WorldWideScience

Sample records for style shape grammars

  1. Style representation in design grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Sumbul; Chase, Scott Curland

    2012-01-01

    to be transformed according to changing design style needs. Issues of formalizing stylistic change necessitate a lucid and formal definition of style in the design language generated by a grammar. Furthermore, a significant aspect of the definition of style is the representation of aesthetic qualities attributed...... to the style. We focus on grammars for representing and generating styles of design and review the use of grammar transformations for modelling changes in style and design language. We identify a gap in knowledge in the representation of style in grammars and in driving strategic style change using grammar...

  2. Shape Grammars for Innovative Hybrid Typological Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-kazzaz, Dhuha; Bridges, Alan; Chase, Scott Curland

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a new methodology of deriving innovative hybrid designs using shape grammars of heterogeneous designs. The method is detailed within three phases of shape grammars: analysis, synthesis and evaluation. In the analysis phase, the research suggests that original rules of each de...

  3. GramCheck: A Grammar and Style Checker

    OpenAIRE

    Bustamante, Flora Ramírez; León, Fernando Sánchez

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a grammar and style checker demonstrator for Spanish and Greek native writers developed within the project GramCheck. Besides a brief grammar error typology for Spanish, a linguistically motivated approach to detection and diagnosis is presented, based on the generalized use of PROLOG extensions to highly typed unification-based grammars. The demonstrator, currently including full coverage for agreement errors and certain head-argument relation issues, also provides correc...

  4. Architectural design with simple shape grammars and learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Jiménez-Morales

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a proposal for the automatic generation of architectural design. This scheme is based on the training of simple shape grammars through reinforcement learning technics. Finally, the results of the implemented system by this technic for the generation of dwelling design with certain restrictions are presented and analyzed.

  5. Use of Grammar for Shape Exploration with Novice Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed S.; Bridges, Alan; Chase, Scott Curland

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a teaching experience conducted and carried out as part of the architectural coursework of the first year students. The workshop is the first of three planned to take place during the course of the first year studio. It aims at introducing new ways of thinking as well....... A grammatical approach was chosen to develop the described methodology, based on the shape grammars system in general, and on one of its basic skills of seeing/understanding shapes & extracting elements of the visual composition in particular....

  6. Interactive design of probability density functions for shape grammars

    KAUST Repository

    Dang, Minh

    2015-11-02

    A shape grammar defines a procedural shape space containing a variety of models of the same class, e.g. buildings, trees, furniture, airplanes, bikes, etc. We present a framework that enables a user to interactively design a probability density function (pdf) over such a shape space and to sample models according to the designed pdf. First, we propose a user interface that enables a user to quickly provide preference scores for selected shapes and suggest sampling strategies to decide which models to present to the user to evaluate. Second, we propose a novel kernel function to encode the similarity between two procedural models. Third, we propose a framework to interpolate user preference scores by combining multiple techniques: function factorization, Gaussian process regression, autorelevance detection, and l1 regularization. Fourth, we modify the original grammars to generate models with a pdf proportional to the user preference scores. Finally, we provide evaluations of our user interface and framework parameters and a comparison to other exploratory modeling techniques using modeling tasks in five example shape spaces: furniture, low-rise buildings, skyscrapers, airplanes, and vegetation.

  7. Computation-Friendly Shape Grammars with Application to Determining the Interior Layout of Buildings from Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Kui

    2009-01-01

    A shape grammar is a formalism that has been widely applied, in many different fields, to analyzing designs. Computer implementation of a shape grammar interpreter is vital to both research and application. However, implementing a shape grammar interpreter is hard, especially for parametric shapes defined by open terms. This dissertation…

  8. REA's handbook of English grammar, style, and writing

    CERN Document Server

    REA, The Editors of

    1992-01-01

    The ability to write and speak correctly and effectively is a prerequisite for doing well in all subjects, including the physical and social sciences, math and the liberal arts. Writing and speaking skills become even more important when seeking a job and trying to succeed in a chosen career. This easy-to-understand, straightforward English handbook does not use the hard-to-understand technical jargon usually found in English grammar books. Instead, this handbook provides hundreds of examples from which it is possible to easily see what is correct and what is incorrect in all areas of English grammar and writing. Learn quickly and easily: 1. Rules and exceptions in grammar, 2. Spelling and proper punctuation, 3. Common errors in sentence structure, 4. 2,000 examples of correct usage, and 5. Effective writing skills. Complete practice exercises with answers follow each chapter.The handbook covers the following in detail: nouns, verbs, adjectives, paragraphs, composition, punctuation, spelling, and much more. A...

  9. TEACHING AND LEARNING GRAMMAR AND STYLE IN WRITING - A PRACTICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larcy C Abello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This report focuses on the exploration of the three dimensions of grammarform, meaning, and usea practical approach to teach and learn grammar and style and effect communication. Using journalistic, literary, and academic/scientific/technical texts, this describes the teaching-learning process involved in language activities, such as text analysis, text conversion, and writing" of original texts. This paper, explains how the procedure engages students in meaningful tasks that hone their language skills and enhance their writing ability and could inspire them to speak and communicate ideas, applying critical/analytic thinking even outside the classroom thus developing autonomous learners. This demonstrates a practical approach to the teaching of language as communication based on a careful consideration of the nature of language and of the strategic development of writing skills among learners within a supportive social context.

  10. Practiced musical style shapes auditory skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuust, Peter; Brattico, Elvira; Seppänen, Miia; Näätänen, Risto; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2012-04-01

    Musicians' processing of sounds depends highly on instrument, performance practice, and level of expertise. Here, we measured the mismatch negativity (MMN), a preattentive brain response, to six types of musical feature change in musicians playing three distinct styles of music (classical, jazz, and rock/pop) and in nonmusicians using a novel, fast, and musical sounding multifeature MMN paradigm. We found MMN to all six deviants, showing that MMN paradigms can be adapted to resemble a musical context. Furthermore, we found that jazz musicians had larger MMN amplitude than all other experimental groups across all sound features, indicating greater overall sensitivity to auditory outliers. Furthermore, we observed a tendency toward shorter latency of the MMN to all feature changes in jazz musicians compared to band musicians. These findings indicate that the characteristics of the style of music played by musicians influence their perceptual skills and the brain processing of sound features embedded in music. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Subsistence styles shape human social learning strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Luke; Molleman, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    Social learning is a fundamental element of human cognition. Learning from others facilitates the transmission of information that helps individuals and groups rapidly adjust to new environments and underlies adaptive cultural evolution1–6. While basic human propensities for social learning are traditionally assumed to be species-universal1,7, recent empirical studies show that they vary between individuals and populations8–13. Yet the causes of this variation remain poorly understood9. Here we show that interdependence in everyday social and economic activities can strongly amplify social learning. With an experimental decision-making task we examine individual versus social learning in three recently diverged populations of a single-ethnic group, whose subsistence styles require varying degrees of interdependence. Interdependent pastoralists and urban dwellers have markedly higher propensities for social learning than independent horticulturalists, who predominantly rely on individual payoff information. These results indicate that everyday social and economic practices can mould human social learning strategies and they highlight the flexibility of human cognition to change with local ecology. Our study further suggests that shifts in subsistence styles – which can occur when humans inhabit new habitats or cultural niches2 – can alter reliance on social learning and may therefore impact the ability of human societies to adapt to novel circumstances. PMID:28553662

  12. Subsistence styles shape human social learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Luke; Molleman, Lucas

    2017-04-28

    Social learning is a fundamental element of human cognition. Learning from others facilitates the transmission of information that helps individuals and groups rapidly adjust to new environments and underlies adaptive cultural evolution1-6. While basic human propensities for social learning are traditionally assumed to be species-universal1,7, recent empirical studies show that they vary between individuals and populations8-13. Yet the causes of this variation remain poorly understood9. Here we show that interdependence in everyday social and economic activities can strongly amplify social learning. With an experimental decision-making task we examine individual versus social learning in three recently diverged populations of a single-ethnic group, whose subsistence styles require varying degrees of interdependence. Interdependent pastoralists and urban dwellers have markedly higher propensities for social learning than independent horticulturalists, who predominantly rely on individual payoff information. These results indicate that everyday social and economic practices can mould human social learning strategies and they highlight the flexibility of human cognition to change with local ecology. Our study further suggests that shifts in subsistence styles - which can occur when humans inhabit new habitats or cultural niches2 - can alter reliance on social learning and may therefore impact the ability of human societies to adapt to novel circumstances.

  13. Generating 3D Scenes in the style of Keith Haring

    OpenAIRE

    Ronfard, Rémi; Doussot, Quentin

    2012-01-01

    http://www.generativeart.com; International audience; Recently, interest in shape grammar models of pictorial style has been revived by the success of generative modelers for buildings and cities. Stochastic methods have been introduced for learning the parameters of shape grammars to adapt to different architectural or visual styles, including Mondrian. We extend those recent approaches for generating 3D graphics in the style of Keith Haring paintings, whose visual vocabulary is significantl...

  14. Style

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rösing, Lilian Munk

    2017-01-01

    Defined as the tropes, figures, and grammar of the text, style is quite concrete, quite analyzable. Pure detection and identification of the tropes and figures of a text is not very interesting to literary studies, though, unless it is combined with interpretation, that is, unless you ask: What...... is the effect of those tropes and figures, how do they contribute to the signification of the text?...

  15. Adaptive Façade: Variant-Finding using Shape Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasowa, Riva; Utama Sjarifudin, Firza

    2017-12-01

    Modular façade construction has never been better since the birth of computer-aided manufacturing which bridges the modeling phase into the manufacturing phase for escalating the mass production. This comes to a result that the identity of a product or a building façade will commonly generate in the same way that the initial design was intended to. Rectifying the early model will then greatly impact the process later. The aim of this paper is to propose a way to solve these two challenges, without risking the manufacturing process, but more to explore the potential designs. Shape grammar is used to conceive more designs in the early stage, derived from the initial product – the modular adaptive façade system. The derivations are then tested through simulation to state the efficacy of the models. We find that the workflow somehow contributes to the better design and engineering process as well as the solution allows diversification in the façade expressions.

  16. Phonological grammar shapes the auditory cortex: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemot, Charlotte; Pallier, Christophe; LeBihan, Denis; Dehaene, Stanislas; Dupoux, Emmanuel

    2003-10-22

    Languages differ depending on the set of basic sounds they use (the inventory of consonants and vowels) and on the way in which these sounds can be combined to make up words and phrases (phonological grammar). Previous research has shown that our inventory of consonants and vowels affects the way in which our brains decode foreign sounds (Goto, 1971; Näätänen et al., 1997; Kuhl, 2000). Here, we show that phonological grammar has an equally potent effect. We build on previous research, which shows that stimuli that are phonologically ungrammatical are assimilated to the closest grammatical form in the language (Dupoux et al., 1999). In a cross-linguistic design using French and Japanese participants and a fast event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigm, we show that phonological grammar involves the left superior temporal and the left anterior supramarginal gyri, two regions previously associated with the processing of human vocal sounds.

  17. Scene grammar shapes the way we interact with objects, strengthens memories, and speeds search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draschkow, Dejan; Võ, Melissa L-H

    2017-11-28

    Predictions of environmental rules (here referred to as "scene grammar") can come in different forms: seeing a toilet in a living room would violate semantic predictions, while finding a toilet brush next to the toothpaste would violate syntactic predictions. The existence of such predictions has usually been investigated by showing observers images containing such grammatical violations. Conversely, the generative process of creating an environment according to one's scene grammar and its effects on behavior and memory has received little attention. In a virtual reality paradigm, we either instructed participants to arrange objects according to their scene grammar or against it. Subsequently, participants' memory for the arrangements was probed using a surprise recall (Exp1), or repeated search (Exp2) task. As a result, participants' construction behavior showed strategic use of larger, static objects to anchor the location of smaller objects which are generally the goals of everyday actions. Further analysis of this scene construction data revealed possible commonalities between the rules governing word usage in language and object usage in naturalistic environments. Taken together, we revealed some of the building blocks of scene grammar necessary for efficient behavior, which differentially influence how we interact with objects and what we remember about scenes.

  18. The neurophysiology of language processing shapes the evolution of grammar: evidence from case marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Balthasar; Witzlack-Makarevich, Alena; Choudhary, Kamal K; Schlesewsky, Matthias; Bornkessel-Schlesewsky, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Do principles of language processing in the brain affect the way grammar evolves over time or is language change just a matter of socio-historical contingency? While the balance of evidence has been ambiguous and controversial, we identify here a neurophysiological constraint on the processing of language that has a systematic effect on the evolution of how noun phrases are marked by case (i.e. by such contrasts as between the English base form she and the object form her). In neurophysiological experiments across diverse languages we found that during processing, participants initially interpret the first base-form noun phrase they hear (e.g. she…) as an agent (which would fit a continuation like … greeted him), even when the sentence later requires the interpretation of a patient role (as in … was greeted). We show that this processing principle is also operative in Hindi, a language where initial base-form noun phrases most commonly denote patients because many agents receive a special case marker ("ergative") and are often left out in discourse. This finding suggests that the principle is species-wide and independent of the structural affordances of specific languages. As such, the principle favors the development and maintenance of case-marking systems that equate base-form cases with agents rather than with patients. We confirm this evolutionary bias by statistical analyses of phylogenetic signals in over 600 languages worldwide, controlling for confounding effects from language contact. Our findings suggest that at least one core property of grammar systematically adapts in its evolution to the neurophysiological conditions of the brain, independently of socio-historical factors. This opens up new avenues for understanding how specific properties of grammar have developed in tight interaction with the biological evolution of our species.

  19. The neurophysiology of language processing shapes the evolution of grammar: evidence from case marking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balthasar Bickel

    Full Text Available Do principles of language processing in the brain affect the way grammar evolves over time or is language change just a matter of socio-historical contingency? While the balance of evidence has been ambiguous and controversial, we identify here a neurophysiological constraint on the processing of language that has a systematic effect on the evolution of how noun phrases are marked by case (i.e. by such contrasts as between the English base form she and the object form her. In neurophysiological experiments across diverse languages we found that during processing, participants initially interpret the first base-form noun phrase they hear (e.g. she… as an agent (which would fit a continuation like … greeted him, even when the sentence later requires the interpretation of a patient role (as in … was greeted. We show that this processing principle is also operative in Hindi, a language where initial base-form noun phrases most commonly denote patients because many agents receive a special case marker ("ergative" and are often left out in discourse. This finding suggests that the principle is species-wide and independent of the structural affordances of specific languages. As such, the principle favors the development and maintenance of case-marking systems that equate base-form cases with agents rather than with patients. We confirm this evolutionary bias by statistical analyses of phylogenetic signals in over 600 languages worldwide, controlling for confounding effects from language contact. Our findings suggest that at least one core property of grammar systematically adapts in its evolution to the neurophysiological conditions of the brain, independently of socio-historical factors. This opens up new avenues for understanding how specific properties of grammar have developed in tight interaction with the biological evolution of our species.

  20. Descriptor Based Classification of Shapes in Terms of Style and Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welnicka, Katarzyna; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Aanæs, Henrik

    of a specific human being have some commonality that separate them from those of another person. Thus, one could argue that an individual represents a style. Style in the context of biological variation is something that we explore in the work presented here. Specifically, we investigate whether we can define...... of functions, since, as we discuss below, the function of the object (what it is) clearly also has a profound impact on shape. Thus, our work can be summed up as example based classification of digital 3D shapes in both style and function categories....

  1. Implementing a Description Grammar Interpreter : A Notation for Descriptions and Description Rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouffs, R.M.F.

    2015-01-01

    Description grammars represent a formalism for generating verbal descriptions of designs, used in conjunction with shape grammars. A description grammar constitutes a set of description rules that define a language of descriptions. A description grammar interpreter implements the mechanisms to

  2. Inhabiting Latino Politics: How Colleges Shape Students' Political Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Daisy Verduzco

    2015-01-01

    To comply with ideals of multiculturalism and diversity, postsecondary institutions incorporate Latino students into distinct campus cultures. These cultures influence how students interact with one another, the university community at large, and communities outside of campus, ultimately shaping how students inhabit Latino politics. Drawing on…

  3. Teaching Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Grammar is a component in all language skills: reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Teachers need to know rules of grammar (teacher knowledge) as well as techniques that help students use grammar effectively and effortlessly (teaching knowledge). Using reflective practice to help teachers become comfortable with teaching grammar, this…

  4. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  5. CHR grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2005-01-01

    A grammar formalism based upon CHR is proposed analogously to the way Definite Clause Grammars are defined and implemented on top of Prolog. These grammars execute as robust bottom-up parsers with an inherent treatment of ambiguity and a high flexibility to model various linguistic phenomena. The...... integrity constraints for language analysis. CHR grammars appear as a powerful tool for specification and implementation of language processors and may be proposed as a new standard for bottom-up grammars in logic programming.......A grammar formalism based upon CHR is proposed analogously to the way Definite Clause Grammars are defined and implemented on top of Prolog. These grammars execute as robust bottom-up parsers with an inherent treatment of ambiguity and a high flexibility to model various linguistic phenomena....... The formalism extends previous logic programming based grammars with a form of context-sensitive rules and the possibility to include extra-grammatical hypotheses in both head and body of grammar rules. Among the applications are straightforward implementations of Assumption Grammars and abduction under...

  6. CHR Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    A grammar formalism based upon CHR is proposed analogously to the way Definite Clause Grammars are defined and implemented on top of Prolog. These grammars execute as robust bottom-up parsers with an inherent treatment of ambiguity and a high flexibility to model various linguistic phenomena. The...... integrity constraints for language analysis. CHR grammars appear as a powerful tool for specification and implementation of language processors and may be proposed as a new standard for bottom-up grammars in logic programming.......A grammar formalism based upon CHR is proposed analogously to the way Definite Clause Grammars are defined and implemented on top of Prolog. These grammars execute as robust bottom-up parsers with an inherent treatment of ambiguity and a high flexibility to model various linguistic phenomena....... The formalism extends previous logic programming based grammars with a form of context-sensitive rules and the possibility to include extra-grammatical hypotheses in both head and body of grammar rules. Among the applications are straightforward implementations of Assumption Grammars and abduction under...

  7. Abstract Interpretation Using Attribute Grammar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mads

    1990-01-01

    This paper deals with the correctness proofs of attribute grammars using methods from abstract interpretation. The technique will be described by defining a live-variable analysis for a small flow-chart language and proving it correct with respect to a continuation style semantics. The proof...... technique is based on fixpoint induction and introduces an extended class of attribute grammars as to express a standard semantics....

  8. English Grammar Workbook For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    O'Sullivan, Nuala

    2010-01-01

    English Grammar Workbook For Dummies, UK Edition is grammar First Aid for anyone wanting to perfect their English and develop the practical skills needed to write and speak correctly. Each chapter focuses on key grammatical principles, with easy-to-follow theory and examples as well as practice questions and explanations. From verbs, prepositions and tenses, to style, expressions and tricky word traps, this hands-on workbook is essential for both beginners looking to learn and practise the basics of English grammar, and those who want to brush up skills they already have - quickly, easily, and

  9. Parsing with Structure-Preserving Categorial Grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capelletti, M.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a study of the logical and computational properties of structure-preserving categorial grammars. The first part of the book presents chart-parsers for non-associative categorial grammars in the style of Ajdukiewicz and Bar-Hillel. These are proposed in Chapter 3 as deductive parsers,

  10. Fold style inversion: Placing probabilistic constraints on the predicted shape of blind thrust faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Benjamin A.; Sandvol, Eric; Ross, Andrew

    2000-06-01

    We develop a new methodology which compares quantitatively styles of folding from seismic reflection data. The goal of the "fold style inversion" (FSI) method is to provide an objective choice of the most appropriate model used when solving for the shape of an unimaged blind fault from folded layer geometry. FSI is a discretization of the dip isogon fold classification scheme reformulated as simple vector transformations. A data set's goodness of fit to parallel (class 1c) or similar (class 2) fold geometry is assessed by calculating misfit between the predicted and observed bed geometries through a grid search of the parameter space specific to each transformation; the two fold types correspond to the constant bed length and arbitrarily inclined simple shear (AISS) fault solution routines, respectively. For seismic reflection data, confidence estimates may be placed on the preference of fold style and its corresponding fault solution by Monte Carlo simulations of depth correlative, spatially limited depth conversion errors. For synthetic geometric examples FSI determines fold style preference and parameters exactly. At low fold limb dips (Barrancas/Lunlunta-Carrizal anticlinal complex in Mendoza, Argentina, FSI analysis determines 71% and 54% probability of similar preference for two seismic lines on separate structures. The corresponding fault solutions for the first example are well constrained, whereas for the second example the solutions are widely variant. This analysis helps to quantify the relationship between the predicted sub surface fault trajectories and hypocenter and aftershock data of the 1985 Mw 5.9 Mendoza earthquake, showing that the earthquake and the fault causing the Barrancas/Lunlunta-Carrizal anticlinorium are most likely unrelated.

  11. Leadership style in Swiss evangelical churches in the light of their historically shaped leadership culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Russenberger

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is a sociological-historical study of the inter-relation between the historically developed leadership culture of democracy and leadership practice in the evangelical churches of Switzerland. Contemporary Swiss leadership style is based on the cultural inheritance of the Celts, the Romans and the Germanic tribes, the foundation of the Confederation, as well as the history of Christianity. The core values that shaped Swiss leadership culture are the idea that not too much power should vest in the individual, that there should be a democratic right of co-determination, that there should be federal freedom, and that work and achievement are very important. These same basic values still affect leadership in Swiss evangelical congregations today.

  12. Grammar Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Roger

    2015-01-01

    This paper looks at the continued survival of "myths" about English grammar, for example, the statement that in negative and interrogative sentences "any" should be used instead of "some". It is based on a survey of 195 Hong Kong students majoring in English, in five different cohorts, which found that such myths are…

  13. The elements of grammar in 90 minutes

    CERN Document Server

    Hollander, Robert

    2011-01-01

    An eminent scholar explains the essentials of English grammar to those who never studied the basics as well as those who need a refresher course. Inspired by Strunk & White's classic The Elements of Style, this user-friendly guide focuses exclusively on grammar, explaining the individual parts of speech and their proper arrangement in sentence form. A modest investment of 90 minutes can provide readers of all ages with simple but important tools that will improve their communication skills. Dover (2011) original publication.

  14. Maternal Style Selectively Shapes Amygdalar Development and Social Behavior in Rats Genetically Prone to High Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua L; Glover, Matthew E; Pugh, Phyllis C; Fant, Andrew D; Simmons, Rebecca K; Akil, Huda; Kerman, Ilan A; Clinton, Sarah M

    2015-01-01

    The early-life environment critically influences neurodevelopment and later psychological health. To elucidate neural and environmental elements that shape emotional behavior, we developed a rat model of individual differences in temperament and environmental reactivity. We selectively bred rats for high versus low behavioral response to novelty and found that high-reactive (bred high-responder, bHR) rats displayed greater risk-taking, impulsivity and aggression relative to low-reactive (bred low-responder, bLR) rats, which showed high levels of anxiety/depression-like behavior and certain stress vulnerability. The bHR/bLR traits are heritable, but prior work revealed bHR/bLR maternal style differences, with bLR dams showing more maternal attention than bHRs. The present study implemented a cross-fostering paradigm to examine the contribution of maternal behavior to the brain development and emotional behavior of bLR offspring. bLR offspring were reared by biological bLR mothers or fostered to a bLR or bHR mother and then evaluated to determine the effects on the following: (1) developmental gene expression in the hippocampus and amygdala and (2) adult anxiety/depression-like behavior. Genome-wide expression profiling showed that cross-fostering bLR rats to bHR mothers shifted developmental gene expression in the amygdala (but not hippocampus), reduced adult anxiety and enhanced social interaction. Our findings illustrate how an early-life manipulation such as cross-fostering changes the brain's developmental trajectory and ultimately impacts adult behavior. Moreover, while earlier studies highlighted hippocampal differences contributing to the bHR/bLR phenotypes, our results point to a role of the amygdala as well. Future work will pursue genetic and cellular mechanisms within the amygdala that contribute to bHR/bLR behavior either at baseline or following environmental manipulations. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Process Grammar The Basis of Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Leyton, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Leyton's Process Grammar has been applied by scientists and engineers in many disciplines including medical diagnosis, geology, computer-aided design, meteorology, biological anatomy, neuroscience, chemical engineering, etc.  This book demonstrates the following: The Process Grammar invents several entirely new concepts in biological morphology and manufacturing design, and shows that these concepts are fundamentally important. The Process Grammar has process-inference rules that give, to morphological transitions, powerful new causal explanations.  Remarkably, the book gives a profound unification of biological morphology and vehicle design. The book invents over 30 new CAD operations that realize fundamentally important functions of a product. A crucial fact is that the Process Grammar is an example of the laws in Leyton's Generative Theory of Shape which give the ability to recover the design intents for which the shape features of a CAD model were created. The book demonstrates that the Process Grammar ...

  16. Sensing the Sentence: An Embodied Simulation Approach to Rhetorical Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rule, Hannah J.

    2017-01-01

    This article applies the neuroscientific concept of embodied simulation--the process of understanding language through visual, motor, and spatial modalities of the body--to rhetorical grammar and sentence-style pedagogies. Embodied simulation invigorates rhetorical grammar instruction by attuning writers to the felt effects of written language,…

  17. Combined Grammar for the Modeling of Building Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, S.; Peter, M.; Fritsch, D.; Philipp, D.; Baier, P.; Dibak, C.

    2013-11-01

    As spatial grammars have proven successful and efficient to deliver LOD3 models, the next challenge is their extension to indoor applications, leading to LOD4 models. Therefore, a combined indoor grammar for the automatic generation of indoor models from erroneous and incomplete observation data is presented. In building interiors where inaccurate observation data is available, the grammar can be used to make the reconstruction process robust, and verify the reconstructed geometries. In unobserved building interiors, the grammar can generate hypotheses about possible indoor geometries matching the style of the rest of the building. The grammar combines concepts from L-systems and split grammars. It is designed in such way that it can be derived from observation data fully automatically. Thus, manual predefinitions of the grammar rules usually required to tune the grammar to a specific building style, become obsolete. The potential benefit of using our grammar as support for indoor modeling is evaluated based on an example where the grammar has been applied to automatically generate an indoor model from erroneous and incomplete traces gathered by foot-mounted MEMS/IMU positioning systems.

  18. Grammar and Context in Functional Discourse Grammar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, K.; Mackenzie, J.L.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a proposal for the organization of the Contextual Component in Functional Discourse Grammar. A guiding principle in this proposal is that, given the fact that Functional Discourse Grammar is a theory of grammar, the Contextual Component should provide the information that is

  19. Constraining Multiple Grammars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Holger

    2014-01-01

    This article offers the author's commentary on the Multiple Grammars (MG) language acquisition theory proposed by Luiz Amaral and Tom Roeper in the present issue. Multiple Grammars advances the claim that optionality is a constitutive characteristic of any one grammar, with interlanguage grammars being perhaps the clearest examples of a…

  20. Breaking the Rules in Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Tom

    1988-01-01

    Describes how allowing students to break the rules of standard writing can increase students' creativity in their written expression. Discusses several traits of this alternate style, or "Grammar B," including sentence fragments, double voice, lists, and spelling variations. (MM)

  1. Grammar and Syntax: The Student's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavra, Ed

    1987-01-01

    Argues that problems in teaching grammar stem from failure to help students develop, as opposed to memorize, grammatical concepts. Recommends discussion of style and vocabulary, student stylistic analysis of their own writing, and deciphering syntactic use, not just definition, of parts of speech. Suggests that such training should begin in…

  2. Nonterminal Separating Macro Grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogendorp, Jan Anne

    1987-01-01

    We extend the concept of nonterminal separating (or NTS) context-free grammar to nonterminal separating $m$-macro grammar where the mode of derivation $m$ is equal to "unrestricted". "outside-in' or "inside-out". Then we show some (partial) characterization results for these NTS $m$-macro grammars.

  3. Understanding the Models of Grammar

    OpenAIRE

    Mahaputri, Ratna Andhika

    2013-01-01

    This article provides comprehensive explanation about several models of grammar. The first model of grammar which is explained is considered from the functional grammar and associated with the American linguist Noam Chomsky that is Transformational Grammar. This model of grammar is consisted of three components they are phrase structure rule, the lexicon, and transformation. The second model of grammar which is explained in this article is Minimalist Grammar. This article also compares her...

  4. Simple chain grammars and languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus

    1979-01-01

    A subclass of the LR(0)-grammars, the class of simple chain grammars is introduced. Although there exist simple chain grammars which are not LL(k) for any k>0, this new class of grammars is very closely related to the LL(1) and simple LL(1) grammars. In fact it can be shown that every simple chain

  5. Grammar in Writing

    OpenAIRE

    Ondroušková, Světlana

    2008-01-01

    The diploma thesis entitled Grammar in Writing focuses on the methods used in teaching grammar in writing, its application in practice and the consequent evaluation based on the progress of students. The theoretical part tries to explain the notion of writing as a skill, the methodology of teaching writing skills and grammar. It also introduces the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages - it explains the key competences for writing and the criteria for achieving particular level...

  6. French grammar in context

    CERN Document Server

    Jubb, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Instructors' edition without answer keysDiscount of 20% offered when 10 ebooks are sold- e.g. they will be sold for 263.60/ £151.90 instead of 329.50/£189.90French Grammar in Context presents a unique and exciting approach to learning grammar. Authentic texts from a rich variety of sources, literary and journalistic, are used as the starting point for the illustration and explanation of key areas of French grammar. Each point is consolidated with a wide range of written and spoken exercises. Grammar is presented not as an end in itself, but as a

  7. Ambiguity Detection for Programming Language Grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.S. Basten (Bas)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractContext-free grammars are the most suitable and most widely used method for describing the syntax of programming languages. They can be used to generate parsers, which transform a piece of source code into a tree-shaped representation of the code's syntactic structure. These parse

  8. Grammar Instruction and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacina, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Much of the research literature from the past 25 years has supported the importance of teaching grammar in the context of writing instruction (Calkins, 1980; DiStefano & Killion, 1984; Weaver, 1996,1998). Unlike other content areas, practice does not make perfect when learning grammar. While isolated drill and practice of grammatical concepts may…

  9. Gramatica generadora (Generative Grammar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruset, Jose

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the difficulty of describing the linguistic approach to the study of language to a non-linguist. Points out certain differences between traditional grammar, structural analysis and contemporary language analysis and gives a short description of the notion of generative grammar. (Text is in Spanish.) (TL)

  10. Necessity of Grammar Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianyun

    2009-01-01

    Grammar is often misunderstood in the language teaching field. The misconception lies in the view that grammar is a collection of arbitrary rules about static structures in the language. Further questionable claims are that the structures do not have to be thought, learners will acquire them on their own, or if the structures are taught, the…

  11. Grammar in a Nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purser, Diana

    1996-01-01

    Describes "Grammar in a Nutshell"--a visual-auditory-kinesthetic approach to traditional textbook grammar, usage, and mechanics concepts. Notes that the idea behind Nutshell is that as the students slowly mature in other writing skills they can also grow in their understanding of how to use, how to handle their language, not only correctly but…

  12. A Papago Grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepeda, Ofelia

    A Papago grammar, intented to help Papago and other junior high, high school and college students learn and appreciate the language and give linguists an overview of the language, contains background information on the language and the book, two grammar units, a unit of five conversations in Papago, and a section of supplementary material. Text…

  13. Grammar and Teaching ESL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Glenda; Young, Barbara N.

    2005-01-01

    The variety of theories relating to teaching ESL learners leads to contradictory ideas about teaching a second language. This paper focuses on the continuing importance of grammar in teaching and the current resurgence in interest in returning to grammar as an important component in the classroom.

  14. Grammar Writing for a Grammar-reading Audience

    OpenAIRE

    Noonan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This paper will be concerned primarily with the problem of establishment of higher standards for grammar writing. The text includes a list of 28 points for grammar writers suggested by the Michael Noonan. About another issue, the evaluation of grammar writing within the profession and the professional support provided to grammar writers, the author makes some few comments at the end of this essay.

  15. Phonology without universal grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archangeli, Diana; Pulleyblank, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e., Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns.

  16. Subverting the grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Amaral da Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available From the notion of parody, credibility and legitimacy, coming mainly from studies in discourse analysis, and ideas from the sociolinguistic we intend to develop a brief comparison between the Expositive Grammar – Advanced Course (46st ed.:1926 of Eduardo Carlos Pereira, who initially presents itself as a merely descriptive grammar, and the Portuguese Grammar by the Confused Method, written by Mendes Fradique (4st ed.: 1985. We observed that the first one claims to be “expositive” when it is cle­arly prescriptive. The work of Mendes Fradique uses humor and irony to parody pres­criptive grammars, criticizing the “good use”. In order to prove the above statement, we selected some of the concepts presented by those works, checking the position taken by each one. Among them is the very concept of grammar, language etc.

  17. Phonology without Universal Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eArchangeli

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The question of identifying the properties of language that are specific human linguistic abilities, i.e. Universal Grammar, lies at the center of linguistic research. This paper argues for a largely Emergent Grammar in phonology, taking as the starting point that memory, categorization, attention to frequency, and the creation of symbolic systems are all nonlinguistic characteristics of the human mind. The articulation patterns of American English rhotics illustrate categorization and systems; the distribution of vowels in Bantu vowel harmony uses frequencies of particular sequences to argue against Universal Grammar and in favor of Emergent Grammar; prefix allomorphy in Esimbi illustrates the Emergent symbolic system integrating phonological and morphological generalizations. The Esimbi case has been treated as an example of phonological opacity in a Universal Grammar account; the Emergent analysis resolves the pattern without opacity concerns.

