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Sample records for students investigate soil

  1. Crime Scene Soil Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Cynthia; Simms, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Mobile learning is an incredible way to engage students in activities that encourage exploration and critical thinking. This type of learning is defined by the use of portable technology, such as laptops, tablets, and smart phones, to support learning in various environments and in various ways. Depending on the technologies and resources already…

  2. The Use of Soil in Criminal Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Lorna; Fitzpatrick, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Forensic soil science, as a newly developed discipline of soil science, has matured to the extent that well-defined questions and successful crime scene investigations are being addressed in increasingly refined ways to assist law enforcement agencies. Soils, rocks, regolith, minerals and man-made mineral particles such as bricks (i.e. referred to "human-made" soil materials) are being used in specialised forensic investigations to associate/disassociate a sample taken from an item, such as shoes, clothing, shovel or vehicle, with a specific location. The majority of forensic cases involving soil materials are usually overwhelmingly complex, and the challenges of associating relevant information from one source with another, often requires the use and development of sophisticated field and laboratory methods. Through examples from case studies, this presentation will demonstrate how advanced field and laboratory approaches have been critical in developing coherent, predictive, soil models, from landscape to microscopic scales, to help contribute to soil-based criminal investigations in both Australia and Scotland. To demonstrate the critical importance of soil materials in forensic investigations, the following 2 case studies, which tackle difficult problems at a range of scales involving highly complex issues, will be presented: •The use of soil evidence to help solve a double murder case. This investigation used morphological, chemical, physical and mineralogical properties to identify similarities between soil-regolith found on a shovel taken from the suspect's vehicle and wetland soil-regolith subsequently located in the bottom of a quarry (Fitzpatrick and Raven, 2012). •The use of soil and related material to help search and to provide evidence in a murder case. This investigation used soil mineralogical and organic properties to identify similarities between sand found on a shovel and sand subsequently located at a beach. Results illustrate the benefit of

  3. An experimental investigation to characterise soil macroporosity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 119; Issue 5 ... quality monitoring and groundwater pollution assessment due to preferential leaching of solutes and pesticides,study of soil structural properties and infiltration behaviour of soils,investigation of flash floods in rivers, and hydrological ...

  4. Sequences for Student Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Jeffrey; Feil, David; Lartigue, David; Mullins, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    We describe two classes of sequences that give rise to accessible problems for undergraduate research. These problems may be understood with virtually no prerequisites and are well suited for computer-aided investigation. The first sequence is a variation of one introduced by Stephen Wolfram in connection with his study of cellular automata. The…

  5. Field classes: key to involve and attract students to soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggler, Cristine Carole; Cardoso, Irene Maria; da Silva Lopes, Angelica

    2015-04-01

    Soil genesis is a subject taught to students of Agrarian Sciences and Geography at the Federal University of Viçosa in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Each semester 200 to 250 students inscribe for it. It is organized as the first 60 hours course on soils for 1st and 2nd year's students. The course has a distinct pedagogical approach, which is based on Paulo Freire's education principles, known as socio constructivism. In such approach, learning environments and materials are prepared to stimulate dialogues and exchange of knowledge between students themselves, strengthening that their role is crucial to their own learning. During the course, students have different types of practical classes: indoors, in a class room or at the Earth Sciences museum and outdoors, in the field. In the class room they have the opportunity to handle materials -minerals, rocks, soils and maps-, follow demonstrations and perform small experiments. The classes given in the museum intend a broadening of the subjects approached in theoretical and practical classes. In the field classes the students are organized in small groups with the task to investigate soil formation by observation and description of geology, landscape, land use, soil expositions and some of the soil properties. Attracting students to soils involves looking at meanings and perceptions related to soils they bring with themselves and follow this up to sensitize and create awareness about their importance. With this aim, it is also included, as part of the evaluation, a final voluntary presentation that many of the students do. The presentation can be a song, a poem, a sketch or whatever they propose and create. Many of the presentations bring topics related to the new perception about soils they get during the semester and to ideas or questions raised in the field classes. A survey with the students showed that field classes are by far the preferred classes and they are considered more dynamic. Since students have less and less

  6. Students Dig Deep in the Mystery Soil Lab: A Playful, Inquiry-Based Soil Laboratory Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiet, Rachel K.

    2014-01-01

    The Mystery Soil Lab, a playful, inquiry-based laboratory project, is designed to develop students' skills of inquiry, soil analysis, and synthesis of foundational concepts in soil science and soil ecology. Student groups are given the charge to explore and identify a "Mystery Soil" collected from a unique landscape within a 10-mile…

  7. Soil Respiration and Student Inquiry: A Perfect Match

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Catherine Marie; Wallenstein, Matthew David

    2011-01-01

    This activity explores the cycling of carbon between the atmosphere (primarily as CO[subscript 2]) and biomass in plants, animals, and microscopic organisms. Students design soil respiration experiments using a protocol that resembles current practice in soil ecology. Three methods for measuring soil respiration are presented. Student-derived…

  8. The academic majors of students taking American soil science classes: 2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.; Vaughan, Karen L.; Parikh, Sanjai J.; Dolliver, Holly; Lindbo, David; Steffan, Joshua J.; Weindorf, David; McDaniel, Paul; Mbila, Monday; Edinger-Marshall, Susan

    2017-04-01

    Many papers have been written in recent years discussing the interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary aspects of soil science. Therefore, it would make sense that soil science courses would be taken by students in a wide array of academic majors. To investigate this, we collected data from eight different American universities on the declared academic majors of students enrolled in soil science courses over a 10 year time period (2004-2005 to 2013-2014 academic years). Data was collected for seven different classes taught at the undergraduate level: introduction to soil science, soil fertility, soil management, pedology, soil biology/microbiology, soil chemistry, and soil physics. Overall trends and trends for each class were evaluated. Generally, environmental science and crop science/horticulture/agronomy students were enrolled in soil science courses in the greatest numbers. Environmental science and engineering students showed rapid increases in enrollment over the 10 years of the study, while the number of crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students declined. In the introduction to soil science classes, environmental science and crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students were enrolled in the greatest numbers, while declared soil science majors only made up 6.6% of the average enrollment. The highest enrollments in soil fertility were crop science/ horticulture/ agronomy students and other agricultural students (all agricultural majors except crop science, horticulture, agronomy, or soil science). In both the soil management and pedology classes, environmental science and other agricultural students were the largest groups enrolled. Other agricultural students and students from other majors (all majors not otherwise expressly investigated) were the largest enrolled groups in soil biology/microbiology courses, and environmental science and soil science students were the largest enrolled groups in soil chemistry classes. Soil physics was the only class

  9. Investigating students' motivations and attitudes towards reading ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on an investigation into students' attitudes to and motivations for reading. These socio-affective factors relating to students' reading abilities have been largely ignored in L1 and L2 reading research, especially in L2 contexts. Yet, L2 students tend to display differing motivations and attitudes for L2 reading ...

  10. Investigating Student Understanding of Histograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Jennifer J.; Gabrosek, John G.; Curtiss, Phyllis; Malone, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Histograms are adept at revealing the distribution of data values, especially the shape of the distribution and any outlier values. They are included in introductory statistics texts, research methods texts, and in the popular press, yet students often have difficulty interpreting the information conveyed by a histogram. This research identifies…

  11. Investigation of natural radionuclide contents in soil in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Sanming; Liu Ruye

    1992-01-01

    The survey of natural radionuclide contents in soil in China (1983-1990) is a part of investigation of environmental natural radioactivity level on China. The results of the investigation area as follows: (1) The average content of natural radionuclides 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K(area weighted) and its standard deviation for single measurement is 39.5 and 34.4,36.5 and 22.0, 49.1 and 27.6, 580.0 and 202.0 Bq.kg -1 ,respectively.(2) The content of natural radionuclides is apparently correlated to the types of soil-forming rock. The analysis results from 1552 soil samples of soil-forming rock show that: the content of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K for magmatic rock type is the highest, 238 U, 226 Ra and 232 Th of metamorphic rock type higher, sedimentary rock type the lowest. However, the content of 40 K of sedimentary rock type is more higher, magmatic rock type the lowest. In magmatic rock type, the content of 238 U, 226 Ra, 232 Th of granite and acidic magmatic rock type, and the content of 40 K of acidic and alkaline magmatic rock type are higher. (3) The analysis results from 9613 various types of soil samples show that for crimson soil of ferralsol wind soil of rock soil-forming order at northern part is lower. For frigid dessert soil of alpine soil order, alpine dessert soil, and the burozem, dark burozem and drab soil of alfisol order and semialfisol order, the content of 40 K is shown to be higher, and it is lower for latosol of ferralsol order, crimson soil, yellow soil and various lime soil. (4) The geographical distribution of the natural radionuclide content in soil appears apparently regional

  12. Using 137 Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, P; Walling, D E

    2011-05-01

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide (137)Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using (137)Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). (137)Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha(-1) yr(-1) to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha(-1) yr(-1). Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil redistribution rate, but for

  13. Using 137Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, P.; Walling, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide 137 Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using 137 Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). 137 Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha -1 yr -1 to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha -1 yr -1 . Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil redistribution rate, but for most

  14. Students' Investigation of a View Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    The inquiry-based approach to learning has gained popularity in recent times. Those who promote this approach maintain that mathematical investigation should be used to engage students. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) recommends that problem solving be the center of mathematics teaching in promoting student learning through…

  15. Investigation of Soil Salinity to Distinguish Boundary Line between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Investigation of Soil Salinity to Distinguish Boundary Line between Saline and ... Setting 4 dSm-1 as the limit between saline and non-saline soils in kriging algorithms resulted in a .... number of sample points within the search window,.

  16. Investigation Of The Microbial-Induced Corrosion Potential Of Soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of sulphate-reducing bacteria induced corrosion potential of soils along 18-inch 45km Tebidaba/Brass underground oil pipeline in Southern Ijaw LGA of Bayelsa State, Nigeria, is carried out experimentally. The analysis involves determination of some physico-chemical parameters of soils in the pipeline route, ...

  17. Comparative investigations of cesium and potassium in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, G.; Leising, C.; Krestel, R.; Wirth, E.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was the reliable estimation of the Cs-137 root uptake by agricultural crops using the ''observed ratio model'' (OR model) for the determination of transfer factors: Cs (plant)/K (plant)=OR x Cs (soil)/K (soil). For model validation representative soil (arable land, grass land, organic substrates from forest and peat) and plant samples from Bavaria were taken These 4 parameters varied within a sufficiently wide range. In addition some samples from forest sites were taken. Soil and plant samples were taken at the same locations within 1 m2. (orig.) [de

  18. Student Developed Knowledge Portfolios from a Soil Fertility Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindelar, Meghan; Mamo, Martha; Wingeyer, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Students who have completed the Soil Nutrient Relationships course at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln often contact instructors once they have begun full-time work, seeking reminders of specific concepts. These students either did not take or keep detailed notes during the course. To assist students, instructors have developed a portfolio…

  19. Investigation and evaluation of orimulsion dispersion in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltrenas, P.; Idzelis, R.; Petraitis, E.

    1999-01-01

    To establish the hardening and penetration of orimulsion into 85 cm diameter plastic drums with different types of soil (light and middle loam, big sand and a fertile mixed soil), orimulsion was poured so that it would form layers with the thickness of 1 cm (56.7 cm 3 ), 3 cm (170.1 cm 3 ) and 5 cm (282.5 cm 3 ). Investigation of each layer was made three times, each time using five filled tankages. When orimulsion is poured on the soil surface, a vertical and horizontal dispersion occurs. A vertical dispersion is called penetration. The penetration of orimulsion (the soaking depth of a filtrate) into different types of soil is different. In a non-thickened dry soil the largest orimulsion penetration was in sand. During the first hour, depending on the amount of poured orimulsion, the filtrate was absorbed into the soil to 10-11 mm, and during twenty-four hours - to 42-45 mm. A vertical penetration of orimulsion into soil stabilized after 3 days and reached 100-115 mm. Orimulsion penetration into a fertile soil is smaller than that in sand. During the first hours the orimulsion was absorbed only 4-7 mm, and after twenty-four hours - 23-32 mm, after 3 days (when stabilized) - 60-78 mm. The penetration of orimulsion into a light loamy soil is the smallest: in the first hour - only I mm, and after 3 days - 2-5 mm. The penetration of orimulsion in all the types of the investigated thickened wet soils is smaller than that in non-thickened ones, and the filtrate penetration depth is twice as less. It is determined that air temperature has an influence on orimulsion penetration into soil. At a lower air temperature orimulsion freezes more quickly. On the other hand, at a higher temperature the orimulsion freezing period becomes longer. That is why the filtrate penetration time into soil is longer, later a pellicle is formed. With the help of experiments, it is found that the most intensive evaporation of drifting hydrocarbons is in the first 3 hours. Later the orimulsion

  20. Investigating Student Attitudes toward Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirakaya, Mustafa; Kiliç Çakmak, Ebru

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the attitudes of secondary school students toward AR applications and to investigate the change in these attitudes according to different variables. The study also aspired to determine the relationship between attitudes toward AR and achievement. The general survey model was used in the study. The study group was…

  1. Investigating student understanding of simple harmonic motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somroob, S.; Wattanakasiwich, P.

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate students’ understanding and develop instructional material on a topic of simple harmonic motion. Participants were 60 students taking a course on vibrations and wave and 46 students taking a course on Physics 2 and 28 students taking a course on Fundamental Physics 2 on the 2nd semester of an academic year 2016. A 16-question conceptual test and tutorial activities had been developed from previous research findings and evaluated by three physics experts in teaching mechanics before using in a real classroom. Data collection included both qualitative and quantitative methods. Item analysis and whole-test analysis were determined from student responses in the conceptual test. As results, most students had misconceptions about restoring force and they had problems connecting mathematical solutions to real motions, especially phase angle. Moreover, they had problems with interpreting mechanical energy from graphs and diagrams of the motion. These results were used to develop effective instructional materials to enhance student abilities in understanding simple harmonic motion in term of multiple representations.

  2. Ammonium citrate as enhancement for electrodialytic soil remediation and investigation of soil solution during the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Kirkelund, Gunvor M; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2015-01-01

    Seven electrodialytic experiments were conducted using ammonium citrate as enhancing agent to remediate copper and chromium-contaminated soil from a wood-preservation site. The purpose was to investigate the effect of current density (0.2, 1.0 and 1.5 mA cm(-2)), concentration of enhancing agent (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0 M) and remediation times (21, 42 and 117 d) for the removal of Cu and Cr from a calcareous soil. To gain insight on metal behavior, soil solution was periodically collected using suction cups. It was seen that current densities higher than 1.0 mA cm(-2) did not increase removal and thus using too high current densities can be a waste of energy. Desorption rate is important and both remediation time and ammonium citrate concentration are relevant parameters. It was possible to collect soil solution samples following an adaptation of the experimental set-up to ensure continuous supply of ammonium citrate to the soil in order to keep it saturated during the remediation. Monitoring soil solution gives valuable information on the evolution of remediation and helps deciding when the soil is remediated. Final concentrations in the soil ranged from 220 to 360 mg Cu kg(-1) (removals: 78-86%) and 440-590 mg Cr kg(-1) (removals: 35-51%), being within the 500 mg kg(-1) limit for a clean soil only for Cu. While further optimization is still required for Cr, the removal percentages are the highest achieved so far, for a real Cu and Cr-contaminated, calcareous soil. The results highlight EDR potential to remediate metal polluted soils at neutral to alkaline pH by choosing a good enhancement solution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of Student Reasoning about Harmonic Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongnopparat, N.; Poonyawatpornkul, J.; Wattanakasiwich, P.

    This study aimed to investigate student reasoning about harmonic oscillations. We conducted a semi-structured interview based on three situations of harmonic motions—(1) a mass attaching to spring and horizontally oscillating without damping, (2) the same situation but vertically oscillating and (3) a mass attaching to spring and oscillating in viscous liquid. Forty-five second-year students taking a vibrations and wave course at Chiang Mai University, Thailand participated in a fifteen-minute interview, which was video-recorded. The videos were transcribed and analyzed by three physics instructors. As results, we found that most students had misconceptions about angular frequency and energy mostly in the second and third situations.

  4. Investigating how students communicate tree-thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Carrie Jo

    Learning is often an active endeavor that requires students work at building conceptual understandings of complex topics. Personal experiences, ideas, and communication all play large roles in developing knowledge of and understanding complex topics. Sometimes these experiences can promote formation of scientifically inaccurate or incomplete ideas. Representations are tools used to help individuals understand complex topics. In biology, one way that educators help people understand evolutionary histories of organisms is by using representations called phylogenetic trees. In order to understand phylogenetics trees, individuals need to understand the conventions associated with phylogenies. My dissertation, supported by the Tree-Thinking Representational Competence and Word Association frameworks, is a mixed-methods study investigating the changes in students' tree-reading, representational competence and mental association of phylogenetic terminology after participation in varied instruction. Participants included 128 introductory biology majors from a mid-sized southern research university. Participants were enrolled in either Introductory Biology I, where they were not taught phylogenetics, or Introductory Biology II, where they were explicitly taught phylogenetics. I collected data using a pre- and post-assessment consisting of a word association task and tree-thinking diagnostic (n=128). Additionally, I recruited a subset of students from both courses (n=37) to complete a computer simulation designed to teach students about phylogenetic trees. I then conducted semi-structured interviews consisting of a word association exercise with card sort task, a retrospective pre-assessment discussion, a post-assessment discussion, and interview questions. I found that students who received explicit lecture instruction had a significantly higher increase in scores on a tree-thinking diagnostic than students who did not receive lecture instruction. Students who received both

  5. Ammonium citrate as enhancement for electrodialytic soil remediation and investigation of soil solution during the process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias-Ferreira, Celia; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Seven electrodialytic experiments were conducted using ammonium citrate as enhancing agent to remediate copper and chromium-contaminated soil from a wood-preservation site. The purpose was to investigate the effect of current density (0.2, 1.0 and 1.5 mA cm−2), concentration of enhancing agent (0...... to remediate metal polluted soils at neutral to alkaline pH by choosing a good enhancement solution....

  6. Investigating Students' Perceptions on Mobile Learning Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Amin Almaiah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available M-learning is a form of learning, which has similarities and differences with the electronic learning (e-learning. It is mainly based on the use of the mobile wireless technologies that allow for learners to easily access learning materials anytime he desires and anywhere, whether on campus or off campus. Therefore, this creates a new flexible learning environment in the context of different learning settings. Students' perception of such technology is one of the most important factors for successful adoption of m-learning in the higher education environment. This study is conducted to investigate the perceptions of students in University Malaysia Terengganu (UMT to move towards applying m-learning in their studies by using their mobile devices and to explore their expectations on mobile learning services. A total number of 91 undergraduate students majoring in computer science participated in the study. The findings show that the students have positive perception towards mobile learning and would like to use their mobile devices for both learning and administrative services.

  7. Investigation of plutonium behaviour in artificially contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luksiene, B.; Druteikiene, R.

    2006-01-01

    The vertical migration and transformation of plutonium chemical forms artificially supplied to sandy loam columns after its exposure to natural conditions for about one year was investigated. An analysis of artificially contaminated samples after one year had shown that 81% of 239 Pu 4+ and 44% of 239 Pu 3+ were accumulated in the 0-5 cm layer of sandy loam. The data of sequential analysis of the same type of soil at the adequate artificial contamination level after one month exposure under laboratory conditions are presented as well. Pu 239 binding to soil geochemical fractions was rather uneven. The largest amount of Pu 239 (60%) was determined in the residual fraction. Consequently, it can be assumed that organic substances and some inorganic compounds, which usually are the main components of a residual fraction, affects the retention and migration of plutonium in the soil. (authors)

  8. Investigation of plutonium behaviour in artificially contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukshiene, B.; Druteikiene, R.

    2006-01-01

    The vertical migration and transformation of plutonium chemical forms artificially supplied to sandy loam columns after its exposure to natural conditions for about one year was investigated. An analysis of artificially contaminated samples after one year had shown that 81% of 239 Pu 4+ and 44% of 239 Pu 3+ were accumulated in the 0-5 cm layer of sandy loam. The data of sequential analysis of the same type of soil at the adequate artificial contamination level after one month exposure under laboratory conditions are presented as well. Pu 239 binding to soil geochemical fractions was rather uneven. The largest amount of Pu 239 (60 %) was determined in the residual fraction. Consequently, it can be assumed that organic substances and some inorganic compounds, which usually are the main components of a residual fraction, affects the retention and migration of plutonium in the soil. (authors)

  9. Laboratory investigation of TerraZyme as a soil stabilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Siti Aimi Nadia Mohd; Azmi, Mastura; Ramli, Harris; Bakar, Ismail; Wijeyesekera, D. C.; Zainorabidin, Adnan

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a laboratory investigation was conducted to examine the performance of TerraZyme on different soil types. Laterite and kaolin were treated with 2% and 5% TerraZyme to determine changes in the soils' geotechnical properties. The obtained results were analysed and investigated in terms of compaction, Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS) and California Bearing Ratio (CBR). The changes in geotechnical properties of the stabilised and unstabilised soils were monitored after curing periods of 0, 7, 15, 21 and 30 days. Changes in compaction properties, UCS and CBR were observed. It was found that laterite with 5% TerraZyme gave a higher maximum dry density (MDD) and decreased the optimum moisture content (OMC). For kaolin, a different TerraZyme percentage did not show any effect on both MDD and OMC. For strength properties, it was found that 2% TerraZyme showed the greatest change in UCS over a 30-day curing period. The CBR value of stabilised kaolin with 2% TerraZyme gave a higher CBR value than the kaolin treated with 5% TerraZyme. It was also found that laterite treated with TerraZyme gave a higher CBR value. Lastly, it can be concluded that TerraZyme is not suitable for stabilising kaolin; TerraZyme requires a cohesive soil to achieve a better performance.

  10. Water Intake by Soil, Experiments for High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969

    Presented are a variety of surface run-off experiments for high school students. The experiments are analogies to basic concepts about water intake, as related to water delivery, soil properties and management, floods, and conservation measures. The materials needed to perform the experiments are easily obtainable. The experiments are followed by…

  11. Student reasoning while investigating plant material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Näs

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this project, 10-12 year old students in three classes, investigated plant material to learn more about plants and photosynthesis. The research study was conducted to reveal the students’ scientific reasoning during their work. The eleven different tasks helped students investigate plant anatomy, plant physiology, and the gases involved in photosynthesis and respiration. The study was carried out in three ordinary classrooms. The collected data consisted of audio-taped discussions, students’ notebooks, and field notes. Students’ discussions and written work, during the different plant tasks, were analysed to see how the students’ learning and understanding processes developed. The analysis is descriptive and uses categories from a modified general typology of student’s epistemological reasoning. The study shows students’ level of interest in doing the tasks, their struggle with new words and concepts, and how they develop their knowledge about plant physiology. The study confirms thatstudents, in this age group, develop understanding and show an interest in complicated processes in natural science, e.g. photosynthesis.

  12. Investigation of soil radioactivity of Alkhwai area central Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, R. H. A.

    2012-10-01

    The present study is the first of its type to be conducted in Alkhwai area aiming at thorough investigation of natural environmental radioactivity. Considerable variation in soil radioactivity with location is observed. Results show that the average concentrations of 2 38U , 2 32T h and 4 0K in soil were found to be 14.79± 2.43, 20.71± 3.59 and 162.09± 21.19 respectively and have the range 10.0-21.98, 13.89-28.55 and from 113.51 to 219.45 respectively. It is observed that there is strong correlation between Uranium-Thorium and fair correlation between Uranium-Potassium and Thorium-Potassium. The average value of calculated gamma radiation dose rate in Alkhwai district was estimated to be (26.10) n Gy h -1 comparable with the world average (59 n Gy/h). The average dose from gamma radiation dose rate to an individual assuming a tropical rural setting is estimated to be 32.03 μSv/year, which is considered to be within the normal range for doses from natural sources. Further measurements of ambient dose for more soil type at different geological features of Sudan are needed to establish a more comprehensive database on the relationship between gamma radiation dose and geological-soil information. (Author)

  13. Experimental Investigation of Phenanthrene Pollutant Removal Efficiency for Contaminated Sandy Soil by Enhanced Soil Washing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif salah Alquzweeni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are environmental concerns that must be removed to acceptable level. This research assesses two agents (Na2EDTA and SDS to remediate contaminated sandy soil, spiked with 500mg/kg phenanthrene. Five sets of experiments (batch are applied to investigate the optimal of five influencing factors on soil remediation: Na2EDTA-SDS concentration, liquid/Solid ratio, stirring speed, pH value of flushing solution and mixing time. The results of batch experiments showed that SDS has high phenanthrene removal efficiency (90%, while Na2EDTA shows no phenanthrene removal. pH has no effect on phenanthrene removal. To study the influence of flow rates on the removal efficiency of contaminants, two column tests with hydraulic gradient of 0.2 and 1.2 conducted by SDS solution. The results illustrate that high phenanthrene removal from soil obtained by 1.2 hydraulic gradient condition. The SDS flushing solution removed approximately 69% and 81% of phenanthrene from soil under low and high hydraulic gradients, respectively. It was concluded that phenanthrene removal depend on surfactant micelles formation. Overall, the study showed that soil flushing removal efficiency for contaminants depends on the flushing agents selectivity and affinity to the contaminants and the condition of hydraulic gradient.

  14. Wind tunnel investigations on tritium reemission from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taeschner, M.; Bunnenberg, C.

    1993-01-01

    Future fusion plants and tritium handling facilities will contain large amounts of tritium. Following chronical or accidental releases to the atmosphere a secondary HTO source is established in the downwind sector of the tritium release point as a result of deposition processes. To investigate HTO reemission rates, experiments were performed with a special wind tunnel, in which the air flows across the surface of soil columns under controlled conditions. In order to measure the HTO content of an air sample that was experimentally contaminated by reemission of HTO from a labeled soil column, a fast method is used. The air sample is bubbled through a flask filled with a definite volume of low-tritium water. At the end of the sampling period, the volume and the specific activity of the flask water are measured. With the help of a simple mathematical formula, that is presented in this report, the HTO activity of the air sample can be calculated. (orig.) [de

  15. Using {sup 137}Cs measurements to investigate the influence of erosion and soil redistribution on soil properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, P. [School of Geography, Beijing Normal University, Beijing (China); Geography, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ, Devon (United Kingdom); Walling, D.E., E-mail: d.e.walling@exeter.ac.u [Geography, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Amory Building, Rennes Drive, Exeter, EX4 4RJ, Devon (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Information on the interaction between soil erosion and soil properties is an important requirement for sustainable management of the soil resource. The relationship between soil properties and the soil redistribution rate, reflecting both erosion and deposition, is an important indicator of this interaction. This relationship is difficult to investigate using traditional approaches to documenting soil redistribution rates involving erosion plots and predictive models. However, the use of the fallout radionuclide {sup 137}Cs to document medium-term soil redistribution rates offers a means of overcoming many of the limitations associated with traditional approaches. The study reported sought to demonstrate the potential for using {sup 137}Cs measurements to assess the influence of soil erosion and redistribution on soil properties (particle size composition, total C, macronutrients N, P, K and Mg, micronutrients Mn, Mo, Fe, Cu and Zn and other elements, including Ti and As). {sup 137}Cs measurements undertaken on 52 soil cores collected within a 7 ha cultivated field located near Colebrooke in Devon, UK were used to establish the magnitude and spatial pattern of medium-term soil redistribution rates within the field. The soil redistribution rates documented for the individual sampling points within the field ranged from an erosion rate of -12.9 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1} to a deposition rate of 19.2 t ha{sup -1} yr{sup -1}. Composite samples of surface soil (0-5 cm) were collected immediately adjacent to each coring point and these samples were analysed for a range of soil properties. Individual soil properties associated with these samples showed significant variability, with CV values generally lying in the range 10-30%. The relationships between the surface soil properties and the soil redistribution rate were analysed. This analysis demonstrated statistically significant relationships between some soil properties (total phosphorus, % clay, Ti and As) and the soil

  16. Teaching Environmental Soil Science to Students older than 55

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Civera, Cristina; Giménez-Morera, Antonio; Burguet, María

    2014-05-01

    The life expectancy growth is a general trend for the world population, which translates into an increase of people older than 55 years in Western societies. This entails to the rise of health problems as well as large investments in healthcare. In general, we are spectators Y tambe voldria saber si ens pots fer una asse of how a large group of citizens have a new life after retirement. The XXI century societies are facing the problem of the need of a healthy population, even after retirement. There is a need in developing new strategies to allow those citizens to improve their knowledge of the environmental changes. The research in Soil Science and related disciplines is the strategy we are using on the Geograns program to inform the students (older than 55) about the changes the Earth and the Soil System are suffering. And this should be done in a healthy and active teaching environment. The NAUGRAN program is being developed by the University of Valencia for more than 10 years and shows the advances on education for senior students. Within this program, Geograns is bringing the environmentalist ideas to the students. This is a difficult task as those students were born in a society were nature was created to be exploited and not to be conserved (e.g. Green Revolution, agricultural transformations of the 60's in Spain). This is the reason why the University of Valencia developed at the end of the 90's a program to teach students older than 55. This paper shows the advances on new strategies developed during 2013 with a group of these senior students. The main strategy was to take the students to visit the nature and to explain the functioning of the Earth and Soil System. Those visits were organized with the collaboration of scientist, environmentalist, farmers and technicians; and the guiding thread was trekking. This mix showed our students different views and sides of the same phenomena (e.g. tillage operations, soil erosion problems, water quantity and

  17. Investigation of transformation of radionuclides in soils oil polluted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbatov, F.Y.; Ahmedov, M.M.; Ibadov, N.A.; Balayev, V.S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Despite of constant improvement in view of last achievement of a science and technique the technological processes of oil production are accompanied by coming in environment a number of chemical substances - oil products, poly aromatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, salts of heavy metals, including soluble and insoluble compound of stable and radioactive isotopes of metals, various gases etc. Technological processes of production, transportation of crude oil and its complex processing is followed with essential pollution of soil by oil products, radioactive substances because of crude oil and grounds waters spillage. The problem of radioactive pollution of environment in oil-extracting sites and especially in old deposits of Apsheron peninsula, in particular, in oil fields of Surakhani and Balakhani by the various factors is rather urgent in Azerbaijan. On a whole, radioactive-ecological situation is defined by the quantitative contents of natural radionuclides, chemical structure of grounds waters and oil, and also accumulation of radioactive substances in pipelines and modular items as crystals radiobarits or calcium and magnesium salts. Systemic and complex research on this direction will allow creating the mechanism of radionuclides transformation in oil-contaminated soils. The condition of radioactive background of soil cover of oil field in Surakhani was studied in our researches. The soil samples taken from various depths of deposit are investigated. The quantities of total oil components, aliphatic and poly aromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals and natural radionuclides are determined. The attempt is made to explain dependence of various meanings of carried out analyses on the depth of taken samples. In summary it is necessary to note, that the researches on more detailed study of influence of the factors on processes of accumulation and transformation natural radionuclides proceed. The systemic researches on this direction will allow securing of

  18. Neutron activation and radiometric investigation of Kazakhstan soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwozdz, R.; Popov, J.V.; Shishkov, I.A.; Poznyak, V.; Solodukhin, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Great diversity of radio-ecological problems requires measurement of materials with vastly differing chemical composition and density, and varying volume. In case of gamma spectrometry such variation in composition, density and volume changes the response of a measuring system quite drastically. A necessary correction is usually achieved by applying one of the four correction methods. The first one is applying a standard with composition as close to the measured sample as possible. The second method needs some previous knowledge about the chemical composition of the sample and a subsequent calculation of the mass absorption coefficient. The third method, an intensity ratio of two gamma lines, can only be applied when an isotope in the investigated sample has two measurable gamma lines. The fourth method consists in an additional gamma transmission measurement, using an isotopic source. Application of the first two methods to samples collected in Kazakhstan is evaluated and the results achieved are described. Instrumental neutron activation analysis by either long, or short irradiation was applied to three groups of samples. The first 15 samples were from the Semipalatinsk area, the next 15 from the area north for the Kara-Tau range. The third group of 5 samples was from the Syr-Darya valley. The Kara-Tau and Syr-Darya samples originate from the area adjacent to an uranium mining site. Only two samples are collected at cultivated soil, all the other are collected at the steppe or semi-desert areas, In the additional group measured there were ten sub-samples of the environmental soil standard, prepared at the Institute of Nuclear Physics. Activation analysis was applied as well to Soil-6 and Soil IAEA-375, two reference materials distributed by IAEA. Determination of concentration of about 40 elements in very sample enabled computation of mass absorption coefficients for all the investigated samples. Results of calculation and experimental testing prove

  19. Advising as Servant Leadership: Investigating Student Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, W. Kohle; Fitzpatrick, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Student satisfaction with advising is positively linked to first-year student retention and sophomore persistence to their senior year. However, inconsistencies in the advising literature confound conclusions about the most effective advising approach to elicit student satisfaction. Positive links between the servant leadership approach and…

  20. Investigating Distance Education Students' Study Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyraz, Cengiz

    2013-01-01

    Distance education, which is a planned way of teaching in which students and instructors are brought face to face in a classroom environment in several different ways by means of technology, has started to become widespread in many fields today. In distance education, students and instructors reside in different locations. Students can learn at…

  1. Investigating Students' Mathematical Difficulties with Quadratic Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Bronwyn Reid; Norton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the factors that hinder students' success in working with and understanding the mathematics of quadratic equations using a case study analysis of student error patterns. Twenty-five Year 11 students were administered a written test to examine their understanding of concepts and procedures associated with this topic. The…

  2. The soil structure investigation for the interpreting radiocaesium behaviour in upper horizons of Chernobyl contaminated sandy soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazhinskij, A.G.

