 170.2 ± 8.5 cm; weight 58.3 ± 11.2 kg participated in this research. We compared these subjects with twelve controls (3 males, 9 females; mean age 24.3 ± 2.75 years; height 173.3 ± 6.01 cm; weight 72.2 ± 12.73 kg. None of the participants had any history of serious musculoskeletal pathology or injury or surgery to the lower limbs. Control groups had no ballet experience. Each participant performed five trials of the gait at self-selected walking speed. Kinematic data was obtained using the Vicon MX optoelectronic system. The observed data was processed in the Vicon Nexus and Vicon Polygon programmes and statistically evaluated in Statistica. Non-parametric test (Mann-Whitney U test, p < .05 was applied for comparing the dancers and the controls. Results:  Significant differences (p < .05 were found in all lower limb joints. In the dancers, greater hip extension (-15.30 ± 3.31° vs. -12.95 ± 6.04°; p = .008 and hip abduction (-9.18 ± 5.89° vs. -6.08 ± 2.52°; p < .001 peaks together with increased pelvic tilt (3.33 ± 1.26° vs. 3.01 ± 1.46°; p = .020, pelvic obliquity (12.46 ± 3.05° vs. 10.34 ± 3.49°; p < .001 and pelvic rotation (14.29 ± 3.77° vs. 13.26 ± 4.91°; p = .029 were observed. Additionally, the dancers demonstrated greater knee flexion (65.67 ± 4.65° vs. 62.45 ± 5.24°; p = .002 and knee

  9. A Facet-Factorial Approach towards the Development and Validation of a Jazz Rhythm Section Performance Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Brian C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable rating scale to assess jazz rhythm sections in the context of jazz big band performance. The research questions that guided this study included: (a) what central factors contribute to the assessment of a jazz rhythm section? (b) what items should be used to describe and assess a jazz…

  10. Canons in Harmony, or Canons in Conflict: A Cultural Perspective on the Curriculum and Pedagogy of Jazz Improvization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, Kenneth E.

    2004-01-01

    This essay examines how jazz educators construct methods for teaching the art of improvisation in institutionalized jazz studies programs. Unlike previous studies of the processes and philosophies of jazz instruction, I examine such processes from a cultural standpoint, to identify why certain methods might be favored over others. Specifically,…

  11. "Play It Again, Billy, but This Time with More Mistakes": Divergent Improvisation Activities for the Jazz Ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    The jazz ensemble represents an important performance opportunity in many school music programs. Due to the cultural history of jazz as an improvisatory art form, school jazz ensemble directors must address methods of teaching improvisation concepts to young students. Progress has been made in the field of prescribed improvisation activities and…

  12. Ballet-Related Content in Music Education in the First Cycle of Primary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stergulec Tjaša

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the integration of ballet-related content into music lessons in the first cycle of primary education. It seeks to outline some current findings concerning the positive impact of dance and classical ballet on integrated child development and the results of an empirical research study the objective of which was to compare the ability of primary school pupils aged six to nine years to perform a simple ballet choreography against that of ballet school pupils and to examine pupils’ attitude towards classical ballet. For this end, we prepared additional ballet-related content in 2011 and incorporated it into classroom practice with students attending Fran Korun Koželjski Music School in Velenje and pupils attending the first and the third grades of Franc Rozman Stane Primary School in Maribor. To compare the performance of one and the other we used specific evaluation criteria, while we obtained pupils’ feedback on ballet lessons by means of a short questionnaire. It was established that children did possess the ability as well as the desire to practice classical ballet. The executions of the ballet choreography by both groups were comparable, and the only difference noticed regarded the physical ability, body coordination, and spatial coordination criteria, which were not fully achieved by the primary school pupils. Due to the positive influence of the activity on the integrated development of children and the children’s positive reaction, it is necessary to incorporate as many ballet-related subject matter as possible into music education.

  13. Swing Once More: Relating Timing and Tempo in Expert Jazz Drumming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.; de Haas, W.B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304841250

    2008-01-01

    Swing refers to a characteristic long-short subdivision of the beat that is generally considered a crucial aspect that contributes to the quality of a jazz or pop performance. The current study measures this pattern (referred to as the ‘swing ratio’) at different tempi in jazz drumming. The

  14. Swing once more: Relating timing and tempo in expert jazz drumming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, H.; de Haas, W.B.

    2008-01-01

    Swing refers to a characteristic long-short subdivision of the beat that is generally considered a crucial aspect that contributes to the quality of a jazz or pop performance. The current study measures this pattern (referred to as the 'swing ratio') at different tempi in jazz drumming. The

  15. Learning Pre-Played Solos: Self-Regulated Learning Strategies in Jazz/Improvised Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Siw G.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the self-regulated learning strategies of two advanced students in jazz/improvised music education when learning pre-played solos over well-known jazz tunes. The students were enrolled in a well-established performance degree programme in a music conservatoire, and videotaped their own individual practice sessions. In…

  16. Reading "Gatsby"/Performing "Jazz": On Narrative Voice, Race, and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Theresa

    1998-01-01

    Describes an experiment in pairing the novels "The Great Gatsby" (F. Scott Fitzgerald) and "Jazz" (Toni Morrison) in a teacher preparation class. Relates that the students (all European American) initially resisted "Jazz" and accepted "Gatsby" as a timeless classic. Includes responses about another Toni…

  17. Exploring the 12-Key Approach: Perceptions and Experiences of Improvising Jazz Vocalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    The 12-key approach is considered a foundational practice strategy for jazz instrumentalists. Its relevance to vocalists, however, seems less clear. This article investigates improvising jazz vocalists' perceptions and experiences of using the 12-key approach as distinguished from instrumentalists'. It uses data from a two-phase, mixed methods…

  18. Vocal Improvisation and Creative Thinking by Australian and American University Jazz Singers: A Factor Analytic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward-Steinman, Patrice Madura

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the author investigated factors underlying vocal improvisation achievement and relationships with the singers' musical background. Participants were 102 college students in Australia and the United States who performed 3 jazz improvisations and 1 free improvisation. Jazz improvisations were rated on rhythmic, tonal, and creative…

  19. Landscapes of Musical Metaphor and Musical Learning: The Example of Jazz Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerstedt, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical approaches to learning in practice-based jazz improvisation contexts include situated learning and ecological perspectives. This article focuses on how interest-driven, self-sustaining jazz learning activities can be matched against the results of a recent Swedish investigation based on extensive qualitative interviews with jazz…

  20. Putting It Together: Integrating Jazz Education in the Elementary General Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Laura

    2004-01-01

    American schools have great secondary performance programs, and many of these programs do wonderful things with jazz education. As wonderful as these programs are, only a small percentage of secondary school students join them, and usually the percentage of students participating in the jazz components of these programs is even smaller. As many…

  1. Stealing Knowledge in a Landscape of Learning: Conceptualizations of Jazz Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerstedt, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical approaches to learning in practice-based jazz improvisation contexts include situated learning and ecological perspectives. This article focuses on how interest-driven, self-sustaining jazz learning activities can be matched against the concepts of stolen knowledge (Brown & Duguid, 1996) and landscape of learning (Bjerstedt, 2014).…

  2. An Approach to Improvisation Pedagogy in Post-Secondary Jazz Programmes Based on Negative Dialectics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louth, Joseph Paul

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that an approach to jazz improvisation pedagogy based on negative dialectics may provide a viable solution to the threat of codification of the jazz language as a result of the academisation of improvisation studies at the post-secondary level. Some tentative means of incorporating such an approach into the design of university…

  3. The effect of modified jazz dance on balance, cognition, and mood in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Patricia T; Miller, Sally K; Wallmann, Harvey; Havey, Richard; Cross, Chad; Chevalia, Theresa; Gillis, Carrie B; Kodandapari, Keshavan

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the impact of jazz dance class instruction on balance, cognition, and mood (specifically depression) in 13 healthy, community-dwelling, English-speaking older women with a mean age of 68. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires (Folstein Mini Mental Status Examination [MMSE] and Geriatric Depression Scale [GDS]), and the sensory organization test (SOT) for balance measurements (using the NeuroCom Smart Balance Master) was performed at three time periods in the study: time 1: between week 1 and week 2 of jazz class (baseline), time 2: between week 8 and week 9 of jazz class (midpoint), and time 3: after week 15 of jazz class (final measurement). Differences in mean MMSE and GDS scores over time were not significant; however, SOT scores showed an increasing trend (p jazz dance does not impact cognition or mood but may improve balance in older women. This finding may have significant implications for fall prevention in the postmenopausal population. Because falls are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults of both genders, research is needed to evaluate both the impact of jazz dance on balance in older men and jazz dance as a fall prevention strategy in aging adults. Additionally, longitudinal research with a larger sample size is needed to test the effectiveness of jazz dance as a strategy for improving balance, cognition, and mood.

  4. A Pilot Study of Using Jazz Warm Up Exercises in Primary School Choir in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jason Chi Wai; Lee, Han Wai

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study is to examine whether it is valuable to implement jazz choral practice in Hong Kong primary school setting. The findings can serve as a reference to explore the possibilities of promoting jazz education in Asian countries or in China. The participants were 70 public primary school students from grade 2 to 5 in Hong Kong. All…

  5. Moral Outrage and Musical Corruption: White Educators' Responses to the "Jazz Problem"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    More than a musical genre, jazz in the 1920s was viewed by critics and supporters alike as a type of lifestyle, one that frequently led to drinking, dancing, and "petting." Much to the horror of older generations, white young people were particularly drawn to jazz and its "hot rhythms." Secondary school teachers and…

  6. Gender and Participation in High School and College Instrumental Jazz Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeage, Kathleen M.

    2004-01-01

    This study is an examination of the relationship between gender and participation in high school and college instrumental jazz ensembles. Student demographic and attitudinal information was collected using the researcher-designed Instrumental Jazz Participation Survey (IJPS). Undergraduate college band students (N = 628) representing 15 programs…

  7. Sharing the Gift of Jazz: An Interview with Willie L. Hill Jr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Brad

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Willie L. Hill Jr., founder and director of the Society for Jazz Education. Currently a professor of music education at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and the director of the UMass Fine Arts Center, Hill has served as director of education for the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz. He is a past…

  8. Forty lives in the bebop business: mental health in a group of eminent jazz musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Geoffrey I

    2003-09-01

    Above-average levels of psychopathology have been demonstrated convincingly in groups of outstanding individuals working in the arts. Currently, jazz musicians have not been studied in this regard. To investigate any evidence of psychopathology in a group of eminent jazz musicians. Biographical material relating to 40 eminent American modern jazz musicians was reviewed and an attempt was made to formulate diagnoses using DSM-IV. Evidence was provided of levels of psychopathology in the sample of jazz musicians similar to those found in other previously investigated creative groups, with the exception of substance related problems. An interesting connection between creativity and sensation-seeking was highlighted. The link between psychopathology and creativity in the arts was given further weight. Future studies of jazz musicians using larger samples and making comparison with groups from different eras of music would give greater clarification to this area.

  9. The artificial gene Jazz, a transcriptional regulator of utrophin, corrects the dystrophic pathology in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Corbi, Nicoletta; Strimpakos, Georgios; Onori, Annalisa; Luvisetto, Siro; Severini, Cinzia; Guglielmotti, Angelo; Batassa, Enrico Maria; Pisani, Cinzia; Floridi, Aristide; Benassi, Barbara; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Magrelli, Armando; Mattei, Elisabetta; Passananti, Claudio

    2010-03-01

    The absence of the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin results in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The utrophin protein is the best candidate for dystrophin replacement in DMD patients. To obtain therapeutic levels of utrophin expression in dystrophic muscle, we developed an alternative strategy based on the use of artificial zinc finger transcription factors (ZF ATFs). The ZF ATF 'Jazz' was recently engineered and tested in vivo by generating a transgenic mouse specifically expressing Jazz at the muscular level. To validate the ZF ATF technology for DMD treatment we generated a second mouse model by crossing Jazz-transgenic mice with dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Here, we show that the artificial Jazz protein restores sarcolemmal integrity and prevents the development of the dystrophic disease in mdx mice. This exclusive animal model establishes the notion that utrophin-based therapy for DMD can be efficiently developed using ZF ATF technology and candidates Jazz as a novel therapeutic molecule for DMD therapy.

  10. Like, comment, share and all that jazz : social media as communication and marketing tool case: Social media marketing approaches used by MaiJazz music festival

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaskovic, Nenad

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in International hotel and tourism management Social networks have become an integral part of everyday life for many. With an increasing number of companies using social media to communicate and build relationships with their customers, social media might be considered as the newest element of the marketing mix. The thesis’ objective is to explore the use of social media communication tools used by the jazz music festival, MaiJazz, in Stavanger, to define key...

  11. Potential Predictors of Injury Among Pre-Professional Ballet and Contemporary Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Rebecca K; Golightly, Yvonne M; Richardson, David B; Runfola, Cristin D; Waller, Anna E; Marshall, Stephen W

    2017-06-15

    Injuries occur frequently among ballet and contemporary dancers. However, limited literature exists on injuries to pre-professional dancers in the USA. The goals of this study were to 1. provide a descriptive epidemiology of the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries in an adolescent and young adult dance population and 2. identify parsimonious regression models that could be potentially used to predict injury incidence. The study was based at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts (UNCSA) from Fall 2009 to Spring 2015. An injury was defined as any event that caused a dancer to be seen at the UNCSA Student Health Services and caused the dancer to modify or curtail dance activity for at least 1 day. Injury rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated using negative binomial generalized estimating equations. Models predicting injury rates were built using forward selection, stratified by sex. Among 480 dancers, 1,014 injuries were sustained. Most injuries were to the lower extremity and the result of overuse. There were differences in upper extremity, lower extremity, and traumatic injury rates by demographic subgroups. Among females, the most parsimonious predictive model for injury rates included a self-reported history of depression, age at time of injury, and number of injuries sustained at UNCSA prior to the semester of current injury. Among males, the most parsimonious model was a univariate model with family history of alcohol or drug problems. Strategies for traumatic injury prevention among dancers should be both sex- and style-specific. No differences were observed in overuse injury rates by sex or style, suggesting that generic overuse prevention strategies may not need to be guided by these factors. It is concluded that strategies can be implemented to reduce and mitigate the consequences of injuries if not the injuries themselves.

  12. Chronic Inflammation and Neutrophil Activation as Possible Causes of Joint Diseases in Ballet Dancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro da Silva Borges

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we investigated the effects of a ballet class on the kinetic profiles of creatine kinase (CK and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activities, cytokines, complement component 3 (C3, and the concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig, IgA and IgM, in ballerinas. We also verified neutrophil death and ROS release. Blood samples were taken from 13 dancers before, immediately after, and 18 hours after a ballet class. The ballet class increased the plasma activities of CK-total (2.0-fold immediately after class, while the activities of CK-cardiac muscle (1.0-fold and LDH (3.0-fold were observed to increase 18 hours after the class. Levels of the TNF-α, IL-1β, IgG, and IgA were not affected under the study conditions. The exercise was found to induce neutrophil apoptosis (6.0-fold 18 hours after the ballet class. Additionally, immediately after the ballet class, the neutrophils from the ballerinas were found to be less responsive to PMA stimulus. Conclusion. Ballet class was found to result in inflammation in dancers. The inflammation caused by the ballet class remained for 18 hours after the exercise. These findings are important in preventing the development of chronic lesions that are commonly observed in dancers, such as those with arthritis and synovitis.

  13. Should Ballet Dancers Vary Postures and Underfoot Surfaces When Practicing Postural Balance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Nili; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Karin, Janet; Tirosh, Oren

    2018-01-01

    Postural balance (PB) is an important component skill for professional dancers. However, the effects of different types of postures and different underfoot surfaces on PB have not adequately been addressed. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different conditions of footwear, surfaces, and standing positions on static and dynamic PB ability of young ballet dancers. A total of 36 male and female young professional ballet dancers (aged 14-19 years) completed static and dynamic balance testing, measured by head and lumbar accelerometers, while standing on one leg in the turnout position, under six different conditions: (1) "relaxed" posture; (2) "ballet" posture; (3) barefoot; (4) ballet shoes with textured insoles; (5) barefoot on a textured mat; and (6) barefoot on a spiky mat. A condition effect was found for static and dynamic PB. Static PB was reduced when dancers stood in the ballet posture compared with standing in the relaxed posture and when standing on a textured mat and on a spiky mat (p ballet shoes with textured insoles and when standing on a spiky mat compared with all other conditions (p ballet aligned position, including dance practice on different types of floors and on different types of textured/spiky materials may result in skill transfer to practice on normal floor surfaces, and both static and dynamic PB exercises should be assessed and generalized into practical dance routines.

  14. Chronic inflammation and neutrophil activation as possible causes of joint diseases in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Leandro da Silva; Bortolon, José Ricardo; Santos, Vinicius Coneglian; de Moura, Nivaldo Ribeiro; Dermargos, Alexandre; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Gorjão, Renata; Pithon-Curi, Tania Cristina; Hatanaka, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we investigated the effects of a ballet class on the kinetic profiles of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities, cytokines, complement component 3 (C3), and the concentrations of immunoglobulin (Ig), IgA and IgM, in ballerinas. We also verified neutrophil death and ROS release. Blood samples were taken from 13 dancers before, immediately after, and 18 hours after a ballet class. The ballet class increased the plasma activities of CK-total (2.0-fold) immediately after class, while the activities of CK-cardiac muscle (1.0-fold) and LDH (3.0-fold) were observed to increase 18 hours after the class. Levels of the TNF-α , IL-1β, IgG, and IgA were not affected under the study conditions. The exercise was found to induce neutrophil apoptosis (6.0-fold) 18 hours after the ballet class. Additionally, immediately after the ballet class, the neutrophils from the ballerinas were found to be less responsive to PMA stimulus. Ballet class was found to result in inflammation in dancers. The inflammation caused by the ballet class remained for 18 hours after the exercise. These findings are important in preventing the development of chronic lesions that are commonly observed in dancers, such as those with arthritis and synovitis.

  15. Physiological fitness and professional classical ballet performance: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twitchett, Emily A; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2009-12-01

    Although classical ballet is an artistic expression through the use of the body, there is a real opportunity to improve and extend the dancer's career by simply applying sports science principles to dance training and performance. Dance training is a long process of physical, intellectual, and psychological preparation, through physical exercise, often beginning in childhood and continuing until retirement. Fitness programs, supplementary to traditional dance classes, have only recently been considered as a part of this process; it may be suggested that this cross-training has generally been avoided thus far because of tradition and a reluctance to follow principles associated with sport. Classical ballet training, rehearsal, and performance do not elicit significant stimulus to result in increased aerobic fitness levels. Therefore, dancers often demonstrate low levels of aerobic fitness even though a strong aerobic foundation is necessary to meet the required workload. Dancers have greater than average range of motion and strength at the hip joint but weaknesses in the upper body, torso, hamstrings, and quadriceps. In the past, dancers have been wary of strength training because they perceive this leads to aesthetically undesirable hypertrophy. Dancers also have low body weights and low percentage body fat. Given that training does not provide the opportunity to expend enough energy to maintain these aesthetic demands, this aesthetic demand may be met by caloric restriction, which may lead to subsequent increased injury risk. It has been hypothesized that a "fit for purpose" body can help improve performance, reduce the risk of injury, and ensure prolonged dance careers. This review aims to explore the extent to which physical fitness components relate to dance performance, in particular classical ballet.

  16. Oxygen consumption and heart rate responses to isolated ballet exercise sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; Dos Santos Cunha, Giovani; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Follmer, Bruno; Krause, Mauricio; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Ballet stage performances are associated with higher cardiorespiratory demand than rehearsals and classes. Hence, new interest is emerging to create periodized training that enhances dancers' fitness while minimizing delayed exercise-induced fatigue and possible injuries. Finding out in what zones of intensity dancers work during different ballet movements may support the use of supplemental training adjusted to the needs of the individual dancer. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to describe dancers' oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) responses during the performance of nine isolated ballet exercise sets, as correlated with their first and second ventilatory thresholds (VT1 and VT2). Twelve female ballet dancers volunteered for the study. Their maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), VT1, and VT2 were determined by use of an incremental treadmill test. Nine sets of ballet movements were assessed: pliés, tendus, jetés, rond de jambes, fondus, grand adage (adage), grand battements, temps levés, and sautés. The sets were randomly executed and separated by 5 minute rest periods. ANOVA for repeated measurements followed by the Bonferroni Post-hoc test were applied (p ballet sets. This stratification followed closely, but not exactly, the variation in HR. For example, rond de jambes (156.8 ± 19 b·min(-1)) did not show any significant difference from all the other ballet sets, nor VT1 or VT2. It is concluded that the workloads of isolated ballet sets, based on VO2 responses, vary between low and moderate aerobic intensity in relation to dancers' VT1 and VT2. However, ballet set workloads may be higher when based on HR responses, due to the intermittent and isometric components of dance.

  17. Overuse Injuries in Professional Ballet: Influence of Age and Years of Professional Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, Francisco José; Guillén, Pedro

    2017-06-01

    In spite of the high rate of overuse injuries in ballet dancers, no studies have investigated the prevalence of overuse injuries in professional dancers by providing specific diagnoses and details on the differences in the injuries sustained as a function of age and/or years of professional practice. Overuse injuries are the most prevalent injuries in ballet dancers. Professional ballet dancers suffer different types of injuries depending on their age and years of professional practice. Descriptive epidemiology study. This descriptive epidemiological study was carried out between January 1, 2005, and October 10, 2010, regarding injuries sustained by professional dancers belonging to the major Spanish ballet companies practicing classical, neoclassical, contemporary, and Spanish dance. The sample was distributed into 3 different groups according to age and years of professional practice. Data were obtained from the specialized medical care the dancers received from the Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery Service at Fremap in Madrid. The dependent variable was the study of the injury. A total of 486 injuries were identified over the study period, with overuse injuries being the most common etiology ( P ballet and veteran dancers practicing contemporary ballet ( P = .01). Specifically, among other findings, stress fractures of the base of the second metatarsal ( P = .03), patellofemoral syndrome, and os trigonum syndrome were more prevalent among junior professionals ( P = .04); chondral injury of the knee in senior professionals ( P = .04); and cervical disc disease in dancers of intermediate age and level of experience. Overall, overuse injuries were more prevalent in younger professionals, especially in women. This finding was especially true for the more technical ballet disciplines. On the other hand, in the athletic ballet disciplines, overuse lesions occurred mainly in the more senior professionals. This study provides specific clinical diagnoses obtained through

  18. Birgitta festival valge tiiva all / Toomas Velmet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Velmet, Toomas, 1942-

    2007-01-01

    19. augustil Pirita kloostris Birgitta festivali raames toimunud kontserdist "Tchaikovsky.Ballet@Classics.Jazz", kus osalesid Novaja Opera orkester, Imperial Ballet, Estonian Dream Big Band ja eesti jazztantsijad

  19. Radiographic Evidence of Hip Microinstability in Elite Ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ronald J; Gerrie, Brayden J; McCulloch, Patrick C; Murphy, Andrew J; Varner, Kevin E; Lintner, David M; Harris, Joshua D

    2016-06-01

    To determine prevalence, magnitude, and predisposing radiographic features of hip subluxation in elite ballet dancers. A cross-sectional investigation of professional male and female ballet dancers was performed using 5 plain radiographs. A "splits" anteroposterior (AP) radiograph was performed with legs abducted parallel to the trunk in the coronal plane (splits position; grand écart facial). Hip center position (HCP) was measured on standing AP pelvis and AP pelvis splits views and the difference calculated (subluxation distance) to determine prevalence and magnitude of femoral head subluxation. Student t test compared HCP on AP pelvis and splits radiographs. Pearson correlations were used to correlate splits HCP with radiographic measures of femoroacetabular impingement and dysplasia. Analyzing 47 dancers (21 men, 26 women; 23.8 ± 5.4 years), mean HCP on standing AP pelvis was 9.39 ± 3.33 mm versus 10.8 ± 2.92 mm on splits radiograph, with mean subluxation distance of 1.41 mm (P = .035). Forty-two dancers' femoral heads translated laterally with splits positioning, and 17 dancers (36%) exhibited a "vacuum sign" (bilateral in 71% of subjects with at least 1 hip vacuum sign). There was strong positive correlation (r = 0.461, P = .001) with splits HCP and alpha angle (Dunn 45°), and moderate negative correlation (r = -0.332, P = .022) with subluxation distance and neck-shaft angle. In men, splits HCP increased as lateral center edge angle (CEA) decreased (r = -0.437, P = .047), as anterior CEA decreased (r = -0.482, P = .027), as Tönnis angle increased (r = 0.656, P = .001), and as femoral head extrusion index increased (r = 0.511, P = .018). In women, there was moderate negative correlation (r = -0.389, P = .049) with subluxation distance and neck-shaft angle. Hip subluxation occurs during splits in most professional ballet dancers, with a significantly greater magnitude of subluxation in women than men. Subluxation magnitude

  20. THE CLASSICAL BALLET METHODOLOGY AND THEIR POSSIBLE DIALOGUE WITH LABANIANAS THEORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanusse Sousa Jaime

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Establish a dialogue between a codified technique with other body techniques becomes a challenge when it comes to a tradition. Moths new avenues for the ballet teaching may move several problems found with respect to a hierarchy of knowledge. Ballet with its tradition and its stroked paths can be reorganized to build thinking and conscious bodies? The traditional classical technique transits other body language? Often there are more complex issues to think today in teaching and learning ballet . These issues translate my need to research and experiment with new ways to teach this technique.

  1. Assessment of Maximum Aerobic Capacity and Anaerobic Threshold of Elite Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyon, Matthew A; Allen, Nick; Cloak, Ross; Beck, Sarah; Davies, Paul; Clarke, Frances

    2016-09-01

    An athlete's cardiorespiratory profile, maximal aerobic capacity, and anaerobic threshold is affected by training regimen and competition demands. The present study aimed to ascertain whether there are company rank differences in maximal aerobic capacity and anaerobic threshold in elite classical ballet dancers. Seventy-four volunteers (M 34, F 40) were recruited from two full-time professional classical ballet companies. All participants completed a continuous incremental treadmill protocol with a 1-km/hr speed increase at the end of each 1-min stage until termination criteria had been achieved (e.g., voluntary cessation, respiratory exchange ratio ballet companies are probably due to the different rehearsal and performance demands.

  2. MODELO DE COMUNICACIÓN NO VERBAL EN DEPORTE Y BALLET NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION MODELS IN SPORTS AND BALLET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Vallejo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio analiza el modelo de comunicación que se genera en los entrenadores de fútbol y de gimnasia artística a nivel profesional, y en los instructores de ballet en modalidad folklórica, tomando como referente el lenguaje corporal dinámico propio de la comunicación especializada de deportistas y bailarines, en la que se evidencia lenguaje no verbal. Este último se estudió tanto en prácticas psicomotrices como sociomotrices, para identificar y caracterizar relaciones entre diferentes conceptos y su correspondiente representación gestual. Los resultados indican que el lenguaje no verbal de los entrenadores e instructores toma ocasionalmente el lugar del lenguaje verbal, cuando este último resulta insuficiente o inapropiado para describir una acción motriz de gran precisión, debido a las condiciones de distancia o de interferencias acústicas. En los instructores de ballet se encontró una forma generalizada de dirigir los ensayos utilizando conteos rítmicos con las palmas o los pies. De igual forma, se destacan los componentes paralingüísticos de los diversos actos de habla, especialmente, en lo que se refiere a entonación, duración e intensidad.This study analyzes the communication model generated among professional soccer trainers, artistic gymnastics trainers, and folkloric ballet instructors, on the basis of the dynamic body language typical of specialized communication among sportspeople and dancers, which includes a high percentage of non-verbal language. Non-verbal language was observed in both psychomotor and sociomotor practices in order to identify and characterize relations between different concepts and their corresponding gestural representation. This made it possible to generate a communication model that takes into account the non-verbal aspects of specialized communicative contexts. The results indicate that the non-verbal language of trainers and instructors occasionally replaces verbal language when the

  3. The Solar System Ballet: A Kinesthetic Spatial Astronomy Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyer, Inge; Slater, T. F.; Slater, S. J.; Astronomy, Center; Education ResearchCAPER, Physics

    2011-05-01

    The Solar System Ballet was developed in order for students of all ages to learn about the planets, their motions, their distances, and their individual characteristics. To teach people about the structure of our Solar System can be revealing and rewarding, for students and teachers. Little ones (and some bigger ones, too) often cannot yet grasp theoretical and spatial ideas purely with their minds. Showing a video is better, but being able to learn with their bodies, essentially being what they learn about, will help them understand and remember difficult concepts much more easily. There are three segments to this activity, which can be done together or separately, depending on time limits and age of the students. Part one involves a short introductory discussion about what students know about the planets. Then students will act out the orbital motions of the planets (and also moons for the older ones) while holding a physical model. During the second phase we look at the structure of the Solar System as well as the relative distances of the planets from the Sun, first by sketching it on paper, then by recreating a scaled version in the class room. Again the students act out the parts of the Solar System bodies with their models. The third segment concentrates on recreating historical measurements of Earth-Moon-Sun system. The Solar System Ballet activity is suitable for grades K-12+ as well as general public informal learning activities.

  4. Specificity of foot configuration during bipedal stance in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabona, Antonino; Leonardi, Giuseppa; Aimola, Ettore; La Grua, Giovanni; Polizzi, Cristina Maria; Cioni, Matteo; Valle, Maria Stella

    2016-05-01

    Learning highly specialized upright postures may be of benefit for more common as well as for novel stances. In this study, we asked whether this generalization occurs with foot configurations previously trained or depends on a generic increase in balance difficulty. We also explored the possibility that the benefit may concern not only the level of postural performance but also the structural organization of the upright standing. Ten elite professional ballet dancers were compared to ten untrained subjects, measuring the motion of the center of pressure (COP) across a set of five stances with different foot configurations. The balance stability was measured computing the area, the sway path, and the root mean square of the COP motion, whereas the structure of the postural control was assessed by compute approximate entropy, fractal dimension and the mean power frequency. The foot position included common and challenging stances, with the level of difficulty changed across the configurations. Among these conditions, only one foot configuration was familiar to the dancers. Statistically significant differences between the two groups, for all the parameters, were observed only for the stance with the foot position familiar to the dancers. Stability and structural parameters exhibited comparable differences. We concluded that the benefit from classical ballet is limited to a specific foot configuration, regardless of the level of stance difficulty or the component of postural control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of foot load during ballet dancers' gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazkova, Marketa; Tepla, Lucie; Svoboda, Zdenek; Janura, Miroslav; Cieslarová, Miloslava

    2014-01-01

    Ballet is an art that puts extreme demands on the dancer's musculoskeletal system and therefore significantly affects motor behavior of the dancers. The aim of our research was to compare plantar pressure distribution during stance phase of gait between a group of professional ballet dancers and non-dancers. Thirteen professional dancers (5 men, 8 women; mean age of 24.1 ± 3.8 years) and 13 nondancers (5 men, 8 women; mean age of 26.1 ± 5.3 years) participated in this study. Foot pressure analysis during gait was collected using a 2 m pressure plate. The participants were instructed to walk across the platform at a self-selected pace barefoot. Three gait cycles were necessary for the data analysis. The results revealed higher (p < 0.05) pressure peaks in medial edge of forefoot during gait for dancers in comparison with nondancers. Furthermore, differences in total foot loading and foot loading duration of rearfoot was higher (p < 0.05) in dancers as well. We can attribute these differences to long-term and intensive dancing exercises that can change the dancer's gait stereotype.

  6. A Survey of Injuries Affecting Pre-Professional Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Dennis; Bergeron, Glen; Goodwin, Brett J; Thomas, Jessica; Caine, Caroline G; Steinfeld, Sam; Dyck, Kevin; André, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional design was employed retrospectively to evaluate injuries self-reported by 71 pre-professional ballet dancers over one season. Some of the descriptive findings of this survey were consistent with those of previous research and suggest particular demographic and injury trends in pre-professional ballet. These results include gender distribution, mean age and age range of participants, training hours, injury location, acute versus overuse injuries, as well as average number of physiotherapy treatments per dancer. Other results provide information that was heretofore unreported or inconsistent with previous investigations. These findings involved proportion of dancers injured, average number of injuries per dancer, overall injury incidence during an 8.5 month period, incidence rate by technique level, mean time loss per injury, proportion of recurrent injury, and activity practiced at time of injury. The results of univariate analyses revealed several significant findings, including a decrease in incidence rate of injury with increased months of experience in the pre-professional program, dancers having lower injury risk in rehearsal and performance than in class, and a reduced risk of injury for dancers at certain technique levels. However, only this latter finding remained significant in multivariate analysis. The results of this study underscore the importance of determining injury rates by gender, technique level, and activity setting in addition to overall injury rates. They also point to the necessity of looking at both overall and individual dancer-based injury risks.

  7. Migration Theories and Mental Health in Toni Morrison's Jazz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Tafreshi Motalgh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to elaborate the relationship between migration and mental health problems that are evident in migrant women in Toni Morrison's Jazz (1992. To this end, pre-migration, migration and post-migration stress factors are identified in the novel based on Danish Bhugra's theory of migration. It seems that pre-migration stress factors and traumas are associated with the push theory of migration, while post-migration stresses are associated with the pull theory of migration. Despite post-migration stresses, the main female characters who encounter pre-migration stress factors and traumas are more likely to develop mental health problems like Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. Although there is extensive literary criticism of Jazz (1992, no theoretical criticism exists that simultaneously covers migration theories and the mental health problems evident in Toni Morrison's female characters. It is worth highlighting that gender is a variable that correlates positively with migration and mental health. This article attempts to fill a gap in literary criticism and contribute to the body of research on mental health problems associated with gender and migration. Keywords: Push-Pull Theory, Great Migration, Black Studies, Gender, Trauma, PTSD

  8. Somatotype analysis of students who will be trained for classical ballet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Gul Kabakci

    2016-12-01

    Material and Methods: In the 2013-2014 academic year Cukurova University State Conservatory Ballet Main Art Branch recieved 8-11-year-old students admitted to study ballet training, compared to students who were not accepted by the accepted students. Convenient and inconvenient students for ballet education were identified as two study groups. While conevient experimental group, inconvenient students were evaluated as control group. This study ballet students determine their body type and includes anthropometric measurements to evaluate objectively the criteria for ballet training. In determining the Heath-Carter body type classification is used. Results: In our study, Cukurova University State Conservatory accepted applicants for training in ballet, for 51 female students were enrolled. As 31 girls were convenient for ballet education, 20 girls were not. While the average of age, height and weight measurements of convenient students were 9.51+/-0.67, 1.38+/-0.07 m and 30.03+/-4.85kg respectively, the same dimensions in inconvenient students, 10.20+/-0.89, 1.43+/-0.10 m and 39.06+/-6.94 kg respectively. Measurements of diameter, circumference and subcutaneous fat thickness were found less for convenient students. Major body type of convenient students was identified as mesomorph, whereas major body type of inconvenient students was identified as endomorphy. Conclusion: These parameters used in convenience for classical ballet education were evaluated objectively. The observations presented in this study have defined physical features and need to be taken into consideration for evaluate and guidelines for determine the deficiency in literature. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 744-753

  9. Hypermobility and joint hypermobility syndrome in Brazilian students and teachers of ballet dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanches, S B; Oliveira, G M; Osório, F L; Crippa, J A S; Martín-Santos, R

    2015-04-01

    The current literature has been discussing the risks and benefits of joint hypermobility (JHM) for careers in ballet This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of JHM and joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS) in a group of ballet teachers and students, looking both at aspects related to the flexibility required to dance, as at the risk of injuries when hypermobility is associated with other symptoms, in the case of JHS. We evaluated ballet teachers and ballet students, with age ranging from 18 to 40 years. All participants completed identification and sociodemographic questionnaires and underwent a physical examination. JHM was assessed using the Beighton score with goniometry. Symptoms of JHS were evaluated according to the Brighton criteria. Final sample consisted of 77 participants, being 44 ballet students and 33 ballet teachers. The prevalence of JHM in the sample as a whole was 58 %. Teachers and students had no significant differences regarding the prevalence of JHM (p = 0.74) (OR 1.21; 95 % CI 0.48-3.07). However, the prevalence of JHS was significantly different (p = 0.04) between students (16 %) and teachers (36 %). Teachers were three times more likely than student to have JHS (OR 3.02; 95 % CI 1.03-8.85). Teachers and students also presented differences in the frequency of specific items of Beighton score and Brighton criteria. These data provide elements to discuss the relationship between hypermobility, ballet technique and selection for dance, suggesting that dancers with JHS could find in ballet teaching an alternative to maintain professional activity with dance, while remaining protected from the higher risk of injury that professional dancers may be exposed to.