  18. Compiler generation based on grammar inheritance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksit, Mehmet; Mostert, Rene; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of grammar inheritance is introduced. Grammar inheritance is a structural organization of grammar rules by which a grammar inherits rules from ancestor grammars or may have its own rules inherited by descendant grammars. Grammar inheritance supports reusability and extensibility of

  19. French grammar for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Mazet, Veronique

    2013-01-01

    The easy way to master French grammar French Grammar For Dummies is a logical extension and complement to the successful language learning book, French For Dummies. In plain English, it teaches you the grammatical rules of the French language, including parts of speech, sentence construction, pronouns, adjectives, punctuation, stress and verb tenses, and moods. Throughout the book, you get plenty of practice opportunities to help you on your goal of mastering basic French grammar and usage. Grasp the grammatical rules of French including parts of speech, sentenc

  20. Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-five : a functional grammar perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Kavalir

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper tries to analyse the style of Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five with the tool of Hallidayan systemic-functional grammar. Its aim is to explore in what way the syntactic and thematic structure helps construct the sentiment of fatalism  and simplicity, and how it reinforces the novel's concept of time.

  1. k-visit attribute grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Hanne; Skyum, Sven

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that any well-defined attribute grammar isk-visit for somek. Furthermore it is shown that given a well-defined grammarG and an integerk, it is decidable whetherG isk-visit. Finally we show that thek-visit grammars specify a proper hierarchy with respect to translations.......It is shown that any well-defined attribute grammar isk-visit for somek. Furthermore it is shown that given a well-defined grammarG and an integerk, it is decidable whetherG isk-visit. Finally we show that thek-visit grammars specify a proper hierarchy with respect to translations....

  2. Effective Grammar Teaching: Lessons from Confident Grammar Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraki, Eleni; Hill, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Learning the grammar of a language is an integral part of learning a second or foreign language. Studies on teacher beliefs, teacher language awareness (TLA) and grammar teaching have reported that the majority of English language teachers recognise the importance of teaching grammar (Borg, 2001; Borg & Burns, 2008). At the same time, many…

  3. Informal and Incidental Learning Experiences of African American Women That Shaped and Influenced Their Leadership Development and Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Marilyn Ann

    2013-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine how African American women in corporations develop leadership and construct their leadership style through informal and incidental learning experiences. This study explored relationships between informal adult learning and career mapping processes of leadership for African American women. A…

  4. La gramatica comunicativa (Communicative Grammar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierer, Ernesto

    This paper explains the main concepts of communicative grammar and provides a detailed view of how communicative grammar analyses language at various levels. Language is discussed in terms of communication; the central elements in the analysis are those that carry information. Communicative grammar seeks to describe the process of the linguistic…

  5. Space-restricted attribute grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Erik Meineche

    1980-01-01

    Restricting the size of attribute values, relative to the length of the string under consideration, leads to a model of attribute grammars in which grammars with both inherited and synthesized attributes can be significantly more economical than grammars with synthesized attributes only....

  6. k-visit Attribute Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielson, Hanne Riis; Skyum, S.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that any well-defined attribute grammar is k-visit for some k. Furthermore, it is shown that given a well-defined grammar G and an integer k, it is decidable whether G is k-visit. Finally it is shown that the k-visit grammars specify a proper hierarchy with respect to translations...

  7. Teaching Grammar: What Really Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Amy; Berger, Joan

    2010-01-01

    In this book, the authors share procedures for teaching grammar effectively and dynamically, in ways that appeal to students and teachers alike. Ideal for teachers just beginning their work in grammar instruction, this book includes day-by-day units and reproducibles to help them embed grammar lessons into writing instruction. Using visuals,…

  8. The Necessity of Grammar Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengjuan

    2010-01-01

    Mastering grammar is the foundation in the proficiency of a language. Grammar teaching is also an essential part of language teaching. However, with the communicative approach was introduced into China, many foreign language teachers gradually make little of grammar teaching. In terms of the theory of linguistics, this paper specifically explores…

  9. Closure properties of Watson-Crick grammars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkufli, Nurul Liyana binti Mohamad; Turaev, Sherzod; Tamrin, Mohd Izzuddin Mohd; Azeddine, Messikh

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we define Watson-Crick context-free grammars, as an extension of Watson-Crick regular grammars and Watson-Crick linear grammars with context-free grammar rules. We show the relation of Watson-Crick (regular and linear) grammars to the sticker systems, and study some of the important closure properties of the Watson-Crick grammars. We establish that the Watson-Crick regular grammars are closed under almost all of the main closure operations, while the differences between other Watson-Crick grammars with their corresponding Chomsky grammars depend on the computational power of the Watson-Crick grammars which still need to be studied.

  10. Financial Literacy of Pupils at Grammar School

    OpenAIRE

    Nováková, Kateřina

    2013-01-01

    The diploma thesis "Financial literacy of pupils at grammar school" deals with the attitudes of students to the issue of financial literacy and the level of their knowledge. It focuses on individual components of financial literacy and key factors which influence and shape the students' knowledge and attitudes. Comparing available literature sources the definition of financial literacy is discussed in the theoretical part. The theoretical part also includes the way financial education is regu...

  11. Spatial grammar implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKay, Alison; Chase, Scott Curland; Shea, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    fluid, demands conceptual design tools that support designers’ ways of thinking and working, and enhance creativity, for example, by offering design alternatives, difficult or not, possible without the use of such tools. The potential of spatial grammars as a technology to support such design tools has...... been demonstrated through experimental research prototypes since the 1970s. In this paper, we provide a review of recent spatial grammar implementations, which were presented in the Design Computing and Cognition 2010 workshop on which this paper is based, in the light of requirements for conceptual...

  12. English Grammar For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Lesley J

    2009-01-01

    If you're confused by commas, perplexed by pronouns, and plain terrified by tenses, English Grammar For Dummies will put your fears to rest. Packed with expert guidance, it covers everything from sentence basics to rules even your English teacher didn't know - if you want to brush up on your grammar, this is the only guide you'll ever need. Discover how to: avoid common grammatical errors; get to grips with apostrophes; structure sentences correctly; use verbs and find the right tense; and decide when to use slang or formal English.  

  13. A comprehensive French grammar

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Glanville

    2013-01-01

    Characterized by clear and accessible explanations, numerous examples and sample sentences, a new section on register and tone, and useful appendices covering topics including age and time, A Comprehensive French Grammar, Sixth Edition is an indispensable tool for advanced students of French language and literature.A revised edition of this established, bestselling French grammarIncludes a new section on register and medium and offers expanded treatment of French punctuationFeatures numerous examples and sample sentences, and useful appendices covering topics including age, time, and dimension

  14. French grammar and usage

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkins, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Long trusted as the most comprehensive, up-to-date and user-friendly grammar available, French Grammar and Usage is a complete guide to French as it is written and spoken today. It includes clear descriptions of all the main grammatical phenomena of French, and their use, illustrated by numerous examples taken from contemporary French, and distinguishes the most common forms of usage, both formal and informal.Key features include:Comprehensive content, covering all the major structures of contemporary French User-friendly organisation offering easy-to-find sections with cross-referencing and i

  15. Aspects of syntactic selections as style in Zaynab Alkali's the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores style at the syntactic level in Zaynab Alkali‟s The Descendants. he systemic grammar is applied as the theoretical framework to analyse aspects of syntactic selections in the text. The basic tenet of systemic grammar is the exploration of the functions of language in the realization of the thematic concerns ...

  16. Grammar and Grammaring: Toward Modes for English Grammar Teaching in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Chengyu

    2015-01-01

    The value of grammar instruction in foreign language learning and teaching has been a focus of debate for quite some time, which has resulted in different views on grammar and grammar teaching as well as different teaching approaches based on different perspectives or in different language learning contexts. To explore some modes for grammar…

  17. TEACHING GRAMMAR IN CONTEXT: WHY AND HOW?

    OpenAIRE

    Noor Maulidiyah

    2017-01-01

    Grammar is an important component of English. Without grammar, it is not possible to communicate meaning successfully. Therefore, teachers and educators have to pay close attention to teaching grammar effectively. Based on the writer‘s experience in teaching grammar using the traditional way, many students still had difficulty in acquiring the grammar points. The grammar meetings were not effective, and the students did not thoroughly understand the grammar exercises. The students seemed bore...

  18. Functional Discourse Grammar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, K.; Mackenzie, J.L.; Heine, B.; Narrog, H.

    2010-01-01

    Functional Discourse Grammar (FDG) is a typologically based structural-functional theory of language. It has a top-down organization to achieve psychological adequacy, and takes the Discourse Act as its basic unit of analysis to achieve pragmatic adequacy. Although itself strictly a model of

  19. Knowing Chinese character grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, James

    2016-02-01

    Chinese character structure has often been described as representing a kind of grammar, but the notion of character grammar has hardly been explored. Patterns in character element reduplication are particularly grammar-like, displaying discrete combinatoriality, binarity, phonology-like final prominence, and potentially the need for symbolic rules (X→XX). To test knowledge of these patterns, Chinese readers were asked to judge the acceptability of fake characters varying both in grammaticality (obeying or violating reduplication constraints) and in lexicality (of the reduplicative configurations). While lexical knowledge was important (lexicality improved acceptability and grammatical configurations were accepted more quickly when also lexical), grammatical knowledge was important as well, with grammaticality improving acceptability equally for lexical and nonlexical configurations. Acceptability was also higher for more frequent reduplicative elements, suggesting that the reduplicative configurations were decomposed. Chinese characters present an as-yet untapped resource for exploring fundamental questions about the nature of the human capacity for grammar. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Grammar and discourse prominence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Marie Herget; Kristensen, Line Burholt; Boye, Kasper

    in Danish, the lexicon-grammar contrast is a more important cue to discourse prominence (foreground vs. background status) than focalization (by means of focus particles). BOYE, K. & HARDER, P. 2012. A usage-based theory of grammatical status and grammaticalization. Language, 88, 1-44. RENSINK, R. A., O...

  1. Teaching Grammar in Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1998-01-01

    Argues for an alternative to the conventional linear model of language acquisition in the learning of second-language grammar, proposing a more organic approach. The two approaches are contrasted, drawing on research in second-language learning and discourse analysis that supports the organic view. Some pedagogical implications of this approach…

  2. Teaching Grammar and Reading

    OpenAIRE

    高棹, 聰子

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore what effectiveness of teaching grammar would be expected in reading, analyzing the statistical data. The data show the lack of the students' motivation and their reluctance about reading the whole passage. In conclusion, we should think out the problems caused by methodology as well as course design.

  3. Spontaneous Grammar Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoo, Hong Sing; Lewis, Marilyn

    1998-01-01

    Describes one New Zealand university language teacher's reflection on her own grammar explanations to university-level students of Bahasa Indonesian. Examines form-focused instruction through the teacher's spontaneous answers to students' questions about the form of the language they are studying. The teacher's experiences show that it takes time…

  4. Multiple Grammars and MOGUL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, John

    2014-01-01

    Optionality is a central phenomenon in second language acquisition (SLA), for which any adequate theory must account. Amaral and Roeper (this issue; henceforth A&R) offer an appealing approach to it, using Roeper's Multiple Grammars Theory, which was created with first language in mind but which extends very naturally to SLA. They include…

  5. A GUJARATI REFERENCE GRAMMAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARDONA, GEORGE

    THIS REFERENCE GRAMMAR WAS WRITTEN TO FILL THE NEED FOR AN UP-TO-DATE ANALYSIS OF THE MODERN LANGUAGE SUITABLE FOR LANGUAGE LEARNERS AS WELL AS LINGUISTS. THE AUTHOR LISTS IN THE INTRODUCTION THOSE STUDIES PREVIOUS TO THIS ONE WHICH MAY BE OF INTEREST TO THE READER. INCLUDED IN HIS ANALYSIS OF THE LANGUAGE ARE MAJOR CHAPTERS ON--(1) PHONOLOGY, (2)…

  6. Robots who read grammars

    OpenAIRE

    Macklin-Cordes, Jayden L.; Blackbourne, Nathaniel L.; Bott, Thomas J.; Cook, Jacqueline; Mark Ellison, T.; Hollis, Jordan; Kirlew, Edith E.; Richards, Genevieve C.; Zhao, Sanle; Round, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Robots who read grammarsJayden L. Macklin-Cordes, Nathaniel L. Blackbourne, Thomas J. Bott, Jacqueline Cook, T. Mark Ellison, Jordan Hollis, Edith E. Kirlew, Genevieve C. Richards, Sanle Zhao, Erich R. RoundPoster presented at CoEDL Fest 2017, Alexandra Park Conference Centre, Alexandra Headlands, QLD, Australia. Hosted by the University of Queensland. 6 February 2017.AbstractLinguistic typology has yet to undergo a computational revolution like that seen in other scientific endeavours. Never...

  7. Abductive Logic Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning; Dahl, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    By extending logic grammars with constraint logic, we give them the ability to create knowledge bases that represent the meaning of an input string. Semantic information is thus defined through extra-grammatical means, and a sentence's meaning logically follows as a by-product of string rewriting...... the norm -- arbitrary (i.e., order-independent) derivations. We show that rich and accurate knowledge extraction from text can be achieved through the use of this new formalism......By extending logic grammars with constraint logic, we give them the ability to create knowledge bases that represent the meaning of an input string. Semantic information is thus defined through extra-grammatical means, and a sentence's meaning logically follows as a by-product of string rewriting....... We formalize these ideas, and exemplify them both within and outside first-order logic, and for both fixed and dynamic knowledge bases. Within the latter variety, we consider the usual left-to-right derivations that are traditional in logic grammars, but also -- in a significant departure from...

  8. A communicative grammar of English

    CERN Document Server

    Leech, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    A Communicative Grammar of English has long been established as a grammar innovative in approach, reliable in coverage, and clear in its explanations. This fully revised and redesigned third edition provides up-to-date and accessible help to teachers, advanced learners and undergraduate students of English. Part One looks at the way English grammar varies in different types of English, such as 'formal' and 'informal', 'spoken' and 'written'; Part Two focuses on the uses of grammar rather than on grammatical structure and Part Three provides a handy alphabetically arranged guide to

  9. Deriving tolerant grammars from a base-line grammar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Klusener (Steven); R. Lämmel (Ralf)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA grammar-based approach to tool development in re- and reverse engineering promises precise structure awareness, but it is problematic in two respects. Firstly, it is a considerable up-front investment to obtain a grammar for a relevant language or cocktail of languages. Existing work

  10. Grammar Dilemma: Teaching Grammar as a Resource for Making Meaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liamkina, Olga; Ryshina-Pankova, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    Adopting a functional perspective that views grammar as a rich resource for making contextualized meanings in a culture- and language-specific way, the article reconsiders the role of explicit grammar instruction in developing communicative abilities of second language learners. It draws on two distinct but complementary research frameworks,…

  11. A Pedagogical Grammar of Tboli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Vivian M.

    1992-01-01

    Tboli is a language spoken by people living in southwestern Mindanao, Philippines, in the province of South Cotabato. The pedagogical grammar of Tboli has been written to help non-Tboli interested in learning to speak Tboli. A discussion of spelling and pronunciation includes the alphabet and spelling rules. Other forms of grammar described are…

  12. Teachers' Perceptions about Grammar Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu, Tran Hoang

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates English as a second language (ESL) teachers' beliefs in grammar teaching. A 32-item questionnaire was administered to 11 ESL teachers in a language school in California. The results show that the participants generally believe that the formal study of grammar is essential to the eventual mastery of a foreign or second…

  13. Modern French Grammar Workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    An innovative new workbook of exercises and language tasks for intermediate and advanced learners of French. This Workbook can be used independently or alongside Modern French Grammar.This Workbook provides exercises in:* Essential grammatical structures* Everyday functions such as agreeing and disagreeing* Role-plays set in a wide range of different contextsIt is suitable for group or pair work and for private study.A comprehensive answer key at the back of the Workbook enables you to check on your progress.This Workbook is ideal for all learners who have a basic knowledge of French, includin

  14. Structural priming, action planning, and grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Maryellen C; Weiss, Daniel J

    2017-01-01

    Structural priming is poorly understood and cannot inform accounts of grammar for two reasons. First, those who view performance as grammar + processing will always be able to attribute psycholinguistic data to processing rather than grammar. Second, structural priming may be simply an example of hysteresis effects in general action planning. If so, then priming offers no special insight into grammar.

  15. Finger Search in Grammar-Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Christiansen, Anders Roy; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2016-01-01

    the grammar, and let N be the size of the string. For the static variant we give a linear space representation that supports placing the finger in O(log(N)) time and subsequently accessing in O(log(D)) time, where D is the distance between the finger and the accessed index. For the dynamic variant we give...... a linear space representation that supports placing the finger in O(log(N)) time and accessing and moving the finger in O(log(D) + log(log(N))) time. Compared to the best linear space solution to random access, we improve a O(log(N)) query bound to O(log(D)) for the static variant and to O(log(D) + log......(log(N))) for the dynamic variant, while maintaining linear space. As an application of our results we obtain an improved solution to the longest common extension problem in grammar compressed strings. To obtain our results, we introduce several new techniques of independent interest, including a novel van Emde Boas style...

  16. Wired Style: Principles of English Usage in the Digital Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Constance, Ed.

    Not intended to replace traditional style and grammar manuals, this manual digs into questions that the "Chicago Manual of Style," the "AP Guide," and "Strunk and White" do not even imagine--it aims to give the user a feel for the new language that is evolving in the digital age. The manual might be considered an…

  17. A grammar checker based on web searching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Moré

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an English grammar and style checker for non-native English speakers. The main characteristic of this checker is the use of an Internet search engine. As the number of web pages written in English is immense, the system hypothesises that a piece of text not found on the Web is probably badly written. The system also hypothesises that the Web will provide examples of how the content of the text segment can be expressed in a grammatically correct and idiomatic way. Thus, when the checker warns the user about the odd nature of a text segment, the Internet engine searches for contexts that can help the user decide whether he/she should correct the segment or not. By means of a search engine, the checker also suggests use of other expressions that appear on the Web more often than the expression he/she actually wrote.

  18. English grammar a university course

    CERN Document Server

    Downing, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This best-selling comprehensive descriptive grammar forms a complete course, ideal for all students studying English Language ,whether on a course or for self-study. Broadly based on Hallidayan systemic-functional grammar but also drawing on cognitive linguistics and discourse analysis, English Grammar is accessible, avoiding overly theoretical or technical explanations.Divided into 12 self-contained chapters based around language functions, each chapter is divided into units of class-length material. Key features include:Numerous authentic texts from a wide range of sources, both spoken and w

  19. The Grammar of Linguistic Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durst-Andersen, Per

    2009-01-01

    interpretations and therefore capable of referring to anything within its own limits. Exactly because of the arbitrariness and the omnipotence of the repertoire of nominal lexemes language must have a grammar that can give a semiotic direction to the otherwise completely static sign (in Peircean terms: impotent......) 'it cannot by itself refer, but must have a vehicle, a grammar. There is an obligatory choice between three types of grammar corresponding to the three ways in which a state of affairs exists in a communication situation: (1) the situation as such in a real or in an imagined world being common...

  20. Practising French grammar a workbook

    CERN Document Server

    Dr Roger Hawkins; Towell, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This new edition of Practising French Grammar offers a set of varied and accessible exercises for developing a practical awareness of French as it is spoken and written today. The lively examples and authentic texts and cartoons have been updated to reflect current usage. A new companion website provides a wealth of additional interactive exercises to help consolidate challenging grammar points. Practising French Grammar provides concise summaries of key grammatical points at the beginning of each exercise, as well as model answers to the exercises and translations of difficult words, making i

  1. Generic Graph Grammar: A Simple Grammar for Generic Procedural Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Asger Nyman; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2012-01-01

    of greater complexity. Consequently, there is a need for a simple, general method which is capable of generating both types of objects. Generic Graph Grammar has been developed to address this need. The production rules consist of a small set of basic productions which are applied directly onto primitives...... in a directed cyclic graph. Furthermore, the basic productions are chosen such that Generic Graph Grammar seamlessly combines the capabilities of L-systems to imitate biological growth (to model trees, animals, etc.) and those of split grammars to design structured objects (chairs, houses, etc.). This results...... in a highly expressive grammar capable of generating a wide range of types of models. Models which consist of skeletal structures or surfaces or any combination of these. Besides generic modelling capabilities, the focus has also been on usability, especially userfriendliness and efficiency. Therefore several...

  2. Teaching Grammar Using Pictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henny Uswatun Hasanah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching is a process of communication. It has to be created through the way ofteaching and exchanging the message or information by every teacher and student. The message can be knowledge, skills, ideas, experiences, and manyothers. Through the process of communication, the people can receive the message or information. To avoid misunderstanding in the process ofcommunication, media are needed in the process of teaching. Using pictures can make exercises and activities more interesting and more interactive. We canconstantly improve our activities by looking at what went well and what fell flat. These 5 unique ways to practice grammar using pictures are a jumping offpoint, and can be expanded in lots of interesting ways. 

  3. Mathematical grammar of biology

    CERN Document Server

    Yamagishi, Michel Eduardo Beleza

    2017-01-01

    This seminal, multidisciplinary book shows how mathematics can be used to study the first principles of DNA. Most importantly, it enriches the so-called “Chargaff’s grammar of biology” by providing the conceptual theoretical framework necessary to generalize Chargaff’s rules. Starting with a simple example of DNA mathematical modeling where human nucleotide frequencies are associated to the Fibonacci sequence and the Golden Ratio through an optimization problem, its breakthrough is showing that the reverse, complement and reverse-complement operators defined over oligonucleotides induce a natural set partition of DNA words of fixed-size. These equivalence classes, when organized into a matrix form, reveal hidden patterns within the DNA sequence of every living organism. Intended for undergraduate and graduate students both in mathematics and in life sciences, it is also a valuable resource for researchers interested in studying invariant genomic properties.

  4. Constraint-Based Categorial Grammar

    CERN Document Server

    Bouma, G; Bouma, Gosse; Noord, Gertjan van

    1994-01-01

    We propose a generalization of Categorial Grammar in which lexical categories are defined by means of recursive constraints. In particular, the introduction of relational constraints allows one to capture the effects of (recursive) lexical rules in a computationally attractive manner. We illustrate the linguistic merits of the new approach by showing how it accounts for the syntax of Dutch cross-serial dependencies and the position and scope of adjuncts in such constructions. Delayed evaluation is used to process grammars containing recursive constraints.

  5. URDU GRAMMAR AND READER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BENDER, ERNEST

    THIS MANUAL IS BASED ON THE URDU DIALECT OF THE EDUCATED CLASSES OF PAKISTAN. IT CONSISTS OF 40 LESSONS IN ROMANIZED SCRIPT. LESSONS ONE TO 17 CONCENTRATE ON SIMPLE CONVERSATIONS AND BASIC GRAMMATICAL CONSTRUCTIONS. LESSONS 18 TO 40 ARE DESIGNED TO ACQUAINT THE STUDENT GRADUALLY WITH MORE COMPLEX CONVERSATION AND WITH LITERARY STYLE. EACH LESSON…

  6. LexGram - a practical categorial grammar formalism -

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, Esther

    1995-01-01

    We present the LexGram system, an amalgam of (Lambek) categorial grammar and Head Driven Phrase Structure Grammar (HPSG), and show that the grammar formalism it implements is a well-structured and useful tool for actual grammar development.

  7. Leadership Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Jo Ann; Smith, Stuart C.

    Chapter 2 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter reviews theories of leadership style--the way a leader leads. Although most experts agree that leadership style is important, they disagree concerning style components, leaders' capabilities for changing styles, the effects of personality traits on style, and the desirability of…

  8. What exactly is Universal Grammar, and has anyone seen it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Universal Grammar (UG) is a suspect concept. There is little agreement on what exactly is in it; and the empirical evidence for it is very weak. This paper critically examines a variety of arguments that have been put forward as evidence for UG, focussing on the three most powerful ones: universality (all human languages share a number of properties), convergence (all language learners converge on the same grammar in spite of the fact that they are exposed to different input), and poverty of the stimulus (children know things about language which they could not have learned from the input available to them). I argue that these arguments are based on premises which are either false or unsubstantiated. Languages differ from each other in profound ways, and there are very few true universals, so the fundamental crosslinguistic fact that needs explaining is diversity, not universality. A number of recent studies have demonstrated the existence of considerable differences in adult native speakers' knowledge of the grammar of their language, including aspects of inflectional morphology, passives, quantifiers, and a variety of more complex constructions, so learners do not in fact converge on the same grammar. Finally, the poverty of the stimulus argument presupposes that children acquire linguistic representations of the kind postulated by generative grammarians; constructionist grammars such as those proposed by Tomasello, Goldberg and others can be learned from the input. We are the only species that has language, so there must be something unique about humans that makes language learning possible. The extent of crosslinguistic diversity and the considerable individual differences in the rate, style and outcome of acquisition suggest that it is more promising to think in terms of a language-making capacity, i.e., a set of domain-general abilities, rather than an innate body of knowledge about the structural properties of the target system.

  9. What exactly is Universal Grammar, and has anyone seen it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa eDabrowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Universal Grammar (UG is a suspect concept. There is little agreement on what exactly is in it; and the empirical evidence for it is very weak. This paper critically examines a variety of arguments that have been put forward as evidence for UG, focussing on the three most powerful ones: universality (all human languages share a number of properties, convergence (all language learners converge on the same grammar in spite of the fact that they are exposed to different input, and poverty of the stimulus (children know things about language which they could not have learned from the input available to them. I argue that these arguments are based on premises which are either false or unsubstantiated. Languages differ from each other in profound ways, and there are very few true universals, so the fundamental crosslinguistic fact that needs explaining is diversity, not universality. A number of recent studies have demonstrated the existence of considerable differences in adult native speakers’ knowledge of the grammar of their language, including aspects of inflectional morphology, passives, quantifiers, and a variety of more complex constructions, so learners do not in fact converge on the same grammar. Finally, the poverty of the stimulus argument presupposes that children acquire linguistic representations of the kind postulated by generative grammarians; constructionist grammars such as those proposed by Tomasello, Goldberg and others can be learned from the input. We are the only species that has language, so there must be something unique about humans that makes language learning possible. The extent of crosslinguistic diversity and the considerable individual differences in the rate, style and outcome of acquisition suggest that it is more promising to think in terms of a language-making capacity, i.e. a set of domain-general abilities, rather than an innate body of knowledge about the structural properties of the target system.

  10. A Learning Algorithm for Multimodal Grammar Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ulizia, A; Ferri, F; Grifoni, P

    2011-12-01

    The high costs of development and maintenance of multimodal grammars in integrating and understanding input in multimodal interfaces lead to the investigation of novel algorithmic solutions in automating grammar generation and in updating processes. Many algorithms for context-free grammar inference have been developed in the natural language processing literature. An extension of these algorithms toward the inference of multimodal grammars is necessary for multimodal input processing. In this paper, we propose a novel grammar inference mechanism that allows us to learn a multimodal grammar from its positive samples of multimodal sentences. The algorithm first generates the multimodal grammar that is able to parse the positive samples of sentences and, afterward, makes use of two learning operators and the minimum description length metrics in improving the grammar description and in avoiding the over-generalization problem. The experimental results highlight the acceptable performances of the algorithm proposed in this paper since it has a very high probability of parsing valid sentences.

  11. A Task-driven Grammar Refactoring Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Halupka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents our proposal and the implementation of an algorithm for automated refactoring of context-free grammars. Rather than operating under some domain-specific task, in our approach refactoring is perfomed on the basis of a refactoring task defined by its user. The algorithm and the corresponding refactoring system are called mARTINICA. mARTINICA is able to refactor grammars of arbitrary size and structural complexity. However, the computation time needed to perform a refactoring task with the desired outcome is highly dependent on the size of the grammar. Until now, we have successfully performed refactoring tasks on small and medium-size grammars of Pascal-like languages and parts of the Algol-60 programming language grammar. This paper also briefly introduces the reader to processes occurring in grammar refactoring, a method for describing desired properties that a refactored grammar should fulfill, and there is a discussion of the overall significance of grammar refactoring.

  12. Procedure Of Teaching Grammar Using Memory Enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Herri Susanto

    2011-01-01

    Teaching grammar has been regarded as a process of understanding from the context. Itmeans a teacher teaches the pupils contextually more than just the rules. However, I have my ownexperience that teaching grammar methods must depend on the purposes of learning grammar. Somepeople learn grammar as a means to fulfill the syllabus needs for schools but other people learngrammar for special purposes out of school syllabus, such as for entrance test. For these reasons, themethods of teaching gram...

  13. The design and implementation of Object Grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. van der Storm (Tijs); W.R. Cook; A. Loh

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractAn Object Grammar is a variation on traditional BNF grammars, where the notation is extended to support declarative bidirectional mappings between text and object graphs. The two directions for interpreting Object Grammars are parsing and formatting. Parsing transforms text into an

  14. Analyzing Ambiguity of Context-Free Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Giegerich, Robert; Møller, Anders

    2010-01-01

    It has been known since 1962 that the ambiguity problem for context-free grammars is undecidable. Ambiguity in context-free grammars is a recurring problem in language design and parser generation, as well as in applications where grammars are used as models of real-world physical structures. We ...

  15. Written Language Performance Following Embedded Grammar Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gingere; Norris, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This study explored whether presenting grammar instruction within the context of reading and writing would improve writing skills. The participating schools were using a traditional grammar instruction in which grammar lessons were predominately taught using worksheets and were presented separately from other reading and writing activities. This…

  16. Reframing the English Grammar Schools Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rebecca; Perry, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    In October 2015 the Department for Education (DfE) permitted a grammar school in Tonbridge, Kent, to open up an annexe in Sevenoaks, 10 miles away. Amidst claims that the annexe was essentially a new grammar school, the decision reignited an old debate about the value of academically-selective "grammar" schools in England. The intensity…

  17. Analyzing Ambiguity of Context-Free Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Giegerich, Robert; Møller, Anders

    2007-01-01

    It has been known since 1962 that the ambiguity problem for context-free grammars is undecidable. Ambiguity in context-free grammars is a recurring problem in language design and parser generation, as well as in applications where grammars are used as models of real-world physical structures. We...

  18. Analyzing Ambiguity of Context-Free Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Claus; Giegerich, Robert; Møller, Anders

    2010-01-01

    It has been known since 1962 that the ambiguity problem for context-free grammars is undecidable. Ambiguity in context-free grammars is a recurring problem in language design and parser generation, as well as in applications where grammars are used as models of real-world physical structures. We...

  19. The Grammars of English and Curriculum Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Joe Darwin

    This study summarizes the kinds of English grammar currently taught in American secondary schools and describes the effects of curriculum proposals by scholars upon the teaching of language and composition. A survey of grammar from classical Greek and Roman times to the present precedes a description of specific types of grammar (e.g.,…

  20. On the covering of left recursive grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Aho, A.V.

    In this paper we show that some prevailing ideas on the elimination of left recursion in a context-free grammar are not valid. An algorithm and a proof are given to show that every proper context-free grammar is covered by a non-left-recursive grammar.

  1. Teaching Grammar as a Liberating Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The idea of grammar as a "liberating force" comes from a paper by Henry Widdowson (1990) in which grammar is depicted as a resource which liberates the language user from an over-dependency on lexis and context for the expression of meaning. In this paper, I consider the implications for second language teaching of the notion of grammar as a…

  2. Drama Grammar: Towards a Performative Postmethod Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the original concept of drama grammar, the synthesis of grammar instruction and drama pedagogy, which integrates both structural and communicative paradigms through a dialectic combination of acting and linguistic analysis. Based on the principles of drama pedagogy, drama grammar makes use of techniques from the performing…

  3. French grammar you really need to know

    CERN Document Server

    Adamson, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Comprehensive and clear explanations of key grammar patterns and structures are reinforced and contextualized through authentic materials. You will not only learn how to construct grammar correctly, but when and where to use it so you sound natural and appropriate. French Grammar You Really Need to Know will help you gain the intuition you need to become a confident communicator in your new language.

  4. Procedure Of Teaching Grammar Using Memory Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herri Susanto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Teaching grammar has been regarded as a process of understanding from the context. It means a teacher teaches the pupils contextually more than just the rules. However, I have my own experience that teaching grammar methods must depend on the purposes of learning grammar. Some people learn grammar as a means to fulfill the syllabus needs for schools but other people learn grammar for special purposes out of school syllabus, such as for entrance test. For these reasons, the methods of teaching grammar should be different. The students who learn grammar based on the school syllabus probably needs longer procedure of learning that usually uses contextual teaching through listening, speaking, writing, and reading. Nevertheless, students who learn grammar for test need shorter procedure of learning such as memorizing. Therefore, I propose giving a workshop of teaching grammar using memory enhancement as another alternative teaching grammar method. This workshop would show the class that grammar can be learnt through memory enhancement process, i.e.; mind map, music, memory technique and drill to boost up students understanding for test preparation.

  5. Example based style classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welnicka, Katarzyna; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Aanæs, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    We address the problem of analysis of families of shapes which can be classified according to two categories: the main one corresponding usually to the coarse shape which we call the function and the more subtle one which we call the style. The style and the function both contribute to the overal...... this similarity should be reflected across different functions. We show the usability of our methods first on the example of a number of chess sets which our method helps sort. Next, we investigate the problem of finding a replacement for a missing tooth given a database of teeth....