    2002-01-01

    The soil-composing particles in natural environment form aggregates of different stability. For soils (topsoil) of contrasting type from Chernobyl NPP area the particle size and microaggregate analyses have been performed and the distribution of Cs 137 in the obtained fractions has been studied. Results of long-term investigation of Cs 137 vertical migration in sandy soils of 50-km zone around Chernobyl NPP have been compared with data on radiocaesium distribution among water-stable aggregates and particles of various size in studied soils. On the basis of particle size analysis and aggregate soil composition the size of soil components with vertical migration potential, and the amount of Cs 137 potentially tending to migrate with the soil components along soil profile have been assessed. Based on findings showing Cs 137 partitioning among water-stable soil aggregates of diverse size and pattern of the radionuclide vertical distribution in top 0-10 cm soil layer, it was assumed that neither shift of peak radiocaesium level from upper soil layer downwards nor the so-called slow constituent of Cs 137 vertical migration (in terms of quasi diffusion description of Cs 137 profile in soil) could not be explained by self-motion of soil aggregates and particles with associated radiocaesium. Hypothesis of root intermixing as principal mechanism responsible for Cs 137 vertical transport in top 0-10 cm soil layer was postulated

  3. Soil Investigation Aspects of a Complex Metro Project in Amsterdam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbschleb, Jurgen

    The municipality of Amsterdam wishes to reduce the level of car traffic within the City Centre. As a consequence the public transport is to be extended by a new (bored) North/South Metro line. The excavation depths for the stations will exceed 30 m and will be constructed in difficult soft soil conditions. A further significant aspect is that the building pits are very near (3 to 5 m) to buildings of historical importance. The design philosophy of the station boxes was to determine an acceptable balance between the safety requirements and construction costs. The guidelines for the design, both for the building pits and the bored tunnel, are the predicted deformations of the adjacent building foundations. One of the more important geotechnical risks for this project is incorrect determination of the deformations arising from the building processes alongside the route of the metro. As such it should be realised that advanced finite element programs with second order material models require different geotechnical parameters than analytical models. The careful selection of calculation (soil) models, the level of safety (risk analysis), and site investigation is the start of the determination of the geotechnical parameters. This paper will focus on the interpretation of the site investigation for this complex project and will concentrate on the process followed, the problems encountered with the interpretation, the obtained results, and the used tools for geotechnical risk management.

  4. Expedition Earth and Beyond: Student Scientist Guidebook. Model Research Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Paige Valderrama

    2009-01-01

    The Expedition Earth and Beyond Student Scientist Guidebook is designed to help student researchers model the process of science and conduct a research investigation. The Table of Contents listed outlines the steps included in this guidebook

  5. Investigation of Undergraduate Students' Environmental Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köse, Sacit; Savran Gencer, Ayse; Gezer, Kudret; Erol, Gül Hanim; Bilen, Kadir

    2011-01-01

    Environmental education has been viewed as an important way to educate students about environmental issues beginning from pre-school to higher education. This study is a part of this field- namely, undergraduate environmental education. The purpose of the study is to explore undergraduate students' attitudes towards environment at the end of the…

  6. Learning Styles among Students in an Advanced Soil Management Class: Impact on Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudoxie, Gaius D.

    2011-01-01

    Learning styles represent an integral component of the learning environment, which has been shown to differ across institutions and disciplines. To identify learner preferences within a discipline would aid in evaluating instructional resources geared toward active learning. The learning profiles of second-year soil science students (n = 62) were…

  7. Investigating alternative conceptions in learning disabled students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Terry Stokes

    Science teachers have long noticed the fact that their students come to school with their own concepts, produced from daily experiences and interactions with the world around them. Sometimes these ideas are in agreement with accepted scientific theories, but often they are not. These "incorrect" ideas, or "misconceptions" have been the focus of many studies, which can be helpful to teachers when planning their lessons. However, there is a dearth of information that is geared specifically to students with learning disabilities. These students generally have deficits in areas of perception and learning that could conceivably influence the way they formulate concepts. The purpose of this study was to examine the concepts held by students with learning disabilities on the causes of the day/night cycle, the phases of the moon, and the seasons. An interview format was judged to be the best method of ensuring that the students' ideas were clearly documented. The subjects were five, sixth-grade students in a city school, who had been determined to have a learning disability. In examining the results, there did not seem to be any direct link between the type of misconception formed and the learning deficit of the child. It seemed more likely that students formed their concepts the way students usually do, but the various disabilities they exhibited interfered with their learning of more appropriate conceptions. The results of this study will be helpful to science teachers, curriculum planners, or anyone who works with students who have learning disabilities. It is hoped that this will begin to fill a void in the area of learning disabilities research.

  8. Investigating biochar as a tool for mine soil remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar is a cost-effective, carbon negative soil amendment that can lead to improved soil quality. Research has also demonstrated the efficacy of biochar to sorb heavy metals and agricultural chemicals from contaminated soils, thus effectively reducing the potential for metal and chemical contamin...

  9. Investigation of bacterial hopanoid inputs to soils from Western Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shunthirasingham, Chubashini [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, Scarborough College, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ont., M1C1A4 (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, Scarborough College, 1265 Military Trail, Toronto, Ont., M1C1A4 (Canada)]. E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.ca

    2006-06-15

    Hopanoids have been widely used as characteristic biomarkers to study inputs of bacterial biomass to sediments because they are preserved in the geologic record. A limited number of studies have been performed on hopanoid biomarkers in soils. The present study examined the distribution and potential preservation of hopanoids in soils that are developed under different climatic conditions and varying vegetative inputs. Solvent extraction and sequential chemical degradation methods were employed to extract both 'free' and 'bound' hopanoids, from three grassland soils, a grassland-forest transition soil, and a forest soil from Western Canada. Identification and quantification of hopanoids in the soil samples were carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Methylbishomohopanol, bishomohopanol and bishomohopanoic acid were detected in all solvent extracts. The base hydrolysis and ruthenium tetroxide extracts contained only bishomohopanoic acid at a concentration range of 0.8-8.8 {mu}g/gC and 2.2-28.3 {mu}g/gC, respectively. The acid hydrolysis procedure did not release detectable amounts of hopanoids. The solvent extraction yielded the greatest amounts of 'free' hopanoids in two of the grassland soils (Dark Brown and Black Chernozems) and in the forest soil (Gray Luvisol). In contrast, the chemical degradation methods resulted in higher amounts of 'bound' hopanoids in the third grassland soil (Brown Chernozem) and the transition soil (Dark Gray Chernozem), indicating that more hopanoids exist in the 'bound' form in these soils. Overall, the forest and the transition soils contained more hopanoids than the grassland soils. This is hypothesized to be due to the greater degradation of hopanoids in the grassland soils and or sorption to clay minerals, as compared to the forest and transition soils.

  10. Investigation of bacterial hopanoid inputs to soils from Western Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2006-01-01

    Hopanoids have been widely used as characteristic biomarkers to study inputs of bacterial biomass to sediments because they are preserved in the geologic record. A limited number of studies have been performed on hopanoid biomarkers in soils. The present study examined the distribution and potential preservation of hopanoids in soils that are developed under different climatic conditions and varying vegetative inputs. Solvent extraction and sequential chemical degradation methods were employed to extract both 'free' and 'bound' hopanoids, from three grassland soils, a grassland-forest transition soil, and a forest soil from Western Canada. Identification and quantification of hopanoids in the soil samples were carried out by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Methylbishomohopanol, bishomohopanol and bishomohopanoic acid were detected in all solvent extracts. The base hydrolysis and ruthenium tetroxide extracts contained only bishomohopanoic acid at a concentration range of 0.8-8.8 μg/gC and 2.2-28.3 μg/gC, respectively. The acid hydrolysis procedure did not release detectable amounts of hopanoids. The solvent extraction yielded the greatest amounts of 'free' hopanoids in two of the grassland soils (Dark Brown and Black Chernozems) and in the forest soil (Gray Luvisol). In contrast, the chemical degradation methods resulted in higher amounts of 'bound' hopanoids in the third grassland soil (Brown Chernozem) and the transition soil (Dark Gray Chernozem), indicating that more hopanoids exist in the 'bound' form in these soils. Overall, the forest and the transition soils contained more hopanoids than the grassland soils. This is hypothesized to be due to the greater degradation of hopanoids in the grassland soils and or sorption to clay minerals, as compared to the forest and transition soils

  11. Investigation into How 8th Grade Students Define Fractals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of 8th grade students' concept definitions and concept images can provide information about their mental schema of fractals. There is limited research on students' understanding and definitions of fractals. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the elementary students' definitions of fractals based on concept image and concept…

  12. Investigating Students' Usage and Acceptance of Electronic Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieche, Susan; Krey, Birte; Bastiaens, Theo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate students' usage and acceptance of electronic books. Factors correlating with students' attitude towards e-books were examined using the Technology Acceptance Model (Davis, Bagozzi, & Warshaw 1989). A questionnaire was administered online for students at University of Hagen. Results indicate that…

  13. Investigating Undergraduate Science Students' Conceptions and Misconceptions of Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Kathryn I.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific research exploring ocean acidification has grown significantly in past decades. However, little science education research has investigated the extent to which undergraduate science students understand this topic. Of all undergraduate students, one might predict science students to be best able to understand ocean acidification. What…

  14. Characterization of Soil Heterogeneity Across Scales in an Intensively Investigated Soil Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Matthew; Gimenez, Daniel; Nemes, Attila; Dathe, Annette; French, Helen; Bloem, Esther; Koestel, John; Jarvis, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous water flow in undisturbed soils is a natural occurrence that is complex to model due to potential changes in hydraulic properties in soils over changes in space. The use of geophysical methods, such as Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), can provide a minimally-invasive approximation of the spatial heterogeneity of the soil. This spatial distribution can then be combined with measured hydraulic properties to inform a model. An experiment was conducted on an Intensively Investigated Soil Volume (IISV), with dimensions of 2m x 1m x 0.8m, located in an agricultural field that is part of the Gryteland catchment in Ås, Norway. The location of the IISV was determined through surface ERT runs at two sequential resolutions. The first run was used to find an area of higher apparent electrical resistivity in a 23.5 x 11.5 m area with 0.5 m spacing. The second run measured apparent electrical resistivity in a 4.7 x 1 m area with 0.1 m spacing, from which the final IISV volume was derived. Distinct features found in the higher resolution run of the IISV, including a recent tire track from a harvester, were used as a spatial reference point for the installation of 20 pairs of TDR probes and tensiometers. The instruments measured water content, temperature and pressure potential at 10 minute intervals and ran continuously for a period of two weeks. After completion of the data collection the IISV was intensively sampled, with 30 samples taken for bulk density, 62 for hydraulic property measurements, and 20 to be used for both CT scanning and hydraulic property measurements. The measurement of hydraulic properties is ongoing and retention will be measured in the 0 - 100 cm range on a sand table, and from 100 - approx. 900 cm with an automated evaporation method. The formation of spatial clusters to represent the soil heterogeneity as relatively homogeneous units based on mesoscale properties like apparent electrical resistivity, bulk density, texture, in

  15. Students' Investigations in Temperature and Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick L.; Concannon, James; Hansert, Bernhard; Frederick, Ron; Frerichs, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Why does a balloon deflate when it is left in a cold car; or why does one have to pump up his or her bike tires in the spring after leaving them in the garage all winter? To answer these questions, students must understand the relationships among temperature, pressure, and volume of a gas. The purpose of the Predict, Share, Observe, and Explain…

  16. Students' Perceptions of Learning Geography through Group Investigation in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ivy Geok-Chin; Sharan, Shlomo; Lee, Christine Kim-Eng

    2005-01-01

    This study examines students' perceptions of the Group Investigation method of cooperative learning. A total of 142 students (62 low-achievers and 80 high-achievers) from two schools worked in cooperative learning groups during a period of over six weeks using the Group Investigation method. At the end of the study, they were asked to write their…

  17. Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenschuss, A.; Huber, S.; Riss, A.; Schwarz, S.; Tulipan, M.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental soil surveys in each province of Austria have been performed, soils of about 5,000 sites were described and analyzed for nutrients and pollutants, the majority of these data are recorded in the soil information system of Austria (BORIS) soil database, http://www.ubavie.gv.at/umweltsituation/boden/boris), which also contains a soil map of Austria, data from 30 specific investigations mainly in areas with industry and results from the Austria - wide cesium investigation. With respect to the environmental state of soils a short discussion is given, including two geographical charts, one showing which sites have soil data (2001) and the other the cadmium distribution in top soils according land use (forest, grassland, arable land, others). Information related to the soil erosion, Corine land cover (Europe-wide land cover database), evaluation of pollutants in soils (reference values of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Se, Pb, Tl, Va, Zn, AOX, PAH, PCB, PCDD/pcdf, dioxin), and relevant Austrian and European standards and regulations is provided. Figs. 2, Tables 4. (nevyjel)

  18. 1 INVESTIGATIONS ON THE EXPANSIVE SOILS OF ADDIS ABABA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to owners for repair, if the structure is to be salvaged at all. The object of this paper is to study the significant engineering properties of the expans- ive soils and assess the damages on structures as a result of heaving and shrinkage of the soil on which the foundations of the structures are erected. For this purpose samples ...

  19. Waste site grouping for 200 Areas soil investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify logical waste site groups for characterization based on criteria established in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy (DOE-RL 1996a). Specific objectives of the document include the following: finalize waste site groups based on the approach and preliminary groupings identified in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; prioritize the waste site groups based on criteria developed in the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy; select representative site(s) that best represents typical and worse-case conditions for each waste group; develop conceptual models for each waste group. This document will serve as a technical baseline for implementing the 200 Areas Soil Remediation Strategy. The intent of the document is to provide a framework, based on waste site groups, for organizing soil characterization efforts in the 200 Areas and to present initial conceptual models

  20. Soil Conservation Unit for the Advanced Crop Production and Marketing Course. Student Reference. AGDEX 570.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Bob R.; And Others

    This student reference booklet is designed to accompany lessons outlined in the companion instructor's guide on soil conservation. The soil conservation unit builds on competencies gained in Agricultural Science I and II. Informative material is provided for these eight lessons: benefits of conservation, land utilization, how soils are eroded,…

  1. Investigating how high school deaf students spend their leisure time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Arabmomeni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on deaf students' interests in spending their leisure times. We design a questionnaire and distribute among all deaf students who are enrolled in high schools in two provinces of Iran. The questionnaire consists of three parts, in the first part, we ask female and male deaf students about their interests in various entertainment activities in Likert scale. In terms of gender, we find out that walking inside or outside house is number one favorite exercise for female students while male students mostly prefer to walk on the streets. Although male students prefer to go biking or running activities, female students prefer to go for picnic or similar activities. This could be due to limitations on female for running or biking inside cities. While going to picnic with members of family or friends is the third popular activity for male students, stretching exercises is third most popular activity among female students. Breathing exercise is the fourth most popular activity among both male and female students. The second part of the survey is associated with the barriers for having no exercise among deaf students. According to our survey, while lack of good attention from public and ordinary people on exercising deaf students is believed to be number one barrier among male students, female students blame lack of transportation facilities as the most important barrier. However, both female and male students believe these two items are the most important factors preventing them to exercise. Lack of awareness for exercising deaf students and lack of good recreational facilities are the third most important barriers among male and female students. The last part of the survey attempted to detect important entertainment activities. Watching TV, entertaining with mobile devices, chatting with friends and watching DVD or movies were the most important items influencing deaf students' free times.DOI: 10.5267/j.msl.2012

  2. Does Formative Assessment Improve Student Learning and Performance in Soil Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopittke, Peter M.; Wehr, J. Bernhard; Menzies, Neal W.

    2012-01-01

    Soil science students are required to apply knowledge from a range of disciplines to unfamiliar scenarios to solve complex problems. To encourage deep learning (with student performance an indicator of learning), a formative assessment exercise was introduced to a second-year soil science subject. For the formative assessment exercise, students…

  3. Soil Investigation of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, Johnbull O [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Earles, Jennifer E [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

    2017-03-01

    Mercury is regarded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management as a priority contaminant on the Oak Ridge Reservation because of the environmental risks associated with substantial losses from buildings, soils, and surface waters at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12). As a result of historical releases of mercury from Y-12 primarily in the 1950s and early 1960s, the lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) stream channel and bank soil margins are contaminated with mercury (Brooks and Southworth 2011; Tennessee Valley Authority 1985b, a). A Mercury Remediation Technology Development project is underway to evaluate the nature of downstream mercury contamination and to develop targeted site-specific remedial technologies that can mitigate mercury release and biological uptake. It is known that mercury concentration varies longitudinally and with depth in LEFPC bank soils; however, soil types and soil physical properties are not well known, especially relative to the zones of mercury contamination. Moreover, there are no soil maps for the downstream reaches of LEFPC in Roane County (i.e. from the Chestnut Hill Road downstream) and this work represents the first ever soil mapping along this section of LEFPC.

  4. An Investigation of Students' Personality Traits and Attitudes toward Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zuway-R.; Lin, Huann-shyang

    2011-05-01

    The purposes of this study were to validate an instrument of attitudes toward science and to investigate grade level, type of school, and gender differences in Taiwan's students' personality traits and attitudes toward science as well as predictors of attitudes toward science. Nine hundred and twenty-two elementary students and 1,954 secondary students completed the School Student Questionnaire in 2008. Factor analyses, correlation analyses, ANOVAs, and regressions were used to compare the similarities and differences among male and female students in different grade levels. The findings were as follows: female students had higher interest in science and made more contributions in teams than their male counterparts across all grade levels. As students advanced through school, student scores on the personality trait scales of Conscientiousness and Openness sharply declined; students' scores on Neuroticism dramatically increased. Elementary school and academic high school students had significantly higher total scores on interest in science than those of vocational high and junior high school students. Scores on the scales measuring the traits of Agreeableness, Extraversion, and Conscientiousness were the most significant predictors of students' attitudes toward science. Implications of these findings for classroom instruction are discussed.

  5. Investigations of the sorption characteristics of radiosilver on some natural and artificial soil particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, Gyula; Guczi, Judit [`FJC` National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary); Valyon, Jozef [Central Research Institute for Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Bulman, Robert A. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton Didcot, England (United Kingdom)

    1995-09-05

    The likely distribution of {sup 110m}Ag(I), a radionuclide that may be produced in nuclear power stations and which has been known to contaminate the environment, between the components of particles of soil has been investigated by measuring its uptake from solutions of sodium nitrate, sodium EDTA and sodium citrate onto particles of chernozem soil and particles formed to simulate soils. The artificial soil particles were formed from: (1) silicas coated with manganese oxide, ferric oxide and hydrated ferric oxide, (2) silicas bearing chemically bound humic and fulvic acids and (3) alumina bearing anionically associated humic acid. These investigations have established that uptake of {sup 110m}Ag(I) by the humate coatings of soil particles will predominate under a wide range of pH. In the absence of humate coatings on the soil particles the radionuclide will be bound by the Fe/Mn oxide fractions of soils.

  6. Investigations of the sorption characteristics of radiosilver on some natural and artificial soil particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Gyula; Guczi, Judit; Valyon, Jozef; Bulman, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    The likely distribution of 110m Ag(I), a radionuclide that may be produced in nuclear power stations and which has been known to contaminate the environment, between the components of particles of soil has been investigated by measuring its uptake from solutions of sodium nitrate, sodium EDTA and sodium citrate onto particles of chernozem soil and particles formed to simulate soils. The artificial soil particles were formed from: (1) silicas coated with manganese oxide, ferric oxide and hydrated ferric oxide, (2) silicas bearing chemically bound humic and fulvic acids and (3) alumina bearing anionically associated humic acid. These investigations have established that uptake of 110m Ag(I) by the humate coatings of soil particles will predominate under a wide range of pH. In the absence of humate coatings on the soil particles the radionuclide will be bound by the Fe/Mn oxide fractions of soils

  7. Elementary Students' Investigations in Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Nancy; Concannon, James P.; Brown, Patrick L.

    2014-01-01

    Students love learning about animals: how animals behave, what animals eat, why some animals are more dangerous than others are, and why animals look the way they do. In this 5E lesson, students investigate why some animals look the way they do--specifically, the advantages of camouflage and mimicry. What are an animal's advantages of being…

  8. Arresting Student Plagiarism: Are We Investigators or Educators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lajuan

    2011-01-01

    Managing student plagiarism can cause instructors to feel as if they are serving educational institutions in the role of investigator rather than educator. Since many educators continue to struggle with the issue of student plagiarism, the author interviewed some of her colleagues. In this article, she shares her and her colleagues' antiplagiarism…

  9. Investigating Secondary School Students' Unmediated Peer Assessment Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivitanidou, Olia E.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Hovardas, Tasos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate secondary school students' unmediated peer assessment skills. Specifically, 36 seventh graders, without receiving any kind of support, were anonymously assigned to reciprocally assess their peers' science web-portfolios. Additionally, students' attitudes towards and intentions about the use of…

  10. Investigating Visually Disabled Students' Attitudes about Physical Education and Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbudak, Ibrahim; Gürkan, Alper C.; Yigit, Sih Mehmet; Kargun, Mehmet; Hazar, Gürkan; Dorak, Feridun

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate visually disabled students', who study in the level of primary education, high school, university, attitudes about physical education and sport in terms of different variables. Totally 100 visually disabled students who are individual and team athletes and study in Izmir, (8 visually disabled athletes study in…

  11. Organic pollutants in Bavarian soils. Investigations in the framework of the 'Bavarian soil cadastre'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joneck, M.; Prinz, R.; Schmidt, R.

    1990-01-01

    Within the framework of the Bavarian soil cadastre, 260 soils from 90 sites throughout Bavaria were sampled for organic pollutants between 1986 and mid-1989. From the material class of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), first results were introduced. The PCB total concentrations depend very strongly on soil utilization. Forest sites occupy a special position. The comparison of agricultural and forest soils with regard to pollutant concentrations is possible only with volume specific concentrations and/or a site-specific material balance. (orig.) [de

  12. Material dynamics in polluted soils with different structures - comparative investigations of general soil and aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taubner, H.

    1992-01-01

    In structured soils, a small-scale heterogeneity of physical and chemical properties will develop which results in a reduced availability of the reaction sites of the soil matrix. In view of the lack of knowledge on the conditions within the individual aggregates were carried out for characterizing the aggregates and comparing them with the soil in, general soil samples were taken from natural structure of a podzolic soil and a podazolic brown earth from two sites in the Fichtelgebirge mountains as well as a parabraun earth from East Holstein. The horizons differed with regard to their texture and structure; silty material tends to have a subpolyhedral structure and calyey material a polyhedral structure. The general soil samples and aggregate samples from the three B horizons were subjected, with comparable experimental conditions, to percolation experiments inducing a multiple acid load. The soil solution from the secondary pore system and aggregate pore system is more heterogeneus for the higher-structured subpolyhedral texture of the perdzolic soil than for the less strongly aggregated subpolyhedral structured of the podzolic brown earth. (orig.) [de

  13. Student-Centred Learning Environments: An Investigation into Student Teachers' Instructional Preferences and Approaches to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Marlies; Dochy, Filip; Struyven, Katrien; Parmentier, Emmeline; Vanderbruggen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The use of student-centred learning environments in education has increased. This study investigated student teachers' instructional preferences for these learning environments and how these preferences are related to their approaches to learning. Participants were professional Bachelor students in teacher education. Instructional preferences and…

  14. Trends in Soil Science education: moving from teacher's questioning to student's questioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Núria

    2017-04-01

    Soil science has suffered from communication problems within its own discipline, with other disciplines (except perhaps agronomy) and with the general public. Prof. Dennis Greenland wrote the following in the early 1990s: "…soil scientists have also been frustrated as their advice has gone apparently unheeded. This may be because the advice is couched in terms more easily understood by other soil scientists than by politicians and economists who control the disposition of land. If soil science is to serve society fully it is essential that its arguments are presented in terms readily understood by all and with both scientific and economic rigor so that they are not easily refuted". Soil is a 3-dimensional body with properties that reflect the impact of climate, vegetation, fauna, man and topography on the soil's parent material over a variable time span. Therefore, soil sciences must integrate different knowledge of many disciplines. How should one go about the teaching and learning of a subject like soil science? This is an ever present question resident in the mind of a soil science teacher who knows that students will find soil science an inherently difficult subject to understand. Therefore, Soil Science cannot be taught in the same way. This paper proposes a mural construction that allows to understand soil formation, soil evolution and soil distribution. This experience has been realized with secondary teachers to offer tools for active learning methodologies. Therefore, this teaching project starts with a box and a global soil map distribution in a wall mural. The box contains many cards with soil properties, soil factors, soil process, soils orders and different natural soil photos as the pieces of a big puzzle. All these pieces will be arranged in the wall mural. These environments imply a new perspective of teaching: moving from a teacher-centered teaching to a student-centered teaching. In contrast to learning-before-doing— the model of most

  15. Communicating Research Through Student Involvement in Phenological Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Kopplin, M.; Gazal, R. M.; Robin, J. H.; Boger, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Phenology plays a key role in the environment and ecosystem. Primary and secondary students around the world have been collecting vegetation phenology data and contributing to ongoing scientific investigations. They have increased research capacity by increasing spatial coverage of ground observations that can be useful for validation of remotely sensed data. The green-up and green-down phenology measurement protocols developed at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) as part of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program, have been used in more than 250 schools in over 20 countries. In addition to contributing their data, students have conducted their own investigations and presented them at science fairs and symposiums, and international conferences. An elementary school student in Alaska conducted a comprehensive study on the green-down rates of native and introduced trees and shrubs. Her project earned her a one-year college scholarship at UAF. Students from the Model Secondary School for the Deaf in Washington, D. C. and from the Indiana School for the Deaf collaborated on a comparative green-up study, and were chosen to present at an international conference where students from more than 20 countries participated. Similarly, students in Thailand presented at national conferences, their studies such as "The Relationship between Environmental Conditions and Green-down of Teak Trees (Tectona grandis L.)" at Roong Aroon School, Bangkok and "The Comparison of Budburst and Green-up of Leab Trees (Ficus infectoria Roxb.) at Rob Wiang and Mae Khao Tom Sub-district in Chiang Rai Province". Some challenges in engaging students in phenological studies include the mismatch in timing of the start and end of the plant growing season with that of the school year in northern latitudes and the need for scientists and teachers to work with students to ensure accurate measurements. However these are outweighed by benefits to the scientists

  16. It's A Gassy World: Middle School Students Investigate Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, C.

    2016-12-01

    When middle school students are asked about our changing earth system, their responses likely include terms like global warming, climate change, and greenhouse gases. However, many students struggle to understand how it all fits together, and sometimes they hear conflicting information or myths about climate change. This activity allows students to explore the impacts of warming oceans and oceans' absorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) through a student planned and carried out investigation that begins with a pre-laboratory engagement and exploration piece, includes a laboratory component, and concludes with an explanation where students analyze their data and interpret their results through the claim-evidence-reasoning framework. It's a Gassy World was developed with three-dimensional instruction in mind to introduce middle school students to the relationship between warming oceans and changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption in the oceans. Students explore disciplinary core ideas in the Earth and Space Sciences discipline of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) using crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices. Specifically, students study CO2 as a greenhouse gas and the effect of increased atmospheric CO2 levels on global climate change by planning and carrying out their own investigations. We structured this activity in a 5E format that can take place in four to five days during a climate change unit. After piloting this activity in over 20 formal classrooms and with 5 informal education groups, we have seen how It's a Gassy World helps support inquiry in the classroom and allows students to experience crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices in NGSS. We found that students were engaged and actively learning throughout the activity. Student work and pilot teacher feedback indicated that, through this activity, many students increased their understanding of CO2 as a greenhouse gas and recognized that warmer oceans will

  17. Investigation of Soil Erosion and Phosphorus Transport within an Agricultural Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klik, A.; Jester, W.; Muhar, A.; Peinsitt, A.; Rampazzo, N.; Mentler, A.; Staudinger, B.; Eder, M.