  10. Comparison of Body Composition and Energy Intake of Young Female Ballet Dancers and Ordinary School Girls

    OpenAIRE

    Kalniņa Līga; Selga Guntars; Sauka Melita; Randoha Aija; Krasovska Eva; Lāriņš Viesturs

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess body fat level, energy and nutrient intake of adolescent ballet dancers and to compare these results with those of adolescents from ordinary school. Participants included 39 ballet dancers and 70 adolescents from ordinary school. Body composition was measured using a multi-frequency 8-polar bioelectrical impedance leg-to-hand analyser (X-Scan Plus II, Korea). Dietary intakes were assessed using a three-day estimated food record. Nutritional intake was calcul...

  11. Prevalence and profile of musculoskeletal injuries in ballet dancers: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Toby O; Davies, Leigh; de Medici, Akbar; Hakim, Allan; Haddad, Fares; Macgregor, Alex

    2016-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and anatomical regions which are most frequently injured in ballet dancers. Published (AMED, CiNAHL, EMBASE, SPORTDiscus, psycINFO, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library) and grey literature databases (OpenGrey, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, Current Controlled Trials and the UK National Research Register Archive) were searched from their inception to 25th May 2015 for papers presenting data on injury prevalence in ballet dancers. Two reviewers independently identified all eligible papers, data extracted and critically appraised studies. Study appraisal was conducted using the CASP appraisal tool. Pooled prevalence data with 95% confidence intervals were estimated to determine period prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and anatomical regions affected. Nineteen studies were eligible, reporting 7332 injuries in 2617 ballet dancers. The evidence was moderate in quality. Period prevalence of musculoskeletal injury was 280% (95% CI: 217-343%). The most prevalent musculoskeletal disorders included: hamstring strain (51%), ankle tendinopathy (19%) and generalized low back pain (14%). No papers explored musculoskeletal disorders in retired ballet dancers. Whilst we have identified which regions and what musculoskeletal disorders are commonly seen ballet dancers. The long-term injury impact of musculoskeletal disorders in retired ballet dancers remains unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Disordered eating, amenorrhea, and substance use and misuse among professional ballet dancers: Preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peric, Mia; Zenic, Natasa; Sekulic, Damir; Kondric, Miran; Zaletel, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Substance use and misuse (SUM), eating disorders (ED) and consequent amenorrhea (AM) occur frequently in professional ballet dancing. The objective of this study has been to explore the prevalence and association between ED, AM and SUM in ballet. The sample comprised 21 ballet dancers, 23.1±4.5 years old, members of the professional National Ballet Ensemble from Croatia. Variables were collected by questionnaires examining SUM, occurrence of amenorrhea, and corresponding ballet-specific and socio-demographic factors (Questionnaire on Substance Use - QSU) and the level of ED (Brief Eating Disorder in Athletes Questionnaire - BEDA-Q). Smoking is prevalent in 40% of dancers (25% smoke on a daily basis), 36% often use analgesics, and 25% engage in binge drinking at least once a month. Smoking and binge drinking are less frequent in ballerinas with a higher academic level (r = 0.60 and r = 0.54 for binge drinking and smoking, respectively; p ballet should target dancers who consume alcohol to a greater extent. Future studies should specifically explore the less frequent consumption of analgesics among dancers who consume nutritional supplements. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. Measurement of the extreme ankle range of motion required by female ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Kruse, David W; Nevill, Alan M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2010-12-01

    Female ballet dancers require extreme ankle motion, especially plantar flexion, but research about measuring such motion is lacking. The purposes of this study were to determine in a sample of ballet dancers whether non-weight-bearing ankle range of motion is significantly different from the weight-bearing equivalent and whether inclinometric plantar flexion measurement is a suitable substitute for standard plantar flexion goniometry. Fifteen female ballet dancers (5 university, 5 vocational, and 5 professional dancers; age 21 ± 3.0 years) volunteered. Subjects received 5 assessments on 1 ankle: non-weight-bearing goniometry dorsiflexion (NDF) and plantar flexion (NPF), weight-bearing goniometry in the ballet positions demi-plié (WDF) and en pointe (WPF), and non-weight-bearing plantar flexion inclinometry (IPF). Mean NDF was significantly lower than WDF (17° ± 1.3° vs 30° ± 1.8°, P ballet proficiency. The authors conclude that assessment of extreme ankle motion in female ballet dancers is challenging, and goniometry and inclinometry appear to measure plantar flexion differently.

  14. Ballet dancers cardiorespiratory, oxidative and muscle damage responses to classes and rehearsals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Krause, Josianne; Krause, Mauricio; Cunha, Giovani Dos Santos; Perin, Diana; Martins, Jocelito B; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Schaun, Maximiliano I; De Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to describe and compare ballet dancers' cardiorespiratory responses, muscle damage and oxidative stress levels during a ballet class (practice of isolated ballet exercises performed with barre/hand-rail support and across-the-floor movements to improve technical skills) and rehearsal (practice of ballet choreography involving technical-artistic skills to improve dancers' performance for shows). The 12 advanced female ballet dancers undertook three exercise sessions: maximum effort test, class and rehearsal. Heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2) were continuously measured. Lactate was determined before 15 min and after class and rehearsal. Blood was sampled pre, post and 48 h after class and rehearsal for creatine kinase (CK), lipid peroxides (LPO) and glutathione analysis (GSSG/GSH). Class was of lower intensity than rehearsal as shown by VO2, HR and lactate values: VO2 (mL.kg(-1).min(-1)): 14.5±2.1 vs. 19.1±1.7 (p Ballet dancers' muscle damage and oxidative stress responses seem not to be dependent on exercise intensity based on VO2 responses.

  15. Three-dimensional analysis of a ballet dancer with ischial tuberosity apophysitis. A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjola, Hanna; Sayers, Mark; Mellifont, Rebecca; Mellifont, Daniel; Venojärvi, Mika

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this case study was to describe the three-dimensional biomechanics of common ballet exercises in a ballet dancer with ischial tuberosity apophysitis. This was achieved by comparing kinematics between the symptomatic (i.e. ischial apophyseal symptoms) and contralateral lower limbs, as well as via reported pain. Results suggest consistent differences in movement patterns in this dancer. These differences included: 1) decreased external rotation of contralateral hip, hence a decreased hip contribution to 'turn out'; 2) increased contralateral knee adduction and internal rotation; 3) an apparent synchronicity in the contralateral lower limb of the decreased hip external rotation and increased knee adduction; and 4) minimal use of ankle plantar/dorsiflexion movement for symptomatic side. Pain related to the left ischial apophysitis was associated with reduced amplitudes especially in fast ballet movements that required large range of motion in flexion and adduction in the left hip joint. These findings suggest that ischial apophysitis may limit dancer's ballet technique and performance. Key PointsThe pain related to the left ischial apophysitis was associated with reduced amplitudes especially in fast ballet movements that require large range of motion. This may affect to the lower limbs kinematics, and limit dancer's technique and performance.Compensatory strategies in the kinetic chain, differences in the joint angles between the lower limbs, traction forces, velocity and amplitude demands should be taken in consideration while training and rehabilitation of the ischial apophyseal injury within classical ballet.

  16. Time motion and video analysis of classical ballet and contemporary dance performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyon, M A; Twitchett, E; Angioi, M; Clarke, F; Metsios, G; Koutedakis, Y

    2011-11-01

    Video analysis has become a useful tool in the preparation for sport performance and its use has highlighted the different physiological demands of seemingly similar sports and playing positions. The aim of the current study was to examine the performance differences between classical ballet and contemporary dance. In total 93 dance performances (48 ballet and 45 contemporary) were analysed for exercise intensity, changes in direction and specific discrete skills (e. g., jumps, lifts). Results revealed significant differences between the 2 dance forms for exercise intensity (pBallet was characterised by longer periods at rest (38 s x min(-1)) and high to very high exercise intensities (9 s x min(-1)), whilst contemporary dance featured more continuous moderate exercise intensities (27 s x min(-1)). These differences have implications on the energy systems utilised during performance with ballet potentially stressing the anaerobic system more than contemporary dance. The observed high rates in the discrete skills in ballet (5 jumps x min(-1); 2 lifts x min(-1)) can cause local muscular damage, particularly in relatively weaker individuals. In conclusion, classical ballet and contemporary dance performances are as significantly different in the underlying physical demands placed on their performers as the artistic aspects of the choreography. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Ethnic Dance. The Origins of Jazz. A Curriculum Design for Dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Karen W.

    1988-01-01

    The article describes the development, organization, goals, and activities of a course designed to trace the evolution of jazz dance and tie this dynamic dance form to the cultural experiences of African-Americans. (CB)

  18. Variations on a theme : the role of music in Toni Morrison´s Jazz

    OpenAIRE

    Berre, Tone

    2008-01-01

    African American music and contemporary African American literature are connected both thematically and structurally. This thesis examines the various ways in which Toni Morrison draws on the cultural traditions of her ancestors, especially blues and jazz music, in creating her sixth novel, Jazz. My analysis includes the important contexts of the history and culture of black Americans from slavery and to the present. Slaves brought with them their traditions and music, out of which musical fo...

  19. Calculations of lattice vibrational mode lifetimes using Jazz: a Python wrapper for LAMMPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Y; Wang, H; Daw, M S

    2015-01-01

    Jazz is a new python wrapper for LAMMPS [1], implemented to calculate the lifetimes of vibrational normal modes based on forces as calculated for any interatomic potential available in that package. The anharmonic character of the normal modes is analyzed via the Monte Carlo-based moments approximation as is described in Gao and Daw [2]. It is distributed as open-source software and can be downloaded from the website http://jazz.sourceforge.net/. (paper)

  20. Calculations of lattice vibrational mode lifetimes using Jazz: a Python wrapper for LAMMPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Wang, H.; Daw, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    Jazz is a new python wrapper for LAMMPS [1], implemented to calculate the lifetimes of vibrational normal modes based on forces as calculated for any interatomic potential available in that package. The anharmonic character of the normal modes is analyzed via the Monte Carlo-based moments approximation as is described in Gao and Daw [2]. It is distributed as open-source software and can be downloaded from the website http://jazz.sourceforge.net/.

  1. La formación de estudiantes de ballet y el desarrollo de competencias emocionales Educating students of ballet and the development of emotional competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adonys Isidro Ordán Bolívar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is aimed at characterizing the historical background of students of ballet education from the perspective of the process of emotional competencies. The study was carried out by examining written documentary about the few memories found. The prevailing trend that favors technical and physical elements at the expense of the emotional ones in educating ballet students justifies the need of the study and gives novelty to the findings herein described. The main finding is the description of characteristic features of antecedents of balletstudent’s formative process and the approach to emotional competencies development.

  2. Application of Jazz Chants in English Phonetic Training%Jazz Chants在英语语音训练中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙元春

    2011-01-01

    语音技能是非英语专业学生亟待解决的问题.在多元智能理论理指导下,将Jazz Chants用于自主语音训练.通过对比实验发现:与传统语音训练形式相比Jazz Chants在语音语调、语音节奏能力提高方面具有比较大的优势,而在单词正音方面的作用不明显;教师要根据学生语音实际状况,把Jazz Chants与传统的语音训练形式有效结合,切实提高学生的英语语音能力.

  3. The artificial zinc finger coding gene 'Jazz' binds the utrophin promoter and activates transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, N; Libri, V; Fanciulli, M; Tinsley, J M; Davies, K E; Passananti, C

    2000-06-01

    Up-regulation of utrophin gene expression is recognized as a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have designed and engineered new zinc finger-based transcription factors capable of binding and activating transcription from the promoter of the dystrophin-related gene, utrophin. Using the recognition 'code' that proposes specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA binding sites, we engineered a new gene named 'Jazz' that encodes for a three-zinc finger peptide. Jazz belongs to the Cys2-His2 zinc finger type and was engineered to target the nine base pair DNA sequence: 5'-GCT-GCT-GCG-3', present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. The entire zinc finger alpha-helix region, containing the amino acid positions that are crucial for DNA binding, was specifically chosen on the basis of the contacts more frequently represented in the available list of the 'code'. Here we demonstrate that Jazz protein binds specifically to the double-stranded DNA target, with a dissociation constant of about 32 nM. Band shift and super-shift experiments confirmed the high affinity and specificity of Jazz protein for its DNA target. Moreover, we show that chimeric proteins, named Gal4-Jazz and Sp1-Jazz, are able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the human utrophin promoter.

  4. Jazz and substance abuse: road to creative genius or pathway to premature death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Gerald H Jerry; Cuyjet, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Jazz music and jazz musicians have often been linked for better or worse to the world of addictive substances. Many talented jazz musicians either had their careers sidetracked or prematurely ended due to their addiction to drugs and/or alcohol. The rigors of nightly performances, travel, and for many musicians a disapproving society exacted a toll that impacted the creativity of many artists of the genre. The fact that drug and alcohol use had a significant impact on the performance levels of numerous jazz musicians in the 1940's and 1950's has been much discussed, but more study of that impact is warranted. While recent research has provided new information regarding this challenging topic, there is still much to learn. Indeed, a number of questions for inquiry may be posed. Among those questions are the following: Was the work of these jazz artists truly inspired? Would their creative output have been enhanced had they not been addicted to substances? What was the impact of the addictive substances on their ability to function as creative artists and is there evidence to refute or verify that impact? Are there identifiable traits in certain artists that allowed them to be creative in spite of their addictions? This examination presents an evaluation of the evidence of the link between creativity and substance abuse especially as it relates to selected jazz artists during this time period and how they remained creative and actually prospered in their careers in spite of addictions to controlled substances.

  5. "Nutcracker Fracture" in a Ballet Dancer Performing in The Nutcracker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsen, Sasha; Quinn, Bridget J; Beck, Elizabeth; Southwick, Heather; Micheli, Lyle J

    2015-09-01

    A 26-year-old female professional dancer sustained an acute injury to her mid-foot during a performance of The Nutcracker. An intra-articular, comminuted, minimally displaced fracture of the cuboid was found. The patient was treated non-operatively with cast and boot immobilization, modified weightbearing, and progressive rehabilitation. She was able to return to professional dance at 6 months post-injury and continues to dance professionally over 1 year out from injury without issue. The unique demands of classical ballet, especially dancing en pointe, increase the risk for mid-foot fractures, and clinicians should have a high-index of suspicion in dancers suffering an acute injury to the foot and ankle with greater than expected pain or swelling. Multiple imaging modalities can be used to make the diagnosis, to include plain film radiographs, MRI, and CT scan. Fracture characteristics and patient-specific factors should be taken into account when deciding on a treatment plan.

  6. Hypermobility and injuries in a professional ballet company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemp, P.; Learmonth, I. D.

    1984-01-01

    A study was conducted on members of the Cape Performing Arts Board (CAPAB) professional ballet company to determine the prevalence of hypermobility and to document the injuries sustained over a ten year period. If forward flexion, which is acquired through training, is excluded as a parameter the difference in hypermobility between dancers and controls is not statistically significant. Considering the stresses imposed on the musculoskeletal system, the number of injuries was surprisingly low. Ligamentous injuries about the ankle and knee were both common and accounted for the major morbidity. There were minor differences in the nature and severity of injuries in the male and female dancers. Back injuries, fractures and osteoarthrosis were uncommon and shin splints was not recorded in any of the dancers. Images p143-a p143-b Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6435713

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the ankle in female ballet dancers en pointe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Jeffrey A. (Dept. of Dance, Univ. of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States)), e-mail: jeff.russell@uci.edu; Shave, Ruth M. (Dept. of Radiology, Russells Hall Hospital, Dudley (United Kingdom)); Yoshioka, Hiroshi (Dept. of Radiological Sciences, Univ. of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States)); Kruse, David W. (Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery and Family Medicine, Univ. of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States)); Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A. (School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure, Univ. of Wolverhampton, Walsall (United Kingdom))

    2010-07-15

    Background: Ballet dancers require extreme range of motion of the ankle, especially weight-bearing maximum plantar flexion (en pointe). In spite of a high prevalence of foot and ankle injuries in ballet dancers, the anatomy and pathoanatomy of this position have not been sufficiently studied in weight-bearing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a beneficial method for such study. Purpose: To develop an MRI method of evaluating the ankles of female ballet dancers standing en pointe and to assess whether pathological findings from the MR images were associated with ankle pain reported by the subjects. Material and Methods: Nine female ballet dancers (age, 21+-2.9 years; dance experience, 16+-4.1 years; en pointe dance experience, 7+-4.9 years) completed an ankle pain visual analog scale questionnaire and underwent T1- and T2-weighted scans using a 0.25 T open MRI device. The ankle was scanned in three positions: supine with full plantar flexion, standing with the ankle in anatomical position, and standing en pointe. Results: Obtaining MR images of the ballet dancers en pointe was successful in spite of limitations imposed by the difficulty of remaining motionless in the en pointe position during scanning. MRI signs of ankle pathology and anatomical variants were observed. Convergence of the posterior edge of the tibial plafond, posterior talus, and superior calcaneus was noted in 100% of cases. Widened anterior joint congruity and synovitis/joint effusion were present in 71% and 67%, respectively. Anterior tibial and/or talar spurs and Stieda's process were each seen in 44%. However, clinical signs did not always correlate with pain reported by the subjects. Conclusion: This study successfully established an ankle imaging technique for ballet dancers en pointe that can be used in the future to assess the relationship between en pointe positioning and ankle pathoanatomy in ballet dancers

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging of the ankle in female ballet dancers en pointe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Shave, Ruth M; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Kruse, David W; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2010-07-01

    Ballet dancers require extreme range of motion of the ankle, especially weight-bearing maximum plantar flexion (en pointe). In spite of a high prevalence of foot and ankle injuries in ballet dancers, the anatomy and pathoanatomy of this position have not been sufficiently studied in weight-bearing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a beneficial method for such study. To develop an MRI method of evaluating the ankles of female ballet dancers standing en pointe and to assess whether pathological findings from the MR images were associated with ankle pain reported by the subjects. Nine female ballet dancers (age, 21+/-2.9 years; dance experience, 16+/-4.1 years; en pointe dance experience, 7+/-4.9 years) completed an ankle pain visual analog scale questionnaire and underwent T1- and T2-weighted scans using a 0.25 T open MRI device. The ankle was scanned in three positions: supine with full plantar flexion, standing with the ankle in anatomical position, and standing en pointe. Obtaining MR images of the ballet dancers en pointe was successful in spite of limitations imposed by the difficulty of remaining motionless in the en pointe position during scanning. MRI signs of ankle pathology and anatomical variants were observed. Convergence of the posterior edge of the tibial plafond, posterior talus, and superior calcaneus was noted in 100% of cases. Widened anterior joint congruity and synovitis/joint effusion were present in 71% and 67%, respectively. Anterior tibial and/or talar spurs and Stieda's process were each seen in 44%. However, clinical signs did not always correlate with pain reported by the subjects. This study successfully established an ankle imaging technique for ballet dancers en pointe that can be used in the future to assess the relationship between en pointe positioning and ankle pathoanatomy in ballet dancers.

  9. The effect of first ballet classes in the community on various postural parameters in young girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Anna; Masharawi, Youssef

    2011-11-01

    To examine the effect of first season ballet classes in the community on the thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), hip external rotation (ER) and joint flexibility in young girls. Longitudinal single blinded cohort control study. Institutional. 30 girls aged 6-9, recruited from the same primary school were divided equally into 2 groups: a group bi-weekly community ballet class and a sedentary control group. All girls were assessed prior to ballet classes (t(0)), at the conclusion (t(1)) (6 months), and approximately one year later (t(fu)). Beighton score for joint hyper-flexibility, peak of TK and LL, range of hip ER, ratio TK/LL, and individual's height, weight and BMI. LL at t1 became greater in the ballet girls' group (23.7°± 6) as opposed to the controls (19.5°±3.9) due to a decrease in LL in the controls from t0 to t1 (mean difference = -16.5°) (cut-off score = 3.45°) (p ballet girls' group (mean difference = -26.1°) and controls (mean difference = -31.3°) (cut-off score = 4.85°) (p ballet girls' group (6.1 ± 2.3) as opposed to the controls (4.4 ± 1.5) (p ballet classes for young girls in the community can be associated with relatively greater LL, and left hip ER and joint hyper-flexibility. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Leadership Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val, Carlin; Kemp, Jess

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how a group's dynamic changes under the influence of different leadership styles, and determines what leadership style works best in a large group expedition. The main question identified was "What roles can a leader play in affecting the dynamic of a large group while partaking in a field expedition?" The following…

  11. Raising the Bar: How a Teacher Built a Ballet-Centered Public School that Aces Standardized Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author features Todd Eric Allen, an acclaimed ballet dancer, who returns home to Florida's so-called Redneck Riviera and opens a magnet school for dance. When asked the inevitable question of what an internationally known ballet dancer is doing teaching 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders in Fort Walton Beach, he simply replies in a way…

  12. The Effects of Multimedia Computer- Assisted Instruction on Learning Basic Ballet Skills with Physical Education Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Moneim Doaa Abd

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Computer technology has become an integral part of physical education, yet there have been few studies exploring the use of multimedia technology in the instruction of Physical Education. The purpose of this study was to investigate if multimedia technology affected the learning of basic ballet skills. A total of 32 female students, mean age 18.1 years, studying at the Faculty of Physical Education Zagazig university were divided into two groups. The experimental group comprised 16 students. Participants in this group participated in a ballet class with multimedia technology for six weeks. Group two participated in the ballet class with the traditional method as the control group. Parameters assessed height, weight, age, and academic level. All participants were free of any disorders known to affect performance, such as bone fractures, osteoporosis, diabetes, or cardiovascular disease. Participants reported no use of anti-seizure drugs or alcohol. In addition, all participants were fully informed of the aims of the study, and gave their voluntary consent prior to participation. The measurement procedures were in accordance with ethical human experimentation. All statistical analyses were calculated with the SPSS statistical package. Results indicated significant differences between the two groups in learning the basic skills and levels of knowledge of ballet. Applying the proposed educational program meant using multimedia to teach basic ballet skills to second-year female students enrolled in the Faculty of Physical Education

  13. The effect of textured ballet shoe insoles on ankle proprioception in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Nili; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Karin, Janet; Tirosh, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Impaired ankle inversion movement discrimination (AIMD) can lead to ankle sprain injuries. The aim of this study was to explore whether wearing textured insoles improved AIMD compared with barefoot, ballet shoes and smooth insoles, among dancers. Forty-four adolescent male and female dancers, aged 13-19, from The Australian Ballet School were tested for AIMD while barefoot, wearing ballet shoes, smooth insoles, and textured insoles. No interaction was found between the four different footwear conditions, the two genders, or the two levels of dancers in AIMD (p > .05). An interaction was found between the four different footwear conditions and the three tertiles when tested in ballet shoes (p = .006). Although significant differences were found between the upper tertiles and the lower tertiles when tested with ballet shoes, barefoot and with smooth insoles (p < .001; p < .001; p = .047, respectively), when testing with textured insoles dancers in the lower tertile obtained similar scores to those obtained by dancers in the upper tertile (p = .911). Textured insoles improved the discrimination scores of dancers with low AIMD, suggesting that textured insoles may trigger the cutaneous receptors in the plantar surface, increasing the awareness of ankle positioning, which in turn might decrease the chance of ankle injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in "turnout".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Luke S; Sato, Nahoko; Weidemann, Andries L

    2016-01-01

    The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve "turning out" or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in "turned out" postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat.

  15. A Survey of Florida High School Instrumental Music Programs: Rationale for the Inclusion of Jazz Ensemble Experience in Music Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkle, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    During the past 60 years, jazz music has slowly become recognized as a genre worthy of study in high school music programs throughout the United States. Only a few researchers have analyzed large samples of jazz-related instruction in instrumental music programs, and of these studies no data were collected to investigate the inclusion of jazz in…

  16. Informal in Formal: The Relationship of Informal and Formal Learning in Popular and Jazz Music Master Workshops in Conservatoires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkkula, Esa

    2016-01-01

    The present article will examine informal learning in popular and jazz music education in Finland and evaluate it as a part of formal upper secondary vocational musicians' training, which is typically teacher directed. It is not necessarily the best model of working in popular and jazz music learning, which has traditionally benefitted from…

  17. The Five Improvisation "Brains": A Pedagogical Model for Jazz Improvisation at High School and the Undergraduate Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Augusto

    2012-01-01

    The learning of jazz improvisation is often treated as the incorporation of stylistic vocabulary and development of technical dexterity. Although this methodology is effective, considering other aspects of jazz improvisation can make the learning process a more holistic and less technical endeavour. My experience teaching improvisation has led me…

  18. Ballet in the Dark: A Critical Review of Black Swan by Darren Aronofsky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Angela Corpus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Choreographing the life of a ballerina in an ominous psychological thriller is a highly gendered project that takes us to well-established suspects in the patriarchal schema of the ballet world. Black Swan’s filmmakers created a narrative out of a performance of the classic ballet Swan Lake, making it a mimicry of the life of the tragic heroine Nina Sayers (Natalie Portman. The symptomatic pathology of perfectionism haunts the lead character, revealing her manifest hubris while unmasking the systemic social conditioning of women in the ballet system. These women are driven to become tenacious competitors, pleasant and willing objects of a gaze and patronage that are traditionally male-defined and controlled.

  19. The effects of vestibular stimulation and fatigue on postural control in classical ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Diana M; Grisbrook, Tiffany L; Newnham, Prudence J; Edwards, Dylan J

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of ballet-specific vestibular stimulation and fatigue on static postural control in ballet dancers and to establish whether these effects differ across varying levels of ballet training. Dancers were divided into three groups: professional, pre-professional, and recreational. Static postural control of 23 dancers was measured on a force platform at baseline and then immediately, 30 seconds, and 60 seconds after vestibular stimulation (pirouettes) and induction of fatigue (repetitive jumps). The professional dancers' balance was unaffected by both the vestibular stimulation and the fatigue task. The pre-professional and recreational dancers' static sway increased following both perturbations. It is concluded that professional dancers are able to compensate for vestibular and fatiguing perturbations due to a higher level of skill-specific motor training.

  20. Corticospinal excitability of the ankle extensor muscles is enhanced in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Sakiko; Obata, Hiroki; Endoh, Takashi; Kuno-Mizumura, Mayumi; Nakazawa, Kimitaka

    2014-09-01

    We tested the corticospinal excitability of the soleus muscle in ballet dancers to clarify whether the presumed long-term repetition of the specific plantarflexion results in changes of excitability in this neural pathway. We compared motor evoked potentials of the soleus muscle at rest and during isometric contraction of the plantar flexors in dancers and non-dancers. The amplitudes of motor evoked potentials elicited by transcranial magnetic stimulation during contraction were examined against the background electromyographic activity. A regression line was calculated for each subject. Results showed that the slope of the regression line is significantly greater in the dancer group than in the control group, suggesting that the corticospinal tract of ballet dancers has adapted to long-term repetition of plantarflexion in daily ballet training.

  1. Disordered eating, amenorrhea, and substance use and misuse among professional ballet dancers: Preliminary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Peric

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substance use and misuse (SUM, eating disorders (ED and consequent amenorrhea (AM occur frequently in professional ballet dancing. The objective of this study has been to explore the prevalence and association between ED, AM and SUM in ballet. Material and Methods: The sample comprised 21 ballet dancers, 23.1±4.5 years old, members of the professional National Ballet Ensemble from Croatia. Variables were collected by questionnaires examining SUM, occurrence of amenorrhea, and corresponding ballet-specific and socio-demographic factors (Questionnaire on Substance Use – QSU and the level of ED (Brief Eating Disorder in Athletes Questionnaire – BEDA-Q. Results: Smoking is prevalent in 40% of dancers (25% smoke on a daily basis, 36% often use analgesics, and 25% engage in binge drinking at least once a month. Smoking and binge drinking are less frequent in ballerinas with a higher academic level (r = 0.60 and r = 0.54 for binge drinking and smoking, respectively; p < 0.05. Alcohol drinking is higher among dancers who consume analgesics more often and those with a higher BEDA-Q score (r = 0.53 and r = 0.54 for analgesics and BEDA-Q, respectively; p < 0.05. Amenorrhea is more prevalent among those dancers with a higher BEDA-Q score. Women who consume nutritional supplements are less likely to use analgesics (Mann Whitney U test = 2.11; p < 0.05. Conclusions: Efforts seeking to prevent ED in ballet should target dancers who consume alcohol to a greater extent. Future studies should specifically explore the less frequent consumption of analgesics among dancers who consume nutritional supplements. Med Pr 2016;67(1:21–27

  2. Similar Prevalence of Acetabular Labral Tear in Professional Ballet Dancers and Sporting Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Ferris, April-Rose; Smith, Peter; Garnham, Andrew; Cook, Jill

    2016-07-01

    To compare the prevalence of acetabular labral tear in male and female professional ballet dancers with age-matched and sex-matched sporting participants and to determine the relationship to clinical findings and cartilage defects. Case-control study. Clinical and radiology practices. Forty-nine (98 hips) male and female professional ballet dancers (current and retired) with median age 30 years (range: 19-64 years) and 49 (98 hips) age-matched and sex-matched sporting participants. Group (ballet or sports), sex, age, hip cartilage defects, history of hip pain, Hip and Groin Outcome Score, passive hip internal rotation (IR), and external rotation range of movement (ROM). Labral tear identified with 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Labral tears were identified in 51% of all 196 hips. The prevalence did not differ significantly between the ballet and sporting participants (P = 0.41) or between sexes (P = 0.34). Labral tear was not significantly associated with clinical measures, such as pain and function scores or rotation ROM (P > 0.01 for all). Pain provocation test using IR at 90° of hip flexion had excellent specificity [96%, 95% confidence intervals (CIs), 0.77%-0.998%] but poor sensitivity (50%, 95% CI, 0.26%-0.74%) for identifying labral tear in participants reporting hip pain. Older age and cartilage defect presence were independently associated with an increased risk of labral tear (both P ballet dancers was similar to a sporting population. Labral tears were not associated with clinical findings but were related to cartilage defects, independent of aging. Caution is required when interpreting MRI findings as labral tear may not be the source of the ballet dancer's symptoms.

  3. Comparison of Body Composition and Energy Intake of Young Female Ballet Dancers and Ordinary School Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalniņa Līga

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess body fat level, energy and nutrient intake of adolescent ballet dancers and to compare these results with those of adolescents from ordinary school. Participants included 39 ballet dancers and 70 adolescents from ordinary school. Body composition was measured using a multi-frequency 8-polar bioelectrical impedance leg-to-hand analyser (X-Scan Plus II, Korea. Dietary intakes were assessed using a three-day estimated food record. Nutritional intake was calculated using the Nutri Survey software. Ballet dancers were slightly shorter, lighter, with less fat and fat-free mass compared to girls from ordinary school. 51.3% (95% CI 35.59 to 66.97 of ballet dancers and 4% (95% CI; 0.27 to 11.15 of ordinary school girls had a body fat level of 12% or less. The recommended amount of 35–45 kcal energy to kg fat-free mass for aesthetic sports was not reached by 42.1% (95% CI 27.61 to 50.65% of ballet dancers. No statistically significant difference was found in percent body fat between ballet dancers who consumed energy less than the recommended amount compared to those who ate normally, but fatfree mass (p < 0.05 was lower in those who consumed 35–45 kcal energy to kg fat-free mass or less compared to those who ate more. The investigated groups had an inadequate intake of minerals and vitamins during the winter period.

  4. Rituals of creativity: tradition, modernity, and the "acoustic unconscious" in a U.S. collegiate jazz music program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf, Eitan

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I seek to complicate the distinction between imitation and creativity, which has played a dominant role in the modern imaginary and anthropological theory. I focus on a U.S. collegiate jazz music program, in which jazz educators use advanced sound technologies to reestablish immersive interaction with the sounds of past jazz masters against the backdrop of the disappearance of performance venues for jazz. I analyze a key pedagogical practice in the course of which students produce precise replications of the recorded improvisations of past jazz masters and then play them in synchrony with the recordings. Through such synchronous iconization, students inhabit and reenact the creativity epitomized by these recordings. I argue that such a practice, which I call a “ritual of creativity,” suggests a coconstitutive relationship between imitation and creativity, which has intensified under modernity because of the availability of new technologies of digital reproduction.

  5. Real-time implementation of an interactive jazz accompaniment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Nikhil

    Modern computational algorithms and digital signal processing (DSP) are able to combine with human performers without forced or predetermined structure in order to create dynamic and real-time accompaniment systems. With modern computing power and intelligent algorithm layout and design, it is possible to achieve more detailed auditory analysis of live music. Using this information, computer code can follow and predict how a human's musical performance evolves, and use this to react in a musical manner. This project builds a real-time accompaniment system to perform together with live musicians, with a focus on live jazz performance and improvisation. The system utilizes a new polyphonic pitch detector and embeds it in an Ableton Live system - combined with Max for Live - to perform elements of audio analysis, generation, and triggering. The system also relies on tension curves and information rate calculations from the Creative Artificially Intuitive and Reasoning Agent (CAIRA) system to help understand and predict human improvisation. These metrics are vital to the core system and allow for extrapolated audio analysis. The system is able to react dynamically to a human performer, and can successfully accompany the human as an entire rhythm section.