  6. Notation-Parametric Grammar Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Zaytsev (Vadim); A.M. Sloane; S. Andova

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractAutomation of grammar recovery is an important research area that received attention over the last decade and a half. Given the abundance of available documentation for software languages that is only going to keep increasing in the future, there is need for reliable extraction

  7. Teachers' Theories in Grammar Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Simon

    1999-01-01

    Considers how research into researchers' theories in English language teaching (ELT) can enhance our understanding of instruction and provide the basis of effective teacher-development work. The nature of teachers' theories is illustrated with examples from classroom research on grammar teaching. Discusses a study conducted with five…

  8. GRAMMAR CONSTRUCTION OR PIECEMEAL LEARNING?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    language learning quite often falls far short of complete mastery and is typically non-uniform across learners. The failure of second language learners to achieve ..... At school she received explicit grammar instruction, the emphasis was on vocabulary, reading and writing, and English was frequently used in the classroom.

  9. A Carib grammar and dictionary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Courtz, Hendrik

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation contains a new detailed description of Carib grammar and the most extensive inventory of Carib lexemes and affixes so far. It is based on the work of previous researchers and a decade of field work carried out by the author, mainly in Galibi, a Carib village in eastern

  10. REFERENCE GRAMMAR OF LITERARY DHIMOTIKI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HOUSEHOLDER, FRED W.; AND OTHERS

    BASED ON A TRADITIONAL APPROACH, THIS REFERENCE GRAMMAR OF LITERARY DHIMOTIKI IS DESIGNED TO BE MOST USEFUL TO ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES OR BEGINNING GRADUATE STUDENTS OF GREEK. (DHIMOTIKI, OR DEMOTIC, IS THE POPULAR FORM OF MODERN GREEK.) IN PART I THERE IS AN EXTENSIVE DESCRIPTION OF THE PHONOLOGICAL SYSTEM FOLLOWED BY A DISCUSSION OF THE WRITING…

  11. Strictness Analysis for Attribute Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mads

    1992-01-01

    Attribute grammars may be seen as a (rather specialised) lazy or demand-driven programming language. The ``programs'' in this language take text or parse trees as input and return values of the synthesised attributes to the root as output. From this observation we establish a framework for abstract...

  12. Learnable Classes of Categorial Grammars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Makoto

    Learnability theory is an attempt to illuminate the concept of learnability using a mathematical model of learning. Two models of learning of categorial grammars are examined here: the standard model, in which sentences presented to the learner are flat strings of words, and one in which sentences are presented in the form of functor-argument…

  13. Kent Sakoda Discusses Pidgin Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Kent; Tamura, Eileen H.

    2008-01-01

    For a number of years, Kent Sakoda has been teaching at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa in the Department of Second Language Studies. His course, "Pidgin and Creole English in Hawai'i," is popular among students on campus. He has also taught at Hawai'i Pacific University. Because of his expertise on the grammar of Pidgin (Hawai'i…

  14. GRAMMAR AND GENDER DISCOURSE: NEW PERSPECTIVES FOR THE PORTUGUESE LANGUAGE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Maria Severino Donaio Ruiz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available When language sociointeractionist design comes guide the pedagogical work with language and the slogan becomes the teaching of textual/discursive genres, the Professor of Portuguese as their mother tongue is faced with new challenges, which end up overlapping the old methodological anxieties, especially with regard to grammar teaching. If the stylistic resources used in interactional dynamics operate in compliance with the specifics of each textual/discoursive genre, there is a demand for a reconsideration of the Portuguese teaching canonical practices as their mother tongue: traditional grammar is not enough, we need to consider other facets of language, in order to guarantee the promotion of the development of skills necessary to command of the language by the learner. Thinking about the difficulty in articulating issues of this nature, we propose to reflect about the theoretical and methodological frameworks that enable the convergence of grammar, style, textual/discursive genre and Portuguese language teaching in contemporary times.

  15. Grammar Teaching Revisited: EFL Teachers between Grammar Abstinence and Formal Grammar Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Ahmad; Allahyar, Negah

    2012-01-01

    The study of English language teachers' cognitions and its relationship to teachers' classroom practices have recently been the focus of language teaching and teacher education (Borg, 2006 & 2010). However, rarely have the studies delved into teachers' knowledge about grammar (reviewed by Borg, 2001) or investigated the relationships between…

  16. The Effects of Mood, Cognitive Style, and Cognitive Ability on Implicit Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretz, Jean E.; Totz, Kathryn Sentman; Kaufman, Scott Barry

    2010-01-01

    In an experiment with 109 undergraduates, we examined the effect of mood, cognitive style, and cognitive ability on implicit learning in the Artificial Grammar (AG) and Serial Reaction Time (SRT) tasks. Negative mood facilitated AG learning, but had no significant effect on SRT learning. Rational cognitive style predicted greater learning on both…

  17. Personality Traits and Learning Styles of Secondary School Students in Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djigic, Gordana; Stojiljkovic, Snežana; Markovic, Andrijana

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the personality dimensions and learning styles of secondary school students, attending grammar and technical vocational school. The aim of the study is to examine differences in personality traits and learning styles between students from these types of schools, as well as to determine the predictive power of…

  18. Attribute And-Or Grammar for Joint Parsing of Human Pose, Parts and Attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyoung; Nie, Xiaohan; Zhu, Song-Chun

    2017-07-25

    This paper presents an attribute and-or grammar (A-AOG) model for jointly inferring human body pose and human attributes in a parse graph with attributes augmented to nodes in the hierarchical representation. In contrast to other popular methods in the current literature that train separate classifiers for poses and individual attributes, our method explicitly represents the decomposition and articulation of body parts, and account for the correlations between poses and attributes. The A-AOG model is an amalgamation of three traditional grammar formulations: (i)Phrase structure grammar representing the hierarchical decomposition of the human body from whole to parts; (ii)Dependency grammar modeling the geometric articulation by a kinematic graph of the body pose; and (iii)Attribute grammar accounting for the compatibility relations between different parts in the hierarchy so that their appearances follow a consistent style. The parse graph outputs human detection, pose estimation, and attribute prediction simultaneously, which are intuitive and interpretable. We conduct experiments on two tasks on two datasets, and experimental results demonstrate the advantage of joint modeling in comparison with computing poses and attributes independently. Furthermore, our model obtains better performance over existing methods for both pose estimation and attribute prediction tasks.

  19. Multiword Constructions in the Grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culicover, Peter W; Jackendoff, Ray; Audring, Jenny

    2017-07-01

    There is ample evidence that speakers' linguistic knowledge extends well beyond what can be described in terms of rules of compositional interpretation stated over combinations of single words. We explore a range of multiword constructions (MWCs) to get a handle both on the extent of the phenomenon and on the grammatical constraints that may govern it. We consider idioms of various sorts, collocations, compounds, light verbs, syntactic nuts, and assorted other constructions, as well as morphology. Our conclusion is that MWCs highlight the central role that grammar plays in licensing MWCs in the lexicon and the creation of novel MWCs, and they help to clarify how the lexicon articulates with the rest of the grammar. Copyright © 2017 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  20. Verbal prefixation, construction grammar, and semantic compatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewandowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    ’s Construction Grammar and Langacker’s Cognitive Grammar approach and show that resultative prefixes are not abstract syntactic features, but rather that each prefixed change-of-state construction is based on a specific configuration between the locatum and the location. I demonstrate that the interaction...... between resultative prefixes, alternating verbs, and the more abstract change-of-state variant is driven by semantic coherence. Keywords: resultative prefixes, construction grammar, semantic coherence, locative alternation, Polish...

  1. Grammar Games: A Case for Instructionist Game Models to Enhance Grammar Awareness and Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Brian; Santos, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Based on our own experiences teaching grammar in developmental writing classes and classes not dedicated to writing instruction, along with a history of scholarship that indicates a need for grammar pedagogies (e.g., Dougherty, 2012), instructor-designed grammar games can likely help facilitate learning about these mechanics of writing while…

  2. The minimalist grammar of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastra, Katerina; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2012-01-12

    Language and action have been found to share a common neural basis and in particular a common 'syntax', an analogous hierarchical and compositional organization. While language structure analysis has led to the formulation of different grammatical formalisms and associated discriminative or generative computational models, the structure of action is still elusive and so are the related computational models. However, structuring action has important implications on action learning and generalization, in both human cognition research and computation. In this study, we present a biologically inspired generative grammar of action, which employs the structure-building operations and principles of Chomsky's Minimalist Programme as a reference model. In this grammar, action terminals combine hierarchically into temporal sequences of actions of increasing complexity; the actions are bound with the involved tools and affected objects and are governed by certain goals. We show, how the tool role and the affected-object role of an entity within an action drives the derivation of the action syntax in this grammar and controls recursion, merge and move, the latter being mechanisms that manifest themselves not only in human language, but in human action too.

  3. The minimalist grammar of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastra, Katerina; Aloimonos, Yiannis

    2012-01-01

    Language and action have been found to share a common neural basis and in particular a common ‘syntax’, an analogous hierarchical and compositional organization. While language structure analysis has led to the formulation of different grammatical formalisms and associated discriminative or generative computational models, the structure of action is still elusive and so are the related computational models. However, structuring action has important implications on action learning and generalization, in both human cognition research and computation. In this study, we present a biologically inspired generative grammar of action, which employs the structure-building operations and principles of Chomsky's Minimalist Programme as a reference model. In this grammar, action terminals combine hierarchically into temporal sequences of actions of increasing complexity; the actions are bound with the involved tools and affected objects and are governed by certain goals. We show, how the tool role and the affected-object role of an entity within an action drives the derivation of the action syntax in this grammar and controls recursion, merge and move, the latter being mechanisms that manifest themselves not only in human language, but in human action too. PMID:22106430

  4. INCORPORATING GRAMMAR INTO TRANSLATION CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurendi Wiwoho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the teaching of translation. It is important to lay a strong foundation in translating for the second year students of English Department. The main goal of this study is to identify and improve students‘ grammar awareness and their grammatical adjustment ability especially in translating Indonesian sentences and short paragraphs into English. The data used in this study were students‘ translation assignments in Translation I course at the English Department of the Favulty of Languages and Culture, University of 17 Agustus 1945 Semarang, academic year 2015-2016. The findings of the research showed that the second year students still made a lot of grammatical mistakes especially in translating Indonesian sentences and short paragraphs into English. The greatest problem faced by the students was related with the use of verbs and tenses, followed by other problems related with the use of parts of speech and function words. This implies that incorporating grammar in teaching translation is important, in which students‘ awareness and knowledge of grammar should be taken with care. Therefore, in addition to these findings, a general model of grammatical instruction in translation teaching was presented to be useful for translation teachers.

  5. A Concise Contrastive Grammar of English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte

    Like the first edition, this second revised edition of the workbook is intended to be used together with A Concise Contrastive Grammar of English for Danish Students, which is a systematic and pedagogical introduction to English grammar for Danish students of English at bachelor level. The purpose...... of the workbook is to supply students and teachers with material which can be used in connection with the study of grammar. The workbook is organised so that each chapter in the grammar book matches a chapter in the workbook. There are exercises of many different kinds in the workbook. Some aim at explanation...

  6. Flexible processing and the design of grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sag, Ivan A; Wasow, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    We explore the consequences of letting the incremental and integrative nature of language processing inform the design of competence grammar. What emerges is a view of grammar as a system of local monotonic constraints that provide a direct characterization of the signs (the form-meaning correspondences) of a given language. This "sign-based" conception of grammar has provided precise solutions to the key problems long thought to motivate movement-based analyses, has supported three decades of computational research developing large-scale grammar implementations, and is now beginning to play a role in computational psycholinguistics research that explores the use of underspecification in the incremental computation of partial meanings.

  7. Product Grammars for Alignment and Folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höner Zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L; Stadler, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    We develop a theory of algebraic operations over linear and context-free grammars that makes it possible to combine simple "atomic" grammars operating on single sequences into complex, multi-dimensional grammars. We demonstrate the utility of this framework by constructing the search spaces of complex alignment problems on multiple input sequences explicitly as algebraic expressions of very simple one-dimensional grammars. In particular, we provide a fully worked frameshift-aware, semiglobal DNA-protein alignment algorithm whose grammar is composed of products of small, atomic grammars. The compiler accompanying our theory makes it easy to experiment with the combination of multiple grammars and different operations. Composite grammars can be written out in L(A)T(E)X for documentation and as a guide to implementation of dynamic programming algorithms. An embedding in Haskell as a domain-specific language makes the theory directly accessible to writing and using grammar products without the detour of an external compiler. Software and supplemental files available here: http://www.bioinf. uni-leipzig.de/Software/gramprod/.

  8. Missed periods and other grammar scares how to avoid unplanned and unwanted grammar errors

    CERN Document Server

    Baranick, Jenny

    2012-01-01

    Grammar has finally let its hair down! Unlike uptight grammar books that overwhelm us with every single grammar rule, Missed Periods and Other Grammar Scares is like a bikini: it's fun, flirty, and covers only the most important bits. Its lessons, which are 100 percent free of complicated grammar jargon, have been carefully selected to include today's most common, noticeable errors-the ones that confuse our readers or make them wonder if we are, in fact, smarter than a fifth grader. What is the proper use of an apostrophe? When should an ellipsis be used instead of an em dash? Why do we capita

  9. Identity processing styles and language proficiency among Persian learners of English as a foreign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmjoo, Seyyed Ayatollah; Neissi, Sina

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between identity processing styles and language proficiency in English as foreign language (EFL) was investigated among the Persian EFL learners. 266 Persian candidates taking part in a Ph.D. examination at Shiraz University took part. The Language Proficiency Test was used to measure language proficiency in English. The Identity Styles Inventory was used to measure normative, informational, and diffuse-avoidant identity processing styles. Relationships between normative and informational styles and language proficiency and its subscales (grammar, vocabulary, and reading) were positive and significant. Negative relationships between diffuse-avoidant style and language proficiency and its subscales (grammar, vocabulary, and reading) were observed. There were significant sex differences for diffuse-avoidant style and for vocabulary.

  10. Constructing functional programs for grammar analysis problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuring, J.T.; Swierstra, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the derivation of functional programs for grammar analysis problems, such as the Empty problem and the Reachable problem. Grammar analysis problems can be divided into two classes: top-down problems such as Follow and Reachable, which are described in terms of the contexts of

  11. Studying Grammar in the Technological Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    2012-01-01

    When being a student in grade school as well as in high school (1934-1946), grammar was heavily emphasized in English/language arts classes, particularly in grades four through the senior year in high school. Evidently, teachers and school administrators then saw a theoretical way to assist pupils in writing achievement. Grammar and writing were…

  12. Towards a Pedagogy of Grammar Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jack C.; Reppen, Randi

    2014-01-01

    Grammar can be viewed both as knowledge and as ability. When viewed as knowledge, the focus is on rules for sentence formation. When viewed as ability, the focus is on how grammar is used as a resource in the creation of spoken and written texts. Twelve principles are proposed as the basis for a pedagogy that focusses on acquiring learning to use…

  13. Flexible Processing and the Design of Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sag, Ivan A.; Wasow, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We explore the consequences of letting the incremental and integrative nature of language processing inform the design of competence grammar. What emerges is a view of grammar as a system of local monotonic constraints that provide a direct characterization of the signs (the form-meaning correspondences) of a given language. This…

  14. in the grammar of student writing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    School of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Natal, Durban. Explicit teaching of grammar and improvement in the grammar of student writing. ABSTRACT. This article focuses on the question of whether formal teaching of grammatical constructions results in a change in ESL students' written use of these constructions.

  15. Reading and Grammar Learning through Mobile Phones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shudong; Smith, Simon

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing language-learning project, three years into its development. We examine both the feasibility and the limitations of developing English reading and grammar skills through the interface of mobile phones. Throughout the project, reading and grammar materials were regularly sent to students' mobile phones. Students read…

  16. Grammar-Guided Writing for AAC Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt, Sheri; Magnuson, Tina

    2007-01-01

    A method of grammar-guided writing has been devised to guide graphic sign users through the construction of text messages for use in e-mail and other applications with a remote receiver. The purpose is to promote morphologically and syntactically correct sentences. The available grammatical structures in grammar-guided writing are the highest…

  17. Chamorro Reference Grammar. Pali Language Texts: Micronesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Donald M.; Dungca, Bernadita C.

    This detailed reference grammar of Chamorro, the native Malayo-Polynesian language spoken in Guam and the other Mariana Islands (Saipan, Rota, Tinian), differs from earlier grammars of the language in that: (1) it includes new data; (2) it offers a different interpretation of some of the data based on more recent linguistic concepts; and (3) it is…

  18. Teaching english grammar through interactive methods

    OpenAIRE

    Aminova N.

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted for the effective ways of teaching grammar. Actuality of the theme is justified as it sets conditions for revealing high progress in teaching a foreign language and for developing effective methods which can be helpful for foreign language teachers. Different progressive methods of teaching English grammar are given in this paper as well.

  19. From Attribute Grammars to Constraint Handling Rules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serrano Mena, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41124115X; Hage, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/229637221

    2016-01-01

    Attribute grammars provide a framework to de ne compu- tations over trees, by decorating those trees with attributes. Attribute grammars have been successfully applied in many areas, including compiler construction and natural language processing. In this paper we present a translation of attribute

  20. Grammar and Usage: History and Myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The paper first traces the history of thinking about language from the Greek writers of the fifth century BC to the development of the first Greek grammar in about 100 BC. Since the glories of Ancient Greek literature predate the development of grammar, there is every reason to doubt the received wisdom that one must have an explicit knowledge of…

  1. Controlled Iteration Grammars and Hyper-AFL's

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asveld, P.R.J.

    1975-01-01

    We study $K$-iteration grammars equiped with a control on the application sequence of the substitutions, called $(\\Gamma,K)$-iteration grammars. In fact, the control is a language over the indices of the substitutions, prescribing the specific order in which one has to apply the different

  2. A Prototype Grammar Kit in Prolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Kenneth M.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a prototype of a computerized grammar kit written in PROLOG and designed for children interested in exploring language. PROLOG's advantages for building parsers, generators, translators, and question-answering systems are discussed, and a scenario of a child working on a grammar project using the kit and implementation issues are…

  3. Generalized Categorial Grammar for Unbounded Dependencies Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Luan Viet

    2014-01-01

    Accurate recovery of predicate-argument dependencies is vital for interpretation tasks like information extraction and question answering, and unbounded dependencies may account for a significant portion of the dependencies in any given text. This thesis describes a Generalized Categorial Grammar (GCG) which, like other categorial grammars,…

  4. HIGHER ORDER THINKING IN TEACHING GRAMMAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citra Dewi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper discussed about how to enhance students’ higher order thinking that should be done by teacher in teaching grammar. Usually teaching grammar was boring and has the same way to learn like change the pattern of sentence into positive, negative and introgative while the students’ need more various way to develop their thinking. The outcome of students’ competence in grammar sometimes not sufficient enough when the students’ occured some test international standart like Test of English Foreign Language, International English Language Testing. Whereas in TOEFL test it needed higher order thinking answer, so teacher should develop students’ higher order thingking in daily teaching grammar in order to make the students’ enhance their thinking are higher. The method was used in this paper by using field study based on the experience of teaching grammar. It can be shown by students’ toefl score was less in stucture and written expression. The result of this paper was after teacher gave some treatments to enhance students’ higher order thinking in teaching grammar, the students’ toefl scores are sufficient enough as a part of stucture and written expression. It can concluded that it needed some strategies to enhancce students higher order thinking by teaching grammar it can make students’ higher toefl score. Teachers should be creative and inovative to teach the students’ started from giving the students’ question or test in teaching grammar.

  5. Student Teacher Beliefs on Grammar Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graus, Johan; Coppen, Peter-Arno

    2016-01-01

    The role of grammar teaching in foreign language education is a controversial one both in second language acquisition (SLA) research and language pedagogy and, as a result, a potential source of confusion to student teachers. The objective of this study was to gain insight into the beliefs on grammar teaching of student teachers of English as a…

  6. Research into Practice: Grammar Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This selective review of the second language acquisition and applied linguistics research literature on grammar learning and teaching falls into three categories: where research has had little impact (the non-interface position), modest impact (form-focused instruction), and where it potentially can have a large impact (reconceiving grammar).…

  7. Video Game Based Learning in English Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravelu, G.

    2008-01-01

    The study enlightens the effectiveness of Video Game Based Learning in English Grammar at standard VI. A Video Game package was prepared and it consisted of self-learning activities in play way manner which attracted the minds of the young learners. Chief objective: Find out the effectiveness of Video-Game based learning in English grammar.…

  8. Design grammars as evaluation tools in the first year studio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed S.; Bridges, Alan; Chase, Scott Curland

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a teaching experience conducted and carried out as part of the coursework of first year students. The workshop is the third of three workshops planned to take place during the course of the first year studio, aimed at introducing new ways of thinking and introducing students...... to a new pattern of architectural education. The experiment was planned under the theme of “Evaluation” during the final stage. A grammatical approach was chosen to deliver the methodology in the design studio, based on shape grammars....

  9. Leadership Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val, Carlin; Kemp, Jess

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how a group's dynamic changes under the influence of different leadership styles, and determines what leadership style works best in a large group expedition. The main question identified was "What roles can a leader play in affecting the dynamic of a large group while partaking in a field expedition?" The following…

  10. An Analysis of Spoken Grammar: The Case for Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Corpus-based grammars, notably "Cambridge Grammar of English," give explicit information on the forms and use of native-speaker grammar, including spoken grammar. Native-speaker norms as a necessary goal in language teaching are contested by supporters of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF); however, this article argues for the inclusion of selected…

  11. Pourquoi les exercices de grammaire? (Why Grammar Exercises?)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastuji, Jacqueline

    1977-01-01

    Recent theories and experiementation running the gamut from the absolute necessity of grammar to its uselessness in teaching a language form the basis of this article. Topics covered are: a typology of the grammar exercise; explicit grammar and linguistic competence; grammar exercises responding to real needs. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  12. Explicit and Implicit Grammar Instructions in Higher Learning Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Ayuni Madarina Abdul; Rashid, Radzuwan Ab

    2017-01-01

    Two universally accepted approaches to grammar instruction are explicit and implicit teaching of the grammar. Both approaches have their own strengths and limitations. Educators may face a dilemma whether to teach grammar explicitly or implicitly. This paper aims to provide insights into the educators' beliefs towards grammar teaching in Malaysian…

  13. A Survey of Grammar Instruction from Scholastic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yanghua

    2017-01-01

    The study of grammar has been paid much attention and the grammar instruction becomes an emphasis and key problem in English language teaching and learning. How to instruct students grammar appropriately becomes controversial for some English teachers increasingly. Some linguistics, theorists and teachers hold that the grammar instruction should…

  14. English Grammar and Thai University Students: An Insurmountable Linguistic Battle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengboon, Saksit

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating English grammar knowledge of a group of Thai university students. The three main research questions revolved around their knowledge of English grammar, the kinds of difficulties they had encountered in using the grammar as well as their perceptions of the roles of grammar in using English. The participants were…

  15. Using a Linguistic Theory of Humour in Teaching English Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmajeed, Rufaidah Kamal; Hameed, Sarab Khalil

    2017-01-01

    Teachers who teach a new language grammar do not usually have the time and the proper situation to introduce humour when starting a new topic in grammar. There are many different opinions about teaching grammar. Many teachers seem to believe in the importance of grammar lessons devoted to a study of language rules and practical exercises. Other…

  16. Ambiguity Detection Methods for Context-Free Grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.S. Basten (Bas)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe Meta-Environment enables the creation of grammars using the SDF formalism. From these grammars an SGLR parser can be generated. One of the advantages of these parsers is that they can handle the entire class of context-free grammars (CFGs). The grammar developer does not have to

  17. Unsupervised grammar induction of clinical report sublanguage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kate, Rohit J

    2012-10-05

    Clinical reports are written using a subset of natural language while employing many domain-specific terms; such a language is also known as a sublanguage for a scientific or a technical domain. Different genres of clinical reports use different sublaguages, and in addition, different medical facilities use different medical language conventions. This makes supervised training of a parser for clinical sentences very difficult as it would require expensive annotation effort to adapt to every type of clinical text. In this paper, we present an unsupervised method which automatically induces a grammar and a parser for the sublanguage of a given genre of clinical reports from a corpus with no annotations. In order to capture sentence structures specific to clinical domains, the grammar is induced in terms of semantic classes of clinical terms in addition to part-of-speech tags. Our method induces grammar by minimizing the combined encoding cost of the grammar and the corresponding sentence derivations. The probabilities for the productions of the induced grammar are then learned from the unannotated corpus using an instance of the expectation-maximization algorithm. Our experiments show that the induced grammar is able to parse novel sentences. Using a dataset of discharge summary sentences with no annotations, our method obtains 60.5% F-measure for parse-bracketing on sentences of maximum length 10. By varying a parameter, the method can induce a range of grammars, from very specific to very general, and obtains the best performance in between the two extremes.

  18. Modelling dynamics with context-free grammars

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Huerta, Juan-M.; Jiménez-Hernández, Hugo; Herrera-Navarro, Ana-M.; Hernández-Díaz, Teresa; Terol-Villalobos, Ivan

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a strategy to model the dynamics performed by vehicles in a freeway. The proposal consists on encode the movement as a set of finite states. A watershed-based segmentation is used to localize regions with high-probability of motion. Each state represents a proportion of a camera projection in a two-dimensional space, where each state is associated to a symbol, such that any combination of symbols is expressed as a language. Starting from a sequence of symbols through a linear algorithm a free-context grammar is inferred. This grammar represents a hierarchical view of common sequences observed into the scene. Most probable grammar rules express common rules associated to normal movement behavior. Less probable rules express themselves a way to quantify non-common behaviors and they might need more attention. Finally, all sequences of symbols that does not match with the grammar rules, may express itself uncommon behaviors (abnormal). The grammar inference is built with several sequences of images taken from a freeway. Testing process uses the sequence of symbols emitted by the scenario, matching the grammar rules with common freeway behaviors. The process of detect abnormal/normal behaviors is managed as the task of verify if any word generated by the scenario is recognized by the grammar.

  19. ANTLR Tree Grammar Generator and Extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craymer, Loring

    2005-01-01

    A computer program implements two extensions of ANTLR (Another Tool for Language Recognition), which is a set of software tools for translating source codes between different computing languages. ANTLR supports predicated- LL(k) lexer and parser grammars, a notation for annotating parser grammars to direct tree construction, and predicated tree grammars. [ LL(k) signifies left-right, leftmost derivation with k tokens of look-ahead, referring to certain characteristics of a grammar.] One of the extensions is a syntax for tree transformations. The other extension is the generation of tree grammars from annotated parser or input tree grammars. These extensions can simplify the process of generating source-to-source language translators and they make possible an approach, called "polyphase parsing," to translation between computing languages. The typical approach to translator development is to identify high-level semantic constructs such as "expressions," "declarations," and "definitions" as fundamental building blocks in the grammar specification used for language recognition. The polyphase approach is to lump ambiguous syntactic constructs during parsing and then disambiguate the alternatives in subsequent tree transformation passes. Polyphase parsing is believed to be useful for generating efficient recognizers for C++ and other languages that, like C++, have significant ambiguities.

  20. Associative Cognitive CREED for Successful Grammar Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrias Tri Susanto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This research article reports a qualitative study which was conducted to investigate ways successful EFL learners learned English grammar. The subjects of this research were eight successful EFL learners from six different countries in Asia: China, Indonesia, Japan, South Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam. The data was collected by interviewing each subject in person individually at an agreed time and place. The result showed that all the grammar learning processes described by the subjects were closely linked to the framework of Associative Cognitive CREED. There were also some contributing factors that could be integrally combined salient to the overall grammar learning process. However, interestingly, each subject emphasized different aspects of learning.

  1. Extracting gene pathway relations using a hybrid grammar: the Arizona Relation Parser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Daniel M; Chen, Hsinchun; Su, Hua; Marshall, Byron B

    2004-12-12

    Text-mining research in the biomedical domain has been motivated by the rapid growth of new research findings. Improving the accessibility of findings has potential to speed hypothesis generation. We present the Arizona Relation Parser that differs from other parsers in its use of a broad coverage syntax-semantic hybrid grammar. While syntax grammars have generally been tested over more documents, semantic grammars have outperformed them in precision and recall. We combined access to syntax and semantic information from a single grammar. The parser was trained using 40 PubMed abstracts and then tested using 100 unseen abstracts, half for precision and half for recall. Expert evaluation showed that the parser extracted biologically relevant relations with 89% precision. Recall of expert identified relations with semantic filtering was 35 and 61% before semantic filtering. Such results approach the higher-performing semantic parsers. However, the AZ parser was tested over a greater variety of writing styles and semantic content. Relations extracted from over 600 000 PubMed abstracts are available for retrieval and visualization at http://econport.arizona.edu:8080/NetVis/index.html.

  2. Formal models of grammar: The Minimalist Program and constraint-based grammars – HPSG and LFG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica dos S. Rodrigues

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at briefly presenting the main tendencies associated with the most productive formal models of grammar currently under scrutiny: the Minimalist Program, a recent version of generative linguistics; Lexical Functional Grammar; and Head- Driven Phrase Structure Grammar. A basic picture of the main concerns of these formal models of language emerges from the comparison and contrast between their main objectives, the formal mechanisms they adopt and the kind of research tendency each model represents.

  3. TEACHING GRAMMAR IN WRITING CLASSES IN ORDER TO CREATE A MEANINGFUL GRAMMAR TEACHING AND LEARNING

    OpenAIRE

    Diyantari Diyantari

    2017-01-01

    Learning grammar is often a problem for many students as they often think it is difficult and boring. Learning how to write is also difficult and very challenging. We can combine these two to make grammar learning less boring and more meaningful. When it is learned in a meaningful context, grammar will also be meaningful and will not be considered as boring and complicated sets of rules only. Students will know that by learning grammar they can enhance their writing skills. Vice versa, in the...

  4. Malrotation of the McGhan Style 510 prosthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schots, J.M.; Fechner, M.R.; Hoogbergen, M.M.; Tits, H.W.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anatomically shaped cohesive silicone breast implants are frequently used in aesthetic and reconstructive surgery. After successful results with the Style 410 prosthesis, McGhan (Natrelle, Allergan) introduced the Style 510 prosthesis. After using this novel prosthesis, the authors

  5. Cognitive grammar and aphasic discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Molly; Franklin, Sue

    2016-01-01

    In cognitive grammar (CG), there is no clear division between language and other cognitive processes; all linguistic form is conceptually meaningful. In this pilot study, a CG approach was applied to investigate whether people with aphasia (PWA) have cognitive linguistic difficulty not predicted from traditional, componential models of aphasia. Narrative samples from 22 PWA (6 fluent, 16 non-fluent) were compared with samples from 10 participants without aphasia. Between-group differences were tested statistically. PWA had significant difficulty with temporal sequencing, suggesting problems that are not uniquely linguistic. For some, these problems were doubly dissociated with naming, used as a general measure of severity, which indicates that cognitive linguistic difficulties are not linked with more widespread brain damage. Further investigation may lead to a richer account of aphasia in line with contemporary linguistics and cognitive science approaches.

  6. The Compactness of Construction Grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Zadrozny, W

    1995-01-01

    We present an argument for {\\em construction grammars} based on the minimum description length (MDL) principle (a formal version of the Ockham Razor). The argument consists in using linguistic and computational evidence in setting up a formal model, and then applying the MDL principle to prove its superiority with respect to alternative models. We show that construction-based representations are at least an order of magnitude more compact that the corresponding lexicalized representations of the same linguistic data. The result is significant for our understanding of the relationship between syntax and semantics, and consequently for choosing NLP architectures. For instance, whether the processing should proceed in a pipeline from syntax to semantics to pragmatics, and whether all linguistic information should be combined in a set of constraints. From a broader perspective, this paper does not only argue for a certain model of processing, but also provides a methodology for determining advantages of different...

  7. Vocatives and discourse markers in textualinteractive grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Penhavel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the class of Vocatives and the class of Discourse Markers as proposed within Textualinteractive Grammar, and we try to demonstrate that Vocatives can work as Discourse Markers.

  8. On the Phenomenological Approach to Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Shyrokov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available On the Phenomenological Approach to Grammar Phenomenological foundations for grammar description of the natural language are under considerations. The picture of language world based on the factorization of communication and cognitivity is proposed. The problem of observability-unobservability in linguistics is discussed. The concept of the states of language units is formulated both with its interpretation in the formal definition of the noun's case. System analysis of the complexity in cognitive processes is considered.

  9. On the Phenomenological Approach to Grammar

    OpenAIRE

    Volodymyr Shyrokov; Igor Shevchenko

    2015-01-01

    On the Phenomenological Approach to Grammar Phenomenological foundations for grammar description of the natural language are under considerations. The picture of language world based on the factorization of communication and cognitivity is proposed. The problem of observability-unobservability in linguistics is discussed. The concept of the states of language units is formulated both with its interpretation in the formal definition of the noun's case. System analysis of the complexity in ...

  10. Encoding Frequency Information in Lexicalized Grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, J; Carroll, John; Weir, David

    1997-01-01

    We address the issue of how to associate frequency information with lexicalized grammar formalisms, using Lexicalized Tree Adjoining Grammar as a representative framework. We consider systematically a number of alternative probabilistic frameworks, evaluating their adequacy from both a theoretical and empirical perspective using data from existing large treebanks. We also propose three orthogonal approaches for backing off probability estimates to cope with the large number of parameters involved.

  11. Continuation Passing Combinators for Parsing Precedence Grammars

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Steve

    1994-01-01

    We describe a scheme for constructing parsers for precedence grammars based on the combinators described by Hutton. The new combinators provide a robust method for building parsers and help avoid the possibility of a non-terminating parser. Efficiency is improved via an optimisation to the grammar. A number of approaches to the problem are described - the most elegant and efficient method is based on continuation passing. A parser for the expression part of the C programming language is prese...