    2003-04-01

    In a 40 ha agricultural used watershed in Austria, surface runoff, soil erosion and nutrient losses are measured spatially distributed with 12 small erosion plots. Crops during growing season 2002 are canola, corn, sunflower, winter wheat, winter barley, rye, sugar beets, and pasture. Canopy height and canopy cover are observed in 14-day intervals. Four times per year soil water content, shear stress and random roughness of the surface are measured in a 25 x 25 m grid (140 points). The same raster is sampled for soil texture analyses and content of different phosphorus fractions in the 0-10 cm soil depth. Spatially distributed data are used for geostatistical analysis. Along three transects hydrologic conditions of the hillslope position (top, middle, foot) are investigated by measuring soil water content and soil matrix potential. After erosive events erosion features (rills, deposition, ...) are mapped using GPS. All measured data will be used as input parameters for the Limburg Soil Erosion Model (LISEM).

  18. Investigation of electro-kinetic methods for soil decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanova, A.N.

    2000-01-01

    The choices of effective methods for ecological system decontamination, their perfection and introduction into practical use have been actual tasks for the Ural region. The objective of this work has been to study the potentials of electrical kinetics method of ISOTRON Corporation (US) for decontamination of the Urals soils. Results obtained have shown the method proposed to be usable for decontaminating some types of soils from strontium and plutonium; it is low effective for decontamination in the area of South-Urals radioactive plume. Thus, a low effectiveness can be expected in podsolic and leached laterite characterized by a high content of loamy sand and sandy soils, as well as for sobby-podsolic ones. The method can be promising for decontamination of soils and wastes from chemical contaminants, such as Zn, Ni, Cu, Pb, Hg, and others. Important advantages of this method compared to others have been its simplicity, small amount of wastes, and feasibility of decontamination in areas difficult to access. (authors)

  19. Analytical investigation of the influence of soil on tanks for seismic analysis of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahara, M.; Wright, J.T.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    When seismically designing equipment, such as ground supported tanks of nuclear power plants, the free field response spectra are normally applied to a model having a fixed base. The consideration of soil structure interaction, which routinely has been applied to nuclear power plant building structures constructed on the soil surface, has not normally been applied to equipment. In this study, the effect of soil structure interaction on seismic response of tanks will be evaluated as a function of soil surface stiffness and depth using the calculated soil stiffness equations developed by H. Tajimi. The authors investigated the influence of the soil properties and composition represented as soil springs which depend on the soil conditions (shear modulus, density, Poisson's ratio) and the depth of soil surface. The results of this study are presented in the form of graphs which may be used to identify the range of soil parameters which have a significant effect on the seismic response of typical nuclear power plant tanks. A typical example to express the influence of the soil surface for seismic response and vibrational characteristics is presented. (orig./HP)

  20. Investigation of radionuclide distribution in soil particles in different landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkinev, V. M.; Korobova, E. M.; Linnik, V. G.

    2012-04-01

    Russian and foreign publications have been analyzed for understanding the role of micro- and nano- particles in distribution and migration of technogenic elements in soils in different landscape conditions. A technique for application of various fractionation methods to separate and study -particles of different size down to micro- and nano-level has been developed. The dry sit method on the first stage of particle separation is recommend to be followed by the membrane filtration method. For obtaining more comprehensive information, combinations of fractionation technique should be chosen taking into account that (1) the efficiency of particles' separation using subsequent technique would be higher than using the preceding one; (2) separation methods should preferably be based on different principles (separation according size, density, charge etc.); (3) initial fractionation should separate particles according to their size, that makes possible to create an even scale for various samples. A study of distribution and balance of technogenic radionuclides' in soil particles of the size intervals 1.0—0.25, 0.25-0.1, 0.1-0.05, 0.05-0.01, 0.01-0.005, 0.005-0.001 and soil layers. Contribution of the silt particles (0,05-0,01 mm) to Cs-137 contamination ranged from 26 to 33,8%, 45% maximum due to "optimal" combination of both factors. Clay fraction was responsible for approximately 30% of Cs-137 contained in soil horizons due to higher sorption capacity. Relatively high correlation between the activity of 152,154Eu and 60 and the content of silt and clay allowed suggesting their incorporation mainly in clay fraction. Selected experimental plots near the Kola NPP (northern taiga) were used to compare soil particles (fractions 140-71; 71-40 and radioactivity found in soil litter appeared to be related to the Chernobyl contamination. Concentration of s-137 was higher in small size fractions. Obtained results were considered to be useful for understanding of radionuclide

  1. Smart system for safe and optimal soil investigation in urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Alqadad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the challenges and difficulties experienced during soil investigation in urban areas using drilling machines and soil sampling. The focus is on the consequences of a lack of data on the subsoil profile and presence of utilities, which could cause major accidents with severe economic and social losses, resulting in constriction activities being delayed and urban services being disrupted. This paper describes certain accidents related to soil investigation in Qatar and their consequences, as well as the lessons learned from these accidents. In order to meet the challenges of soil investigation in urban areas, this paper presents a solution based on smart technology, which includes: (i a geotechnical information system with update data concerning the soil profile, soil surface, utilities locations, and water table level; (ii tools for data management, analysis, and visualization; and (iii a user interface that allows authorities, companies, and citizens to access authorized data via a graphic interface, update data, and send messages and alerts in the case of any incident occurring. Finally, the paper presents a promising perspective for the development of smart drilling devices, which record data related to the functioning of a drilling machine and transmit data to the smart soil investigation system. Keywords: Soil investigation, Smart, Urban area, Drill borehole, GIS, Underground utility

  2. E-Learning: A Student's Perspective a Phenomenological Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological investigation focused on the exploration of the lived experiences of students who had dropped out of traditional four year colleges and returned to complete their degree by e-Learning. The goal of this investigation was to gain a new understanding of the psychological, motivational, and ethical aspects of continuing a four…

  3. Pore-scale investigation on the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in heterogeneous soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Todd-Brown, Katherine E.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2016-11-15

    The relationship between microbial respiration rate and soil moisture content is an important property for understanding and predicting soil organic carbon degradation, CO2 production and emission, and their subsequent effects on climate change. This paper reports a pore-scale modeling study to investigate the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in soils and to evaluate various factors that affect this response. X-ray computed tomography was used to derive soil pore structures, which were then used for pore-scale model investigation. The pore-scale results were then averaged to calculate the effective respiration rates as a function of water content in soils. The calculated effective respiration rate first increases and then decreases with increasing soil water content, showing a maximum respiration rate at water saturation degree of 0.75 that is consistent with field and laboratory observations. The relationship between the respiration rate and moisture content is affected by various factors, including pore-scale organic carbon bioavailability, the rate of oxygen delivery, soil pore structure and physical heterogeneity, soil clay content, and microbial drought resistivity. Simulations also illustrates that a larger fraction of CO2 produced from microbial respiration can be accumulated inside soil cores under higher saturation conditions, implying that CO2 flux measured on the top of soil cores may underestimate or overestimate true soil respiration rates under dynamic moisture conditions. Overall, this study provides mechanistic insights into the soil respiration response to the change in moisture conditions, and reveals a complex relationship between heterotrophic microbial respiration rate and moisture content in soils that is affected by various hydrological, geochemical, and biophysical factors.

  4. The experience sampling method: Investigating students' affective experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Jayson M.; Stetzer, MacKenzie R.; Shemwell, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Improving non-cognitive outcomes such as attitudes, efficacy, and persistence in physics courses is an important goal of physics education. This investigation implemented an in-the-moment surveying technique called the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) [1] to measure students' affective experience in physics. Measurements included: self-efficacy, cognitive efficiency, activation, intrinsic motivation, and affect. Data are presented that show contrasts in students' experiences (e.g., in physics vs. non-physics courses).

  5. Investigating The Self-Esteem of Elemantary Boarding Scholls' Students

    OpenAIRE

    SEÇER, İsmail; İLBAY, Azmi; AY, İsmail; ÇİFTÇİ, Muhammet

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the second-tier regional boarding primary schools, students are receiving education and self-esteem levels of age, gender, type of study, academic achievement and significant differences according to the variables  whether or not to take disciplinary action were investigated. 2010-2011 academic research in the regional boarding primary schools are receiving education in Erzurum, which was carried out on 428 students. Piers and Harris to collect data from the study (1964), devel...

  6. Investigation of features in radon soil dynamics and search for influencing factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, Grigorii; Cherepnev, Maxim; Nagorskiy, Petr; Yakovleva, Valentina

    2018-03-01

    The features in radon soil dynamics at two depths were investigated and the main influencing factors were revealed. The monitoring of radon volumetric activity in soil air was performed at experimental site of Tomsk Observatory of Radioactivity and Ionizing Radiation with using radon radiometers and scintillation detectors of alpha-radiation with 10 min sampling frequency. The detectors were installed into boreholes of 0.5 and 1 m depths. The analysis of the soil radon monitoring data has allowed revealing some dependencies at daily and annual scales and main influencing factors. In periods with clearly defined daily radon variations in the soil were revealed the next: 1) amplitude of the daily variations of the soil radon volumetric activity damps with the depth, that is related with the influence of convective fluxes in the soil; 2) temporal shift between times of occurrence of radon volumetric activity maximum (or minimum) values at 0.5 m and 1 m depths can reach 3 hours. In seasonal dynamics of the soil radon the following dependences were found: 1) maximal values are observed in winter, but minimal - in summer; 2) spring periods of snow melting are accompanied by anomaly increasing of radon volumetric activity in the soil up to about 3 times. The main influencing factors are atmospheric precipitations, temperature gradient in the soil and the state of upper soil layer.

  7. The taste of soil: chemical investigation of soil, grape and wine in the Sopron wine region (Hungary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Tomás; Horvàth, Imre; Bidló, András; Hofmann, Eszther

    2015-04-01

    The taste of soil: chemical investigation of soil, grape and wine in the Sopron wine region (Hungary) The Sopron wine region is one of the most significant and historical wine-producing regions of Hungary. 1800 hectares out of the total area of 4300 hectares of the wine region are used for grape cultivation. Kékfrankos (Blue Frankish) is the most frequent grape variety (60%) nevertheless other varieties are also grown here (including Zweigelt, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Portugieser and Sauvignon Blanc). In this study preliminary results of the chemical analyses involving soil, grape and wine are presented, which could provide a future basis for a comprehensive terroir research in the wine region. As soil is the premanent home of grapevine, its quality is highly influencing for the growth of the plants and grape berries, and also determines future organoleptic characteristics of the wines. The investigated basic soil parameters included humus content, transition, soil structure, compactness, roots, skeletal percent, color, physical assortment, concretion, soil defects. Laboratory measurements involved the determination of pH, carbonated lime content, humus content, ammonium lactate-acetic acid soluble P and K content, KCl soluble Ca and Mg content, EDTA and DTPA soluble Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn content. Soil samples were also investigated for heavy metal contents using ICP-OES method (Thermo Scientific iCAP 7000 Series). By the use of thermoanalytical measurements (Mettler Toledo TGA/DSC 1 type thermogravimeter, 5°C/min, air atmosphere, 25-1000°C) the mineral composition of the soils was evaluated. Regarding major aroma compounds in grape berries and wine, the concentrations of organic acids (tartaric-, acetic-, succinic-, malic-, lactic acid), methanol, ethanol, glycerine, glucose and fructose were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (Shimadzu LC-20 HPLC equipment with DAD and RID detection). The density, titratable acidity, pH and total extractive

  8. Investigating Daily Mobile Device Use Among University Students in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, Ahmad R.

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates daily mobile device use among Indonesian university students by using survey data collected in the first quarter of 2016. The data show that 55.49% of the students spend more than five hours a day on their mobile devices. OLS regression analysis shows that female students, owners of the most expensive smartphone or tablet, and those who access social media apps and play mobile games frequently are more likely to spend more time on their mobile devices each day. Contrary to that, those who consider themselves as laggards are less likely to do so. The findings in this study help better understand how university students in Indonesia use their mobile device and lay a foundation as part of a larger research agenda about the relationship between mobile technology and education in Indonesia.

  9. An injected gamma-tracer method for soil-moisture movement investigations in arid zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, A.R.; Navada, S.V.; Rao, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    A method for the in-situ determination of soil-moisture transport rates using K 3 60 Co(CN) 6 is discussed. The tracer compares well with tritiated water in laboratory investigations and the results obtained in limited field studies are very encouraging. The method promises to be of specific interest in arid-zone investigations where the soil-moisture fluxes in liquid and vapour phases could cause complications for tritium tracer data interpretation. (author)

  10. Investigation of structure and characteristics of soil for foundation design of gamma irradiators capacity 2 MCi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukuh Prayogo; Hasriyasti Saptowati

    2016-01-01

    Soil investigation conducted before the work of irradiator building structural foundation design is initiated. Intake of sample was set at some point drill at Irradiator facility site to the disturbed soil layer or not disturbed. From the results of this soil investigation will be selected as alternative / types, the depth and dimensions of the foundation of the most economical but still safe. Soil investigation method used was Deep Boring, undisturbed and disturbed sampling, SPT ( Standard Penetration Test ), CPT ( Cone Penetration Test / Sondir ). Testing conducted in the field and in the laboratory of soil mechanics to determine the mechanical properties, soil layer thickness and other physical properties for calculation of the bearing capacity of the foundation. The results of the soil investigation at the three-point drill showed the average depth of the bedrock -19.33 m and adhesion 3163.88 kg / cm’. Test boring at point BH1 found the depth of the bedrock -19.33 m and adhesion 3163.88 kg / cm’. Test boring at point BH1 found the bedrock at a depth of 32 m with a maximum SPT value 16. from the data can be determined the appropriate type of foundation is bored pile. The foundation is the upper structure support which can lead to a reduction / settlement if its bearing capacity is not able to withstand the load on it. (author)

  11. Investigating the Jack the Ripper Case: Engaging Students in a Criminal Investigations Class through Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Kazmi, Syed

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the utilization of a class project involving the Jack the Ripper murders. Students enrolled in a criminal investigations class were required to investigate the five canonical murders associated with the infamous serial killer known as Jack the Ripper and the murders that occurred in London during 1888. This paper…

  12. Investigation and Evaluation of Heavy Metals Pollution of Agricultural Soils Near a Steel Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIE Tuan-hui

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The pollution of heavy metals in farmland around a steel plant in the west of Fujian Province was investigated. The pollution index method, principal component analysis and factor analysis on the pollution of Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, Cu, Zn and As in the soils were carried out to clarify the pollution status, the main source, the degree, and the distribution of the heavy metals pollution in the soil. The secondary standards for acidic agricultural soils of "soil environmental quality standard"(GB 15618-1995were used as the evaluation criterion. The single factor evaluation results showed that the pollution of soil by Cd and Zn in the investigated area was widespread and serious and the points over standard rate was 100% and 95.5% respectively, while the pollution by Pb, Cu and As was slight and the points over standard rate was 29.6%,15.9% and 6.8% respectively. The soils were not polluted by Cr and Ni. The principal component analysis and factor analysis showed that the correlation between Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn and As was significant and homologous. Therefore, the pollution of Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn and As of the soils should be mainly attributed to the pollutants emitted from the steel plant. The correlation between Cr and Ni was also significant and homologous. It was deduced that Cr and Ni in the soils were largely originated from the soils themselves. The comprehensive pollution degree of the heavy metals in the soils decreased as the distance between the steel plant and farmland increasing. The soils of the fields near the entrance of irrigation water from the waste water of the steel plant were more seriously polluted.

  13. Studies and further needed investigations on radioactive contaminants in soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belivermis, M.; Kilic, O.; Topcuoglu, S.; Cotuk, Y.; Kalayci, G.; Pestreli, D.

    2009-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident, the radionuclides were deposited on the marine and terrestrial environments of Turkey and other countries as wet and / or dry fallout. It is well known that, the soil is the main reservoir at the terrestrial environment. The geographic distribution of the Chernobyl radionuclides per unit area is significantly different. Many countries have drawn radiation maps using the radionuclide data of the soil samples. The radioecological monitoring study in the soil samples are also investigated in the our country. However, the exist data is limited for whole region of Turkey. In general, the type study, that make, in uncultivated soil sample use of different soil layers (0-5, 5-10, 10-20, 20-30 cm). In our previous studies, the activity concentration of gamma emitting radionuclides were determined in soil samples (0-5 cm) from the Thrace (73 sites) and East and South Marmara (100 sites) regions. Moreover, the mean values of the annual effective dose equivalent were also calculated. In literature, numerous studies have been published concerning vertical migration of 1 37Cs in uncultivated soil samples use of different soil types. However, we have not enough data on this subject. On the other hand, we want to present a previously published data on the vertical distribution of 1 37Cs radionuclide in an uncultivated site in the eastern Black Sea region. It is well known that the determination of soil to plant transfer factors of radiocesium that take account all economically crops on the soil varieties is a need to support dose assessment or countermeasure studies. Previously published IAEA reports, we determined transfer factors for some crops of 1 37Cs radionuclides in cultivated soil samples (0-20 cm depth) in the eastern Black Sea region. At the same time, we have given a new project to IAEA for the determination of transfer factor of radiocesium from soil to some crops for Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant site.

  14. Investigating High School Students' Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpudewan, Mageswary; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro; Won, Mihye; Chandrasegaran, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the year 12 students' (N = 56) understanding of chemical equilibrium concepts after instruction using two conceptual tests, the "Chemical Equilibrium Conceptual Test 1" ("CECT-1") consisting of nine two-tier multiple-choice items and the "Chemical Equilibrium Conceptual Test 2"…

  15. Greek Students Research the Effects of Fire on the Soil System through Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kioupi, Vasiliki; Arianoutsou, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    This study is focused on the development, implementation and evaluation of an environmental education programme for secondary education students. The programme was entitled "?he effects of fire on the soil system" and it was implemented during the school period of 2008. Twenty-four (24) students (aged from 15 to 20) coming from Lidoriki…

  16. Childhood lead poisoning investigations: evaluating a portable instrument for testing soil lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Ginger; Lance, Larrie L

    2002-04-01

    The Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch of the California Department of Health Services evaluated a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument for use as a soil lead-testing tool during environmental investigations of lead-poisoned children's homes. A Niton XRF was used to test soil at 119 sampling locations in the yards of 11 San Francisco Bay Area houses. Niton XRF readings were highly correlated with laboratory results and met the study criteria for an acceptable screening method. The data suggest that the most health-protective and time-efficient approach to testing for soil lead above regulatory levels is to take either surface readings or readings of a test cup of soil prepared by grinding with a mortar and pestle. The advantage of the test cup method is that the test cup with soil may be submitted to a laboratory for confirmatory analysis.

  17. The use of gamma ray computed tomography to investigate soil compaction due to core sampling devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, Luiz F.; Arthur, Robson C.J.; Correchel, Vladia; Bacchi, Osny O.S.; Reichardt, Klaus; Brasil, Rene P. Camponez do

    2004-01-01

    Compaction processes can influence soil physical properties such as soil density, porosity, pore size distribution, and processes like soil water and nutrient movements, root system distribution, and others. Soil porosity modification has important consequences like alterations in results of soil water retention curves. These alterations may cause differences in soil water storage calculations and matrix potential values, which are utilized in irrigation management systems. Because of this, soil-sampling techniques should avoid alterations of sample structure. In this work soil sample compaction caused by core sampling devices was investigated using the gamma ray computed tomography technique. A first generation tomograph with fixed source-detector arrangement and translation/rotational movements of the sample was utilized to obtain the images. The radioactive source is 241 Am, with an activity of 3.7 GBq, and the detector consists of a 3 in. x 3 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation crystal coupled to a photomultiplier tube. Soil samples were taken from an experimental field utilizing cylinders 4.0 cm high and 2.6 cm in diameter. Based on image analyses it was possible to detect compacted regions in all samples next to the cylinder wall due to the sampling system. Tomographic unit profiles of the sample permitted to identify higher values of soil density for deeper regions of the sample, and it was possible to determine the average densities and thickness of these layers. Tomographic analyses showed to be a very useful tool for soil compaction characterization and presented many advantages in relation to traditional methods. (author)

  18. Investigating students' academic numeracy in 1st level university courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, Linda; Hobohm, Carola

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates how an online test (`Self-Test' developed at the University of Southern Queensland) can enrich students' understanding of their academic numeracy, through a purpose-built, self-assessment tool aligned with online modules. Since its creation and evaluation, the tool has been developed and tailored to suit other first year courses based around an academic numeracy framework of competence, confidence and critical awareness (Galligan 2013a). This paper will highlight how the new Self-Test is underpinned by this framework and how students' levels of numeracy can be better understood by the lecturer through Self-Test in a first year nursing for numeracy course and a maths for teachers course. It particularly addresses over- and under-confidence, error analysis and students' reflective comments, and how this understanding can better inform course development and teaching.

  19. An Investigation into the Clinical Reasoning Development of Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinten, Claire E K; Cobb, Kate A; Freeman, Sarah L; Mossop, Liz H

    Clinical reasoning is a fundamental skill for veterinary clinicians and a competency required of graduates by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. However, it is unknown how veterinary students develop reasoning skills and where strengths and shortcomings of curricula lie. This research aimed to use the University of Nottingham School of Veterinary Medicine and Science (SVMS) as a case study to investigate the development of clinical reasoning among veterinary students. The analysis was framed in consideration of the taught, learned, and declared curricula. Sixteen staff and sixteen students from the SVMS participated separately in a total of four focus groups. In addition, five interviews were conducted with recent SVMS graduates. Audio transcriptions were used to conduct a thematic analysis. A content analysis was performed on all curriculum documentation. It was found that SVMS graduates feel they have a good level of reasoning ability, but they still experience a deficit in their reasoning capabilities when starting their first job. Overarching themes arising from the data suggest that a lack of responsibility for clinical decisions during the program and the embedded nature of the clinical reasoning skill within the curriculum could be restricting development. In addition, SVMS students would benefit from clinical reasoning training where factors influencing "real life" decisions (e.g., finances) are explored in more depth. Integrating these factors into the curriculum could lead to improved decision-making ability among SVMS graduates and better prepare students for the stressful transition to practice. These findings are likely to have implications for other veterinary curricula.

  20. The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign: Empowering Students to Measure, Investigate, and Understand Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackaro, J.; Andersen, T.; Malmberg, J.; Randolph, J. G.; Wegner, K.; Tessendorf, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    The GLOBE Program's Student Climate Research Campaign (SCRC) is a two-year campaign focused on empowering students to measure, investigate, and understand the climate system in their local community and around the world. Schools can participate in the campaign via three mechanisms: climate foundations, intensive observing periods (IOPs), and research investigations. Participation in the first year of the SCRC focused on increasing student understanding and awareness of climate. Students in 49 countries participated by joining a quarterly webinar, completing the online climate learning activity, collecting and entering data during IOPs, or completing an online join survey. The year also included a video competition with the theme of Earth Day 2012, as well as a virtual student conference in conjunction with The GLOBE Program's From Learning to Research Project. As the SCRC continues into its second year, the goal is for students to increase their understanding of and ability to conduct scientific research focused on climate. Furthermore, year two of the SCRC seeks to improve students' global awareness by encouraging collaborations among students, teachers and scientists focused on understanding the Earth as a system. In addition to the continuation of activities from year one, year two will have even more webinars offered, two competitions, the introduction of two new IOPs, and a culminating virtual student conference. It is anticipated that this virtual conference will showcase research by students who are enthusiastic and dedicated to understanding climate and mitigating impacts of climate change in their communities. This presentation will highlight examples of how the SCRC is engaging students all over the world in hands-on and locally relevant climate research.

  1. DNA analysis of soil extracts can be used to investigate fine root depth distribution of trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bithell, Sean L.; Tran-Nguyen, Lucy T. T.; Hearnden, Mark N.; Hartley, Diana M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the root distribution of trees by soil coring is time-consuming as it requires the separation of roots from soil and classification of roots into particular size classes. This labour-intensive process can limit sample throughput and therefore sampling intensity. We investigated the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) on soil DNA extractions to determine live fine root DNA density (RDD, mg DNA m−2) for mango (Mangifera indica) trees. The specificity of the qPCR was tested against DNA extracted from 10 mango cultivars and 14 weed species. All mango cultivars and no weeds were detected. Mango DNA was successfully quantified from control soil spiked with mango roots and weed species. The DNA yield of mango root sections stored in moist soil at 23–28 °C declined after 15 days to low concentrations as roots decayed, indicating that dead root materials in moist soil would not cause false-positive results. To separate large roots from samples, a root separation method for field samples was used to target the root fragments remaining in sieved (minimum 2 mm aperture) soil for RDD comparisons. Using this method we compared the seasonal RDD values of fine roots for five mango rootstock cultivars in a field trial. The mean cultivar DNA yields by depth from root fragments in the sieved soil samples had the strongest relationship (adjusted multiple R2 = 0.9307, P < 0.001) with the dry matter (g m−2) of fine (diameter <0.64 mm) roots removed from the soil by sieving. This method provides a species-specific and rapid means of comparing the distribution and concentration of live fine roots of trees in orchards using soil samples up to 500 g. PMID:25552675

  2. INVESTIGATING THE PERCEIVED NEEDS OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS LEARNING EAP

    OpenAIRE

    Dedy Setiawan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: The perceived needs of students learning EAP were analysed u-sing a questionnaire which investigated the subjects’ preference for particular topics and various modes of learning in relation to both the target and present situation. The target situation in the questionnaire was represented by items concerning study skills; while items concerning the present situation were oriented to the contents of the EAP course and its methodology and activities. The findings provide evidence fo...

  3. INVESTIGATING SELF-REGULATED LEARNING HABITS OF DISTANCE EDUCATION STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Ozkan Kirmizi

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at exploring self-regulated learning habits of distance education students. Self-regulation can be defined as a process where learners take the initiative, with or without the guidance of others, in identifying their own needs, formulating goals, exploring resources, focusing on appropriate learning strategies, and evaluating learning outcomes. This study investigates self-regulated learning in terms of goal setting, environment structuring, time management, help seeking, self...

  4. How to engage undergraduate students in Soil Science: some strategies to enhance their motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornoza, Raúl; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Acosta, Jose A.; Martínez-Martínez, Silvia; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Faz, Angel

    2017-04-01

    Teaching soil science can be a challenge in those degrees where students are not familiar with the soil system and do not understand the importance of soil science for their future career. This is the case of students of Biology, Agronomy or Environmental Science, who normally consider soil as a mere substrate for vegetation development, with no interest about how soil determines productivity and quality of terrestrial ecosystems. Thus, students lack of initial motivation to study Soil Science, and just attend lectures and practical lessons as mandatory procedure to get the degree. To engage undergraduate students from Biology, Agronomy and Environmental Sciences in Soil Science, we developed a strategy to enhance their motivation by means of making them participants of the selection of the soils and analyses used for their training. By means of dichotomous keys, students, grouped in pairs, first select the main purpose of their study from different options (land productivity, soil biodiversity, soil fertility, effectiveness of restoration, effect of land use, effect of management, etc). Once objective is decided, we give them some information about sampling strategies, so that they select how soil sampling is going to be performed, and the number of samples to be taken. In terms of the initial objective, they also decide from a given list the properties they should measure. In a practical basis, from the list of selected properties to be measured, professors decide the ones they can really develop in terms of timing, resources and space demand. After that, they are aware about the fact that they have an experimental design developed by them to achieve the goal they meant. Under this perspective, their motivation is enhanced since students are the ones deciding what to study in terms of their personal and professional interests, so that learning is more effective. The negative aspect of this strategy is that it involves many hours of tutorials for the professor

  5. Investigation of the transport of actinide-bearing soil colloids in the soil-aquatic environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, J.C.; Campbell, M.J.; Kittrick, J.; Cheng, T.

    1980-04-01

    Uranium-233 particle size dependent distribution ratios for the 10 to 60 range were determined for muscatine silt loam, Burbank loamy sand, Ritzville silt loam, Fuquay sand, and Idaho sandy clay. A mathematical method for the analysis of centrifuge data was developed to determine particle size dependent distribution ratio for the 10 to 60 nm range. Comparison of the distribution ratio data for the 0 to 60 nm particle size range strongly suggests that particles in the 1 to 10 nm (8000 to 50,000 MW) range play a dominate role. Since these particles are probably humic acid polymers, future research should be focused on humic acid complexing of radionuclides. A mathematical analysis is given to demonstrate the role of humic acid complexing in the transport of radionuclides in the soil-aquatic environment

  6. Investigating physics learning with layered student interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Traxler, Adrienne

    Centrality in student interaction networks (SINs) can be linked to variables like grades [1], persistence [2], and participation [3]. Recent efforts in the field of network science have been done to investigate layered - or multiplex - networks as mathematical objects [4]. These networks can be e......, this study investigates how target entropy [5,1] and pagerank [6,7] are affected when we take time and modes of interaction into account. We present our preliminary models and results and outline our future work in this area....

  7. Information Content in Radio Waves: Student Investigations in Radio Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, K.; Scaduto, T.

    2013-12-01

    We describe an inquiry-based instructional unit on information content in radio waves, created in the summer of 2013 as part of a MIT Haystack Observatory (Westford, MA) NSF Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) program. This topic is current and highly relevant, addressing science and technical aspects from radio astronomy, geodesy, and atmospheric research areas as well as Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). Projects and activities range from simple classroom demonstrations and group investigations, to long term research projects incorporating data acquisition from both student-built instrumentation as well as online databases. Each of the core lessons is applied to one of the primary research centers at Haystack through an inquiry project that builds on previously developed units through the MIT Haystack RET program. In radio astronomy, students investigate the application of a simple and inexpensive software defined radio chip (RTL-SDR) for use in systems implementing a small and very small radio telescope (SRT and VSRT). Both of these systems allow students to explore fundamental principles of radio waves and interferometry as applied to radio astronomy. In ionospheric research, students track solar storms from the initial coronal mass ejection (using Solar Dynamics Observatory images) to the resulting variability in total electron density concentrations using data from the community standard Madrigal distributed database system maintained by MIT Haystack. Finally, students get to explore very long-baseline interferometry as it is used in geodetic studies by measuring crustal plate displacements over time. Alignment to NextGen standards is provided for each lesson and activity with emphasis on HS-PS4 'Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer'.