  6. Jazz Guitar Improvisation: Beginning with Guide-Tones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Andersen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses an approach to teaching linear improvisation to beginning jazz guitarists through the function of voice leading in harmonic progressions. The student may gain a clear understanding of improvising melodies by establishing clear visual and aural relationships between the chordal and melodic textures. Three dominant 7th chord voicings are introduced and applied to a twelve bar blues progression in F major. After learning the rhythm guitar accompaniment, single note guide tones consisting of the flat 7th and 3rd chord tones of each dominant seventh chord are extracted from the chord voicings and applied in a melodic texture following chromatic voice leading principles within the harmonic progression. Musicality within the exercises is increased by the addition of a series of rhythmic variations that are applied to the guide-tone lines. Continuing with the concept, full dominant seventh arpeggios are introduced in order to expand the available note choices as a way to build a solid foundation for improvising within harmonic progressions prior to using diatonic scales.

  7. Neurosyphilis in Anglo-American Composers and Jazz Musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenfeld, Darko; Kust, Davor; Breitenfeld, Tomislav; Prpić, Marin; Lucijanić, Marko; Zibar, Davor; Hostić, Vedran; Franceschi, Maja; Bolanča, Ante

    2017-09-01

    Syphilis is a sexually transmitted, systemic disease caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum. The most common mechanism of transmission is sexual intercourse. Although there are several hypotheses, the exact origin of the disease remains unknown. Newly published evidence suggests that the hypothesis supporting the theory of the American origin of the disease is the valid one. Among 1500 analyzed pathographies of composers and musicians, data on ten Anglo-American composers and jazz musicians having suffered from neurosyphilis (tertiary stage of the disease) were extracted for this report. In this group of Anglo-American composers and musicians, most of them died from progressive paralysis while still in the creative phase of life. Additionally, diagnoses of eleven other famous neurosyphilitic composers, as well as basic biographic data on ten less known composers that died from neurosyphilis-progressive paralysis are also briefly mentioned. In conclusion, neurosyphilis can cause serious neurological damage, as well as permanent disability or death, preventing further work and skill improvement.

  8. Jazz, guitar, and neurosurgery: the Pat Martino case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galarza, Marcelo; Isaac, Claire; Pellicer, Olga; Mayes, Andrew; Broks, Paul; Montaldi, Daniela; Denby, Christine; Simeone, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a professional jazz guitarist with temporal lobe epilepsy secondary to an arteriovenous cerebral malformation. The patient underwent a left temporal lobectomy in 1980. After surgery, he presented with severe retrograde amnesia and complete loss of musical interest and capabilities. The patient's musical abilities recovered over time, and he regained his previous virtuoso status. In 2007, his medical history, neuropsychologic functions, and structural magnetic resonance imaging study were examined and revealed a remarkable degree of recovery of memory and musical abilities in the context of extensive temporal lobe resection. The neuropsychologic findings and neuroanatomic features of the magnetic resonance imaging study were analyzed to try to understand the high degree of recovery of both long-term memory and musical processing abilities in this musician. This case reveals the possibility of an unusual degree of cerebral plasticity and reorganization. Additionally, it emphasizes the question of musical virtuosity. This report shows that the musical capabilities of professional musicians, in specific cases, can completely recover even when much of the left temporal lobe has been removed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Audio-Visual Feedback for Self-monitoring Posture in Ballet Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Esben Winther; Hølledig, Malte Lindholm; Bach-Nielsen, Sebastian Siem

    2017-01-01

    An application for ballet training is presented that monitors the posture position (straightness of the spine and rotation of the pelvis) deviation from the ideal position in real-time. The human skeletal data is acquired through a Microsoft Kinect v2. The movement of the student is mirrored......-coded. In an experiment with 9-12 year-old dance students from a ballet school, comparing the audio-visual feedback modality with no feedback leads to an increase in posture accuracy (p

  10. Assessment of spine pain presence in children and young persons studying in ballet schools

    OpenAIRE

    W?jcik, Ma?gorzata; Siatkowski, Idzi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Spine disorders affect various sections of the spine and have a variety of causes. Most pain occurs in the lumbo-sacral and cervical regions. Dance is associated with exercise. High levels of physical activity predispose to back pain occurrence. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 237 ballet learners; 80 children (primary school level), mean age 11.24?0.77, mean of years of training ballet 2.14?0.74; 93 students (junior high school level), mean age 14.01?0.84, mean of years of ...

  11. The relation of eating problems and amenorrhea in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Gunn, J; Warren, M P; Hamilton, L H

    1987-02-01

    Exercise-induced amenorrhea has received considerable attention in the medical literature. The combination of exercise and low body weight is thought to exert synergistic effects in the pathogenesis of amenorrhea, while the role of dieting and eating problems, another possible causative mechanism, has not been examined. A sample of 55 adult dancers in national and regional classical ballet companies was studied; their mean age was 24.7 yr. Fifty-six percent of the dancers had delayed menarche (age 14 or later) and 19% of the sample were currently amenorrheic (5 months or longer). One-third of the dancers reported having had an eating problem (self-reported anorexia nervosa or bulimia). Amenorrhea and reported eating problems were significantly related: 50% of amenorrheics reported anorexia nervosa while 13% of the normals did. In addition, prolonged amenorrhea was significantly related to dieting (as measured by EAT-26 scales, a measure of dieting behavior). As expected, leanness and absolute weight also were related to prolonged amenorrhea. Amenorrhea in this sample of adult dancers was not related to current activity level or age at which training began. Thus, eating problems may be one factor in the pathogenesis of prolonged amenorrhea in certain athletic groups.

  12. Pain and pain tolerance in professional ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajet-Foxell, B; Rose, F D

    1995-01-01

    Pain experience in sport had been the subject of increasing research in recent years. While sports professionals have generally been found to have higher pain thresholds than control subjects the reasons for this are not entirely clear. The present study seeks to investigate one possible explanatory factor, the importance of the popular image of the physical activity and of the self-image of its participants, by examining pain experience in professional ballet dancers. Like sports professionals, dancers were found to have higher pain and pain tolerance thresholds than age matched controls in the Cold Pressor Test. However, they also reported a more acute experience of the sensory aspects of the pain. Explanations of this apparent paradox are discussed both in terms of the neuroticism scores of the two groups and in terms of the dancers' greater experience of pain and its relationship with physical activity. The results illustrated the importance of using multidimensional measures of pain in this type of investigation. PMID:7788215

  13. Psychological intervention programs for reduction of injury in ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Young-Eun; Morris, Tony; Andersen, Mark B

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of two psychological interventions designed to reduce injury among dancers by enhancing coping skills. Participants were 35 ballet dancers. They were assigned to three conditions: control (n = 12), autogenic training (n = 12), and a broad-based coping skills condition, including autogenic training, imagery, and self-talk (n = 11). The 12-week interventions were designed on the basis of results from previous studies. For the 12 weeks following the intervention, participants were asked to practice their respective interventions three times a week. During the 24-week period (12 weeks training plus 12 weeks practice), training staff at the dance academies recorded injuries on a record sheet each day. Participants wrote injury records by themselves for another 24 weeks. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and univariate tests for each dependent variable showed that the broad-based coping skills condition enhanced coping skills, in particular, peaking under pressure, coping with adversity, having confidence and achievement motivation, and concentrating. Separate analyses of covariance (ANCOVA), one using preintervention injury frequency as the covariate and one using preintervention injury duration as the covariate, revealed that participants in the broad-based coping skills condition spent less time injured than participants in the control condition.

  14. Effect of Mulligan's and Kinesio knee taping on adolescent ballet dancers knee and hip biomechanics during landing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, D; Campbell, A; Ng, L; Grisbrook, T L; Hopper, D M

    2015-12-01

    Taping is often used to manage the high rate of knee injuries in ballet dancers; however, little is known about the effect of taping on lower-limb biomechanics during ballet landings in the turnout position. This study investigated the effects of Kinesiotape (KT), Mulligan's tape (MT) and no tape (NT) on knee and hip kinetics during landing in three turnout positions. The effect of taping on the esthetic execution of ballet jumps was also assessed. Eighteen pain-free 12-15-year-old female ballet dancers performed ballet jumps in three turnout positions, under the three knee taping conditions. A Vicon Motion Analysis system (Vicon Oxford, Oxford, UK) and Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc. (Watertown, Massa chusetts, USA) force plate collected lower-limb mechanics. The results demonstrated that MT significantly reduced peak posterior knee shear forces (P = 0.025) and peak posterior (P = 0.005), medial (P = 0.022) and lateral (P = 0.014) hip shear forces compared with NT when landing in first position. KT had no effect on knee or hip forces. No significant differences existed between taping conditions in all landing positions for the esthetic measures. MT was able to reduce knee and the hip forces without affecting the esthetic performance of ballet jumps, which may have implications for preventing and managing knee injuries in ballet dancers. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Characterising the proximal patellar tendon attachment and its relationship to skeletal maturity in adolescent ballet dancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudavsky, Aliza; Cook, Jillianne; Magnusson, Stig Peter

    2017-01-01

    gain an understanding of how and when the tendon attachment matures. Methods: Sixty adolescent elite ballet students (ages 11-18) and eight mature adults participated. Peak height velocity (PHV) estimated skeletal maturity. Ultrasound tissue characterisation (UTC) scan was taken of the left knee...

  16. Early signs of osteoarthritis in professional ballet dancers: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioi, Manuela; Maffulli, Gayle D; McCormack, Moira; Morrissey, Dylan; Chan, Otto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2014-09-01

    To investigate a cohort of professional ballet dancers for evidence of early signs of osteoarthritis (OA). One radiologist and 1 orthopedic surgeon specialized in musculoskeletal disorders analyzed magnetic resonance imaging scans independently. University Teaching Hospital. Fifteen professional ballet dancers (4 males and 11 females; age range, 19-36 years) experiencing chronic pain in the hip, knee, spine, ankle, or foot joints. Presence of osteophytes, subchondral sclerosis, joint space narrowing, cysts, and bone marrow changes; the Kellgren and Lawrence scale was used to quantify the knee OA. In the knee, there was thinning and irregularity of the articular cartilage over the medial femoral condyle and bone marrow changes within the lateral femoral condyle. In the hip, there was a loss of joint space and a frayed labrum with deep recess. The first metatarsophalangeal joint showed evidence of osteophytic development. Early signs of OA, in different joints, were present in a small but highly selected cohort of professional ballet dancers. In future, prospective studies among a number of ballet companies should control for medical and natural history alongside the visual analysis of images and plain radiographs to confirm these preliminary results.

  17. Reflections on a Degree Initiative: The UK's Birmingham Royal Ballet Dancers Enter the University of Birmingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Tansin

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an opportunity to share experiences and perceptions of the first 5 years of a degree programme for professional dancers. A partnership developed in the mid-1990s between the UK's Birmingham Royal Ballet and the University of Birmingham, Westhill (now School of Education), to provide a part-time, post-experience, flexible study…

  18. The Nutcracker Ballet: How To Use a Video as a Big Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, Rosemary

    2002-01-01

    Presents three days of classroom activities for children 4 years and older in preschools using a videotape of Tchaikovsky's ballet "The Nutcracker" through which children explore storytelling through dance and music, learn the nuances of music, and become aware of the performing arts. Includes steps for teacher preparation, a script for…

  19. The Ballet of the Streets: Teaching about Cities at Street Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Patrick A.; Spates, James L.

    2011-01-01

    The urban scholar Jane Jacobs once described city life as "the ballet of the streets." In more than a quarter century of joint teaching, the authors have used Jacobs' metaphor to help their students understand that cities are living organisms created and maintained, for good or ill, by the people who live and work in them. At heart their…

  20. Stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones in young trainee ballet dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albisetti, Walter; De Bartolomeo, Omar; Tagliabue, Lorenzo; Camerucci, Emanuela; Calori, Giorgio Maria

    2009-01-01

    Classical ballet is an art form requiring extraordinary physical activity, characterised by rigorous training. These can lead to many overuse injuries arising from repetitive minor trauma. The purpose of this paper is to report our experience in the diagnosis and treatment of stress fractures at the base of the second and third metatarsal bones in young ballet dancers. We considered 150 trainee ballet dancers from the Ballet Schools of "Teatro Alla Scala" of Milan from 2005 to 2007. Nineteen of them presented with stress fractures of the base of the metatarsal bones. We treated 18 dancers with external shockwave therapy (ESWT) and one with pulsed electromagnetic fields (EMF) and low-intensity ultrasound (US); all patients were recommended rest. In all cases good results were obtained. The best approach to metatarsal stress fractures is to diagnose them early through clinical examination and then through X-ray and MRI. ESWT gave good results, with a relatively short time of rest from the patients’ activities and a return to dancing without pain. PMID:19415273

  1. Single leg balancing in ballet: effects of shoe conditions and poses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo da Costa, Paula H; Azevedo Nora, Fernanda G S; Vieira, Marcus Fraga; Bosch, Kerstin; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of lower limb positioning and shoe conditions on stability levels of selected single leg ballet poses performed in demi-pointe position. Fourteen female non-professional ballet dancers (mean age of 18.4±2.8 years and mean body mass index of 21.5±2.8kg/m(2)) who had practiced ballet for at least seven years, without any musculoskeletal impairment volunteered to participate in this study. A capacitive pressure platform allowed for the assessment of center of pressure variables related to the execution of three single leg ballet poses in demi pointé position: attitude devant, attitude derriére, and attitude a la second. Peak pressures, contact areas, COP oscillation areas, anterior-posterior and medio-lateral COP oscillations and velocities were compared between two shoe conditions (barefoot versus slippers) and among the different poses. Barefoot performances produced more stable poses with significantly higher plantar contact areas, smaller COP oscillation areas and smaller anterior-posterior COP oscillations. COP oscillation areas, anterior-posterior COP oscillations and medio-lateral COP velocities indicated that attitude a la second is the least challenging and attitude derriére the most challenging pose. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Characteristics and prevalence of musculoskeletal injury in professional and non-professional ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Michelle S S; Ferreira, Arthur S; Orsini, Marco; Silva, Elirez B; Felicio, Lilian R

    2016-01-19

    Ballet is a high-performance activity that requires an advanced level of technical skills. Ballet places great stress on tendons, muscles, bones, and joints and may act directly as a trigger of injury by overuse. 1) to describe the main types of injuries and affected areas related to classical ballet and 2) to compare the frequency of musculoskeletal injuries among professional and non-professional ballet dancers, considering possible gender differences among the professional dancers. A total of 110 questionnaires were answered by professional and non-professional dancers. The questionnaire contained items related to the presence of injury, the regions involved, and the mechanism of the injury. We observed a high frequency of musculoskeletal injuries, with ankle sprains accounting for 69.8% of injuries in professional dancers and 42.1% in non-professional dancers. Pirouettes were the most frequent mechanism of injury in professional dancers, accounting for 67.9% of injuries, whereas in the non-professional dancers, repetitive movement was the most common mechanism (28.1%). Ankle sprains occurred in 90% of the women's injuries, and muscle sprains occurred in 54.5% of the men's injuries. The most frequent injury location was the ankle joint in both sexes among the professional dancers, with 67.6% in women and 40.9% in men. The identification of the mechanism of injury and time of practice may contribute to better therapeutic action aimed at the proper function of the dancers' bodies and improved performance by these athletes.

  3. Comparative study of anthropometric variables in female classical ballet dancers, volleyball players and physically active subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Vaz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare anthropometric variables (body weight, height, and percent body fat and plantarflexion and dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM between three different groups of women: classical ballet dancers (n=14, volleyball players (n=22 and physically active subjects (n=13. The assumption was that different functional requirements should produce differences in the anthropometric variables and ROM between the three groups. Body weight and height were higher in volleyball players (66.42 ± 5.8 kg; 174.77 ± 5.6 cm, followed by physically active women (59.93 ±10.3 kg; 164 ± 7.5 cm and ballet dancers (49.25 ± 4.5 kg; 157.03 ± 3.6 cm (p<0.05. Percent body fat was higher in physically active women (30.67 ± 4.6% compared to theother two groups, which showed similar percentages (volleyball players: 24.93 ± 4.1%; ballet dancers: 21.94 ± 4.3%. The three groups were similar in terms of total ankle ROM and active dorsiflexion ROM between the right and left sides. However, plantarflexion ROM was higher in ballet dancers (~83°, followed by physically active women (~68° and volleyball players who presented the smallest ROM (~60°. The different requirements imposed by the three distinct physical activities seem to be responsible for changes in some of the anthropometric variables and ankle joint ROM.

  4. Exercise intensities during a ballet lesson in female adolescents with different technical ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidetti, L; Gallotta, M C; Emerenziani, G P; Baldari, C

    2007-09-01

    To investigate the exercise intensity during a typical grade five ballet lesson, thirty-nine dancers (13 - 16 yrs) were divided into three different technical proficiency groups: low level (n = 13), intermediate level (n = 14), and high level (n = 12). A progressively incremented treadmill test was administered to determine VO(2max), individual ventilatory threshold (IVT), and the individual anaerobic threshold (IAT). Oxygen uptake (VO(2)), heart rate (HR) and blood lactate (La) were then evaluated during a grade five ballet lesson. Oxygen uptake at IVT, IAT and maximal oxygen uptake were greater (p ballet lesson were similar among groups. During the ballet lesson, low technical level dancers had more V.O (2) and La values above (p < 0.05) the IAT than the other groups. Correlation analysis revealed that the number of exercises performed above IAT was positively related to anthropometric characteristics (BMI, %FM; r = 0.36, p < 0.05; r = 0.46, p < 0.01), negatively related to fitness parameters (VO(2IVT), VO(2IAT), VO(2max); r between - 0.43 and - 0.69; p < 0.001) and to technical level (r = - 0.70; p < 0.001). The subjects classified as having low technical abilities had lower fitness levels and performed more exercises above IAT than the more skilled dancers.

  5. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valenti Erica E

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Methods We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old. We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. Results There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. Conclusion There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers.

  6. Evaluation of movements of lower limbs in non-professional ballet dancers: hip abduction and flexion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The literature indicated that the majority of professional ballet dancers present static and active dynamic range of motion difference between left and right lower limbs, however, no previous study focused this difference in non-professional ballet dancers. In this study we aimed to evaluate active movements of the hip in non-professional classical dancers. Methods We evaluated 10 non professional ballet dancers (16-23 years old). We measured the active range of motion and flexibility through Well Banks. We compared active range of motion between left and right sides (hip flexion and abduction) and performed correlation between active movements and flexibility. Results There was a small difference between the right and left sides of the hip in relation to the movements of flexion and abduction, which suggest the dominant side of the subjects, however, there was no statistical significance. Bank of Wells test revealed statistical difference only between the 1st and the 3rd measurement. There was no correlation between the movements of the hip (abduction and flexion, right and left sides) with the three test measurements of the bank of Wells. Conclusion There is no imbalance between the sides of the hip with respect to active abduction and flexion movements in non-professional ballet dancers. PMID:21819566

  7. Three-Dimensional Analysis of a Ballet Dancer with Ischial Tuberosity Apophysitis. A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Pohjola

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this case study was to describe the three-dimensional biomechanics of common ballet exercises in a ballet dancer with ischial tuberosity apophysitis. This was achieved by comparing kinematics between the symptomatic (i.e. ischial apophyseal symptoms and contralateral lower limbs, as well as via reported pain. Results suggest consistent differences in movement patterns in this dancer. These differences included: 1 decreased external rotation of contralateral hip, hence a decreased hip contribution to ‘turn out’; 2 increased contralateral knee adduction and internal rotation; 3 an apparent synchronicity in the contralateral lower limb of the decreased hip external rotation and increased knee adduction; and 4 minimal use of ankle plantar/dorsiflexion movement for symptomatic side. Pain related to the left ischial apophysitis was associated with reduced amplitudes especially in fast ballet movements that required large range of motion in flexion and adduction in the left hip joint. These findings suggest that ischial apophysitis may limit dancer’s ballet technique and performance.

  8. Recontextualizing Dance Skills: Overcoming Impediments to Motor Learning and Expressivity in Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Janet

    2016-01-01

    The process of transmitting ballet's complex technique to young dancers can interfere with the innate processes that give rise to efficient, expressive and harmonious movement. With the intention of identifying possible solutions, this article draws on research across the fields of neurology, psychology, motor learning, and education, and considers their relevance to ballet as an art form, a technique, and a training methodology. The integration of dancers' technique and expressivity is a core theme throughout the paper. A brief outline of the historical development of ballet's aesthetics and training methods leads into factors that influence dancers' performance. An exploration of the role of the neuromotor system in motor learning and the acquisition of expert skills reveals the roles of sensory awareness, imagery, and intention in cuing efficient, expressive movement. It also indicates potentially detrimental effects of conscious muscle control, explicit learning and persistent naïve beliefs. Finally, the paper presents a new theory regarding the acquisition of ballet skills. Recontextualization theory proposes that placing a problematic task within a new context may engender a new conceptual approach and/or sensory intention, and hence the genesis of new motor programs; and that these new programs may lead to performance that is more efficient, more rewarding for the dancer, more pleasing aesthetically, and more expressive. From an anecdotal point of view, this theory appears to be supported by the progress of many dancers at various stages of their dancing lives.

  9. Style Wars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Postmodernismen er kommet på museum i Victoria and Alberts stort anlagte udstilling Postmodernism. Style and Subversion 1970-1990. Reportage fra en udstilling, der spænder fra filosofi til firserpop og tager den nære fortid på museum....

  10. Novel adeno-associated viral vector delivering the utrophin gene regulator jazz counteracts dystrophic pathology in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strimpakos, Georgios; Corbi, Nicoletta; Pisani, Cinzia; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Onori, Annalisa; Luvisetto, Siro; Severini, Cinzia; Gabanella, Francesca; Monaco, Lucia; Mattei, Elisabetta; Passananti, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    Over-expression of the dystrophin-related gene utrophin represents a promising therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The strategy is based on the ability of utrophin to functionally replace defective dystrophin. We developed the artificial zinc finger transcription factor "Jazz" that up-regulates both the human and mouse utrophin promoter. We observed a significant recovery of muscle strength in dystrophic Jazz-transgenic mdx mice. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of an experimental gene therapy based on the systemic delivery of Jazz gene in mdx mice by adeno-associated virus (AAV). AAV serotype 8 was chosen on the basis of its high affinity for skeletal muscle. Muscle-specific expression of the therapeutic Jazz gene was enhanced by adding the muscle α-actin promoter to the AAV vector (mAAV). Injection of mAAV8-Jazz viral preparations into mdx mice resulted in muscle-specific Jazz expression coupled with up-regulation of the utrophin gene. We show a significant recovery from the dystrophic phenotype in mAAV8-Jazz-treated mdx mice. Histological and physiological analysis revealed a reduction of fiber necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration associated with functional recovery in muscle contractile force. The combination of ZF-ATF technology with the AAV delivery can open a new avenue to obtain a therapeutic strategy for treatment of DMD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Les « routes du jazz », ou portrait du jazz en nomade : mémoire sonore et voyage identitaire dans Jazz from the Haiku King de James A. Emanuel (1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Vincent-Arnaud

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Poète américain contemporain, auteur de nombreux recueils dont l’éclectisme souligne son goût pour le franchissement des frontières géographiques et culturelles, James A. Emanuel fait figure de passeur entre l’art poétique et l’art musical comme en témoigne sa collaboration étroite avec des musiciens de jazz depuis une quinzaine d’années. Décrivant volontiers son activité poétique récente comme « des ponts jetés entre musique et poésie », revendiquant la paternité du genre du « jazz and blues and gospel haiku » dont la pratique s’est affirmée et systématisée dans son recueil Jazz from the Haiku King paru en 1999, il paraît ainsi s’inscrire de plein droit dans la tradition des poètes jazz initiée par un Kerouac ou un Burroughs au cours de la période particulièrement riche dans ce domaine de la Beat Generation.Consacré à l’exploration de l’« anatomie du jazz » à travers l’évocation d’une myriade de figures du jazz, du gospel et du blues – de Louis Armstrong à Sonny Rollins en passant par Cab Calloway, Ray Charles et Mahalia Jackson – le recueil est avant tout conçu comme le parcours de reconnaissance d’une mémoire culturelle. Au fil de ces « routes du jazz » – autoroutes soigneusement balisées ou chemins de traverse plus obscurs – qu’il met en scène, se trouvent peu à peu dévoilées les diverses facettes de la tension omniprésente entre la mémoire spécifique d’un peuple et l’élargissement à l’universel d’un art complexe qui fait résonner la symbiose de divers modes d’expression identitaire.Le présent article a pour but de montrer comment ces poèmes, au carrefour du linguistique et du musical, tissent une toile de fond identitaire des plus foisonnantes qui, œuvrant à la redéfinition d’un genre, confère à ce dernier de nouveaux et féconds points de résonance.

  12. El proceso de selección natural en el campo social del ballet en Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamlet Betancourt León

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available El campo del ballet es un sistema social conflictivo donde se manifiesta gran competitividad -reflejada en continuas selecciones sociales y naturales- para cumplimentar la fantasía de todos los bailarines: bailar públicamente. El objetivo de esta investigación es demostrar la pertinencia del supuesto teórico darwinista de selección natural en la discriminación de belleza escénica de la figura del bailarín en el sistema piramidal de selección, formación y desempeño profesional del campo cubano del ballet. El campo del ballet se registra fácticamente en instituciones culturales pobladas por individuos que persiguen cotidianamente crear bailarines profesionales aptos -primera condición es ser revolucionario- que representen internacionalmente a la Revolución Cubana. El campo se estructura en un sistema piramidal de selección, formación y desempeño de bailarines profesionales que rige sus prácticas principales de exclusión/inclusión -puntos de corte- por el principio darwinista de selección natural. Los exámenes de capacidades físicas de ingreso y pase de nivel a la enseñanza de nivel medio y la aceptación a la compañía profesional Ballet Nacional de Cuba conforman los puntos de corte del sistema piramidal. Estos contienen prácticas sociales que valoran -empírica, pero sistemáticamente- las características morfo-funcionales de los participantes interesados respecto al deber ser del canon artístico de figura, para seleccionar siempre a los más bellos, los más aptos, bailarines de ballet.

  13. Incidence and Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Injury in Ballet: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Preston J; Gerrie, Brayden J; Varner, Kevin E; McCulloch, Patrick C; Lintner, David M; Harris, Joshua D

    2015-07-01

    Most published studies on injuries in the ballet dancer focus on the lower extremity. The rigors of this activity require special training and care. By understanding prevalence and injury pattern to the musculoskeletal system, targeted prevention and treatment for this population can be developed. To determine the incidence and prevalence of musculoskeletal injuries in ballet. Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. A systematic review registered with PROSPERO was performed using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. Level 1 through 4 evidence studies reporting incidence of musculoskeletal injuries in male and female ballet dancers were included, with the numbers and types of injuries extracted from each. Injury rates were recorded and calculated based on professional status, sex, and nature of injury. Incidence was defined as number of injuries sustained over a specific time. Prevalence was defined as proportion of subjects with an injury at a given point in time. The studies analyzed reported injury incidence or prevalence in more than 1365 amateur and 900 professional dancers. The mean age was 16.2 years among amateur and 27.0 years among professional dancers. The incidence of injury among amateur dancers was 0.99 and 1.09 injuries per 1000 dance hours in males and females, respectively; 75% of injuries were overuse, with similar rates among males and females. In professional dancers, the incidence of injury was 1.06 and 1.46 injuries per 1000 dance hours in males and females, respectively, and 64% of female injuries were overuse, compared with 50% in males (P ballet dancers is 0.97 and 1.24 injuries per 1000 dance hours, respectively. The majority are overuse in both amateur and professional dancers, with amateur ballet dancers showing a higher proportion of overuse injuries than professionals (P < .001). Male professional dancers show a higher proportion of traumatic injuries, accounting for half of their

  14. Association Between Previous Injury and Risk Factors for Future Injury in Preprofessional Ballet and Contemporary Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Sarah J; Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; Shi, Qian; Whittaker, Jackie L; Emery, Carolyn A

    2017-10-20

    To determine the prevalence of self-reported 1-year injury history and examine its association with preparticipation evaluation components aimed at predicting future injury risk (PPE-IP) among preprofessional ballet and contemporary dancers. Cross-sectional study. Preprofessional ballet school, university contemporary dance program. Full-time preprofessional ballet and contemporary dancers. Preparticipation evaluation consisted of the Athletic Coping Skills Inventory-28, body mass index, total bone mineral density, ankle range of motion, active standing turnout, lumbopelvic control, unipedal dynamic balance, and Y-Balance test. Self-reported 1-year history of dance-related medical attention and/or time-loss injury. A total of 155 ballet [n = 90, 80 females, median age 15 years (range 11-19)] and contemporary [n = 65, 63 females, median age 20 years (range 17-30)] dancers participated. Forty-six percent (95% confidence interval (CI), 38.4-54.6) reported a 1-year injury history. Self-reported injury history was not associated with any PPE-IP, however, an influence of age and psychological coping skills on the relationship between 1-year injury history and PPE-IP was identified. Multivariable analyses revealed that prevalence of 1-year injury history did not differ by age [referent group 18 years: OR 0.69 (95% CI, 0.30-1.56)], or level of psychological coping skills [OR 1.35 (95% CI, 0.61-2.94)]. The prevalence of self-reported 1-year injury history among preprofessional ballet and contemporary dancers is high. Although measures of PPE-IP did not differ based on injury history, it is important that age and psychological coping skills are considered in future dance injury prevention and prediction research. Level 3 evidence.

  15. "Our subcultural shit-music": Dutch jazz, representation, and cultural politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusch, L.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, musicologist Loes Rusch examines how Dutch musicians, policy makers, audiences and journalists in the 1960s and 1970s contributed to the development of what has become known as a distinctively Dutch sound in jazz: ‘Nederlandse (aktuele) geïmproviseerde muziek’. Through interviews and

  16. Auditory profiles of classical, jazz, and rock musicians: Genre-specific sensitivity to musical sound features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari eTervaniemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When compared with individuals without explicit training in music, adult musicians have facilitated neural functions in several modalities. They also display structural changes in various brain areas, these changes corresponding to the intensity and duration of their musical training. Previous studies have focused on investigating musicians with training in Western classical music. However, musicians involved in different musical genres may display highly differentiated auditory profiles according to the demands set by their genre, i.e. varying importance of different musical sound features. This hypothesis was tested in a novel melody paradigm including deviants in tuning, timbre, rhythm, melody transpositions, and melody contour. Using this paradigm while the participants were watching a silent video and instructed to ignore the sounds, we compared classical, jazz, and rock musicians’ and non-musicians’ accuracy of neural encoding of the melody. In all groups of participants, all deviants elicited an MMN response, which is a cortical index of deviance discrimination. The strength of the MMN and the subsequent attentional P3a responses reflected the importance of various sound features in each music genre: these automatic brain responses were selectively enhanced to deviants in tuning (classical musicians, timing (classical and jazz musicians, transposition (jazz musicians, and melody contour (jazz and rock musicians. Taken together, these results indicate that musicians with different training history have highly specialized cortical reactivity to sounds which violate the neural template for melody content.

  17. The Cultural-Rhetorical Role of Free Jazz: Forging an Identity in the Sixties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesconi, Robert

    The free jazz movement of the 1960s provided a rhetorical parallel in music to the verbal messages of black power and black nationalism. The use of Third World musical patterns represented an attempt to reinforce the revolutions in perceptions that black Americans held of themselves, their cultural heritage, and relationships to the rest of the…

  18. Using the Jazz Metaphor to Enhance Student Learning and Skill Development in the Marketing Research Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Michael Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The marketing research course is often a very challenging one both for students and instructors. This article discusses how the jazz metaphor can aid the instructor in both facilitating students' learning of the more basic as well as the more specific skills that make up the course, in addition to contributing more to student enjoyment of the…

  19. ERGO Jazz Session võõrustab Chris Gall Triot. Vennad Urbid ajakohaste lauludega

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    14. septembril alustab Jazzkaar koostöös ERGO Kindlustusega uut sarja ERGO Jazz Session, mille avaesinejaks on Chris Gall Trio (kontserdid 14. sept.Kumu auditooriumis ja 15. sept. Tartus Athena keskuses). Vendade Urbide kontserdist "Aeg" 13. sept. Vanemuise kontserdimajas

  20. Students Engaging in Diversity: Blogging to Learn the History of Jazz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Anissa Ryan; Reid, Jacqueline Marie; Stewart, Jeffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined discursive choices made by the instructor of a Black Studies course in constructing what counted as blogging and the history of jazz; how students showed evidence of meeting the course requirements, and how particular students engaged with issues of race and diversity in their blogs. The instructor required blogging to enable…

  1. Creating in the Collective: Dialogue, Collaboration, and the Search for Understanding in the Jazz Small Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branker, Anthony Daniel John

    2010-01-01

    What would happen if college students involved in jazz small group performance were given the opportunity to be musically independent and self-directed while working in their own collaborative space? What sorts of things would they experience? What kind of learning space would they create for themselves? The purpose of this study was to…

  2. The Tight-interlocked Rhythm Section: Production and Perception of Synchronisation in Jazz Trio Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Alex; Wesolowski, Brian C; Goebl, Werner

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the production and perception of timing, synchronisation and dynamics in jazz trio performances. In a production experiment, six trio combinations of one saxophonist, two bassists, and three drummers were recorded while they performed three popular jazz songs. Onset timing and dynamics of each performer were extracted and analysed. Results showed that the tempo was significantly influenced by the timing of the drummers and all performers showed higher temporal precision on the backbeats. The drummers demonstrated individual swing-ratios, accentuations of beats and intrapersonal asynchronies between simultaneous hi-hat and ride cymbal onsets, which resulted in a hi-hat played 2-26 ms ahead of the pulse of the music. In a subsequent perception test, participants ([Formula: see text]) rated 12 excerpts of the jazz recordings. They selected their preferred version from a pool of stimuli containing the original version, but also manipulations with artificially increased or reduced asynchronies. Stimuli with reduced asynchronies smaller than 19 ms were preferred by the listeners over the original or the fully quantised timing. This suggests that listeners endorse a 'tight-interlocked' jazz rhythm section, with asynchronies smaller than the perceptual threshold (temporal masking), but with natural timing variabilities that makes it distinguishable from a computer-generated playback.

  3. The Value of Clinical Jazz: Teaching Critical Reflection on, in, and Toward Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casapulla, Sharon; Longenecker, Randall; Beverly, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Clinical Jazz is a small-group strategy in medical education designed to develop interpersonal skills and improve doctor-patient and interprofessional relationships. The purpose of this study was to explore medical students' and faculty facilitators' perceived value of Clinical Jazz. We conducted a modified Nominal Group Process with participating medical students (n=21), faculty facilitators (n=5), and research team members (n=3). Students and faculty facilitators independently answered the question, "What do you value about Clinical Jazz?" We then conducted content and thematic analyses on the resulting data. Three themes emerged during analysis: (1) students and faculty appreciated the opportunity to learn and practice a thoughtful and structured process for problem solving, (2) students and faculty valued the safety of the group process in sharing a diversity of perspectives on topics in medicine, and (3) students and faculty acknowledged the importance of addressing real and challenging problems that are rarely addressed in formal lectures and other planned small-group settings. Clinical Jazz provides students and faculty with the opportunity to address the hidden and/or informal curriculum in medical education, while providing a safe space and time to solve important clinical and interprofessional problems.