  12. Incremental Parser Generation for Tree Adjoining Grammars

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Anoop

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the incremental generation of parse tables for the LR-type parsing of Tree Adjoining Languages (TALs). The algorithm presented handles modifications to the input grammar by updating the parser generated so far. In this paper, a lazy generation of LR-type parsers for TALs is defined in which parse tables are created by need while parsing. We then describe an incremental parser generator for TALs which responds to modification of the input grammar by updating parse tables b...

  13. Faculty application of the American Psychological Association style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Gwen Goetz

    2009-10-01

    This article explores current faculty methods with the application and evaluation of the American Psychological Association (APA) style. Specific aims were to determine concerns related to APA style, review faculty grading practices, identify institutional resources, and report potential solutions for improving application of APA style. A survey with an exploratory descriptive research design was developed and distributed online to academic chairs and deans, requesting their support in distributing the survey to their faculty. Responses (N = 704) were grouped into five categories: departmental and personal concerns; faculty grading practices; institutional resources; format, writing style, and grammar; and suggestions and potential solutions. Sixty percent reported that application and evaluation of APA style is a concern in their department. Content analysis identified four categories as proposed solutions: consistency, education, resources, and dialogue. On the basis of the feedback of the participants, the CRED program is proposed for the issues that were identified. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Grammar-based Automatic 3D Model Reconstruction from Terrestrial Laser Scanning Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q.; Helmholz, P.; Belton, D.; West, G.

    2014-04-01

    The automatic reconstruction of 3D buildings has been an important research topic during the last years. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to automatically reconstruct the 3D building models from segmented data based on pre-defined formal grammar and rules. Such segmented data can be extracted e.g. from terrestrial or mobile laser scanning devices. Two steps are considered in detail. The first step is to transform the segmented data into 3D shapes, for instance using the DXF (Drawing Exchange Format) format which is a CAD data file format used for data interchange between AutoCAD and other program. Second, we develop a formal grammar to describe the building model structure and integrate the pre-defined grammars into the reconstruction process. Depending on the different segmented data, the selected grammar and rules are applied to drive the reconstruction process in an automatic manner. Compared with other existing approaches, our proposed method allows the model reconstruction directly from 3D shapes and takes the whole building into account.

  15. Grammar, Punctuation, and Capitalization: a Handbook for Technical Writers and Editors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccaskill, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Writing problems are addressed which are often encountered in technical documents and preferences are indicated (Langley's) when authorities do not agree. It is directed toward professional writers, editors, and proofreaders. Those whose profession lies in other areas (for example, research or management), but who have occasion to write or review others' writing will also find this information useful. A functional attitude toward grammar and punctuation is presented. Chapter 1 on grammar presents grammatical problems related to each part of speech. Chapter 2 on sentence structure concerns syntax, that is, effective arrangement of words, with emphasis on methods of revision to improve writing effectiveness. Chapter 3 addresses punctuation marks, presenting their function, situations when they are required or incorrect, and situations when they are appropriate but optional. Chapter 4 presents capitalization, which is mostly a matter of editorial style and preference rather than a matter of generally accepted rules. An index and glossary are included.

  16. Problem-Based Learning to Improve Students’ Grammar Competence

    OpenAIRE

    Mukminatus Zuhriyah

    2017-01-01

    Grammar becomes one of the subjects studied in all Indonesian English Department. It is because grammar has the important role in all English skills. Grammar makes those four English skills meaningful. Somebody can be said as a master of English when he or she also masters grammar. Unfortunately, learning grammar is not as easy as what we think. It needs the effective method that can make the learners motivated and active in learning as well as in applying the grammar in the real life. Proble...

  17. Syntactic Functions in Functional Discourse Grammar and Role and Reference Grammar: An Evaluative Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Christopher S.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the treatment of syntactic functions, and more particularly those traditionally labelled as Subject and Object, in Functional Discourse Grammar and Role and Reference Grammar. Relevant aspects of the overall structure of the two theories are briefly described. The concept of alignment between levels of the…

  18. Missionary Pragmalinguistics: Father Diego Luis de Sanvitores’ grammar within the tradition of Philippine grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkler, A.P.

    2016-01-01

    The grammar written in Latin, in 1668, by the Jesuit missionary Father Diego Luis de Sanvitores (1627-1672) is the oldest description we have of Chamorro, a language spoken on the Mariana islands. The grammar received a number of bad reviews and as a consequence has become neglected and almost

  19. Conceptualisations of "Grammar Teaching": L1 English Teachers' Beliefs about Teaching Grammar for Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Annabel Mary

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of L1 English teachers' conceptual and evaluative beliefs about teaching grammar, one strand of a larger Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)-funded investigation into the impact of contextualised grammar teaching [RES-062-23-0775]. Thirty-one teachers in English secondary schools were interviewed…

  20. Pronominal expression rule ordering in Danish and the question of a discourse grammar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lisbeth Falster

    2005-01-01

    Dansk, funktionel grammatik, discourse grammar, personlige pronominer, modtageorientering, referens......Dansk, funktionel grammatik, discourse grammar, personlige pronominer, modtageorientering, referens...

  1. Body shape and life style of the extinct Balearic dormouse Hypnomys (Rodentia, Gliridae): new evidence from the study of associated skeletons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Pere; Alcover, Josep A; Michaux, Jacques J; Hautier, Lionel; Hutterer, Rainer

    2010-12-31

    Hypnomys is a genus of Gliridae (Rodentia) that occurred in the Balearic Islands until Late Holocene. Recent finding of a complete skeleton of the chronospecies H. morpheus (Late Pleistocene-Early Holocene) and two articulated skeletons of H. cf. onicensis (Late Pliocene) allowed the inference of body size and the calculation of several postcranial indexes. We also performed a Factorial Discriminant Analysis (FDA) in order to evaluate locomotory behaviour and body shape of the taxa. Using allometric models based on skull and tooth measurements, we calculated a body weight between 173 and 284 g for H. morpheus, and direct measurements of articulated skeletons yielded a Head and Body Length (HBL) of 179 mm and a Total Body Length of 295 mm for this species. In addition to the generally higher robustness of postcranial bones already recorded by previous authors, H. morpheus, similar to Canariomys tamarani, another extinct island species, displayed elongated zygopodium bones of the limbs and a wider distal humerus and femur than in an extant related taxon, Eliomys quercinus. Indexes indicated that Hypnomys was more terrestrial and had greater fossorial abilities than E. quercinus. This was also corroborated by a Discriminant Analysis, although no clear additional inference of locomotory abilities could be calculated.

  2. The Tower of Babel and the Teaching of Grammar: Writing Instruction for a New Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinsen, Amy

    2000-01-01

    Considers the teaching of grammar and its importance in the writing classroom. Examines what grammar is; why writing instruction has moved away from grammar; differing opinions regarding grammar and writing instruction; and grammar's place in the writing classroom of the new century. Argues that grammar must be applied to students' own writing.…

  3. Unsupervised grammar induction of clinical report sublanguage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Rohit J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical reports are written using a subset of natural language while employing many domain-specific terms; such a language is also known as a sublanguage for a scientific or a technical domain. Different genres of clinical reports use different sublaguages, and in addition, different medical facilities use different medical language conventions. This makes supervised training of a parser for clinical sentences very difficult as it would require expensive annotation effort to adapt to every type of clinical text. Methods In this paper, we present an unsupervised method which automatically induces a grammar and a parser for the sublanguage of a given genre of clinical reports from a corpus with no annotations. In order to capture sentence structures specific to clinical domains, the grammar is induced in terms of semantic classes of clinical terms in addition to part-of-speech tags. Our method induces grammar by minimizing the combined encoding cost of the grammar and the corresponding sentence derivations. The probabilities for the productions of the induced grammar are then learned from the unannotated corpus using an instance of the expectation-maximization algorithm. Results Our experiments show that the induced grammar is able to parse novel sentences. Using a dataset of discharge summary sentences with no annotations, our method obtains 60.5% F-measure for parse-bracketing on sentences of maximum length 10. By varying a parameter, the method can induce a range of grammars, from very specific to very general, and obtains the best performance in between the two extremes.

  4. Style Wars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Postmodernismen er kommet på museum i Victoria and Alberts stort anlagte udstilling Postmodernism. Style and Subversion 1970-1990. Reportage fra en udstilling, der spænder fra filosofi til firserpop og tager den nære fortid på museum....

  5. A new variant of Petri net controlled grammars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Nurhidaya Mohamad; Turaev, Sherzod; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2015-10-01

    A Petri net controlled grammar is a Petri net with respect to a context-free grammar where the successful derivations of the grammar can be simulated using the occurrence sequences of the net. In this paper, we introduce a new variant of Petri net controlled grammars, called a place-labeled Petri net controlled grammar, which is a context-free grammar equipped with a Petri net and a function which maps places of the net to productions of the grammar. The language consists of all terminal strings that can be obtained by parallelly applying multisets of the rules which are the images of the sets of the input places of transitions in a successful occurrence sequence of the Petri net. We study the effect of the different labeling strategies to the computational power and establish lower and upper bounds for the generative capacity of place-labeled Petri net controlled grammars.

  6. The chemists' style of thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaude-Vincent, Bernadette

    2009-12-01

    This paper discusses the relevance of the notion of "styles of scientific thinking" introduced by Alistair Crombie and revisited by Ian Hacking, for understanding how chemistry shaped its identity. Although neither Crombie nor Hacking applied this notion to individual disciplines, it seems appropriate to use it in the case of chemistry because it helps to address a puzzling issue: how did chemists manage to shape an identity of their own, despite shifting territories and theoretical transformations? Following a presentation of the notion of style, I will argue that the stable identity of chemistry is rooted in laboratory practices, which determined the specific questions that chemists put to nature as well as the answers to their questions. The "chemical style of thinking" is characterized by (i) a specific way of knowing through making, (ii) the concern with individual materials rather than matter in general and (iii) a specific commitment to nature.

  7. Style in knitted textiles and fashion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štemberger, M.; Pavko-Čuden, A.

    2017-10-01

    The presented research relates the basic elements of the art theory with the concept of style and fashion design. The objective of the research was to determine how style is manifested in knitting in different periods of fashion seasons. The collections of three designers were compared: Missoni, Issey Miyake and Sonia Rykiel, in four different seasons in three different years. The basic artistic elements used in the presented research were: point, line, light-dark and colour together with syntactic rules. A combination of different elements and syntactic rules refers to different artistic languages, which have their own artistic grammar, i.e. a different style. All three investigated fashion designers used knitting in their collections as a significant element which defined their style. Different knitting technologies as well as different yarns made of synthetic or natural fibres in all colour spectra significantly influence the surface of a knitted fabric. Even when the technology is the same, the use of different materials, structures, colours, etc. creates various unique surfaces. The method used in the presented research was a style matrix which is developed from the axiomatic system. Only the part dealing with the language of fine arts and the pictorial speech – the style of a certain designer and a certain work of art/knitted fabric was used. After the selected three designers were examined through all the periods, it was concluded that each designer can be characterised by his own style. Despite the influencing fashion trends, all the compared designers still retained their own style, their own techniques, their own inspirations.

  8. Bottom-up grammar analysis : a functional formulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeuring, J.T.; Swierstra, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses bottom-up grammar analysis problems such as te EMPTY problem and the FIRST problem. It defines a general class of bottom-up grammar analysis problems, and from this definition it derives a functional program for performing bottom-up grammar analysis. The derivation is purely

  9. Spoken Grammar and Its Role in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses key issues and considerations for teachers wanting to incorporate spoken grammar activities into their own teaching and also focuses on six common features of spoken grammar, with practical activities and suggestions for teaching them in the language classroom. The hope is that this discussion of spoken grammar and its place…

  10. Indirect Positive Evidence in the Acquisition of a Subset Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Misha; Goad, Heather

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes that second language learners can use indirect positive evidence (IPE) to acquire a phonological grammar that is a subset of their L1 grammar. IPE is evidence from errors in the learner's L1 made by native speakers of the learner's L2. It has been assumed that subset grammars may be acquired using direct or indirect negative…

  11. The structure of modern standard French a student grammar

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Maj-Britt Mosegaard

    2016-01-01

    This book is an advanced student's grammar of French that integrates traditional grammar with knowledge and insights from modern linguistics. It assumes some prior knowledge of French grammar but is designed to be accessible to those with no background in linguistics.

  12. LR-parsing of Extended Context-free Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann; Kristensen, Bent Bruun

    1976-01-01

    To improve the readability of a grammar it is common to use extended context free grammars (ECFGs) which are context free grammars (CFGs) extended with the repetition operator (*), the alternation operator (¦) and parentheses to express the right hand sides of the productions. The topic treated h...

  13. Pupils' Word Choices and the Teaching of Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Dominic

    2006-01-01

    The idea that formal grammar teaching leads to improvements in school pupils' writing has been a popular one. However, the robust and extensive evidence base shows that this is not the case. Despite this, policy initiatives have continued to suggest that grammar teaching does improve pupils' writing: the "Grammar for Writing" resource is…

  14. Structure preserving transformations on non-left-recursive grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurer, H.A.; Nijholt, Antinus

    We will be concerned with grammar covers, The first part of this paper presents a general framework for covers. The second part introduces a transformation from nonleft-recursive grammars to grammars in Greibach normal form. An investigation of the structure preserving properties of this

  15. When Is a Verb? Using Functional Grammar to Teach Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearn, Leif; Farnan, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    While evidence shows that grammar study focused on identification, description, and definition (IDD) fails to enhance writing performance, the grammar most students study remains focused on the IDD tradition. We taught a functional grammar that featured what words do in sentences, rather than what words are called and how they are defined, to two…

  16. Ways of Knowing: Writing with Grammar in Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, Debra

    2005-01-01

    In the international context of concerns about standards in writing, this article addresses the role of grammar in the teaching of writing. It considers both current and historical perspectives on the teaching of grammar and offers a critique of research which attempts to determine the impact of grammar teaching on writing, but which does not…

  17. Linearly Ordered Attribute Grammar Scheduling Using SAT-Solving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bransen, Jeroen; van Binsbergen, L.Thomas; Claessen, Koen; Dijkstra, Atze

    2015-01-01

    Many computations over trees can be specified using attribute grammars. Compilers for attribute grammars need to find an evaluation order (or schedule) in order to generate efficient code. For the class of linearly ordered attribute grammars such a schedule can be found statically, but this problem

  18. Adaptable Grammars for Non-Context-Free Languages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2009-01-01

    We consider, as an alternative to traditional approaches for describing non-context-free languages, the use of grammars in which application of grammar rules themselves control the creation or modification of grammar rules. This principle is shown to capture, in a concise way, standard example la...

  19. On the Generating Power of Regularly Controlled Bidirectional Grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asveld, P.R.J.; Hogendorp, J.A.; Hogendorp, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    RCB-grammars or regularly controlled bidirectional grammars are context-free grammars of which the rules can be used in a productive and in a reductive fashion. In addition, the application of these rules is controlled by a regular language. Several modes of derivation can be distinguished for this

  20. On the Generating Power of Regularly Controlled Bidirectional Grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asveld, P.R.J.; Hogendorp, Jan Anne

    1989-01-01

    RCB-grammars or regularly controlled bidirectional grammars are context-free grammars of which the rules can be used in a productive and in a reductive fashion. In addition, the application of these rules is controlled by a regular language. Several modes of derivation can be distinguished for this

  1. Vocabulary and Grammar: Critical Content for Critical Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael Clay

    2002-01-01

    This article argues that direct instruction of grammar and vocabulary must be restored to their necessary place in language arts programs for gifted children, who need educated vocabularies and grammar competence of exceptional quality. It discusses strategies for instructing vocabulary and the benefits of learning grammar. (Contains references.)…

  2. Difficulties in Teaching and Learning Grammar in an EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mekhlafi, Abdu Mohammed; Nagaratnam, Ramani Perur

    2011-01-01

    The role of grammar instruction in an ESL/EFL context has been for decades a major issue for students and teachers alike. Researchers have debated whether grammar should be taught in the classroom and students, for their part, have generally looked upon grammar instruction as a necessary evil at best, and an avoidable burden at worst. The paper…

  3. Playful Explicitness with Grammar: A Pedagogy for Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, Debra; Jones, Susan; Watson, Annabel; Lines, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The place of grammar within the teaching of writing has long been contested and successive research studies have indicated no correlation between grammar teaching and writing attainment. However, a recent study has shown a significant positive impact on writing outcomes when the grammar input is intrinsically linked to the demands of the writing…

  4. Teaching Grammar and Testing Grammar in the English Primary School: The Impact on Teachers and Their Teaching of the Grammar Element of the Statutory Test in Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar (SPaG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safford, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    The research examined the impact on teachers of the grammar element of a new statutory test in Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar (SPaG) in primary schools in England. The research aimed to evaluate the nature and the extent of changes to the teaching of grammar and to wider literacy teaching since the introduction of the test in 2013. The research…

  5. Web Exclusive--The Case for Not Teaching Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwagerman, Sean

    2012-01-01

    The value of grammar instruction in improving students' writing has been debated for at least 150 years, and is showing no signs of tiring. But would teaching grammar actually improve writing? In fact, study after study has shown that the study of grammar does not translate to improved student writing. Indeed, the basic skills of writing are not…

  6. Grammars with two-sided contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Barash

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In a recent paper (M. Barash, A. Okhotin, "Defining contexts in context-free grammars", LATA 2012, the authors introduced an extension of the context-free grammars equipped with an operator for referring to the left context of the substring being defined. This paper proposes a more general model, in which context specifications may be two-sided, that is, both the left and the right contexts can be specified by the corresponding operators. The paper gives the definitions and establishes the basic theory of such grammars, leading to a normal form and a parsing algorithm working in time O(n^4, where n is the length of the input string.

  7. Modularity and derivation in Functional Discourse Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel GARCÍA VELASCO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Functional Discourse Grammar (FDG is a typologically-based theory of language structure which is organized in levels, layers and components. In this paper, I will claim that FDG is modular in Sadock’s sense, as it presents four independent levels of representation with their own linguistic primitives each. For modular grammars, the relation between the different levels (more technically, the nature of the interfaces is a central issue. It will be shown that FDG is a top-down grammar which follows two basic principles in its dynamic implementation: Depth-first and Maximal depth. Together with external constraints, these principles conspire to create linguistic representations which are psychologically adequate and which allow levels to be circumvented if necessary, thus simplifying representations and creating mismatches among them.

  8. The autonomy of grammar and semantic internalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobler Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In his post-Tractatus work on natural language use, Wittgenstein defended the notion of what he dubbed the autonomy of grammar. According to this thought, grammar - or semantics, in a more recent idiom - is essentially autonomous from metaphysical considerations, and is not answerable to the nature of things. The argument has several related incarnations in Wittgenstein’s post-Tractatus writings, and has given rise to a number of important insights, both critical and constructive. In this paper I will argue for a potential connection between Wittgenstein’s autonomy argument and some more recent internalist arguments for the autonomy of semantics. My main motivation for establishing this connection comes from the fact that the later Wittgenstein’s comments on grammar and meaning stand in opposition to some of the core assumptions of semantic externalism.

  9. Reading and grammar learning through mobile phones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shudong Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an ongoing language-learning project, three years into its development. We examine both the feasibility and the limitations of developing English reading and grammar skills through the interface of mobile phones. Throughout the project, reading and grammar materials were regularly sent to students’ mobile phones. Students read or took part in any aspect of the materials that appealed to them. Information gathered from participants and server logs indicate that reading and learning grammar using mobile devices is regarded as a positive language experience. However, the data also indicate that the success of any mobile learning project could be limited unless certain criteria are applied. This includes (a providing engaging learning materials that are neither too long nor overly-demanding; (b a proper degree of teacher monitoring; (c student involvement; (d the need for incentives; (e a respect for privacy; and (f a safe and secure mobile-learning technical environment.

  10. Workshops Increase Students' Proficiency at Identifying General and APA-Style Writing Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Terrence D.; Marek, Pam

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of 20- to 30-min workshops on recognition of errors in American Psychological Association-style writing, 58 introductory psychology students attended one of the three workshops (on grammar, mechanics, or references) and completed error recognition tests (pretest, initial posttest, and three follow-up tests). As a…

  11. Followership Styles and Job Satisfaction in Secondary School Teachers in Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinic, Darko; Grubor, Jelena; Brulic, Lida

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of followership styles, and their connection with job satisfaction and satisfaction with extrinsic/intrinsic aspects of work in teachers. The sample included 206 secondary school teachers of three grammar and three vocational schools in three towns in Serbia. The results indicate that the most…

  12. Incremental Refinement of FAÇADE Models with Attribute Grammar from 3d Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehbi, Y.; Staat, C.; Mandtler, L.; Pl¨umer, L.

    2016-06-01

    Data acquisition using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has gotten more and more attention over the last years. Especially in the field of building reconstruction the incremental interpretation of such data is a demanding task. In this context formal grammars play an important role for the top-down identification and reconstruction of building objects. Up to now, the available approaches expect offline data in order to parse an a-priori known grammar. For mapping on demand an on the fly reconstruction based on UAV data is required. An incremental interpretation of the data stream is inevitable. This paper presents an incremental parser of grammar rules for an automatic 3D building reconstruction. The parser enables a model refinement based on new observations with respect to a weighted attribute context-free grammar (WACFG). The falsification or rejection of hypotheses is supported as well. The parser can deal with and adapt available parse trees acquired from previous interpretations or predictions. Parse trees derived so far are updated in an iterative way using transformation rules. A diagnostic step searches for mismatches between current and new nodes. Prior knowledge on façades is incorporated. It is given by probability densities as well as architectural patterns. Since we cannot always assume normal distributions, the derivation of location and shape parameters of building objects is based on a kernel density estimation (KDE). While the level of detail is continuously improved, the geometrical, semantic and topological consistency is ensured.

  13. THE GRAMMAR OF DISNEY LONG ANIMATIONS: A STRUCTURALIST READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyrna Santosa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Treating several animated films as texts, the analysis of this particular genre of entertainment is using structuralist narratology, which is applied to establish a general grammar of Disney long animations by revealing the underlying rules governing the tilm narratives. Discussing the typical characters and actions, the construction of "function", and the significant actions which shape the story, this study reveals the six actant/roles based on the prescribed characterization, three basic patterns of how each actant is related to one another, and the twelve sets of basic arrangement of functions as the single basic structure of all Disney long animations. This study proves how loyal and consistent the creators of Disney long animations are toward the underlying basic structure of the story.

  14. Teaching Children Foreign-Language Grammar: Are Authentic Materials Appropriate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Malova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses authentic materials as a resource for teaching grammar to young learners. Difficulties in foreign-language grammar learning for Russian pupils are presented, and typical challenges are described. The paper provides a pre-/post-intervention study of the development of children’s grammar skills. The research question is, “How does one use authentic materials for teaching grammar in an English as a foreign language (EFL classroom?” A qualitative method is used to assess the learning outcomes of using authentic materials in teaching grammar to eight–nine-year-old pupils (the second year of studying English.

  15. Transition-based combinatory categorial grammar parsing for English and Hindi

    OpenAIRE

    Ambati, Bharat Ram

    2016-01-01

    Given a natural language sentence, parsing is the task of assigning it a grammatical structure, according to the rules within a particular grammar formalism. Different grammar formalisms like Dependency Grammar, Phrase Structure Grammar, Combinatory Categorial Grammar, Tree Adjoining Grammar are explored in the literature for parsing. For example, given a sentence like “John ate an apple”, parsers based on the widely used dependency grammars find grammatical relations, such as ...

  16. A Unified Framework to Compute over Tree Synchronized Grammars and Primal Grammars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Saubion

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Tree languages are powerful tools for the representation and schematization of infinite sets of terms for various purposes (unification theory, verification and specification .... In order to extend the regular tree language framework, more complex formalisms have been developed. In this paper, we focus on Tree Synchronized Grammars and Primal Grammars which introduce specific control structures to represent non regular sets of terms. We propose a common unified framework in order to achieve the membership test for these particular languages. Thanks to a proof system, we provide a full operational framework, that allows us to transform tree grammars into Prolog programs (as it already exists for word grammars with DCG whose goal is to recognize terms of the corresponding language.

  17. A Grammar Correction Algorithm – Deep Parsing and Minimal Corrections for a Grammar Checker

    OpenAIRE

    Clément, Lionel; Gerdes, Kim; Marlet, Renaud

    2009-01-01

    International audience; This article presents the central algorithm of an open system for grammar checking, based on deep parsing. The grammatical specification is a context-free grammar with flat feature structures. After a shared-forest analysis where feature agreement constraints are relaxed, error detection globally minimizes the number of corrections and alternative correct sentences are automatically proposed in an order of plausibility reflecting the number of changes made to the origi...

  18. A Glossary of Grammar and Linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeish, Andrew

    A guide to linguistic analysis and to the three co-existing grammars--conventional, structural, and transformational--this glossary, which is directed to the beginning student, provides descriptions of terms and topics as they are used in their most frequent and familiar senses. Encyclopedic descriptions and information about the referent are…

  19. Assessing Primary Literacy through Grammar Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, John

    2017-01-01

    Originally an editorial for "English in Education," this short article summarises key issues in the imposition of a separate test for grammar, punctuation and spelling. It illustrates the poor foundations, lack of clarity and distortion of curriculum which invalidate the test.

  20. Workspace theorems for regular-controlled grammars

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meduna, Alexander; Zemek, Petr

    2011-01-01

    ... grammar H , there is a positive integer k such that H generates every sentence y ∈ L(H) by a derivation in which every sentential form x contains atmost (k−1)|x|/k occurrences of nontermina...

  1. Ontological semantics in modified categorial grammar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szymczak, Bartlomiej Antoni

    2009-01-01

    Categorial Grammar is a well established tool for describing natural language semantics. In the current paper we discuss some of its drawbacks and how it could be extended to overcome them. We use the extended version for deriving ontological semantics from text. A proof-of-concept implementation...

  2. Grammar Schools: Brief Flowering of Social Mobility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Grammar schools are increasingly remembered, especially by right-wing ideologues, as the agents of a "brief flowering" of post-war social mobility. This article presents statistical, documentary and interview evidence of secondary education in the eleven plus era, and finds nothing to justify the claim that selective schools produced a general…

  3. A Grammar of Spoken Brazilian Portuguese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Earl W.

    This is a first-year text of Portuguese grammar based on the Portuguese of moderately educated Brazilians from the area around Rio de Janeiro. Spoken idiomatic usage is emphasized. An important innovation is found in the presentation of verb tenses; they are presented in the order in which the native speaker learns them. The text is intended to…

  4. A Basic Reference Grammar of Slovene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbyshire, William W.

    This reference grammar is intended for adult speakers of English who are at the elementary through the intermediate levels of acquisition of the Slovene language. It begins with a brief description of the Slovene language, its major dialects and its place among the Slavic languages. Information on the alphabet, pronunciation, and spelling rules…

  5. A DESCRIPTIVE INDONESIAN GRAMMAR--PRELIMINARY EDITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DYEN, ISIDORE

    THIS PRELIMINARY EDITION COMPRISES A DESCRIPTIVE GRAMMAR OF INDONESIAN (BAHASA INDONESIA), THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGE OF THE REPUBLIC OF INDONESIA. THE THREE SECTIONS--PHONOLOGY, SYNTAX, AND MORPHOLOGY--PRESENT A COMPREHENSIVE LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS OF INDONESIAN, WITH OCCASIONAL CONTRASTIVE REFERENCE TO MALAY, JAVANESE, SUNDANESE, AND SUMATRAN. THIS…

  6. On defining semantics of extended attribute grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ole Lehrmann

    1980-01-01

    Knuth has introduced attribute grammars (AGs) as a tool to define the semanitcs of context-free languages. The use of AGs in connection with programming language definitions has mostly been to define the context-sensitive syntax of the language and to define a translation in code for a hypothetic...

  7. What Is a Rule of Grammar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardiere, Donna

    2014-01-01

    This article offers commentary on the Multiple Grammars (MG) language acquisition theory proposed by Luiz Amaral and Tom Roeper in this issue. It argues that more precise definitions are needed for the terms "rule," "simple," and "productive." Topics discussed include Amaral and Roeper's verb second (V2) rule,…

  8. A Grammar Library for Information Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sanghoun

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation makes substantial contributions to both the theoretical and computational treatment of information structure, with an eye toward creating natural language processing applications such as multilingual machine translation systems. The aim of the present dissertation is to create a grammar library of information structure for the…

  9. Interpretation and reduction of attribute grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filè, Gilberto

    1983-01-01

    An attribute grammar (AG) is in reduced form if in all its derivation trees every attribute contributes to the translation. We prove that, eventhough AG are generally not in reduced form, they can be reduced, i.e., put into reduced form, without modifying their translations. This is shown first for

  10. Grammar success in 20 minutes a day

    CERN Document Server

    Express, Learning

    2013-01-01

    Thorough and concise, Grammar Success in 20 Minutes a Day, covers all the essentials, including common and proper nouns; personal, reflexive, and demonstrative pronouns; regular and irregular verbs; adjectives, adverbs, misplaced modifiers, prepositions, subordinate and insubordinate clauses; coordinating and correlating conjunctions; compound sentences; and punctuation.

  11. Commentary: Revealing the workings of universal grammar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 28; Issue 5. Commentary: Revealing the workings of universal grammar. Mohinish Shukla. Volume 28 Issue 5 September 2003 pp 535-537. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/028/05/0535-0537. Author Affiliations.

  12. What Research Tells Us about Teaching Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael W.; Wilhelm, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    The authors offer research studies and other documented evidence that teaching grammar without a meaningful context does not improve student writing, largely because that approach does not address the root causes of errors. Several resources that support this position and offer more productive strategies are summarized, including the authors'…

  13. Eye Movements in Implicit Artificial Grammar Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana; Inácio, Filomena; Folia, Vasiliki; Petersson, Karl Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Artificial grammar learning (AGL) has been probed with forced-choice behavioral tests (active tests). Recent attempts to probe the outcomes of learning (implicitly acquired knowledge) with eye-movement responses (passive tests) have shown null results. However, these latter studies have not tested for sensitivity effects, for example, increased…

  14. Enriching a Descriptive Grammar with Treebank Queries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, G.; van Koppen, J.M.; Landsbergen, Frank; Odijk, J.E.J.M.; van der Wouden, Ton; van de Camp, Matje

    2015-01-01

    The Syntax of Dutch (SoD) is a descriptive and detailed grammar of Dutch, that provides data for many issues raised in linguistic theory. We present the results of a pilot project that investigated the possibility of enriching the online version of the text with links to queries that provide

  15. Interactive Russian Grammar: The Case System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimma Gam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available My paper addresses a problem many of us in North American college language programs confront regularly, the solution to which regularly and frustratingly remains just out of our reach. I refer to the teaching of the most basic and most crucial element of Russian grammar, namely, its case system, and teaching it to our students whose native language, English, does not have such a system. As I teach the Russian cases, I see vividly the disconnect between grammar presented for students (simplified, episodic, based on the "pick it up along the way" principle and the learned papers on Russian grammar by linguists, which are barely comprehensible to a non-linguist. Materials in the middle are lacking-materials to help a literature professor acting as a "de facto" language instructor understand and address the needs of students as they learn this crucial segment of basic Russian grammar. This core element of Russian grammar is presented to students in the first year of college language study, is revisited in the second year, and very often by the third year students either manage to completely block it out from their memory (as if it were some traumatic experience that happened "a long time ago"-that is, before .summer break-but most importantly due to the lack of practice or demonstrate a partial or even complete lack of understanding or misunderstanding of this system forcing us to deal with it again in the third year. Not only is it frustrating for both the students and the language instructor; but from the point of view of their overall proficiency, the lack of control of the case system holds our students back. There can be no talk of advanced language proficiency without a complete and automatic mastery of this basic system. Unfortunately, regardless of the specific textbooks used, the students very often manage not to have a general idea and mastery of this system even by the third year of study.

  16. Leadership: Four Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, W. C.

    2005-01-01

    The Four Styles narrative of Leadership is written in three sections: (1) Overview of Leadership Styles; (2) Analysis of Leadership Styles; and (3) Applications of Leadership Styles. While the primary foundation for its development was generated from more than 30 years of research and studying leadership styles in education, the secondary…

  17. Affective Style, Humor Styles and Happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Ford

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the relationships between dispositional approach and avoidance motives, humor styles, and happiness. In keeping with previous research, approach motives and the two positive humor styles (self-enhancing and affiliative positively correlated with happiness, whereas avoidance motives and the two negative humor styles (self-defeating and aggressive negatively correlated with happiness. Also, we found support for three new hypotheses. First, approach motives correlated positively with self-enhancing and affiliative humor styles. Second, avoidance motives correlated positively with self-defeating humor style, and third, the positive relationship between approach motives and happiness was mediated by self-enhancing humor style.

  18. Ch(k) grammars: A characterization of LL(k) languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becvar, J.; Nijholt, Antinus; Soisalon-Soininen, E.

    In this paper we introduce the class of so called Ch(k) grammars [pronounced "chain k grammars"]. This class of grammars is properly contained in the class of LR(k) grammars and it properly contains the LL(k) grammars. However, the family of Ch[k) languages coincides with the family of LL(k)

  19. Nigel: A Systemic Grammar for Text Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    in the logical component). Henrici [ Henrici 811 observes that "linear recursion is rather more troublesome" than recursion through embedding (which...notation defined by Henrici [ Henrici 81]. However, we have neither exhausted the grammar nor reached the lexicon. This section will present how the...Halliday, M. A. K., Language as Social Semiotic, University Park Press, Baltimore, 1978 [ Henrici 81] Henrici , A., "Some notes on the systemic generation of

  20. Astronomy at Torquay Boys' Grammar School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, David; Lintott, Chris

    1996-10-01

    TBGS Observatory is owned and run by Torquay Boys' Grammar School in South Devon. The school itself encompasses a wide curriculum from sports to academic studies, ranging from the arts to humanities and science. Due to a high interest from pupils and staff the school has a special focus upon Astronomy. Resulting from this TBGS owns one of the largest, best equipped school observatories in the UK. It is now a minor centre for research and studies at GCSE and higher levels.