  8. Neutron-activation analysis for investigation of biochemical manganese in soils cotton soweol zone of Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhumamuratov, A.; Tillaev, T.; Khatamov, Sh.; Suvanov, M.; Osinskaya, N.S.; Rakhmanova, T.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: For many years we neutron activation analysis of soils sampled from different areas of landscape-geochemical regions of Uzbekistan including zone of extreme ecological catastrophe of Aral. Content of manganese and some other elements in the 'soil-cotton' system was investigated. Neutron-activation method of manganese determining with productivity up to 400 samples on shift with detection limit of 1,1 10 -5 % and discrepancies not more than 10%. Was developed extremely uniform distribution of manganese in cotton sowed soils of the Republic (340-1800mg/kg) is determined. Practically all soils of cotton-sowed zone of Republic are with lack of manganese. Distribution of manganese on soil profile of separate organs of cotton (leaves seeds etc.) was studied. Correlation between gross concentration of manganese and its active part extracted by distilled water on the basis of quantity analysis was found. Successive comparison of gross content of manganese in the soil with crop capacity of cotton in different zones of Republic made it possible to find interconnection between these quantities, which proves necessity of using micro-additions of manganese in the soils where its low concentration is detected

  9. Numerical Investigations of Moisture Distribution in a Selected Anisotropic Soil Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanek, M.

    2018-01-01

    The moisture of soil profile changes both in time and space and depends on many factors. Changes of the quantity of water in soil can be determined on the basis of in situ measurements, but numerical methods are increasingly used for this purpose. The quality of the results obtained using pertinent software packages depends on appropriate description and parameterization of soil medium. Thus, the issue of providing for the soil anisotropy phenomenon gains a big importance. Although anisotropy can be taken into account in many numerical models, isotopic soil is often assumed in the research process. However, this assumption can be a reason for incorrect results in the simulations of water changes in soil medium. In this article, results of numerical simulations of moisture distribution in the selected soil profile were presented. The calculations were conducted assuming isotropic and anisotropic conditions. Empirical verification of the results obtained in the numerical investigations indicated statistical essential discrepancies for the both analyzed conditions. However, better fitting measured and calculated moisture values was obtained for the case of providing for anisotropy in the simulation model.

  10. Investigating soil moisture-climate interactions with prescribed soil moisture experiments: an assessment with the Community Earth System Model (version 1.2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mathias; Orth, René; Seneviratne, Sonia I.

    2017-04-01

    Land surface hydrology is an important control of surface weather and climate. A valuable technique to investigate this link is the prescription of soil moisture in land surface models, which leads to a decoupling of the atmosphere and land processes. Diverse approaches to prescribe soil moisture, as well as different prescribed soil moisture conditions have been used in previous studies. Here, we compare and assess four methodologies to prescribe soil moisture and investigate the impact of two different estimates of the climatological seasonal cycle used to prescribe soil moisture. Our analysis shows that, though in appearance similar, the different approaches require substantially different long-term moisture inputs and lead to different temperature signals. The smallest influence on temperature and the water balance is found when prescribing the median seasonal cycle of deep soil liquid water, whereas the strongest signal is found when prescribing soil liquid and soil ice using the mean seasonal cycle. These results indicate that induced net water-balance perturbations in experiments investigating soil moisture-climate coupling are important contributors to the climate response, in addition to the intended impact of the decoupling. These results help to guide the set-up of future experiments prescribing soil moisture, as for instance planned within the Land Surface, Snow and Soil Moisture Model Intercomparison Project (LS3MIP).

  11. Experimental and theoretical investigations of soil-structure interaction effect at HDR-reactor-building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wassermann, K.

    1983-01-01

    Full-scale dynamic testing on intermediate and high levels was performed at the Heissdampfreaktor (HDR) in 1979. Various types of dynamic forces were applied and response of the reactor containment structure and internal components was measured. Precalculations of dynamic behaviour and response of the structure were made through different mathematical models for the structure and the underlying soil. Soil-Structure Interaction effects are investigated and different theoretical models are compared with experimental results. In each model, the soil is represented by springs attached to the structural model. Stiffnesses of springs are calculated by different finite-element idealizations and half-space approximations. Eigenfrequencies and damping values related to interaction effects (translation, rocking, torsion) are identified from test results. The comparisons of dynamic characteristic of the soil-structure system between precalculations and test results show good agreement in general. (orig.)

  12. Child's play : investigating the exposure potential of environmental contaminants in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, D.C.; Dowling, K.; Waldron, H.; Garnett, D.

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic and chromium have been identified as soil contaminants from smelting, industrial and mining activities. The potential for human uptake of these elements from soil has been established with highest concentrations found in children, who are particularly susceptible to environmental exposure. This study explores the exposure potential of selected soil trace elements in rural Victoria, Australia, by investigating the relationship between uptake, measured using toenail clippings as the biomarker of exposure, and soil concentrations in two communities: one near current and historic gold mining, the other an agricultural community. We report the preliminary findings of a cross-sectional survey, in which toenail clippings were obtained from 12 children in the former community, and 16 children in the latter. (author). 26 refs., 3 tabs

  13. Investigating the Effect of Soil Texture and Fertility on Evapotranspiration and Crop Coefficient of Maize Forage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghorbanian Kerdabadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Crop coefficient varies in different environmental conditions, such as deficit irrigation, salinity and intercropping. The effect of soil fertility and texture of crop coefficient and evapotranspiration of maize was investigated in this study. Low soil fertility and food shortages as a stressful environment for plants that makes it different evapotranspiration rates of evapotranspiration calculation is based on the FAO publication 56. Razzaghi et al. (2012 investigate the effect of soil type and soil-drying during the seed-filling phase on N-uptake, yield and water use, a Danish-bred cultivar (CV. Titicaca was grown in field lysimeters with sand, sandy loam and sandy clay loam soil. Zhang et al (2014 were investigated the Effect of adding different amounts of nitrogen during three years (from 2010 to 2012 on water use efficiency and crop evapotranspiration two varieties of winter wheat. The results of their study showed. The results indicated the following: (1 in this dry land farming system, increased N fertilization could raise wheat yield, and the drought-tolerant Changhan No. 58 showed a yield advantage in drought environments with high N fertilizer rates; (2 N application affected water consumption in different soil layers, and promoted wheat absorbing deeper soil water and so increased utilization of soil water; and (3 comprehensive consideration of yield and WUE of wheat indicated that the N rate of 270 kg/ha for Changhan No. 58 was better to avoid the risk of reduced production reduction due to lack of precipitation; however, under conditions of better soil moisture, the N rate of 180 kg/ha was more economic. Materials and Methods: The study was a factorial experiment in a completely randomized design with three soil texture treatment, including silty clay loam, loam and sandy-loam soil and three fertility treatment, including without fertilizer, one and two percent fertilizer( It was conducted at the experimental farm in

  14. [Investigation and analysis of heavy metal pollution related to soil-Panax notoginseng system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Mi, Yan-Hua; Lin, Xin; Liu, Da-Hui; Zeng, Min; Chen, Xiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    In this study, five heavy metals contamination of soil and different parts of Panax notoginseng in the plantation area was investigated. Analysis of heavy metals correlation between the planting soil and P. notoginseng; and the absorption and accumulation characteristics and translocation of soil heavy metals by P. notoginseng plants was revealed. Through field investigation and laboratory analytical methods, analysis of China's 30 different soil P. notoginseng origin and content of heavy metals in five different parts of the P. notoginseng plant content of heavy metals. The results revealed that the soil heavy metals should not be neglected in the plantation area Referring to the national soil quality standards (GB15608-1995), the excessive degree of soil heavy metals pollution showed Hg > As > Cd > Cr in the plantation area, and Pb content of soil was in the scope of the standard. Refer to 'Green Industry Standards for Import and Export of Medical Plants and Preparations', the excessive degree of heavy metals content of P. notoginseng plants showed As > Pb > Cr > Cd, and Hg content of plants was in the scope of the standard. Concentrations of five heavy metals of underground parts of P. notoginseng plants are higher than aboveground, and heavy metals elements are more concentrated in the root, followed by the rhizome of P. notoginseng plants. Heavy metal accumulation characteristics of the different parts of the P. notoginseng of the overall performance is the root > the rhizome > the root tuber > leaves > stems. From the point of view BCF value analysis of various parts of the P. notoginseng plants to absorb heavy metals in soil, BCF values of all samples were less than 1, description P. notoginseng not belong Hyperaccumulator. From the view of transportation and related analysis of the soil-P. notoginseng systems, the rhizome of P. notoginseng and the content of As and Cr in soil was significantly correlated, the root of P. notoginseng and the content of Cd in

  15. [Investigation on sleep status of college and high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shen, Yue-di; Chen, Rong; Ding, Guo-xian

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the sleep status of college and high schools students. Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and self-manufactured questionnaires about siesta habits were used as tools. Three groups of students from medical college (MC), senior high school (SS) and junior high school (JS) were surveyed. In the group MC, SS and JS, the occurrence rates of sleep disorders were 27%, 62% and 54%, respectively, and in which the appearance rates of insomnia were 17%, 19% and 19%, longing for sleep were 10%, 43% and 35% respectively. And there were no significant difference between schoolboy and schoolgirl. The occurrence rates of slack breathing were different (5/155, 1/154) significantly between group SS and JS. The distinct differences also were found in group JS and MC, in which students felt hot (10/155, 1/122) and in all the three groups, in which students felt sleepy (55/155, 62/154, 13/122) whereas the difference of sleepy between group SS and JS was comparatively distinct (55/155, 62/154). Significant differences were also found between group JS and SS, MC in average sleep time of (7.65 +/- 0.87) hours, (7.16 +/- 0.83) hours, and (7.10 +/- 0.57) hours. The time of falling asleep (median 15 min, 10 min, 20 min) and siesta habit (8/155, 19/154, 75/122) among group MC and SS, JS were different respectively and markedly, whereas siesta habit differences between group SS and JS were comparatively distinct (8/155, 19/154). Students in high school showed higher rate of longing for sleep, and this implicated they fall short of sleep time greatly and siesta could improve their sleepy signs.

  16. Investigation of dielectric constant variations for Malaysians soil species towards its natural background dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafery, Khawarizmi Mohd; Embong, Zaidi; Khee, Yee See; Haimi Dahlan, Samsul; Tajudin, Saiful Azhar Ahmad; Ahmad, Salawati; Kudnie Sahari, Siti; Maxwell, Omeje

    2018-01-01

    The correlation of natural background gamma radiation and real part of the complex relative permittivity (dielectric constant) for various species Malaysian soils was investigated in this research. The sampling sites were chosen randomly according to soils groups that consist of sedentary, alluvial and miscellaneous soil which covered the area of Batu Pahat, Kluang and Johor Bahru, Johor state of Malaysia. There are 11 types of Malaysian soil species that have been studied; namely Peat, Linau-Sedu, Selangor-Kangkong, Kranji, Telemong-Akob-Local Alluvium, Holyrood-Lunas, Batu Anam-Melaka-Tavy, Harimau Tampoi, Kulai-Yong Peng, Rengam-Jerangau, and Steepland soils. In-situ exposure rates of each soil species were measured by using portable gamma survey meter and ex-situ analysis of real part of relative permittivity was performed by using DAK (Dielectric Assessment Kit assist by network analyser). Results revealed that the highest and the lowest background dose rate were 94 ± 26.28 μR hr-1 and 7 ± 0.67 μR hr-1 contributed by Rengam Jerangau and Peat soil species respectively. Meanwhile, dielectric constant measurement, it was performed in the range of frequency between 100 MHz to 3 GHz. The measurements of each soils species dielectric constant are in the range of 1 to 3. At the lower frequencies in the range of 100 MHz to 600 MHz, it was observed that the dielectric constant for each soil species fluctuated and inconsistent. But it remained consistent in plateau form of signal at higher frequency at range above 600 MHz. From the comparison of dielectric properties of each soil at above 600 MHz of frequency, it was found that Rengam-Jerangau soil species give the highest reading and followed by Selangor-Kangkong species. The average dielectric measurement for both Selangor-Kangkong and Rengam-Jerangau soil species are 2.34 and 2.35 respectively. Meanwhile, peat soil species exhibits the lowest dielectric measurement of 1.83. It can be clearly seen that the pattern

  17. The Implementation of Group Investigation to Improve the Students' Speaking Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iswardati

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to find out how group investigation improves the student's speaking skill of the second grade students of SMA 2 Samarinda, how group investigation improves the student's participation in speaking of second grade students of SMA 2 Samarinda, and what the obstacles are in the implementation of Group Investigation. The classroom…

  18. Investigation of internet addiction and personality relationship among university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Özgen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, it was aimed to examine to internet addiction and personality relation among university students. Material and Methods: Totally 527 students, studying at Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart university participated to this study as a volunteer. Internet addiction scale and Eysenck personality scale were used to collect data. Kruskal Wallis was used to investigate differences between groups and Pearson Correlation was also used to investigate the relation between variables in SPSS. Findings were accepted at p<0.05 level. Results: Total internet addiction scores of participants were 26.85±14.41 point, %94 of them were average internet user. It was determined that they are mostly connected the internet from the mobile phone (%58, 5.8±1.8 days a week and 4.7±3.0 hours a day, and that they mostly use social network and chat sites (%30. There were statistical differences between departments (p<0.05. The internet addiction score of students of Faculty of Science and Literature, School of Health and Theology was significantly lower than other sections. internet addiction scores were higher in males (p<0.05. In terms of personality characteristics of participants, it was found that they had a higher score (3.9±1.8 in the "Outward Turnover". It was determined that there is a statistically positive relationship between internet addiction score and Neurotism, Psychotism but the negative relationship with the "Lie" personality sub-dimensions. Conclusion: Internet dependency score was found low in this study. Although this is a desirable situation, it would be useful to ensure participation of students in the recreational activities to protect this situation.

  19. The relation between student motivation and student grades in physical education: A 3-year investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkoukis, V; Taylor, I; Chanal, J; Ntoumanis, N

    2014-10-01

    Enhancing students' academic engagement is the key element of the educational process; hence, research in this area has focused on understanding the mechanisms that can lead to increased academic engagement. The present study investigated the relation between motivation and grades in physical education (PE) employing a 3-year longitudinal design. Three hundred fifty-four Greek high school students participated in the study. Students completed measures of motivation to participate in PE on six occasions; namely, at the start and the end of the school year in the first, second, and third year of junior high school. Students' PE grades were also recorded at these time points. The results of the multilevel growth models indicated that students' PE grades increased over the 3 years and students had better PE grades at the end of each year than at the beginning of the subsequent year. In general, students and classes with higher levels of controlling motivation achieved lower PE grades, whereas higher levels of autonomous motivation were associated with higher PE grades. These findings provide new insight on the associations between class- and individual-level motivation with objectively assessed achievement in PE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The use of classical and radionuclide methods to investigate soil erosion in the Beskidy Mts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehlich, W.

    1997-01-01

    Information concerning the spatial patterns of erosion and deposition on cultivated hillslopes is difficult to obtain using conventional soil loss monitoring techniques. The use of the fallout radionuclides 134 Cs and 137 Cs as a sediment tracers offers considerable potential for elucidating patterns of soil redistribution. This paper presents the results of an investigation of soil erosion on a cultivate hillslope within the Homerka drainage basin in the Polish Flysch Carpathians, based on 134 Cs and 137 Cs measurements. The 137 Cs inventories of soils in this region reflect inputs from both bomb and Chernobyl-derived fallout. The high degree of spatial variability associated with Chernobyl fallout deposition poses considerable limitations on the potential for using radiocesium measurements to elucidate detailed patterns of soil loss. With an application of cesium method it was stated that during the last 35 years sediment storage within the edge of agricultural terraces is ca. 4 mm year -1 on the average on agricultural experimental slope in the drainage basin of Homerka. This value reflects tillage and dispersed wash and is comparable with the intensity of erosion on agricultural plots. The results provided by the 137 Cs measurements are consistent with other process-based measurements undertaken on the slopes and with available evidence concerning the dominant sources of suspended sediment transported by the local streams. A general model of soil loss and sediment delivery from cultivated slopes in the Polish Flysch Carpathians is proposed. (author)

  1. Investigation of the impacts of ethyl lactate based Fenton treatment on soil quality for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Suyin; Yap, Chiew Lin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Venny

    2013-11-15

    This study aims to investigate the impacts of ethyl lactate (EL) based Fenton treatment on soil quality for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)-contaminated soils. Accumulation of oxygenated-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (oxy-PAHs) was observed, but quantitative measurement on the most abundant compound 9,10-anthraquinone (ATQ) showed lower accumulation of the compound than that reported for ethanol (ET) based Fenton treatment. In general, as compared to conventional water (CW) based Fenton treatment, the EL based Fenton treatment exerted either a lower or higher negative impact on soil physicochemical properties depending on the property type and shared the main disadvantage of reduced soil pH. For revegetation, EL based Fenton treatment was most appropriately adopted for soil with native pH >/~ 6.2 in order to obtain a final soil pH >/~ 4.9 subject to the soil buffering capacity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily Moghaddas; Ken Hubbert

    2014-01-01

    When managing for resilient forests, each soil’s inherent capacity to resist and recover from changes in soil function should be evaluated relative to the anticipated extent and duration of soil disturbance. Application of several key principles will help ensure healthy, resilient soils: (1) minimize physical disturbance using guidelines tailored to specific soil types...

  3. Oskarshamn site investigation. Programme for further investigations of bedrock, soil, water and environment in Laxemar subarea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-03-15

    SKB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co), has been conducting a site investigation at Simpevarp and Laxemar in Oskarshamn for siting of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. An equivalent investigation is being conducted in Forsmark in Ohmmeter's. The initial part of the site investigations had been completed for the both of the subareas Simpevarp and Laxemar in the autumn of 2004. Based on the results of these investigations, SKB preliminarily prioritized the Laxemar subarea for further investigations. A programme was presented for the first stage of the complete site investigation in the Laxemar subarea, along with the main features of the remainder of the site investigation. The programme included investigations up until the summer of 2005 and was particularly aimed at obtaining answers to several vital questions so that the subsequent investigations could be focused on the rock areas judged to be most suitable for a final repository. These investigations have now been completed. This report presents the programme for the remainder of the site investigation. The points of departure are the general goals for the Deep Repository Project during the site investigation phase, analyses and evaluations of data from completed investigations, and the needs for additional data to be able to evaluate the site as a siting alternative for the final repository. The account mainly covers the investigations on the site. All other work - analyses, site descriptive modelling, facility design, safety assessments and studies and assessments of consequences for the environment, human health and society - are only mentioned to the extent necessary in order to place the investigations in their context. The direction of the site investigation in Oskarshamn and the investigation programme presented in this report is based on SKB's preliminary decision to prioritize the Laxemar subarea for further investigations. A final decision on the direction of the site

  4. Oskarshamn site investigation. Programme for further investigations of bedrock, soil, water and environment in Laxemar subarea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-03-01

    SKB (the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co), has been conducting a site investigation at Simpevarp and Laxemar in Oskarshamn for siting of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. An equivalent investigation is being conducted in Forsmark in Ohmmeter's. The initial part of the site investigations had been completed for the both of the subareas Simpevarp and Laxemar in the autumn of 2004. Based on the results of these investigations, SKB preliminarily prioritized the Laxemar subarea for further investigations. A programme was presented for the first stage of the complete site investigation in the Laxemar subarea, along with the main features of the remainder of the site investigation. The programme included investigations up until the summer of 2005 and was particularly aimed at obtaining answers to several vital questions so that the subsequent investigations could be focused on the rock areas judged to be most suitable for a final repository. These investigations have now been completed. This report presents the programme for the remainder of the site investigation. The points of departure are the general goals for the Deep Repository Project during the site investigation phase, analyses and evaluations of data from completed investigations, and the needs for additional data to be able to evaluate the site as a siting alternative for the final repository. The account mainly covers the investigations on the site. All other work - analyses, site descriptive modelling, facility design, safety assessments and studies and assessments of consequences for the environment, human health and society - are only mentioned to the extent necessary in order to place the investigations in their context. The direction of the site investigation in Oskarshamn and the investigation programme presented in this report is based on SKB's preliminary decision to prioritize the Laxemar subarea for further investigations. A final decision on the direction of the site

  5. Students as Virtual Scientists: An exploration of students' and teachers' perceived realness of a remote electron microscopy investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Gina; Jones, M. Gail

    2015-10-01

    Remote access technologies enable students to investigate science by utilizing scientific tools and communicating in real-time with scientists and researchers with only a computer and an Internet connection. Very little is known about student perceptions of how real remote investigations are and how immersed the students are in the experience. This study, conducted with high school students and their teachers, explored the impact of students' perception of ownership and virtual presence during a remote investigation using a scanning electron microscope. Students were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: students able to select their own insect to use during the remote investigation, and students that did not select their own insects to view during the remote investigation. The results of this study showed that students in the experimental group who had choice and ownership of their insect reported being more present (less distracted) during the remote investigation than students in the control group, whereas students in the control group reported controlling the technology was easier than the experimental group. Students indicated the remote investigation was very real; however, the teachers of these students were less likely to describe the investigation as being real. The results of this study have practical implications for designing remote learning environments.

  6. Isotopic investigation of the colloidal mobility of depleted uranium in a podsolic soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harguindeguy, S.; Crancon, P.; Pointurier, F.; Potin-Gautier, M.; Lespes, G.

    2014-01-01

    The mobility and colloidal migration of uranium were investigated in a soil where limited amounts of anthropogenic uranium (depleted in the "2"3"5U isotope) were deposited, adding to the naturally occurring uranium. The colloidal fraction was assumed to correspond to the operational fraction between 10 kDa and 1.2 μm after (ultra)filtration. Experimental leaching tests indicate that approximately 8-15% of uranium is desorbed from the soil. Significant enrichment of the leachate in the depleted uranium (DU) content indicates that uranium from recent anthropogenic DU deposit is weakly bound to soil aggregates and more mobile than geologically occurring natural uranium (NU). Moreover, 80% of uranium in leachates was located in the colloidal fractions. Nevertheless, the percentage of DU in the colloidal and dissolved fractions suggests that NU is mainly associated with the non-mobile coarser fractions of the soil. A field investigation revealed that the calculated percentages of DU in soil and groundwater samples result in the enhanced mobility of uranium downstream from the deposit area. Colloidal uranium represents between 10% and 32% of uranium in surface water and between 68% and 90% of uranium in groundwater where physicochemical parameters are similar to those of the leachates. Finally, as observed in batch leaching tests, the colloidal fractions of groundwater contain slightly less DU than the dissolved fraction, indicating that DU is primarily associated with macromolecules in dissolved fraction. (authors)

  7. Bridge-in-a-Backpack(TM) task 3.1: investigating soil - structure interaction - experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This report includes fulfillment of Task 3.1 of a multi-task contract to further enhance concrete filled FRP tubes, or : the Bridge in a Backpack. Task 3 is an investigation of soil-structure interaction for the FRP tubes. Task 3.1 is the : design of...

  8. New strategies to strengthen the soil science knowledge of student during field activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Marta; Hontoria, Chiquinquirá; Masaguer, Alberto; Diéguez, Carmen; Almorox, Javier; Pérez, Juana; Santano, Jesús; Mariscal, Ignacio; Gutiérrez, Jesús; Moliner, Ana

    2013-04-01

    Soil Science can be considered a discipline that serves as a fundamental base for other disciplines such as ecology, agronomy, plant production, etc. In order to demonstrate the relevance and connection to real world it is important to develop field and practical activities. Field activities help student to comprehend soil as part of the landscape and the natural ecosystems. These activities also help them to realize the importance of historical soil use on the quality of todaýs soil and landscapes. It is well known that fieldwork practices are essential to strengthen the soil science knowledge of students and their learning process. These fieldwork practices involve doing a physical activity rather than passively attending lectures or watching demonstrations. The simple visual and tactile observations in the field could be used to predict soil behavior and these direct observations are best made in the field. Students who learned in the field using an active work are more motivated, have more positive attitudes, and place more value in their work than those that learn passively. Therefore, when scheduling the coursework an important time is assigned to field work, which sometimes is not sufficiently profited from the standpoint of student learning taking into consideration the economic effort involved. We are aware that part of the students are simple spectators in the field so we encourage their participation by making them responsible for obtaining part of the information about the place and the types of soils that will be visited. On the other hand, we will invite the students to do some game based exercises, which are fun and force them to work in groups and to pay attention to explanations. Our objective is to present the information in a more attractive way, making the learning of soil profile description and easier task. The exercises that we propose are both field and problem-based learning to make sure that the knowledge is more memorable (non

  9. Investigation of nonlinear dynamic soil property at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    This document summarizes laboratory dynamic soil testing investigations conducted by the University of Texas at Austin (UTA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Stokoe et al., 1995a, Stokoe et al., 1995b, Sponseller and Stokoe, 1995). The purpose of the investigation is to provide an evaluation of past testing results in the context of new test data and the development of consistent site wide models of material strain dependencies based upon geologic formation, depth, and relevant index properties

  10. ''In situ'' investigations of the radioactive fissionable element infiltration and retention in different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oncescu, M.; Danis, A.; Sahagia, M.; Negrescu, C.; Bobe, M.; Balanescu, P.; Burcescu, M.; Tautu, N.

    1980-01-01

    ''In situ'' investigations of the natural and forced infiltration and retention of the fissionable elements from a liquid residue in several natural compacted soils and compacted clays are presented. The velocities and flow rates for different stages of the residue infiltration are determined. The retention of the fissionable elements by variation of the fissionable element concentration with the distance from the place of the residue depot is investigated. (author)

  11. For Better Soil, Let Earthworms Toil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinehart, Rebecca, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This activity involves elementary students in investigating how earthworms affect soil fertility. An introduction discusses topsoil loss and the connections between soil and earthworm ecology. Materials needed and step-by-step procedure are provided. (LZ)

  12. Meteoric 10Be as a tool to investigate human induced soil fluxes: a conceptual model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; De Vente, Joris; Boix-Fayos, Carolina; Minella, Jean; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The use of meteoric 10Be as a tool to understand long term landscape behavior is becoming increasingly popular. Due its high residence time, meteoric 10Be allows in principle to investigate in situ erosion rates over time scales exceeding the period studied with classical approaches such as 137Cs. The use of meteoric 10Be strongly contributes to the traditional interpretation of sedimentary archives which cannot be unequivocally coupled to sediment production and could provide biased information over longer time scales (Sadler, 1981). So far, meteoric 10Be has successfully been used in geochemical fingerprinting of sediments, to date soil profiles, to assess soil residence times and to quantify downslope soil fluxes using accumulated 10Be inventories along a hill slope. However, less attention is given to the potential use of the tracer to directly asses human induced changes in soil fluxes through deforestation, cultivation and reforestation. A good understanding of the processes governing the distribution of meteoric 10Be both within the soil profile and at landscape scale is essential before meteoric 10Be can be successfully applied to assess human impact. We developed a spatially explicit 2D-model (Be2D) in order to gain insight in meteoric 10Be movement along a hillslope that is subject to human disturbance. Be2D integrates both horizontal soil fluxes and vertical meteoric 10Be movement throughout the soil prolife. Horizontal soil fluxes are predicted using (i) well studied geomorphical laws for natural erosion and soil formation as well as (ii) human accelerated water and tillage erosion. Vertical movement of meteoric 10Be throughout the soil profile is implemented by inserting depth dependent retardation calculated using experimentally determined partition coefficients (Kd). The model was applied to different environments such as (i) the Belgian loess belt, characterized by aeolian deposits enriched in inherited meteoric 10Be, (ii) highly degraded and stony

  13. University Students' Metacognitive Failures in Mathematical Proving Investigated Based on the Framework of Assimilation and Accommodation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Nizlel; Subanji; Nusantar, Toto; Susiswo; Sutawidjaja, Akbar; Rahardjo, Swasono

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine students' metacognitive failure in Mathematics Education Program of FKIP in Jambi University investigated based on assimilation and accommodation Mathematical framework. There were 35 students, five students did not answer the question, three students completed the questions correctly and 27 students tried to solve…

  14. Radioecological investigations in the food-chain air-soil-vine-wine. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.; Hellmuth, K.H.; Fischer, E.

    1988-12-01

    In a field investigation (1983-1985) comprising 8 locations of the most important viticultural regions in Germany, the contents of H-3, C-14, Sr-90, and Cs-137 in air, soils, leaves of the vine, grapes and wine were measured and site-specific transfer factors were calculated. Data concerning soil parameters, climatic conditions, cultivation and vinification were collected. The T contents of all samples were 10 Bq/l water of combustion, independent of location and year. The specific activity of C-14 in the atmosphere and in biological material was 0.22 Bq/g C, independent of site and year. Sr-90 contents of soils fluctuated between 0.7 and 3.5 Bq/kg dry matter. The mean content of leaves was 2 Bq/kg fresh material, of grapes 0.035 Bq/kg and of wine 0.008 Bq/l. The Cs-137 level of soils fluctuated between 1.3 and 7.9 Bq/kg dry matter. The mean content of leaves was 0.098 Bq/kg fresh material, of grapes 0.021 Bq/kg and of wine 0.0085 Bq/l. A relation between transfer and soil parameters and between the contents of grapes and wine was not recognizeable. While cultivar-specific differences were not observed in grapes, red wines contained somewhat more Cs-137 than white wines. Transfer factors soil-grapes were 0.027 for Sr-90 and 0.0057 for Cs-137. Site-specific influences such as soil parameters, climate, cultivation, vinification and differences between years led to a small fluctuation of values. No influence of the Neckarwestheim reactor has been found in any of the radionuclides. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Development of atmosphere-soil-vegetation model for investigation of radioactive materials transport in terrestrial biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katata, Genki; Nagai, Haruyasu; Zhang, Leiming; Held, Andreas; Serca, Dominique; Klemm, Otto

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the transport of radionuclides in the terrestrial biosphere we have developed a one-dimensional numerical model named SOLVEG that predicts the transfer of water, heat, and gaseous and particulate matters in atmosphere-soil-vegetation system. The SOLVEG represents atmosphere, soil, and vegetation as an aggregation of several layers. Basic equations used in the model are solved using the finite difference method. Most of predicted variables are interrelated with the source/sink terms of momentum, water, heat, gases, and particles based on mathematically described biophysical processes in atmosphere, soil and vegetation. The SOLVEG can estimate dry, wet and fog deposition of gaseous and particulate matters at each canopy layer. Performance tests of the SOLVEG with several observational sites were carried out. The SOLVEG predicted the observed temporal changes in water vapor, CO 2 , and ozone fluxes over vegetated surfaces. The SOLVEG also reproduced measured fluxes of fog droplets and of fine aerosols over the forest. (author)

  16. Laboratory investigation of steam transmission in unsaturated clayey soil under osmotic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Jalili

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquids coming from different sources like wastewaters, agricultural and industrial activities and leakages of chemical substances often have high concentration of chemical compositions and the osmotic gradient generated around such sources causes a considerable transmission of the Contamination. The steam transmitted by non-polluted soils moves to polluted masses, causing an increase in the volume of pollution zone and movement of pollutants. Therefore, such physical and chemical processes should be taken into account in pollution transmission models. Using Crumb method, laboratory investigations were conducted on non-dispersive and dispersive clayey soil samples obtained from three areas in Zanjan Province of Iran. A simple experimental setup has been used and hereby introduced. The impact of osmotic force from salinities of 0.5, 1, and 1.5% on steam transmission in clayey soil was examined. Results indicate that for all samples between 5 to 15 days, the moisture content increased in the pollutant zone and decreased in the non-pollutant area. Also it was observed that for dispersive clayey soil, movement of steam among layers was observed to be orderly and its amount was higher than that of non-dispersive clayey soil.