  4. Auditory Profiles of Classical, Jazz, and Rock Musicians: Genre-Specific Sensitivity to Musical Sound Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaniemi, Mari; Janhunen, Lauri; Kruck, Stefanie; Putkinen, Vesa; Huotilainen, Minna

    2015-01-01

    When compared with individuals without explicit training in music, adult musicians have facilitated neural functions in several modalities. They also display structural changes in various brain areas, these changes corresponding to the intensity and duration of their musical training. Previous studies have focused on investigating musicians with training in Western classical music. However, musicians involved in different musical genres may display highly differentiated auditory profiles according to the demands set by their genre, i.e., varying importance of different musical sound features. This hypothesis was tested in a novel melody paradigm including deviants in tuning, timbre, rhythm, melody transpositions, and melody contour. Using this paradigm while the participants were watching a silent video and instructed to ignore the sounds, we compared classical, jazz, and rock musicians' and non-musicians' accuracy of neural encoding of the melody. In all groups of participants, all deviants elicited an MMN response, which is a cortical index of deviance discrimination. The strength of the MMN and the subsequent attentional P3a responses reflected the importance of various sound features in each music genre: these automatic brain responses were selectively enhanced to deviants in tuning (classical musicians), timing (classical and jazz musicians), transposition (jazz musicians), and melody contour (jazz and rock musicians). Taken together, these results indicate that musicians with different training history have highly specialized cortical reactivity to sounds which violate the neural template for melody content.

  5. Musical Preferences as a Function of Stimulus Complexity of Piano Jazz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Josh; Gridley, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Seven excerpts of modern jazz piano improvisations were selected to represent a range of perceived complexities. Audio recordings of the excerpts were played for 27 listeners who were asked to indicate their level of enjoyment on 7-point scales. Indications of enjoyment followed an inverted-U when plotted against perceived complexity of the music.…

  6. On Being and Becoming a Jazz Musician: Perceptions of Young Scottish Musicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Pauline

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines what goes on in an improvising jazz combo in a secondary school in Scotland, where teaching follows Rogoff's three-stage sociocultural process, moving from an initial apprenticeship model through one of guided participation to one of participatory appropriation. Using a case study research design and interpretative…

  7. An Aural Learning Project: Assimilating Jazz Education Methods for Traditional Applied Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamso, Nancy M.

    2011-01-01

    The Aural Learning Project (ALP) was developed to incorporate jazz method components into the author's classical practice and her applied woodwind lesson curriculum. The primary objective was to place a more focused pedagogical emphasis on listening and hearing than is traditionally used in the classical applied curriculum. The components of the…

  8. Proprioception of foot and ankle complex in young regular practitioners of ice hockey, ballet dancing and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing Xian; Xu, Dong Qing; Hoshizaki, Blaine

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the proprioception of the foot and ankle complex in regular ice hockey practitioners, runners, and ballet dancers. A total of 45 young people with different exercise habits formed four groups: the ice hockey, ballet dancing, running, and sedentary groups. Kinesthesia of the foot and ankle complex was measured in plantarflexion (PF), dorsiflexion (DF), inversion (IV), and eversion (EV) at 0.4 degrees /s using a custom-made device. The results showed the following: (1) significantly better perceived passive motion sense in PF/DF was found as compared with the measurements in IV/EV within each group (P ballet groups perceived significantly better passive motion sense in IV/EV than the running (P ballet dancing on proprioception may be associated with their movement characteristics.

  9. Self-Described Differences Between Legs in Ballet Dancers: Do They Relate to Postural Stability and Ground Reaction Force Measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Laura; Docherty, Carrie

    2012-12-01

    Ballet technique classes are designed to train dancers symmetrically, but they may actually create a lateral bias. It is unknown whether dancers in general are functionally asymmetrical, or how an individual dancer's perceived imbalance between legs might manifest itself. The purpose of this study was to examine ballet dancers' lateral preference by analyzing their postural stability and ground reaction forces in fifth position when landing from dance-specific jumps. Thirty university ballet majors volunteered to participate in this study. The subjects wore their own ballet technique shoes and performed fundamental ballet jumps out of fifth position on a force plate. The force plate recorded center of pressure (COP) and ground reaction force (GRF) data. Each subject completed a laterality questionnaire that determined his or her preferred landing leg for ballet jumps, self-identified stronger leg, and self-identified leg with better balance. All statistical comparisons were made between the leg indicated on the laterality questionnaire and the other leg (i.e., if the dancer's response to a question was "left," the comparison was made with the left leg as the "preferred" leg and the right leg as the "non-preferred leg"). No significant differences were identified between the limbs in any of the analyses conducted (all statistical comparisons produced p values > 0.05). The results of this study indicate that a dancer's preferential use of one limb over the other has no bearing on GRFs or balance ability after landing jumps in ballet. Similarly, dancers' opinions of their leg characteristics (such as one leg being stronger than the other) seem not to correlate with the dancers' actual ability to absorb GRFs or to balance when landing from ballet jumps.

  10. Body mass composition of ballet dancers and elite female aesthetic sport athletes from Cuba. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n5p335

    OpenAIRE

    Hamlet Betancout León; Oscar Salinas Flores; Julieta Aréchiga Viramontes

    2011-01-01

    The level of scenic beauty of ballet dancer’s figure is signified for the reason of possessing morpho-functional characteristics valid only within the artistic cannon. The female ballet dancers and the sportswomen who practice esthetic sports do have in common the need of being slim and executing efficiently the complex movements of their technical activities. The objective of this paper is to compare the body composition of ballet female dancers with that of the artistic gymnastics (GAR), th...

  11. [Parenting styles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torío López, Susana; Peña Calvo, José Vicente; Inda Caro, Mercedes

    2008-02-01

    Parental educational styles constitute one of the key elements of family socialization. The aim of the present essay is to present the results of a research project carried out in the Principality of Asturias (Spain) among 2,965 families with children of infant and primary-school age (5-8 years old). This research attempts to analyse, among other aspects, parental behaviour tendencies in child upbringing. The analysis of the results obtained allows us to: 1) identify the most common attitudinal and behavioural tendencies of parents in the upbringing of their children; 2) determine how many people have a well defined parental style, and delimit their socio-educational characteristics. Lastly, we consider the need to change some parental behaviour patterns and stress the importance of family education programmes, with the aim of promoting appropriate parenting models and modifying or improving current practices.

  12. Effects of jazz on postoperative pain and stress in patients undergoing elective hysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafer, Lorenzo; Austin, Flower; Frey, Jessica; Mulvey, Christie; Vaida, Sonia; Prozesky, Jansie

    2015-01-01

    Anesthesiologists use various medications to provide surgical patients with pain relief in the postoperative period. Other modalities, such as music, could be used in conjunction with opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to decrease pain and lower heart rate and blood pressure. Our hypothesis was that patients listening to jazz in a postanesthesia care unit (PACU) would have lower heart rates and blood pressures and reduced pain and anxiety. The study objective was to determine if listening to jazz music in the PACU, when compared to wearing noise-canceling headphones with no music playing, would decrease heart rate, blood pressure, pain, or anxiety in patients undergoing a hysterectomy. The research design was a prospective, randomized study. The study was conducted in the PACU at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, PA, USA. A total of 56 patients, aged 18-75 y, who were categorized as status 1 or 2 according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status Classification System, and who were undergoing elective laparoscopic or abdominal hysterectomies, were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly assigned either to listen to jazz music where the beats per min (BPM) was jazz group, heart rates were significantly lower at 15, 20, 25, and 30 min when compared with baseline. The pain scores were significantly lower (P jazz group at 10 min into the recovery period. Overall, the results showed that patients responded not only to music but also to silence in the PACU. Using music and/or noise reduction could decrease opioid administration, promote relaxation, and improve patient satisfaction.

  13. Effect of narrowing the base of support on the gait, gaze and quiet eye of elite ballet dancers and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchuk, Derek; Vickers, Joan N

    2011-08-01

    We determined the gaze and stepping behaviours of elite ballet dancers and controls as they walked normally and along progressively narrower 3-m lines (l0.0, 2.5 cm). The ballet dancers delayed the first step and then stepped more quickly through the approach area and onto the lines, which they exited more slowly than the controls, which stepped immediately but then slowed their gait to navigate the line, which they exited faster. Contrary to predictions, the ballet group did not step more precisely, perhaps due to the unique anatomical requirements of ballet dance and/or due to releasing the degrees of freedom under their feet as they fixated ahead more than the controls. The ballet group used significantly fewer fixations of longer duration, and their final quiet eye (QE) duration prior to stepping on the line was significantly longer (2,353.39 ms) than the controls (1,327.64 ms). The control group favoured a proximal gaze strategy allocating 73.33% of their QE fixations to the line/off the line and 26.66% to the exit/visual straight ahead (VSA), while the ballet group favoured a 'look-ahead' strategy allocating 55.49% of their QE fixations to the exit/VSA and 44.51% on the line/off the line. The results are discussed in the light of the development of expertise and the enhanced role of fixations and visual attention when more tasks become more constrained.

  14. Is goniometry suitable for measuring ankle range of motion in female ballet dancers? An initial comparison with radiographic measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Shave, Ruth M; Kruse, David W; Nevill, Alan M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2011-06-01

    Female ballet dancers require extreme ankle motion to attain the demi-plié (weight-bearing full dorsiflexion [DF]) and en pointe (weight-bearing full plantar flexion [PF]) positions of ballet. However, techniques for assessing this amount of motion have not yet received sufficient scientific scrutiny. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine possible differences between weight-bearing goniometric and radiographic ankle range of motion measurements in female ballet dancers. Ankle range of motion in 8 experienced female ballet dancers was assessed by goniometry and 2 radiographic measurement methods. The latter were performed on 3 mediolateral x-rays, in demi-plié, neutral, and en pointe positions; one of them used the same landmarks as goniometry. DF values were not significantly different among the methods, but PF values were (P ballet dancers and suggest that goniometry may not be ideal for assessing ankle range of motion in these individuals. Therefore, further research is needed to standardize how DF and PF are measured in ballet dancers. Diagnostic, Level I.

  15. Decision-Based Transcription of Jazz Guitar Solos Using a Harmonic Bident Analysis Filter Bank and Spectral Distribution Weighting

    OpenAIRE

    Gorlow, Stanislaw; Ramona, Mathieu; Pachet, François

    2016-01-01

    Jazz guitar solos are improvised melody lines played on one instrument on top of a chordal accompaniment (comping). As the improvisation happens spontaneously, a reference score is non-existent, only a lead sheet. There are situations, however, when one would like to have the original melody lines in the form of notated music, see the Real Book. The motivation is either for the purpose of practice and imitation or for musical analysis. In this work, an automatic transcriber for jazz guitar so...

  16. Anthropometric evaluation of body composition in ballet dancers. A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elena Díaz Sánchez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The body of the adolescent dancer is the result of morphological, physiological and behavioral adaptations due to specific physical training. For the ballet master, body weight is irrelevant to evaluating the technical and artistic performance and beauty of a figure. All ballet dancers must have bodies that conform to the canon of international ballet in order to be able to perform in public. The purpose of this study is to describe the changes in the body composition of dancers at the Cuban National School of Ballet between two points in their training process. This was a longitudinal study of 54 girls and 40 boys, aged between 15 and 20 years old. An anthropometric protocol of 6 measurements was employed in order to determine body composition using the Durnin and Rahaman method for females and the Parizková and Buzková method for males. The main results demonstrate signifi cant increases in both weight and height for age in both sexes, and it was observed that height growth velocity decreased with age. The female dancers exhibited stable body fat percentages for all ages while male dancers signifi cantly reduced this percentage from one year to the next. The female students exhibited higher mean percentage body fat values than the normal range established in Cuba for elite athletes from competitive artistic sports and professional dancers, while the male students exhibited body fat percentages that were similar to these specialized groups. Resumo El cuerpo humano del bailarín adolescente es resultado de las adaptaciones orfológicas-fi siológicas y conductuales de un entrenamiento físico particular. Para los maestros de ballet el peso corporal no es relevante en la evaluación técnica-artística y de belleza de la fi gura del danzante. Cada bailarín tiene que cumplir con los cánones internacionales de fi gura del ballet para presentarse en el escenario artístico. El objetivo de esta investigación es describir las variaciones de la

  17. A Case in Pointe: Romance and Regimentation at the New York City Ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laemmli, Whitney E

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the ballet dancer's pointe shoe as a technology of artistic production and bodily discipline. Drawing on oral histories, memoirs, dance journals, advertisements, and other archival materials, it demonstrates that the shoe utilized by dancers at George Balanchine's New York City Ballet was not the quintessentially Romantic entity it is so often presumed to be. Instead, it emerged from uniquely twentieth-century systems of labor and production, and it was used to alter dancers' bodies and professional lives in particularly modern ways. The article explores not only the substance of these changes but also the ways in which Balanchine's artistic oeuvre was inextricably intertwined with the material technologies he employed and, more broadly, how the history of technology and the history of dance can productively inform one another. Fundamentally, this article recasts Balanchine, seeing him not as a disconnected artist but as an eager participant in the twentieth-century national romance with American technology.

  18. Effects of ballet training of children in Turkey on foot anthropometric measurements and medial longitudinal arc development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdinc, Sevgi Anar; Turan, Fatma Nesrin

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of ballet training on foot structure and the formation of the medial longitudinal arc in childhood, and the association of body mass index with structural change secondary to ballet training. This study was conducted at Öykü Ballet and Dance School and Trakya University, Edirne, Turkey, from September 2007 to November 2008, and comprised girl students who were taking ballet classes, and a group of those who were not taking such who acted as the controls. Static footprints of both feet of all participants were taken with an ink paedogram. Parameters evaluated from footprints included foot length, metatarsal width, heel width and medial longitudinal arch. The relationship between the parameters, the ballet starting age, training duration and body mass index was investigated. Of the 67 participants, there were 36(53.7%) in the experimental group and 31(48.3%) in the control group. The difference between age, height, weight and body mass index between the two groups was insignificant (p>0.05). The average ballet starting age was 6.47±1.55 years and duration was 4.36±2.002 years. Positive correlations were found between body mass index and foot length, metatarsal width, heel width, medial longitudinal arch contact width and halluxvalgus angle; between ballet starting age and metatarsal width, heel width; between duration of training and foot length, metatarsal width and hallux valgus angle (p?0.05 each). Evidence supporting the education in children on foot anthropometric measurements and medial longitudinal arc development could not be found.

  19. Bone stress injury of the ankle in professional ballet dancers seen on MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besser Marcus P

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ballet Dancers have been shown to have a relatively high incidence of stress fractures of the foot and ankle. It was our objective to examine MR imaging patterns of bone marrow edema (BME in the ankles of high performance professional ballet dancers, to evaluate clinical relevance. Methods MR Imaging was performed on 12 ankles of 11 active professional ballet dancers (6 female, 5 male; mean age 24 years, range 19 to 32. Individuals were imaged on a 0.2 T or 1.5 T MRI units. Images were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists and one orthopaedic surgeon in consensus for location and pattern of bone marrow edema. In order to control for recognized sources of bone marrow edema, images were also reviewed for presence of osseous, ligamentous, tendinous and cartilage injuries. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the strength of the correlation between bone marrow edema and ankle pain. Results Bone marrow edema was seen only in the talus, and was a common finding, observed in nine of the twelve ankles imaged (75% and was associated with pain in all cases. On fluid-sensitive sequences, bone marrow edema was ill-defined and centered in the talar neck or body, although in three cases it extended to the talar dome. No apparent gender predilection was noted. No occult stress fracture could be diagnosed. A moderately strong correlation (phi = 0.77, p= 0.0054 was found between edema and pain in the study population. Conclusion Bone marrow edema seems to be a specific MRI finding in the talus of professional ballet dancers, likely related to biomechanical stress reactions, due to their frequently performed unique maneuvers. Clinically, this condition may indicate a sign of a bone stress injury of the ankle.

  20. A preseason cardiorespiratory profile of dancers in nine professional ballet and modern companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Shaw; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi; Lora, Jennifer Bailey; Southwick, Heather; Kulak, Michelina Cassella; Gamboa, Jennifer; Rooney, Megan; Gilman, Greg; Gibbs, Richard

    2014-01-01

    While studies have investigated the physical demands of dance in terms of cardiorespiratory fitness, there are no recent comparisons of cardiorespiratory response to exercise among professional dancers of different genres. Our purpose was to: 1. develop a cardiorespiratory profile of professional dancers; 2. investigate differences in peak and recovery heart rate (HR) between professional modern and ballet dancers using an accelerated 3-minute step test; 3. demonstrate the relationship between cardiorespiratory variables; and 4. investigate the effects of company and work variables on the dancers' cardiorespiratory profiles. We hypothesized greater cardiorespiratory fitness in modern dancers than in ballet dancers, due to the nature of their repertory. Furthermore, we hypothesized that company profiles would reflect differences in work variables. Two hundred and eleven dancers (mean age 24.6 ± 4.7) from nine companies (two modern and seven ballet) performed a 3-minute step test. Demographics, height, mass, blood pressure (BP), smoking history, and resting peak and recovery HR were recorded. Body mass index (BMI) and fitness category were calculated. Independent t-tests were used to compare differences in demographics and cardiorespiratory variables due to genre, MANOVA were conducted to compare differences due to company, and correlations were calculated to determine the relationships between cardiorespiratory variables (p < 0.05). Modern dancers demonstrated higher mass and BMI, lower BP, lower resting HR and HR recovery, and a higher percentage were categorized as "fit" compared to ballet dancers (p < 0.03). There were differences between companies in age, experience, BMI, BP, resting, peak, and recovery HR, and fitness category (p < 0.001). The differences in cardiorespiratory fitness levels that may be related to rigor of repertory, rehearsal and performance seasons, or off-season exercise training are discussed. Results support the need for comprehensive

  1. Bone stress injury of the ankle in professional ballet dancers seen on MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Ilan; Zoga, Adam C; Raikin, Steven M; Peterson, Judith R; Besser, Marcus P; Morrison, William B; Schweitzer, Mark E

    2008-01-01

    Background Ballet Dancers have been shown to have a relatively high incidence of stress fractures of the foot and ankle. It was our objective to examine MR imaging patterns of bone marrow edema (BME) in the ankles of high performance professional ballet dancers, to evaluate clinical relevance. Methods MR Imaging was performed on 12 ankles of 11 active professional ballet dancers (6 female, 5 male; mean age 24 years, range 19 to 32). Individuals were imaged on a 0.2 T or 1.5 T MRI units. Images were evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists and one orthopaedic surgeon in consensus for location and pattern of bone marrow edema. In order to control for recognized sources of bone marrow edema, images were also reviewed for presence of osseous, ligamentous, tendinous and cartilage injuries. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the strength of the correlation between bone marrow edema and ankle pain. Results Bone marrow edema was seen only in the talus, and was a common finding, observed in nine of the twelve ankles imaged (75%) and was associated with pain in all cases. On fluid-sensitive sequences, bone marrow edema was ill-defined and centered in the talar neck or body, although in three cases it extended to the talar dome. No apparent gender predilection was noted. No occult stress fracture could be diagnosed. A moderately strong correlation (phi = 0.77, p= 0.0054) was found between edema and pain in the study population. Conclusion Bone marrow edema seems to be a specific MRI finding in the talus of professional ballet dancers, likely related to biomechanical stress reactions, due to their frequently performed unique maneuvers. Clinically, this condition may indicate a sign of a bone stress injury of the ankle. PMID:18371230

  2. Bony morphology of the hip in professional ballet dancers compared to athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Ferris, April-Rose; Smith, Peter; Garnham, Andrew; Cook, Jill

    2017-07-01

    To compare hip bony morphology between ballet dancers and a sporting control group and to determine the relationship with hip pain. Thirty-three professional ballet dancers and 33 age- and sex-matched athletes completed questionnaires, including the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS), and underwent clinical testing and 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging to measure acetabular coverage with lateral centre edge angles, femoral head-neck junction concavity with alpha angles at anterior and superior positions, femoral neck-shaft angles, and acetabular version angles. Bony morphological measures fell within normal ranges. Dancers had higher neck-shaft angles (dancers 134.6 ± 4.6°/athletes130.8 ± 4.7°, p = 0.002), lower acetabular version angles (13.5 ± 4.7°/17.1 ± 4.7°, p = 0.003), lower superior alpha angles (38.9 ± 6.9°/46.7 ± 10.6°, p ballet dancers have hip bony morphology that differentiates them from athletes. Hip pain correlated poorly with bony morphology. • Ballet dancers have hip bony morphology that may allow extreme hip motion. • Morphological parameter means fell within normal reference intervals in dancers. • Bony morphology correlates poorly with hip pain. • The risk of hip injury due to abnormal morphology requires prospective studies.

  3. Anthropometric evaluation of body composition in ballet dancers. A longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamlet Betancourt León

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2008v10n2p115 The body of the adolescent dancer is the result of morphological, physiological and behavioral adaptations due to specific physical training. For the ballet master, body weight is irrelevant to evaluating the technical and artistic performance and beauty of a figure. All ballet dancers must have bodies that conform to the canon of international ballet in order to be able to perform in public. The purpose of this study is to describe the changes in the body composition of dancers at the Cuban National School of Ballet between two points in their training process. This was a longitudinal study of 54 girls and 40 boys, aged between 15 and 20 years old. An anthropometric protocol of 6 measurements was employed in order to determine body composition using the Durnin and Rahaman method for females and the Parizková and Buzková method for males. The main results demonstrate signifi cant increases in both weight and height for age in both sexes, and it was observed that height growth velocity decreased with age. The female dancers exhibited stable body fat percentages for all ages while male dancers signifi cantly reduced this percentage from one year to the next. The female students exhibited higher mean percentage body fat values than the normal range established in Cuba for elite athletes from competitive artistic sports and professional dancers, while the male students exhibited body fat percentages that were similar to these specialized groups.

  4. Radiographic Prevalence of Dysplasia, Cam, and Pincer Deformities in Elite Ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Gerrie, Brayden J; Varner, Kevin E; Lintner, David M; McCulloch, Patrick C

    2016-01-01

    The demands of hip strength and motion in ballet are high. Hip disorders, such as cam and pincer deformities or dysplasia, may affect dance performance. However, the prevalence of these radiographic findings is unknown. To determine the prevalence of radiographic cam and pincer deformities, borderline dysplasia, and dysplasia in a professional ballet company. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. An institutional review board-approved cross-sectional investigation of a professional ballet company was undertaken. Male and female adult dancers were eligible for inclusion. Four plain radiographs were obtained (standing anteroposterior pelvis, bilateral false profile, and supine Dunn 45°) and verified for adequacy. Cam and pincer deformities, dysplasia, borderline dysplasia, and osteoarthritis were defined. All plain radiographic parameters were measured and analyzed on available radiographs. Student t test, chi-square test (and Fisher exact test), and Spearman correlation analyses were performed to compare sexes, groups, and the effect of select radiographic criteria. A total of 47 dancers were analyzed (21 males, 26 females; mean age (±SD), 23.8 ± 5.4 years). Cam deformity was identified in 25.5% (24/94) of hips and 31.9% (15/47) of subjects, with a significantly greater prevalence in male dancers than females (48% hips and 57% subjects vs 8% hips and 12% subjects; P ballet company, a high prevalence of radiographic abnormalities was found, including cam and pincer deformity and dysplasia. The results also revealed several sex-related differences of these abnormalities in this unique population. The long-term implications of these findings in this group of elite athletes remain unknown, and this issue warrants future investigation. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Re-Contextualizing Dance Skills: Overcoming Impediments to Motor Learning and Expressivity in Ballet Dancers

    OpenAIRE

    Janet eKarin; Janet eKarin; Janet eKarin

    2016-01-01

    The process of transmitting ballet’s complex technique to young dancers can interfere with the innate processes that give rise to efficient, expressive and harmonious movement. With the intention of identifying possible solutions, this article draws on research across the fields of neurology, psychology, motor learning, and education, and considers their relevance to ballet as an art form, a technique, and a training methodology. The integration of dancers’ technique and expressivity is a cor...

  6. Recontextualizing Dance Skills: Overcoming Impediments to Motor Learning and Expressivity in Ballet Dancers

    OpenAIRE

    Karin, Janet

    2016-01-01

    The process of transmitting ballet’s complex technique to young dancers can interfere with the innate processes that give rise to efficient, expressive and harmonious movement. With the intention of identifying possible solutions, this article draws on research across the fields of neurology, psychology, motor learning, and education, and considers their relevance to ballet as an art form, a technique, and a training methodology. The integration of dancers’ technique and expressivity is a cor...

  7. Affective Style, Humor Styles and Happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Ford

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the relationships between dispositional approach and avoidance motives, humor styles, and happiness. In keeping with previous research, approach motives and the two positive humor styles (self-enhancing and affiliative positively correlated with happiness, whereas avoidance motives and the two negative humor styles (self-defeating and aggressive negatively correlated with happiness. Also, we found support for three new hypotheses. First, approach motives correlated positively with self-enhancing and affiliative humor styles. Second, avoidance motives correlated positively with self-defeating humor style, and third, the positive relationship between approach motives and happiness was mediated by self-enhancing humor style.

  8. Posterior Endoscopic Excision of Os Trigonum in Professional National Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Moez S; Roche, Andy; Brodrick, Anna; Williams, R Lloyd; Calder, James D F

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have compared the outcomes after open and endoscopic excision of an os trigonum in patients of mixed professions. No studies have compared the differences in outcomes between the 2 procedures in elite ballet dancers. From October 2005 to February 2010, 35 professional ballet dancers underwent excision of a symptomatic os trigonum of the ankle after a failed period of nonoperative treatment. Of the 35 patients, 13 (37.1%) underwent endoscopic excision and 22 (62.9%) open excision. We compared the outcomes, complications, and time to return to dancing. The open excision group experienced a significantly greater incidence of flexor hallucis longus tendon decompression compared with the endoscopic group. The endoscopic release group returned to full dance earlier at a mean of 9.8 (range 6.5 to 16.1) weeks and those undergoing open excision returned to full dance at a mean of 14.9 (range 9 to 20) weeks (p = .001). No major complications developed in either group, such as deep infection or nerve or vessel injury. We have concluded that both techniques are safe and effective in the treatment of symptomatic os trigonum in professional ballet dancers. Endoscopic excision of the os trigonum offers a more rapid return to full dance compared with open excision. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Size and symmetry of trunk muscles in ballet dancers with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, Jan E; Hides, Julie A; Hodges, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    Cross-sectional, observational study. To investigate the cross-sectional area (CSA) of trunk muscles in professional ballet dancers with and without low back pain (LBP). LBP is the most prevalent chronic injury in classical ballet dancers. Research on nondancers has found changes in trunk muscle size and symmetry to be associated with LBP. There are no studies that examine these changes in ballet dancers. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 14 male and 17 female dancers. The CSAs of 4 muscles (multifidus, lumbar erector spinae, psoas, and quadratus lumborum) were measured and compared among 3 groups of dancers: those without LBP or hip pain (n = 8), those with LBP only (n = 13), and those with both hip-region pain and LBP (n = 10). Dancers with no pain had larger multifidus muscles compared to those with LBP at L3-5 (P.05). The CSAs of the other muscles did not differ between groups. The psoas (Pballet dancers, LBP and hip-region pain and LBP are associated with a smaller CSA of the multifidus but not the erector spinae, psoas, or quadratus lumborum muscles.

  10. Are maturation, growth and lower extremity alignment associated with overuse injury in elite adolescent ballet dancers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, Erin; Whatman, Chris; Harris, Nigel; Bradshaw, Elizabeth; Karin, Janet

    2014-11-01

    To identify growth, maturation and biomechanical risk factors for overuse injury in elite adolescent ballet dancers. Maturation (Tanner scale), growth (foot length change) and age at onset of menarche were recorded in elite adolescent ballet dancers. A modified knee valgus angle and lateral tilt of the pelvis were measured using 2D video during two dance movements (fondu, temps levé) to quantify lower extremity alignment. Overuse dance injuries were recorded by a physiotherapist. The injury rate ratio (RR) associated with each variable was estimated using over-dispersed Poisson regression modelling. Changes in right foot length (RR = 1.41, CI = 0.93-2.13), right knee angles during the fondu (RR = 0.68, CI = 0.45-1.03) and temps levé (RR = 0.72, CI = 0.53-0.98), and pelvic angles during the temps levé on the left (RR = 0.52, CI = 0.30-0.90) and fondu on the right (RR = 1.28, CI = 0.91-1.80) were associated with substantial changes in injury risk. Rate of growth in elite adolescent ballet dancers is likely associated with an increase in risk of lower extremity overuse injury and better right lower extremity alignment is likely associated with a reduction in risk of right lower extremity overuse injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance anxiety experiences of professional ballet dancers: the importance of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Imogen J; Nordin-Bates, Sanna M

    2010-01-01

    Performance anxiety research abounds in sport psychology, yet has been relatively sparse in dance. The present study explores ballet dancers' experiences of performance anxiety in relation to: 1. symptom type, intensity, and directional interpretation; 2. experience level (including company rank); and 3. self-confidence and psychological skills. Fifteen elite ballet dancers representing all ranks in one company were interviewed, and qualitative content analysis was conducted. Results revealed that cognitive anxiety was more dominant than somatic anxiety, and was unanimously interpreted as debilitative to performance. Somatic anxiety was more likely to be interpreted as facilitative, with the majority of dancers recognizing that a certain amount of anxiety could be beneficial to performance. Principal dancers suffered from higher intensities of performance anxiety than corps de ballet members. Feeling out of control emerged as a major theme in both the experience of anxiety and its interpretation. As a result, prevention or handling of anxiety symptoms may be accomplished by helping dancers to feel in control. Dancers may benefit from education about anxiety symptoms and their interpretation, in addition to psychological skills training incorporating cognitive restructuring strategies and problem-focussed coping to help increase their feelings of being in control.

  12. Learning and remembering strategies of novice and advanced jazz dancers for skill level appropriate dance routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, P P; Rodgers, W M

    2000-06-01

    This study examined the influence of the challenge level of to-be-learned stimulus on learning strategies in novice and advanced dancers. In Study 1, skill-level appropriate dance routines were developed for novice and advanced jazz dancers. In Study 2, 8 novice and 9 advanced female jazz dancers attempted to learn and remember the two routines in mixed model factorial design, with one between-participants factor: skill level (novice or advanced) and two within-participants factors: routine (easy or difficult) and performance (immediate or delayed). Participants were interviewed regarding the strategies used to learn and remember the routines. Results indicated that advanced performers used atypical learning strategies for insufficiently challenging stimuli, which may reflect characteristics of the stimuli rather than the performer. The qualitative data indicate a clear preference of novice and advanced performers for spatial compatibility of stimuli and response.

  13. Central common drive to antagonistic ankle muscles in relation to short-term co-contraction training in non-dancers and professional ballet dancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Kjær, Majken; Pedersen, Kasper Karhu

    2013-01-01

    Optimization of co-contraction of antagonistic muscles around the ankle joint has been shown to involve plastic changes in spinal and cortical neural circuitries. Such changes may explain the ability of elite ballet dancers to maintain a steady balance during various ballet postures. Here we inve...

  14. Body mass composition of ballet dancers and elite female aesthetic sport athletes from Cuba. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2011v13n5p335

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Aréchiga Viramontes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The level of scenic beauty of ballet dancer’s figure is signified for the reason of possessing morpho-functional characteristics valid only within the artistic cannon. The female ballet dancers and the sportswomen who practice esthetic sports do have in common the need of being slim and executing efficiently the complex movements of their technical activities. The objective of this paper is to compare the body composition of ballet female dancers with that of the artistic gymnastics (GAR, the rhythmic gymnastics (GRI and the synchronized swimming (NAS elite sportswomen. Thirty two female ballet dancers of the National Cuban Ballet School and sixty three elite sportswomen who practice aesthetic sports in Cuba have been studied for the purpose. An anthropometric protocol of sixteen measures has been applied to calculate the kinanthropometric indexes of the corporal mass composition’s component. The general percentage of the fat mass (PMG in the ballet dancers was found statistically different to the GAR and GRI groups, but this one was similar in comparison with NAS group. Mayor muscle mass general percentage (PMM was obtained in the GAR and GRI groups, in comparison with the dancers. The ballet group showed the minor differential PMM-PMG, and muscular percentage of the transverse areas of the segments of extremities than the elite athlete groups. The data classified the ballet group as the one of less potential efficiency of technical and transitive movement than the other ones.

  15. Generalizable Aspects of the Development of Expertise in Ballet across Countries and Cultures: A Perspective from the Expert-Performance Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Carla U.; Sachs-Ericsson, Natalie J.; Ericsson, K. Anders

    2013-01-01

    The expert-performance approach guided the collection of survey data on the developmental history of elite professional ballet dancers from three different countries/cultures (USA, Mexico, and Russia). The level of ballet expertise attained by age 18 was found to be uniquely predicted by only two factors, namely the total number of accumulated…

  16. "Goltsman Ballet" начинает обучать малышей

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2014-01-01

    Tantsutrupp Goltsman Ballet asutaja, kunstilise juhi ja tänapäevase balletikunsti pedagoog Maria Goltsmani sõnul hakkab tantsutrupp andma tantsutunde 5-7-aastastele lastele, esialgu Tallinnas. Detsembri lõpus esitles Goltsman Ballet uut tantsuetendust "Blue", lavastajaks Krista Köster

  17. 如何在语音教学中使用Jazz Chants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈娜; 孟燕只

    2009-01-01

    Jazz Chants因其节奏活泼明快,内容贴近生活,又反映了一些语音朗读技巧,因此可以应用在语音教学中.它不仅可以活跃课堂气氛,还可以让学生更有效的掌握相关语音知识.

  18. 30th Detroit International Jazz Festival 向爵士家族致敬

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沙拉

    2009-01-01

    今年9月,底特律国际爵士音乐节(Detroit International Jazz Festival)迎来了自己的30岁生日。这个美国最大的免费爵士音乐节大概不会受到当地汽车业的影响,该庆祝的时候还是要庆祝。

  19. JAZZ, MÚSICA BRASILEIRA E FRICÇÃO DE MUSICALIDADES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acácio Tadeu de Camargo Piedade

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo resulta de minhas pesquisas sobre a música popular brasileira instrumental, ou jazz brasileiro, conhecido no Brasil pelo rótulo “música instrumental”. Para tratar deste tema, apresento uma reflexão sobre questões como imperialismo cultural, identidade nacional, globalização, regionalismo e musicalidade. Tenho pesquisado o tema baseando-me no discurso nativo e na análise de peças musicais, principalmente no âmbito das improvisações, e apresento aqui algumas características sócio-culturais da “música instrumental”, em especial no seu contraste com o jazz norte-americano. Procuro mostrar como, no interior do jazz brasileiro, constantemente emerge uma dialética do interno e do externo que tem implicações fundas, particularmente através de tópicos musicais nos temas e improvisações. Chamei de fricção de musicalidades esta marca do tenso diálogo da música instrumental, característica fundante deste gênero.