  1. Experimental functional realization of attribute grammar system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Attali

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an experimental functional realization of attribute grammar(AG system for personal computers. For AG system functioning only Turbo Prolog compiler is required. The system functioning is based on a specially elaborated metalanguage for AG description, universal syntactic and semantic constructors. The AG system provides automatic generation of target compiler (syntax--oriented software using Turbo Prolog as object language.

  2. Handbook of graph grammars and computing by graph transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, G; Kreowski, H J; Rozenberg, G

    1999-01-01

    Graph grammars originated in the late 60s, motivated by considerations about pattern recognition and compiler construction. Since then, the list of areas which have interacted with the development of graph grammars has grown quite impressively. Besides the aforementioned areas, it includes software specification and development, VLSI layout schemes, database design, modeling of concurrent systems, massively parallel computer architectures, logic programming, computer animation, developmental biology, music composition, visual languages, and many others.The area of graph grammars and graph tran

  3. Bottom-up grammar analysis : a functional formulation

    OpenAIRE

    Jeuring, J.T.; Swierstra, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses bottom-up grammar analysis problems such as te EMPTY problem and the FIRST problem. It defines a general class of bottom-up grammar analysis problems, and from this definition it derives a functional program for performing bottom-up grammar analysis. The derivation is purely calculational, using theorems from lattice therory, the Bird-Meertens calculus, and laws for list-comprehensions. Sufficient conditions guaranteeing the existence of a solution emerge as a byproduct o...

  4. Problem-Based Learning to Improve Students’ Grammar Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukminatus Zuhriyah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Grammar becomes one of the subjects studied in all Indonesian English Department. It is because grammar has the important role in all English skills. Grammar makes those four English skills meaningful. Somebody can be said as a master of English when he or she also masters grammar. Unfortunately, learning grammar is not as easy as what we think. It needs the effective method that can make the learners motivated and active in learning as well as in applying the grammar in the real life. Problem-based learning applied in this research is one of the alternatives that can help the learners learn grammar easily. This research was a collaborative action research whose general purpose to know whether or not Problem-based learning could improve the students’ grammar competence. Meanwhile, the specific purposes were to know the lecturer’s activities, the students’ activities, and the students’ responses when problem-based learning was implemented in grammar class. Nine students of the fifth semester of English department of education faculty of Hasyim Asy’ari University (UNHASY Tebuireng Jombang in the academic year of 2016/2017 became the subjects of this research. The data got was from the observation notes and the grammar test. There was an improvement on students’ grammar competence from cycle one to cycle two. It was proven by their mean score from 66.7 in cycle one to 72.8 in cycle two. Meanwhile, the percentage of students passing the minimum mastery criteria was from 44.4 in cycle one and 88.9 in cycle two. So that it can be concluded that problem-based learning could improve students’ grammar competence.

  5. Completeness of Compositional Translation for Context-Free Grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Huijsen, W O

    1996-01-01

    A machine translation system is said to be *complete* if all expressions that are correct according to the source-language grammar can be translated into the target language. This paper addresses the completeness issue for compositional machine translation in general, and for compositional machine translation of context-free grammars in particular. Conditions that guarantee translation completeness of context-free grammars are presented.

  6. Human kinship, from conceptual structure to grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Doug

    2010-10-01

    Research in anthropology has shown that kin terminologies have a complex combinatorial structure and vary systematically across cultures. This article argues that universals and variation in kin terminology result from the interaction of (1) an innate conceptual structure of kinship, homologous with conceptual structure in other domains, and (2) principles of optimal, "grammatical" communication active in language in general. Kin terms from two languages, English and Seneca, show how terminologies that look very different on the surface may result from variation in the rankings of a universal set of constraints. Constraints on kin terms form a system: some are concerned with absolute features of kin (sex), others with the position (distance and direction) of kin in "kinship space", others with groups and group boundaries (matrilines, patrilines, generations, etc.). Also, kin terms sometimes extend indefinitely via recursion, and recursion in kin terminology has parallels with recursion in other areas of language. Thus the study of kinship sheds light on two areas of cognition, and their phylogeny. The conceptual structure of kinship seems to borrow its organization from the conceptual structure of space, while being specialized for representing genealogy. And the grammar of kinship looks like the product of an evolved grammar faculty, opportunistically active across traditional domains of semantics, syntax, and phonology. Grammar is best understood as an offshoot of a uniquely human capacity for playing coordination games.

  7. Kiss my asterisk a feisty guide to punctuation and grammar

    CERN Document Server

    Baranick, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Grammar has finally let its hair down! Unlike uptight grammar books that overwhelm us with every single grammar rule, Kiss My Asterisk is like a bikini: it's fun, flirty, and covers only the most important bits. Its lessons, which are 100 percent free of complicated grammar jargon, have been carefully selected to include today's most common, noticeable errors—the ones that confuse our readers or make them wonder if we are, in fact, smarter than a fifth grader. What is the proper use of an apostrophe? When should an ellipsis be used instead of an em dash? Why do we capitalize President Obama bu

  8. PECULIARITIES OF GRAMMAR STUDY OF MOUNTAIN FIRST-FORM PUPILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kiryk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The articles describes the role of analiztor system (auditory, visual, kinesthetic at the initial stage of learning literacy and language development six years old. They from specific integration system, that provides more efficient perception, memorization and reproduction of educational material. The article deals with attempt to ascertain linguadidactic interconnections and interdependence between grammar education (reading, writing and speech of six-year pupils. Summing up it should be mentioned to organize 6-year pupils studing in the country mountain school becides pedagogical, economical, geographic and social problems psychologic linguadidactic are added. Preferences of mountain country children: –                    Formation from childhood ability to live in harmony with nature; –                    Sensitive  perception of alive and inanimate surrounding nature; –                    Life-style form children’s responsibility for entrusted things, labour habits, training by hard nature conditions. They should be solved in complex providing achievents of psychology, pedagogics, linguists and up-to-date technology. The aim of the article  - to reveal individual peculiarities of country mountain child who needs special method of approach to grammar studing as well as to help country teacher who strongly feels lack for efficient method help. All these affect on prepearing level, children’s outlook, general development. Scientific and methodogical institutions have not easy task-system training and skill raising of primary school teachers to realize State standart of primary general education. Acquaintance of country teacher with up-to-date achievements in psychologic, pedagogic and linguistic education will help him to organize his work in the country school on rather higher level as well as let him give more qualitative education services and save country school as the

  9. Adapting Queneau's "Exercices de style" to Classroom Use: An Experiment in Creative Writing at the Undergraduate Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Gerald

    1985-01-01

    Describes the way one teacher used Raymond Queneau's "Exercices de style" in a college-level French composition course. The students prepared 15 to 20 assignments, which focused on grammar and syntax, logical development of ideas, changes in perspective, shifts in mood or tonality, and experiments with different literary genres. (SED)

  10. An Attempt to Employ Diagrammatic Illustrations in Teaching English Grammar: Pictorial English Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Takahashi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In order for intermediate students poor at English grammar to enjoy learning it, a unique methodology has been improved in the classroom. In this article illustrated vehicles relevant to the five basic sentence patterns are presented in order to show how helpful this method is to understand English grammar. Also, more enhanced areas of this theory are discussed, which clarifies the feasibility of this methodology. The items to be introduced in my method are gerund, the passive voice, the relative pronoun and so on.

  11. ULTRA: Universal Grammar as a Universal Parser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, David P

    2018-01-01

    A central concern of generative grammar is the relationship between hierarchy and word order, traditionally understood as two dimensions of a single syntactic representation. A related concern is directionality in the grammar. Traditional approaches posit process-neutral grammars, embodying knowledge of language, put to use with infinite facility both for production and comprehension. This has crystallized in the view of Merge as the central property of syntax, perhaps its only novel feature. A growing number of approaches explore grammars with different directionalities, often with more direct connections to performance mechanisms. This paper describes a novel model of universal grammar as a one-directional, universal parser. Mismatch between word order and interpretation order is pervasive in comprehension; in the present model, word order is language-particular and interpretation order (i.e., hierarchy) is universal. These orders are not two dimensions of a unified abstract object (e.g., precedence and dominance in a single tree); rather, both are temporal sequences, and UG is an invariant real-time procedure (based on Knuth's stack-sorting algorithm) transforming word order into hierarchical order. This shift in perspective has several desirable consequences. It collapses linearization, displacement, and composition into a single performance process. The architecture provides a novel source of brackets (labeled unambiguously and without search), which are understood not as part-whole constituency relations, but as storage and retrieval routines in parsing. It also explains why neutral word order within single syntactic cycles avoids 213-like permutations. The model identifies cycles as extended projections of lexical heads, grounding the notion of phase. This is achieved with a universal processor, dispensing with parameters. The empirical focus is word order in noun phrases. This domain provides some of the clearest evidence for 213-avoidance as a cross

  12. Visual artificial grammar learning by rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): exploring the role of grammar complexity and sequence length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbauer, Lisa A; Conway, Christopher M; Christiansen, Morten H; Beran, Michael J; Owren, Michael J

    2018-03-01

    Humans and nonhuman primates can learn about the organization of stimuli in the environment using implicit sequential pattern learning capabilities. However, most previous artificial grammar learning studies with nonhuman primates have involved relatively simple grammars and short input sequences. The goal in the current experiments was to assess the learning capabilities of monkeys on an artificial grammar-learning task that was more complex than most others previously used with nonhumans. Three experiments were conducted using a joystick-based, symmetrical-response serial reaction time task in which two monkeys were exposed to grammar-generated sequences at sequence lengths of four in Experiment 1, six in Experiment 2, and eight in Experiment 3. Over time, the monkeys came to respond faster to the sequences generated from the artificial grammar compared to random versions. In a subsequent generalization phase, subjects generalized their knowledge to novel sequences, responding significantly faster to novel instances of sequences produced using the familiar grammar compared to those constructed using an unfamiliar grammar. These results reveal that rhesus monkeys can learn and generalize the statistical structure inherent in an artificial grammar that is as complex as some used with humans, for sequences up to eight items long. These findings are discussed in relation to whether or not rhesus macaques and other primate species possess implicit sequence learning abilities that are similar to those that humans draw upon to learn natural language grammar.

  13. Grammars Preceding the 16th-Century Bohorič Grammar in Some European Countries Relevant to Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozma Ahačič

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the grammars of European vernacular languages as possible indirect and (partly direct sources for the first grammar of the Slovene language, Arcticae Horulae Succisivae de Latinocarniolana Literatura [Free Winter Hours on Latin-Carniolian Grammar], written in 1584 by Adam Bohorič. Within this framework, the situation in the field of grammar writing is outlined for Germany (Ickelsamer, Albertus, Ölinger, Clajus, France (de Bovelles, Dubois, Drosée, Meigret, R. Estienne, de la Ramée , Pillot, Garnier, Cauchie, Italy (Alberti, Fortunio, Bembo, Corso, Dolce, Castelvetro, Ruscelli, Salviati, Giambullari, Trissino, Bohemia (Optát, Gzel, Philomates, Blahoslav, and Poland (Statorius. The grammar works of the individual authors are described in detail, put into the context of European production, and commented on from the viewpoint of their possible influence on the Bohorič grammar. Particular emphasis is placed on the German grammar by Johannes Clajus (1578, which may have served as its direct source, and on the Polish grammar by Statorius (1568, which shows similarities to the Bohorič grammar in both development and sources.

  14. The Multiple Grammars Theory and the Nature of L2 Grammars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liceras, Juana M.

    2014-01-01

    This article offers the author's commentary on the Multiple Grammar (MG) language acquisition theory proposed by Luiz Amaral and Tom Roeper in the present issue and touches on other second language acquisition research. Topics discussed include the concept of second language (L2) optionality, a hypothesis regarding the acquisition of the…

  15. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string.

  16. Developments in generative grammar and their applications to the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is to highlight how developments in generative grammar have been applied to the study of Nigerian languages. Serious attempts to incorporate developments in generative grammar in the analysis of Nigerian languages started in the 1970s. The trend has been progressive. Indeed, very recent ...

  17. Spoken Grammar: An Urgent Necessity in the EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-wossabi, Sami A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies in corpus linguistics have revealed apparent inconsistencies between the prescriptive grammar presented in EFL textbooks and the type of grammar used in the speech of native speakers. Such variations and learning gaps deprive EFL learners of the actual use of English and delay their oral/aural developmental processes. The focus of…

  18. Construction Morphology and the Parallel Architecture of Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booij, Geert; Audring, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a systematic exposition of how the basic ideas of Construction Grammar (CxG) (Goldberg, 2006) and the Parallel Architecture (PA) of grammar (Jackendoff, 2002]) provide the framework for a proper account of morphological phenomena, in particular word formation. This framework is referred to as Construction Morphology (CxM). As…

  19. Effect of Direct Grammar Instruction on Student Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lisa; Feng, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Grammar Instruction has an important role to play in helping students to speak and write more effectively. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of direct grammar instruction on the quality of student's writing skills. The participants in this study included 18 fifth grade students and two fifth grade teachers. Based on the results…

  20. Triumph through Texting: Restoring Learners' Interest in Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedjazi Moghari, Mona; Marandi, S. Susan

    2017-01-01

    It is usually the case that learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) are exposed to language materials in class only, and of course in such a short space of time, they do not always find enough chance to practice English grammar features and become aware of their grammar mistakes. As a potential solution to this problem, the current study…

  1. Systemic Approach in Teaching Grammar to Adult Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhi, Anna

    This article addresses difficulty in English-as-a-Second-Language grammar instruction, offering the systemic approach as an alternative method of teaching grammar. Observation of the process of learning various grammatical rules reveals a tendency to make two types of errors (formational and functional). Analysis of grammatical errors made by…

  2. The Effect of Grammar Teaching on Writing Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Richard; Torgerson, Carole; Beverton, Sue; Freeman, Allison; Locke, Terry; Low, Graham; Robinson, Alison; Zhu, Die

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on the results of two international systematic research reviews which focus on different aspects of teaching grammar to improve the quality and accuracy of 5-16-year-olds' writing in English. The results show that there is little evidence to indicate that the teaching of formal grammar is effective; and that teaching…

  3. Second Language Learners' Beliefs about Grammar Instruction and Error Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Shawn; Li, Shaofeng; Fei, Fei; Thompson, Amy; Nakatsukasa, Kimi; Ahn, Seongmee; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2009-01-01

    Learner beliefs are an important individual difference in second language (L2) learning. Furthermore, an ongoing debate surrounds the role of grammar instruction and error correction in the L2 classroom. Therefore, this study investigated the beliefs of L2 learners regarding the controversial role of grammar instruction and error correction. A…

  4. GRAMMAR--THE PROTEUS OF THE ENGLISH CURRICULUM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASTON, KATHARINE O.

    THE ENGLISH CURRICULUM CAN BE MADE MORE EFFECTIVE BY CONSIDERING THE SIGNIFICANT PART PLAYED BY THE COMPONENT OF GRAMMAR. THE NATIVE SPEAKER OF ENGLISH POSSESSES AN INTUITIVE KNOWLEDGE OF THE RULES OF GRAMMAR AND YET CANNOT EXPLAIN WHAT HIS INTUITION KNOWS. THEREFORE, A PRECISE, ECONOMICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE LANGUAGE MECHANISM AND HOW IT FUNCTIONS…

  5. Grammar for College Writing: A Sentence-Composing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgallon, Don; Killgallon, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Across America, in thousands of classrooms, from elementary school to high school, the time-tested sentence-composing approach has given students tools to become better writers. Now the authors present a much anticipated sentence-composing grammar worktext for college writing. This book presents a new and easier way to understand grammar: (1) Noun…

  6. John Ash and the Rise of the Children's Grammar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navest, Karlijn Marianne

    2011-01-01

    From the second half of the eighteenth century onwards a knowledge of grammar served as an important marker of class in England. In order to enable their children to rise in society, middle-class parents expected their sons and daughters to learn English grammar. Since England did not have an

  7. Pair Counting to Improve Grammar and Spoken Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    English language learners are often more grammatically accurate in writing than in speaking. As students focus on meaning while speaking, their spoken fluency comes at a cost: their grammatical accuracy decreases. The author wanted to find a way to help her students improve their oral grammar; that is, she wanted them to focus on grammar while…

  8. Constraints and Logic Programming in Grammars and Language Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    analysis. With a tool such as Constraint Handling Rules, CHR, to be ex- plained below, the grammar writer or programmer working with language analysis can define his or her own constraint solvers specifically tailored for the linguistic problems at hand. We concentrate on grammars and lan- guage analysis...

  9. The Effects of Using Online Concordancers on Teaching Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkmen, Yasemin; Aydin, Selami

    2016-01-01

    Studies conducted so far have mainly focused on the effects of online concordancers on teaching vocabulary, while there is a lack of research focusing on the effects of online concordancers on teaching and learning grammar. Thus, this study aims to review the studies on the effects of online concordancers on teaching and learning grammar and how…

  10. Towards a Rationale for Research into Grammar Teaching in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontich, Xavier; Camps, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This article hopes to bring new insights to the debate about the effect of grammar knowledge on language use, especially writing. It raises the question of the need to look more closely at the following three questions: (1) What is the aim of grammar teaching?; (2) How capable are students of conceptualising about language and how is their…

  11. Effectiveness of Inductive and Deductive Methods in Teaching Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzu'bi, Mohammad Akram

    2015-01-01

    The study investigates the comparative effectiveness of teaching English grammar by using deductive and inductive teaching models. The study also attempts to see which of these two methods has a positive effect on the grammar academic achievement of the university students and elementary school students in Jordan so it answers the following…

  12. Researching the effects of teaching grammar rules to English ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article describes the effects of an interventionist form-focused course on the written English of first-year second language university learners. For two semester courses the form (or grammar) of the language was concentrated upon. During the first semester the use of correct grammar was focussed on intensively, while ...

  13. Grammar Teaching and Learning in L2: Necessary, but Boring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Gladys; Simard, Daphnee

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive inquiry-based study targeted second language (L2) high school students' (n = 2321) and teachers' (n = 45) beliefs and perceptions about grammar instruction, specifically about grammatical accuracy, corrective feedback, and diverse forms of grammar teaching and learning. Results showed only slight discrepancies between students'…

  14. Effect of Jigsaw I Technique on Teaching Turkish Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Akif

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the effect of Jigsaw I technique on students' academic success and attitude towards the course in teaching Turkish grammar. For that purpose, three grammar topics (spelling and punctuation marks rules) were determined and an experimental study conforming to "control group preliminary-testing final…

  15. Functional Grammar and Its Implications for English Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhiwen

    2013-01-01

    Functional grammar has received more and more attention from domestic scholars in the world of linguistics since 1970s, but it is still new to most EFL teachers. In spite of controversies about its applications into classroom teaching, this new grammar model has its own advantages and can facilitate EFL students to achieve academic success. This…

  16. Yemeni Teachers' Beliefs of Grammar Teaching and Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzi, Nemah Abdullah Ayash

    2012-01-01

    Beliefs of in-service English teachers about grammar learning/teaching and the influence of such beliefs on their classroom practices remain relatively unexplored. More precisely, this study explores English teachers' beliefs about grammar learning and teaching. It throws light on the teachers' actual practices in the classrooms of 7th -12th…

  17. The Role of Teaching Grammar in First Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Sezgin; Erdogan, Ayse

    2018-01-01

    Grammar; while originating from the natural structure of the language also is the system which makes it possible for different language functions meet within the body of common rules especially communication. Having command of the language used, speaking and writing it correctly require strong grammar knowledge actually. However only knowing the…

  18. English spelling performance of Dutch grammar school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeijmakers, M.; de Bree, E.; Keijzer, M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates English spelling performance of Dutch grammar school students to establish whether Dutch grammar school students are able to spell words differing in complexity, as well as whether they are sensitive to the information available in the spellings (phonological,

  19. Linguistics deviation, a tool for teaching English grammar: evidence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We have always advocated that those teaching the Use of English must seek out novel ways of teaching the grammar of English to take out the drudgery of the present approach. Here, we proposed using Linguistic deviation as a tool for teaching English grammar. This approach will produce students who are both strong in ...

  20. A Unifying Framework for Concatenation-based Grammar Formalisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.V. Groenink (Annius); S.T. Fischer (Sarah); M.H. Trautwein

    1995-01-01

    htmlabstractLinear Context Free Rewriting Systems (LCFRS, [Wei88]) are a general class of trans-context-free grammar systems; it is the largest well-known class of mildly context sensitive grammar; languages recognized by LCFRS strictly include those generated by the HG, TAG, LIG, CCG family.

  1. Environmental Peace Education in Foreign Language Learners' English Grammar Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Arda

    2009-01-01

    English language teachers create contexts to teach grammar so that meaningful learning occurs. In this study, English grammar is contextualized through environmental peace education activities to raise students' awareness of global issues. Two sources provided data to evaluate the success of this instructional process. Fourth-year pre-service…

  2. GRAMMAR IN TEFL: A CRITIQUE OF INDONESIAN HIGH SCHOOL TEXTBOOKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Collins

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of this paper is to critically assess the presentation of English grammar in textbooks used in secondary schools in Indonesia. The influence of the Communicative Approach is in evidence in the books examined, and yet the importance of explicit grammar instruction is not ignored, reflecting the view of many today that grammatical forms cannot be successfully learnt merely on the basis of comprehensible input. Despite recognition of its central role, the grammar instruction presented in the textbooks invites questions as to its linguistic adequacy and accuracy. Writers often seem unwilling to take on board the insights recorded in the influential and authoritative descriptive grammars of recent years, continuing to accept tacitly the principles exposed in Traditional Grammar.

  3. Introduction (of 'The Noun Phrase in Functional Discourse Grammar')

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Velasco, Daniel; Rijkhoff, Jan

    2008-01-01

    are handled in FDG. Moreover, to analyse a major linguistic construction from various perspectives (textual, typological, logical, semantic, morphosyntactic, etc.) is an excellent way to test a new model of grammar with regard to some of the standards of adequacy for linguistic theories (see also section 1......The articles in this volume analyse the noun phrase within the framework of Functional Discourse Grammar (FDG), the successor to Simon C. Dik’s Functional Grammar (FG). The Noun Phrase was the main conference theme of the 11th International Conference on Functional Grammar, which took place......, the most recent treatment of NPs by Dik in terms of “classical FG” was published (posthumously) in 1997, in the first volume of The Theory of Functional Grammar. Given the fact that FDG presents a strongly revised version of Dikkian FG with respect to rules, variables, representations and overall design...

  4. Finite-State Approximation of Phrase-Structure Grammars

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, F C N; Pereira, Fernando C. N.; Wright, Rebecca N.

    1996-01-01

    Phrase-structure grammars are effective models for important syntactic and semantic aspects of natural languages, but can be computationally too demanding for use as language models in real-time speech recognition. Therefore, finite-state models are used instead, even though they lack expressive power. To reconcile those two alternatives, we designed an algorithm to compute finite-state approximations of context-free grammars and context-free-equivalent augmented phrase-structure grammars. The approximation is exact for certain context-free grammars generating regular languages, including all left-linear and right-linear context-free grammars. The algorithm has been used to build finite-state language models for limited-domain speech recognition tasks.

  5. Bookmarks in Grammar-Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gawrychowski, Pawel; Weimann, Oren

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of storing a grammar of size n compressing a string of size N, and a set of positions {i1, . . . , i } (bookmarks) such that any substring of length l crossing one of the positions can be decompressed in O(l) time. Our solution uses space O((n + b) max{1, log* n − log*( n....../b + b/n)}). Existing solutions for the bookmarking problem either require more space or a super-constant “kick-off” time to start the decompression....

  6. Universal moral grammar: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupoux, Emmanuel; Jacob, Pierre

    2007-09-01

    A new framework for the study of the human moral faculty is currently receiving much attention: the so-called 'universal moral grammar' framework. It is based on an intriguing analogy, first pointed out by Rawls, between the study of the human moral sense and Chomsky's research program into the human language faculty. To assess UMG, we ask: is moral competence modular? Does it have an underlying hierarchical grammatical structure? Does moral diversity rest on culture-dependant parameters? We review the evidence and argue that formal grammatical concepts are of limited value for the study of moral judgments, moral development and moral diversity.

  7. Grammar, Writing, and Technology: A Sample Technology-Supported Approach to Teaching Grammar and Improving Writing for ESL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegelheimer, Volker; Fisher, David

    2006-01-01

    English language learners are frequently unable to benefit from the prevailing process-writing approaches due to a lack of grammar and vocabulary knowledge relevant to academic writing. This paper describes how the need for explicit grammar instruction as part of preparing students to write can be addressed by using a collection of learner texts…

  8. Grammar for Writing? An Investigation of the Effects of Contextualised Grammar Teaching on Students' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Susan; Myhill, Debra; Bailey, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    The role of grammar instruction in the teaching of writing is contested in most Anglophone countries, with several robust meta-analyses finding no evidence of any beneficial effect. However, existing research is limited in that it only considers isolated grammar instruction and offers no theorisation of an instructional relationship between…

  9. Making Grammar Instruction More Empowering: An Exploratory Case Study of Corpus Use in the Learning/Teaching of Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dilin

    2011-01-01

    Despite a long debate and the accompanying call for changes in the past few decades, grammar instruction in college English classes, according to some scholars, has remained largely "disempowering,""decontextualized," and "remedial" (Micciche, 2004, p. 718). To search for more effective and empowering grammar teaching, this study explores the use…

  10. An Exploration of the Relationship between Vietnamese Students' Knowledge of L1 Grammar and Their English Grammar Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tammie M.

    2010-01-01

    The problem. This research study explores an important issue in the field of TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) and second language acquisition (SLA). Its purpose is to examine the relationship between Vietnamese students' L1 grammar knowledge and their English grammar proficiency. Furthermore, it investigates the extent to…

  11. The Effectiveness of Teaching Traditional Grammar on Writing Composition at the High School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Gina

    2011-01-01

    Traditional grammar instruction is a challenging element of the English curriculum; both students and teachers struggle with the rules and dull nature of grammar. However, understanding grammar is important because students need to understand the language they speak in order to be effective communicators, and teachers provide grammar instruction…

  12. The Effects of Communicative Grammar Teaching on Students' Achievement of Grammatical Knowledge and Oral Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pham Vu Phi; The Binh, Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    So far the students of Le Hong Phong Junior High School have been taught grammar with GTM (Grammar-Translation Method), which just prepares learners for conventional grammar-paper tests. Despite their considerable knowledge of grammar, the students fail to use the language they have learnt to communicate in real-life situations. The purpose of…

  13. The Role of Grammar Teaching in Writing in Second Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Li

    2008-01-01

    "Grammar is the sound, structure, and meaning system of language. All languages have grammar, and each language has its own grammar" (Beverly, 2007, p.1). People who speak the same language are able to communicate with each other because they all know the grammar system and structure of that language, that is, the meaningful rules of…

  14. Understanding the Complex Processes in Developing Student Teachers' Knowledge about Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalberg, Agneta M.-L.

    2015-01-01

    This article takes the view that grammar is driven by user choices and is therefore complex and dynamic. This has implications for the teaching of grammar in language teacher education and how teachers' cognitions about grammar, and hence their own grammar teaching, might change. In this small, interpretative study, the participants--students on…

  15. THE LEVEL OF GRAMMAR SCHOOL STUDENTS' KNOWLEDGE ON CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK FACTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaraković, Milana; Mihajlović, Bojan; Ćemerlić, Snežana; Ađić, Filip; Sladojević, Miroslava; Mihajlović, Boaoliub

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The atherosclerotic process in the aorta starts in childhood, while atheroclerotic changes of coronary heart vessels start in adolescence. The aim of the study was to evaluate the knowledge of the students attending all four grades of grammar school about the risk factors for cardiovascular disease, with special attention to the risk factors that can be influenced by modification of life-style. Data from the entrance and exit tests were collected from 197 students attending a grammar school in Novi Sad. Chi-square test and Student T-test or Mann-Whitney U test were used to examine the statistical difference between categorized variables and the continuous variables, respectively. The difference between the number of correct answers for all the students on the entrance test and exit test was statistically significant (pgrammar school and after the lectures, the student's knowledge level was increased by 82.3% (p<0.0005). Children and adolescents from Vojvodina and Serbia should be well informed about the cardiovascular disease risk factors and their prevention with special attention paid to the risk factors that can be influenced by changing lifestyle habits.

  16. Process Grammar and Process History for 2D Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas W.

    This project is the written report for the course in Picture Processing as part of the computer science master's degree at the university of Århus. The starting point for my project is an article of Michael Leyton in Artificial Intelligence 34 1988 "A process grammar for shape"[AI vol. 34 1988......]. The article describes how it is possible to derive the process history for an object from its state at two stages in its development. The aim in this priject is to describe and test an algorithm for deriving the process history of an object form it state at two different stages. First I give a short summary...... testing are programmed in C and the user interace is built in Sun-View (Sun's window system). The images used for testing (not all of which are in this report) are scanned in a Macinthosh and then ftp-ed to a Sun. I will freely use terms from image processing and computer graphics without defining...

  17. A Contribution Towards A Grammar of Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Berry

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past thirty years there has been an increasing interest in the social and cultural implications of digital technologies and ‘informationalism’ from the social sciences and humanities. Generally this has concentrated on the implications of the “convergence” of digital devices and services, understood as linked to the discrete processing capabilities of computers, which rely on logical operations, binary processing and symbolic representation. In this paper, I wish to suggest that a ‘grammar of code’ might provide a useful way of thinking about the way in which digital technologies operate as a medium and can contribute usefully to this wider debate. I am interested in the way in which the dynamic properties of code can be understood as operating according to a grammar reflected in its materialisation and operation in the lifeworld – the discretisation of the phenomenal world. As part of that contribution in this paper I develop some tentative Weberian ‘ideal-types’. These ideal-types are then applied to the work of the Japanese composer, Masahiro Miwa, whose innovative ‘Reverse-Simulation music’ models the operation of basic low-level digital circuitry for the performance and generation of musical pieces.

  18. Information packaging in Functional Discourse Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Smit

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available

    The paper addresses the modelling of information packaging in Functional Discourse Grammar (FDG, in particular the treatment of Topic, Comment and Focus. Current FDG has inherited the traditional Functional Grammar (FG representation of these categories as functions, which attach to Subacts of evocation. However, arguments of a formal, notional and descriptive nature can be advanced against pragmatic function assignment and in favour of an alternative analysis in which informational and evocational structures are dissociated so as to command their own primitives. In the context of a model of discourse knowledge organisation in which communicated contents are associated with packaging instructions that tell the Addressee how to treat the evoked knowledge, it is argued that focality can be modelled by means of a Focus operator that can attach to various constituents at the Interpersonal Level. Topicality, on the other hand, concerns binomial and monomial modes of presenting communicated contents. This can be rendered by means of the dedicated informational units Topic (Top and Comment (Cm, that interact in frames.

  19. Style in Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    Because music is not objectively descriptive or representational, the subjective qualities of music seem to be most important. Style is one of the most salient qualities of music, and in fact most descriptions of music refer to some aspect of musical style. Style in music can refer to historical periods, composers, performers, sonic texture, emotion, and genre. In recent years, many aspects of music style have been studied from the standpoint of automation: How can musical style be recognized and synthesized? An introduction to musical style describes ways in which style is characterized by composers and music theorists. Examples are then given where musical style is the focal point for computer models of music analysis and music generation.

  20. Apparel styles suitable for young Swazi women with the prevalent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    women. Thus, this study aimed at assessing apparel styles suitable for young Swazi women with the two most prevalent body shapes. Through purposive .... The division of space with construction details, decorations, texture, colour, and printed fabric design is critical to the style of the garment (Marshall et al, 2012) and.

  1. Film Noir Style Genealogy

    OpenAIRE

    Dita Rietuma

    2012-01-01

    Annotation for the Doctoral Work Film Noir Style Genealogy (The Genealogy of the Film Noir Style) The doctoral work topic Film Noir Style Genealogy encompasses traditionally approved world film theory views on the concept of film noir and its related cinematographic heritage, and an exploration of its evolution and distinctive style, including – the development of film noir in the USA, Europe, and also in Latvia, within the context of both socio-political progression and the paradigm of m...

  2. Implicit Learning of Recursive Context-Free Grammars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmeier, Martin; Fu, Qiufang; Dienes, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    Context-free grammars are fundamental for the description of linguistic syntax. However, most artificial grammar learning experiments have explored learning of simpler finite-state grammars, while studies exploring context-free grammars have not assessed awareness and implicitness. This paper explores the implicit learning of context-free grammars employing features of hierarchical organization, recursive embedding and long-distance dependencies. The grammars also featured the distinction between left- and right-branching structures, as well as between centre- and tail-embedding, both distinctions found in natural languages. People acquired unconscious knowledge of relations between grammatical classes even for dependencies over long distances, in ways that went beyond learning simpler relations (e.g. n-grams) between individual words. The structural distinctions drawn from linguistics also proved important as performance was greater for tail-embedding than centre-embedding structures. The results suggest the plausibility of implicit learning of complex context-free structures, which model some features of natural languages. They support the relevance of artificial grammar learning for probing mechanisms of language learning and challenge existing theories and computational models of implicit learning. PMID:23094021

  3. Grammar-Based Specification and Parsing of Binary File Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Underwood

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The capability to validate and view or play binary file formats, as well as to convert binary file formats to standard or current file formats, is critically important to the preservation of digital data and records. This paper describes the extension of context-free grammars from strings to binary files. Binary files are arrays of data types, such as long and short integers, floating-point numbers and pointers, as well as characters. The concept of an attribute grammar is extended to these context-free array grammars. This attribute grammar has been used to define a number of chunk-based and directory-based binary file formats. A parser generator has been used with some of these grammars to generate syntax checkers (recognizers for validating binary file formats. Among the potential benefits of an attribute grammar-based approach to specification and parsing of binary file formats is that attribute grammars not only support format validation, but support generation of error messages during validation of format, validation of semantic constraints, attribute value extraction (characterization, generation of viewers or players for file formats, and conversion to current or standard file formats. The significance of these results is that with these extensions to core computer science concepts, traditional parser/compiler technologies can potentially be used as a part of a general, cost effective curation strategy for binary file formats.