  17. Investigation of elemental and radiological contamination of soils in two shipyards in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M. Shuza; Shariff, M. Asad; Hasan, M. Mehedi

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of metallic elements and natural radioactivity in soils collected from two shipyards and their surroundings in Chittagong, Bangladesh is presented. The elemental concentrations of the metals Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu were obtained by PIXE analysis with a 3 MV Tandem Accelerator, and the radioactivity of 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K was determined using HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry. From the mean specific activities of the three radionuclides in soil samples, the radium equivalent activity, the gamma absorbed dose rate, the annual effective dose rate and the external hazard index were calculated. The study was focused on investigation of soil contamination via shipbreaking activities, if any. The somewhat higher contents of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu in soil samples of shipyards, as compared to other locations, seem to be caused by the shipbreaking activities. The specific radioactivities as well as radium equivalent activity in soils of shipyards are also higher and thus possibly an indirect result of shipbreaking activities.

  18. Investigation of elemental and radiological contamination of soils in two shipyards in Chittagong, Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M. Shuza; Shariff, M. Asad; Hasan, M. Mehedi [Tandem Accelerator Facility, Dhaka (Bangladesh). Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Atomic Energy Research Establishment; Barua, Bijoy Sonker [Tandem Accelerator Facility, Dhaka (Bangladesh). Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Atomic Energy Research Establishment; Chittagong Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Chittagong (Bangladesh). Dept. of Physics; Rashid, M. Abdur [Chittagong Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Chittagong (Bangladesh). Dept. of Physics; Kamal, Masud [Radioactivity Testing and Monitoring Lab. Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission, Chittagong (Bangladesh)

    2014-10-01

    An analysis of metallic elements and natural radioactivity in soils collected from two shipyards and their surroundings in Chittagong, Bangladesh is presented. The elemental concentrations of the metals Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu were obtained by PIXE analysis with a 3 MV Tandem Accelerator, and the radioactivity of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K was determined using HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry. From the mean specific activities of the three radionuclides in soil samples, the radium equivalent activity, the gamma absorbed dose rate, the annual effective dose rate and the external hazard index were calculated. The study was focused on investigation of soil contamination via shipbreaking activities, if any. The somewhat higher contents of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu in soil samples of shipyards, as compared to other locations, seem to be caused by the shipbreaking activities. The specific radioactivities as well as radium equivalent activity in soils of shipyards are also higher and thus possibly an indirect result of shipbreaking activities.

  19. Use of 137Cs and other fallout radionuclide in soil erosion investigations: progress, problems and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walling, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Accelerated erosion and soil degradation currently represent serious problems for the global environment. Against this background there is a need to assemble reliable information on the rates of soil loss involved. Existing techniques for documenting rates of soil loss possess many limitations and there is increasing interest in the potential for using fallout radionuclides, particularly 137 Cs, to obtain such information. An example of the application of the 137 Cs approach to a cultivated field at Rufford Forest Farm, Nottinghamshire, UK, is presented to illustrate its value. The key advantages of the approach are that it provides a means of assembling retrospective estimates of medium-term (ca. 40 years) rates of soil loss and the spatial pattern of erosion and deposition involved, on the basis of a single site visit. There are, however, currently a number of problems and uncertainties associated with the use of 137 Cs in soil erosion investigations, and these are reviewed and needs for further research identified. Potential developments of the approach, including the use of other fallout radionuclides such as unsupported 210 Pb and 7 Be are also considered. (author)

  20. Investigation of electric fields for low-temperature treatment of soils and liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heath, W.O.; Goheen, S.C.; Miller, M.C.; Richardson, R.L.

    1992-02-01

    Work was performed to assess the feasibility of an in situ technology for decomposing and removing hazardous organic waste compounds from soils. The technology is based on conductive soil heating and partial electrical discharges (corona) combined with soil-vapor extraction. A pilot-scale facility was developed and used to evaluate the ability to heat and dry soils using polyphase electricity applied through inserted pipes. Uniform heating (100 ± 2 degrees C) and drying to 1.2-wt % moisture were observed. Heating and resultant in situ steam formation have been demonstrated in previous studies to be effective in removing volatile and semivolatile compounds. Corona reactors were constructed to investigate decomposition of organic compounds by oxidants produced in a point-to-liquid corona discharge in ambient air at room temperature and pressure. Point-to-liquid corona was found to be capable of destroying a wide variety of organics, including three aromatics, two polyaromatics, a pcp, a pcb, an alkane, an alkene, an amide, a complexant, a chelator, and an organic dye. Tests with trichloroethylene demonstrated a decontamination factor of 2 x 10 5 (equal to a destruction efficiency of 99.999995%) and nearly complete (99.7%) mineralization, with the main byproduct being aqueous chloride ions. Real-time data on the decolorization kinetics of aqueous methylene blue were obtained using in situ probe colorimetry. Reaction rates were directly proportional to the amount of unreacted dye present and the square of electrode current. Other exploratory tests were performed to investigate concepts for generating ac corona discharges in soil and the ability of those discharges to decompose adsorbed organic compounds. All findings are discussed in relation to a conceptual soil-treatment scenario that includes a description of the basic hardware requirements

  1. Inspiring the undergraduate soil students for a future effective public outreach role: Success strategies and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ismaily, Said; Al-Maktoumi, Ali; Kacimov, Anvar

    2015-04-01

    Undergraduates, majoring in soil sciences (SS), have a broad holistic role because SS integrates several intertwined geo-environmental/ecological and socio-economical aspects. Consequently, students have to learn how the information, advice, practices and expertise, pertinent to food security, water shortage, hydropedology, among others amalgamate through SS . Hence, university SS-programs should incorporate public outreach activities. We present experience at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) in Oman on how to develop an effective public outreach program that can be implemented by undergraduate students. Our strategy has three components : (i) offering a course Soil and Water Tour (SWAE 4110) of hydropedology nature that integrates field, laboratory-work, and presentation-extension activities; the course is research-oriented and designed to provide opportunities for students to practice their metacognitive abilities and critical thinking; the course is offered by the Department of Soils, Water & Agricultural Engineering (SWAE), (ii) Training and involving the undergraduates in planning and conducting enjoyable, interactive, and effective workshops for school pupils; a training workshop on "Soils" was conducted for pupils (a total 300 participants, grades 7-9) and teachers aiming to unveil the secrets and the role of soil in ecosystems; workshop was organized by the SWAE Students Society (iii) Guiding the undergraduates on the best practice for raising funds for their outreach activities (e.g. the undergraduates secured funds for the workshop on "Soils", which was sponsored by Muscat Municipality, a governmental agency, and several private companies such as HMR Consultants, Metal Engineering L.L.C and Bauer Nimr LLC); SS students were mentored in submission of research proposals to the national research agency (e.g. FURAP program of The Research Council, TRC, WWW.trc.gov.om). The three components were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively using fixed-response and

  2. An Investigation of Institutional Enhancement Factors on Student College Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaokoro, Amaechi Nkemakolem

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the importance of students' hard work and institutional factors--technology, advising, mentoring, and tutoring on student's academic performance. It is important for institutions to emphasize both students' hard work and effective institutional factors that will have positive impact on student success.

  3. Behaviour and fate radionuclides in soils. Mathematical modelling and experimental investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovdan, E.N.

    2003-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of radionuclides as result of Chernobyl accident has led to contamination of 23% of territory of Republic of Belarus. Soil has high capacity to adsorb radionuclides and their intensive sorption provides the creation of a long-lived radionuclide source in a terrestrial environment. In the management of the contaminated areas and application of a countermeasure strategy it is extremely important to know the environmental mechanisms governing the behaviour of radionuclides in soils. Basic attention in the work is paid to the study of 137 Cs and 90 Sr because they are the main radionuclides from the view point of radioactive danger in polluted areas. The main features and processes that control radionuclide behaviour in soil have been analysed. On the basis of natural researches, lab test and mathematical modelling the impact of physical-chemical factors and the soil component composition changes upon the radionuclides migration and sorption in natural dispersed systems (peat, sand, bentonite, kaolin, sapropel) has been investigated. The investigations done allowed to substantiate the mathematical models of the radionuclides migration in the regions of positive and negative temperatures, to develop methods of experimental identification of main transfer characteristics and to compile a data base for these models. (orig.)

  4. Investigating microbial transformations of soil organic matter: synthesizing knowledge from disparate fields to guide new experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, S. A.; Tiemann, L. K.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Lehmeier, C. A.; Min, K.

    2015-04-01

    Discerning why some soil organic matter (SOM) leaves soil profiles relatively quickly while other compounds, especially at depth, can be retained for decades to millennia is challenging for a multitude of reasons. Simultaneous with soil-specific advances, multiple other disciplines have enhanced their knowledge bases in ways potentially useful for future investigations of SOM decay. In this article, we highlight observations highly relevant for those investigating SOM decay and retention but often emanating from disparate fields and residing in literature seldom cited in SOM research. We focus on recent work in two key areas. First, we turn to experimental approaches using natural and artificial aquatic environments to investigate patterns of microbially mediated OM transformations as environmental conditions change, and highlight how aquatic microbial responses to environmental change can reveal processes likely important to OM decay and retention in soils. Second, we emphasize the importance of establishing intrinsic patterns of decay kinetics for purified substrates commonly found in soils to develop baseline rates. These decay kinetics - which represent the upper limit of the reaction rates - can then be compared to substrate decay kinetics observed in natural samples, which integrate intrinsic decay reaction rates and edaphic factors essential to the site under study but absent in purified systems. That comparison permits the site-specific factors to be parsed from the fundamental decay kinetics, an important advance in our understanding of SOM decay (and thus persistence) in natural systems. We then suggest ways in which empirical observations from aquatic systems and purified substrate-enzyme reaction kinetics can be used to advance recent theoretical efforts in SOM-focused research. Finally, we suggest how the observations in aquatic and purified substrate-enzyme systems could be used to help unravel the puzzles presented by oft-observed patterns of SOM

  5. Students' Performance in Investigative Activity and Their Understanding of Activity Aims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alessandro Damasio Trani; Borges, A. Tarciso; Justi, Rosaria

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the students' understanding of the aims of an investigative activity and their performance when conducting it. One hundred and eighty-one year nine students from a public middle school in Brazil took part in the study. Students working in pairs were asked to investigate two problems using a…

  6. Investigation of PCBs biodegradation by soil bacteria using tritium-labeled PCBs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.A.; Djuraeva, G.T.; Takhtobin, K.S.; Kadirova, M.; Yadgarov, H.T.; Zinovev, P.V.; Abdukarimov, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    The method of tritium labeling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been developed. It allows producing of uniformly labeled tritium PCBs. High specific activity permits the tracing all of the tritium labeled PCBs biodegradation products. Radiochemical approach of the investigation of PCBs microbial degradation has been developed and PCB-destructive activity of soil bacteria strains has been studied. It was found that 4 investigated bacteria strains of Bacillus sp. has the ability accumulate and destroy PCBs. Use of developed radiochemical methods in complex with other analytical methods in investigation of PCBs biodegradation provide useful additional information. The radiochemical methods developed can be successfully used for wide screening of microorganisms, destructors of PCBs. (author)

  7. Labile pools of Pb in vegetable-growing soils investigated by an isotope dilution method and its influence on soil pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong; Huang, Zhi-Yong; Cao, Ying-Lan; Cai, Chao; Zeng, Xiang-Cheng; Li, Jian

    2012-08-01

    Pollution of Pb in the surface of agricultural soils is of increasing concern due to its serious impact on the plant growth and the human health through the food chain. However, the mobility, activity and bioavailability of Pb rely mainly on its various chemical species in soils. In the present study, E and L values, the labile pools of isotopically exchangeable Pb, were estimated using the method of isotope dilution in three vegetable-growing soils. The experiments involved adding a stable enriched isotope ((206)Pb > 96%) to a soil suspension and to soils in which plants are subsequently grown, the labile pools of Pb were then estimated by measuring the isotopic composition of Pb in soil solutions and in the plant tissues, respectively. In addition, the correlation of E values and soil pH was investigated at the ranges of pH 4.5-7.0. The amount of labile Pb in soils was also estimated using different single chemical extractants and a modified BCR approach. The results showed that after spiking the enriched isotopes of (206)Pb (>96%) for 24 hours an equilibration of isotopic exchanges in soil suspensions was achieved, and the isotope ratios of (208)Pb/(206)Pb measured at that time was used for calculating the E(24 h) values. The labile pools of Pb by %E(24 h) values, ranging from 53.2% to 61.7% with an average 57%, were found to be significantly higher (p soil pH was found in the tested soil sample. The results indicate that the %E(24 h) value can more rapidly and easily predict the labile pools of Pb in soils compared with L values, but it might be readily overestimated because of the artificial soil acidity derived from the spiked isotopic tracer and the excess of spiked enriched isotopes. The results also suggest that the amounts of Pb extracted with EDTA and the Σ(BCR) values extracted with the modified BCR approach are helpful to detect the labile pools of Pb in soils. In addition, the negative correlation between soil pH and the labile pools of Pb in soils

  8. Decision Analysis on Survey and SOil Investigation Problem in Power Engineering Consultant

    OpenAIRE

    Setyaman, Amy Maulany; Sunitiyoso, Yos

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to gather and organize information for decision making against the problems arising in Power Engineering Consultant's survey and soil investigation product due to new policy in production cost efficiency that is implemented in 2012. The study conducted using Kepner and Tragoe's analytical process that consisted of four stages analytical process such as situation analysis, problem analysis, decision making analysis and potential problem analysis. As for the decision making analy...

  9. Investigation of Soil and Vegetation Characteristics in Discontinuous Permafrost Landscapes Near Fairbanks, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    ER D C TR -1 5- 7 ERDC Center-Directed Research Investigation of Soil and Vegetation Characteristics in Discontinuous Permafrost ...Characteristics in Discontinuous Permafrost Landscapes Near Fairbanks, Alaska Jacob F. Berkowitz U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC...Washington, DC 20314-1000 Under ERDC Center-Directed Research project “Integrated Technologies for Delineat- ing Permafrost and Ground-State

  10. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil extracts investigated by FT-ICR-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, D.; Steffen, D.; Jablonowski, N. D.; Burauel, P.

    2012-04-01

    Soil drying and rewetting usually increases the release of xenobiotics like pesticides present in agricultural soils. Besides the effect on the release of two aged 14C-labeled pesticide residues we focus on the characterisation of simultaneously remobilized dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to gain new insights into structure and stability aspects of soil organic carbon fractions. The test soil (gleyic cambisol; Corg 1.2%, pH 7.2) was obtained from the upper soil layer of two individual outdoor lysimeter studies containing either environmentally long-term aged 14C residues of the herbicide ethidimuron (0-10 cm depth; time of aging: 9 years) or methabenzthiazuron (0-30 cm depth; time of aging: 17 years). Soil samples (10 g dry soil equivalents) were (A=dry/wet) previously dried (45°C) or (B=wet/wet) directly mixed with pure water (1+2, w:w), shaken (150 rpm, 1 h), and centrifuged (2000 g). This extraction procedure was repeated several individual times, for both setups. The first three individual extractions, respectively were used for further investigations. Salt was removed from samples prior analysis because of a possible quench effect in the electrospray (ESI) source by solid phase extraction (SPE) with Chromabond C18 Hydra-cartridges (Macherey-Nagel) and methanol as backextraction solvent. The so preconcentrated and desalted samples were introduced by flow injection analysis (FIA) in a fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS), equipped with an ESI source and a 7 T supra-conducting magnet (LTQ-FT Ultra, ThermoFisher Scientific). This technique is the key technique for complex natural systems attributed by their outstanding mass resolution (used 400.000 at m/z 400 Da) and mass accuracy (≤ 1ppm) by simultaneously providing molecular level details of thousands of compounds and was successful applied for the investigations of natural organic matter (NOM) different sources like marine and surface water, soil, sediment, bog and crude oil

  11. Investigating Students' Beliefs about Arabic Language Programs at Kuwait University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaye, Shaye S.

    2009-01-01

    The current study attempted to identify students' of Arabic programs beliefs about their chosen programs. To achieve this purpose, a survey was developed to collect the data from randomly selected students in liberal-arts and education-based programs at Kuwait University. The results showed that students were statistically differentiated as a…

  12. An Investigation into Credit Card Debt among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Dylan; Waterwall, Brian; Giardelli, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    It is no surprise that the amount of credit card debt and outstanding loan balances of college students is increasing every year. College students are heavily targeted by credit companies through the use of e-mail, campus booths, and standard mail. The reason for these solicitations is because of the soaring expense levels of college students and…

  13. Students' Written Arguments in General Chemistry Laboratory Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Aeran; Hand, Brian; Greenbowe, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the written arguments developed by college freshman students using the Science Writing Heuristic approach in inquiry-based general chemistry laboratory classrooms and its relationships with students' achievement in chemistry courses. Fourteen freshman students participated in the first year of the study while 19…

  14. Springing into Inquiry: Using Student Ideas to Investigate Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Jesse; Kruse, Jerrid

    2012-01-01

    Although inquiry is more engaging and results in more meaningful learning (Minner, Levy, and Century 2010) than traditional science classroom instruction, actually involving students in the process is difficult. Furthermore, many students have misconceptions about Earth's seasons, which are supported by students' prior knowledge of heat sources.…

  15. Comparative investigations of the heavy-metal uptake of different culture plants from soils fertilized with sewage sludge and its forecasting by means of soil extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebben, S.; Goettingen Univ.

    1993-01-01

    This report is part of a research programme sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Science and Technology entitled ''Impact of municipal wastes on soils, soil organisms and plants''. In field experiments or on samples from these fields (four partial projects), soil microbiological, soil zoological and other pedological investigations were carried through; furthermore, soil samples were taken in the areas of five other partial projects studying for many years the impact of municipal waste, in order to investigate heavy metal transfer from soil to plants in greater detail. As the evaluation of the rates of heavy metal elimination shows, the possibility of soil decontamination merely through heavy metal transfer to plants is practically excluded. In moderately contaminated areas those culture plants should be given priority whose useful parts take up relatively little heavy metal. By raising the pH-value the availability of cadmium, zinc and nickel can, moreover, be effectively reduced and the concentrations of these elements in the plants lowered. The conclusion from this study is that moderate recycling of low-heavy-metal sewage sludge in farming will be safe as long as, especially, cadmium concentrations are critically monitored and as long as the soils in question are mainly medium to heavy ones with pH values higher than 6.5. (orig./Vhe) [de

  16. 100-FR-3 groundwater/soil gas supplemental limited field investigation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    In 1993, a Limited Field Investigation (LFI) was conducted for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit which identified trichloroethylene (TCE) as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) (DOE-RL 1994). In groundwater samples collected for the LFI, TCE was detected in well 199-177-1 at a concentration exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (5 μg/L) and Washington State groundwater criteria (3 μg/L). With the concurrence of the EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), a supplemental LFI was conducted to determine the extent and potential source of TCE groundwater contamination associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. This report summarizes the activities and results of the groundwater/soil gas supplemental LFI for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The primary objective of this investigation was to assess the lateral distribution of TCE in shallow (3 to 5 ft below the water table) groundwater associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The second objective was to assess soil gas (3 to 5 concentrations in the study area in an attempt to identify potential sources of TCE and develop a correlation between soil gas and groundwater concentrations). Finally, the third objective of the investigation was to refine the site conceptual model

  17. Investigation on reusing water treatment residuals to remedy soil contaminated with multiple metals in Baiyin, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Changhui; Zhao, Yuanyuan [The Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Pei, Yuansheng, E-mail: yspei@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2012-10-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe/Al water treatment residuals (FARs) can stabilize As, Pb, Ni, Zn, Cr and Cu. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FARs cannot stabilize Ba and Cd. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of FARs and soil affect the FARs' ability of stabilizing metals. - Abstract: In this work, the remediation of soils contaminated with multiple metals using ferric and alum water treatment residuals (FARs) in Baiyin, China, was investigated. The results of metals fractionation indicated that after the soil was treated with FARs, arsenic (As), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) could be transformed into more stable forms, i.e., As bound in crystalline Fe/Al oxides and other metals in the oxidable and residual forms. However, the forms of chromium (Cr) and cadmium (Cd) were unaffected. Interestingly, due to the effect of FARs, barium (Ba) was predominantly transformed into more mobile forms. The bioaccessibility extraction test demonstrated that the FARs reduced the bioaccessibility of As by 25%, followed by Cu, Cr, Zn, Ni and Pb. The bioaccessibility of Cd and Ba were increased; in particular, there was an increase of 41% for Ba at the end of the test. In conclusion, the FARs can be used to remedy soil contaminated with multiple metals, but comprehensive studies are needed before practical applications of this work.

  18. Investigation on reusing water treatment residuals to remedy soil contaminated with multiple metals in Baiyin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Changhui; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Pei, Yuansheng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Fe/Al water treatment residuals (FARs) can stabilize As, Pb, Ni, Zn, Cr and Cu. ► FARs cannot stabilize Ba and Cd. ► The properties of FARs and soil affect the FARs’ ability of stabilizing metals. - Abstract: In this work, the remediation of soils contaminated with multiple metals using ferric and alum water treatment residuals (FARs) in Baiyin, China, was investigated. The results of metals fractionation indicated that after the soil was treated with FARs, arsenic (As), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) could be transformed into more stable forms, i.e., As bound in crystalline Fe/Al oxides and other metals in the oxidable and residual forms. However, the forms of chromium (Cr) and cadmium (Cd) were unaffected. Interestingly, due to the effect of FARs, barium (Ba) was predominantly transformed into more mobile forms. The bioaccessibility extraction test demonstrated that the FARs reduced the bioaccessibility of As by 25%, followed by Cu, Cr, Zn, Ni and Pb. The bioaccessibility of Cd and Ba were increased; in particular, there was an increase of 41% for Ba at the end of the test. In conclusion, the FARs can be used to remedy soil contaminated with multiple metals, but comprehensive studies are needed before practical applications of this work.

  19. Chemical elemental distribution and soil DNA fingerprints provide the critical evidence in murder case investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Concheri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The scientific contribution to the solution of crime cases, or throughout the consequent forensic trials, is a crucial aspect of the justice system. The possibility to extract meaningful information from trace amounts of samples, and to match and validate evidences with robust and unambiguous statistical tests, are the key points of such process. The present report is the authorized disclosure of an investigation, carried out by Attorney General appointment, on a murder case in northern Italy, which yielded the critical supporting evidence for the judicial trial. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proportional distribution of 54 chemical elements and the bacterial community DNA fingerprints were used as signature markers to prove the similarity of two soil samples. The first soil was collected on the crime scene, along a corn field, while the second was found in trace amounts on the carpet of a car impounded from the main suspect in a distant location. The matching similarity of the two soils was proven by crossing the results of two independent techniques: a elemental analysis via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES approaches, and b amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis by gel electrophoresis (ARDRA. CONCLUSIONS: Besides introducing the novel application of these methods to forensic disciplines, the highly accurate level of resolution observed, opens new possibilities also in the fields of soil typing and tracking, historical analyses, geochemical surveys and global land mapping.

  20. Investigation the Kinetic Models of Biological Removal of Petroleum Contaminated Soil Around Oil Pipeline Using Ryegrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghaheri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The industrial revolution of the past century has resulted in significant damage to environmental resources such as air, water and soil. Petroleum contamination of soil is a serious problem throughout the oil producer countries. Remediation of petroleum contamination of soils is generally a slow and expensive process. Phytoremediation is a potentially less-damaging, cost-effective, but needs longer-term for remediation of contaminated land compared to the alternative methods. In this study the kinetics of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils in Khozestan were investigated. For this paper Ryegrass (Lolium perenne plant selected and the decline of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH was analyzed after growth stage, every 10 days up to 90 days. The results of TPH concentration was fitted with zero-order kinetic, first-order kinetic and Higuchi model. The result indicated that degradation of TPH with presence of plants as a function of time was well fitted with the first-order kinetic model. The first-order rate constants (K and half-lives (T1/2 for TPH degradation were 0.0098 1/day and 71 day; respectively. The results of phytoremediation showed that there were 65% decreases in TPH concentration with Ryegrass during the 17 weeks.

  1. Investigation of Scalar Implicatures of Binus University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Herlina Karjo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Scalar implicatures are based on a range of quantifiers ordered in terms of informational strength, for example in quantity: some, most, all; in frequency: sometimes, often, and always. This study measures the scalar implicatures among university students who learn English as a foreign language. The participants for this study are fourth semester English Department students at Binus University. Using the same instruments as in Slabakova (2009 and Noveck’s study (2001 the present study aims to find out the general ability of the university students of computing scalar implicatures and to discover the level of pragmatic/logical competence of the university students with regards to their gender and grade point average. The results show that the students with GPA lower than three are more logical than those with GPA higher than three; while female students are more pragmatic than male students.

  2. A Multiyear Approach to Student-Driven Investigations in Exercise Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.; Campisi, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Many undergraduate institutions offer individual research opportunities for upper-level students in independent study courses and summer undergraduate research programs. These are necessarily limited to a small number of students. Greater numbers of students can benefit from incorporating student-directed investigative experiences into…

  3. Nuclear-physical methods of investigation of an element composition in samples of soils and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hushmurodov, Sh.; Botaev, N.

    2002-01-01

    Soil (ground) and vegetative covers of the Earth are one of the most responsive and specific parts of the biosphere with respect to pollution. A proper control after them is of fundamental importance in creating and protecting optical surrounding. Analysis of soils and plants is a necessary and important stage in the process of investigation of microelements' migration in biogeochemical cycles. For this purpose we studied some reserved terrains of Uzbekistan to reveal a level of their contamination by heavy metals, as well as to find out typical and territorial singularities in accumulation of a number of elements by soils and plants. In order to decrease an influence of systematic errors, and to obtain more precise and reliable data, we carried out the element analysis of the samples by different methods, such as gamma-activation analysis, neutron-activation analysis, X-ray spectral analysis, and X-ray fluorescent analysis. As a result of our investigations we have obtained rather great information, which can be used in future to estimate the conditions of the surrounding nature. The investigations allowed us to determine the content of about 40 elements, as well as to show that the data, obtained by different nuclear-physical methods, are in rather good agreement. A reproducibility of the results of the methods, determined in control measurements, depends on the concentration of the analyzed elements, and is equal to 10-35 %. A comparison of the obtained data allowed us to reveal some singularities in element composition of the investigated samples depending on their type and territorial factor. It has been revealed that the data, obtained by different methods, are in rather good agreement. Our investigations allowed us to find out a series of regularities and singularities in accumulation of elements in plants, as well as to show the possibility of using nuclear-physical methods in such investigations

  4. From bulk soil to intracrystalline investigation of plant-mineral interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemarchand, D.; Voinot, A.; Chabaux, F.; Turpault, M.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the controls and feedbacks regulating the flux of matter between bio-geochemical reservoirs in forest ecosystems receives a fast growing interest for the last decades. A complex question is to understand how minerals and vegetation interact in soils to sustain life and, to a broader scope, how forest ecosystems may respond to human activity (acid rain, harvesting,...) and climate perturbations (temperature, precipitation,...). Many mineralogical and biogeochemical approaches have longtime been developed, and occasionally coupled, in order to investigate the mechanisms by which chemical elements either are exchanged between soil particles and solutions, or are transferred to plants or to deeper soil layers and finally leave the system. But the characterization of particular processes like the contribution of minor reactive minerals to plant nutrition and global fluxes or the mechanisms by which biology can modify reaction rates and balance the bioavailability of nutrients in response to environmental perturbation sometimes fails because of the lack of suitable tracers. Recent analytical and conceptual advances have opened new perspectives for the use of light "non traditional" stable isotopes. Showing a wild range of concentrations and isotopic compositions between biogeochemical reservoirs in forest ecosystem, boron has physico-chemical properties particularly relevant to the investigation of water/rock interactions even when evolving biologically-mediated reactions. In this study, we focused on the distribution of boron isotopes from intracrystalline to bulk soil scales. An overview of the boron distribution and annual fluxes in the soil-plant system clearly indicates that the vegetation cycling largely controls the mobility of boron. We also observe that the mineral and biological B pools have drastically different isotopic signature that makes the transfer of B between them very easy to follow. In particular, the podzol soil we analyzed shows a

  5. “Doing the Wrong Things Right” Site Investigations in Soft Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilus, M. H.; Lim, A. J. M. S.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Azmi, M. A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Site investigation is a very important process by which geotechnical, geological and other relevant information which might affect the construction or performance of a civil engineering or building project is acquired. However, common practice in site investigations is not always in accordance to the standard that has been defined. Reliability on the information obtained depends upon several factors that involves correct procedures and competent workers and also supervision. Several examples on site investigation methods are discussed in this paper. Explanation on the difference between the site investigation methods used for real practices in the field and how it should be done are discussed in detail. Therefore, it is hoped that site investigation should always be uniquely planned and should be an interactive and flexible process of discovery and changes according to the condition of the soil.

  6. Soil Organic Carbon Stocks in Arctic Deltaic Sediments: Investigations in the Lena River Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycki, S.; Kutzbach, L.; Desyatkin, A.; Pfeiffer, E.-M.