  20. Jazz of physics the secret link between music and the structure of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Stephon

    2016-01-01

    More than fifty years ago, John Coltrane drew the twelve musical notes in a circle and connected them by straight lines, forming a five-pointed star. Inspired by Einstein, Coltrane had put physics and geometry at the core of his music. Physicist and jazz musician Stephon Alexander returns the favor, using jazz to answer physics’ most vexing questions about the past and future of the universe. Following the great minds that first drew the links between music and physics—a list including Pythagoras, Kepler, Newton, Einstein, and Rakim—The Jazz of Physics revisits the ancient realm where music, physics, and the cosmos were one. This cosmological journey accompanies Alexander’s own tale of struggling to reconcile his passion for music and physics, from taking music lessons as a boy in the Bronx to studying theoretical physics at Imperial College, London’s inner sanctum of string theory. Playing the saxophone and improvising with equations, Alexander uncovered the connection between the fundamental wave...

  1. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Luke S; Sato, Nahoko; Weidemann, Andries L

    2016-01-01

    The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve “turning out” or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in “turned out” postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat. PMID:27895518

  2. The Effects of 17 Weeks of Ballet Training on the Autonomic Modulation, Hormonal and General Biochemical Profile of Female Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silva Carla Cristiane

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine the alterations in physiological and biochemical markers, after 17 weeks of ballet training in high level ballet dancers. Twenty four female ballet dancers from 12 to 15 years old took part in the study. The study followed 17 weeks of ballet training and analyzed changes in body composition, the autonomic nervous system and biochemical variables before and after (post training. The internal training load was obtained using the session rating of perceived exertion (session-RPE method, calculated as the mean weekly session-RPE, monotony and strain. After 17 weeks of training there were significant increases in body mass, height, lean body mass, total protein, urea, hemoglobin concentration, testosterone and thyroxine. During this period, decreases in relative body fat, uric acid, red blood cells, C-reactive protein, and ferritin were also found. After the training period, the autonomic modulation demonstrated significant positive alterations, such as increases in parasympathetic related indices. Based on the results obtained we concluded that ballet training led to improvements in body composition and autonomic modulation. In general hematological and biochemical variables demonstrated that the training did not have adverse effects on the health state of the adolescents.

  3. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hopper LS

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Luke S Hopper,1 Nahoko Sato,2 Andries L Weidemann1 1Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, Edith Cowan University, Mt Lawley, WA, Australia; 2Department of Physical Therapy, Nagoya Gakuin University, Seto, Japan Abstract: The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve “turning out” or external rotation of the legs beyond that typically used in sports. This study evaluated the ability of the traditional single-leg squat to predict the leg alignment of dancers performing ballet movements with turnout. Three-dimensional kinematic data of dancers performing the single-leg squat and five ballet movements were recorded and analyzed. Reduction of the three-dimensional data into a one-dimensional variable incorporating the ankle, knee, and hip joint center positions provided the strongest predictive model between the single-leg squat and the ballet movements. The single-leg squat can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements, even in “turned out” postures. Clinicians should pay careful attention to observational positioning and rating criteria when assessing dancers performing the single-leg squat. Keywords: injury, motion capture, clinical assessment

  4. Vitamin D status and musculoskeletal health in adolescent male ballet dancers a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducher, Gaele; Kukuljan, S; Hill, B; Garnham, A P; Nowson, C A; Kimlin, M G; Cook, J

    2011-09-01

    Adequate vitamin D levels during growth are critical to ensuring optimal bone development. Vitamin D synthesis requires sun exposure; thus, athletes engaged in indoor activities such as ballet dancing may be at relatively high risk of vitamin D insufficiency. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of low vitamin D levels in young male ballet dancers and its impact on musculoskeletal health. Eighteen male ballet dancers, aged 10 to 19 years and training for at least 6 hours per week, were recruited from the Australian Ballet School, Melbourne, Australia. Serum 25(OH)D and intact PTH were measured in winter (July) from a non-fasting blood sample. Pubertal stage was determined using self-assessed Tanner criteria. Body composition and areal bone mineral density (aBMD) at the whole body and lumbar spine were measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Injury history and physical activity levels were assessed by questionnaire. Blood samples were obtained from 16 participants. Serum 25(OH)D levels ranged from 20.8 to 94.3 nmol/L, with a group mean of 50.5 nmol/L. Two participants (12.5%) showed vitamin D deficiency [serum 25(OH)D level 50 nmol/L). No relationship was found between vitamin D status, PTH levels, body composition, and aBMD. The most commonly reported injuries were muscle tears and back pain. The average number of injuries reported by each dancer was 1.9 ± 0.4 (range: 0 to 5). There was no difference in the frequency of reported injuries between subjects with vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency (2.1 ± 0.6 injuries) and those with normal vitamin D levels (1.4 ± 0.6 injuries). This pilot study showed that more than half of highly-trained young male ballet dancers presented with low levels of vitamin D in winter. Further investigations in larger samples of adolescent athletes are needed to determine if this could negatively impact bone growth and place them at higher risk for musculoskeletal injuries.

  5. Auditory risk assessment of college music students in jazz band-based instructional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamakshi V Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that musicians are at risk for music-induced hearing loss, however, systematic evaluation of music exposure and its effects on the auditory system are still difficult to assess. The purpose of the study was to determine if college students in jazz band-based instructional activity are exposed to loud classroom noise and consequently exhibit acute but significant changes in basic auditory measures compared to non-music students in regular classroom sessions. For this we (1 measured and compared personal exposure levels of college students (n = 14 participating in a routine 50 min jazz ensemble-based instructional activity (experimental to personal exposure levels of non-music students (n = 11 participating in a 50-min regular classroom activity (control, and (2 measured and compared pre- to post-auditory changes associated with these two types of classroom exposures. Results showed that the L eq (equivalent continuous noise level generated during the 50 min jazz ensemble-based instructional activity ranged from 95 dBA to 105.8 dBA with a mean of 99.5 ± 2.5 dBA. In the regular classroom, the L eq ranged from 46.4 dBA to 67.4 dBA with a mean of 49.9 ± 10.6 dBA. Additionally, significant differences were observed in pre to post-auditory measures between the two groups. The experimental group showed a significant temporary threshold shift bilaterally at 4000 Hz (P < 0.05, and a significant decrease in the amplitude of transient-evoked otoacoustic emission response in both ears (P < 0.05 after exposure to the jazz ensemble-based instructional activity. No significant changes were found in the control group between pre- and post-exposure measures. This study quantified the noise exposure in jazz band-based practice sessions and its effects on basic auditory measures. Temporary, yet significant, auditory changes seen in music students place them at risk for hearing loss compared to their non-music cohorts.

  6. The Ballet-Pantomime Technique of Passions: Constructing Knowledge of Dance during the 17th and 18th Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio VALLEJOS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the fundamentals of the pantomime-ballet dance technique, which was characteristic of the eighteenth century. In particular, it explores how knowledge developed with regard to the representation of passions and expressive gestures. Our hypothesis proposes the existence of a correlation between the regulation of the theatrical practice of dance in the seventeenth century, during the reign of Louis XIV, and the discourses on the dancing-body that accompanied the zenith of the pantomime-ballet project between 1760 and 1776. In this way, we show that the passage from baroque ballet to pantomimeballet represents a breakthrough in body encoding as well as a development of the aesthetic framework for the theatrical expression of the dancer.

  7. It Don't Mean a Thing if It Ain't Got Musicality: A Music-First Method for Teaching Historically Rooted Jazz Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebhard, Erinn

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a method for teaching jazz dance technique according to music concepts and prioritizing deep embodiment of music. This method addresses what can be seen as a disconnect between current practices and historical understanding in jazz dance today, a gap that can be bridged with education empowering students to make innovative…

  8. Penser la musique, Écouter les images. Lectures de Cahiers d’art, Jazz et Documents sur le jazz et le cinéma américains

    OpenAIRE

    Turquety, Diane

    2017-01-01

    De 1926 à 1931, les revues d’art ou plus largement d’actualité intellectuelle, Cahiers d’art, Jazz et Documents, couvrent de façon inédite l’actualité du jazz et du cinéma américains, notamment. Sous le signe du populaire, de l’Amérique et d’un apport « exotique » incarné par la communauté noire américaine, ces spectacles sont hissés en de nouvelles références artistiques vecteurs d’une modernité idéale. Le jazz et le cinéma parlant deviennent alors, progressivement et selon des orientations ...

  9. Examination and treatment of a professional ballet dancer with a suspected acetabular labral tear: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo-Summers, Lynnette; Bloom, Nancy J

    2015-08-01

    Dancers are at risk for developing groin pain that is due to acetabular labral tears. Although surgical management of labral tears has been reported extensively, conservative management has been poorly described. This case report describes the examination, diagnosis, and treatment of groin pain in a professional ballet dancer with a suspected acetabular labral tear. Treatment focused on decreasing anterior hip joint stresses and improving the precision of hip motion through correction of alignment and movement impairments noted during functional activities and dance. Successful outcomes included a reduction in pain and return to professional ballet dancing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Musical Preferences are Linked to Cognitive Styles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Greenberg

    Full Text Available Why do we like the music we do? Research has shown that musical preferences and personality are linked, yet little is known about other influences on preferences such as cognitive styles. To address this gap, we investigated how individual differences in musical preferences are explained by the empathizing-systemizing (E-S theory. Study 1 examined the links between empathy and musical preferences across four samples. By reporting their preferential reactions to musical stimuli, samples 1 and 2 (Ns = 2,178 and 891 indicated their preferences for music from 26 different genres, and samples 3 and 4 (Ns = 747 and 320 indicated their preferences for music from only a single genre (rock or jazz. Results across samples showed that empathy levels are linked to preferences even within genres and account for significant proportions of variance in preferences over and above personality traits for various music-preference dimensions. Study 2 (N = 353 replicated and extended these findings by investigating how musical preferences are differentiated by E-S cognitive styles (i.e., 'brain types'. Those who are type E (bias towards empathizing preferred music on the Mellow dimension (R&B/soul, adult contemporary, soft rock genres compared to type S (bias towards systemizing who preferred music on the Intense dimension (punk, heavy metal, and hard rock. Analyses of fine-grained psychological and sonic attributes in the music revealed that type E individuals preferred music that featured low arousal (gentle, warm, and sensual attributes, negative valence (depressing and sad, and emotional depth (poetic, relaxing, and thoughtful, while type S preferred music that featured high arousal (strong, tense, and thrilling, and aspects of positive valence (animated and cerebral depth (complexity. The application of these findings for clinicians, interventions, and those on the autism spectrum (largely type S or extreme type S are discussed.

  11. Musical Preferences are Linked to Cognitive Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David M.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Stillwell, David J.; Kosinski, Michal; Rentfrow, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Why do we like the music we do? Research has shown that musical preferences and personality are linked, yet little is known about other influences on preferences such as cognitive styles. To address this gap, we investigated how individual differences in musical preferences are explained by the empathizing-systemizing (E-S) theory. Study 1 examined the links between empathy and musical preferences across four samples. By reporting their preferential reactions to musical stimuli, samples 1 and 2 (Ns = 2,178 and 891) indicated their preferences for music from 26 different genres, and samples 3 and 4 (Ns = 747 and 320) indicated their preferences for music from only a single genre (rock or jazz). Results across samples showed that empathy levels are linked to preferences even within genres and account for significant proportions of variance in preferences over and above personality traits for various music-preference dimensions. Study 2 (N = 353) replicated and extended these findings by investigating how musical preferences are differentiated by E-S cognitive styles (i.e., ‘brain types’). Those who are type E (bias towards empathizing) preferred music on the Mellow dimension (R&B/soul, adult contemporary, soft rock genres) compared to type S (bias towards systemizing) who preferred music on the Intense dimension (punk, heavy metal, and hard rock). Analyses of fine-grained psychological and sonic attributes in the music revealed that type E individuals preferred music that featured low arousal (gentle, warm, and sensual attributes), negative valence (depressing and sad), and emotional depth (poetic, relaxing, and thoughtful), while type S preferred music that featured high arousal (strong, tense, and thrilling), and aspects of positive valence (animated) and cerebral depth (complexity). The application of these findings for clinicians, interventions, and those on the autism spectrum (largely type S or extreme type S) are discussed. PMID:26200656

  12. Musical Preferences are Linked to Cognitive Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David M; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Stillwell, David J; Kosinski, Michal; Rentfrow, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Why do we like the music we do? Research has shown that musical preferences and personality are linked, yet little is known about other influences on preferences such as cognitive styles. To address this gap, we investigated how individual differences in musical preferences are explained by the empathizing-systemizing (E-S) theory. Study 1 examined the links between empathy and musical preferences across four samples. By reporting their preferential reactions to musical stimuli, samples 1 and 2 (Ns = 2,178 and 891) indicated their preferences for music from 26 different genres, and samples 3 and 4 (Ns = 747 and 320) indicated their preferences for music from only a single genre (rock or jazz). Results across samples showed that empathy levels are linked to preferences even within genres and account for significant proportions of variance in preferences over and above personality traits for various music-preference dimensions. Study 2 (N = 353) replicated and extended these findings by investigating how musical preferences are differentiated by E-S cognitive styles (i.e., 'brain types'). Those who are type E (bias towards empathizing) preferred music on the Mellow dimension (R&B/soul, adult contemporary, soft rock genres) compared to type S (bias towards systemizing) who preferred music on the Intense dimension (punk, heavy metal, and hard rock). Analyses of fine-grained psychological and sonic attributes in the music revealed that type E individuals preferred music that featured low arousal (gentle, warm, and sensual attributes), negative valence (depressing and sad), and emotional depth (poetic, relaxing, and thoughtful), while type S preferred music that featured high arousal (strong, tense, and thrilling), and aspects of positive valence (animated) and cerebral depth (complexity). The application of these findings for clinicians, interventions, and those on the autism spectrum (largely type S or extreme type S) are discussed.

  13. Injuries in pre-professional ballet dancers: Incidence, characteristics and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekegren, Christina L; Quested, Rachele; Brodrick, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Compared to other athletic activities, research on injury incidence and risk factors in dance is limited. There is also a need for more research evaluating the impact of intense training on elite adolescent athletes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the rates and risk of injuries, the hours of dance exposure and the characteristics and consequences of injuries among elite pre-professional ballet students. Prospective epidemiological study. 266 (112 male) full-time students aged 15-19 years from three elite pre-professional ballet schools were followed prospectively over one school year. Injury rate was reported per 1000 h of dance and 1000 dance exposures (DEs). Injury details collected included type and anatomical location of injury. The clinical incidence of injury was 1.42 injuries per dancer and the risk of injury was 76% over the one-year period. The rate of injury was 1.38/1000 h of dance and 1.87/1000 DEs. Joints were the most commonly injured structures and the ankle was the most commonly injured body area. Overuse injuries were more common than traumatic injuries. Bony injuries (e.g. stress fractures), and injuries to the knee were associated with the greatest time loss per injury. Injury risk and rate increased as students progressed through their three years of training. In comparison with other adolescent athletic populations, participants in this study had a similar injury rate but a higher risk of injury. This may be attributable to the high level of training exposure in pre-professional ballet students. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Injuries in a Professional Ballet Dance Company: A 10-year Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Prem N; Farber, Joseph; Arnouk, Johnny; Varner, Kevin E; Mcculloch, Patrick C

    2016-03-01

    Ballet dancers are high-performance athletes who are particularly susceptible to a wide variety of musculoskeletal injuries. However, they are relatively understudied, and data on their injury rates are lacking. This retrospective study features the largest aggregate data on professional ballet dancers to date and aims to identify the most common diagnoses and areas of injury in this unique population to better direct preventative and clinical practices. The study encompassed a 10-year period from January 2000 to December 2010 of dancers from a single company. Data regarding the dancers' age, gender, location of injury, and diagnosis were collected from workers' compensation claims, company records, and medical records maintained by the treating doctors. These were analyzed to determine metrics on injury incidence, frequency, and diagnosis. Over the 10-year span, 574 injuries occurred. There were approximately 52 dancers per year for a total of 153 who danced at least one complete season during the study period. The average age was 27, and 53% were female. Given turnover with retirement and replacements, the total number of dancer-years was 520, indicating an injury incidence per annum of 1.10 (574 injuries per 520 dancer-years). The most common locations of injury were foot and ankle and the lumbar spine, with the three most common diagnoses making up greater than a third (37%) of the total. As the current largest study in professional ballet, the findings set the benchmark metrics for musculoskeletal injury to the foot, ankle, and lumbar spine sites. Future studies should aim to identify injury risk factors and modalities for prevention of these injuries.

  15. Body mass index, nutritional knowledge, and eating behaviors in elite student and professional ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyon, Matthew A; Hutchings, Kate M; Wells, Abigail; Nevill, Alan M

    2014-09-01

    It is recognized that there is a high esthetic demand in ballet, and this has implications on dancers' body mass index (BMI) and eating behaviors. The objective of this study was to examine the association between BMI, eating attitudes, and nutritional knowledge of elite student and professional ballet dancers. Observational design. Institutional. One hundred eighty-nine participants from an elite full-time dance school (M = 53, F = 86) and from an elite ballet company (M = 16, F = 25) volunteered for the study. There were no exclusion criteria. Anthropometric data (height and mass), General Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire (GNKQ), and the Eating Attitude Test-26 (EAT-26) were collected from each participant. Univariate analysis of variance was used to examine differences in gender and group for BMI, GNKQ, and EAT-26. Regression analyses were applied to examine interactions between BMI, GNKQ, and EAT-26. Professional dancers had significantly greater BMI than student dancers (P < 0.001), and males had significantly higher BMI scores than females (P < 0.05). Food knowledge increased with age (P < 0.001) with no gender difference. Student dancers had a significant interaction between year group and gender because of significantly higher EAT-26 scores for females in years 10 and 12. Regression analysis of the subcategories (gender and group) reported a number of significant relationships between BMI, GNKQ, and EAT-26. The findings suggest that dancers with disordered eating also display lower levels of nutritional knowledge, and this may have an impact on BMI. Female students' eating attitudes and BMI should especially be monitored during periods of adolescent development.

  16. Correlation of clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings in hips of elite female ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duthon, Victoria B; Charbonnier, Caecilia; Kolo, Frank C; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia; Becker, Christophe D; Bouvet, Cindy; Coppens, Elia; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Menetrey, Jacques

    2013-03-01

    To understand why professional female ballet dancers often complain of inguinal pain and experience early hip osteoarthritis (OA). Goals were to examine clinical and advanced imaging findings in the hips of dancers compared with those in a matched cohort of nondancers and to assess the femoral head translation in the forward split position using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty professional female ballet dancers and 14 active healthy female individuals matched for age (control group) completed a questionnaire on hip pain and underwent hip examination with impingement tests and measurement of passive hip range of motion (ROM). All had a pelvic 1.5 T MRI in the back-lying position to assess femoroacetabular morphologic features and lesions. For the dancers, additional MR images were acquired in the split position to evaluate femoroacetabular congruency. Twelve of 20 dancers complained of groin pain only while dancing; controls were asymptomatic. Dancers' passive hip ROM was normal. No differences in α neck angle, acetabular depth, acetabular version, and femoral neck anteversion were found between dancers and controls. MRI of dancers while performing splits showed a mean femoral head subluxation of 2.05 mm. MRI of dancers' hips showed labral tears, cartilage thinning, and herniation pits, located in superior and posterosuperior positions. Lesions were the same for symptomatic and asymptomatic dancers. Controls had proportionally the same number of labral lesions but in an anterosuperior position. They also had 2 to 3 times fewer cartilage lesions and pits than did dancers. The results of our study are consistent with our hypothesis that repetitive extreme movements can cause femoral head subluxations and femoroacetabular abutments in female ballet dancers with normal hip morphologic features, which could result in early OA. Pathologic changes seen on MRI were symptomatic in less than two thirds of the dancers. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright

  17. Trunk Dynamics Are Impaired in Ballet Dancers with Back Pain but Improve with Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gildea, Jan E; VAN DEN Hoorn, Wolbert; Hides, Julie A; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-08-01

    Trunk control is essential in ballet and may be compromised in dancers with a history of low back pain (LBP) by associated changes in motor control. This study aimed to compare trunk mechanical properties between professional ballet dancers with and without a history of LBP. As a secondary aim, we assessed whether asking dancers to use motor imagery to respond in a "fluid" manner could change the mechanical properties of the trunk and whether this was possible for both groups. Trunk mechanical properties of stiffness and damping were estimated with a linear second-order system, from trunk movement in response to perturbations, in professional ballet dancers with (n = 22) and without (n = 8) a history of LBP. The second-order model adequately described trunk movement in response to the perturbations. Trials were performed with and without motor imagery to respond in a fluid manner to the perturbation. Dancers with a history of LBP had lower damping than dancers without LBP during the standard condition (P = 0.002) but had greater damping during the "fluid" condition (P 0.99). Stiffness was not different between the dancers with and those without a history of LBP (P = 0.252) but was less during the fluid condition than the standard condition (P < 0.001). Although dancers with a history of LBP have less trunk damping than those without LBP, they have the capacity to modulate the trunk's mechanical properties to match that of pain-free dancers by increasing damping with motor imagery. These observations have potential relevance for LBP recurrence and rehabilitation.

  18. Testosterone concentrations in female athletes and ballet dancers with menstrual disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łagowska, Karolina; Kapczuk, Karina

    2016-01-01

    Menstrual disorders are common among female athletes and ballet dancers. Endocrine changes, such as high testosterone (HT) levels and high luteinizing hormone (LH)/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) ratios, may suggest functional ovarian hyperandrogenism which may induce such dysfunction. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate endocrine status in female athletes and ballet dancers with menstrual disorders. Their nutritional status and dietary habits were analysed in relation to the testosterone levels. In a cross-sectional approach, 31 female athletes (18.1 ± 2.6 years) and 21 ballerinas (17.1 ± 0.9) with menstrual disorders participated in the study. The levels of serum LH, FSH, progesterone (P), estradiol (E2), prolactin (PRL), thyroid-stimulating hormone, testosterone (T) and sex hormone-binding globulinwere measured to assess hormonal status. In addition, the free androgen index (FAI) was calculated. Nutritional status, total daily energy expenditure and nutritional habits were evaluated. Girls were assigned to one of the following groups: low testosterone (LT) level, normal testosterone level or HT level. There were significant differences between ballerinas and other female athletes in terms of testosterone levels, FAI, age at the beginning of training, length of training period and age at menarche. The PRL level was lowest in the LT group while the FAI index was highest in the HT group. Daily energy and carbohydrate intakes were significantly lower in the HT group. T levels in the study subjects were found to be associated with nutritional factors, energy availability, age at the beginning of training and frequency of training. This is the first report of HT levels being associated with the status of a female ballet dancer, the age of menarche and the length of the training history. Further research is necessary to confirm the results in a larger study group.

  19. The ballet of the planets a mathematician's musings on the elegance of planetary motion

    CERN Document Server

    Benson, Donald

    2012-01-01

    The Ballet of the Planets unravels the beautiful mystery of planetary motion, revealing how our understanding of astronomy evolved from Archimedes and Ptolemy to Copernicus, Kepler, and Newton. Mathematician Donald Benson shows that ancient theories of planetary motion were based on the assumptions that the Earth was the center of the universe and the planets moved in a uniform circular motion. Since ancient astronomers noted that occasionally a planet would exhibit retrograde motion--would seem to reverse its direction and move briefly westward--they concluded that the planets moved in epicyc

  20. Lesiones acumulativas por microtraumatismos de repetición en el ballet

    OpenAIRE

    Sobrino Serrano, Francisco José

    2016-01-01

    Las lesiones acumulativas por microtraumatismos de repetición, son las más frecuentes en la práctica de actividades atléticas como el ballet, que requieren una técnica precisa y numerosas repeticones de gestos técnicos específicos para adquirir destreza suficiente en su ejecución, existiendo diferencias en función de la disciplina, sexo, edad y/o experiencia profesional. En este estudio se analizan las lesiones presentadas por 145 bailarines profesionales de las principales compañías españ...

  1. Auditory risk assessment of college music students in jazz band-based instructional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Kamakshi V; Chesky, Kris; Beschoner, Elizabeth A; Nelson, Paul D; Stewart, Bradley J

    2013-01-01

    It is well-known that musicians are at risk for music-induced hearing loss, however, systematic evaluation of music exposure and its effects on the auditory system are still difficult to assess. The purpose of the study was to determine if college students in jazz band-based instructional activity are exposed to loud classroom noise and consequently exhibit acute but significant changes in basic auditory measures compared to non-music students in regular classroom sessions. For this we (1) measured and compared personal exposure levels of college students (n = 14) participating in a routine 50 min jazz ensemble-based instructional activity (experimental) to personal exposure levels of non-music students (n = 11) participating in a 50-min regular classroom activity (control), and (2) measured and compared pre- to post-auditory changes associated with these two types of classroom exposures. Results showed that the L eq (equivalent continuous noise level) generated during the 50 min jazz ensemble-based instructional activity ranged from 95 dBA to 105.8 dBA with a mean of 99.5 ± 2.5 dBA. In the regular classroom, the L eq ranged from 46.4 dBA to 67.4 dBA with a mean of 49.9 ± 10.6 dBA. Additionally, significant differences were observed in pre to post-auditory measures between the two groups. The experimental group showed a significant temporary threshold shift bilaterally at 4000 Hz (P music students place them at risk for hearing loss compared to their non-music cohorts.

  2. A Machine Learning Approach to Discover Rules for Expressive Performance Actions in Jazz Guitar Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Sergio I.; Ramirez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Expert musicians introduce expression in their performances by manipulating sound properties such as timing, energy, pitch, and timbre. Here, we present a data driven computational approach to induce expressive performance rule models for note duration, onset, energy, and ornamentation transformations in jazz guitar music. We extract high-level features from a set of 16 commercial audio recordings (and corresponding music scores) of jazz guitarist Grant Green in order to characterize the expression in the pieces. We apply machine learning techniques to the resulting features to learn expressive performance rule models. We (1) quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of the induced models, (2) analyse the relative importance of the considered musical features, (3) discuss some of the learnt expressive performance rules in the context of previous work, and (4) assess their generailty. The accuracies of the induced predictive models is significantly above base-line levels indicating that the audio performances and the musical features extracted contain sufficient information to automatically learn informative expressive performance patterns. Feature analysis shows that the most important musical features for predicting expressive transformations are note duration, pitch, metrical strength, phrase position, Narmour structure, and tempo and key of the piece. Similarities and differences between the induced expressive rules and the rules reported in the literature were found. Differences may be due to the fact that most previously studied performance data has consisted of classical music recordings. Finally, the rules' performer specificity/generality is assessed by applying the induced rules to performances of the same pieces performed by two other professional jazz guitar players. Results show a consistency in the ornamentation patterns between Grant Green and the other two musicians, which may be interpreted as a good indicator for generality of the ornamentation rules

  3. A Machine Learning Approach to Discover Rules for Expressive Performance Actions in Jazz Guitar Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Ivan Giraldo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Expert musicians introduce expression in their performances by manipulating sound properties such as timing, energy, pitch, and timbre. Here, we present a data driven computational approach to induce expressive performance rule models for note duration, onset, energy, and ornamentation transformations in jazz guitar music. We extract high-level features from a set of 16 commercial audio recordings (and corresponding music scores of jazz guitarist Grant Green in order to characterize the expression in the pieces. We apply machine learning techniques to the resulting features to learn expressive performance rule models. We (1 quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of the induced models, (2 analyse the relative importance of the considered musical features, (3 discuss some of the learnt expressive performance rules in the context of previous work, and (4 assess their generailty. The accuracies of the induced predictive models is significantly above base-line levels indicating that the audio performances and the musical features extracted contain sufficient information to automatically learn informative expressive performance patterns. Feature analysis shows that the most important musical features for predicting expressive transformations are note duration, pitch, metrical strength, phrase position, Narmour structure, and tempo and key of the piece. Similarities and differences between the induced expressive rules and the rules reported in the literature were found. Differences may be due to the fact that most previously studied performance data has consisted of classical music recordings. Finally, the rules’ performer specificity/generality is assessed by applying the induced rules to performances of the same pieces performed by two other professional jazz guitar players. Results show a consistency in the ornamentation patterns between Grant Green and the other two musicians, which may be interpreted as a good indicator for generality of the

  4. A Machine Learning Approach to Discover Rules for Expressive Performance Actions in Jazz Guitar Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Sergio I; Ramirez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Expert musicians introduce expression in their performances by manipulating sound properties such as timing, energy, pitch, and timbre. Here, we present a data driven computational approach to induce expressive performance rule models for note duration, onset, energy, and ornamentation transformations in jazz guitar music. We extract high-level features from a set of 16 commercial audio recordings (and corresponding music scores) of jazz guitarist Grant Green in order to characterize the expression in the pieces. We apply machine learning techniques to the resulting features to learn expressive performance rule models. We (1) quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of the induced models, (2) analyse the relative importance of the considered musical features, (3) discuss some of the learnt expressive performance rules in the context of previous work, and (4) assess their generailty. The accuracies of the induced predictive models is significantly above base-line levels indicating that the audio performances and the musical features extracted contain sufficient information to automatically learn informative expressive performance patterns. Feature analysis shows that the most important musical features for predicting expressive transformations are note duration, pitch, metrical strength, phrase position, Narmour structure, and tempo and key of the piece. Similarities and differences between the induced expressive rules and the rules reported in the literature were found. Differences may be due to the fact that most previously studied performance data has consisted of classical music recordings. Finally, the rules' performer specificity/generality is assessed by applying the induced rules to performances of the same pieces performed by two other professional jazz guitar players. Results show a consistency in the ornamentation patterns between Grant Green and the other two musicians, which may be interpreted as a good indicator for generality of the ornamentation rules.

  5. Negotiating Primitivist Modernisms: Louis Armstrong, Robert Goffin, and the Transatlantic Jazz Debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Stein

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available “Dear Pal Goffin,” Louis Armstrong wrote to his Belgian acquaintance, the lawyer, hobby journalist, and jazz historian Robert Goffin, on July 19, 1944. “‘Man—I’ve been trying to get in touch with you […]. Here’s another hundred dollars toward the five hundred. […] So accept this hundred and I’ll send the other before a ‘Black Cat can ‘Lick his ‘Bu‘hind’ ….. haw haw haw…” (80. Sending Goffin a batch of money along with this playfully worded missive, Armstrong was hoping for quick results. He ...

  6. Race, identity and the meaning of Jazz in 1940s Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Tackley, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    During the Blitz, on 8 March 1941, a bomb fell on the Café de Paris, an exclusive London nightclub, just as the Guianaian-born bandleader Ken “Snakehips” Johnson and his West Indian Dance Orchestra were in full swing. Johnson and saxophonist Dave ‘Baba’ Williams were killed in the blast, which also marked the demise of this successful group. The Orchestra was dedicated to reproducing emergent American big band jazz, but contemporary reports (if not extant recorded performances) also suggest t...

  7. Difficulties in the neuroscience of creativity: jazz improvisation and the scientific method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Malinda; Limb, Charles J

    2013-11-01

    Creativity is a fundamental and remarkable human capacity, yet the scientific study of creativity has been limited by the difficulty of reconciling the scientific method and creative processes. We outline several hurdles and considerations that should be addressed when studying the cognitive neuroscience of creativity and suggest that jazz improvisation may be one of the most useful experimental models for the study of spontaneous creativity. More broadly, we argue that studying creativity in a way that is both scientifically and ecologically valid requires collaboration between neuroscientists and artists. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  8. INVESTIGACIÓN CUALITATIVA COMO JAZZ. Variaciones prospectivas de una analogía

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Iván García Suárez

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo pretende contribuir a la comprensión de los desafíos futuros de la investigación cualitativa, a partir del análisis de algunas transiciones significativas que se evidencian hoy en dicho campo. Lo hace en cuatro movimientos: pluralidad, diálogo, rigor y expresividad, como ejes de una analogía entre la investigación cualitativa y el jazz, que combina escritura personal e intertextualidad. Se recomienda escuchar la discografía mínima indicada al final.

  9. Evénement culturel et dynamiques territoriales : le festival de jazz à Marciac

    OpenAIRE

    Fontorbes, Jean-Pascal; Granié, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Notre propos concerne des formes de rituels collectifs, de rites, de cérémonies interprétées comme maintien-construction de lien social et de nouvelles formes de sociabilités dans les campagnes c'est-à-dire de vie sociale, culturelle et économique en émergence. Nous considérons ici la culture comme « levain » de développement durable des territoires. L'exemple du festival de jazz à Marciac est pertinent car il renvoie à une pratique culturelle territorialisée.

  10. Encounters in place ballet: a phenomenological perspective on older people’s walking routines in an urban park

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eck, D. van; Pijpers, R.A.H.

    2017-01-01

    The phenomenological tradition within human geography continues to inspire research on everyday city life. This paper draws on David Seamon's notion of place ballet to understand the meaning of encounters between older people visiting an urban park in the city of Eindhoven, the Netherlands. The

  11. Fatigue-Induced Changes in Movement Pattern and Muscle Activity During Ballet Releve on Demi-Pointe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cheng-Feng; Lee, Wan-Chin; Chen, Yi-An; Hsue, Bih-Jen

    2016-08-01

    Fatigue in ballet dancers may lead to injury, particularly in the lower extremities. However, few studies have investigated the effects of fatigue on ballet dancers' performance and movement patterns. Thus, the current study examines the effect of fatigue on the balance, movement pattern, and muscle activities of the lower extremities in ballet dancers. Twenty healthy, female ballet dancers performed releve on demi-pointe before and after fatigue. The trajectory of the whole body movement and the muscle activities of the major lower extremity muscles were recorded continuously during task performance. The results show that fatigue increases the medial-lateral center of mass (COM) displacement and hip and trunk motion, but decreases the COM velocity and ankle motion. Moreover, fatigue reduces the activities of the hamstrings and tibialis anterior, but increases that of the soleus. Finally, greater proximal hip and trunk motions are applied to compensate for the effects of fatigue, leading to a greater COM movement. Overall, the present findings show that fatigue results in impaired movement control and may therefore increase the risk of dance injury.

  12. My Body and Its Reflection: A Case Study of Eight Dance Students and the Mirror in the Ballet Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radell, Sally Anne; Keneman, Margaret Lynn; Adame, Daniel D.; Cole, Steven P.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the impact of the mirror on a dancer's body image. Two groups of students enrolled in beginner ballet classes were taught the same classroom material; one group was taught with mirrors, the other, without. At the end of the semester four students from each class were randomly selected to participate in a private…

  13. The effect of a comprehensive injury audit program on injury incidence in ballet: a 3-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Nick; Nevill, Alan M; Brooks, John H M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an intervention with individualized conditioning program based on injury history and functional movement screening would be effective in reducing ballet injury incidence. Prospective 3-year epidemiological study. Professional ballet company and its in-house medical facility. Dancers from a professional ballet company over the 3-year study period. Participant numbers ranged from 52 to 58 (year 1: 52; year 2: 58; year 3: 53). The intervention consisted of individual conditioning programs developed using injury history and functional movement screening. Analysis was undertaken of the all dancers who were present in the company during the study period. The significance of change in injuries over a 3-year period was determined using a Poisson distribution model. To determine whether individual conditioning programs resulted in a decrease in injury incidence over the study period. The injury count reduced significantly in years 2 and 3 (P ballet. The implementation of well-structured injury surveillance programs can impact on injury incidence through its influence on intervention programs.