  4. Reading Stories to Enhance English Grammar Intake: Correlational Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoseph Gebrehiwot Tedla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, stories are recommended by many scholars in the area of ELT as good vehicles for presenting grammar items contextually. The roles they play increase as they become appropriate to students’ level, experience and interest. Students get the opportunity to see grammar points functioning within real contexts when they get exposed to stories, and they learn the varied ways of expressing a single thought through different structural formations in stories. In this respect, this paper is a part of the project which was designed to investigate whether association exists between reading stories for longer hours and grammar intake in the elementary levels in the Ethiopian context or not. After attending reading sessions for a specified number of hours, participants (from the total were randomly selected (to reduce the effects of any extraneous variables and were given grammar test, and then their scores were analyzed. Accordingly, the correlation coefficient was found to be (r = 0.668, which indicated a strong positive relationship. The significance value was recorded as (p < 0.001, indicating that a significant correlation exists between number of hours spent on reading stories and grammar intake. Based on the results and findings, the paper also recommends that material developers, in general, and classroom practitioners, specifically, should consider the contribution of carefully selected stories to the enhancement of students’ grammar intake and should use them as a technique of grammar presentation.

  5. Implicit learning of recursive context-free grammars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Rohrmeier

    Full Text Available Context-free grammars are fundamental for the description of linguistic syntax. However, most artificial grammar learning experiments have explored learning of simpler finite-state grammars, while studies exploring context-free grammars have not assessed awareness and implicitness. This paper explores the implicit learning of context-free grammars employing features of hierarchical organization, recursive embedding and long-distance dependencies. The grammars also featured the distinction between left- and right-branching structures, as well as between centre- and tail-embedding, both distinctions found in natural languages. People acquired unconscious knowledge of relations between grammatical classes even for dependencies over long distances, in ways that went beyond learning simpler relations (e.g. n-grams between individual words. The structural distinctions drawn from linguistics also proved important as performance was greater for tail-embedding than centre-embedding structures. The results suggest the plausibility of implicit learning of complex context-free structures, which model some features of natural languages. They support the relevance of artificial grammar learning for probing mechanisms of language learning and challenge existing theories and computational models of implicit learning.

  6. Adolescent Learning Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Thomas G.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from a study of the learning styles of 306 high school students. The study examined learning style characteristics (abstraction, concreteness, reflection, activity); comparisons between adolescent and adult learning styles; and differences between freshmen and seniors, males and females, and slow-track and fast-track learners.…

  7. DEVELOPING YOUNG LEARNERS‘ PERCEPTION OF FUNDAMENTAL GRAMMAR THROUGH TOTAL PHYSICAL RESPONSE

    OpenAIRE

    Betari Irma Ghasani

    2017-01-01

    Reconsidering the role of grammar as a fundamental aspect in second language learner have become important nowadays. It is argued that acquiring grammar can build their basic skill as second language learner. In addition, developing their correct perception of fundamental grammar is also needed in order to expand learners‘ ability in using grammar precisely in foreign language teaching and learning process. These beliefs have led to an increased interest in teaching grammar, es...

  8. Linking speech errors and phonological grammars: Insights from Harmonic Grammar networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldrick, Matthew; Daland, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Phonological grammars characterize distinctions between relatively well-formed (unmarked) and relatively ill-formed (marked) phonological structures. We review evidence that markedness influences speech error probabilities. Specifically, although errors result in both unmarked as well as marked structures, there is a markedness asymmetry: errors are more likely to produce unmarked outcomes. We show that stochastic disruption to the computational mechanisms realizing a Harmonic Grammar (HG) can account for the broad empirical patterns of speech errors. We demonstrate that our proposal can account for the general markedness asymmetry. We also develop methods for linking particular HG proposals to speech error distributions, and illustrate these methods using a simple HG and a set of initial consonant errors in English. PMID:20046856

  9. "Artificial grammar learning" in pigeons: a preliminary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbranson, Walter T; Shimp, Charles P

    2003-02-01

    An avian analogue to human artificial or synthetic grammar learning (Reber, 1967) was developed. Pigeons viewed horizontal strings of three to eight colored letters. These strings either conformed to Reber's artificial grammar or violated it in one or two locations. Pigeons categorized the letter strings as grammatical (left keypeck) or nongrammatical (right keypeck). Overall accuracy of categorization was above chance to both familiar training strings and to novel transfer strings, thereby satisfying a conventional criterion for learning an abstract concept. The results support a multiple mechanisms point of view according to which pigeons, like humans, learn both abstract concepts and specific strings, or specific parts of strings, in artificial grammar learning tasks.

  10. Random Access to Grammar-Compressed Strings and Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Landau, Gad M.; Raman, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Grammar-based compression, where one replaces a long string by a small context-free grammar that generates the string, is a simple and powerful paradigm that captures (sometimes with slight reduction in efficiency) many of the popular compression schemes, including the Lempel-Ziv family, run...... and other operations on grammar-compressed ordered trees. All of the above bounds significantly improve the currently best known results. To achieve these bounds, we introduce several new techniques and data structures of independent interest, including a predecessor data structure, two “biased” weighted...

  11. Grammar Teaching in the EFL Classroom: An Analysis of Grammar Tasks in Three Textbooks

    OpenAIRE

    Askeland, Eilén

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to examine the grammar tasks in three EFL textbooks. Despite other tools available, the textbook remains an important instructional medium in the classroom. There are several reasons for analysing textbooks. First, it is important that the textbooks are good in order for the teaching to be effective. Second, it is important to investigate whether the textbook is in accordance with the current trends in language teaching. Third, a textbook analysi...

  12. To teach, or not to teach grammar? - Teachers’ approaches to grammar teaching in lower secondary school

    OpenAIRE

    Bentsen, Lisa Gunhild

    2017-01-01

    This MA study combines a descriptive analysis of 32 videotaped English lessons taught by seven teachers in seven classrooms at different lower secondary schools (Year 9), with interviews with two of these teachers. The data were collected as part of the Linking Instruction and Student Experiences (LISE) project, led by Professor Kirsti Klette and with Associate Professor Lisbeth M. Brevik as coordinator. The data were analyzed to identify grammar instruction in the English classroom, to chara...

  13. Starlink Document Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawden, M. D.

    This document describes the various styles which are recommended for Starlink documents. It also explains how to use the templates which are provided by Starlink to help authors create documents in a standard style. This paper is concerned mainly with conveying the ``look and feel" of the various styles of Starlink document rather than describing the technical details of how to produce them. Other Starlink papers give recommendations for the detailed aspects of document production, design, layout, and typography. The only style that is likely to be used by most Starlink authors is the Standard style.

  14. Syntactic transfer in artificial grammar learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beesley, T; Wills, A J; Le Pelley, M E

    2010-02-01

    In an artificial grammar learning (AGL) experiment, participants were trained with instances of one grammatical structure before completing a test phase in which they were required to discriminate grammatical from randomly created strings. Importantly, the underlying structure used to generate test strings was different from that used to generate the training strings. Despite the fact that grammatical training strings were more similar to nongrammatical test strings than they were to grammatical test strings, this manipulation resulted in a positive transfer effect, as compared with controls trained with nongrammatical strings. It is suggested that training with grammatical strings leads to an appreciation of set variance that aids the detection of grammatical test strings in AGL tasks. The analysis presented demonstrates that it is useful to conceptualize test performance in AGL as a form of unsupervised category learning.

  15. Individual strategies in artificial grammar learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Ingmar; Raijmakers, Maartje E J; Pothos, Emmanuel M

    2009-01-01

    Artificial grammar learning (AGL) has been used extensively to study theories of learning, but compelling conclusions cannot be drawn without an analysis of individual strategies. We describe a new statistical method for doing so, based on the increasingly popular framework of latent variable models, which is especially suited to capture heterogeneity in participants' responses. We applied the method of latent class regression models, in which the intercept and regression coefficients can have different values in different latent groups of participants; each latent group represents different reliance on the potentially available sources of knowledge in AGL, such as grammaticality and fragment overlap. The results indicate that grammaticality and fragment overlap can be understood as distinct aspects of learning performance, as evidenced by different groups of participants adopting predominantly one or the other strategy in a series of comparable datasets from AGL studies.

  16. Grammar resources for modelling dialogue dynamically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargett, Andrew; Gregoromichelaki, Eleni; Kempson, Ruth; Purver, Matthew; Sato, Yo

    2009-12-01

    This paper argues that by analysing language as a mechanism for growth of information (Cann et al. in The Dynamics of Language, Elsevier, Oxford, 2005; Kempson et al. in Dynamic Syntax, Blackwell, Oxford, 2001), not only does a unitary basis for ellipsis become possible, otherwise thought to be irredeemably heterogeneous, but also a whole range of sub-types of ellipsis, otherwise thought to be unique to dialogue, emerge as natural consequences of use of language in context. Dialogue fragment types modelled include reformulations, clarification requests, extensions, and acknowledgements. Buttressing this analysis, we show how incremental use of fragments serves to progressively narrow down the otherwise mushrooming interpretational alternatives in language use, and hence is central to fluent conversational interaction. We conclude that, by its ability to reflect dialogue dynamics as a core phenomenon of language use, a grammar with inbuilt parsing dynamics opens up the potential for analysing language as a mechanism for communicative interaction.

  17. An entropy model for artificial grammar learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Pothos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed to characterize the type of knowledge acquired in Artificial Grammar Learning (AGL. In particular, Shannon entropy is employed to compute the complexity of different test items in an AGL task, relative to the training items. According to this model, the more predictable a test item is from the training items, the more likely it is that this item should be selected as compatible with the training items. The predictions of the entropy model are explored in relation to the results from several previous AGL datasets and compared to other AGL measures. This particular approach in AGL resonates well with similar models in categorization and reasoning which also postulate that cognitive processing is geared towards the reduction of entropy.

  18. Lexical competence and Functional Discourse Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel García Velasco

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available

    This article discusses the role of the lexicon component within Functional Discourse Grammar. It argues that the treatment of lexical meaning in most grammatical models is not adequate and proposes an alternative analysis based on Marconi’s (1997 notion of lexical competence, according to which lexical meaning comprises two different dimensions: referential and inferential lexical knowledge. It is further claimed that decompositional models of lexical meaning do not really capture speakers’ inferential knowledge, as it is doubtful that they possess detailed and similar definitions for most lexical items. It is claimed that speakers associate beliefs and specifications with lexical items and that communication emerges when those beliefs converge dynamically in verbal interaction. Finally, the implications of this analysis for FDG are examined. It is suggested that abstract meaning definitions are not really needed in the model and that the lexicon should be in close contact with the conceptual component.

  19. Studying the prose style of Dastgiri Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Mirzaei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dastgiri Rules is a valuable work in the field of Persian grammar and rhetoric which has remained in manuscript form. In case of an exact and scientific editing of this title, a precious source will be added into the legacy of Persian language and literature. The manuscript belongs to the thirteenth century and the early Qajar period. It was writtenin two volumes by Maulana Gholam Dastgir in order to teach Persian grammar to non-Persian speakers of the Indian subcontinent. Like most of the subcontinent grammarian, the author wrote his work in Arabic grammar style and based on this fact, the word is divided into the three types of verb, noun and letter and expressions are divided into full and partial compound statements. There is no significant information about the biography of Gholam Dastgir, the author; although his work is well known, his condition and life story is unclear, like many other author in the subcontinent. But relying on his work, some aspects of his life is revealed including date of birth, creed and religion, some masters and so on. This work is written in eight chapters, based on the 8 doors of heaven, and every chapter has some parts. The first volume consists of 4 chapters and the first chapter is about the definition of morphology, past tense and its eight types, present tense in 9 rules, future tense, imperative mood in 7 rules, negative imperatives, verbs, pseudo-verbs and infinitives, Amale, reduced muthana, plural, genus name, genus alam and person alam of a word which sometimes considered as single and sometimes plural, makharej and attributes of letters, dictation and definition of handwriting, merge, combining two words, some rules and advantages of Turkish dictation and spelling. The second chapter is dedicated to the definition of noun and its types and the third chapter is about history of literature including the first Persian poet, the 7 various branches of the Persian language, and it explained the

  20. Information theory and artificial grammar learning: inferring grammaticality from redundancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Randall K; Nevzorova, Uliana; Lee, Graham; Mewhort, D J K

    2016-03-01

    In artificial grammar learning experiments, participants study strings of letters constructed using a grammar and then sort novel grammatical test exemplars from novel ungrammatical ones. The ability to distinguish grammatical from ungrammatical strings is often taken as evidence that the participants have induced the rules of the grammar. We show that judgements of grammaticality are predicted by the local redundancy of the test strings, not by grammaticality itself. The prediction holds in a transfer test in which test strings involve different letters than the training strings. Local redundancy is usually confounded with grammaticality in stimuli widely used in the literature. The confounding explains why the ability to distinguish grammatical from ungrammatical strings has popularized the idea that participants have induced the rules of the grammar, when they have not. We discuss the judgement of grammaticality task in terms of attribute substitution and pattern goodness. When asked to judge grammaticality (an inaccessible attribute), participants answer an easier question about pattern goodness (an accessible attribute).

  1. DIFFICULTIES IN TEACHING AND LEARNING GRAMMAR IN AN EFL CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdu Mohammed Al-Mekhlafi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of grammar instruction in an ESL/EFL context has been for decades a major issue for students and teachers alike. Researchers have debated whether grammar should be taught in the classroom and students, for their part, have generally looked upon grammar instruction as a necessary evil at best, and an avoidable burden at worst. The paper reports a study undertaken to investigate the difficulties teachers face in teaching grammar to EFL students as well as those faced by students in learning it, in the teachers' perception. The study aimed to find out whether there are significant differences in teachers' perceptions of difficulties in relation to their gender, qualification, teaching experience, and the level they teach in school, thus providing insights into their own and their students' difficulties. Mean scores and t-test were used to interpret the data. The main findings are reported with implications.

  2. Construction Grammar as a tool for diachronic analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fried, Mirjam

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2009), s. 262-291 ISSN 1876-1933 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90610518 Keywords : grammatical change * gradualness of change * internal reconstruction * Construction Grammar Subject RIV: AI - Linguistics

  3. Teacher beliefs and practices of grammar teaching: focusing on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESL contexts in the world. For example, many large-scale national curriculum reforms around the world have targeted mainly one end – the meaning-focused communicative approach by encouraging implicit learning of grammar in many ...

  4. Teacher beliefs and practices of grammar teaching: focusing on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    focused communicative approaches over the years, studies report that most language teachers still follow transmission-based grammar-oriented approaches. It is known that the success of any curriculum innovation is dependent on teachers.

  5. Stars in the teaching of astrophysics at grammar schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefl, V.

    The paper subjects to theoretical analysis the topic "Stars" of the teaching programme of astrophysics at grammar schools. Diagrams express the relations among parameters of stars, sources of energy, structure and evolution of stars.

  6. XPath Node Selection over Grammar-Compressed Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Maneth

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available XML document markup is highly repetitive and therefore well compressible using grammar-based compression. Downward, navigational XPath can be executed over grammar-compressed trees in PTIME: the query is translated into an automaton which is executed in one pass over the grammar. This result is well-known and has been mentioned before. Here we present precise bounds on the time complexity of this problem, in terms of big-O notation. For a given grammar and XPath query, we consider three different tasks: (1 to count the number of nodes selected by the query, (2 to materialize the pre-order numbers of the selected nodes, and (3 to serialize the subtrees at the selected nodes.

  7. Compiling a corpus-based dictionary grammar: an example for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article it is shown how a corpus-based dictionary grammar may be compiled — that is, a mini-grammar fully based on corpus data and specifically written for use in and inte-grated with a dictionary. Such an effort is, to the best of our knowledge, a world's first. We exem-plify our approach for a Northern Sotho ...

  8. Normal ordering problem and the extensions of the Stirling grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, S.-M.; Mansour, T.; Schork, M.

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the connection between context-free grammars and normal ordered problem, and then to explore various extensions of the Stirling grammar. We present grammatical characterizations of several well known combinatorial sequences, including the generalized Stirling numbers of the second kind related to the normal ordered problem and the r-Dowling polynomials. Also, possible avenues for future research are described.

  9. Multiple Grammars and the Logic of Learnability in L2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom W Roeper

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to enhance the technical description of multi-lingual speakers in terms of a theoryof Multiple Grammars where more than one language utilizes a grammar. The challenge of V2 and itsimplications for interfaces from the perspective of the L2 learner is the focus. A number of constructionsare considered including: Quotation, Topicaliation, Empty subjects and Objects, Expletives, and Subject-auxiliary inversoni.

  10. Artificial intelligence tools for grammar and spelling instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Pijls, F.; Daelemans, W.; Kempen, G.

    1987-01-01

    In The Netherlands, grammar teaching is an especially important subject in the curriculum of children aged 10-15 for several reasons. However, in spite of all attention and time invested, the results are poor. This article describes the problems and our attempt to overcome them by developing an intelligent computational instructional environment consisting of: a linguistic expert system, containing a module representing grammar and spelling rules and a number of modules to manipulate these ru...

  11. Addressing grammar in the interaction task-based learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Brent M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major problems in language teaching is developing grammatical accuracy. This paper proposes that using error correction based on a functional grammar in a task-based learning approach may be a suitable solution. Towards this end an emic (using categories intrinsic to the language functional grammar of the verb phrase is proposed and a description of how this fits into the focus on form component of task-based learning is provided.

  12. Parsing for Semidirectional Lambek Grammar is NP-Complete

    CERN Document Server

    Dörre, J

    1996-01-01

    We study the computational complexity of the parsing problem of a variant of Lambek Categorial Grammar that we call {\\em semidirectional}. In semidirectional Lambek calculus $\\SDL$ there is an additional non-directional abstraction rule allowing the formula abstracted over to appear anywhere in the premise sequent's left-hand side, thus permitting non-peripheral extraction. that. We show that the parsing problem for semidirectional Lambek Grammar is NP-complete by a reduction of the 3-Partition problem.

  13. A Constraint-Satisfaction Parser for Context-Free Grammars

    OpenAIRE

    Quesada, Luis; Berzal, Fernando; Cortijo, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional language processing tools constrain language designers to specific kinds of grammars. In contrast, model-based language specification decouples language design from language processing. As a consequence, model-based language specification tools need general parsers able to parse unrestricted context-free grammars. As languages specified following this approach may be ambiguous, parsers must deal with ambiguities. Model-based language specification also allows the definition of ass...

  14. The contribution of phonological short-term memory to artificial grammar learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Jackie; Baddeley, Alan

    2011-05-01

    Three experiments investigated the contribution of phonological short-term memory (STM) to grammar learning by manipulating rehearsal during study of an auditory artificial grammar made up from a vocabulary of spoken Mandarin syllables. Experiment 1 showed that concurrent, irrelevant articulation impaired grammar learning compared with a nonverbal control task. Experiment 2 replicated and extended this finding, showing that repeating the grammatical strings at study improved grammar learning compared with suppressing rehearsal or remaining silent during learning. Experiment 3 found no effects of rehearsal on grammar learning once participants had learned the component syllables. The findings suggest that phonological STM aids artificial grammar learning via effects on vocabulary learning.

  15. Leadership styles and theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltinane, Charlotte Louise

    It is useful for healthcare professionals to be able to identify the leadership styles and theories relevant to their nursing practice. Being adept in recognising these styles enables nurses to develop their skills to become better leaders, as well as improving relationships with colleagues and other leaders, who have previously been challenging to work with. This article explores different leadership styles and theories, and explains how they relate to nursing practice.

  16. Grammar instruction in the Hispanic area : the case of Spain with attention to empirical studies on metalinguistic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Fontich Vicens, Xavier

    2018-01-01

    Grammar instruction is an unresolved issue in the Hispanic area, having long been approached from within the disjunction between rhetoric (teaching how to use language, especially writing) and grammar (teaching the grammar content). Over time grammar instruction has generated an intense debate around two positions: direct instruction on grammar content, versus instruction devoted to prompting reflection on grammar and language use. There has been an insistent and recurring tendency towards th...

  17. The Effect of Parenting Styles on Children Attachment Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    علي زينالي

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of parenting style on prediction of children's attachment style. To achieve this aim, the study investigates whether different parenting styles (authoritative, authoritarian, permissive and neglectful Leads to shaping various attachment styles (secure, fearful, preoccupied and dismissing in children? 508 high school adolescent boys and girls with the age range of 14-19 participated in this study and were selected through Stratified Random Sampling method. Data were gathered through Parenting Style Questionnaire (PSQ and Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ. In order to analyze the data, the researcher used Multiple Regression statistics. The results showed, Authoritative, authoritarian, neglectful and permissive parenting styles have positive and significant relationships with secure, preoccupied, fearful and dismissing attachment in children respectively and are considered as direct and significant predictor of them in children. The present study, with emphasize on fundamental role of parenting styles, recommend learning of authoritative parenting style and correction of authoritarian, neglectful and permissive parenting styles to parents in family setting.

  18. How Universal is Chomsky's Universal Grammar?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Effendi Kadarisman

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The publication of this book signifies three important things. First, syntactic theory in generative grammar—after nearly five decades of its inception—remains a thriving discipline. In fact, it seems to have been too progressive and dynamic, making some drastic change in a rather unex­pected manner. Considering the proliferation and world-wide fame of the Government-Binding (GB Theory during the 1980s and early 1990s, Chomsky 's publication of The Minimalist Program (1995 might have taken GB syntacticians by surprise, since this book was intended as a major revi­sion of GB syntax. Second, syntax, as ever, remains central and plays the leading role in generative grammar. The creative aspect of human lan­guage, the argument goes, is best explained by syntax—part of the linguis­tic competence which contributes most to accounting for native speakers' ability to understand and produce novel utterances in their language. The centrality of syntax also shows up very clearly in the most influential books by Chomsky. Prior to The Minimalist Program, the earlier hallmarks in the generative enterprise are Syntactic Structures (1957, Aspects of the Theory of Syntax (1965, and Lectures on Government and Binding (1981. These books, while dealing with linguistic theory in general, dwelled heavily into syntax. Third, as is "notorious" among students of language, Chomsky re-mains a hard reading. Readers familiar with GB Theory would recall that Chomsky 1981 is intellectually accessible only to well-trained syntacticians. Therefore, during the past two decades syntacticians were busy "translat­ing" GB syntax to make it accessible to language students in general. Works by Cook (1988, Cowper (1992, Radford (1988, and Sells (1985—to cite just a few examples—are simplified versions of GB syntax intended for beginners. It is along this line of "simplification" that the book now being reviewed was written. In other

  19. Style as Supplement - Supplement as Style

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent

    , and to aim for an almost Brechtian Verfremdung-effect, but the film also uses this device as a stylistic trait to characterize something ‘essential' about Derrida and his style. Derrida strikes the same chord by insisting on drawing attention to the artificiality of the making of the film, where questions...... and deferrals. This is of course another link in the infinite Derridean chain of supplements to supplements of supplements - in his writings, his persona and the legacy of images of him left behind in the archives. How does this perpetual deferral reflect itself in Derrida's visual and verbal style...

  20. The grammar of approximating number pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Kimmo; Bailey, Drew H; Geary, David C

    2010-04-01

    In the present article, we studied approximating pairs of numbers (a, b) that were used to estimate quantity in a single phrase ("two, three years ago"). Pollmann and Jansen (1996) found that only a few of the many possible pairs are actually used, suggesting an interaction between the ways in which people estimate quantity and their use of quantitative phrases in colloquial speech. They proposed a set of rules that describe which approximating pairs are used in Dutch phrases. We revisited this issue in an analysis of Swedish and American language corpora and in a series of three experiments in which Swedish and American adults rated the acceptability of various approximating pairs and created approximating pairs of their own in response to various estimation tasks. We found evidence for Pollmann and Jansen's rules in both Swedish and English phrases, but we also identified additional rules and substantial individual and cross-language variation. We will discuss implications for the origin of this loose "grammar" of approximating pairs.

  1. Adaptation to aphasia: grammar, prosody and interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhys, Catrin S; Ulbrich, Christiane; Ordin, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates recurrent use of the phrase very good by a speaker with non-fluent agrammatic aphasia. Informal observation of the speaker's interaction reveals that she appears to be an effective conversational partner despite very severe word retrieval difficulties that result in extensive reliance on variants of the phrase very good. The question that this paper addresses using an essentially conversation analytic framework is: What is the speaker achieving through these variants of very good and what are the linguistic and interactional resources that she draws on to achieve these communicative effects? Tokens of very good in the corpus were first analyzed in a bottom-up fashion, attending to sequential position, structure and participant orientation. This revealed distinct uses that were subsequently subjected to detailed acoustic analysis in order to investigate specific prosodic characteristics within and across the interactional variants. We identified specific clusters of prosodic cues that were exploited by the speaker to differentiate interactional uses of very good. The analysis thus shows how, in the adaptation to aphasia, the speaker exploits the rich interface between prosody, grammar and interaction both to manage the interactional demands of conversation and to communicate propositional content.

  2. CLIL in physics lessons at grammar school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štefančínová, Iveta; Valovičová, Ľubomíra

    2017-01-01

    Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) is one of the most outstanding approaches in foreign language teaching. This teaching method has promising prospects for the future of modern education as teaching subject and foreign languages are combined to offer a better preparation for life in Europe, especially when the mobility is becoming a highly significant factor of everyday life. We realized a project called Foreign languages in popularizing science at grammar school. Within the project five teachers with approbation subjects of English, French, German and Physics attended the methodological courses abroad. The teachers applied the gained experience in teaching and linking science teaching with the teaching of foreign languages. Outputs of the project (e.g. English-German-French-Slovak glossary of natural science terminology, student activity sheets, videos with natural science orientation in a foreign language, physical experiments in foreign languages, multimedia fairy tales with natural contents, posters of some scientists) are prepared for the CLIL-oriented lessons. We collected data of the questionnaire for students concerning attitude towards CLIL. The questionnaire for teachers showed data about the attitude, experience, and needs of teachers employing CLIL in their lessons.

  3. Library Automation Style Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaylord Bros., Liverpool, NY.

    This library automation style guide lists specific terms and names often used in the library automation industry. The terms and/or acronyms are listed alphabetically and each is followed by a brief definition. The guide refers to the "Chicago Manual of Style" for general rules, and a notes section is included for the convenience of individual…

  4. Style and Sociolinguistic Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Penelope, Ed.; Rickford, John R., Ed.

    This collection of papers by leading experts from a range of disciplines is divided into four sections. Section 1, "Anthropological Approaches," includes: (1) "'Style' as Distinctiveness: The Culture and Ideology of Linguistic Differentiation" (Judith T. Irvine); (2) "Variety, Style-Shifting, and Ideology" (Susan…

  5. Is Cognitive Style Bipolar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, David H.

    This study assessed the bipolarity of cognitive style for 970 clients of the Johnson O'Connor Research Foundation, a vocational guidance service. The 462 male and 508 female examinees were aged 14 to 65 years, with a median age of 24 years. Three cognitive style tests were investigated: (1) the Kagan Matching Familiar Figures Test (KMFFT); (2) the…

  6. Page Styles on steroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Designing a page style has long been a pain for novice users. Some parts are easy; others need strong LATEX knowledge. In this article we will present the memoir way of dealing with page styles, including new code added to the recent version of memoir that will reduce the pain to a mild annoyance...

  7. AUTOMATIC ARCHITECTURAL STYLE RECOGNITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mathias

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Procedural modeling has proven to be a very valuable tool in the field of architecture. In the last few years, research has soared to automatically create procedural models from images. However, current algorithms for this process of inverse procedural modeling rely on the assumption that the building style is known. So far, the determination of the building style has remained a manual task. In this paper, we propose an algorithm which automates this process through classification of architectural styles from facade images. Our classifier first identifies the images containing buildings, then separates individual facades within an image and determines the building style. This information could then be used to initialize the building reconstruction process. We have trained our classifier to distinguish between several distinct architectural styles, namely Flemish Renaissance, Haussmannian and Neoclassical. Finally, we demonstrate our approach on various street-side images.

  8. Transfer and access to universal grammar in adult second language acquisition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauter, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Summary This dissertation focuses on the roles of first language transfer and Universal Grammar in adult second (or foreign) language acquisition. It contributes to the ongoing debate whether second language acquisition is constrained by Universal Grammar. According to generative linguists,

  9. Consistency of Measured Accuracy in Grammar Knowledge Tests and Writing: TOEFL PBT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahangari, Saeideh; Barghi, Ali Hamed

    2012-01-01

    Almost no language test is void of grammar items, and the reason is probably the assumption that there exists a positive correlation between examinees' grammar knowledge and the actual demonstrable...

  10. Applying cognitive grammar in the foreign language classroom teaching English tense and aspect

    CERN Document Server

    Bielak, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    This book shows how Cognitive Grammar can be used in foreign language classrooms to help learners better grasp the complexities of English grammar. Reports on a study comparing traditional pedagogic methods with CG-grounded ones, and discusses future research.

  11. Earlier Latin Grammars as (Indirect Sources for the First Slovene Grammar Written by Adam Bohorič

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozma Ahačič

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes some possible sources, direct and indirect, for the grammar authored by the Slovene Protestant writer Adam Bohorič. Entitled Arcticae horulae succisivae de Latinocarniolana literatura(Winter Hours of Leisure on Latin-Carniolian Grammar, it was published in 1584 as the first grammar of Slovene. Since its language is Latin, the present discussion is limited to Latin grammar works. The two direct sources of Bohorič's chapter on etymology are identified as the second or third set of editions of Melanchthon's grammar (i.e., the text as edited in 1540 by Iacobus Micyllus and slightly revised in 1550 by Joachim Camerarius and as one of the (probably bilingual editions of Donatus published before 1540 (perhaps the so-called "Torgauer Donat", of which we had access to the edition Aelii Donati Methodus ?eu Declinandi coniungandique prima elementa, pro pueris Alphabetarijs, rerum grammaticarum pror?us ignaris, diligentiori cura nunc primum concinata. Cum Epistola Phil. Mel., Vitebergae, 1542. The direct source of Bohorič's chapter on syntax is identified as the second set of editions of Melanchthon's syntax, edited in 1538 by Vitus Oertelius Winshemius. The editions of Melanchthon's Latin grammar and syntax not used by Bohorič are likewise treated in detail. Among the indirect sources, there is a brief reference to Priscian's oeuvre, with detailed descriptions reserved for the major Latin humanist grammars published before Bohorič's work: Valla, Perotti, Perger, Sulpicius, Nebrija, Manutius, Despauterius, Linacre, Alvarus, Scaliger, and Ramus.

  12. Grammar Correction in the Writing Centre: Expectations and Experiences of Monolingual and Multilingual Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Although most writing centres maintain policies against providing grammar correction during writing tutorials, it is undeniable that students expect some level of grammar intervention there. Just how much students expect and receive is a matter of speculation. This article examines the grammar-correction issue by reporting on a survey of L1, L2,…

  13. A constraint-based bottom-up counterpart to definite clause grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henning

    2004-01-01

    A new grammar formalism, CHR Grammars (CHRG), is proposed that provides a constraint-solving approach to language analysis, built on top of the programming language of Constraint Handling Rules in the same way as Definite Clause Grammars (DCG) on Prolog. CHRG works bottom-up and adds the following...

  14. Spelling and Grammar--Their Importance to Journalism: What Journalism Schools Are Doing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Thomas A.; And Others

    With increasing enrollments in journalism, many journalism instructors contend that problems of spelling, grammar, usage, and punctuation are particularly acute. Some of the questions raised at recent gatherings include: Are formal rules of English grammar dying? Is proper punctuation mere pedantry? What can journalism schools do about grammar and…

  15. Language Practice with Multimedia Supported Web-Based Grammar Revision Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baturay, Meltem Huri; Daloglu, Aysegul; Yildirim, Soner

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of elementary-level English language learners towards web-based, multimedia-annotated grammar learning. WEBGRAM, a system designed to provide supplementary web-based grammar revision material, uses audio-visual aids to enrich the contextual presentation of grammar and allows learners to…

  16. Corpus-based Grammar and the Heineken Effect: Lexico-grammatical Description for Language Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Charles

    1993-01-01

    The current status of corpus-based lexico-grammar is assessed. Particular reference is to the one substantial descriptive grammar of English to have made use of the new computational techniques, the Collins COBUILD English Grammar. (39 references) (Author/LB)

  17. Impact of Consciousness-Raising Activities on Young English Language Learners' Grammar Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemipour, Hamidreza; Hemmati, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    Grammar Consciousness-Raising (GCR) is an approach to teaching of grammar which learners instead of being taught the given rules, experience language data. The data challenge them to rethink, restructure their existing mental grammar and construct an explicit rule to describe the grammatical feature which the data illustrate (Ellis, 2002). And…

  18. The Role of Grammar in the Writing Curriculum: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, Debra; Watson, Annabel

    2014-01-01

    For most Anglophone countries, the history of grammar teaching over the past 50 years is one of contestation, debate and dissent: and 50 years on we are no closer to reaching a consensus about the role of grammar in the English/Language Arts curriculum. The debate has been described through the metaphor of battle and grammar wars (Kamler, 1995;…

  19. Development and Validation of a Diagnostic Grammar Test for Japanese Learners of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Rie; Sakai, Hideki; Ido, Takahiro; Ota, Hiroshi; Hayama, Megumi; Sato, Masatoshi; Nemoto, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the development and validation of the English Diagnostic Test of Grammar (EDiT Grammar) for Japanese learners of English. From among the many aspects of grammar, this test focuses on the knowledge of basic English noun phrases (NPs), especially their internal structures, because previous research has indicated the…

  20. Automating 3D reconstruction using a probabilistic grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Xu, Jun; Xu, Chenxi; Pan, Ming

    2015-10-01

    3D reconstruction of objects from point clouds with a laser scanner is still a laborious task in many applications. Automating 3D process is an ongoing research topic and suffers from the complex structure of the data. The main difficulty is due to lack of knowledge of real world objects structure. In this paper, we accumulate such structure knowledge by a probabilistic grammar learned from examples in the same category. The rules of the grammar capture compositional structures at different levels, and a feature dependent probability function is attached for every rule. The learned grammar can be used to parse new 3D point clouds, organize segment patches in a hierarchal way, and assign them meaningful labels. The parsed semantics can be used to guide the reconstruction algorithms automatically. Some examples are given to explain the method.