    2012-04-01

    The soil organic carbon stock (SSOC) of deltaic sediments in arctic permafrost regions is known to be significant but is insufficiently investigated so far. Previous SSOC studies were conducted mainly in the comparatively well studied Mackenzie River Delta (area: 13,000 km2) in Canada. The few studies from other arctic delta regions report only the gravimetric carbon (C) contents and are limited to the active layer depth at the time of sampling. Since C deposits in permafrost regions are likely to become a future C source, more detailed investigations of the presently frozen likely carbon-rich sediment and soil layers in other arctic delta regions are of importance. Our investigations were performed on Samoylov Island in the southern-central part of the Lena River Delta (32,000 km2) which is the largest arctic delta and the fifth largest delta worldwide. Samoylov Island is representative for the Lena River Delta's first terrace and the active floodplains. Within this study a new portable Snow-Ice-Permafrost-Research-Establishment (SIPRE) auger was used during a spring field session to obtain 1 m deep frozen soil cores (n = 37) distributed over all known soil and vegetation units. These cores are analyzed for bulk contents of nitrogen (N) and C, ice content and bulk density (BD) and to determine the SSOC including the rarely investigated currently permanently frozen layers up to 1 m depth on Samoylov Island. Our study provides evidence for high SSOC for a depth of 1 m for the investigated area ranging between 6 kg m2 and 54 kg m2. Considering the spatial extent of different soil units on the two geomorphological units of Samoylov Island, the area-weighted average SSOC were 31 kg m2 (n = 31) for the first terrace and 15 kg m2 (n = 6) for the active floodplain. For the correspondent soil units of Turbels and Orthels in circumpolar permafrost regions, Tarnocai et al. 2009 reported a mean SSOC of 27 kg m2 (min: 0.1 kg m2, max: 126 kg m2) for a depth of 1 m. For up

  7. Investigation of soil structure in Uzungöl settlement area by Shallow Seismic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Karslı

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to relase the soil structure of Uzungöl district of Trabzon city, a vocational area, where had been formed by a historical landslide and lake deposits and to evaluate its geotechnical characters by using seismic methods which are noninvasive, rapidly applicable and provide substantial information about the structure of investigated ground in a short time. For this purpose, seismic refraction, active-passive surface waves and seismic reflections in 16 profiles were gathered on four sub-areas and and evaluated by current favorable numerical methods. Although it considerably varies between profiles, the depth of basement, depositional base of deposits, was averagely obtained as 13.5-15m at upper elevation and 25-50m at lower elevation of the study area. Dynamic elastic parameters and average shear wave velocity of the upper 30m (VS30 of soil in the area were calculated. The soil classification of study area was interpreted as locally Z1 and Z2 class for TEC, B and C class for EC-8 code, C and D class for NERHP. According to VS30 (394-530m/s, ground amplification and predominant vibration period of the study area are respectively obtained as 1.5-2.1 and 0.23-0.30sec. On the other hand, all deposits are characterized by stiffness-solid soil, excluding arable soil from surface to a few meters depth. In addition, the first meters of bedrock shows weathered character, but deeper parts are very compact and hard. Therefore, a scientific infrastructure has been formed to carry out the engineering projects to be planned for Uzungöl settletment safely and without damaging the environment.

  8. Investigating substrate use efficiency across different microbial physiologies in soil-extracted, solubilized organic matter (SESOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyle, K. T.; Martinez, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Recent experimental work has elevated the importance of microbial processing for the stabilization of fresh carbon inputs within the soil mineral matrix. Enhancing our understanding of soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics therefore requires a better understanding of how efficiently microbial metabolism can process low molecular weight carbon substrates (carbon use efficiency, CUE) under environmentally relevant conditions. One approach to better understanding microbial uptake rates and CUE is the ecophysiological study of soil isolates in liquid media culture consisting of soil-extracted solubilized organic matter (SESOM). We are using SESOM from an Oa horizon under hemlock hardwood vegetation in upstate New York as liquid media for the growth of 12 isolates from the Oa and B horizon of the same site. Here we seek to test the uptake rates as well as CUE of 5 different low molecular weight substrates spanning compound class and nominal oxidation state (glucose, acetate, formate, glycine, valine) by isolates differing in phylogeny and physiology. The use of a spike of each of the 13C-labeled substrates into SESOM, along with a 0.2 μm filtration step, allows accurate partitioning of labeled carbon between biomass, gaseous CO2 as well as the exometabolome. Coupled UHPLC-MS measurements are being used to identify and determine uptake rates of over 80 potential C substrates present in the extract as well as our labeled substrate of interest along the course of the isolate growth curve. This work seeks to utilize a gradient in substrate class as well as microbial physiologies to inform our understanding of C and N cycling under relevant soil solution conditions. Future experiments may also use labeled biomass from stationary phase to investigate the stabilization potential of anabolic products formed from each substrate with a clay fraction isolated from the same site.

  9. Field investigations of soils at TA-19, TA-26, TA-73 and TA-0, SWMU aggregate 0-D and 016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFadden, L.D.

    1995-01-01

    Field based investigations of the general soil-geomorphic characteristics were carried out at TA-19, -26, -73, -0, Aggregate 0-D and -016 in order to provide information for utilization in ongoing and anticipated LANL ERP (Environmental Restoration Project) activities at these sites. These investigations show that soils exhibiting diverse morphologic character, varying ages, and relations to landforms characterize these sites. A review of recent and ongoing soils studies also shows that soil textural, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics may profoundly influence the migration and/or retardation of a variety of potential contaminants initially placed in direct contact with soils, or that encounter soils during subsurface percolation or discharge. Soil-geomorphic relations also provide important insights into recent site erosion, deposition or other surficial processes that must, be considered as part of environmental assessment of a given site and remediation; and, the planned geomorphic mapping activities at each site, as well as other associated activities (e.g, geophysical survey, site sampling) are accordingly appropriate and necessary with respect to identification of significant soil relations at each site. Specific and general recommendations in consideration of important findings regarding the possible impacts of soil development of the nature of contaminant behavior at various sites are provided to help guide sampling and analysis activities during ERP investigations outlined in the RFI Work Plan for Operational Unit-1071

  10. Upscaling the Use of Fallout Radionuclides in Soil Erosion and Sediment Budget Investigations: Addressing the Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.E. Walling

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of fallout radionuclides in soil erosion investigations and related sediment budget studies has provided a widely used tool for improving understanding of soil erosion and sediment transfer processes. However, most studies using fallout radionuclides undertaken to date have focussed on small areas. This focus on small areas reflects both the issues addressed and practical constraints associated with sample collection and analysis. Increasing acceptance of the important role of fine sediment in degrading aquatic habitats and in the transfer and fate of nutrients and contaminants within terrestrial and fluvial systems has emphasised the need to consider larger areas and the catchment or regional scale. The need to upscale existing approaches to the use of fallout radionuclides to larger areas represents an important challenge. This contribution provides a brief review of existing and potential approaches to upscaling the use of fallout radionuclides and presents two examples where such approaches have been successfully applied. These involve a national scale assessment of soil erosion rates in England and Wales based on 137Cs measurements and an investigation of the sediment budgets of three small/intermediate-size catchments in southern Italy.

  11. Investigation of students' experiences of gendered cultures in engineering workplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, Sally A.; Gardner, Anne; Figueroa, Eugenia; Bennett, Dawn

    2018-05-01

    Women remain severely under-represented in engineering in Australia as in all Western countries. This limits the pool of talent, standpoints and approaches within the profession. Furthermore, this under-representation equates to restriction of the benefits of being an engineer mainly to men. Gendered workplace experiences have been found to contribute to women leaving the profession. In this study we explore students' experiences of gendered cultures in engineering workplaces, using interviews with a purposive sample of 13 students (4 male) recruited following a previous survey. Although the overall experience of workplace learning is positive for many students, male and female engineering students reported experiences consistent with masculine cultures. Educators and employers must proactively lead improvements to the culture in engineering workplaces, prepare students for gendered workplaces and support students to reflect during and after workplace experiences. The experiences presented here could be adapted to enhance inclusivity training.

  12. Microbiological investigation of soil samples of the caprock above the Gorleben salt dome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutzner, H.J.; Sonnen, H.; Bachmann, F.

    1993-01-01

    Microorganisms constitute an essential part of the soil structure. Through their activities a large number of processes in the soil are caused: decomposition (mineralization) and conversion (humate formation) of organic substances; formation of biomass (reproduction); oxidation and reduction of various elements or compounds, and thus generation of a geomicrobiological cycle of nitrogen, sulphur, iron, manganese and other elements; and, at the same time, by means of oxidation/reduction processes they cause modifications of the solubility of metals (precipitation or mobility increase). Therefore, an influence exerted by microorganisms, as an integral part of the caprock, on radionuclide migration cannot be excluded. The investigations performed served to look into the question to which extent microorganisms occur in the profile of the caprock above the Gorleben salt dome; which geomicrobiological activities are to be expected there due to their physiological properties, and whether their influence on radionuclide migration seems to be realistic. (orig./DG) [de

  13. Investigation of soil properties for identifying recharge characteristics in the Lake Chad Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, M. L.; Ndunguru, G. G.; Adisa, S. J.; Lee, J.; Adegoke, J. O.; Goni, I. B.; Grindley, J.; Mulugeta, V.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Chad was once labeled as one of the largest fresh water lakes in the world, providing water and livelihood to over 20 million people. The lake is shared by six different countries; Chad Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon, Central African Republic, and Sudan. Since the 1970 to date, a significant decrease in the size of the lake has been observed with the use of satellite imagery. This shrinking of the lake has been blamed on global warming, population increase and poor water management by the agriculture industry for farming purpose for both plants and animals. While these can be all valid reasons for the decrease of Lake Chad, we see the need to examine environmental and hydrological evidence around the Lake Chad basin. This study was carried out from upper stream to lower stream leading from Kano to the Damatru region which is one of several water bodies that supply Lake Chad. Over seventy six sites were sampled for soil texture, bulk density and other physical properties to investigate recharge capacity of the basin especially along the stream. Soils were collected using a soil core and properly stored at 4 degrees Celsius. Soils were weighed and put to dry at 105 degrees for twenty four hours. Dry weight was recorded and bulk density was calculated. The wet sieve method was used to determine the particle size analysis. Soils were weighed to 10 grams and hydrogen peroxide added to separate particles. Samples were washed with water and put to dry overnight. Soils were reweighed and sieved to separate as course sand, fine sand and silt and clay. The data revealed that in the upstream, coarse sand continuously decreased while silt and clay continuously increased down toward the lake. At mid stream silt and clay had significantly higher values when compared to coarse sand and fine sand. In the lower stream, bulk density clearly decreased compared to the upper and mid streams. Correlations will be carried out to investigate the particle size analysis and bulk density with

  14. Alternative methods and radionuclides for use in soil-erosion and sedimentation investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Q.; Walling, D.E.; Wallbrink, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of 137 Cs for documenting rates and patterns of soil redistribution and sediment deposition represents an important advance that overcomes many of the limitations of existing techniques. Thus, the 137 Cs approach presents several key advantages but a number of potential limitations must also be recognized and addressed in any application. For example, traditional procedures for applying 137 Cs measurements in soil-erosion and sedimentation investigations involve the collection of soil or sediment cores from a study site and their subsequent transfer to the laboratory for preparation and analysis of 137 Cs activity by gamma spectrometry. The resulting measurements of 137 Cs activity (Bq g -1 ) are used to calculate the 137 Cs inventories (Bq m -2 ) for the individual cores and, thus the sampling points. In cases where a large number of cores are collected and require analysis, their processing and laboratory measurement will involve substantial effort. Furthermore, an extended period of time will generally be required for the measurements, because long count times are required for environmental samples containing relatively low levels of 137 Cs activity. Appreciable delays in obtaining results may, therefore, arise and it is not generally possible to obtain immediate data for use in planning and developing an ongoing sampling programme for detailed investigations. In view of these limitations, there is clearly a need to explore the potential for enhancing and extending the 137 Cs technique by using other methods to obtain the 137 Cs measurements within a shorter period of time and by using other fallout radionuclides with behaviour similar to that of 137 Cs but with a continuous input or a half-life extending to days rather than years, that could be used to document either the short-term contemporary rates of soil redistribution and sediment deposition or address issues of variability. This chapter discusses the procedures involved in employing field

  15. An Investigation into Student Engagement in Higher Education Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Witkowski, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a one-year research project that used peer coaching and collaboration between two reading professors to study the effects of collaborative classroom activities on student engagement. In order to address professors’ concerns about student participation, two undergraduate reading-methods classes were revised through the inclusion of more collaborative learning activities. Classroom observations were conducted to take notes on both pedagogical methods and student response to these methods. Students were also asked to self-assess their engagement in behavioral, cognitive, and affective domains. The results of this research were then used to revise pedagogical techniques in these and other classes.

  16. Qualitative investigation of students' views about experimental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dehui; Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    This study examines students' reasoning surrounding seemingly contradictory Likert-scale responses within five items in the Colorado Learning Attitudes About Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS). We administered the E-CLASS with embedded open-ended prompts, which asked students to provide explanations after making a Likert-scale selection. The quantitative scores on those items showed that our sample of the 216 students enrolled in first year and beyond first year physics courses demonstrated the same trends as previous national data. A qualitative analysis of students' open-ended responses was used to examine common reasoning patterns related to particular Likert-scale responses. When explaining responses to items regarding the role of experiments in confirming known results and also contributing to the growth of scientific knowledge, a common reasoning pattern suggested that confirming known results in a classroom experiment can help with understanding concepts. Thus, physics experiments contribute to students' personal scientific knowledge growth, while also confirming widely known results. Many students agreed that having correct formatting and making well-reasoned conclusions are the main goal for communicating experimental results. Students who focused on sections and formatting emphasized how it enables clear and efficient communication. However, very few students discussed the link between well-reasoned conclusions and effective scientific communication. Lastly, many students argued it was possible to complete experiments without understanding equations and physics concepts. The most common justification was that they could simply follow instructions to finish the lab without understanding. The findings suggest several implications for teaching physics laboratory courses, for example, incorporating some lab activities with outcomes that are unknown to the students might have a significant impact on students' understanding of experiments as an

  17. Introducing Students to the Application of Statistics and Investigative Methods in Political Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Dominic D.; Nemire, Nathan A.

    2017-01-01

    This exercise introduces students to the application of statistics and its investigative methods in political science. It helps students gain a better understanding and a greater appreciation of statistics through a real world application.

  18. Investigating with concept cartoons: practical suggestions for using concept cartoons to start student investigations in elementary school and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, E.; Kruit, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Concept cartoons can be used to diagnose misconceptions and stimulate discussion of basic concepts and phenomena. However, the teacher can also present a cartoon and then ask students to think of experiments to further investigate the phenomenon shown in the cartoon. Our experience is that students

  19. Investigating ESL Students' Performance on Outcomes Assessments in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Joni M.; Elliott, Diane Cardenas; Liu, Ou Lydia

    2012-01-01

    Outcomes assessments are gaining great attention in higher education because of increased demand for accountability. These assessments are widely used by U.S. higher education institutions to measure students' college-level knowledge and skills, including students who speak English as a second language (ESL). For the past decade, the increasing…

  20. Investigating Students' Reasoning about Acid-Base Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Kouyoumdjian, Hovig; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base chemistry is central to a wide range of reactions. If students are able to understand how and why acid-base reactions occur, it should provide a basis for reasoning about a host of other reactions. Here, we report the development of a method to characterize student reasoning about acid-base reactions based on their description of…

  1. Future Time Orientation and Student Expectations: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyx, Douglas; Bristow, Dennis

    2004-01-01

    Navajo and Anglo college students' time orientation scores from the Future Time Orientation (FTO) Scale (Bristol & Amyx, 1996) were analyzed and compared. Anglo students were found to be significantly more future time oriented in two of the three dimensions: temporal distance and involvement with time. Future time orientation was used to explain…

  2. Investigating undergraduate students' ideas about the fate of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Mallory; Coble, Kim; Bailey, Janelle M.; Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2017-12-01

    As astronomers further develop an understanding of the fate of the Universe, it is essential to study students' ideas on the fate of the Universe so that instructors can communicate the field's current status more effectively. In this study, we examine undergraduate students' preinstruction ideas of the fate of the Universe in ten semester-long introductory astronomy course sections (ASTRO 101) at three institutions. We also examine students' postinstruction ideas about the fate of the Universe in ASTRO 101 over five semester-long course sections at one institution. The data include precourse surveys given during the first week of instruction (N =264 ), postinstruction exam questions (N =59 ), and interviews. We find that, preinstruction, more than a quarter of ASTRO 101 students either do not respond or respond with "I don't know" when asked what the long-term fate of the Universe is. We also find that, though the term was not necessarily used, students tend to describe a "big chill" scenario in the preinstruction surveys, among a wide variety of other scenarios. A fraction of students describe the fate of smaller-scale systems, possibly due to confusion of the hierarchical nature of structure in the Universe. Preinstruction, students mention the Universe's expansion when describing how astronomers know the fate of the Universe but do not discuss how we know the Universe is expanding or the relationship between expansion and the fate of the Universe. Postinstruction, students' responses shift toward greater degrees of completeness and correctness.

  3. Investigating Student Ideas about Cosmology I: Distances and Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, Kim; Camarillo, Carmen T.; Nickerson, Melissa D.; Trouille, Laura E.; Bailey, Janelle M.; Cochran, Geraldine L.; Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, powerful new observations and advances in computation and visualization have led to a revolution in our understanding of the structure of the Universe. As the field of cosmology advances, it is of interest to study how student ideas relate to scientific understanding. In this paper, we examine in-depth undergraduate students' ideas on…

  4. Effective Participation and Motivation: An Investigation on Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasgin, Adnan; Tunc, Yunus

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between the secondary school students' level of effective participation and their motivation. This study employs a survey consisting of 251 secondary school students from the schools located in Igdir and Erzurum, in East of Turkey. The data of the study were gathered through "Effective…

  5. University Students' Depression: A Cross-Cultural Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Santos, Maria Luisa R.; Habibi, Mojtaba; Smith, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Australian, Iranian and Portuguese university students ("n"?=?967) completed the University Students Depression Inventory (USDI) in English, Persian and Portuguese languages, respectively. A series of MANOVA analyses were used to examine differences in depression symptoms as an effect of the country and demographic variables.…

  6. Perceived Discrimination and International Students' Learning: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppan, Corinne M.; Barari, Mahua

    2011-01-01

    At a time when the number of internationally mobile students worldwide has been growing steadily, the US share of this market has been declining. Since, as it is often claimed, international students are the best ambassadors for their host countries, an effective recruitment strategy is to enhance their learning experience, with the expectation…

  7. An Empirical Investigation of MPA Student Performance and Admissions Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragothaman, Srinivasan; Carpenter, Jon; Davies, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The quality of a Master of Professional Accountancy (MPA) program, similar to other undergraduate and graduate programs in business and other disciplines, is typically directly related to the quality of its students. While there is a considerable published scholarly work on MBA student performance, there is very little research to predict student…

  8. Response of soil bacterial communities to lead and zinc pollution revealed by Illumina MiSeq sequencing investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xihui; Zhang, Zhou; Hu, Shunli; Ruan, Zhepu; Jiang, Jiandong; Chen, Chen; Shen, Zhenguo

    2017-01-01

    Soil provides a critical environment for microbial community development. However, microorganisms may be sensitive to substances such as heavy metals (HMs), which are common soil contaminants. This study investigated bacterial communities using 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene fragment sequencing in geographic regions with and without HM pollution to elucidate the effects of soil properties and HMs on bacterial communities. No obvious changes in the richness or diversity of bacterial communities were observed between samples from mining and control areas. Significant differences in bacterial richness and diversity were detected between samples from different geographic regions, indicating that the basic soil characteristics were the most important factors affecting bacterial communities other than HMs. However, the abundances of several phyla and genera differed significantly between mining and control samples, suggesting that Zn and Pb pollution may impact the soil bacterial community composition. Moreover, regression analyses showed that the relative abundances of these phyla and genera were correlated significantly with the soil-available Zn and Pb contents. Redundancy analysis indicated that the soil K, ammoniacal nitrogen (NH 4 + -N), total Cu, and available Zn and Cu contents were the most important factors. Our results not only suggested that the soil bacteria were sensitive to HM stresses but also indicated that other soil properties may affect soil microorganisms to a greater extent.

  9. An investigation of inorganic antimony species and antimony associated with soil humic acid molar mass fractions in contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steely, Sarah; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri; Xing Baoshan

    2007-01-01

    The presence of antimony compounds is often suspected in the soil of apple orchards contaminated with lead arsenate pesticide and in the soil of shooting ranges. Nitric acid (1 M) extractable Sb from the shooting range (8300 μg kg -1 ) and the apple orchard (69 μg kg -1 ) had considerably higher surface Sb levels than the control site ( -1 ), and Sb was confined to the top ∼30 cm soil layer. Sb(V) was the principal species in the shooting range and the apple orchard surface soils. Size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS) analysis of humic acids isolated from the two contaminated soils demonstrated that Sb has complexed to humic acid molar mass fractions. The results also indicate that humic acids have the ability to arrest the mobility of Sb through soils and would be beneficial in converting Sb(III) to a less toxic species, Sb(V), in contaminated areas. - The soil surface and depth distribution Sb(V) and Sb(III) species in a contaminated apple orchard and a shooting range, and the effect soil humic acids on inorganic antimony species is reported

  10. Investigating with Concept Cartoons: Practical suggestions for using concept cartoons to start student investigations in elementary school and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed van den Berg

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Concept cartoons can be used to diagnose misconceptions and stimulate discussion of basic concepts and phenomena. However, the teacher can also present a cartoon and then ask students to think of experiments to further investigate the phenomenon shown in the cartoon. Our experience is that students from age 9–18 very quickly come with creative ideas and start investigations. That is, of course, only the beginning. The teacher will have to follow the work of the students closely and help them to develop their investigation skills and critical thinking. In the workshop you will experience how to start an investigation with the cartoon and then we will focus on how to use formative assessment to improve the work of students.

  11. An investigation of radionuclide uptake into food crops grown in soils treated with bauxite mining residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.B.; Clarke, P.C.; Robertson, W.; McPharlin, I.R.; Jeffrey, R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Sandy soils of the coastal plain area of Western Australia have poor phosphorous retention capacity which leads to pollution of surface water bodies in the region. Application of bauxite mining residues (termed 'red mud') to vegetable and crops has been proposed as a solution to increase the phosphorous and water retention and thereby reduce the leaching of nutrients. The thorium and radium-226 concentrations in the 'red mud' residues are in excess of 1 kBq/kg, and 300 Bq/kg respectively. Potentially, the use of these residues on agricultural land could result in increased levels of radionuclides in food grown in amended soils. The transfer of long-lived radionuclides of both the natural thorium and uranium series to a variety of vegetable crops grown under controlled conditions is investigated. The effects of varying the rates of application of 'red mud' and phosphate fertilizers on radionuclide uptake are studied. It has been shown previously that fallout caesium-137 is sandy soils of the region transfers readily to food and grazing crops. Some of the parameters which influence that transfer are also examined. (author). 14 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs

  12. An investigation into the attitudes of nursing students toward technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubaishat, Ahmad

    2014-06-01

    Attitudes toward technology may impact the levels of technology acceptance and training willingness among nursing students. Nurse acceptance and effective utilization of technology are critical to improving patient care and safety. The aims of this cross-sectional study were to measurethe attitude of nursing students toward technology and to determine if demographic characteristics affect their attitudinal measures. Furthermore, the amount of formal education provided on the use of technology applications is explored. A convenience sample of nursing students attending a public university in Jordan was recruited, and a technology attitude scale designed to measure the attitude of nursing students toward technology was used. Scales designed to gather data on participant demographics, self-reported technology skills, and level of formal technology education were also used. The results showed that participants held a positive attitude toward technology. Students who reported a high level of technology skill had the most positive attitude toward technology. The impact years of formal education on the use of technology applications were low, whereas academic level had a significant impact on technology attitudes. Senior student participants had the highest level of technology education, likely because of their exposure to relatively more educational opportunities, and the most positive attitude toward technology. Despite the positive attitude of nursing students toward technology, the problem of minimal technology education should be addressed in future nursing programs to further enhance positive attitudes toward technology.

  13. Investigations of soil-plant transfer of radiocesium after deposition from the Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilo, M.

    1991-11-01

    Due to the low deposition of radiocaesium in NRW after the Chernobyl accident of about 2500 Bq 137 Cs/m 2 and 720 Bq 134 Cs/m 2 , radiocaesium was not detectable in cereals from NRW. A deposition of about 44,100 Bq 137 Cs/m 2 and 13,500 Bq 134 Cs/m 2 was calculated for the vicinity of Tannheim, a village in Upper Swabia. Nevertheless, the content of radiocaesium in grain from Upper Swabia was found to be more than one hundred times lower than that of natural 40 K. Transferfactors (TF/SP) for radiocaesium were determined for cereals from the three investigated soil types: Kalkvega (FAO classification: Calcaric Fluvisol), Braunerde (Cambisol) and Parabraunerde-Pseudogley (Luvisol-Planosol). The total variation in TF(SP) from 54 sampling sites was a factor of 43 (grain) and 18 (straw). However, the values did not reach the calculation basis of the German Regulatory Guide of 0.05 (Allgemeine Berechnungsgrundlage). The maximum TF(SP) for 134/137 Cs in grain of 0.026 is clearly below that limit. A drastic increase of radioactivity in sewage sludge was observed in Upper Swabia. In the Tannheim sewage plant a radiocaesium content of about 12,500 Bq/kg dry matter was measured. In order to obtain further information on the possible radioecological consequences of using this sewage sludge as fertilizer a lysimeter study was carried out with application of the contaminated sewage sludge. Radioactivity in soil and several crops was measured for the growing periods 1989 and 1990. Although the soil type ('worst-case model') could have led one to expect high TF(SP) the increase of radiocaesium in plants was quite small. A higher uptake of radiocaesium by plants is caused by varying the potassium contents of the soil rather than by the application of the contaminated sewage sludge. (orig./HP) [de

  14. Lab-scale impact test to investigate the pipe-soil interaction and comparative study to evaluate structural responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Man Ryu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the dynamic response of a subsea pipeline under an impact load to determine the effect of the seabed soil. A laboratory-scale soil-based pipeline impact test was carried out to investigate the pipeline deformation/strain as well as the interaction with the soil-pipeline. In addition, an impact test was simulated using the finite element technique, and the calculated strain was compared with the experimental results. During the simulation, the pipeline was described based on an elasto-plastic analysis, and the soil was modeled using the Mohr-Coulomb fail-ure criterion. The results obtained were compared with ASME D31.8, and the differences between the analysis results and the rules were specifically investigated. Modified ASME formulae were proposed to calculate the precise structural behavior of a subsea pipeline under an impact load when considering sand- and clay-based seabed soils.

  15. Geochemical Investigations In Soils And Waters Of Ischia Island (southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avino, R.; Capaldi, G.; Di Matteo, V.; Pece, R.

    The island of Ischia is localized in the Gulf of Naples and is a volcanic field belonging to the volcanic district of the Phlegraean Fields. It covers an area of about 42 Km2 and is characterized by a complex system of faults and fractures of tectonic and volcano- tectonic origin. The highest peak of the island is Mt Epomeo (787 m), situated in the central part of Ischia. The last eruption on this island took place in 1302 (Arso) and from that time the volcanic activity has reduced only to hydrothermal manifestations (fumaroles and thermal springs) localized especially along the faults that border Mt Epomeo. So the area around the Epomeo is an area of great interest for geochemical investigations, and in fact in this place high concentration of mercury, carbon dioxide and radon have been measured. In this work are presented the data of a study on the concentration of CO2 and mercury and of the activity of radon in the soils and in the waters of the island of Ischia. For these investigations 184 samples of soils have been collected and analyzed in laboratory to calculate the concentration of mercury using the Jerome 511 Mercury Vapor Analyzer. In the same sampling sites measurements of CO2 and of the activity of radon-222 in the soils have also been made using the Track- etch@ method. As regards the waters, a sampling of 50 wells localized all around the coast of the island has been carried out. In these waters measures of mercury and of the activity of some radioactive elements have been done. The measures of radioactivity has been carried out by gamma spectrometry with a HPE Ge detector. All the investigations (in soils and in waters) allow to have preliminary information about the concentrations of these investigated elements and will be a starting-point for a more detailed sampling in those place where anomalies have been found. This set of data can also help to better understand the degassing process of these elements through the principal structures of the

  16. Investigating the spatial anisotropy of soil radioactivity in the region of Vinaninkarena, Antsirabe-Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabesiranana, N.; Rasolonirina, M.; Solonjara, A.F.; Raoelina Andriambololona

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted in the region of Vinaninkarena-Antsirabe, to investigate the spatial distrubition of the environmental radioactivity. Forty-two (42) top soil samples were collected from two different sampling points. They were analyzed for uranium and thorium series by gamma spectrometry. In order to determine radioactivity spatial structure, semi-variance analysis was used. From 82 samples and 840 paired data, semi-variances were computed, variograms charted and modelled. Results showed that spatial dependance ranges vary from 100 m to 300m. Moreover, spatial anisotropy is also detected. Such result allows optimizing sampling design for future mapping of the environmental radioactivity of the region.

  17. Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenschuss, A.; Huber, S.; Riss, A.; Schwarz, S.; Tulipan, M.

    2001-01-01

    For Austria there exists a comprehensive soil data collection, integrated in a GIS (geographical information system). The content values of pollutants (cadmium, mercury, lead, copper, mercury, radio-cesium) are given in geographical charts and in tables by regions and by type of soil (forests, agriculture, greenland, others) for the whole area of Austria. Erosion effects are studied for the Austrian region. Legal regulations and measures for an effective soil protection, reduction of soil degradation and sustainable development in Austria and the European Union are discussed. (a.n.)