  14. Emerging Themes on the Efficacy of Ballet Barre Work and Its Connection to Center Work: An Investigatory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinell, Nicole Antonette

    2009-01-01

    Research on the efficacy of traditional ballet barre exercises in relation to student learning and performance in technique class essentially is non-existent. This research explored how students described their experiences with barre work as well as how they saw these experiences as developing desired skills for moving in the center work.…

  15. A review of the risk factors for lower extremity overuse injuries in young elite female ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, Erin Anne; Whatman, Chris; Harris, Nigel; Bradshaw, Elizabeth

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to review the evidence for selected risk factors of lower extremity overuse injuries in young elite female ballet dancers. An electronic search of key databases from 1969 to July 2013 was conducted using the keywords dancers, ballet dancers, athletes, adolescent, adolescence, young, injury, injuries, risk, overuse, lower limb, lower extremity, lower extremities, growth, maturation, menarche, alignment, and biomechanics. Thirteen published studies were retained for review. Results indicated that there is a high incidence of lower extremity overuse injuries in the target population. Primary risk factors identified included maturation, growth, and poor lower extremity alignment. Strong evidence from well-designed studies indicates that young elite female ballet dancers suffer from delayed onset of growth, maturation, menarche, and menstrual irregularities. However, there is little evidence that this deficit increases the risk of overuse injury, with the exception of stress fractures. Similarly, there is minimal evidence linking poor lower extremity alignment to increased risk of overuse injury. It is concluded that further prospective, longitudinal studies are required to clarify the relationship between growth, maturation, menarche, and lower extremity alignment, and the risk of lower extremity overuse injury in young elite female ballet dancers.

  16. Moving Is Like Making Out: Developing Female University Dancers' Ballet Technique and Expression through the Use of Metaphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohn, Cydney; Prettyman, Sandra Spickard

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the use of metaphor within a somatic context as a means to bridge the divide between technique and expression in two undergraduate advanced intermediate ballet classes. Data included surveys, classroom observations, student journal responses and student work, as well as surveys and journal responses, one year after…

  17. Obturator externus was larger, while obturator internus size was similar in ballet dancers compared to nondancing athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Ferris, April-Rose; Smith, Peter; Cook, Jill

    2018-06-02

    To compare the cross-sectional area (CSA) of hip external rotators, obturator externus (OE) and obturator internus (OI), in ballet dancers and nondancing athletes, and evaluate the relationship between obturator muscle size and hip pain. Case-control study. Elite ballet and sport. 33 male and female professional ballet dancers and 33 age and sex-matched athletes. CSA's of OE and OI measured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of one hip. Hip pain was scored with the Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS): HAGOS pain score of 100 was defined as no pain and a score less than 100 was defined as pain. Participants weight and height. Estimated marginal mean CSA of OE was 14% larger in dancers than athletes (p = 0.01, ηp2 = 0.1); the size of OI was similar (p > 0.05). Men and women in both groups had similar sized OI and OE. There was no interaction between the estimated marginal mean CSA of either obturator and hip pain. It appears that ballet selectively increases muscle size of OE, but not OI. Obturator size was not related to mild hip pain, as OE and OI size was similar in dancers and athletes with and without pain. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Social Physique Anxiety and Pressure to Be Thin in Adolescent Ballet Dancers, Rhythmic Gymnastics and Swimming Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidou, Evdoxia; Giannitsopoulou, Evgenia; Moysidou, Dimitra

    2017-01-01

    Participation in sports may influence negative body image and Social Physique Anxiety (SPA) as there is pressure by significant others to have a certain body image. The aim of the present study was to examine possible differences in SPA and perceived pressure to be thin between female preadolescent and adolescent ballet dancers, rhythmic…

  19. Acute Effects of Static vs. Ballistic Stretching on Strength and Muscular Fatigue Between Ballet Dancers and Resistance-Trained Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Camila D; Brown, Lee E; Wong, Megan A; Leyva, Whitney D; Pinto, Ronei S; Cadore, Eduardo L; Ruas, Cassio V

    2016-11-01

    Lima, CD, Brown, LE, Wong, MA, Leyva, WD, Pinto, RS, Cadore, EL, and Ruas, CV. Acute effects of static vs. ballistic stretching on strength and muscular fatigue between ballet dancers and resistance-trained women. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3220-3227, 2016-Stretching is used to increase joint range of motion, but the acute effects can decrease muscle strength. However, this may depend on the population or mode of stretching. The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of static vs. ballistic stretching on strength and muscular fatigue between ballet dancers and resistance-trained women. Fifteen resistance-trained women (age 23.8 ± 1.80 years, mass 67.47 ± 7.77 kg, height 168.30 ± 5.53 cm) and 12 ballet dancers (age 22.8 ± 3.04 years, mass 58.67 ± 5.65 kg, height 168.00 ± 7.69 cm) performed 5 days of testing. The first day was control (no stretching), whereas the other 4 days were static or ballistic stretching in a counterbalanced order. Range of motion, strength, and fatigue tests were also performed. Both groups demonstrated a significant decrease in hamstrings strength after static (102.71 ± 2.67 N·m) and ballistic stretching (99.49 ± 2.61 N·m) compared with control (113.059 ± 3.25 N·m), with no changes in quadriceps strength. For fatigue, only ballet dancers demonstrated a decrease from control (71.79 ± 4.88%) to ballistic (65.65 ± 8.19%), but no difference with static (65.01 ± 12.29%). These findings suggest that stretching decreases hamstrings strength similarly in ballet dancers and resistance-trained women, with no differences between modes of stretching. However, ballistic stretching only decreased muscular fatigue in ballet dancers, but not in resistance-trained women. Therefore, no stretching should be performed before strength performance. However, ballistic stretching may decrease acute muscular fatigue in ballet dancers.

  20. Style in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    Because music is not objectively descriptive or representational, the subjective qualities of music seem to be most important. Style is one of the most salient qualities of music, and in fact most descriptions of music refer to some aspect of musical style. Style in music can refer to historical periods, composers, performers, sonic texture, emotion, and genre. In recent years, many aspects of music style have been studied from the standpoint of automation: How can musical style be recognized and synthesized? An introduction to musical style describes ways in which style is characterized by composers and music theorists. Examples are then given where musical style is the focal point for computer models of music analysis and music generation.

  1. MRI features of posterior ankle impingement syndrome in ballet dancers: a review of 25 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peace, K.A.L. E-mail: kalpeace@hotmail.com; Hillier, J.C.; Hulme, A.; Healy, J.C

    2004-11-01

    AIM: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS) in classical ballet dancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review was undertaken of 25 MRI examinations of the ankle performed on 23 ballet dancers over a 26-month period. Images were examined for the presence of osseous and soft-tissue anatomical variants at the posterior ankle and imaging signs of PAIS. All patients presented with symptoms and signs suggestive of PAIS including posterior ankle pain, swelling and stiffness during plantar flexion. RESULTS: Anatomical variants predisposing to PAIS including as os trigonum and tuberosity arising from the superior calcaneum were clearly depicted. The most common imaging feature of PAIS in our series was high T2 signal posterior to the talocalcaneal joint indicating synovitis (n=25). Thickening of the posterior capsule (n=13) and tenosynovitis of flexor hallucis longus (n=17) were also common. An os trigonum was an infrequent finding (n=7). Bone marrow oedema, commonly in the posterior talus (n=10) or in a patchy distribution (n=10) was often noted. CONCLUSION: MRI is a useful diagnostic tool in PAIS, and in the present series, clearly demonstrates the anatomical variants and range of osseous and soft-tissue abnormalities associated with this condition. Prospective studies are needed to understand the significance and importance of individual MRI findings in producing the symptoms of PAIS.

  2. Joint Coordination and Muscle Activities of Ballet Dancers During Tiptoe Standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Hiroko; Fujii, Keisuke; Kouzaki, Motoki

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate joint coordination of lower limbs in dancers during tiptoe standing and the relationship between joint coordination and muscle coactivation. Seven female ballet dancers performed tiptoe standing with six leg positions (fi e classical dance positions and one modern dance position) for 10 s. The kinematic data of the metatarsophalangeal (MP), ankle, knee, and hip joints was collected, and surface electromyography (EMG) of over 13 lower limb muscles was conducted. Principal component analysis was performed to determine joint coordination. MP-ankle and ankle-knee had in-phase coordination, whereas knee-hip showed anti-phase coordination in the sagittal plane. In addition, most EMG-EMG coherence around the MP and ankle joints was significant up to 50 Hz when these two joints swayed with in-phase. This suggests that different joint coordination patterns are associated with neural processing related to different muscle coactivation patterns. In conclusion, ballet dancers showed in-phase coordination from the MP to knee joints, which was associated with muscle coactivation to a higher frequency domain (up to 50 Hz) in comparison with anti-phase coordination.

  3. Recontextualizing Dance Skills: Overcoming Impediments to Motor Learning and Expressivity in Ballet Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Janet

    2016-01-01

    The process of transmitting ballet’s complex technique to young dancers can interfere with the innate processes that give rise to efficient, expressive and harmonious movement. With the intention of identifying possible solutions, this article draws on research across the fields of neurology, psychology, motor learning, and education, and considers their relevance to ballet as an art form, a technique, and a training methodology. The integration of dancers’ technique and expressivity is a core theme throughout the paper. A brief outline of the historical development of ballet’s aesthetics and training methods leads into factors that influence dancers’ performance. An exploration of the role of the neuromotor system in motor learning and the acquisition of expert skills reveals the roles of sensory awareness, imagery, and intention in cuing efficient, expressive movement. It also indicates potentially detrimental effects of conscious muscle control, explicit learning and persistent naïve beliefs. Finally, the paper presents a new theory regarding the acquisition of ballet skills. Recontextualization theory proposes that placing a problematic task within a new context may engender a new conceptual approach and/or sensory intention, and hence the genesis of new motor programs; and that these new programs may lead to performance that is more efficient, more rewarding for the dancer, more pleasing aesthetically, and more expressive. From an anecdotal point of view, this theory appears to be supported by the progress of many dancers at various stages of their dancing lives. PMID:27047437

  4. Kinematic analysis of hip and knee rotation and other contributors to ballet turnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanbeck, Amy E; Russell, Jeffrey A; Handley, Sara C; Quanbeck, Deborah S

    2017-02-01

    Turnout, or external rotation (ER) of the lower extremities, is essential in ballet. The purpose of this study was to utilise physical examination and a biomechanical method for obtaining functional kinematic data using hip and knee joint centres to identify the relative turnout contributions from hip rotation, femoral anteversion, knee rotation, tibial torsion, and other sources. Ten female dancers received a lower extremity alignment assessment, including passive hip rotation, femoral anteversion, tibial torsion, weightbearing foot alignment, and Beighton hypermobility score. Next, turnout was assessed using plantar pressure plots and three-dimensional motion analysis; participants performed turnout to ballet first position on both a plantar pressure mat and friction-reducing discs. A retro-reflective functional marker motion capture system mapped the lower extremities and hip and knee joint centres. Mean total turnout was 129±15.7° via plantar pressure plots and 135±17.8° via kinematics. Bilateral hip ER during turnout was 49±10.2° (36% of total turnout). Bilateral knee ER during turnout was 41±5.9° (32% of total turnout). Hip ER contribution to total turnout measured kinematically was less than expected compared to other studies, where hip ER was determined without functional kinematic data. Knee ER contributed substantially more turnout than expected or previously reported. This analysis method allows precise assessment of turnout contributors.

  5. Re-Contextualizing Dance Skills: Overcoming Impediments to Motor Learning and Expressivity in Ballet Dancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet eKarin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The process of transmitting ballet’s complex technique to young dancers can interfere with the innate processes that give rise to efficient, expressive and harmonious movement. With the intention of identifying possible solutions, this article draws on research across the fields of neurology, psychology, motor learning, and education, and considers their relevance to ballet as an art form, a technique, and a training methodology. The integration of dancers’ technique and expressivity is a core theme throughout the paper. A brief outline of the historical development of ballet’s aesthetics and training methods leads into factors that influence dancers’ performance. An exploration of the role of the neuromotor system in motor learning and the acquisition of expert skills reveals the roles of sensory awareness, imagery, and intention in cuing efficient, expressive movement. It also indicates potentially detrimental effects of conscious muscle control, explicit learning and persistent naïve beliefs. Finally, the paper presents a new theory regarding the acquisition of ballet skills. Recontextualisation theory proposes that placing a problematic task within a new context may engender a new conceptual approach and/or sensory intention, and hence the genesis of new motor programs; and that these new programs may lead to performance that is more efficient, more rewarding for the dancer, more pleasing aesthetically, and more expressive. From an anecdotal point of view, this theory appears to be supported by the progress of many dancers at various stages of their dancing lives.

  6. MODELO DE COMUNICACIÓN NO VERBAL EN DEPORTE Y BALLET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Vallejo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio analiza el modelo de comunicación que se genera en los entrenadores de fútbol y de gimnasia artística a nivel profesional, y en los instructores de ballet en modalidad folklórica, tomando como referente el lenguaje corporal dinámico propio de la comunicación especializada de deportistas y bailarines, en la que se evidencia lenguaje no verbal. Este último se estudió tanto en prácticas psicomotrices como sociomotrices, para identificar y caracterizar relaciones entre diferentes conceptos y su correspondiente representación gestual. Los resultados indican que el lenguaje no verbal de los entrenadores e instructores toma ocasionalmente el lugar del lenguaje verbal, cuando este último resulta insuficiente o inapropiado para describir una acción motriz de gran precisión, debido a las condiciones de distancia o de interferencias acústicas. En los instructores de ballet se encontró una forma generalizada de dirigir los ensayos utilizando conteos rítmicos con las palmas o los pies. De igual forma, se destacan los componentes paralingüísticos de los diversos actos de habla, especialmente, en lo que se refiere a entonación, duración e intensidad.

  7. Modelo de comunicación no verbal en deporte y ballet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallejo Gloria

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio analiza el modelo de comunicación que se genera en los entrenadores de fútbol y de gimnasia artística a nivel profesional, y en los instructores de ballet en modalidad folklórica, tomando como referente el lenguaje corporal dinámico propio de la comunicación especializada de deportistas y bailarines, en la que se evidencia lenguaje no verbal. Este último se estudió tanto en prácticas psicomotrices como sociomotrices, para identificar y caracterizar relaciones entre diferentes conceptos y su correspondiente representación gestual. Los resultados indican que el lenguaje no verbal de los entrenadores e instructores toma ocasionalmente el lugar del lenguaje verbal, cuando este último resulta insuficiente o inapropiado para describir una acción motriz de gran precisión, debido a las condiciones de distancia o de interferencias acústicas. En los instructores de ballet se encontró una forma generalizada de dirigir los ensayos utilizando conteos rítmicos con las palmas o los pies. De igual forma, se destacan los componentes paralingüísticos de los diversos actos de habla, especialmente, en lo que se refiere a entonación, duración e intensidad.

  8. Modelo de comunicación no verbal en deporte y ballet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Vallejo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio analiza el modelo de comunicación que se genera en los entrenadores de fútbol y de gimnasia artística a nivel profesional, y en los instructores de ballet en modalidad folklórica, tomando como referente el lenguaje corporal dinámico propio de la comunicación especializada de deportistas y bailarines, en la que se evidencia lenguaje no verbal. Este último se estudió tanto en prácticas psicomotrices como sociomotrices, para identificar y caracterizar relaciones entre diferentes conceptos y su correspondiente representación gestual. Los resultados indican que el lenguaje no verbal de los entrenadores e instructores toma ocasionalmente el lugar del lenguaje verbal, cuando este último resulta insuficiente o inapropiado para describir una acción motriz de gran precisión, debido a las condiciones de distancia o de interferencias acústicas. En los instructores de ballet se encontró una forma generalizada de dirigir los ensayos utilizando conteos rítmicos con las palmas o los pies. De igual forma, se destacan los componentes paralingüísticos de los diversos actos de habla, especialmente, en lo que se refiere a entonación, duración e intensidad.

  9. MRI features of posterior ankle impingement syndrome in ballet dancers: a review of 25 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peace, K.A.L.; Hillier, J.C.; Hulme, A.; Healy, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of posterior ankle impingement syndrome (PAIS) in classical ballet dancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review was undertaken of 25 MRI examinations of the ankle performed on 23 ballet dancers over a 26-month period. Images were examined for the presence of osseous and soft-tissue anatomical variants at the posterior ankle and imaging signs of PAIS. All patients presented with symptoms and signs suggestive of PAIS including posterior ankle pain, swelling and stiffness during plantar flexion. RESULTS: Anatomical variants predisposing to PAIS including as os trigonum and tuberosity arising from the superior calcaneum were clearly depicted. The most common imaging feature of PAIS in our series was high T2 signal posterior to the talocalcaneal joint indicating synovitis (n=25). Thickening of the posterior capsule (n=13) and tenosynovitis of flexor hallucis longus (n=17) were also common. An os trigonum was an infrequent finding (n=7). Bone marrow oedema, commonly in the posterior talus (n=10) or in a patchy distribution (n=10) was often noted. CONCLUSION: MRI is a useful diagnostic tool in PAIS, and in the present series, clearly demonstrates the anatomical variants and range of osseous and soft-tissue abnormalities associated with this condition. Prospective studies are needed to understand the significance and importance of individual MRI findings in producing the symptoms of PAIS

  10. Film Noir Style Genealogy

    OpenAIRE

    Rietuma, Dita

    2012-01-01

    Annotation for the Doctoral Work Film Noir Style Genealogy (The Genealogy of the Film Noir Style) The doctoral work topic Film Noir Style Genealogy encompasses traditionally approved world film theory views on the concept of film noir and its related cinematographic heritage, and an exploration of its evolution and distinctive style, including – the development of film noir in the USA, Europe, and also in Latvia, within the context of both socio-political progression and the paradigm of m...

  11. Assessment of female ballet dancers' ankles in the en pointe position using high field strength magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jeffrey A; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    The en pointe position of the ankle in ballet is extreme. Previously, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of ballet dancers' ankles en pointe was confined to a low field, open MR device. To develop a reproducible ankle MRI protocol for ballet dancers en pointe and to assess the positions of the key structures in the dancers ankles. Six female ballet dancers participated; each was randomly assigned to stand en pointe while one of her feet and ankles was splinted with wooden rods affixed with straps or to begin with the ankle in neutral position. She lay in an MR scanner with the ankle inside a knee coil for en pointe imaging and inside an ankle/foot coil for neutral position imaging. Proton density weighted images with and without fat suppression and 3D water excitation gradient recalled echo images were obtained en pointe and in neutral position in sagittal, axial, and coronal planes. We compared the bones, cartilage, and soft tissues within and between positions. No difficulties using the protocol were encountered. En pointe the posterior articular surface of the tibial plafond was incongruent with the talar dome and rested on the posterior talus. The posterior edge of the plafond impinged Kager's fat pad. All participants exhibited one or more small ganglion cysts about the ankle and proximal foot, as well as fluid accumulation in the flexor and fibularis tendon sheaths. Our MRI protocol allows assessment of female ballet dancers' ankles in the extreme plantar flexion position in which the dancers perform. We consistently noted incongruence of the talocrural joint and convergence of the tibia, talus, and calcaneus posteriorly. This protocol may be useful for clinicians who evaluate dancers. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2015.

  12. Jazz drummers recruit language-specific areas for the processing of rhythmic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdener, Marcus; Humbel, Thierry; Esposito, Fabrizio; Habermeyer, Benedikt; Cattapan-Ludewig, Katja; Seifritz, Erich

    2014-03-01

    Rhythm is a central characteristic of music and speech, the most important domains of human communication using acoustic signals. Here, we investigated how rhythmical patterns in music are processed in the human brain, and, in addition, evaluated the impact of musical training on rhythm processing. Using fMRI, we found that deviations from a rule-based regular rhythmic structure activated the left planum temporale together with Broca's area and its right-hemispheric homolog across subjects, that is, a network also crucially involved in the processing of harmonic structure in music and the syntactic analysis of language. Comparing the BOLD responses to rhythmic variations between professional jazz drummers and musical laypersons, we found that only highly trained rhythmic experts show additional activity in left-hemispheric supramarginal gyrus, a higher-order region involved in processing of linguistic syntax. This suggests an additional functional recruitment of brain areas usually dedicated to complex linguistic syntax processing for the analysis of rhythmical patterns only in professional jazz drummers, who are especially trained to use rhythmical cues for communication.

  13. Assessment of hearing and hearing disorders in rock/jazz musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kähärit, Kim; Zachau, Gunilla; Eklöf, Mats; Sandsjö, Leif; Möller, Claes

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess hearing and hearing disorders among rock/jazz musicians. One hundred and thirty-nine (43 women and 96 men) musicians participated. The results are based on pure-tone audiometry and questionnaire responses. According to our definition of hearing loss, tinnitus, hyperacusis, distortion and/or diplacusis as hearing disorders, we found disorders in 74%, of the rock/jazz musicians studied. Hearing loss, tinnitus and hyperacusis were most common, and the latter two were found significantly more frequently than in different reference populations. The women showed bilateral, significantly better hearing thresholds at 3-6 kHz than the men. Hyperacusis, and the combination of both hyperacusis and tinnitus, were found to be significantly more frequent among women than among men. Hearing loss and tinnitus were significantly more common among men than among women. It is important to evaluate all kinds of hearing problems (other than hearing loss) in musicians, since they represent an occupational group especially dependent on optimal, functional hearing. On the basis of our results, we suggest that hearing problems such as tinnitus, hyperacusis, distortion and/or diplacusis should, in addition to hearing loss, be defined as hearing disorders.

  14. ‘Don’t play the butter notes’: jazz in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bradner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jazz has influenced world music and culture globally – attesting to its universal truths of surviving, enduring, and triumphing over tragedy. This begs the question, what can we glean in medical education from this philosophy of jazz mentoring? Despite our training to understand disease and illness in branching logic diagrams, the human experience of illness is still best understood when told as a story. Stories like music have tempos, pauses, and silences. Often they are not linear but wrap around the past, future, and back to the present, frustrating the novice and the experienced clinician in documenting the history of present illness. The first mentoring lesson Hancock discusses is from a time he felt stuck with his playing – his sound was routine. Miles Davis told him in a low husky murmur, ‘Don’t play the butter notes’. In medical education, ‘don’t play the butter notes’ suggests not undervaluing the metacognition and reflective aspects of medical training that need to be fostered during the early years of clinical teaching years.

  15. 'Don't play the butter notes': jazz in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradner, Melissa; Harper, Darryl V; Ryan, Mark H; Vanderbilt, Allison A

    2016-01-01

    Jazz has influenced world music and culture globally - attesting to its universal truths of surviving, enduring, and triumphing over tragedy. This begs the question, what can we glean in medical education from this philosophy of jazz mentoring? Despite our training to understand disease and illness in branching logic diagrams, the human experience of illness is still best understood when told as a story. Stories like music have tempos, pauses, and silences. Often they are not linear but wrap around the past, future, and back to the present, frustrating the novice and the experienced clinician in documenting the history of present illness. The first mentoring lesson Hancock discusses is from a time he felt stuck with his playing - his sound was routine. Miles Davis told him in a low husky murmur, 'Don't play the butter notes'. In medical education, 'don't play the butter notes' suggests not undervaluing the metacognition and reflective aspects of medical training that need to be fostered during the early years of clinical teaching years.

  16. The Youth Worker as Jazz Improviser: Foregrounding Education "In the Moment" within the Professional Development of Youth Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Pete

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues for the foregrounding of improvisation and education "in the moment" within youth workers' professional development. Devised in collaboration with third-year Youth and Community Work students and lecturers at a university in Birmingham, this participatory action research project drew on work of jazz ethnomusicologists…

  17. The Effects of Aural versus Notated Instructional Materials on Achievement and Self-Efficacy in Jazz Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kevin E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of aural versus notated pedagogical materials on achievement and self-efficacy in instrumental jazz improvisation performance. A secondary purpose of this study was to investigate how achievement and self-efficacy may be related to selected experience variables. The sample for the…

  18. Central common drive to antagonistic ankle muscles in relation to short-term cocontraction training in nondancers and professional ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertsen, S S; Kjær, M; Pedersen, K K; Petersen, T H; Perez, M A; Nielsen, J B

    2013-10-01

    Optimization of cocontraction of antagonistic muscles around the ankle joint has been shown to involve plastic changes in spinal and cortical neural circuitries. Such changes may explain the ability of elite ballet dancers to maintain a steady balance during various ballet postures. Here we investigated whether short-term cocontraction training in ballet dancers and nondancers leads to changes in the coupling between antagonistic ankle motor units. Eleven ballet dancers and 10 nondancers were recruited for the study. Prior to training, ballet dancers and nondancers showed an equal amount of coherence in the 15- to 35-Hz frequency band and short-term synchronization between antagonistic tibialis anterior and soleus motor units. The ballet dancers tended to be better at maintaining a stable cocontraction of the antagonistic muscles, but this difference was not significant (P = 0.09). Following 27 min of cocontraction training, the nondancers improved their performance significantly, whereas no significant improvement was observed for the ballet dancers. The nondancers showed a significant increase in 15- to 35-Hz coherence following the training, whereas the ballet dancers did not show a significant change. A group of control subjects (n = 4), who performed cocontraction of the antagonistic muscles for an equal amount of time, but without any requirement to improve their performance, showed no change in coherence. We suggest that improved ability to maintain a stable cocontraction around the ankle joint is accompanied by short-term plastic changes in the neural drive to the involved muscles, but that such changes are not necessary for maintained high-level performance.

  19. Starlink Document Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawden, M. D.

    This document describes the various styles which are recommended for Starlink documents. It also explains how to use the templates which are provided by Starlink to help authors create documents in a standard style. This paper is concerned mainly with conveying the ``look and feel" of the various styles of Starlink document rather than describing the technical details of how to produce them. Other Starlink papers give recommendations for the detailed aspects of document production, design, layout, and typography. The only style that is likely to be used by most Starlink authors is the Standard style.

  20. Exposure to music and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL among professional pop/rock/jazz musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana N Halevi-Katz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL has been extensively studied in industrial work environments. With the advent of new technologies, loud music has been increasingly affecting listeners outside of the industrial setting. Most research on the effects of music and hearing loss has focused on classical musicians. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between the amount of experience a professional pop/rock/jazz musician has and objective and subjective variables of the musician′s hearing loss. This study also examined professional pop/rock/jazz musicians′ use of hearing protection devices in relation to the extent of their exposure to amplified music. Forty-four pop/rock/jazz musicians were interviewed using the Pop/Rock/Jazz Musician′s Questionnaire (PRJMQ in order to obtain self-reported symptoms of tinnitus and hyperacusis. Forty-two of the subjects were also tested for air-conduction hearing thresholds in the frequency range of 1-8 kHz. Results show that the extent of professional pop/rock/jazz musicians′ exposure to amplified music was related to both objective and subjective variables of hearing loss: Greater musical experience was positively linked to higher hearing thresholds in the frequency range of 3-6 kHz and to the subjective symptom of tinnitus. Weekly hours playing were found to have a greater effect on hearing loss in comparison to years playing. Use of hearing protection was not linked to the extent of exposure to amplified music. It is recommended that further research be conducted with a larger sample, in order to gain a greater understanding of the detrimental effects of hours playing versus years playing.

  1. Exposure to music and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among professional pop/rock/jazz musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevi-Katz, Dana N; Yaakobi, Erez; Putter-Katz, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) has been extensively studied in industrial work environments. With the advent of new technologies, loud music has been increasingly affecting listeners outside of the industrial setting. Most research on the effects of music and hearing loss has focused on classical musicians. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between the amount of experience a professional pop/rock/jazz musician has and objective and subjective variables of the musician's hearing loss. This study also examined professional pop/rock/jazz musicians' use of hearing protection devices in relation to the extent of their exposure to amplified music. Forty-four pop/rock/jazz musicians were interviewed using the Pop/Rock/Jazz Musician's Questionnaire (PRJMQ) in order to obtain self-reported symptoms of tinnitus and hyperacusis. Forty-two of the subjects were also tested for air-conduction hearing thresholds in the frequency range of 1-8 kHz. Results show that the extent of professional pop/rock/jazz musicians' exposure to amplified music was related to both objective and subjective variables of hearing loss: Greater musical experience was positively linked to higher hearing thresholds in the frequency range of 3-6 kHz and to the subjective symptom of tinnitus. Weekly hours playing were found to have a greater effect on hearing loss in comparison to years playing. Use of hearing protection was not linked to the extent of exposure to amplified music. It is recommended that further research be conducted with a larger sample, in order to gain a greater understanding of the detrimental effects of hours playing versus years playing.

  2. Extreme hip motion in professional ballet dancers: dynamic and morphological evaluation based on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolo, Frank C; Charbonnier, Caecilia; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Duc, Sylvain R; Lubbeke, Anne; Duthon, Victoria B; Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia; Hoffmeyer, Pierre; Menetrey, Jacques; Becker, Christoph D

    2013-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) of the cam or pincer type based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a group of adult female professional ballet dancers, and to quantify, in vivo, the range of motion (ROM) and congruence of the hip joint in the splits position. Institutional review board approval and informed consent from each volunteer were obtained. Thirty symptomatic or asymptomatic adult female professional ballet dancers (59 hips) and 14 asymptomatic non-dancer adult women (28 hips, control group) were included in the present study. All subjects underwent MRI in the supine position, while, for the dancers, additional images were acquired in the splits position. Labral abnormalities, cartilage lesions, and osseous abnormalities of the acetabular rim were assessed at six positions around the acetabulum. A morphological analysis, consisting of the measurement of the α angle, acetabular depth, and acetabular version, was performed. For the dancers, ROM and congruency of the hip joint in the splits position were measured. Acetabular cartilage lesions greater than 5 mm were significantly more frequent in dancer's hips than in control hips (28.8 vs 7.1%, p = 0.026), and were mostly present at the superior position in dancers. Distribution of labral lesions between the dancers and the control group showed substantially more pronounced labral lesions at the superior, posterosuperior, and anterosuperior positions in dancers (54 lesions in 28 dancer's hips vs 10 lesions in 8 control hips). Herniation pits were found significantly more often (p = 0.002) in dancer's hips (n = 31, 52.5%), 25 of them being located in a superior position. A cam-type morphology was found for one dancer and a retroverted hip was noted for one control. Femoroacetabular subluxations were observed in the splits position (mean: 2.05 mm). The prevalence of typical FAI of the cam or pincer type was low in this selected population of professional ballet

  3. Energetic efficiency, menstrual irregularity, and bone mineral density in elite professional female ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle-Lucas, Ashley F; Akers, Jeremy D; Davy, Brenda M

    2010-01-01

    Sports that emphasize low body weight for optimal performance, such as ballet, are associated with an increased prevalence of the female athlete triad (FT). Previous research in this area that involves dancers has been limited; the majority of studies have been performed on adolescents training in classical ballet, and not professional adult dancers. The purpose of this study is to compare the physical and behavioral characteristics of female elite ballet dancers to sedentary, recreationally active non-dancing controls, with regard to characteristics of the FT and energetic efficiency. Women aged 18 to 35 years were recruited as participants. The dancers (N = 15) and non-dancing controls (N = 15) were pair-matched via age (dancers: 24.3 ± 1.3 years; controls: 23.7 ± 0.9 years), body mass index (dancers: 18.9 ± 0.2; controls: 19.4 ± 0.2 kg/m 2 ), and fat-free mass (dancers: 44.3 ± 0.8; controls: 44.1 ± 0.9 kg). Assessments included habitual dietary intake using 4-day food records, self-reported physical activity, psychometric measures of eating behaviors, health and menstrual history, body composition and bone density (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry), and resting metabolic rate (RMR) assessed by indirect calorimetry. Characteristics of the FT, specifically menstrual irregularities (6 of 15 dancers reported irregular or no menses; 1 of 15 controls reported irregular menses) and low energy availability, were more prevalent in dancers than in pair-matched controls. Despite having a similar fat-free mass (FFM), dancers had a significantly lower absolute RMR (dancers: 1367 ± 27; controls: 1454 ± 34 kcal/d; p ≤ 0.05) and significantly lower RMR relative to FFM (dancers: 30.9 ± 0.6; controls: 33.1 ± 0.8 kcal/kg fat-free mass/d; p ≤ 0.05). Energy intake between dancers (1577 ± 89 kcal/d) and pair-matched controls (2075 ± 163 kcal/d) also differed significantly (p ≤ 0.01). Six of the 15 dancers met the criteria for the FT (including low bone mineral

  4. Body weight, exercise and menstrual status among ballet dancers in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, S F; Beumont, P J; Fraser, I S; Llewellyn-Jones, D

    1982-07-01

    A prospective study of the menstrual pattern and weight changes was made in the first year of training of 29 new female entrants to a professional ballet school. Seventy-nine per cent of the student girls had menstrual disturbances at entry: primary amenorrhoea, four; secondary amenorrhoea, 11; irregular menses, eight. The incidence of secondary amenorrhoea increase substantially by the end of the year (20), but was not associated with any significant change in body weight. Only three students menstruated regularly during the year. Menstrual regularity improved during periods of injury and long vacation and it appears that deterioration of the menstrual pattern during dancing periods was related to strenuous physical exercise rather than to any change in body weight.

  5. The effects of nutrition, puberty and dancing on bone density in adolescent ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckhardt, Peter; Wynn, Emma; Krieg, Marc-Antoine; Bagutti, Carlo; Faouzi, Mohamed

    2011-06-01

    Ballet dancers have on average a low bone mineral content (BMC), with elevated fracture-risk, low body mass index (BMI) for age (body mass index, kg/m2), low energy intake, and delayed puberty. This study aims at a better understanding of the interactions of these factors, especially with regard to nutrition. During a competition for pre-professional dancers we examined 127 female participants (60 Asians, 67 Caucasians). They averaged 16.7 years of age, started dancing at 5.8 years, and danced 22 hours/week. Assessments were made for BMI, BMC (DXA), and bone mineral apparent density (BMAD) at the lumbar spine and femoral neck, pubertal stage (Tanner score), and nutritional status (EAT-40 questionnaire and a qualitative three-day dietary record). BMI for age was found to be normal in only 42.5% of the dancers, while 15.7% had a more or less severe degree of thinness (12.6% Grade2 and 3.1% Grade 3 thinness). Menarche was late (13.9 years, range 11 to 16.8 years). Food intake, evaluated by number of consumed food portions, was below the recommendations for a normally active population in all food groups except animal proteins, where the intake was more than twice the recommended amount. In this population, with low BMI and intense exercise, BMC was low and associated with nutritional factors; dairy products had a positive and non-dairy proteins a negative influence. A positive correlation between BMAD and years since menarche confirmed the importance of exposure to estrogens and the negative impact of delayed puberty. Because of this and the probable negative influence of a high intake of non-dairy proteins, such as meat, fish, and eggs, and the positive association with a high dairy intake, ballet schools should promote balanced diets and normal weight and should recognize and help dancers avoid eating disorders and delayed puberty caused by extensive dancing and inadequate nutrition.