  1. A Compositional Treatment of Polysemous Arguments in Categorial Grammar

    CERN Document Server

    Mineur, A M; Mineur, Anne-Marie; Buitelaar, Paul

    1995-01-01

    We discuss an extension of the standard logical rules (functional application and abstraction) in Categorial Grammar (CG), in order to deal with some specific cases of polysemy. We borrow from Generative Lexicon theory which proposes the mechanism of {\\em coercion}, next to a rich nominal lexical semantic structure called {\\em qualia structure}. In a previous paper we introduced coercion into the framework of {\\em sign-based} Categorial Grammar and investigated its impact on traditional Fregean compositionality. In this paper we will elaborate on this idea, mostly working towards the introduction of a new semantic dimension. Where in current versions of sign-based Categorial Grammar only two representations are derived: a prosodic one (form) and a logical one (modelling), here we introduce also a more detaled representation of the lexical semantics. This extra knowledge will serve to account for linguistic phenomena like {\\em metonymy\\/}.

  2. Midpoint Shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welchman, Rosamond; Urso, Josephine

    2000-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of children exploring hands-on and minds-on mathematics. Presents a midpoint shape activity for students to explore the midpoint shape of familiar quadrilaterals, such as squares and rectangles. (KHR)

  3. ATLAS Style Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhandler, E F

    2008-01-01

    This is a compendium of rules, recommendations, information and advice for writing papers and notes within the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. It covers what to include in the paper, and some general guidelines and specific points about writing a scientific paper. There are sections on the use of English (though it is not a guide to grammar), punctuation, and typography. Advice about the use of LATEX is given in the main text, and there is an appendix on software tools containing general comments about LATEX and information on using Microsoft Word. Currently on version 2.6, 3 March 2017, 47pp.

  4. Thinking Styles: Teaching and Learning Styles in Graduate Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Tricia A.; Lesh, Jennifer J.; Trocchio, Jennie S.; Wolman, Clara

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between two intellectual styles approaches: Sternberg's thinking styles of teachers and Felder and Silverman's learning styles. Ninety-five graduate students majoring in special education, reading, educational leadership and curriculum, and elementary education completed the Thinking Styles in Teaching…

  5. On Anaphora and the Binding Principles in Categorial Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, Glyn; Valentín, Oriol

    In type logical categorial grammar the analysis of an expression is a resource-conscious proof. Anaphora represents a particular challenge to this approach in that the antecedent resource is multiplied in the semantics. This duplication, which corresponds logically to the structural rule of contraction, may be treated lexically or syntactically. Furthermore, anaphora is subject to constraints, which Chomsky (1981) formulated as Binding Principles A, B, and C. In this paper we consider English anaphora in categorial grammar including reference to the binding principles. We invoke displacement calculus, modal categorial calculus, categorial calculus with limited contraction, and entertain addition of negation as failure.

  6. An Evaluation of Universal Grammar and the Phonological Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues against the hypothesis of a "phonological mind" advanced by Berent. It establishes that there is no evidence that phonology is innate and that, in fact, the simplest hypothesis seems to be that phonology is learned like other human abilities. Moreover, the paper fleshes out the original claim of Philip Lieberman that Universal Grammar predicts that not everyone should be able to learn every language, i.e., the opposite of what UG is normally thought to predict. The paper also underscores the problem that the absence of recursion in Pirahã represents for Universal Grammar proposals.

  7. A Sign-Based Phrase Structure Grammar for Turkish

    CERN Document Server

    Sehitoglu, O T

    1996-01-01

    This study analyses Turkish syntax from an informational point of view. Sign based linguistic representation and principles of HPSG (Head-driven Phrase Structure Grammar) theory are adapted to Turkish. The basic informational elements are nested and inherently sorted feature structures called signs. In the implementation, logic programming tool ALE (Attribute Logic Engine) which is primarily designed for implementing HPSG grammars is used. A type and structure hierarchy of Turkish language is designed. Syntactic phenomena such a s subcategorization, relative clauses, constituent order variation, adjuncts, nomina l predicates and complement-modifier relations in Turkish are analyzed. A parser is designed and implemented in ALE.

  8. Conversation Trees: A Grammar Model for Topic Structure in Forums

    OpenAIRE

    Louis, Annie; Cohen, Shay B.

    2015-01-01

    Online forum discussions proceed differently from face-to-face conversations and any single thread on an online forum contains posts on different subtopics. This work aims to characterize the content of a forum thread as a conversation tree of topics. We present models that jointly per- form two tasks: segment a thread into sub-parts, and assign a topic to each part. Our core idea is a definition of topic structure using probabilistic grammars. By leveraging the flexibility of two grammar for...

  9. Route description in Iwaidja: grammar and conceptualisation of motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cris Edmonds-Wathen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focussed on the effect of grammar of Iwaidja, an indigenous Australian language, on mathematical conceptualisation. It investigated route description in Iwaidja. Spatial concepts such as direction, height and movement in relation to another object are briefly described using examples. Differences between English and Iwaidja are used to illustrate the some of the impact of grammar on mathematical conceptualisation. The implications are discussed in terms of how understanding these grammatical features can help teachers, especially when children are not fluent in the language of instruction, as well as providing keys to cross-linguistic investigations of mathematical cognition.

  10. The Briefest English Grammar and Punctuation Guide Ever!

    CERN Document Server

    Coleman, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Now in one handy volume: the bestselling The Briefest English Grammar Ever! and The Briefest Punctuation Guide Ever! Covering the basics of English grammar and punctuation, this friendly guide is perfect for students at all levels. It clearly and simply explains how language works and functions and strips out all the jargon to make understanding punctuation easy. So if you need to sort out your verbs from your nouns and your adjectives from your adverbs, or if you aren't sure whether a comma should go before or after a word or when to start a new sentence, then this concise, unintimidating gui

  11. How to describe grammar and vocabulary in ELT

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Dilin

    2013-01-01

    Language description plays an important role in language learning/teaching because it often determines what specific language forms, features, and usages are taught and how. A good understanding of language description is vital for language teachers and material writers and should constitute an important part of their knowledge. This book provides a balanced treatment of both theory and practice. It focuses on some of the most important and challenging grammar and vocabulary usage questions. Using these questions as examples, it shows how theory can inform practice and how grammar and vocab

  12. Supervision: Substance and Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellerman, Saul W.

    1976-01-01

    Argues that managerial style and substance are inextricably intertwined, illustrating the discussion with excerpts from an extensive study and job analysis of first-line supervisors in a food packaging plant. (JG)

  13. Children's Responses to Literary Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, Mary Vance

    This study undertook to determine (1) whether teaching sixth grade children elements of style would increase their pleasure in listening to "The Hobbit," (2) whether children who learned the most about style would respond the most positively to Tolkien's style, and (3) what children's preferences would be for selected examples of Tolkien's style.…

  14. Exploring story grammar structure in the book reading interactions of African American mothers and their preschool children: a pilot investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Yvette R; Rothstein, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to identify the book reading behaviors and book reading styles of middle class African American mothers engaged in a shared book reading activity with their preschool children. To this end, the mothers and their children were videotaped reading one of three books, Julius, Grandfather and I, or Somewhere in Africa. Both maternal and child behaviors were coded for the frequency of occurrence of story grammar elements contained in their stories and maternal behaviors were also coded for their use of narrative eliciting strategies. In addition, mothers were queried about the quality and quantity of book reading/story telling interactions in the home environment. The results suggest that there is a great deal of individual variation in how mothers use the story grammar elements and narrative eliciting strategies to engage their children in a shared book reading activity. Findings are discussed in terms of suggestions for additional research and practical applications are offered on ways to optimally engage African American preschool children and African American families from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds in shared book reading interactions.

  15. Influence of Parenting Style on Children’s Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiullah Sarwar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research determined the influence of parents and their parenting styles on children’s behavior. The author examined different parenting styles to understand which style leads the children to be juvenile delinquent, that ultimately makes the children low academic achievers. In this paper, the researcher attempts to bring an original contribution through the identification of what is missing in the literature thus offering recommendations for future research on the role of parents in shaping the future of their children. Much research has been done on the role of parents in shaping the future of their children; however, more comprehensive research needs to be conducted on the role of parents and different parenting styles on their children’s behavior. A qualitative paradigm was preffered using in-depth interviews with two mothers of children with delinquent behavior. The findings revealed that authoritarian parenting style leads the children to become rebellious and adopt problematic behavior due tomore than necessary power exercised on children by parents. In contrast, authoritative parenting style is effective for children, as it encourages moderate parenting style. There is a demonstrated need reported in the literature that parents who spend maximum time with their children reduce the probability of developing delinquent behavior among their children. Spending more time together with the adolescents reciprocate through

  16. Radif in Iraqi’s Style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mah Nazari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The most exquisite and the greatest manifestations of our culture in our turbulent historical periods are the magnificent works in Persian literature reflecting all historical, cultural, social, psychological, aesthetic, and other aspects. To appreciate the value of these invaluable gems, we must scrutinize over the delicate and witty points and distinguish between the good as well as bad aspects because our contemporary literature is the logical continuation of the past literature. In this regard, knowledge of different genres, history of literature, prosody, stylistics, mysticism, history of language, grammar, rhyme and rhythm, Radif, etc each provides a way for better understanding of literary works. Rhythmical language has a greatly significant role in assigning Prominence to the images present in the mind of the poets, similar to mysticism being an interpretation of attraction. These all, from all litrary perspectives, particularly Radif need to be repeated. It is noteworthy that Radif has been welcomed from ancient times. In the present article, contrary to the ideas proposed with most of the scholors, attempts to present the aduantages of using poetic Radifs in the forms of words, nouns, adjectives, advebs, vebs and sentence – wise in the works of famous poets of Iraqi’s style.

  17. Active and Passive Minimum of Grammar in Teaching a Foreign Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandras Velička

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article the problem of active and passive minimum of grammar is analysed alongside with the questions relevant to this problem: the aspects of selection of grammar material, its presentation, teaching, consolidation and realization in communicational process. The author, while analysing students mistakes, states that the main criteria for selecting passive minimum of grammar must be the frequency of the subject and the possibilities of its usage in a definite text. The main factor for choosing active grammar minimum is communicative value of grammar. In the article it has been stated that different grammar exercises are needed for receptive and reproductive learning. The possibilities of grammar material presentation, consolidation and realization in a concrete situation are also touched on in the article.

  18. Stream Processing Using Grammars and Regular Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ulrik Terp

    In this dissertation we study regular expression based parsing and the use of grammatical specifications for the synthesis of fast, streaming string-processing programs. In the first part we develop two linear-time algorithms for regular expression based parsing with Perl-style greedy...... disambiguation. The first algorithm operates in two passes in a semi-streaming fashion, using a constant amount of working memory and an auxiliary tape storage which is written in the first pass and consumed by the second. The second algorithm is a single-pass and optimally streaming algorithm which outputs...... as much of the parse tree as is semantically possible based on the input prefix read so far, and resorts to buffering as many symbols as is required to resolve the next choice. Optimality is obtained by performing a PSPACE-complete pre-analysis on the regular expression. In the second part we present...

  19. Grammar Errors Made by ESL Tertiary Students in Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Charanjit Kaur Swaran; Singh, Amreet Kaur Jageer; Razak, Nur Qistina Abd; Ravinthar, Thilaga

    2017-01-01

    The educational context in Malaysia demands students to be equipped with sound grammar so that they can produce good essays in the examination. However, despite having learnt English in primary and secondary schools, students in the higher learning institutions tend to make some grammatical errors in their writing. This study presents the…

  20. Reconstructive description of eighteenth-century Xinka grammar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachse, Frauke

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation presents a comprehensive description of Xinka based on the missionary grammar "Arte de la lengua szinca" that was written by the priest Manuel Maldonado de Matos around 1773. Xinka is an isolate family of today mostly extinct, closely related languages in southeastern Guatemala.

  1. A Model for Teaching Literary Analysis Using Systemic Functional Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrocklin, Shannon; Slater, Tammy

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces an approach that middle-school teachers can follow to help their students carry out linguistic-based literary analyses. As an example, it draws on Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG) to show how J.K. Rowling used language to characterize Hermione as an intelligent female in "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows."…

  2. Grammar Is a System That Characterizes Talk in Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Jonathan; Poesio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Much of contemporary mainstream formal grammar theory is unable to provide analyses for language as it occurs in actual spoken interaction. Its analyses are developed for a cleaned up version of language which omits the disfluencies, non-sentential utterances, gestures, and many other phenomena that are ubiquitous in spoken language. Using evidence from linguistics, conversation analysis, multimodal communication, psychology, language acquisition, and neuroscience, we show these aspects of language use are rule governed in much the same way as phenomena captured by conventional grammars. Furthermore, we argue that over the past few years some of the tools required to provide a precise characterizations of such phenomena have begun to emerge in theoretical and computational linguistics; hence, there is no reason for treating them as "second class citizens" other than pre-theoretical assumptions about what should fall under the purview of grammar. Finally, we suggest that grammar formalisms covering such phenomena would provide a better foundation not just for linguistic analysis of face-to-face interaction, but also for sister disciplines, such as research on spoken dialogue systems and/or psychological work on language acquisition.

  3. A Grammar of Conversation with a Quantitative Empirical Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stech, Ernest L.

    1979-01-01

    Examines a grammar of conversation using three units of analysis: talk acts (statements, questions, agreements, and disagreements); turns at talk; and topic sequences. Rules covering the use of talk acts and definitions of units of analysis provide the basis for propositions about the location of categories of talk acts. (JMF)

  4. Spoken Grammar: Where Are We and Where Are We Going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ronald; McCarthy, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This article synthesises progress made in the description of spoken (especially conversational) grammar over the 20 years since the authors published a paper in this journal arguing for a re-thinking of grammatical description and pedagogy based on spoken corpus evidence. We begin with a glance back at the 16th century and the teaching of Latin…

  5. What do animals learn in artificial grammar studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Gabriël J L; Berwick, Robert C; Okanoya, Kazuo; Bolhuis, Johan J

    2017-10-01

    Artificial grammar learning is a popular paradigm to study syntactic ability in nonhuman animals. Subjects are first trained to recognize strings of tokens that are sequenced according to grammatical rules. Next, to test if recognition depends on grammaticality, subjects are presented with grammar-consistent and grammar-violating test strings, which they should discriminate between. However, simpler cues may underlie discrimination if they are available. Here, we review stimulus design in a sample of studies that use particular sounds as tokens, and that claim or suggest their results demonstrate a form of sequence rule learning. To assess the extent of acoustic similarity between training and test strings, we use four simple measures corresponding to cues that are likely salient. All stimulus sets contain biases in similarity measures such that grammatical test stimuli resemble training stimuli acoustically more than do non-grammatical test stimuli. These biases may contribute to response behaviour, reducing the strength of grammatical explanations. We conclude that acoustic confounds are a blind spot in artificial grammar learning studies in nonhuman animals. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Geelong Grammar boy saw deep inside the atom

    CERN Multimedia

    Persse, M C

    2003-01-01

    "John Gordon Rushbrooke, whose brilliant career as a high-energy physicist has been cut short by cancer, was one of a succession of scientists educated at Geelong Grammar School in the middle years of the 20th century who achieved world eminence in their fields" (1 page).

  7. Performance and competence in usage-based construction grammar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Ebensgaard

    2014-01-01

    -based definition of the language system, his paper explores the interplay between performance and competence in a construction grammar perspective in which grammatical constructions are considered meaningful symbolic units on par with lexemes, in relation to the [V until ADJ]-construction, based on a study...

  8. Professional Interventions as a State-Crafting Grammar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian; Øland, Trine

    2015-01-01

    This article is written in connection with a joint research project which adopts a comparative outlook in investigating post-war Danish professional interventions aimed at immigrants. Specifically, these interventions are investigated as a state-crafting grammar. One project primarily focuses...

  9. A Fast and Simple Online Synchronous Context Free Grammar Extractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Baltescu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical phrase-based machine translation systems rely on the synchronous context free grammar formalism to learn and use translation rules containing gaps. The grammars learned by such systems become unmanageably large even for medium sized parallel corpora. The traditional approach of preprocessing the training data and loading all possible translation rules into memory does not scale well for hierarchical phrase-based systems. Online grammar extractors address this problem by constructing memory efficient data structures on top of the source sideof the parallel data (often based on suffix arrays, which are usedto efficiently match phrases in the corpus and to extract translation rules on the fly during decoding. This paper describes an open source implementation of an online synchronous context free grammar extractor. Our approach builds on the work of Lopez (2008a and introduces a new technique for extending the lists of phrase matches for phrases containing gaps that reduces the extraction time by a factor of 4. Our extractor is available as part of the cdec toolkit1 (Dyer et al., 2010.

  10. Adverbial Placement in Ewe: A Role and Reference Grammar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is a description of Ewe adverb placement and interpretation from an RRG (Role and Reference Grammar) perspective. Ewe is a member of the Kwa branch of Niger Congo languages. It is also described as a dialect of GBE (Capo 1982). GBE is a cluster of five languages; Aja,. Ewe, Fon, Gen, and Phla-Phera.

  11. A Practical Spanish Grammar for Border Patrol Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Border Patrol Academy, El Paso, TX.

    Designed to be used in the Spanish training program for probationary officers at the Border Patrol Academy in El Paso, Texas, this revised 21-lesson traditional grammar text includes special features that make it pertinent to the job of a patrol inspector in the Mexican border area. An extensive appendix is comprised of exercise translations,…

  12. An Organic Approach to the Teaching of Grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1996-01-01

    Examines the relationship between grammar and discourse and explores the implications of this relationship for language education. Suggests that the linear approach to language acquisition is problematic and does not reflect what is known about the process of acquisition. Argues for an "organic" approach. (Author/VWL)

  13. A grammar of Tadaksahak a northern Songhay language of Mali

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiansen-Bolli, Regula

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a descriptive grammar of the language Tadaksahak spoken by about 30,000 people living in the most eastern part of Mali. The four chapters of the book give 1. Information about the background of the group. 2. The phonological features of the language with the inventory of the

  14. English grammar and teaching strategies lifeline to literacy

    CERN Document Server

    Pollock, Joy

    2012-01-01

    This text aims to demystify grammar and equip any teacher to teach it in the classroom. Carefully set out for ease of reference, each grammatical term is clearly defined. Varieties of usage are illustrated and teaching strategies can be extended according to the age and key stage of the pupil.

  15. A Grammar of Peripheralization : Neill Blomkamp’s District 9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosello, M.

    2016-01-01

    This article claims that no community is peripheral. In a collection of studies devoted to the periphery, the hypothesis may sound paradoxical. The point is not to provoke but to argue that peripheral subjects must first be constructed as such but a grammar of peripheralization. To explore the rules

  16. The P600 in implicit artificial grammar learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, S.; Folia, V.; Hagoort, P.; Petersson, K.M.

    2017-01-01

    The suitability of the artificial grammar learning (AGL) paradigm to capture relevant aspects of the acquisition of linguistic structures has been empirically tested in a number of EEG studies. Some have shown a syntax-related P600 component, but it has not been ruled out that the AGL P600 effect is

  17. What Artificial Grammar Learning Reveals about the Neurobiology of Syntax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersson, Karl-Magnus; Folia, Vasiliki; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we examine the neurobiological correlates of syntax, the processing of structured sequences, by comparing FMRI results on artificial and natural language syntax. We discuss these and similar findings in the context of formal language and computability theory. We used a simple right-linear unification grammar in an implicit artificial…

  18. On the interaction of Linguistic Typology and Functional Grammar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, J.

    2002-01-01

    of adjectives as a distinct word class. Conversely it will be shown that facts from many different languages have played an important role in the development of a layered model of the noun phrase in Functional Grammar and how currently these facts are used to test hypotheses concerning parallels between NPs...

  19. What Role for Grammar after the Communicative Resolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celce-Murcia, Marianne

    Language is a system developed for the purpose of communication. Grammar (structure), which reflects language form, is only one aspect of language; the other two are meaning and function. Failure of form-centered approaches to second language teaching, the audiolingual and cognitive approaches, led to the emergence of the communicative approach in…

  20. "Fire Your Proofreader!" Grammar Correction in the Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Keun

    2008-01-01

    This article critically reviews the usefulness of grammar correction in second language writing instruction through the eyes of five second-language writers. It first examines the validity of four teaching principles that appear to influence how writing instructors approach error correction in classrooms and concludes with discussions as to why…

  1. Time and Space Complexity of Inside-Out Macro Grammars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asveld, P.R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Starting form Fischer's IO Standard Form Theorem we show that for each inside-out (or IO-) macro language $L$ there exists a $\\lambda$-free IO macro grammar with the following property: for each $x$ in $L$ there is a derivation of $x$ of length at most linear in the length of $x$. Then we construct

  2. A STUDENT'S REFERENCE GRAMMAR OF MODERN FORMAL INDONESIAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MACDONALD, R. ROSS; SOENJONO, DARJOWIDJOJO

    THE INDONESIAN DESCRIBED IN THIS GRAMMAR IS THE FORMAL LANGUAGE USED IN PUBLISHED TEXTS RATHER THAN THE COLLOQUIAL LANGUAGE. ALL OF THE TEXTS USED WERE PUBLISHED BETWEEN 1945 AND 1966 AND THEY INCLUDE POLITICAL SPEECHES, LEGAL DOCUMENTS, AND TEXTBOOKS. SINCE THIS BOOK WAS DESIGNED PRIMARILY FOR GENERAL STUDENTS OF THE INDONESIAN LANGUAGE AND ONLY…

  3. Learning Tree Adjoining Grammars from structures and strings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa Florêncio, C.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the learnability of certain subclasses of tree adjoining grammars (TAGs). TAGs are based on two tree-tree operations, and generate structures known as derived trees. The corresponding strings form a mildly context-sensitive language. We prove that even very constrained subclasses of

  4. Lexical, Functional Grammar Analysis of Korean Complex Predicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Seob

    The structure of complementation in complex predicates in Korean has attracted configurational analysis. Using a lexical functional grammar (LFG) framework, this paper examines the structure of complementation in complex predicates. The term "predicate" in this context is used to describe both verbs and adjectives that are assumed to…

  5. Teachers’ Attitudes towards Teaching English Grammar: A Scale Development Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Polat

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In most ELT classes, the importance of grammar, how it should be taught or how much it should be integrated into language teaching are still matters of discussion. Considering this fact, learning teachers’ attitudes towards teaching grammar is significantly valuable for researchers. This study thus aimed to design a scale that identifies teachers’ attitudes towards the role of grammar in the process of teaching English, to pilot it, and to find out the psychometric qualities like reliability and validity of the scale designed. The scale was developed in two phases; it was first aimed to explore the factor structure of the scale, then to confirm the structure gained from the exploration of the items. The study was carried out in 2015 and 247 volunteer language teachers from 3 state universities in Eskişehir and Kütahya were included. The results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed that the scale developed in this study was a considerably valid and reliable data collection tool including three factors. Finally, the analyses indicated that gender and graduate faculties did not create significant differences whereas age and the degrees obtained by the teachers created a considerable difference on language teachers’ attitudes towards grammar teaching (p<.05

  6. El Hispanohablante y la Gramatica (The Spanish Speaker and Grammar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, George M.

    1994-01-01

    Studied the grammatical knowledge that undergraduates specializing in bilingual education have of their mother tongue. Data collected from an entrance exam, dialog journals and a simulated oral proficiency exam indicate that these students do not have a formal knowledge of grammatical rules but do have a high level of functional grammar. (24…

  7. E-Learning Turkish Language and Grammar: Analyzing Learners' Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgalas, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    This study analyses the behavior and the preferences of the Greek learners of Turkish language, who use a particular e-learning website in parallel with their studies, namely: http://turkish.pgeorgalas.gr. The website offers free online material in Greek and English language for learning the Turkish language and grammar. The traffic of several…

  8. Grammar disruption in a patient with Neuro-Sweet syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marien, Peter; Tops, Wim; Crols, Roel; Jonkers, Roel; De Deyn, Peter P.; Verhoeven, Jo

    2012-01-01

    This paper for the first time reports detailed neurolinguistic findings in a patient with Neuro-Sweet syndrome. In this patient the presenting symptoms of central nervous system (CNS) involvement primarily consisted of a selective grammar deficit restricted to spontaneous speech. On MRI a left

  9. Learning Second Language Grammar: Teachers and Learners at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lando, John

    1999-01-01

    Addresses three issues of interest to language teachers: the relevance of research studies in second language acquisition (SLA) for classroom teaching, the effectiveness of the formal teaching of grammatical rules, and the identification of good strategies to enable learners to internalize grammar. (Author/VWL)

  10. The Foreign Language Syllabus--Grammar, Notions and Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltarelli, Mario, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    Papers in this journal issue concern various aspects of foreign language syllabus construction. Titles and authors are: "The Threshold Level: A Notional-Functional Syllabus" (Barbara F. Matthies); "Functions of Grammar in a Language Teaching Syllabus" (William E. Rutherford); "Communicative and Grammatical Syllabuses to…

  11. Using Webquest in Learning Grammar: Students' Perceptions in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irzawati, Ira

    2013-01-01

    Webquest is an internet based learning tool that can be used by students in learning English. This study investigates students' perceptions about the use of Webquest to support learning grammar in Higher Education. Seventy-two of second semester students were involved as participants in this study. Questionnaire and interview were used to collect…

  12. The Strategies Approach: Effective for Reviewing Grammar and Punctuation Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quible, Zane K.

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on results of a quasi-experimental study in which the efficacy of the strategies approach for reviewing grammar and punctuation concepts was assessed in a business communication course. The control group studied rules-based review materials; the treatment group studied strategies-based review materials. On the three sets of…

  13. Ewe (for Togo): Grammar Handbook. Peace Corps Language Handbook Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozelka, Paul R.

    This handbook is composed of: (1) 20 grammar lessons; (2) an introduction to the handbook and to the Ewe language; (3) an appendix presenting the most important differences between Ewe and Mina, the lingua franca in the capital and in markets, offices, and work-sites throughout Togo; (4) answers to written summary exercises; (5) an Ewe-English…

  14. Explicit grammar teaching in EAL classrooms: Suggestions from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of the subject English Additional Language (EAL) to serve as a strong support subject in explicitly teaching learners the grammar of English is suggested as an interim solution to the effects of the non-implementation of the 1997 South African Language in Education Policy. To identify specific grammatical ...

  15. Program Evaluation: English Grammar in the Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Mozhgan

    2014-01-01

    The present study wants to find out the reasons for choosing the current methods/techniques for teaching grammar and it also wants to investigate whether there is a relation between teachers' thinking and their actions in the class or not. For this reason, four language teachers were selected. The subjects were selected by non-random sampling.…

  16. Effectiveness of Using Games in Teaching Grammar to Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yolageldili, Gulin; Arikan, Arda

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to explore the effectiveness of using games in teaching grammar to young learners from the view points of Turkish EFL teachers working in primary schools. English language teacher' (n = 15) opinions were collected through a questionnaire and the results of this study demonstrated that Turkish EFL teachers have a…

  17. How do Spanish EFL learners perceive grammar instruction and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research study of an exploratory-interpretive nature mainly focuses on the role and effectiveness of grammar instruction and corrective feedback as controversial areas of language instruction of considerable debate in SLA research and L2 pedagogy. Since the question today is no longer whether or not to teach ...

  18. Strategies for Better Learning of English Grammar: Chinese vs. Thais

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supakorn, Patnarin; Feng, Min; Limmun, Wanida

    2018-01-01

    The success of language learning significantly depends on multiple sets of complex factors; among these are language-learning strategies of which learners in different countries may show different preferences. Needed areas of language learning strategy research include, among others, the strategy of grammar learning and the context-based approach…

  19. Simple & progressive aspects of grammar and their usage in literature

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As English teachers, we are constantly worried about the poor performance of our students in the subject. We also notice that most of them are more interested in reading novels than their grammar texts because such texts are 'very dry, and abstract'. A number of students also argue that they cannot see the relevance of ...

  20. Prevalence of Ascariasis among the Students of Jooro Grammar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Study to know the prevalence of ascariasis among the students and teachers of Jooro Grammar School, Ibule-Soro, Ondo State, was undertaken. A total of 243 subjects examined. Stool sample was collected from each subject and examined for the presence of the parasite, using wet preparation and concentration methods ...

  1. Elaborer un exercice de grammaire (Working Out a Grammar Exercise)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principaud, Jeanne-Marie

    1977-01-01

    An elaboration of the official instruction on teaching French to native speakers in elementary school. The topics covered are: Methodological development of exercises; the linguistic ability and milieu of the students; operative criteria; and the question of a logical progression or spontaneous use of grammar exercises. (Text is in French.) (AMH)

  2. MATERIALS FOR A JAPANESE REFERENCE GRAMMAR. FIRST DRAFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARTIN, SAMUEL E.

    MATERIALS WERE COMPILED FOR A JAPANESE REFERENCE GRAMMAR. THIS FIRST DRAFT IS CONCERNED WITH SYNTAX AND PARASYNTAX. A THEORY OF JAPANESE STRUCTURE UNDERLIES THE SENTENCES, WORDS, AND PARTS OF SPEECH. ILLUSTRATIVE CHARTS ARE ALSO INCLUDED FOR JAPANESE SENTENCES. IT IS THE AUTHOR'S INTENTION TO CONTINUE THE WORK TOWARD A JAPANESE REFERENCE GRAMMAR…

  3. Language Dictionaries and Grammars of Guam and Micronesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzfridt, Nicholas J.; Goniwiecha, Mark C.

    The study of language reference materials, particularly dictionaries and grammar works, for languages of Guam and Micronesia includes a brief history of their evolution and an annotated bibliography. An introductory section describes the geographic situation of Micronesia and chronicles numerous periods of foreign influence: Spanish Colonization…

  4. Development of an English Grammar Checker: A Progress Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Hsien-Chin

    1991-01-01

    A computer grammar checker is described that evolved from a sample of errors and resulting in a taxonomy of 14 main and 93 subtypes. Using a 1,402-word stem electronic dictionary, an augmented transition network parser, and a set of disambiguating rules, the checker provides feedback for 7 types of errors. (12 references) (Author/LB)

  5. Making Meaning with Grammar: A Repertoire of Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, Debra; Lines, Helen; Watson, Annabel

    2012-01-01

    The place of grammar in an English or literacy curriculum has long been a source of debate, one in which professionals, politicians and the public have often engaged with unbridled enthusiasm. As such, the debate has sometimes been characterised more by ideology or polemic, than by intellectual engagement with the core ideas. In part, this is…

  6. Relationship Between Leadership Styles and Organizational Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bratnicka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Empirical research on entrepreneurship in organizations has brought disparate and often contradictory evidence related to the impact of leadership on creativity in organizations. The purpose of this paper is to explore and discuss the impact of different leadership styles on creativity, with the view to formulating an integrated conceptual model that links creative novelty and creative practicality with leadership. Methodology: The author applied the methodology of meta-theoretical review. In accordance with the principles of theoretical bricolage, a new conceptual model was built on the basis of the multidimensional creativity theory and the leadership theory. In her analysis, the author took into account leadership styles that have already been subject to research; each of them was mapped in the two-dimensional space of organizational creativity. Findings: In order to fully understand the reasons for differences in organizational creativity, the drivers of divergences in the space of creative novelty and creative practicality need to be clarified. Greater knowledge about the impact of leadership styles on the structure and configuration of organizational creativity is necessary. In this paper, the author provides a theoretical framework that illustrates manners in which leadership influences organizational creativity. The model clarifies the role that leadership plays in shaping a unique configuration of organizational creativity, and consequently in ensuring the necessary internal adaptation of an organization. Originality: The value of this research lies in the situational interpretation of various leadership styles in the context of their impact on organizational creativity. The analysis goes beyond the conventional discussion about leadership and creativity, focused on establishing whether a given leadership style proves beneficial or not for organizational creativity. The paper identifies particular effects that several key

  7. Linguistic grammar learning and DRD2-TAQ-IA polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Patrick C M; Ettlinger, Marc; Zheng, Jing

    2013-01-01

    As research into the neurobiology of language has focused primarily on the systems level, fewer studies have examined the link between molecular genetics and normal variations in language functions. Because the ability to learn a language varies in adults and our genetic codes also vary, research linking the two provides a unique window into the molecular neurobiology of language. We consider a candidate association between the dopamine receptor D2 gene (DRD2) and linguistic grammar learning. DRD2-TAQ-IA polymorphism (rs1800497) is associated with dopamine receptor D2 distribution and dopamine impact in the human striatum, such that A1 allele carriers show reduction in D2 receptor binding relative to carriers who are homozygous for the A2 allele. The individual differences in grammatical rule learning that are particularly prevalent in adulthood are also associated with striatal function and its role in domain-general procedural memory. Therefore, we reasoned that procedurally-based grammar learning could be associated with DRD2-TAQ-IA polymorphism. Here, English-speaking adults learned artificial concatenative and analogical grammars, which have been respectively associated with procedural and declarative memory. Language learning capabilities were tested while learners' neural hemodynamic responses were simultaneously measured by fMRI. Behavioral learning and brain activation data were subsequently compared with the learners' DRD2 (rs1800497) genotype. Learners who were homozygous for the A2 allele were better at concatenative (but not analogical) grammar learning and had higher striatal responses relative to those who have at least one A1 allele. These results provide preliminary evidence for the neurogenetic basis of normal variations in linguistic grammar learning and its link to domain-general functions.