  18. Investigating the Effect of Biological Crusts on Some Biological Properties of Soil (Case Study: Qare Qir Rangelands of Golestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kakeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physical and biological soil crusts are the principal types of soil crusts. Physical and biological soil crusts are distributed in arid, semi-arid and sub-humid regions which constitute over 40% of the earth terrestrial surface. Biological soil crusts (BSCs result from an intimate association between soil particles and cyanobacteria, algae, fungi, lichens and mosses in different proportions which live on the surface, or in the immediately uppermost millimeters of soil. Some of the functions that BSCs influences include: water absorption and retention, nutrient retention, Carbon and nitrogen fixation, biological activate and hydrologic Status. BSCs are important from the ecological view point and their effects on the environment, especially in rangeland, and desert ecosystems and this caused which researchers have a special attention to this component of the ecosystems more than before. Materials and Methods: This study carried out in the Qara Qir rangelands of Golestan province, northeast of Iran (37º15′ - 37º23′ N &54º33′ -54º39′ E, to investigate the effects of BSCs on some of soil biological properties. Four sites including with and without BSCs cover were selected. Soil biological properties such as microbial populations, soil respiration, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, as well as, other effective properties such asorganic carbon percent, total nitrogen, electrical conductivity, and available water content were measured in depths of 0-5 and 5-15 cm of soil with four replications. The gathered data were analyzed by nested plot, and the mean values were compared by Duncan test. Results and Discussion: The results showed that organic carbon and water content were higher at the surface under BSCs, followed by 5-15 cm soils under BSCs. Both soil depths of uncrusted soils showed substantially lower organic carbon and water content than the BSC-covered soils. Total nitrogen was far higher in BSC-encrusted surface

  19. Using the University Student Depression Inventory to Investigate the Effect of Demographic Variables on Students' Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Nigar G.; Duncanson, Krystle

    2008-01-01

    Depression is a problem in the student population and may impact students of any age, gender and ethnicity. Previous studies have indicated student demographic characteristics are associated with depression; however, these studies have not utilised scales specifically designed to measure depression in the student population. The aim of the present…

  20. Managed aquifer recharge: the fate of pharmaceuticals from infiltrated treated wastewater investigated through soil column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Matthew; Selke, Stephanie; Balsaa, Peter; Wefer-Roehl, Annette; Kübeck, Christine; Schüth, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    The EU FP7 project MARSOL addresses water scarcity challenges in arid regions, where managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is an upcoming technology to recharge depleted aquifers using alternative water sources. Within this framework, column experiments were conducted to investigate the fate of pharmaceuticals when secondary treated wastewater (TWW) is infiltrated through a natural soil (organic matter content 6.8%) being considered for MAR. Three parallel experiments were run under conditions of continuous infiltration (one column) and wetting-drying cycles (two columns, with different analytes) over a 16 month time period. The pharmaceuticals diclofenac, ibuprofen, carbamazepine, naproxen, gemfibrozil, and fenoprofen, as well as the antibiotics doxycycline, sulfadimidine, and sulfamethoxazole, are commonly present in treated wastewater in varying concentrations. For the experiments, concentration variability was reduced by spiking the column inflow water with these compounds. Concentrations were periodically analyzed at different depths in each column and the mass passing each depth over the duration of the experiment was calculated. At the end of the experiments, sorbed pharmaceuticals were extracted from soil samples collected from different depths. A pressurized liquid extraction method was developed and resulted in recoveries from spiked post-experiment soil samples ranging from 64% (gemfibrozil) to 82% (carbamazepine) for the six non-antibiotic compounds. Scaling results by these recovery rates, the total mass of pharmaceuticals sorbed to the soil in the columns was calculated and compared to the calculated attenuated mass (i.e. mass that left the water phase). The difference between the attenuated mass and the sorbed mass is considered to be mass that degraded. Results for continuous infiltration conditions indicate that for carbamazepine and diclofenac, sorption is the primary attenuation mechanism, with missing (i.e. degraded) mass lying within the propagated

  1. Investigation of Stabilised Batu Pahat Soft Soil Pertaining on its CBR and Permeability Properties for Road Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Idrus, M. M.; Singh, J. S. M.; Musbah, A. L. A.; Wijeyesekera, D. C.

    2016-07-01

    Soil stabilization by adding materials such as cement, lime and bitumen is one of the effective methods for improving the geotechnical properties of soils [11] Nano-particle is one of the newest additives and many studies about using nano-particle in soil improvement has been done but it was given less attention when soft clay soils stabilization is concerned. To evaluate the strength characteristics of stabilized Batu Pahat soft clay, laboratory investigation on early strength gained by the stabilized soil must be conducted to formulate a suitable and economical mix design [10]. To achieve such purpose, the study examined the effect of NanoClay on the California Bearing Ratio and the Permeability of soft clay. The results gained shows that the Nano-Clay is able to increase the strength of the soft clay [9]. The California Bearing Ratio of the soil is increase significantly where the results for the highest percentage of admixture is 14.4% while the permeability of the soil decreases significantly with increasing Nano-Clay whereby the results of the highest percentage of admixture is 2.0187x10-11 m/s. After doing this research, it is proven that Nano-clay can contribute towards better soil stabilization and enhance the quality of soil as subgrade and foundation at large.

  2. Investigating students' perceptions of graduate learning outcomes in mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Deborah; Varsavsky, Cristina; Belward, Shaun; Matthews, Kelly

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the perceptions mathematics students have of the knowledge and skills they develop throughout their programme of study. It addresses current concerns about the employability of mathematics graduates by contributing much needed insight into how degree programmes are developing broader learning outcomes for students majoring in mathematics. Specifically, the study asked students who were close to completing a mathematics major (n = 144) to indicate the extent to which opportunities to develop mathematical knowledge along with more transferable skills (communication to experts and non-experts, writing, working in teams and thinking ethically) were included and assessed in their major. Their perceptions were compared to the importance they assign to each of these outcomes, their own assessment of improvement during the programme and their confidence in applying these outcomes. Overall, the findings reveal a pattern of high levels of students' agreement that these outcomes are important, but evidence a startling gap when compared to students' perceptions of the extent to which many of these - communication, writing, teamwork and ethical thinking - are actually included and assessed in the curriculum, and their confidence in using such learning.

  3. World Language Students' Ethnographic Investigations of Culture through Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Harry G.; Tuttle, Lori A.

    2017-01-01

    World language teachers can transform how their students learn culture through the use of mobile devices. When world language students use their mobile devices to access authentic current culture, they go from being passive receivers of culture to active cultural investigators. These students go from learning thin surface culture to exploring…

  4. Identity Development of Chinese Graduate Students in the United States: A Phenomenological Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kang

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological study investigated the lived experiences of identity development of Chinese graduate students in the United States. Through in-depth interviews with 15 participants at a Midwestern research university, the study found that the majority of Chinese graduate students came with a strong student identity that conflated with…

  5. Investigating Effect of Origami-Based Instruction on Elementary Students' Spatial Skills and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Sedanur; Isiksal, Mine; Koc, Yusuf

    2014-01-01

    The authors' purpose was to investigate the effect of origami-based instruction on elementary students' spatial ability. The students' self-reported perceptions related to the origami-based instruction were also examined. Data was collected via purposive sampling techniques from students enrolled in a private elementary school. A spatial ability…

  6. An Investigation of Students' Perceptions about Democratic School Climate and Sense of Community in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Memet

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate students' perceptions about democratic school climate and sense of community in school. In line with this purpose, it aims to find answers to the following questions: How democratic do students find the school climate? What is students' sense of belonging level at school? What is the academic success level of…

  7. Investigating General Chemistry Students' Metacognitive Monitoring of Their Exam Performance by Measuring Postdiction Accuracies over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Morgan J.; Dysleski, Lisa; Rickey, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Metacognitive monitoring of one's own understanding plays a key role in learning. An aspect of metacognitive monitoring can be measured by comparing a student's prediction or postdiction of performance (a judgment made before or after completing the relevant task) with the student's actual performance. In this study, we investigated students'…

  8. Investigating the Impact of Financial Aid on Student Dropout Risks: Racial and Ethnic Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; DesJardins, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on the differences in college student dropout behavior among racial/ethnic groups. We employ event history methods and data from the Beginning Postsecondary Students (BPS) and National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS) surveys to investigate how financial aid may differentially influence dropout risks among these student…

  9. The Investigation of Human Values Perceived from the Use of Social Media of Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ahmet; Tekin, Hatice

    2017-01-01

    This research has been carried out to investigate the relation between social media usage of secondary school students and their perceived human values. The population of the research consisted of 1952 students, of which 48% were female and 52% were male, 7th and 8th grade students attending secondary schools in central Adiyaman in 2014-2015…

  10. Subspace in Linear Algebra: Investigating Students' Concept Images and Interactions with the Formal Definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawro, Megan; Sweeney, George F.; Rabin, Jeffrey M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a study investigating students' ways of conceptualizing key ideas in linear algebra, with the particular results presented here focusing on student interactions with the notion of subspace. In interviews conducted with eight undergraduates, we found students' initial descriptions of subspace often varied substantially from…

  11. An Investigation of Students' Acceptance of Moodle in a Blended Learning Setting Using Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeou, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Moodle and other web-based learning systems have become very popular in higher education. Their success will not be achieved if students fail to use such systems. The present study investigates university student's attitudes regarding the use of Moodle. Forty-seven students from a Moroccan university were involved in the study. The students…

  12. Online Course Delivery: An Empirical Investigation of Factors Affecting Student Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beqiri, Mirjeta S.; Chase, Nancy M.; Bishka, Atena

    2010-01-01

    The authors investigated potential factors impacting students' satisfaction with online course delivery using business students as participants. The findings suggest that the student who would be more satisfied with the delivery of online courses fits the following profile: graduate, married, resides more than 1 mile away from campus, and male.…

  13. An Investigation of Students' Views about Enzymes by Fortune Lines Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özarslan, Murat; Çetin, Gülcan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate ninth grade students' views about enzymes using fortune lines technique and to obtain the students' views about fortune lines technique. Participants were 38 ninth grade students in a Technique Vocational Girls High School in the city of Kocaeli, Turkey. After instruction of subject of enzymes, the participants were…

  14. Investigation and analysis of network psychology of college students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    Based on basic situational research and analysis carried out on 638 college students using network,we found that as many as 20 percent of the students are not only largely dependent on internet,but also addicted to it.Further biography characteristics analyses for different individuals on the four dimensions of the network forced addiction,tolerance,and time management and interpersonal relationship and health,show that there are significant differences in grades,gender with different education levels of their parents.Further researches on discrepancy that addicted groups have in network entertainment addiction,network information,cyber porn,network relations and network transactions addictions also illustrate that significant discrepancies exist in gender,net age,different discipline and other factors.Finally we put forward some correlative measures to solve the problems of college students network psychology from individuals,schools,and society levels.

  15. Curiositas and Studiositas: Investigating Student Curiosity and the Design Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Korydon

    2011-01-01

    Curiosity is often considered the foundation of learning. There is, however, little understanding of how (or if) pedagogy in higher education affects student curiosity, especially in the studio setting of architecture, interior design and landscape architecture. This article provides a brief cultural history of curiosity and its role in the design…

  16. AN INVESTIGATION OF CSR ORIENTATIONS AMONG GREEK UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Robyn Walker; Charalambos Kanellopoulos; Maria Papanayiotou; Antonios Vitalis

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey of the corporate social responsibility (CSR) orientations of commerce students at the University of Piraeus. The study utilised the instrument developed by Aupperle (1982, cited in Aupperle, Carroll, & Hatfield, 1985) based on Carroll's (1979) social responsibility framework. Comparisons are made with the results of other surveys that have used the same method.

  17. Investigation of Cardiovascular Endurance Levels of Sedentary High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Betül; Sögüt, Kayhan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of our study is to examine the cardiovascular endurance systems of sedentary high school students. The 112 sedentary individual was taken to the 1600 meter walking test run, and the 120 sedentary individual Harward step test. While both individuals were participating in the same test, weight, height, oxygen saturation, and heart rate of…

  18. A Novel Technology to Investigate Students' Understandings of Enzyme Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2012-01-01

    Digital pen-and-paper technology, although marketed commercially as a bridge between old and new note-taking capabilities, synchronizes the collection of both written and audio data. This manuscript describes how this technology was used to improve data collection in research regarding students' learning, specifically their understanding of…

  19. Investigating Access to Educational Assessment for Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kevin; Parkinson, Gill; Lewis, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Many countries have established systems for identifying, and providing for, the range of students with disabilities during their formal educational assessments. Most systems include the provision of variously termed "special access arrangements" (SAAs), such as the provision of extra time or practical assistance with some aspect of an…

  20. An Investigation of Undergraduate Students' Beliefs about Autonomous Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orawiwatnakul, Wiwat; Wichadee, Saovapa

    2017-01-01

    The concept of learner autonomy is now playing an important role in the language learning field. An emphasis is put on the new form of learning which enables learners to direct their own learning. This study aimed to examine how undergraduate students believed about autonomous language learning in a university setting and to find out whether some…

  1. Investigating a Relationship between Nonverbal Communication and Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    Clear and effective communication is essential in today's society (Smith & Cotten, 1980; Smith & Land, 1981). Nonverbal communication specifically has a vital role in communication. There is inconsistent data on the effect of nonverbal communication used by instructors and the impact on student learning within the higher education…

  2. Social Justice Advocacy among Graduate Students: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnemeyer, Rachel McQuown

    2009-01-01

    Although social justice advocacy has increasingly been acknowledged as important in the field of psychology (e.g., Goodman et al., 2004; Toporek et al., 2006a, Vera & Speight, 2003), there is a dearth of empirical research examining social justice advocacy across graduate psychology students. This mixed-methods study examined demographic and…

  3. A Qualitative Investigation of Student Engagement in a Flipped Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen-Utheim, Anna Therese; Foldnes, Njål

    2018-01-01

    The flipped classroom is gaining acceptance in higher education as an alternative to more traditional methods of teaching. In the current study, twelve students in a Norwegian higher education institution were in-depth interviewed about their learning experiences in a two-semester long mathematics course. The first semester was taught using…

  4. Academic Misconduct among Nursing Students: A Multivariate Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Larry G.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Using Maslow's Need-Goal Motivation Model, data from 190 nursing students showed moderately high correlation between perceptions of peers' maturity, commitment, and neutralizing attitude and perceptions of peers' engagement in academic misconduct. Neutralization (rationalizing behavior) was the strongest predictor. (SK)

  5. Investigating Entrepreneurial Intention among Public Sector University Students of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Naimatullah; Soomro, Bahadur Ali

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Nowadays, entrepreneurship is regarded as an indispensable means for economic development. In this regard, promoting entrepreneurship is a necessity for every economy. The purpose of this paper is to identify factors that may influence students' entrepreneurial intentions. Design/methodology/approach: The conceptual framework underlying…

  6. Students' Entrepreneurial Inclination at a Malaysian Polytechnic: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasin, Ahmad Yasruddin Md; Mahmood, Nik Abdul Aziz Nik; Jaafar, Nik Azyyati Nik

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results of an ongoing project to examine students' inclination towards entrepreneurship at a Malaysian polytechnic. The study used a self-administered questionnaire to explore the influence of entrepreneurial intent, perceived behavioral control, self-efficacy, perceived barriers, perceived support factors and…

  7. Investigation and Identification of Types and Amounts of Heavy Metals in Soil of an Industrial Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Mohammadhosseini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was mainly designed to investigate and identify the amounts and types of heavy metals in the soils of National Iranian Oil Refining & Distribution Company in Shahrood region and tried to establish a logical relation between the presence of heavy metals and their damage on vegetation. In addition, considering the power of drained soil and due to the proximity of ground water in Shahrood region, conducting this study provides a better insight into recognition of the possible contamination centers of drinking waters. The gridding and selective method was used for sampling step. Accordingly, five sub-samples were taken from each grid and finally after mixing all of the sub-samples, the final samples were obtained with an average weight of 400 grams prior to sending to the laboratory. To determine the total concentration of heavy metals in soil, extraction was done using concentrated solutions of HCl and HNO3. The total concentration of the heavy metals of chromium, cobalt and nickel were measured using an ICP-MS instrument, and the rest of the elements using an XRF device. The results explicitly indicated that the quantities of nickel, lead, zinc and strontium in patient samples exceeded the standard, and the other elements were lower than their standard limits. More specifically, the contents of lead and strontium in both normal and patient samples were higher than their standard contents. Moreover, the majority of the vegetation loss across the affected areas was caused by heavy metal accumulation, particularly nickel, lead, zinc, and strontium.

  8. Rates of leaching of radium from contaminated soils: an experimental investigation of radium bearing soils from Port Hope, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathwani, J.S.; Phillips, C.R.

    1978-01-01

    The leachability of Ra-226 from soil at Port Hope, Ontario contaminated by waste from a long established U refinery is described here. A small-scale static leach test was devised to provide information to permit an assessment of hazard due to leaching in the environment. Two different leaching solutions were prepared to simulate a range of infiltrating water quality in disposal environments: one by bubbling CO 2 into distilled water to pH 5.5, and another by bubbling SO 2 into water to pH 3.5. Narrow-range size fractions of the soils (i.e. 0.250 to 0.105 mm) were leached for 30 to 45 days (equivalent rainfall of 2 to 3 yr). It was found that leaching is significantly affected by soil texture, total amounts leached and the maximum concentrations reached being much greater for coarser, and intermediate size fractions than for fine soil fractions. Also, leachant acidity significantly increased leaching rates and resulted in enhanced mobility in soils. A straight line for the plot of Q/Q 0 (cumulative fraction released) vs. Tsup(1/2) (T is leaching time in days) indicated that leaching could be considered to be a diffusion phenomenon in accordance with Fick's law. Diffusion coefficients ranging from 5 X 10 -11 to 2 X 10 -13 cm 2 day -1 were found. These coefficients provide a basis for estimating the fraction that would be leached over longer periods. (Auth.)

  9. Investigate the influence of halloysite and activated carbon mixtures in phytostabilization of Pb-contaminated soil with Lolium perenne L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radziemska Maja

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of halloysite and activated carbon mixtures on the biomass and distribution of macronutrients (Mg, K, Ca, Na, P in ryegrass grown in Pb-contaminated soil. The soil was spiked with four different levels of lead contamination, i.e. 0 (control, 200, 400, 800 mg·kg−1 were applied in an analytical grade Pb(NO32 solution mixed thoroughly with the soil. Raw halloysite (3% and activated carbon (1% relative to soil mass mixtures were used to reduce the effect of soil lead contamination. Ryegrass of the Bokser variety was harvested after 42 days, and soil samples were collected for laboratory tests. The mixture of sorbents applied in the experiment which turned out to be most effective at doses of lead amounting to 400 and 800 mg·kg−1 of soil, with the increase in the yield of ryegrass being the highest. Increasing contamination of soil with lead in the series without the mixture of sorbents increased the contents of phosphorus, sodium, calcium and magnesium in ryegrass. The applied mixture of halloysite and activated carbon changed the macronutrient concentration in ryegrass, with the greatest changes found in that of potassium and sodium.

  10. A Phenomenographic Investigation of the Ways Engineering Students Experience Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fila, Nicholas David

    Innovation has become an important phenomenon in engineering and engineering education. By developing novel, feasible, viable, and valued solutions to complex technical and human problems, engineers support the economic competitiveness of organizations, make a difference in the lives of users and other stakeholders, drive societal and scientific progress, and obtain key personal benefits. Innovation is also a complex phenomenon. It occurs across a variety of contexts and domains, encompasses numerous phases and activities, and requires unique competency profiles. Despite this complexity, many studies in engineering education focus on specific aspects (e.g., engineering students' abilities to generate original concepts during idea generation), and we still know little about the variety of ways engineering students approach and understand innovation. This study addresses that gap by asking: 1. What are the qualitatively different ways engineering students experience innovation during their engineering projects? 2. What are the structural relationships between the ways engineering students experience innovation? This study utilized phenomenography, a qualitative research method, to explore the above research questions. Thirty-three engineering students were recruited to ensure thorough coverage along four factors suggested by the literature to support differences related to innovation: engineering project experience, academic major, year in school, and gender. Each participant completed a 1-2 hour, semi-structured interview that focused on experiences with and conceptions of innovation. Whole transcripts were analyzed using an eight-stage, iterative, and comparative approach meant to identify a limited number of categories of description (composite ways of experiencing innovation comprised of the experiences of several participants), and the structural relationships between these categories. Phenomenographic analysis revealed eight categories of description that were

  11. Investigations of effective porosity of till by means of a combined soil-moisture/density gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordberg, L.; Modig, S.

    1974-01-01

    Effective porosity and processes of saturation and dewatering in till have been investigated. The study was performed in undisturbed till columns, surrounded by ring-shaped excavations filled with sand. The procedure allowed for a raising and lowering of an artificial groundwater level in the till under controlled conditions, which in turn made possible controlled processes of saturation and dewatering. A combined gamma-neutron soil moisture /density gauge was used. The water content was recorded during a period in which water was added to a specially prepared, undisturbed in-situ soil column until a state of saturation was reached. This was followed by a period of induced dewatering by gravity drainage. The drainage was recorded until a steady state> approximately equalling field capacity, was approached (5-16 d). Water contents at saturation are assumed approximately to equal total porosity, having a range of 17.9-32.0% in the investigated till. The intensity of drainage was highest on the first day of dewatering and then diminished with time. A perfectly steady state was never reached. Therefore field capacity is used with indices, indicating the length of time of drainage. Consequently, effective porosity is qualified by the corresponding indices. After 15-16 days of gravity drainage, effective porosity was calculated to be on the average 7.4% at one test plot and 3.4% at another. The difference has been attributed to a corresponding difference in depth to the natural groundwater level; because of the method used a higher groundwater level and capillary fringe may have hampered the complete drainage, resulting in a relatively low value of effective porosity. The investigation is most likely to be applicable in water balance studies, groundwater discharge predictions and various construction and waste-water projects in moraine terrain. (author)

  12. Water retention of repellent and subcritical repellent soils: New insights from model and experimental investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czachor, H.; Doerr, S. H.; Lichner, L.

    2010-01-01

    SummarySoil organic matter can modify the surface properties of the soil mineral phase by changing the surface tension of the mineral surfaces. This modifies the soil's solid-water contact angle, which in turn would be expected to affect its water retention curve (SWRC). Here we model the impact of differences in the soil pore-water contact angle on capillarity in non-cylindrical pores by accounting for their complex pore geometry. Key outcomes from the model include that (i) available methods for measuring the Young's wetting angle on soil samples are insufficient in representing the wetting angle in the soil pore space, (ii) the wetting branch of water retention curves is strongly affected by the soil pore-water contact angle, as manifest in the wetting behavior of water repellent soils, (iii) effects for the drying branch are minimal, indicating that both wettable and water repellent soils should behave similarly, and (vi) water retention is a feature not of only wettable soils, but also soils that are in a water repellent state. These results are tested experimentally by determining drying and wetting branches for (a) 'model soil' (quartz sands with four hydrophobization levels) and (b) five field soil samples with contrasting wettability, which were used with and without the removal of the soil organic matter. The experimental results support the theoretical predictions and indicate that small changes in wetting angle can cause switches between wettable and water repellent soil behavior. This may explain the common observation that relatively small changes in soil water content can cause substantial changes in soil wettability.

  13. Using Q Methodology to Investigate Undergraduate Students' Attitudes toward the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Julia M.; Shepardson, Daniel P.

    2018-01-01

    Undergraduate students have different attitudes toward the geosciences, but few studies have investigated these attitudes using Q methodology. Q methodology allows the researcher to identify more detailed reasons for students' attitudes toward geology than Likert methodology. Thus this study used Q methodology to investigate the attitudes that 15…

  14. Investigation of Participation Motivations in Exercises of Students Participating in Archery in Extra Curricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Nevin; Keskin, Muzaffer Toprak; Erdugan, Fuat

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate Investigation of Participation Motivations in Exercises of Students Participating in Archery in Extra Curricular Activities. While the study's universe consists of all 11th graders studying at High school, the sample includes 32 of the 11th grade students who participated in arrow shooting activities in…

  15. Multidisciplinary Investigations Regarding the Wear of Machine Tools Operating Into the Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardei, P.; Vladutoiu, L. C.; Gheorghe, G.; Fechete, T. L. V.; Chisiu, G.

    2018-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by the authors in investigating the problem of wear of work organs of machines working in continuous interaction with the soil. The phenomenon of the interaction of the tools of agricultural machinery for ploughing, and the soil, is a complex of phenomena, one of the most difficult to model. Among the phenomena involved in this interaction, friction and wear (of many types) are the most important. We did not take into account the chemical wear, and by the wear caused by weather conditions. Research has focused on formulating a theory that has more than a descriptive character, for it be used for application purposes. For this we used classical theoretical models, mathematical models based on the theory of continuous bodies, theory of flow of fluids around the profiles, as well as other theories, approached or not, in an attempt to solve as satisfactorily the issue of the wear, for the tools of the agricultural machines for the tillage. We also sought to highlight the fact that wear is a phenomenon on a micro and macro-scale scale, and its generating causes must ultimately be related to observable effects, on the macro-structural scale.

  16. Degradation of 14C-ETU in a soil profile investigated by means of incubation in two different incubation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech, A.; Johannesen, H.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of the paper is to elucidate the mechanism of biodegradation of ethylenethiourea (ETU) in arable soils, both on the surface and in the deeper layers. The effect of incubation system upon the ETU biodegradation was studied by incubation of undisturbed and mixed soil cores in tubes or flasks respectively. The total mineralization of ETU to CO2 in the ploughed layer and in the deeper layers is investigated by means of biodegradation tests with 14 C-ETU in soil samples collected from 15, 60 and 100 cm depth. ETU microbial biodegradation was studied in a series of tests covering conversion and isolation of ETU degrading microorganisms. (EG) 86 refs

  17. Investigation of Tin and Molybdenum concentrations in the Soils in the southern part of the Silesian Upland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bureć-Drewniak W.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Majority of soils from the southern part of the Silesian Upland (Poland are highly degraded and contain elevated levels of heavy metals. Detailed studies, including dissemination, mobility and bioavailability have been conducted for most heavy metals, except tin and molybdenum. Therefore, the purpose of presented studies was evaluation of molybdenum and tin pollution and determination of their mobility and bioavailability in all soil types derived from the investigated area. A total of 9920 soil samples, including 5256 topsoil samples and 4664 subsoil samples were analyzed. Comparison of elements concentration between topsoil and subsoil allows identification of the source of pollution (natural or anthropogenic of tested elements.

  18. Inquiry-based laboratory investigations and student performance on standardized tests in biological science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patke, Usha

    Achievement data from the 3rd International Mathematics and Sciences Study and Program for International Student Assessment in science have indicated that Black students from economically disadvantaged families underachieve at alarming rates in comparison to White and economically advantaged peer groups. The study site was a predominately Black, urban school district experiencing underachievement. The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationship between students' use of inquiry-based laboratory investigations and their performance on the Biology End of Course Test, as well as to examine the relationship while partialling out the effects of student gender. Constructivist theory formed the theoretical foundation of the study. Students' perceived levels of experience with inquiry-based laboratory investigations were measured using the Laboratory Program Variable Inventory (LPVI) survey. LPVI scores of 256 students were correlated with test scores and were examined by student gender. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a small direct correlation between students' experience in inquiry-based laboratory investigation classes and standardized test scores on the Biology EOCT. A partial correlational analysis indicated that the correlation remained after controlling for gender. This study may prompt a change from teacher-centered to student-centered pedagogy at the local site in order to increase academic achievement for all students. The results of this study may also influence administrators and policy makers to initiate local, state, or nationwide curricular development. A change in curriculum may promote social change as students become more competent, and more able, to succeed in life beyond secondary school.

  19. Molecular investigations into a globally important carbon pool: permafrost-protected carbon in Alaskan soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.P. Waldrop; K.P. Wickland; R. White; A.A. Berhe; J.W. Harden; V.E. Romanovsky

    2010-01-01

    The fate of carbon (C) contained within permafrost in boreal forest environments is an important consideration for the current and future carbon cycle as soils warm in northern latitudes. Currently, little is known about the microbiology or chemistry of permafrost soils that may affect its decomposition once soils thaw. We tested the hypothesis that low microbial...

  20. Investigation of some Macro and Micro Elements in Soil and Sugarcane Plant in Elguneid Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassona, R K [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1996-09-01

    The contents of some macro nutrients(N,Mg,P,K and Ca), micro nutrients(Mn,Fe,Cu,Zn and Mo) and other elements in sugarcane plant and soil samples in Elguneid scheme were evaluated in this study.During this study soil and plant samples were taken from different depths and different sites.Plant samples were collected from the same sites at 6 and 10 months age.The objectives of this work were to determine the nutrient contents of soil and sugarcane plant, to relate the nutrient contents of soil with that of plant and to compare the average elemental content of soil and plant with the available literature.To achieve the above mentioned goals,atomic absorption spectrometry(AAS), X-ray fluorescence,flame photometry,kjeldahl method and colorimetry were used for the elemental analysis of soil and plant samples. It was found that the elemental concentration decreases with soil depth increase.There were no seasonal variations in the elemental in soil and plant samples.The data obtained in this work for soil and plant samples were comparable to those reported in litreature in other areas.Using the elemental concentration ratios in soil and plant samples referred to the concentration of iron which is an indicator of soil as a source. The enrichment factor for some nutrients was calculated that N, P, and K have some sources other than soil, such as fertilizers and pesticides. (Author). 85 refs., 27 tabs., 20 figs.

  1. Investigation of some Macro and Micro Elements in Soil and Sugarcane Plant in Elguneid Scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassona, R.K.

    1996-09-01

    The contents of some macro nutrients(N,Mg,P,K and Ca), micro nutrients(Mn,Fe,Cu,Zn and Mo) and other elements in sugarcane plant and soil samples in Elguneid scheme were evaluated in this study.During this study soil and plant samples were taken from different depths and different sites.Plant samples were collected from the same sites at 6 and 10 months age.The objectives of this work were to determine the nutrient contents of soil and sugarcane plant, to relate the nutrient contents of soil with that of plant and to compare the average elemental content of soil and plant with the available literature.To achieve the above mentioned goals,atomic absorption spectrometry(AAS), X-ray fluorescence,flame photometry,kjeldahl method and colorimetry were used for the elemental analysis of soil and plant samples. It was found that the elemental concentration decreases with soil depth increase.There were no seasonal variations in the elemental in soil and plant samples.The data obtained in this work for soil and plant samples were comparable to those reported in litreature in other areas.Using the elemental concentration ratios in soil and plant samples referred to the concentration of iron which is an indicator of soil as a source. The enrichment factor for some nutrients was calculated that N, P, and K have some sources other than soil, such as fertilizers and pesticides. (Author)

  2. U.S. Geological Survey programs and investigations related to soil and water conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Gray, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has a rich tradition of collecting hydrologic data, especially for fluxes of water and suspended sediment, that provide a foundation for studies of soil and water conservation. Applied and basic research has included investigations of the effects of land use on rangelands, croplands, and forests; hazards mapping; derivation of flood and drought frequency, and other statistics related to streamflow and reservoir storage; development and application of models of rainfall-runoff relations, chemical quality, and sediment movement; and studies of the interactive processes of overland and channel flow with vegetation. Networks of streamgaging stations and (or) sampling sites within numerous drainage basins are yielding information that extends databases and enhances the ability to use those data for interpretive studies.

  3. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veselská, Veronika, E-mail: veselskav@fzp.czu.cz [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic); Fajgar, Radek [Department of Analytical and Material Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the CAS, v.v.i., Rozvojová 135/1, CZ-16502, Prague (Czech Republic); Číhalová, Sylva [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic); Bolanz, Ralph M. [Institute of Geosciences, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10, DE-07745, Jena (Germany); Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph [ANKA Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, DE-76344, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Siddique, Jamal A.; Komárek, Michael [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcka 129, CZ-16521, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Study of Cr(VI) adsorption on soil minerals over a large range of conditions. • Combined surface complexation modeling and spectroscopic techniques. • Diffuse-layer and triple-layer models used to obtain fits to experimental data. • Speciation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) was assessed. - Abstract: This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3–10), ionic strengths (0.001–0.1 M KNO{sub 3}), sorbate concentrations (10{sup −4}, 10{sup −5}, and 10{sup −6} M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50–500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes.