  6. Effect of Reduced Stiffness Dance Flooring on Lower Extremity Joint Angular Trajectories During a Ballet Jump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, James; Brummel, Sara; Newman, Mary; Scott, Shannon; Reinagel, Matthew; Smith, Jennifer

    2015-09-01

    We carried out a study to investigate how low stiffness flooring may help prevent overuse injuries of the lower extremity in dancers. It was hypothesized that performing a ballet jump (sauté) on a reduced stiffness dance floor would decrease maximum joint flexion angles and negative angular velocities at the hips, knees, or ankles compared to performing the same jump on a harder floor. The participants were 15 young adult female dancers (age range 18 to 28, mean = 20.89 ± 2.93 years) with at least 5 years of continuous ballet experience and without history of serious lower body injury, surgery, or recent pain. They performed sautés on a (low stiffness) Harlequin ® WoodSpring Floor and on a vinyl-covered hardwood on concrete floor. Maximum joint flexion angles and negative velocities at bilateral hips, knees, and ankles were measured with the "Ariel Performance Analysis System" (APAS). Paired one-tailed t-tests yielded significant decreases in maximum knee angle (average decrease = 3.4° ± 4.2°, p = 0.026) and angular negative velocity of the ankles (average decrease = 18.7°/sec ± 27.9°/sec, p = 0.009) with low stiffness flooring. If the knee angle is less acute, then the length of the external knee flexion moment arm will also be shorter and result in a smaller external knee flexion moment, given an equal landing force. Also, high velocities of eccentric muscle contraction, which are necessary to control negative angular velocity of the ankle joint, are associated with higher risk of musculotendinous injury. Hence, our findings indicate that reduced floor stiffness may indeed help decrease the likelihood of lower extremity injuries.

  7. Muscle oxygenation and fascicle length during passive muscle stretching in ballet-trained subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, A; Fujita, E; Ikegawa, S; Kuno-Mizumura, M

    2011-07-01

    Muscle stretching transiently decreases muscle-blood flow corresponding to a muscle extension. It may disturb a balance between muscular oxygen demand and oxygen supply to muscles and reduce muscle oxygenation. However, muscle-stretching training may improve blood circulatory condition, resulting in the maintained muscle oxygenation during muscle stretching. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in muscle-blood volume (tHb) and tissue oxygenation index (TOI) during muscle stretching determined by using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in ballet-trained (BT) and untrained (C) subjects. 11 BT women who regularly perform muscle stretching and 11 C women participated in this study. Fascicle lengths, tHb and TOI in the tibialis anterior muscle were measured during passive plantar flexion from ankle joint angles of 120° (baseline) to 140°, 160°, the maximal comfortable position without pain (CP), and the maximal position (MP). At 160°, the % fascicle-length change from baseline was significantly lower in the BT than the C group, however, for the changes in tHb and TOI the significant interaction effect between the 2 groups was not detected. On the other hand, although the increases in the fascicle length from baseline to CP and MP were greater in BT than C, the tHb and TOI reductions were comparable between groups. We concluded that it appears that BT can extend their muscles without excessive reduction in muscle-blood volume and muscle oxygenation at relatively same but absolutely greater muscle-stretching levels than C. The attenuation in these indices during high-level muscle stretching may be associated with the repetitive muscle stretching of long-term ballet training. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Dance floor mechanical properties and dancer injuries in a touring professional ballet company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Luke S; Allen, Nick; Wyon, Matthew; Alderson, Jacqueline A; Elliott, Bruce C; Ackland, Timothy R

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the floors used by dancers have often been suggested to be associated with injury, yet limited etiological evidence is available to support this hypothesis. The dance floors at three theatres regularly used by a touring professional ballet company were mechanically quantified with the aim of comparing floor properties with injury incidence in dancers. Cross sectional. Test points on the floors were quantified in accordance with European Sports Surface Standard protocols for force reduction. Injuries and associated variables occurring within the ballet company dancers during activity on the three floors were recorded by the company's medical staff. An injury was recorded if a dancer experienced an incident that restricted the dancer from performing all normal training or performance activities for a 24 h period. Injuries were delimited to those occurring in the lower limbs or lumbar region during non-lifting tasks. Floor construction varied between venues and a range of floor mechanical properties were observed. None of the floors complied with the range of force reduction values required by the European Sport Surface Standards. The highest injury rate was observed on the floor with the greatest variability of force reduction magnitudes. No difference in injury frequency was observed between the venues with the highest and lowest mean force reduction magnitudes. Professional dancers can be required to perform on floors that may be inadequate for safe dance practice. Intra-floor force reduction variability may have a stronger association with injury risk than mean floor force reduction magnitude. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Leadership styles and theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltinane, Charlotte Louise

    It is useful for healthcare professionals to be able to identify the leadership styles and theories relevant to their nursing practice. Being adept in recognising these styles enables nurses to develop their skills to become better leaders, as well as improving relationships with colleagues and other leaders, who have previously been challenging to work with. This article explores different leadership styles and theories, and explains how they relate to nursing practice.

  10. A jazz-based approach for optimal setting of pressure reducing valves in water distribution networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paola, Francesco; Galdiero, Enzo; Giugni, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a model for valve setting in water distribution networks (WDNs), with the aim of reducing the level of leakage. The approach is based on the harmony search (HS) optimization algorithm. The HS mimics a jazz improvisation process able to find the best solutions, in this case corresponding to valve settings in a WDN. The model also interfaces with the improved version of a popular hydraulic simulator, EPANET 2.0, to check the hydraulic constraints and to evaluate the performances of the solutions. Penalties are introduced in the objective function in case of violation of the hydraulic constraints. The model is applied to two case studies, and the obtained results in terms of pressure reductions are comparable with those of competitive metaheuristic algorithms (e.g. genetic algorithms). The results demonstrate the suitability of the HS algorithm for water network management and optimization.

  11. Citation Styles For Internet Resources : A Webliography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A Webliography collects resources about citation Styles For internet resources, it divided by the styles: Chicago University style, MLA style, APA style, ISO style, and some articles about internet resources citation.

  12. Bridging the Gap: Enriching YouTube Videos with Jazz Music Annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Balke

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Web services allow permanent access to music from all over the world. Especially in the case of web services with user-supplied content, e.g., YouTube™, the available metadata is often incomplete or erroneous. On the other hand, a vast amount of high-quality and musically relevant metadata has been annotated in research areas such as Music Information Retrieval (MIR. Although they have great potential, these musical annotations are often inaccessible to users outside the academic world. With our contribution, we want to bridge this gap by enriching publicly available multimedia content with musical annotations available in research corpora, while maintaining easy access to the underlying data. Our web-based tools offer researchers and music lovers novel possibilities to interact with and navigate through the content. In this paper, we consider a research corpus called the Weimar Jazz Database (WJD as an illustrating example scenario. The WJD contains various annotations related to famous jazz solos. First, we establish a link between the WJD annotations and corresponding YouTube videos employing existing retrieval techniques. With these techniques, we were able to identify 988 corresponding YouTube videos for 329 solos out of 456 solos contained in the WJD. We then embed the retrieved videos in a recently developed web-based platform and enrich the videos with solo transcriptions that are part of the WJD. Furthermore, we integrate publicly available data resources from the Semantic Web in order to extend the presented information, for example, with a detailed discography or artists-related information. Our contribution illustrates the potential of modern web-based technologies for the digital humanities, and novel ways for improving access and interaction with digitized multimedia content.

  13. María de Ávila in the National Ballet of Spain: trajectory and legacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Elvira Esteban

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During the years 1983-1986 María de Ávila played the work of director of the National Ballet of Spain, a period which can be considered special and characteristic, being the only time in its history in which one person exercised that position while did in Classic National Ballet. The aim of this paper is to examine this period using various documentary sources (texts and commemorative compilations, programs, dissertations, journals performing arts and media to proceed after your analysis and provide a rationale for the documentation compiled following a historical-temporal qualitative approach that allows better understand not only the legacy of María de Ávila, but its influence on the evolution and history of the BNE.

  14. Perda de peso e consumo de bebidas durante sessões de treinamento de ballet clássico

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Cláudia Villela da; Fayh, Ana Paula Trussardi

    2011-01-01

    O objetivo do estudo foi analisar a perda de peso (PP) e o consumo de líquidos durante sessões de treinamento de ballet clássico. A amostra foi composta por vinte e uma bailarinas, que foram avaliadas em três sessões de ballet: uma sessão sem oferta de líquidos, uma sessão com oferta de água e outra com oferta de bebida esportiva. Na sessão em que as bailarinas receberam água, a mediana de consumo foi 376,19 mL e a mediana de PP foi -190g. Na sessão com bebida esportiva, a mediana do consumo ...

  15. A mídia e o jazz no Brasil: investigação em torno da recepção crítica dos festivais de jazz na imprensa paulistana

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, Luiza Spínola

    2011-01-01

    O objetivo desta pesquisa é levantar o registro histórico da memória da música popular no Brasil, através de um acompanhamento da cobertura jornalística que os festivais de jazz recebem na mídia impressa paulistana. Trata-se também de enfocar as relações que se estabelecem entre a crítica e a indústria cultural, mostrando como nossa memória musical é inflexionada por certa visão sociológica a partir da qual se enxerga o jazz como mais um produto da indústria cultural norte-americana, e como a...

  16. Lower Extremity Injury Patterns in Elite Ballet Dancers: Ultrasound/MRI Imaging Features and an Institutional Overview of Therapeutic Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmani, Razia; Endo, Yoshimi; Bauman, Phillip; Hamilton, William; Potter, Hollis; Adler, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Altered biomechanics from repetitive microtrauma, such as long practice hours in en pointe (tip of the toes) or demi pointe (balls of the feet) predispose ballet dancers to a multitude of musculoskeletal pathologies particularly in the lower extremities. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are radiation-sparing modalities which can be used to confidently evaluate these injuries, with ultrasound (US) offering the added utility of therapeutic intervention at the same time in experienced hands. The purposes of this paper were: (1) to illustrate the US and MRI features of lower extremity injury patterns in ballet dancers, focusing on pathologies commonly encountered at a single orthopedic hospital; (2) to present complementary roles of both ultrasound and MRI in the evaluation of these injuries whenever possible; (3) to review and present our institutional approach towards therapeutic ultrasound-guided interventions by presenting explicit cases. Online searches were performed using the search criteria of "ballet biomechanics" and "ballet injuries." The results were then further narrowed down by limiting articles published in the past 15 years, modality (US and MRI), anatomical region (foot and ankle, hip and knee) and to major radiology, orthopedics, and sports medicine journals. Performing ballet poses major stress to lower extremities and predisposes dancer to several musculoskeletal injuries. These can be adequately evaluated by both US and MRI. US is useful for evaluating superficial structures such as soft tissues, tendons, and ligaments, particularly in the foot and ankle. MRI provides superior resolution of deeper structures such as joints, bone marrow, and cartilage. In addition, US can be used as a therapeutic tool for providing quick symptomatic improvement in these athletes for who "time is money". Performing ballet may cause major stress to the lower extremities, predominantly affecting the foot and ankle, followed by the knee and hip. US

  17. Single-leg squats can predict leg alignment in dancers performing ballet movements in “turnout”

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper,Luke S; Sato,Nahoko; Weidemann,Andries L

    2016-01-01

    Luke S Hopper,1 Nahoko Sato,2 Andries L Weidemann1 1Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts, Edith Cowan University, Mt Lawley, WA, Australia; 2Department of Physical Therapy, Nagoya Gakuin University, Seto, Japan Abstract: The physical assessments used in dance injury surveillance programs are often adapted from the sports and exercise domain. Bespoke physical assessments may be required for dance, particularly when ballet movements involve “turning out” or external...

  18. The prevalence and clinical significance of sonographic tendon abnormalities in asymptomatic ballet dancers: a 24-month longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin, Jules; Cook, Jill L; Malliaras, Peter; McCormack, Moira; Calleja, Michelle; Clarke, Andrew; Connell, David

    2013-01-01

    Sonographic abnormalities of the achilles and patellar tendons are common findings in athletes, and tendinopathy is a common cause of pain and disability in athletes. However, it is unclear whether the sonographic changes are pathological or adaptive, or if they predict future injury. We undertook a cohort study to determine what sonographic features of the achilles and patellar tendons are consistent with changes as a result of ballet training, and which may be predictive of future development of disabling tendon symptoms. The achilles and patellar tendons of 79 (35 male, 44 female) professional ballet dancers (members of the English Royal Ballet) were examined with ultrasound, measuring proximal and distal tendon diameters and assessing for the presence of hypoechoic change, intratendon defects, calcification and neovascularity. All subjects were followed for 24 months for the development of patellar tendon or achilles-related pain or injury severe enough to require time off from dancing. Sonographic abnormalities were common among dancers, both male and female, and in both achilles and patellar tendons. Disabling tendon-related symptoms developed in 10 dancers and 14 tendons: 7 achilles (3 right, 4 left) and 7 patellar (2 right, 5 left). The presence of moderate or severe hypoechoic defects was weakly predictive for the development of future disabling tendon symptoms (p=0.0381); there was no correlation between any of the other sonographic abnormalities and the development of symptoms. There was no relationship between achilles or patellar tendons' diameter, either proximal or distal, with an increased likelihood of developing tendon-related disability. The presence of sonographic abnormalities is common in ballet dancers, but only the presence of focal hypoechoic changes predicts the development of future tendon-related disability. This suggests that screening of asymptomatic individuals may be of use in identifying those who are at higher risk of developing

  19. Hip Joint Effusion-Synovitis Is Associated With Hip Pain and Sports/Recreation Function in Female Professional Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Ferris, April-Rose; Smith, Peter; Cook, Jill

    2018-03-23

    To compare hip joint effusion-synovitis prevalence in professional ballet dancers with nondancing athletes and to evaluate the relationship between effusion-synovitis and clinical measures and cartilage defects. Case-control study. Elite ballet and sport. Forty-nine professional ballet dancers and 49 age-matched and sex-matched athletes. Group (dancers/athletes), sex, age, years of training, Copenhagen Hip and Groin Outcome Scores (HAGOSs), hip rotation range of motion (ROM), generalized joint hypermobility (GJH), and hip cartilage defect scores. Hip joint effusion-synovitis (absent, grade 1 = 2-4 mm, grade 2 = >4 mm) scored with 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Hip joint effusion-synovitis was found in 22 (45%) dancers and 13 (26.5%) athletes (P = 0.06). Grade 2 effusion-synovitis was only found in dancers (n = 8, r = 0.31, P = 0.009). The prevalence of effusion-synovitis was similar in men (n = 11, 26%) and women (n = 24, 43%, P = 0.09). Female dancers with effusion-synovitis had lower HAGOS pain (r = 0.63, P = 0.001) and sports/recreation scores (r = 0.66, P = 0.001) compared with those without effusion-synovitis. The HAGOS scores were not related to effusion-synovitis in male dancers or female and male athletes (P > 0.01 for all). Effusion-synovitis was not related to hip ROM, GJH, or cartilage defect scores (P > 0.05 for all). Hip joint effusion-synovitis was related to higher levels of pain and lower sports/recreation function in female ballet dancers. Effusion-synovitis was not related to hip rotation ROM, GJH or cartilage defects. Larger sized joint effusion-synovitis was exclusively found in dancers.

  20. Atraumatic tears of the ligamentum teres are more frequent in professional ballet dancers than a sporting population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan; Ferris, April-Rose; Smith, Peter; Garnham, Andrew; Cook, Jill

    2016-07-01

    To compare the frequency of atraumatic ligamentum teres (LT) tear in professional ballet dancers with that of athletes, and to determine the relationship with clinical and imaging findings. Forty-nine male and female professional ballet dancers (98 hips) and 49 age and sex-matched non-dancing athletes (98 hips) completed questionnaires on hip symptoms and physical activity levels, underwent hip rotation range of movement (ROM) and hypermobility testing, and 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (3 T MRI) on both hips to detect LT tears, acetabular labral tears, and articular cartilage defects, and to measure the lateral centre edge angles (LCE). A higher frequency of LT tear was found in dancers (55 %) compared with athletes (22 %, P = 0.001). The frequency and severity of LT tears in dancers increased with older age (P = 0.004, P = 0.006, respectively). The Hip and Groin Outcome Score (HAGOS) pain scores or hip rotation ROM did not differ significantly among participants with normal, partial, or complete tears of LT (P > 0.01 for all). Neither the frequency of generalised joint hypermobility (P = 0.09) nor the LCE angles (P = 0.32, P = 0.16, left and right hips respectively) differed between those with and those without LT tear. In most hips, LT tear co-existed with either a labral tear or a cartilage defect, or both. The higher frequency of atraumatic LT tears in professional ballet dancers suggests that the LT might be abnormally loaded in ballet, and caution is required when evaluating MRI, as LT tears may be asymptomatic. A longitudinal study of this cohort is required to determine if LT tear predisposes the hip joint to osteoarthritis.

  1. Differences in Cortical Representation and Structural Connectivity of Hands and Feet between Professional Handball Players and Ballet Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Jessica; Topka, Marlene Sofie; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    It is known that intensive training and expertise are associated with functional and structural neuroadaptations. Most studies, however, compared experts with nonexperts; hence it is, specifically for sports, unclear whether the neuroplastic adaptations reported are sport-specific or sport-general. Here we aimed at investigating sport-specific adaptations in professional handball players and ballet dancers by focusing on the primary motor and somatosensory grey matter (GM) representation of hands and feet using voxel-based morphometry as well as on fractional anisotropy (FA) of the corticospinal tract by means of diffusion tensor imaging-based fibre tractography. As predicted, GM volume was increased in hand areas of handball players, whereas ballet dancers showed increased GM volume in foot areas. Compared to handball players, ballet dancers showed decreased FA in both fibres connecting the foot and hand areas, but they showed lower FA in fibres connecting the foot compared to their hand areas, whereas handball players showed lower FA in fibres connecting the hand compared to their foot areas. Our results suggest that structural adaptations are sport-specific and are manifested in brain regions associated with the neural processing of sport-specific skills. We believe this enriches the plasticity research in general and extends our knowledge of sport expertise in particular. PMID:27247805

  2. The role of puberty in the making and breaking of young ballet dancers: Perspectives of dance teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Siobhan B; Haase, Anne M; Malina, Robert M; Cumming, Sean P

    2016-02-01

    Physical changes associated with puberty may conflict with functional and aesthetic ideals for a career in ballet. The dance teacher is in a position to guide young dancers through the pubertal transition, although dancers rather than teachers are often the focus of research. This study explores the social stimulus value of the female body in ballet as perceived by the dance teacher and how value may change during puberty. Ten UK dance teachers were interviewed; interpretative phenomenological analysis was used. Four main themes perceived by dance teachers emerged as central to the social stimulus value of the body among adolescent dancers: the ideal body; teacher approaches to managing puberty in the dance environment; puberty as a 'make or break' stage in ballet; and teacher awareness of pubertal onset and the implications of timing. Dance teachers can play an important role in moderating external and individual expectations during the pubertal transition. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Perda de peso e consumo de bebidas durante sessões de treinamento de ballet clássico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Villela da Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi analisar a perda de peso (PP e o consumo de líquidos durante sessões de treinamento de ballet clássico. A amostra foi composta por vinte e uma bailarinas, que foram avaliadas em três sessões de ballet: uma sessão sem oferta de líquidos, uma sessão com oferta de água e outra com oferta de bebida esportiva. Na sessão em que as bailarinas receberam água, a mediana de consumo foi 376,19 mL e a mediana de PP foi -190g. Na sessão com bebida esportiva, a mediana do consumo foi de 226,19 mL e a mediana da PP foi -150g. Observou-se diferença na ingestão de líquidos, mas não na PP, durante as sessões com consumo de líquidos (p=0,01 e p=0,79, respectivamente. As bailarinas, voluntariamente, beberam mais água do que bebida esportiva durante os treinos de ballet clássico.

  4. Differences in Cortical Representation and Structural Connectivity of Hands and Feet between Professional Handball Players and Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Jessica; Topka, Marlene Sofie; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    It is known that intensive training and expertise are associated with functional and structural neuroadaptations. Most studies, however, compared experts with nonexperts; hence it is, specifically for sports, unclear whether the neuroplastic adaptations reported are sport-specific or sport-general. Here we aimed at investigating sport-specific adaptations in professional handball players and ballet dancers by focusing on the primary motor and somatosensory grey matter (GM) representation of hands and feet using voxel-based morphometry as well as on fractional anisotropy (FA) of the corticospinal tract by means of diffusion tensor imaging-based fibre tractography. As predicted, GM volume was increased in hand areas of handball players, whereas ballet dancers showed increased GM volume in foot areas. Compared to handball players, ballet dancers showed decreased FA in both fibres connecting the foot and hand areas, but they showed lower FA in fibres connecting the foot compared to their hand areas, whereas handball players showed lower FA in fibres connecting the hand compared to their foot areas. Our results suggest that structural adaptations are sport-specific and are manifested in brain regions associated with the neural processing of sport-specific skills. We believe this enriches the plasticity research in general and extends our knowledge of sport expertise in particular.

  5. Differences in Cortical Representation and Structural Connectivity of Hands and Feet between Professional Handball Players and Ballet Dancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Meier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that intensive training and expertise are associated with functional and structural neuroadaptations. Most studies, however, compared experts with nonexperts; hence it is, specifically for sports, unclear whether the neuroplastic adaptations reported are sport-specific or sport-general. Here we aimed at investigating sport-specific adaptations in professional handball players and ballet dancers by focusing on the primary motor and somatosensory grey matter (GM representation of hands and feet using voxel-based morphometry as well as on fractional anisotropy (FA of the corticospinal tract by means of diffusion tensor imaging-based fibre tractography. As predicted, GM volume was increased in hand areas of handball players, whereas ballet dancers showed increased GM volume in foot areas. Compared to handball players, ballet dancers showed decreased FA in both fibres connecting the foot and hand areas, but they showed lower FA in fibres connecting the foot compared to their hand areas, whereas handball players showed lower FA in fibres connecting the hand compared to their foot areas. Our results suggest that structural adaptations are sport-specific and are manifested in brain regions associated with the neural processing of sport-specific skills. We believe this enriches the plasticity research in general and extends our knowledge of sport expertise in particular.

  6. Analisis Pengaruh Redesign Transmisi dan Final Drive Gear Terhadap Karakteristik Traksi Honda New Jazz RS 2010 Untuk Kejuaraan Dragrace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Putu Gede Jaya Laksana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Catatan waktu adalah hal yang terpenting untuk menjadi juara pada kompetisi dragrace. Pada kelas bracket 10, kendaraan harus finish dengan waktu lebih dari 10 detik dan yang paling mendekati 10 detik akan menjadi pemenang. Untuk meraih itu, perlu dilakukan modifikasi sistem transmisi pada kendaraan, yaitu rasio transmisi dan final drive gear. Pada penelitian ini, pertama dilakukan pengujian dynotest untuk mendapatkan tenaga dan torsi aktual kendaraan. Tahapan kedua dilakukan pengolahan data secara aktual dan teoritis untuk setiap tingkatan transmisi dan rasio final drive gear. Kemudian analisa akhir merupakan komparatif studi antara karakteristik traksi desain baru sistem transmisi dengan parameter desain. Hasil analisa menunjukkan bahwa rasio final drive gear memiliki pengaruh proporsional terhadap karaktersitik traksi dari kendaraan New Honda Jazz. Pada penelitian ini dapat disimpulkan bahwa kendaraan Honda New Jazz RS 2010 diprediksi finish dengan catatan waktu 10,08 detik tanpa mengalami fenomena slip.

  7. Novel activation domain derived from Che-1 cofactor coupled with the artificial protein Jazz drives utrophin upregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desantis, Agata; Onori, Annalisa; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Mattei, Elisabetta; Fanciulli, Maurizio; Passananti, Claudio; Corbi, Nicoletta

    2009-02-01

    Our aim is to upregulate the expression level of the dystrophin related gene utrophin in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, thus complementing the lack of dystrophin functions. To this end, we have engineered synthetic zinc finger based transcription factors. We have previously shown that the artificial three-zinc finger protein named Jazz fused with the Vp16 activation domain, is able to bind utrophin promoter A and to increase the endogenous level of utrophin in transgenic mice. Here, we report on an innovative artificial protein, named CJ7, that consists of Jazz DNA binding domain fused to a novel activation domain derived from the regulatory multivalent adaptor protein Che-1/AATF. This transcriptional activation domain is 100 amino acids in size and it is very powerful as compared to the Vp16 activation domain. We show that CJ7 protein efficiently promotes transcription and accumulation of the acetylated form of histone H3 on the genomic utrophin promoter locus.

  8. 美国语音教材Jazz Chants在英语语音课堂中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐苏

    2014-01-01

    美国著名英语语音教材Jazz Chants出现在听说法仍然流行和交际法崭露头角的20世纪70年代,在近40年的发展中成为英语语音教学中最为广泛使用的教学手段之一。Jazz chants是由美国纽约大学英语教授Carolyn Graham提出的全新英语语音教学模式,并将其定义为“Rhythms of American English for Students of English as a Second Language”,而这一教学理念为新形势下的英语语音课堂教学指明了发展方向。

  9. Evaluating Style Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roon, F.A.; Nijman, T.E.; Ter Horst, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate applications of (return based) style analysis.The portfolio and positivity constraints imposed by style analysis are useful in constructing mimicking portfolios without short positions.Such mimicking portfolios can be used, e.g., to construct efficient portfolios of mutual

  10. Evaluating Style Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A. de Roon (Frans); T.E. Nijman (Theo); B.J.M. Werker

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we evaluate applications of (return based) style analysis. The portfolio and positivity constraints imposed by style analysis are useful in constructing mimicking portfolios without short positions. Such mimicking portfolios can be used e.g. to construct efficient

  11. Profiling & Utilizing Learning Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, James W., Ed.

    The purpose of the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) Learning Style Profile is to provide educators with a well-validated and easy-to-use instrument for diagnosing the cognitive styles, perceptual response tendencies, and study/instructional preferences of middle level and senior high school students. The Learning Style…

  12. Cognitive Style: Individual Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracho, Olivia N.

    1989-01-01

    A literature review describes several dimensions of cognitive styles in an effort to illustrate individual stylistic differences. Discusses the field dependence-independence dimension, taking into account age, sex, and cultural differences. Suggests that cognitive style theory needs to be structured in a broader theoretical framework. (NH)

  13. Codependency and Parenting Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Judith L.; Crawford, Duane W.

    1992-01-01

    College students (n=175) reported the parenting style of their mother and father and completed a scale assessing their own level of codependency. Parenting style of the father (uninvolved, permissive, authoritarian, or democratic) was related to offspring codependency. Both sons and daughters of authoritarian fathers had higher levels of…

  14. AUTOMATIC ARCHITECTURAL STYLE RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mathias

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Procedural modeling has proven to be a very valuable tool in the field of architecture. In the last few years, research has soared to automatically create procedural models from images. However, current algorithms for this process of inverse procedural modeling rely on the assumption that the building style is known. So far, the determination of the building style has remained a manual task. In this paper, we propose an algorithm which automates this process through classification of architectural styles from facade images. Our classifier first identifies the images containing buildings, then separates individual facades within an image and determines the building style. This information could then be used to initialize the building reconstruction process. We have trained our classifier to distinguish between several distinct architectural styles, namely Flemish Renaissance, Haussmannian and Neoclassical. Finally, we demonstrate our approach on various street-side images.

  15. The Rediscovery and Resurrection of Bunk Johnson – a Grounded Theory Approach: A case study in jazz historiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Ekins, Ph.D., FRSA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper was written in the beginning phase of my transitioning from grounded theory sociologist (Ekins, 19971 to grounded theory musicologist (Ekins, 20102. In particular, it provides preliminary data for a grounded theory of ‘managing authenticity’, the core category/basic social process (Glaser, 1978 that has emerged from my ongoing grounded theory work in jazz historiography. It was written whilst I was ‘credentialising’ (Glaser, 2010 my transition to popular music studies and popular musicology. In consequence, it incorporates many aspects that are inimical to classic grounded theory. As with so much of Straussian and so-called constructivist grounded theory (Bryant and Charmaz, 2007, it roots itself in G.H. Mead and a social constructivist symbolic interactionism – inter alia, a legitimising (authenticating strategy. Moreover, as is typical of this mode of conceptualising, the paper fills the void of inadequate classic grounded theorising with less conceptual theorising and more conceptual description. Nevertheless, the article does introduce a number of categories that ‘fit and work’, and have ‘conceptual grab’ (Glaser, 1978; Glaser, 1992. In particular, in terms of my own continuing credentialising as a classic grounded theorist, it sets forth important categories to be integrated into my ongoing work on managing authenticity in New Orleans revivalist jazz, namely, ‘trailblazing’, ‘mythologizing’, ‘debunking’, and ‘marginalising’, in the context of the ‘rediscovering’ and ‘resurrecting’ of a jazz pioneer. More specifically, the paper is offered to classic grounded theorists as a contribution to preliminary generic social process analysis in the substantive area of jazz historiography.

  16. Emotional Intent Modulates The Neural Substrates Of Creativity: An fMRI Study of Emotionally Targeted Improvisation in Jazz Musicians

    OpenAIRE

    Malinda J. McPherson; Frederick S. Barrett; Monica Lopez-Gonzalez; Patpong Jiradejvong; Charles J. Limb

    2016-01-01

    Emotion is a primary motivator for creative behaviors, yet the interaction between the neural systems involved in creativity and those involved in emotion has not been studied. In the current study, we addressed this gap by using fMRI to examine piano improvisation in response to emotional cues. We showed twelve professional jazz pianists photographs of an actress representing a positive, negative or ambiguous emotion. Using a non-ferromagnetic thirty-five key keyboard, the pianists improvise...

  17. 1945, Le jazz libère l’Allemagne... pour la seconde fois

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Cohen-Avenel

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available 1945, l’Allemagne vaincue est détruite, le régime en déroute, les morts innombrables, un grand nombre d’hommes faits prisonniers. La démocratie n’existe pas. Tout est à (reconstruire. Arrivent alors les troupes alliées et, avec les Américains, le jazz, une musique si prenante que bon nombre de jeunes d’Europe se laissent séduire immédiatement. Comme d’autres européens, les Allemands sont saisis par cette musique qui leur permet de se libérer, de s’exprimer et de le faire à l’unisson des autres États, vaincus ou vainqueurs. C’est au son de cette musique américaine, et plus tard du rock ‘n’ roll, qu’ils vont apprendre ou réapprendre la démocratie occidentale. Mais le triomphe de cette musique est-il seulement émancipateur ? N’est-il pas aussi le signe d’une domination du monde, nouvelle et sans partage, par le géant américain et sa puissance économique dont le plan Marshall incarne à la fois les bienfaits et la toute-puissance ? En fait, cette question est loin d’être inédite en Allemagne. Elle s’est déjà posée avec la même acuité en 1920, date à laquelle les Allemands furent confrontés pour la première fois au jazz dans des circonstances assez proches : une défaite humiliante, l’effondrement du régime, une démocratie imposée par les vainqueurs, la quête d’une culture et de valeurs démocratiques sans racines dans l’inconscient collectif, une possible émancipation des corps grâce à la danse après des années d’oppression et de militarisme. Car c’est dès 1920 que les Allemands découvrent le jazz, une musique alors non seulement américaine, mais noire, une musique qui semble primitive, mais qui incarne aussi les grandes villes les plus modernes du monde et une domination économique que les Allemands craignent depuis la fin du XXe siècle. D’économique, le « péril américain », se fait culturel par le biais de la danse. A moins qu’il n’offre enfin aux

  18. Low RMRratio as a surrogate marker for energy deficiency, the choice of predictive equation vital for correctly identifying male and female ballet dancers at risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staal, Sarah; Sjödin, Anders Mikael; Fahrenholtz, Ida Lysdahl

    2018-01-01

    Ballet dancers are reported to have an increased risk for energy deficiency with or without disordered eating (DE) behavior. A low ratio between measured (m) and predicted (p) resting metabolic rate (RMRratio... the prevalence of suppressed RMR using different methods to calculatepRMR and to explore associations with additional markers of energy deficiency. Female (n=20) and male (n=20) professional ballet dancers, 19-35 years of age were enrolled. mRMR was assessed by respiratory calorimetry (ventilated open hood). p......% hypotension. Forty percent of females had elevated LEAF-Q score, and 50% were underweight. Suppressed RMR was associated with elevated LEAF-Q score in females and with higher training volume in males. In conclusion, professional ballet dancers are at risk for energy deficiency. The number of identified...

  19. A Matter of Style

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Lasse Gøhler; Grønvad, Jonas Følsgaard; Pedersen, David Budtz

    2018-01-01

    , defined by choices of research topics, theories, empirical material, analytical methods/techniques, epistemological research aims, practical research aims, publication strategies and collaborative activities. The first dimension opposes a quantitative style focusing on questions of cognition, on the one...

  20. A mixed-methods study into ballet for people living with Parkinson's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Sara; McGill, Ashley

    2013-06-01

    Background : Parkinson's is a neurological disease that is physically debilitating and can be socially isolating. Dance is growing in popularity for people with Parkinson's and claims have been made for its benefits. The paper details a mixed-methods study that examined a 12-week dance project for people with Parkinson's, led by English National Ballet. Methods : The effects on balance, stability and posture were measured through the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale and a plumb-line analysis. The value of participation and movement quality were interpreted through ethnographic methods, grounded theory and Effort analysis. Results : Triangulation of results indicates that people were highly motivated, with 100% adherence, and valued the classes as an important part of their lives. Additionally, results indicated an improvement in balance and stability, although not in posture. Conclusions : Dancing may offer benefit to people with Parkinson's through its intellectual, artistic, social and physical aspects. The paper suggests that a range of research methods is fundamental to capture the importance of multifaceted activity, such as dance, to those with Parkinson's.