  8. Grammar Checkers for Slovene: Introduction and Use Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Jurišić

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The widespread application of word processors entails the use of grammar checkers. These tools are frequently employed by professional as well as unskilled language users. Some of the unskilled users, including pupils and students, tend to use such tools as an aid for their poor grammar knowledge. Therefore, questions are to be addressed concerning the efficiency and practical usefulness of such tools. The paper focuses on the analysis of the existing grammar checkers for Slovenian, namely Besana and LanguageTool, in terms of their precision, reliability, and practical usefulness. Firstly, both grammar checkers are briefly introduced emphasizing the crucial differences between them in terms of duration in their development as well as with regard to their financial and technical support. This is followed by a detailed description of the methods and materials used to design a practical experiment. In the experiment, the tools are examined from the point of view of the listed parameters when translating from Slovenian into English and from English into Slovenian. In addition, a hypothesis is also assessed claiming that the users of these tools trust the suggested error corrections more often when translating into a foreign language compared to translating into their mother tongue The findings are analysed using a typology of individual error categories developed specifically for this purpose. The results confirm the hypothesis tested and indicate a relatively high level of precision and reliability of both Besana and Languagetool, thus justifying the use of both grammar checkers for Slovenian. Nevertheless, they also suggest some possible upgrades to the tools discussed concerning their approach to error detection and their ability to suggest errors for users with varying levels of language competence.

  9. Linguistic grammar learning and DRD2-TAQ-IA polymorphism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C M Wong

    Full Text Available As research into the neurobiology of language has focused primarily on the systems level, fewer studies have examined the link between molecular genetics and normal variations in language functions. Because the ability to learn a language varies in adults and our genetic codes also vary, research linking the two provides a unique window into the molecular neurobiology of language. We consider a candidate association between the dopamine receptor D2 gene (DRD2 and linguistic grammar learning. DRD2-TAQ-IA polymorphism (rs1800497 is associated with dopamine receptor D2 distribution and dopamine impact in the human striatum, such that A1 allele carriers show reduction in D2 receptor binding relative to carriers who are homozygous for the A2 allele. The individual differences in grammatical rule learning that are particularly prevalent in adulthood are also associated with striatal function and its role in domain-general procedural memory. Therefore, we reasoned that procedurally-based grammar learning could be associated with DRD2-TAQ-IA polymorphism. Here, English-speaking adults learned artificial concatenative and analogical grammars, which have been respectively associated with procedural and declarative memory. Language learning capabilities were tested while learners' neural hemodynamic responses were simultaneously measured by fMRI. Behavioral learning and brain activation data were subsequently compared with the learners' DRD2 (rs1800497 genotype. Learners who were homozygous for the A2 allele were better at concatenative (but not analogical grammar learning and had higher striatal responses relative to those who have at least one A1 allele. These results provide preliminary evidence for the neurogenetic basis of normal variations in linguistic grammar learning and its link to domain-general functions.

  10. Discovery of a Recursive Principle: An Artificial Grammar Investigation of Human Learning of a Counting Recursion Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Pyeong Whan; Szkudlarek, Emily; Tabor, Whitney

    2016-01-01

    Learning is typically understood as a process in which the behavior of an organism is progressively shaped until it closely approximates a target form. It is easy to comprehend how a motor skill or a vocabulary can be progressively learned-in each case, one can conceptualize a series of intermediate steps which lead to the formation of a proficient behavior. With grammar, it is more difficult to think in these terms. For example, center embedding recursive structures seem to involve a complex interplay between multiple symbolic rules which have to be in place simultaneously for the system to work at all, so it is not obvious how the mechanism could gradually come into being. Here, we offer empirical evidence from a new artificial language (or "artificial grammar") learning paradigm, Locus Prediction, that, despite the conceptual conundrum, recursion acquisition occurs gradually, at least for a simple formal language. In particular, we focus on a variant of the simplest recursive language, a (n) b (n) , and find evidence that (i) participants trained on two levels of structure (essentially ab and aabb) generalize to the next higher level (aaabbb) more readily than participants trained on one level of structure (ab) combined with a filler sentence; nevertheless, they do not generalize immediately; (ii) participants trained up to three levels (ab, aabb, aaabbb) generalize more readily to four levels than participants trained on two levels generalize to three; (iii) when we present the levels in succession, starting with the lower levels and including more and more of the higher levels, participants show evidence of transitioning between the levels gradually, exhibiting intermediate patterns of behavior on which they were not trained; (iv) the intermediate patterns of behavior are associated with perturbations of an attractor in the sense of dynamical systems theory. We argue that all of these behaviors indicate a theory of mental representation in which recursive

  11. The technical writer's handbook writing with style and clarity

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Matt

    2002-01-01

    "The Technical Writer's Handbook" is by a practising scientist who screens hundreds of manuscripts each year. It is directed at scientists, engineers and others who want to improve their writing and communication. It teaches that technical writing, although it has its own special requirements, is no different from ordinary writing and should be written with short, clear sentences and in the active voice. Divided into two parts, the first part is an introduction to technical and report writing and provides a sort of prescription for writing and organizing technical papers of all kinds. The second part is written in dictionary format and contains entries on grammar, style, and organization, as well as entries on topics such as common errors, resume writing, metric units, jargon, conference proceedings, figures, tables and slides. A comprehensive list of cross-references reveals related topics quickly and easily.

  12. Grammar Is the Heart of Language: Grammar and Its Role in Language Learning among Finnish University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaristo, Pekka

    2015-01-01

    This article presents and discusses views on grammar and its role in formal language learning amongst Finnish university students. The results are based on a questionnaire which was distributed to students at the University of Jyväskylä as part of institutional action research. The background to the project was a feeling amongst some teachers of…

  13. Re-Thinking Grammar: The Impact of Embedded Grammar Teaching on Students' Writing and Students' Metalinguistic Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, Debra A.; Jones, Susan M.; Lines, Helen; Watson, Annabel

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a national study, involving a mixed-method research design comprising a randomised controlled trial (RCT), text analysis, student and teacher interviews and lesson observations. It set out to investigate whether contextualised teaching of grammar, linked to the teaching of writing, would improve student outcomes in writing…

  14. A Grammar of Bantawa : grammar, paradigm tables, glossary and texts of a Rai language of Eastern Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornenbal, Marius Albert

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation provides a comprehensive overview of the grammar of Bantawa, a Kiranti (Rai) language spoken in Eastern Nepal. Bantawa is an SOV language featuring rich verbal morphology. In Bantawa we find both ergative and accusative alignment patterns in verbal affix agreement, and an ergative

  15. Adult attachment styles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Žvelc

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Theory of attachment primarily described early relationships between a child and his caretakers. In the last twenty years there is a growing interest in adult attachment research. Theories and research findings of adult attachment stem from two different methodological approaches. The first approach measures adult attachment through Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; Main, 1991 where the attachment is assessed through the narratives of adult people of their early child experiences with their primary caretakers. The second approach measures adult attachment with the help of self-evaluative questionnaires, developed by (a Hazan and Shaver (1987 who started this approach in the field of personality and social psychology, and (b Bartholomew and Horowitz (1991. Research shows that there is significant correlation between early and adult attachment style. Attachment styles are passed from generation to generation. Basic adult attachment styles are: securely attached, preoccupied, fearful-avoidant, dismissing-avoidant and disorganized. Previous research using Barholomew and Horowitz (1991 Relationship Questionnaire on 176 Slovenian students showed that 48% students are securely attached, 29% are fearful-avoidant, 10% are dismissing-avoidant, and 13% have preoccupied attachment style. Theory of attachment is very useful for understanding the behavior and subjective experiences of children and adults. It is applicable to different contexts (psychotherapy, counseling, education .... The paper proposes further research focused on integration of adult attachment styles and types of object relations measured by Test of object relations (Žvelc, 1998 and Pictorial test of Separation and Individuation (Žvelc, 2003.

  16. Management styles and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Dana Ann

    2012-01-01

    According to a review of the current literature, common managerial styles are transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire. When managers expand their leadership skills to improve the staff's morale, they must use a combination of transformational leadership behaviors and transactional contingent rewards to maximize their effectiveness on employees. A motivation theory such as Herzberg and Maslow enhances employees' motivation, morale, and satisfaction. Being able to motivate, empower, and influence staff improves satisfaction and retention levels among the team. A manager's leadership style influences motivation, morale, and retention in staff. Leaders are influenced by their educational development and the organizational culture. Organizational culture has an impact on a manager's style, which is forwarded to their followers.

  17. Leadership styles in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Vicki; Murray, Melanie

    2017-06-21

    Nurses are often asked to think about leadership, particularly in times of rapid change in healthcare, and where questions have been raised about whether leaders and managers have adequate insight into the requirements of care. This article discusses several leadership styles relevant to contemporary healthcare and nursing practice. Nurses who are aware of leadership styles may find this knowledge useful in maintaining a cohesive working environment. Leadership knowledge and skills can be improved through training, where, rather than having to undertake formal leadership roles without adequate preparation, nurses are able to learn, nurture, model and develop effective leadership behaviours, ultimately improving nursing staff retention and enhancing the delivery of safe and effective care.

  18. Demystifying APA style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Claudia M

    2002-01-01

    Many nursing schools and health care journals have adopted the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA stylebook) as their guide to achieve uniformity and consistency in manuscript preparation as well as in usage and writing style. Published in 2001, the fifth edition of the APA stylebook contains 440 pages and can overwhelm someone who tries to use it for the first time. This article delineates main points in the areas of manuscript preparation, reference lists, in-text citations, and style choices.

  19. Identifying learning styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Grace

    2016-12-14

    What was the nature of the CPD activity, practice-related feedback and/or event and/or experience in your practice? The article explored different learning styles and outlined some of the models that can be used to identify them. It discussed the limitations of these models, indicating that although they can be helpful in identifying a student's preferred learning style, this is not 'fixed' and might change over time. Learning is also influenced by other factors, such as culture and age.

  20. The Role of Parenting Styles in Predicting Anxiety Thoughts and Obsessive Compulsive Symptoms in Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Z Khanjani; B Esmaeili Anamage; M Gholamzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Parents interaction styles with children or teens have an important impact on shaping their character and mental health and the incidence of some psychiatric symptoms. The aim of this study was to predict anxiety thought and obsessive - compulsive symptoms of the adolescents based on parents' parenting styles. Methods: This was a descriptive study. 180 male students in Marand were selected by cluster random sampling. We used Baumrind parents parenting style questionnaire, Wales ...

  1. Humor Styles and Leadership Styles: Community College Presidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrica, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between leadership styles (transformational, transactional, laissez-faire) and humor styles (affiliative, self-enhancing, aggressive, self-defeating) of community college presidents. Research has shown that humor and leadership styles are related and that humor may enhance interpersonal…

  2. Structure of the style and pollen tube pathway in the Ziziphoid and Rhamnoid clades of Rhamnaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotelli, Marina M; Galati, Beatriz G; Zarlavsky, Gabriela; Medan, Diego

    2017-09-14

    The ultrastructure of the style and pollen tube pathway before, during and after anthesis were studied in 13 species belonging to the tribes Pomaderreae, Paliureae, Colletieae and Gouanieae (Ziziphoid clade) and Rhamneae (Rhamnoid clade) using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The aim of this study is to provide new morphological characters useful for phylogenetic analysis at suprageneric level in Rhamnaceae. The patterns of pollen tube growth and the ultrastructural changes undergone by cells of the style were also described. Species of Rhamneae (Scutia buxifolia and Condalia buxifolia) have a solid style, with the transmitting tissue forming three independent strands (S. buxifolia) or a central, single horseshoe-shaped strand as seen in transversal section (C. buxifolia) which could derive from the fusion of formerly independent strands. In contrast, Pomaderreae, Gouanieae and Paliureae showed semi-solid styles, while in Colletieae, as previously reported, the style is hollow with two or three stylar canals. The style anatomy and the ultrastructure of the pollen tube pathway show that there is a tendency towards a solid style with a single strand of transmitting tissue within the family. The three-canalled hollow style could be the plesiomorphic state of the character "type of style" in the family, the semi-solid style the synapomorphic state and the solid style with three strands of transmitting tissue the apomorphic state, with the solid style with a single strand of transmitting tissue as the most derived state. Therefore, Colletieae would be the most basal tribe of the Ziziphoid clade.

  3. Leadership Style: Attitudes and Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Paul; Blanchard, Kenneth H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses significant differences between the Grid and Situational leadership styles. Examines the difference between attitudes and behaviors, gives examples, and explores the relationship between self-perception and leadership style. (CT)

  4. Style and creativity in design

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chiu-Shui

    2015-01-01

    This book looks at causative reasons behind creative acts and stylistic expressions. It explores how creativity is initiated by design cognition and explains relationships between style and creativity. The book establishes a new cognitive theory of style and creativity in design and provides designers with insights into their own cognitive processes and styles of thinking, supporting a better understanding of the qualities present in their own design.  An explanation of the nature of design cognition begins this work, with a look at how design knowledge is formulated, developed, structured and utilized, and how this utilization triggers style and creativity. The author goes on to review historical studies of style, considering a series of psychological experiments relating to the operational definition, degree, measurement, and creation of style. The work conceptually summarizes the recognition of individual style in products, as well as the creation of such styles as a process before reviewing studies on cr...

  5. Identity style and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzonsky, M D

    1992-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between identity style and strategies used to cope with stressors that potentially threaten one's sense of identity. Identity style refers to differences in the way individuals construct and revise or maintain their sense of identity. An informational style involves actively seeking out, evaluating, and utilizing self-relevant information. A normative style highlights the expectations and standards of significant others. A diffuse/avoidant style is characterized by procrastination and situation-specific reactions. Late-adolescent college subjects were administered measures of identity style, ways of coping with academic stressors, and test anxiety. Within this self-as-student context, subjects with diffuse and normative identity styles employed avoidant-oriented coping strategies (wishful thinking, distancing, and tension reduction). An informational style was associated with deliberate, problem-focused coping. Findings are discussed in terms of a process model of identity development.

  6. Styles and Voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkle, Sherry; Papert, Seymour

    1993-01-01

    Case studies of elementary school and college students are used to examine the different styles of approach taken to computer programing. Introduces the term "bricoleur" to describe programers who do not take a structured approach to programing. Discusses gender differences among programers. (MDH)

  7. Styles of success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Nørgaard, Anders; Jakobsen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    Corporate success stories tend to emphasize the "great men" theory of history. But now a European research project established the managerial attributes that can turn an ordinary leader into one ideal for the pursuit of business excellence. The emergence of five leadership styles as crucial drivers...

  8. Policy in style

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, Dave; Van Snellenberg, Ton

    Environmental policy directed at industry is changing course. 'Shared responsibility' and related concepts reflect the idea that industry and government can now work together to solve environmental problems. In our view, this change implies a shift towards a more consensual policy style. This is

  9. Policy in style

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, D.; van Snellenberg, A.H.L.M.

    1999-01-01

    Environmental policy directed at industry is changing course. 'Shared responsibility' and related concepts reflect the idea that industry and government can now work together to solve environmental problems. In our view, this change implies a shift towards a more consensual policy style. This is

  10. Cultural Styles of Persuasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, E. S.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Offers an alternative methodology for studying persuasive strategies by examining the persuasive strategies selected by professional persuaders representing those cultures being studied. Analyzes the persuasive styles of United States, Soviet Union and Arab diplomats involved in international negotiations in the Security Council of the United…

  11. Creating a Leadership Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnici, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Many articles about school improvement talk about data-driven instruction and statistics. In the barrage of evaluative numbers, school leaders can forget that teaching and leading are arts, not sciences. Positive outcomes depend on the ambience of the school, which is a direct result of the leadership style of its principal and assistant…

  12. Perspective: Louisville Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Louisville, Kentucky is an eclectic town of architectural styles from Greek revival to Renaissance Revival to Post modernism, not to mention an entire street dedicated to artsy mom and pop stores. Louisville is second only to the New York City Soho district in terms of the number of its cast-iron facades. Many of these building's fronts have…

  13. Tigers with Artistic Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Maureen

    2003-01-01

    Presents an art lesson used with sixth-grade students in which they painted their school mascot (a tiger) in the style of a famous artist. Explains that students selected an artist, such as Andrew Wyeth or Edvard Munch. Describes how the students created their tigers. (CMK)

  14. Styles of Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia M. Cmeciu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Styles of Communicationeste o nouărevistăinternaţionalăcare va fipublicatăanual de Facultatea detiinţe ale Comunicării, Universitatea„Danubius” din Galaţi, în colaborare cu Comitetul de Filologie al Academieidetiinţe din Polonia, filiala Wroclaw.

  15. Growing for wine style

    Science.gov (United States)

    An overview of grape metabolites from anabolism and catabolism during berry development, and their significance to different wine styles. For example, grape secondary metabolites, such as phenolics, have long been valuable for the organoleptic properties they impart to fruit and wine, but more recen...

  16. Retrieving Similar Styles to Parse Clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kota; Kiapour, M Hadi; Ortiz, Luis E; Berg, Tamara L

    2015-05-01

    Clothing recognition is a societally and commercially important yet extremely challenging problem due to large variations in clothing appearance, layering, style, and body shape and pose. In this paper, we tackle the clothing parsing problem using a retrieval-based approach. For a query image, we find similar styles from a large database of tagged fashion images and use these examples to recognize clothing items in the query. Our approach combines parsing from: pre-trained global clothing models, local clothing models learned on the fly from retrieved examples, and transferred parse-masks (Paper Doll item transfer) from retrieved examples. We evaluate our approach extensively and show significant improvements over previous state-of-the-art for both localization (clothing parsing given weak supervision in the form of tags) and detection (general clothing parsing). Our experimental results also indicate that the general pose estimation problem can benefit from clothing parsing.

  17. Evolving stochastic context-free grammars for RNA secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, James WJ; Tataru, Paula Cristina; Stains, Joe

    2012-01-01

    with quite different structure could have very similar predictive ability. Many ambiguous grammars were found which were at least as effective as the best current unambiguous grammars. Conclusions Overall the method of evolving SCFGs for RNA secondary structure prediction proved effective in finding many...... grammars that had strong predictive accuracy, as good or slightly better than those designed manually. Furthermore, several of the best grammars found were ambiguous, demonstrating that such grammars should not be disregarded.......Background Stochastic Context-Free Grammars (SCFGs) were applied successfully to RNA secondary structure prediction in the early 90s, and used in combination with comparative methods in the late 90s. The set of SCFGs potentially useful for RNA secondary structure prediction is very large, but a few...

  18. A new method of cardiographic image segmentation based on grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Salah; Ben Abdallah, Asma; Bedoui, Mohamed H.; Alimi, Adel M.

    2011-10-01

    The measurement of the most common ultrasound parameters, such as aortic area, mitral area and left ventricle (LV) volume, requires the delineation of the organ in order to estimate the area. In terms of medical image processing this translates into the need to segment the image and define the contours as accurately as possible. The aim of this work is to segment an image and make an automated area estimation based on grammar. The entity "language" will be projected to the entity "image" to perform structural analysis and parsing of the image. We will show how the idea of segmentation and grammar-based area estimation is applied to real problems of cardio-graphic image processing.

  19. Regular languages, regular grammars and automata in splicing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Jan, Nurhidaya; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2013-04-01

    Splicing system is known as a mathematical model that initiates the connection between the study of DNA molecules and formal language theory. In splicing systems, languages called splicing languages refer to the set of double-stranded DNA molecules that may arise from an initial set of DNA molecules in the presence of restriction enzymes and ligase. In this paper, some splicing languages resulted from their respective splicing systems are shown. Since all splicing languages are regular, languages which result from the splicing systems can be further investigated using grammars and automata in the field of formal language theory. The splicing language can be written in the form of regular languages generated by grammar. Besides that, splicing systems can be accepted by automata. In this research, two restriction enzymes are used in splicing systems namely BfuCI and NcoI.

  20. The Impact of Conferencing Assessment on EFL Students’ Grammar Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Baleghizadeh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a study that was carried out in order to examine the impact of conferencing assessment on students’ learning of English grammar. Forty-two Iranian intermediate university students were randomly assigned to an experimental and a control group. The participants in the experimental group took part in four individual and four whole class conferences. The participants in the control group studied the same grammatical points but they were not involved in conferencing assessment. The results of the study showed that the experimental group performed significantly better than the control group on the given post-test. Moreover, the attitudes of the participants toward grammar learning in the experimental group significantly changed from the first administration of a questionnaire to its second administration.

  1. Learning System of Web Navigation Patterns through Hypertext Probabilistic Grammars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Cortez Vasquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One issue of real interest in the area of web data mining is to capture users’ activities during connection and extract behavior patterns that help define their preferences in order to improve the design of future pages adapting websites interfaces to individual users. This research is intended to provide, first of all, a presentation of the methodological foundations of the use of probabilistic languages to identify relevant or most visited websites. Secondly, the web sessions are represented by graphs and probabilistic context-free grammars so that the sessions that have the highest probabilities are considered the most visited and most preferred, therefore, the most important in relation to a particular topic. It aims to develop a tool for processing web sessions obtained from a log server represented by probabilistic context-free grammars.

  2. Birdsong neurolinguistics: songbird context-free grammar claim is premature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Gabriël J L; Bolhuis, Johan J; Okanoya, Kazuo; Berwick, Robert C

    2012-02-15

    There are remarkable behavioral, neural, and genetic similarities between song learning in songbirds and speech acquisition in human infants. Previously, we have argued that this parallel cannot be extended to the level of sentence syntax. Although birdsong can indeed have a complex structure, it lacks the combinatorial complexity of human language syntax. Recently, this conclusion has been challenged by a report purporting to show that songbirds can learn so-called context-free syntactic rules and then use them to discriminate particular syllable patterns. Here, we demonstrate that the design of this study is inadequate to draw such a conclusion, and offer alternative explanations for the experimental results that do not require the acquisition and use of context-free grammar rules or a grammar of any kind, only the simpler hypothesis of acoustic similarity matching. We conclude that the evolution of vocal learning involves both neural homologies and behavioral convergence, and that human language reflects a unique cognitive capacity.

  3. Leadership Styles and Their Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses leadership style theories and offers an integration of the theories by describing typical characteristics, skills, philosophies, and consequences associated with each major style. An experiential exercise is described which portrays the major styles and the productivity and satisfaction each is likely to produce. Nine figures accompany…

  4. Learning styles in otolaryngology fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, David A Diaz Voss; Malik, Mohammad U; Laeeq, Kulsoom; Pandian, Vinciya; Brown, David J; Weatherly, Robert A; Cummings, Charles W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies have identified a predominant learning style in trainees from different specialties, more recently in otolaryngology residents. The purpose of our study was to determine a predominant learning style within otolaryngology fellowships and to identify any differences between otolaryngology fellows and residents. We conducted a survey of otolaryngology fellows at 25 otolaryngology fellowship programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. We emailed Kolb's Learning Style Index version 3.1 to 16 pediatric otolaryngology (PO) and 24 otology/neurotology (ON) fellows. This index is a widely used 12-item questionnaire. The participants answered each item in the questionnaire as it applied to their preferred learning style: accommodating, converging, diverging, or assimilating. Results were then analyzed and compared between each subspecialty and the previously reported preferred styles of otolaryngology residents. Ten PO and 20 ON fellows completed the survey, with an overall response rate of 75%. PO and ON fellows (60% of each group) preferred a learning style that was "balanced" across all four styles. For ON fellows, 35% preferred converging and 5% preferred accommodating styles. For PO fellows, converging and accommodating styles accounted for 20% each. It was previously reported that 74.4% of otolaryngology residents prefer either converging or accommodating styles. We believe that the fellowship training environment calls for fellows to use more than one learning style to become proficient physicians, hence the trend toward potentially developing a balanced style when at this level. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Strategies for Bridging Learning Styles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchman, J. A.; Sadowski, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Regardless of the instrument used to determine learning styles, it is commonly accepted that people learn in different ways. As Professors, we tend to teach in a style that matches the way we ourselves learn. Tis may or may not match the learning styles of the students in our classroom. As Graphics educators, we cannot meet every student's…

  6. Parenting Style Transitions and Delinquency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Ryan D.; Mowen, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Parenting style has been extensively analyzed as a contributor to juvenile delinquency in the criminological literature, but no research to date has assessed the prevalence of parenting style changes during adolescence or the influence of such parenting style changes on juvenile delinquency. Drawing from the life course theory, the results show…

  7. Style drift in private equity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cumming, D.; Fleming, G.; Schwienbacher, A.

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the concept of style drift to private equity investment. We present theory and evidence pertaining to style drifts in terms of a fund manager's stated focus on particular stages of entrepreneurial development. We develop a model that derives conditions under which style drifts are less

  8. PECULIARITIES OF GRAMMAR STUDY OF MOUNTAIN FIRST-FORM PUPILS

    OpenAIRE

    Marija Kiryk

    2015-01-01

    The articles describes the role of analiztor system (auditory, visual, kinesthetic) at the initial stage of learning literacy and language development six years old. They from specific integration system, that provides more efficient perception, memorization and reproduction of educational material. The article deals with attempt to ascertain linguadidactic interconnections and interdependence between grammar education (reading, writing) and speech of six-year pupils. Summing up it should be ...

  9. Prescriptive Grammar in Teaching English in Indonesian Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Artini, Luh Putu

    2001-01-01

    This article is written in an attempt to argue that there is a need of uniformity in terms of grammar when English is taught as a foreign language. Thus, the idea that prescriptivism is "out of date" as well as "not permissive to language change" is corrected by presenting some arguments of the need to maintain its application. Some of those are related to language testing, language environment, size of foreign language classess and text books

  10. A LEXICAL-FUNCTIONAL GRAMMAR REPRESENTATION OF INDONESIAN VERBAL SENTENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Fuad Cholisi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a Lexical-Functional Grammar (LFG) description of Indonesian structures with a verbal predicate. The similarity of Indonesian and English in this type of construction has enabled the application of the original patterns of LFG for the English structures on its Indonesian counterparts. However, some adjustment has to be made in the description of the constituent structure (c-structure). The Indonesian constituent structure here is unique in that whilst it is organized endoc...

  11. The Premature Use of English Grammar by EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Mukminatien

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The roles of conscious learning and error corrections have been questioned since the development of communicative approaches to language teaching, along with theoritical and empirical insights from Second Language Acquisition (SLA research. Whether overt learning really helps the learner produce better L2 performance is a mistery. This article describes the premature use of English Grammar by EFL learners as shown on their writing performance. It also reviews theoritical insights from SLA theories to uncover the mystery.

  12. UNIVERSAL GRAMMAR AND SECOND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION THEORY : PROSPECTS AND PROBLEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin R., Gregg; 桃山学院大学文学部

    1996-01-01

    One of the central problems in second language acquisition (SLA) theory has been the question of whether it is constrained by Universal Grammar (UG), as first language acquisition is posited to be. This paper considers three criteria, based on Atkinson (1982), for assessing any putative SLA theory: the Theoretical Framework Condition, the Sequence Condition, and the Mechanism Condition, and evaluates current proposals for an SLA theory in the light of these criteria.

  13. Tool Support for Design Patterns based on Reference Attribute Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornils, Aino; Hedin, Görel

    2000-01-01

    a flexible and extensible tool which enables designers to use design patterns in a safe and easy way and which semi-automatically documents and maintains the documentation of a software system. The system is implemented using reference attribute grammars (RAGs) which are capable of describing non......-local dependencies. Both the programming language and the design patterns are specified using RAGs, and reference attributes are used for connecting design pattern instances to the corresponding elements in the program code....

  14. The grammar of conversation: How much of it is syntax?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Hill

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the interaction between conversational pragmatics and syntax with a view to identifying to what extent pragmatic interpretation can be read off syntactic structure. Building on empirical data from Romanian, it argues, from a generative grammar perspective, for a speech acts component of clausal derivations. The speech act maps the pragmatic roles of speaker, hearer and the topic of their conversation (the sentience dimension to syntactic positions.

  15. Teaching grammar communicatively(Exploring the Evolving Goals of English Education)

    OpenAIRE

    DAVID CHARLES, NUNAN; Hong Kong大学; University of Hong Kong

    2005-01-01

    With the development of communicative approaches to language teaching, some language specialists have called into question to place of grammar in the curriculum. For some it plays and minor role, and for others it has no place at all. In this presentation, I will argue that grammar is of fundamental importance in the communicative classroom. However, the approach to teaching grammar in the classroom needs to reflect principles of communicative language teaching. During the presentation, parti...

  16. A stochastic context free grammar based framework for analysis of protein sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Dyrka, Witold; Nebel, Jean-Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In the last decade, there have been many applications of formal language theory in bioinformatics such as RNA structure prediction and detection of patterns in DNA. However, in the field of proteomics, the size of the protein alphabet and the complexity of relationship between amino acids have mainly limited the application of formal language theory to the production of grammars whose expressive power is not higher than stochastic regular grammars. However, these grammars,...

  17. [Reliability and applications of a grammar comprehension assessment test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Higes, Ramón; Martín-Aragoneses, M Teresa; Rubio-Valdehita, Susana

    2010-04-01

    The sentence comprehension test from the sentence comprehension cognitive examination (ECCO) battery can be used to assess children and adults with grammar comprehension disorders by means of a simple verification procedure that requires few memory resources. AIM. To present a psychometric analysis of the sentence comprehension test based on the classical theory of tests and on item response theory, as well as several studies that show its usefulness for assessing grammar comprehension in different populations. The test was applied to 2238 subjects with ages ranging from 6 to 85 years. The analysis shows that the test has a high overall reliability and, through the age groups that were considered, it includes elements that are especially discriminating or informative (lexical and syntactic distractors) and is biased towards medium-low levels of the trait. In view of the results, the sentence comprehension test from the ECCO battery provides a reliable measure of grammar comprehension through a wide variety of constructions and has great potential value for use in the clinical and research domains.

  18. Describing visual scenes: towards a neurolinguistics based on construction grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, Michael A; Lee, Jinyong

    2008-08-15

    The present paper is part of a larger effort to locate the production and perception of language within the broader context of brain mechanisms for action and perception more generally. Here we model function in terms of the competition and cooperation of schemas. We use the task of describing visual scenes to explore the suitability of Construction Grammar as an appropriate framework for a schema-based linguistics. We recall the early VISIONS model of schema-based computer analysis of static visual scenes and then introduce SemRep as a graphical representation of dynamic visual scenes designed to support the generation of varied descriptions of episodes. We report preliminary results on implementing the production of sentences using Template Construction Grammar (TCG), a new form of construction grammar distinguished by its use of SemRep to express semantics. We summarize data on neural correlates relevant to future work on TCG within the context of neurolinguistics, and show how the relation between SemRep and TCG can serve as the basis for modeling language comprehension.

  19. Vega-Lite: A Grammar of Interactive Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayan, Arvind; Moritz, Dominik; Wongsuphasawat, Kanit; Heer, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    We present Vega-Lite, a high-level grammar that enables rapid specification of interactive data visualizations. Vega-Lite combines a traditional grammar of graphics, providing visual encoding rules and a composition algebra for layered and multi-view displays, with a novel grammar of interaction. Users specify interactive semantics by composing selections. In Vega-Lite, a selection is an abstraction that defines input event processing, points of interest, and a predicate function for inclusion testing. Selections parameterize visual encodings by serving as input data, defining scale extents, or by driving conditional logic. The Vega-Lite compiler automatically synthesizes requisite data flow and event handling logic, which users can override for further customization. In contrast to existing reactive specifications, Vega-Lite selections decompose an interaction design into concise, enumerable semantic units. We evaluate Vega-Lite through a range of examples, demonstrating succinct specification of both customized interaction methods and common techniques such as panning, zooming, and linked selection.

  20. Real time QRS complex detection using DFA and regular grammar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Salah; Ben Abdallah, Asma; Bedoui, Mohamed Hedi

    2017-02-28

    The sequence of Q, R, and S peaks (QRS) complex detection is a crucial procedure in electrocardiogram (ECG) processing and analysis. We propose a novel approach for QRS complex detection based on the deterministic finite automata with the addition of some constraints. This paper confirms that regular grammar is useful for extracting QRS complexes and interpreting normalized ECG signals. A QRS is assimilated to a pair of adjacent peaks which meet certain criteria of standard deviation and duration. The proposed method was applied on several kinds of ECG signals issued from the standard MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. A total of 48 signals were used. For an input signal, several parameters were determined, such as QRS durations, RR distances, and the peaks' amplitudes. σRR and σQRS parameters were added to quantify the regularity of RR distances and QRS durations, respectively. The sensitivity rate of the suggested method was 99.74% and the specificity rate was 99.86%. Moreover, the sensitivity and the specificity rates variations according to the Signal-to-Noise Ratio were performed. Regular grammar with the addition of some constraints and deterministic automata proved functional for ECG signals diagnosis. Compared to statistical methods, the use of grammar provides satisfactory and competitive results and indices that are comparable to or even better than those cited in the literature.