  1. A mixed-methods study into ballet for people living with Parkinson's1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Sara; McGill, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Background: Parkinson's is a neurological disease that is physically debilitating and can be socially isolating. Dance is growing in popularity for people with Parkinson's and claims have been made for its benefits. The paper details a mixed-methods study that examined a 12-week dance project for people with Parkinson's, led by English National Ballet. Methods: The effects on balance, stability and posture were measured through the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale and a plumb-line analysis. The value of participation and movement quality were interpreted through ethnographic methods, grounded theory and Effort analysis. Results: Triangulation of results indicates that people were highly motivated, with 100% adherence, and valued the classes as an important part of their lives. Additionally, results indicated an improvement in balance and stability, although not in posture. Conclusions: Dancing may offer benefit to people with Parkinson's through its intellectual, artistic, social and physical aspects. The paper suggests that a range of research methods is fundamental to capture the importance of multifaceted activity, such as dance, to those with Parkinson's. PMID:23805165

  2. INVITATION Replay of the Rudra-Béjart Ballet for the CERN Staff

    CERN Multimedia

    Luciano Maiani

    2000-01-01

    Most of you couldn't attend the ballet performance given by the Rudra-Béjart School at the LEP Ministerial Ceremony on 9 October due to the limited space on the seating - and I felt that was a great pity. But I am very happy to announce now, prompted by the quality of the show and the unanimous enthusiasm of those present, that I have asked the Rudra-Béjart School to repeat the show for you - not on CERN Site this time - but nonetheless in excellent conditions. Not only has Maurice Béjart accepted, but this second performance also gives great joy to the young dancers of his School, who felt so proud to perform at CERN. A private performance will be given for you at the Geneva ARENA on Tuesday 5 December at 8.00 pm sharp, and will last longer than the original performance at CERN: 1 hour 20 instead of 35 minutes. I encourage you all to attend this performance-bring in great numbers yourselves, members of your family, and your friends. 2,020 places are available, for which tick...

  3. Hip and ankle range of motion and hip muscle strength in young female ballet dancersand controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennell, K.; Khan, K. M.; Matthews, B.; De Gruyter, M.; Cook, E.; Holzer, K.; Wark, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the hip and ankle range of motion and hip muscle strength in 8-11 year old novice female ballet dancers and controls. METHODS: Subjects were 77 dancers and 49 controls (mean (SD) age 9.6 (0.8) and 9.6 (0.7) years respectively). Supine right active hip external rotation (ER) and internal rotation (IR) were measured using an inclinometer. A turnout protractor was used to assess standing active turnout range. The measure of ER achieved from below the hip during turnout (non-hip ER) was calculated by subtracting hip ER range from turnout range, and hip ER:IR was derived by dividing ER range by IR range. Range of right weight bearing ankle dorsiflexion was measured in a standing lunge using two methods: the distance from the foot to the wall (in centimetres) and the angle of the shank to the vertical via an inclinometer (in degrees). Right calf muscle range was measured in weight bearing using an inclinometer. A manual muscle tester was used to assess right isometric hip flexor, internal rotator, external rotator, abductor, and adductor strength. RESULTS: Dancers had less ER (pballetic training. 


 PMID:10522638

  4. Effects of leg dominance on performance of ballet turns (pirouettes) by experienced and novice dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Hong-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Turns (pirouettes) are an important movement in ballet and may be affected by "lateral bias". This study investigated physiological differences exhibited by experienced and novice dancers, respectively, when performing pirouette with dominant and non-dominant leg supports, respectively. Thirteen novice and 13 experienced dancers performed turns on dominant or non-dominant legs. The maximum ankle plantarflexion, knee extension and hip extension were measured during the single-leg support phase. The inclination angle of rotation axis is the angle between instantaneous rotation axis and global vertical axis in the early single-leg support phase. Both groups exhibited a greater hip extension, knee extension, and ankle plantarflexion when performing a turn on the non-dominant leg. For experienced dancers, the inclination angle of rotation axis during the pre-swing phase was generally smaller for dominant leg support than non-dominant leg. However, no significant difference was found in inclination angle of rotation axis of novice dancers. For experienced dancers, an improved performance is obtained when using the dominant leg for support. By contrast, for novice dancers, the performance is independent of choice of support leg. The significant lateral bias in experienced dancers indicates the possible influence of training. That is, repetitive rehearsal on the preferred leg strengthens the impact of side dominance in experienced dancers.

  5. The perception of musical spontaneity in improvised and imitated jazz performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annerose eEngel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to evaluate spontaneity in human behavior is called upon in the aesthetic appreciation of dramatic arts and music. The current study addresses the behavioral and brain mechanisms that mediate the perception of spontaneity in music performance. In a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging experiment, 22 jazz musicians listened to piano melodies and judged whether they were improvised or imitated. Judgment accuracy (mean 55%; range 44-65%, which was low but above chance, was positively correlated with musical experience and empathy. Analysis of listeners’ hemodynamic responses revealed that amygdala activation was stronger for improvisations than imitations. This activation correlated with the variability of performance timing and intensity (loudness in the melodies, suggesting that the amygdala is involved in the detection of behavioral uncertainty. An analysis based on the subjective classification of melodies according to listeners’ judgments revealed that a network including the pre-supplementary motor area, frontal operculum, and anterior insula was most strongly activated for melodies judged to be improvised. This may reflect the increased engagement of an action simulation network when melodic predictions are rendered challenging due to perceived instability in the performer’s actions. Taken together, our results suggest that, while certain brain regions in skilled individuals may be generally sensitive to objective cues to spontaneity in human behavior, the ability to evaluate spontaneity accurately depends upon whether an individual’s action-related experience and perspective taking skills enable faithful internal simulation of the given behavior.

  6. How to Achieve CO2 Emission Reduction Goals: What 'Jazz' and 'Symphony' Can Offer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving CO 2 emission reduction goals remains one of today's most challenging tasks. Global energy demand will grow for many decades to come. In many regions of the world cheap fossil fuels seem to be the way forward to meet ever growing energy demand. However, there are negative consequences to this, most notably increasing emission levels. Politicians and industry therefore must accept that make hard choices in this generation need to be made to bring about real changes for future generations and the planet to limit CO 2 emissions and climate change. In his presentation, prof. Rose will provide an insight into how CO 2 emission reduction goals can be set and achieved and how a balance between future energy needs and supply can be realised in the long run up to 2050 both globally and regionally. This will be done based on WEC's own leading analysis in this area, namely it recently launched World Energy Scenarios: composing energy futures to 2050 report and WEC's scenarios, Jazz and Symphony. WEC's full analysis, the complete report and supporting material is available online at: http://www.worldenergy.org/publications/2013/world-energy-scenarios-composing-energy-futures-to-2050.(author)

  7. Neural substrates of spontaneous musical performance: an FMRI study of jazz improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limb, Charles J; Braun, Allen R

    2008-02-27

    To investigate the neural substrates that underlie spontaneous musical performance, we examined improvisation in professional jazz pianists using functional MRI. By employing two paradigms that differed widely in musical complexity, we found that improvisation (compared to production of over-learned musical sequences) was consistently characterized by a dissociated pattern of activity in the prefrontal cortex: extensive deactivation of dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral orbital regions with focal activation of the medial prefrontal (frontal polar) cortex. Such a pattern may reflect a combination of psychological processes required for spontaneous improvisation, in which internally motivated, stimulus-independent behaviors unfold in the absence of central processes that typically mediate self-monitoring and conscious volitional control of ongoing performance. Changes in prefrontal activity during improvisation were accompanied by widespread activation of neocortical sensorimotor areas (that mediate the organization and execution of musical performance) as well as deactivation of limbic structures (that regulate motivation and emotional tone). This distributed neural pattern may provide a cognitive context that enables the emergence of spontaneous creative activity.

  8. The perception of musical spontaneity in improvised and imitated jazz performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Annerose; Keller, Peter E

    2011-01-01

    The ability to evaluate spontaneity in human behavior is called upon in the esthetic appreciation of dramatic arts and music. The current study addresses the behavioral and brain mechanisms that mediate the perception of spontaneity in music performance. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, 22 jazz musicians listened to piano melodies and judged whether they were improvised or imitated. Judgment accuracy (mean 55%; range 44-65%), which was low but above chance, was positively correlated with musical experience and empathy. Analysis of listeners' hemodynamic responses revealed that amygdala activation was stronger for improvisations than imitations. This activation correlated with the variability of performance timing and intensity (loudness) in the melodies, suggesting that the amygdala is involved in the detection of behavioral uncertainty. An analysis based on the subjective classification of melodies according to listeners' judgments revealed that a network including the pre-supplementary motor area, frontal operculum, and anterior insula was most strongly activated for melodies judged to be improvised. This may reflect the increased engagement of an action simulation network when melodic predictions are rendered challenging due to perceived instability in the performer's actions. Taken together, our results suggest that, while certain brain regions in skilled individuals may be generally sensitive to objective cues to spontaneity in human behavior, the ability to evaluate spontaneity accurately depends upon whether an individual's action-related experience and perspective taking skills enable faithful internal simulation of the given behavior.

  9. Neural substrates of spontaneous musical performance: an FMRI study of jazz improvisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J Limb

    Full Text Available To investigate the neural substrates that underlie spontaneous musical performance, we examined improvisation in professional jazz pianists using functional MRI. By employing two paradigms that differed widely in musical complexity, we found that improvisation (compared to production of over-learned musical sequences was consistently characterized by a dissociated pattern of activity in the prefrontal cortex: extensive deactivation of dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral orbital regions with focal activation of the medial prefrontal (frontal polar cortex. Such a pattern may reflect a combination of psychological processes required for spontaneous improvisation, in which internally motivated, stimulus-independent behaviors unfold in the absence of central processes that typically mediate self-monitoring and conscious volitional control of ongoing performance. Changes in prefrontal activity during improvisation were accompanied by widespread activation of neocortical sensorimotor areas (that mediate the organization and execution of musical performance as well as deactivation of limbic structures (that regulate motivation and emotional tone. This distributed neural pattern may provide a cognitive context that enables the emergence of spontaneous creative activity.

  10. Victor Assis Brasil: a importância do período na Berklee School of Music (1969-1974 em seu estilo composicional Victor Assis Brasil: the importance of the Berklee School of Music period (1969-1974 on his compositional style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Túlio de Paula Pinto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Discussão sobre o papel do ambiente musical de Boston, especialmente da Berklee School of Music entre 1969 e 1974, no desenvolvimento do estilo composicional e das habilidades como arranjador de Victor Assis Brasil (1945-1981 e seus reflexos na parcela de sua produção musical que apresenta a mistura de elementos de música clássica, jazz e música brasileira.Discussion about the influence of the musical environment of Boston, especially that of the Berklee School of Music, between 1969 and 1974, on the development of the compositional style and arranging skills of Brazilian saxophone player and composer Victor Assis Brasil. (1945-1981, and its reflexes in his musical production which mixes elements from classical music, jazz and Brazilian popular music.

  11. Dietary Intake, Anthropometric Characteristics, and Iron and Vitamin D Status of Female Adolescent Ballet Dancers Living in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kathryn L; Mitchell, Sarah; Foskett, Andrew; Conlon, Cathryn A; von Hurst, Pamela R

    2015-08-01

    Ballet dancing is a multifaceted activity requiring muscular power, strength, endurance, flexibility, and agility; necessitating demanding training schedules. Furthermore dancers may be under aesthetic pressure to maintain a lean physique, and adolescent dancers require extra nutrients for growth and development. This cross-sectional study investigated the nutritional status of 47 female adolescent ballet dancers (13-18 years) living in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants who danced at least 1 hr per day 5 days per week completed a 4-day estimated food record, anthropometric measurements (Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry) and hematological analysis (iron and vitamin D). Mean BMI was 19.7 ± 2.4 kg/m2 and percentage body fat, 23.5 ± 4.1%. The majority (89.4%) of dancers had a healthy weight (5th-85th percentile) using BMI-for-age growth charts. Food records showed a mean energy intake of 8097.3 ± 2155.6 kJ/day (48.9% carbohydrate, 16.9% protein, 33.8% fat, 14.0% saturated fat). Mean carbohydrate and protein intakes were 4.8 ± 1.4 and 1.6 ± 0.5 g/kg/day respectively. Over half (54.8%) of dancers consumed less than 5 g carbohydrate/kg/day, and 10 (23.8%) less than 1.2 g protein/kg/day. Over 60% consumed less than the estimated average requirement for calcium, folate, magnesium and selenium. Thirteen (28.3%) dancers had suboptimal iron status (serum ferritin (SF) ballet dancers are at risk for iron deficiency, and possibly inadequate nutrient intakes.

  12. Programa de entrenamiento cognitivo-constructivista para piano de acompa??amiento de ballet cl??sico

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera Torres, Luc??a; G??mez, Ileana Guillermina

    2011-01-01

    El aprendizaje del piano de acompa??amiento es una tarea compleja para la que se requiere m??ltiples habilidades. Entre ellas, dos son de especial relevancia: el control r??tmico y el procesamiento dual. El presente trabajo tiene como objetivo principal analizar la eficacia de un programa de entrenamiento cognitivo-constructivista en el piano de acompa??amiento de ballet cl??sico. Para ello, se realiz?? un estudio de casos con tres alumnos de la materia Pr??cticas de acompa??am...

  13. Tradiciones performativas regionales y discurso nacional: Sonora en el repertorio del Ballet Folklórico de México

    OpenAIRE

    Brenscheidt genannt Jost, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Resumen: Se busca indagar la influencia del nacionalismo posrevolucionario y los diferentes discursos regionales que se le contraponen. Se estudia una tradición escénica y musical mexicana particular surgida a mediados del siglo XX: el Ballet Folklórico de México de Amalia Hernández, lo que permite describir la interrelación (así como el conflicto y el entrecruzamiento) entre el discurso escénico nacional, regional y su respectivo marco de competencia. Desde una perspectiva etnocultural, esté...

  14. Tradiciones performativas regionales y discurso nacional: Sonora en el repertorio del Ballet Folklórico de México

    OpenAIRE

    Diana Brenscheidt genannt Jost

    2017-01-01

    Se busca indagar la influencia del nacionalismo posrevolucionario y los diferentes discursos regionales que se le contraponen. S e estudia una tradición escénic a y musical mexicana particular surgida a mediados del s iglo XX : el Ballet Folk lórico de México de Amalia Hernández, lo que permite describir la interrelación (así como el conflic to y el entrecruzamiento) entre el discurso escénico nacional, regional y su respe ctivo marco de competencia....

  15. La sociedad del espectáculo como posibilidad de construcción de sentido estético a partir de jazz al parque.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Ricardo Barrera Tacha

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Este texto plantea cómo, a partir del festival Jazz al Parque, pueden desentrañarse elementos estéticos diversos, como los planteados por la estética de la recepción, que obligan a repensar el carácter alienante de la sociedad de consumo planteado en las teorías marxistas y reivindican el carácter liberador de la experiencia estética, justificando la necesidad de fusionar la música colombiana y el jazz

  16. Technological Style is History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blond, Lasse

    The effort to comprehend innovation across cultures and time highlights the importance of the explicating factors external to technology. It becomes relevant to nuance or differentiate the understanding of social and cultural responses to adopted technologies by recognizing that technology shapes...... culture, and just as importantly that culture shapes technology. By looking at a recent transfer of technology this reciprocal exchange is elaborated by considering the cultural or contextual influence in the adaptation of technology. In this connection the notion of technological style is revisited...... by questioning whether it pays due attention to the non-technical factors of the process? In order to compensate for the deficiencies of the technological style as a sensitizing device the concept of sociotechnical style is introduced – a concept more in tune with resent research in technology studies....

  17. Management styles and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Dana Ann

    2012-01-01

    According to a review of the current literature, common managerial styles are transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire. When managers expand their leadership skills to improve the staff's morale, they must use a combination of transformational leadership behaviors and transactional contingent rewards to maximize their effectiveness on employees. A motivation theory such as Herzberg and Maslow enhances employees' motivation, morale, and satisfaction. Being able to motivate, empower, and influence staff improves satisfaction and retention levels among the team. A manager's leadership style influences motivation, morale, and retention in staff. Leaders are influenced by their educational development and the organizational culture. Organizational culture has an impact on a manager's style, which is forwarded to their followers.

  18. El Jam Session como un agente educador externo en el jazz. Una perspectiva desde el aprendizaje significativo

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos López, Jorge Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Este estudio pretende ilustrar la importancia de la improvisación en el proceso de formación del músico, no sólo de Jazz sino también de todos los músicos de hoy; para esto, se resalta la importancia de los espacios informales de trabajo colectivo en los cuales los músicos improvisan, en los llamados "Jam sessions” y la manera en que, en estos espacios, se asimila la información con una teoría de aprendizaje en plena vigencia, llamada “aprendizaje significativo”

  19. 高校英语专业新生语音现状及Jazz Chants教学法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓惠

    2007-01-01

    随着英语教学理论的发展,语音教学方法也在不断地更新,但是语音习得收效依然不尽如人意.该文对高校英语专业新生在语音方面存在的问题、根源进行了分析,认为Jazz Chants作为一种全新的教学方式,值得一试.

  20. Example based style classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welnicka, Katarzyna; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Aanæs, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We address the problem of analysis of families of shapes which can be classified according to two categories: the main one corresponding usually to the coarse shape which we call the function and the more subtle one which we call the style. The style and the function both contribute to the overal...... this similarity should be reflected across different functions. We show the usability of our methods first on the example of a number of chess sets which our method helps sort. Next, we investigate the problem of finding a replacement for a missing tooth given a database of teeth....

  1. Leadership styles in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Vicki; Murray, Melanie

    2017-06-21

    Nurses are often asked to think about leadership, particularly in times of rapid change in healthcare, and where questions have been raised about whether leaders and managers have adequate insight into the requirements of care. This article discusses several leadership styles relevant to contemporary healthcare and nursing practice. Nurses who are aware of leadership styles may find this knowledge useful in maintaining a cohesive working environment. Leadership knowledge and skills can be improved through training, where, rather than having to undertake formal leadership roles without adequate preparation, nurses are able to learn, nurture, model and develop effective leadership behaviours, ultimately improving nursing staff retention and enhancing the delivery of safe and effective care.

  2. Demystifying APA style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Claudia M

    2002-01-01

    Many nursing schools and health care journals have adopted the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA stylebook) as their guide to achieve uniformity and consistency in manuscript preparation as well as in usage and writing style. Published in 2001, the fifth edition of the APA stylebook contains 440 pages and can overwhelm someone who tries to use it for the first time. This article delineates main points in the areas of manuscript preparation, reference lists, in-text citations, and style choices.

  3. Proporción de lesiones y factores correlacionados en bailarines de ballet clásico de una academia en Bogotá, D.C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Yirley Cuan-Cerquera

    2016-09-01

    Conclusiones. La práctica de ballet aumenta los riesgos de sufrir lesiones musculoesqueléticos y de tejido conectivo, a esto se debe la importancia de realizar más investigaciones que promuevan acciones preventivas en dicha población.

  4. Šostakovitš, D. Suites de ballet no. 1 a 4 et no. 5 op. 27A / Pierre-E. Barbier

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Barbier, Pierre-E.

    1995-01-01

    Uuest heliplaadist "Šostakovitš, D. Suites de ballet no. 1 a 4 et no. 5 op. 27A. Ouverture de tete op. 96. Royal Scottish National Orchestra, Neeme Järvi" Chandos CHAN 7000/1, distribution Media 7(2CD: 195F). 1987/88. TT: 1h 54'36"

  5. A comparison of ballet dancers with different level of experience in performing single-leg stance on retiré position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Hsue, Bih-Jen; Su, Fong-Chin

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the postural stability of single-leg standing on the retiré position in ballet dancers having three different levels of skill. Nine superior experienced female ballet dancers, 9 experienced, and 12 novice dancers performed single-leg standing in the retiré position. The parameters of center of pressure (COP) in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions and the maximum distance between COP and the center of mass (COM) were measured. The inclination angles of body segments (head, torso, and supporting leg) in the frontal plane were also calculated. The findings showed that the novice dancers had a trend of greater torso inclination angles than the experienced dancers but that the superior experienced dancers had greater maximum COM-COP distance in the anterior-posterior direction. Furthermore, both experienced and novice dancers had better balance when standing on the nondominant leg, whereas the superior experienced dancers had similar postural stability between legs. Based on the findings, ballet training should put equal focus on both legs and frontal plane control (medial-lateral direction) should be integrated to ballet training program.

  6. Effect of teaching with or without mirror on balance in young female ballet students

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In literature there is a general consensus that the use of the mirror improves proprioception. During rehabilitation the mirror is an important instrument to improve stability. In some sports, such as dancing, mirrors are widely used during training. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of a mirror on balance in young dancers. Sixty-four young dancers (ranging from 9–10 years) were included in this study. Thirty-two attending lessons with a mirror (mirror- group) were compared to 32 young dancers that attended the same lessons without a mirror (non-mirror group). Balance was evaluated by BESS (Balance Error Scoring System), which consists of three stances (double limb, single limb, and tandem) on two surfaces (firm and foam). The errors were assessed at each stance and summed to create the two subtotal scores (firm and foam surface) and the final total score (BESS). The BESS was performed at recruitment (T0) and after 6 months of dance lessons (T1). Results The repeated measures ANOVA analysis showed that for the BESS total score there is a difference due to the time (F = 3.86; p  0.05). The analysis of the multiple regression model showed the influence of the values at T0 for every BESS items and the dominance of limb for stability on an unstable surface standing on one or two legs. Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that the use of a mirror in a ballet classroom does not improve balance acquisition of the dancer. On the other hand, improvement found after 6 months confirms that at the age of the dancers studied motor skills and balance can easily be trained and improved. PMID:24996519

  7. Effect of teaching with or without mirror on balance in young female ballet students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarnicola, Angela; Maccagnano, Giuseppe; Pesce, Vito; Di Pierro, Silvia; Tafuri, Silvio; Moretti, Biagio

    2014-07-04

    In literature there is a general consensus that the use of the mirror improves proprioception. During rehabilitation the mirror is an important instrument to improve stability. In some sports, such as dancing, mirrors are widely used during training. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of a mirror on balance in young dancers. Sixty-four young dancers (ranging from 9-10 years) were included in this study. Thirty-two attending lessons with a mirror (mirror- group) were compared to 32 young dancers that attended the same lessons without a mirror (non-mirror group). Balance was evaluated by BESS (Balance Error Scoring System), which consists of three stances (double limb, single limb, and tandem) on two surfaces (firm and foam). The errors were assessed at each stance and summed to create the two subtotal scores (firm and foam surface) and the final total score (BESS). The BESS was performed at recruitment (T0) and after 6 months of dance lessons (T1). The repeated measures ANOVA analysis showed that for the BESS total score there is a difference due to the time (F = 3.86; p  0.05). The analysis of the multiple regression model showed the influence of the values at T0 for every BESS items and the dominance of limb for stability on an unstable surface standing on one or two legs. These preliminary results suggest that the use of a mirror in a ballet classroom does not improve balance acquisition of the dancer. On the other hand, improvement found after 6 months confirms that at the age of the dancers studied motor skills and balance can easily be trained and improved.

  8. Prevalence and predictors of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in adolescent ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longworth, Brooke; Fary, Robyn; Hopper, Diana

    2014-09-01

    To determine any differences between the prevalence of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in ballet dancers who are girls compared with age-matched nondancers, and to establish if any relations exist between the presence of scoliosis and generalized joint hypermobility, age of menarche, body mass index (BMI), and the number of hours of dance training per week. Cross-sectional, matched pair study. Dance school. Dancers (n=30) between the ages of 9 and 16 years were recruited from a certified dance school in Western Australia; each dancer provided a consenting age-matched nondancer (n=30). Not applicable. Measurements were taken for angle of trunk rotation using a scoliometer (presence of scoliosis) and for height and weight to produce generalized joint hypermobility using Beighton criteria and an age-adjusted BMI, respectively. A subjective questionnaire regarding age of menarche and participation in dance and other sports was completed. Thirty percent of dancers tested positive for scoliosis compared with 3% of nondancers. Odds ratio calculations suggest that dancers were 12.4 times more likely to have scoliosis than nondancers of the same age. There was a higher rate of hypermobility in the dancer group (70%) compared with the nondancers (3%); however, there were no statistically significant relations between scoliosis and hypermobility, age of menarche, BMI, or hours of dance per week. Adolescent dancers, similar to adult dancers, are at significantly higher risk of developing scoliosis than nondancers of the same age. Vigilant screening and improved education of dance teachers and parents of dance students may be beneficial in earlier detection and, consequently, reducing the risk of requiring surgical intervention. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. It takes time: Building relationships and understanding through an intergenerational ballet programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Shelley E; Gaetz, Michael; Blakeborough, Darren

    2018-01-01

    Individuals living in long-term residential care homes are often viewed through a negative lens. These residents have increasingly complex care needs, and their functional, communication and cognitive challenges can support conceptualizations of difference and disability perpetuating negative stereotypes of age and dementia. However, engaging in meaningful activities and relationships with older adults, including those with dementia, has been shown to promote positive attitudes. Specifically, intergenerational programming that provides opportunities for meaningful engagement between children and older adults has been shown to support positive emotional experiences through socializing and building relationships. This qualitative study explored the development of relationships between school-aged children and older adults with dementia living in a long-term residential care home. Residents in long-term care homes and children typically have limited opportunities to interact with each other; in this study, participating in an intergenerational dance programme provided an opportunity for meaningful relationships to develop. This paper focuses on the development of the children's attitudes and understandings of their much older dance partners. Seven girls between the ages of seven and nine participated in ballet classes with residents in a long-term care home for one hour each week over a six-month period. All of the residents had a diagnosis of moderate to advanced dementia. Further, all of the residents also had other chronic health issues such as cardiac, respiratory and/or neurological diseases. The children were interviewed at the baseline, three- and six-month intervals. Prior to beginning the dance programme, the children anticipated their dance partners to be unwell and unable. However, by the end of six months, the children described the residents much more positively highlighting their abilities and strengths. Over time, through participating in a structured

  10. Humor Styles and Leadership Styles: Community College Presidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrica, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between leadership styles (transformational, transactional, laissez-faire) and humor styles (affiliative, self-enhancing, aggressive, self-defeating) of community college presidents. Research has shown that humor and leadership styles are related and that humor may enhance interpersonal…

  11. Does physical fitness affect injury occurrence and time loss due to injury in elite vocational ballet students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twitchett, Emily; Brodrick, Anna; Nevill, Alan M; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Angioi, Manuela; Wyon, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Most ballet dancers will suffer at least one injury a year. There are numerous causes of injury in dance, and while many investigators have documented risk factors such as anatomical characteristics, past medical history, menstrual history, dance experience, length of dance training, fatigue, and stress, risk factors related to body characteristics and nutrient intake, levels of conditioning, or physical fitness parameters have only recently received the same amount of attention. The aim of the present study was, therefore, to investigate correlations between ballet injury and body fat percentage, active and passive flexibility, lower limb power, upper body and core endurance, and aerobic capacity. Low levels of aerobic fitness were significantly associated with many of the injuries sustained over a 15-week period (r=.590, p=0.034), and body fat percentage was significantly associated with the length of time a dancer was forced to modify activity due to injury (r=-.614, p=0.026). This information may be of benefit to dancers, teachers, physical therapists and physicians in dance schools and companies when formulating strategies to prevent injury.

  12. Tradiciones performativas regionales y discurso nacional: Sonora en el repertorio del Ballet Folklórico de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Brenscheidt genannt Jost

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Se busca indagar la influencia del nacionalismo posrevolucionario y los diferentes discursos regionales que se le contraponen. S e estudia una tradición escénic a y musical mexicana particular surgida a mediados del s iglo XX : el Ballet Folk lórico de México de Amalia Hernández, lo que permite describir la interrelación (así como el conflic to y el entrecruzamiento entre el discurso escénico nacional, regional y su respe ctivo marco de competencia. Desde una perspectiva etnocultural, estética y performativa, apoyada en entrevistas y estudios de caso, se retoma el lugar de Sonora en el program a del ballet, específicamente la Danza del venado y el repertorio denominado “Sonora bronco”. Se analizan aspectos como la disposición corporal, la vestimenta o el estilo, que ponen de manifiesto diferencias y adaptaciones, así como la negociación continua entre el discurso nacional homogene izante y la identidad regional que lo cuestiona.

  13. The influence of winter vitamin D supplementation on muscle function and injury occurrence in elite ballet dancers: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyon, Matthew A; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wolman, Roger; Nevill, Alan M; Allen, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Athletes who train indoors during the winter months exhibit low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations due to a lack of sunlight exposure. This has been linked to impaired exercise performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of oral vitamin D₃ supplementation on selected physical fitness and injury parameters in elite ballet dancers. Controlled prospective study. 24 elite classical ballet dancers (intervention n=17; control n=7) participated in a controlled 4-month oral supplementation of vitamin D₃ (2000 IU per day). Isometric muscular strength and vertical jump height were measured pre and post intervention. Injury occurrence during the intervention period was also recorded by the in-house medical team. Repeated measures ANOVA and Mann-Whitney-U statistical tests were used and significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. Significant increases were noted for the intervention group for isometric strength (18.7%, pballet dancers. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and evaluation of an educational intervention program for pre-professional adolescent ballet dancers: nutrition for optimal performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle-Lucas, Ashley F; Davy, Brenda M

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop, implement, and evaluate a theoretically based nutritional education intervention through a DVD lecture series (three 30-minute classes) in summer intensive programs for pre-professional, adolescent ballet dancers. Objectives of this intervention program were to increase knowledge of basic sports nutrition principles and the Female Athlete Triad and promote self-efficacy for adopting healthier dietary habits. Dancers ranging from 13 to 18 years old who were attending summer intensive programs affiliated with professional ballet companies were recruited. Group One (n = 231) participated in the nutrition education program, while Group Two the control participants (n = 90) did not. Assessments of the participants' dietary status consisted of a demographic questionnaire, a Sports Nutrition Knowledge and Behavior Questionnaire, and a Food Frequency Questionnaire. The intervention group was assessed at baseline, immediately post-program, and at six weeks post-program. The control group was assessed at baseline and at six weeks post-baseline. The intervention program was effective at increasing nutrition knowledge, perceived susceptibility to the Female Athlete Triad, and self-efficacy constructs. Improvements in dietary intake were also observed among intervention group participants. To improve overall health and performance nutrition education should be incorporated into the training regimens of adolescent dancers. This potentially replicable DVD-based program may be an effective, low-cost mechanism for doing that.

  15. Comparison of lower limb kinetics during vertical jumps in turnout and neutral foot positions by classical ballet dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, Akiko; Iino, Yoichi

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of hip external rotation (turnout) on lower limb kinetics during vertical jumps by classical ballet dancers. Vertical jumps in a turnout (TJ) and a neutral hip position (NJ) performed by 12 classical female ballet dancers were analysed through motion capture, recording of the ground reaction forces, and inverse dynamics analysis. At push-off, the lower trunk leaned forward 18.2° and 20.1° in the TJ and NJ, respectively. The dancers jumped lower in the TJ than in the NJ. The knee extensor and hip abductor torques were smaller, whereas the hip external rotator torque was larger in the TJ than in the NJ. The work done by the hip joint moments in the sagittal plane was 0.28 J/(Body mass*Height) and 0.33 J/(Body mass*Height) in the TJ and NJ, respectively. The joint work done by the lower limbs were not different between the two jumps. These differences resulted from different planes in which the lower limb flexion-extension occurred, i.e. in the sagittal or frontal plane. This would prevent the forward lean of the trunk by decreasing the hip joint work in the sagittal plane and reduce the knee extensor torque in the jump.

  16. Incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injuries among elite ballet and modern dancers: a 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liederbach, Marijeanne; Dilgen, Faye E; Rose, Donald J

    2008-09-01

    Ballet and modern dance are jump-intensive activities, but little is known about the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries among dancers. Rigorous jump and balance training has been shown in some prospective studies to significantly reduce ACL injury rates among athletes. Dancers advance to the professional level only after having achieved virtuosic jump and balance technique. Therefore, dancers on the elite level may be at relatively low risk for ACL injury. Descriptive epidemiology study. Dance exposure, injuries, and injury conditions were systematically recorded at 4 dance organizations over 5 years. Select neuromuscular and psychometric variables were compared between and within ACL-injured and noninjured dancers. Of 298 dancers, 12 experienced an ACL injury over the 5-year period. The incidence of ACL injury was 0.009 per 1000 exposures. Landing from a jump onto 1 leg was the mechanism of injury in 92% of cases. Incidence was not statistically different between gender or dance groups, although women modern dancers had a 3 to 5 times greater relative risk than women ballet dancers and men dancers. No difference between ACL-injured and noninjured dancers emerged with regard to race, oral contraceptive use, or select musculoskeletal measures. Dancers suffer considerably fewer ACL injuries than athletes participating in team ball sports. The training dancers undertake to perfect lower extremity alignment, jump, and balance skills may serve to protect them against ACL injury. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries happened most often late in the day and season, suggesting an effect of fatigue.

  17. Generation of vertical angular momentum in single, double, and triple-turn pirouette en dehors in ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jemin; Wilson, Margaret A; Singhal, Kunal; Gamblin, Sarah; Suh, Cha-Young; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vertical angular momentum generation strategies used by skilled ballet dancers in pirouette en dehors. Select kinematic parameters of the pirouette preparation (stance depth, vertical center-of-mass motion range, initial shoulder line position, shoulder line angular displacement, and maximum trunk twist angle) along with vertical angular momentum parameters during the turn (maximum momentums of the whole body and body parts, and duration and rate of generation) were obtained from nine skilled collegiate ballet dancers through a three-dimensional motion analysis and compared among three turn conditions (single, double, and triple). A one-way ('turn') multivariate analysis of variance of the kinematic parameters and angular momentum parameters of the whole body and a two-way analysis of variance ('turn' × 'body') of the maximum angular momentums of the body parts were conducted. Significant 'turn' effects were observed in the kinematic/angular momentum parameters (both the preparation and the turn) (p <  0.05). As the number of turns increased, skilled dancers generated larger vertical angular momentums by predominantly increasing the rate of momentum generation using rotation of the upper trunk and arms. The trail (closing) arm showed the largest contribution to whole-body angular momentum followed by the lead arm.

  18. Style as Supplement - Supplement as Style

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    The film Derrida by Amy Ziering Kofman & Kirby Dick (2003) has a memorable scene, showing Derrida watching Derrida watching Derrida. This regression, almost ad infinitum, would seem to have the specific purpose to hammer home the point to the viewer of the film that all communication is mediated......, and to aim for an almost Brechtian Verfremdung-effect, but the film also uses this device as a stylistic trait to characterize something ‘essential' about Derrida and his style. Derrida strikes the same chord by insisting on drawing attention to the artificiality of the making of the film, where questions...... have to be repeated and answers interrupted when the light or the sound is not just right. He furthermore deconstructs the interview process by constantly referring to the impossibility of answering questions without specific contexts, frames and grounds. This makes it easy to characterize the film...

  19. Style in Educational Television

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, John

    1976-01-01

    Characteristics of broadcast educational television for adult audiences are discussed in terms of: style in television, television grammar, and course and resource-type programs. The current British Broadcasting Company (BBC) Adult Literacy Project and the television program "On the Move" are used as examples. (LH)

  20. Cultural Styles of Persuasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, E. S.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Offers an alternative methodology for studying persuasive strategies by examining the persuasive strategies selected by professional persuaders representing those cultures being studied. Analyzes the persuasive styles of United States, Soviet Union and Arab diplomats involved in international negotiations in the Security Council of the United…