  4. Multidecadal persistence of organic matter in soils: insights from spatially resolved investigations at the submicrometer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, Suzanne; Barré, Pierre; Bernard, Sylvain; Le Guillou, Corentin; Alléon, Julien; Chenu, Claire

    2016-04-01

    Better understanding the mechanisms responsible for the pluri-decadal persistence of carbon in soils requires well constraining the dynamics, the distribution and the chemical nature of both the soil organic carbon (SOC) and the associated mineral phases. The question we address in this work is whether different mineral species lead to different organo-mineral interactions and stabilize different quantities of SOM and different types of SOC. Here, benefiting from the unique opportunity offered by an INRA long term bare fallow (LTBF) experiment having started in 1928 in Versailles (France), we report the in-situ characterization of SOC dynamics in four clay fractions of this silty loam soil (total clays [TC, clays [CC, 0.2-2μm], intermediate clays [IC, 0.05-0.2μm] and fine clays [FC, 0-0.05μm]). The IC and FC fractions only contain smectite and illite/smectite mixed-layered clay minerals while the CC fraction also contains illite and kaolinite. In the absence of any carbon input, the plant-free LTBF clay fractions from Versailles progressively lost SOC during the first 50 years of the experiment, until they reached a seemingly stable concentration. Of note, the investigated clay fractions did not lose the same amount of SOC and do not exhibit the same final carbon concentrations. The decrease of the organic C:N ratios with LTBF duration corresponds to a progressive enrichment in N-rich SOC for all fractions which can be attributed to microbial material. Even though the speciation of SOC appears to only slightly evolve with LTBF duration, an enrichment in carboxyl and carbonyl groups is revealed by bulk-scale C-NEXAFS data for SOC from all clay fractions. In addition, STXM-based NEXAFS investigations at the submicrometer scale reveal three types of SOC-clay assemblages in addition to clay-free SOC and organic-free clays. While SOC appears mostly adsorbed onto clay surfaces within the IC and FC fractions, other protection mechanisms occur within the CC fraction

  5. Engaging secondary students in geoscience investigations through the use of low-cost instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A. L.; Hansen, W.; Healy, S.

    2010-12-01

    to the geosciences, such as solar and wind power, water and soil quality, and assessing land-use change through remote sensing and geospatial tools. The goal of the workshop was to give the teachers tools to engage students in investigating these concepts in the classroom, thereby stimulating an interest in geosciences that would carry over into undergraduate education. As part of the workshop, we provided a low-cost set of tools to give to the teachers for hands-on use in the classroom. We developed a compact, rugged system for measuring solar insolation and temperature, and combined it with a datalogger to collect a continuous timeseries of data. We also built a standalone anemometer for measuring wind speed. These instruments offer entry points for multiple types of classroom investigations into weather, climate, and renewable energy potential. They also provide a platform for practicing mathematical and computer skills such as timeseries graphing, data analysis, spreadsheet use, etc. The cost of the pyranometer, datalogger, and anemometer setup was $229 per user. Feedback from workshop participants was very positive, and the teachers were confident that the instrumentation would give them a new way to engage students in geoscience topics.

  6. Soil Is More than Just Dirt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Carrie; Graves, C. John

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a series of activities in which students investigate soil, culminating in the biomimicry of reducing landfill waste. After students learned about soil's ecosystem structure and the function of its food web with nutrient cycling and decomposition, they discovered that they know a solution to reduce the trash in landfills by…

  7. Do screencasts help to revise prerequisite mathematics? An investigation of student performance and perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Birgit; Jordan, Camilla R.; Lowe, Tim W.; Mestel, Ben D.

    2014-02-01

    Basic calculus skills that are prerequisites for advanced mathematical studies continue to be a problem for a significant proportion of higher education students. While there are many types of revision material that could be offered to students, in this paper we investigate whether short, narrated video recordings of mathematical explanations (screencasts) are a useful tool to enhance student learning when revisiting prerequisite topics. We report on the outcomes of a study that was designed to both measure change in student performance before and after watching screencasts, and to capture students' perception of the usefulness of screencasts in their learning. Volunteers were recruited from students enrolled on an entry module for the Mathematics Master of Science programme at the Open University to watch two screencasts sandwiched between two online calculus quizzes. A statistical analysis of student responses to the quizzes shows that screencasts can have a positive effect on student performance. Further analysis of student feedback shows that student confidence was increased by watching the screencasts. Student views on the value of screencasts for their learning indicated that they appreciated being able to watch a problem being solved and explained by an experienced mathematician; hear the motivation for a particular problem-solving approach; engage more readily with the material being presented, thereby retaining it more easily. The positive student views and impact on student scores indicate that short screencasts could play a useful role in revising prerequisite mathematics.

  8. Investigation of soil erosion in arable land in Hungary using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezsoe, Z.; Szabo, Sz.

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative data on long-term soil erosion rates on agricultural land are an essential requirement for the development of effective soil management and conservation strategies. Although several methods to estimate soil erosion exist, the use of 137 Cs and/or 210 Pb as fallout radionuclides for tracing soil movement overcomes many of the limitations of the traditional methods. Recently, the 137 Cs-technique has been widely accepted and is now commonly used for estimating the magnitude of soil loss. Long-term migration of 137 Cs in the Buekkzserc-Cserepfalu-Bogacs triangle area, at the foot of Buekk mountain (NE Hungary) was studied. The samples were analysed for 137 Cs by gamma spectrometry, using a calibrated high-resolution, low background HPGe coaxial detector. Migration of fallout nuclides in an undisturbed stable soil reflects the influence of a range of physico-chemical and biological processes operating in the soil system. (N.T.)

  9. Investigating relations between environmental toxins in Northern Irish soils and streams and Chronic Kidney Disease prevalence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, Chloe E.; McKinley, Jennifer M.; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Fogarty, Damian; Atkinson, Peter M.; Palmer, Sherry

    2016-01-01

    The unknown aetiology of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) has attracted recent attention as a result of the increasing global prevalence and recent reviews of occupational and environmental exposure to nephrotoxins. The main focus of this research is to examine the potential relationship between environmental exposure to known nephrotoxins including arsenic, cadmium and lead and the potential health risk associated with the progressive dysfunction of the kidneys in renal impaired patients with CKD across Northern Ireland. In addition to these known nephrotoxins, co-abundance with several essential elements has been found to play a role as protecting mechanisms while others increase the uptake of nephrotoxic elements as a result of similar absorption mechanisms within the body. Key elements protecting the body from toxicity include selenium and zinc, whereas those which have been attributed to enhance the uptake of arsenic, cadmium and lead include iron and calcium. The compositional nature of the soil and stream geochemical data is explored to aid in the analysis of interactions between elements. Two approaches, one data-driven and the other knowledge-driven, are explored to investigate the associations between co-abundant elements. The bioaccessibility of these elements, which is the portion of the relevant toxin absorbed within the body, is also investigated to identify areas across Northern Ireland with an increased environmental hazard and potential health risk. The study uses a combination of datasets from the United Kingdom Renal Registry (UKRR) unknown aetiology subset, the soil and stream geochemical dataset from the Tellus Survey (GSNI) with the addition of a bioaccessibility subset. Findings suggest a relationship between the presence of elevated arsenic in stream waters and impaired renal function of the kidneys. Interactions between essential elements and potentially toxic elements could explain the regional variation of CKD of uncertain aetiology across

  10. Investigating of Memory - Colours of Intellectually Disabled Children and Virtual Game Addict Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sik Lányi, Cecília

    We describe an investigation of memory colours. For this investigation Flash test software was developed. 75 observers used this test software in 4 groups: average elementary school children (aged: 8-9 years), intellectually disabled children (age: 9-15), virtual game addict university students (average age: 20) and university students who play with VR games rarely or never (average age: 20). In this pilot test we investigated the difference of memory colours of these 4 groups.

  11. Socioscientific Issues-Based Instruction: An Investigation of Agriscience Students' Content Knowledge Based on Student Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulders, Catherine W.; Myers, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous researchers in science education have reported student improvement in areas of scientific literacy resulting from socioscientific issues (SSI)-based instruction. The purpose of this study was to describe student agriscience content knowledge following a six-week SSI-based instructional unit focusing on the introduction of cultured meat…

  12. An Investigation into the Effects of Temperature Gradient on the Soil Water–Salt Transfer with Evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Ren

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Temperature gradients exist in the field under brackish water irrigation conditions, especially in northern semi–arid areas of China. Although there are many investigators dedicated to studying the mechanism of brackish water irrigation and the effect of brackish water irrigation on crops, there are fewer investigations of the effects of temperature gradient on the water–salt transport. Based on the combination of a physical experiment and a mathematical model, this study was conducted to: (a build a physical model and observe the redistribution of soil water–heat–salt transfer; (b develop a mathematical model focused on the influence of a temperature gradient on soil water and salt redistribution based on the physical model and validate the proposed model using the measured data; and (c analyze the effects of the temperature gradient on the soil water–salt transport by comparing the proposed model with the traditional water–salt model in which the effects of temperature gradient on the soil water–salt transfer are neglected. Results show that the soil temperature gradient has a definite influence on the soil water–salt migration. Moreover, the effect of temperature gradient on salt migration was greater than that of water movement.

  13. Investigation of the binding of tiron to uranium(IV) and uranium(VI) found in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnbaum, E.R.; Iams, H.D.; del Rio Garcia, M.; Ford, D.K.; Smith, P.H.; Strietelmeier, B.; Brainard, J.

    1993-01-01

    The authors are investigating the utility of a chelate-reductant system to extract uranium from 2 million yards of contaminated soil at the Fernald uranium reprocessing plant near Cincinnati, Ohio. It has been found that reduction of the uranyl contaminants using Tiron as the ligand. Of concern is whether the increased mobilization is simply a result of the higher affinity of Tiron to U(IV), or whether reduction of amorphous iron oxides contained in the soil is exposing greater amounts of uranyl ions to the ligand. It is important to establish if the latter mechanism is occurring, since a removal process which does not damage the soil is desired. Potentiometric and spectrophotometric studies of Tiron binding to soluble uranyl and U(V) salts will be presented as models to help understand the soil studies. Extraction behavior of UO 2 (OH) 2 will also be presented

  14. Remote sensing investigations of fugitive soil arsenic and its effects on vegetation reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, E. Terrence

    2007-12-01

    Three different remote sensing technologies were evaluated in support of the remediation of fugitive arsenic and other hazardous waste-related risks to human and ecological health at the Spring Valley Formerly Used Defense Site in northwest Washington D.C., an area of widespread soil arsenic contamination as a result of World War I research and development of chemical weapons. The first evaluation involved the value of information derived from the interpretation of historical aerial photographs. Historical aerial photographs dating back as far as 1918 provided a wealth of information about chemical weapons testing, storage, handling and disposal of these hazardous materials. When analyzed by a trained photo-analyst, the 1918 aerial photographs resulted in 42 features of potential interest. When compared with current remedial activities and known areas of contamination, 33 of 42 or 78.5 % of the features were spatially correlated with current areas of contamination or remedial activity. The second investigation involved the phytoremediation of arsenic through the use of Pteris ferns and the evaluation of the spectral properties of these ferns. Three hundred ferns were grown in controlled laboratory conditions in soils amended with five levels (0, 20, 50, 100 and 200 parts per million) of sodium arsenate. After 20 weeks, the Pteris ferns were shown to have an average uptake concentration of over 4,000 parts per million each. Additionally, statistical analysis of the spectral signature from each fern showed that the frond arsenic concentration could be reasonably predicted with a linear model when the concentration was equal or greater than 500 parts per million. Third, hyperspectral imagery of Spring Valley was obtained and analyzed with a suite of spectral analysis software tools. Results showed the grasses growing in areas of known high soil arsenic could be identified and mapped at an approximate 85% level of accuracy when the hyperspectral image was processed

  15. Instructional multimedia: An investigation of student and instructor attitudes and student study behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Educators in allied health and medical education programs utilize instructional multimedia to facilitate psychomotor skill acquisition in students. This study examines the effects of instructional multimedia on student and instructor attitudes and student study behavior. Methods Subjects consisted of 45 student physical therapists from two universities. Two skill sets were taught during the course of the study. Skill set one consisted of knee examination techniques and skill set two consisted of ankle/foot examination techniques. For each skill set, subjects were randomly assigned to either a control group or an experimental group. The control group was taught with live demonstration of the examination skills, while the experimental group was taught using multimedia. A cross-over design was utilized so that subjects in the control group for skill set one served as the experimental group for skill set two, and vice versa. During the last week of the study, students and instructors completed written questionnaires to assess attitude toward teaching methods, and students answered questions regarding study behavior. Results There were no differences between the two instructional groups in attitudes, but students in the experimental group for skill set two reported greater study time alone compared to other groups. Conclusions Multimedia provides an efficient method to teach psychomotor skills to students entering the health professions. Both students and instructors identified advantages and disadvantages for both instructional techniques. Reponses relative to instructional multimedia emphasized efficiency, processing level, autonomy, and detail of instruction compared to live presentation. Students and instructors identified conflicting views of instructional detail and control of the content. PMID:21693058

  16. Instructional multimedia: An investigation of student and instructor attitudes and student study behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavanaugh Cathy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Educators in allied health and medical education programs utilize instructional multimedia to facilitate psychomotor skill acquisition in students. This study examines the effects of instructional multimedia on student and instructor attitudes and student study behavior. Methods Subjects consisted of 45 student physical therapists from two universities. Two skill sets were taught during the course of the study. Skill set one consisted of knee examination techniques and skill set two consisted of ankle/foot examination techniques. For each skill set, subjects were randomly assigned to either a control group or an experimental group. The control group was taught with live demonstration of the examination skills, while the experimental group was taught using multimedia. A cross-over design was utilized so that subjects in the control group for skill set one served as the experimental group for skill set two, and vice versa. During the last week of the study, students and instructors completed written questionnaires to assess attitude toward teaching methods, and students answered questions regarding study behavior. Results There were no differences between the two instructional groups in attitudes, but students in the experimental group for skill set two reported greater study time alone compared to other groups. Conclusions Multimedia provides an efficient method to teach psychomotor skills to students entering the health professions. Both students and instructors identified advantages and disadvantages for both instructional techniques. Reponses relative to instructional multimedia emphasized efficiency, processing level, autonomy, and detail of instruction compared to live presentation. Students and instructors identified conflicting views of instructional detail and control of the content.

  17. The use of statistics in real and simulated investigations performed by undergraduate health sciences' students

    OpenAIRE

    Pimenta, Rui; Nascimento, Ana; Vieira, Margarida; Costa, Elísio

    2010-01-01

    In previous works, we evaluated the statistical reasoning ability acquired by health sciences’ students carrying out their final undergraduate project. We found that these students achieved a good level of statistical literacy and reasoning in descriptive statistics. However, concerning inferential statistics the students did not reach a similar level. Statistics educators therefore claim for more effective ways to learn statistics such as project based investigations. These can be simulat...

  18. Investigation of self-esteem for university students in terms of doing sports

    OpenAIRE

    CIMEN, Fadime; KUMARTASLI, Mehmet; SOYLEYICI, Senem

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate self-esteem of university students in terms of doing exercise variable. Totally 300 students from Suleyman Demirel University voluntarily participated in the research. The students were grouped into two: doing exercises (n: 150) and not doing exercises (n: 150). In the research, Self-respect scale developed by Arıcak (1999) was used. In the analysis of findings obtained, frequency analysis, independent ''t'' test and One Way ANOVA s...

  19. Investigation of Vocational High-School Students' Computer Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Murat; Dogan, Yunus; Tanas, Ramazan

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of the computer technologies, we are increasingly encountering these technologies in every field of life. The fact that the computer technology is so much interwoven with the daily life makes it necessary to investigate certain psychological attitudes of those working with computers towards computers. As this study is limited to…

  20. The Effects of Issue Investigation and Action Training on Eighth-Grade Students' Environmental Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Reports the instructional effects of a formal environmental education methodology, issue investigation and action training (IIAT), on eighth-grade students. Focuses on whether IIAT can improve responsible environmental behavior in middle school students and whether variables associated with responsible adult environmental behavior will be…

  1. Investigation of High School Students' Attitude and Anxiety Levels towards Mathematics in Terms of Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Semsettin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Turkish high school students' attitude and anxiety levels towards mathematics. For this purpose, the methodology employed in this study was a descriptive study. The participants of the study consisted of 361 high school students from three different high school types from a province in Turkey during…

  2. An Investigation of Faculty Perceptions of the Use of a Student Evaluation of Faculty Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulgham, Julie Cordell

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the faculty perception of the use of a student evaluation of faculty instrument. The areas considered were use of the current Student Evaluation of Faculty (SEF) instrument to measure teaching effectiveness; use of the current instrument for annual faculty review; faculty involvement in developing the instrument; utilizing…

  3. Investigation of Millennial Students' Responses to a Shelter-in-Place Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas C.; Frick, Melodie H.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated millennial students' responses to an armed gunman threat and shelter-in-place warnings that occurred on a university campus. Using descriptive statistics and quantitative analysis, several significant differences were found for students' responses for sheltering-in-place and engaging in protective behaviors. Baxter Magolda'…

  4. An Investigation of Selected Variables Related to Student Algebra I Performance in Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Undray

    2016-01-01

    This research study attempted to determine if specific variables were related to student performance on the Algebra I subject-area test. This study also sought to determine in which of grades 8, 9, or 10 students performed better on the Algebra I Subject Area Test. This study also investigated the different criteria that are used to schedule…

  5. The Art-Science Connection: Students Create Art Inspired by Extracurricular Lab Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Tess; Segarra, Verónica A.; Allen, Tawannah G.; Wilson, Hillary; Garr, Casey; Budzinski, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The authors developed an integrated science-and-art program to engage science students from a performing arts high school in hands-on, inquiry based lab experiences. The students participated in eight biology-focused investigations at a local university with undergraduate mentors. After the laboratory phase of the project, the high school students…

  6. Investigating Grit and Its Relations with College Students' Self-Regulated Learning and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Christopher A.; Hussain, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    We investigated grit and its relations with students' self-regulated learning (SRL) and academic achievement. An ethnically diverse sample of 213 college students completed an online self-report survey that included the Grit Short scale (Duckworth and Quinn "Journal of Personality Assessment, 91(2)," 166-174, 2009), seven indicators of…

  7. A Phenomenological Investigation of the Lived Experiences of Successful First Generation Hispanic College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente, Christina C.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study investigated the lived experiences of five successful first generation Hispanic college students. Participants' interviews were analyzed using Creswell's (2007) six steps for analyzing phenomenological studies. Findings from this study affirm the factors for student success in college regarding…

  8. Investigating Students' Attitude and Intention to Use Social Software in Higher Institution of Learning in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shittu, Ahmed Tajudeen; Basha, Kamal Madarsha; AbdulRahman, Nik Suryani Nik; Ahmad, Tunku Badariah Tunku

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Social software usage is growing at an exponential rate among the present generation of students. Yet, there is paucity of empirical study to understand the determinant of its use in the present setting of this study. This study, therefore, seeks to investigate factors that predict students' attitudes and intentions to use this…

  9. An Anatomy of Feedback: A Phenomenographic Investigation of Undergraduate Students' Conceptions of Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Angela J.; Bond, Carol H.; Nicholson, Helen D.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate how undergraduate students conceptualise feedback, and compare this with research into conceptions of teaching and learning related phenomena in higher education. Using a phenomenographic approach, 28 physiotherapy students in New Zealand were interviewed about their experiences. Data analysis resulted…

  10. A Multi-Institutional Investigation of Students' Preinstructional Ideas about Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Janelle M.; Sanchez, Roxanne; Coble, Kim; Larrieu, Donna; Cochran, Geraldine; Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve instruction in introductory astronomy, we are investigating students' preinstructional ideas about a number of cosmology topics. This article describes one aspect of this large research study in which 1270 students responded to a subset of three questions each from a larger set of questions about the following areas: definition…

  11. An Investigation into the Number Sense Performance of Secondary School Students in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaya, Recai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the number sense performance of secondary school students according to grade level, gender and the components of number sense. A descriptive survey design was used to collect data. A total of 576 secondary school students (291 girls and 285 boys) participated in the study. The results revealed that the…

  12. An Investigation of Graduate Student Knowledge and Usage of Open-Access Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Regina M.

    2016-01-01

    Graduate students lament the need to achieve the proficiency necessary to competently search multiple databases for their research assignments, regularly eschewing these sources in favor of Google Scholar or some other search engine. The author conducted an anonymous survey investigating graduate student knowledge or awareness of the open-access…

  13. Investigating Students' Self-Efficacy and Attitudes towards the Use of Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorganci, Serpil

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, mobile learning (m-learning) presents new and powerful opportunities for effective teaching and learning. Two significant factors that serve in understanding if students accept m-learning technology are self-efficacy and attitudes towards m-learning usage. For this purpose, the present study investigated vocational college students'…

  14. Investigating the Impact of Internet Dependency on Student-Teachers' Loneliness of Adiyaman University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytaç, Kürsat Yusuf

    2018-01-01

    This research was conducted to investigate the effect of internet dependency on student- teachers' loneliness of Admiyaman University. The study also examined the differences in internet dependency and loneliness among students and teachers of Adiyaman University of Turkey. The standard questionnaire of Jung (1996) was used to measure the internet…

  15. Investigating Teachers' and Students' Beliefs and Assumptions about CALL Programme at Caledonian College of Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Holi Ibrahim Holi

    2012-01-01

    This study is set to investigate students' and teachers' perceptions and assumptions about newly implemented CALL Programme at the School of Foundation Studies, Caledonian College of Engineering, Oman. Two versions of questionnaire were administered to 24 teachers and 90 students to collect their beliefs and assumption about CALL programame. The…

  16. Investigating Elementary School Students' Technology Acceptance by Applying Digital Game-Based Learning to Environmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuh-Ming; Lou, Shi-Jer; Kuo, Sheng-Huang; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve and promote students' environmental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour, integrating environmental education into the primary education curriculum has become a key issue for environmental education. For this reason, this study aimed to investigate elementary school students' acceptance of technology applying digital game-based…

  17. Investigating Student Choices in Performing Higher-Level Comprehension Tasks Using TED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Francesca; Marenzi, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    The current paper describes a first experiment in the use of TED talks and open tagging exercises to train higher-level comprehension skills, and of automatic logging of the student's actions to investigate the student choices while performing analytical tasks. The experiment took advantage of an interactive learning platform--LearnWeb--that…

  18. British Students' Perceptions of Ethical Issues in International Marketing: An Empirical Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sammy G.

    1996-01-01

    A survey investigated 122 British business students' perceptions of ethics in international marketing practices, particularly as they are affected by demographic characteristics. In response to 12 specific scenarios, students indicated relatively liberal attitudes. Implications for global marketing specialists and for business education are…

  19. A Multilevel, Statewide Investigation of School District Anti-Bullying Policy Quality and Student Bullying Involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Amy L.; Cousin, Molly; Borowsky, Iris W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Although nearly all states in the United States require school districts to adopt anti-bullying policies, little research examines the effect of these policies on student bullying and health. Using a statewide sample, we investigated associations between the quality of school district anti-bullying policies and student bullying…

  20. An Investigation of First-Year Engineering Student and Instructor Perspectives of Learning Analytics Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, David B.; Brozina, Cory; Novoselich, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how first-year engineering undergraduates and their instructors describe the potential for learning analytics approaches to contribute to student success. Results of qualitative data collection in a first-year engineering course indicated that both students and instructors\temphasized a preference for learning analytics…

  1. Investigating University Students' Preferences to Science Communication Skills: A Case of Prospective Science Teacher in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suprapto, Nadi; Ku, Chih-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Indonesian university students' preferences to science communication skills. Data collected from 251 students who were majoring in science education program. The Learning Preferences to Science Communication (LPSC) questionnaire was developed with Indonesian language and validated through an exploratory…

  2. Online Lecture Recordings and Lecture Attendance: Investigating Student Preferences in a Large First Year Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alexandra; Raju, Sadhana; Sharma, Manjula D.

    2016-01-01

    While blended learning has been around for some time, the interplay between lecture recordings, lecture attendance and grades needs further examination particularly for large cohorts of over 1,000 students in 500 seat lecture theatres. This paper reports on such an investigation with a cohort of 1,450 first year psychology students' who indicated…

  3. Investigating the Perceptions and Behaviors of Elementary Students and Teachers when Internet Access is Universal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Janice M

    2005-01-01

    This study presents a preliminary investigation into changes in the perceptions and behaviors of teachers and students when all have universal Internet access at home and school using Internet-on-TV technology. Four hundred fourth-grade students and their teachers from seven schools participated in the WISH TV (WorldGate Internet School to Home)…

  4. Investigating the Attitude of PCG University Students towards Their Parents and towards Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görkem, Anil; Bengisoy, Ayse

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate students in classes 1-2-3-4, studying Pyschological Guidance and Counselling (PGC) at a university in T.R.N.C. (Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) in their relationships with their parents and their attitudes towards marriage. The study includes 325 students and was conducted during the spring of…

  5. The Investigation of Preservice Teachers' and Primary School Students' Views about Online Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoyun, Ferit; Kuzu, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the views held by preservice teachers from the department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) and those of 6th grade students about the process of online digital storytelling activities as it applies to the students' education. The study was designed as a case study. The data were…

  6. An Investigation of High School Students' Online Game Addiction with Respect to Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müezzin, Emre

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate high school students' online game addiction with respect to gender. The sample which was selected through the criterion sampling method, consists of 81 female (61.8%) female, and 50 male (38.2%), total 131 high school students. The "Online Game Addiction Scale" which was developed by Kaya and Basol…

  7. Investigation of Cd Adsorption and Accumulation from Contaminated Soil in Different Parts of Root Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Yargholi

    2010-01-01

        Environmental pollution with heavy metals and their absorption by plants form a universal problem around the world. Numerous investigations have been conducted to put wastewaters containing heavy metals to agricultural reuse. Little is known, however, about the absorption of cadmium in the root zone and its accumulation in the different organs of crops, particularly in root crops. This study was carried out to investigate the influence of different levels of Cd concentration in the root zone on the accumulation rate in various parts of four different types of common root crops in karaj Iran. The experiment was performed in a factorial testing plan in random blocks and in four treatments with three replicates. The treatments included four levels of Cd concentration in soil (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, control without Cd addition and water with 0.5 molar of EDTA. The soil used in this study was prepared by passing through a sieve with a 2mm mesh and adding Nitrate Cadmium (Cd(NO32. Cylinder plastic vases 40 Cm in diameter and 60 cm high were employed to cultivate vegetables. Water demandwas estimated via the Penman-Mantith method, in which Kc was calculated by means of recorded data at Meshgin-Abad synoptic station in Karaj. At the end of the growing season, samples were taken from different organs of the plants to measure Cadmium accumulation. The SPSS software was used for the variance analysis of the collected data. The Dunkan test (at 0.01 and 0.05 levels was then used to evaluate averages of the specifications in the factorial testing levels. The results indicate a direct relationship between Cd concentration in the root zone and Cd accumulation in plant organs. Adding 0.5 molar of EDTA to the irrigation water caused Cd accumulation in plant organs to exceed 60 percent. The results also show that Cd concentration, except for the control, was in excess of the limit for human consumption and that its accumulation levels in the different species tested

  8. The investigation of the possibility for using some wild and cultivated plants as hyperaccumulators of heavy metals from contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Miroslava; Antonijevic, Milan; Alagic, Sladjana

    2013-02-01

    The copper production in Bor (East Serbia) during the last 100 years presents an important source of the pollution of environment. Dust, waste waters, tailing, and air pollutants influence the quality of soil, water, and air. Over 2,000 ha of fertile soil have been damaged by the flotation tailing from Bor's facilities. The goal of the present work has been to determine the content of Pb, Cu, and Fe in wild plants (17 species) naturally growing in the damaged soil and in fodder crops (nine species) planted at the same place. The content of Pb, Cu, and Fe has been analyzed in damaged soil as well. This study has also searched for native (wild) and cultivated plants which are able to grow in contaminated soil in the area of the intense industrial activity of copper production in Bor, which means that they can accumulate and tolerate heavy metals in their above-ground tissues. It has been found out that the content of all metals in contaminated soil decreases considerably at the end of the experiment. As it has been expected, all plant species could accumulate investigated metals. All tested plants, both wild-growing and cultivated plants, seem to be quite healthy on the substrate which contained extremely high concentrations of copper.

  9. Do Entrepreneur Courses Matter? : An Investigation of Students from Swedish University, Mälardalen University

    OpenAIRE

    Centeno, Ignacio; Peng, He; Punthapong, Parityada

    2008-01-01

    The purpose is to investigate the relationship between Entrepreneur perspectives and education objectives in order to explore students´ attitudes towards the course and also their expectations to become an Entrepreneur.

  10. An Investigation of Primary School Students' Perceptions of Violence Revealed Through Their Drawings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Saban

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, primary school students' perceptions of violence were investigated by means of pictures drawn by them. The participants included 80 students between the ages of 9 and 11 who attended three primary schools (3rd, 4th, and 5th grades in the city of Konya during the 2011-2012 academic year. According to the findings of the study, the students mostly drew pictures of general violence which occurred in a family environment in the form of physical violence. In addition, students drew “father” as a figure practicing violence most, and “male child” and “mother” as figures exposed to violence most.

  11. Investigation of Influence Zones Induced by Shallow Tunnelling in Soft Soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu Minh, N.; Broere, W.; Bosch, J.W.

    2017-01-01

    The extent of the influence zone affected by shallow tunnelling depends on the value of volume loss which normally represents the amount of over-excavation and stress changes induced in the soil. This paper combines upper and lower estimates of volume loss for different soft soils and

  12. Advancing investigation and physical modeling of first-order fire effects on soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    William J. Massman; John M. Frank; Sacha J. Mooney

    2010-01-01

    Heating soil during intense wildland fires or slash-pile burns can alter the soil irreversibly, resulting in many significant long-term biological, chemical, physical, and hydrological effects. To better understand these long-term effects, it is necessary to improve modeling capability and prediction of the more immediate, or first-order, effects that fire can have on...

  13. Use of Carbon Isotopic Tracers in Investigating Soil Carbon Sequestration and Stabilization in Agroecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-09-01

    The global surface temperatures have been reported to increase at an average rate of 0.06 C (0.11 F) per decade. This observed climate change known as the greenhouse effect is attributed to the emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs), including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, resulting in trapping the heat near the earth’s surface causing global warming. World soils are the largest reservoir of terrestrial carbon and that soils are a source or sink of GHGs depending on land use management. Recognizing the urgent need to address the soil organic matter constraints for a sustainable agricultural production to ensure food security, this publication provides an integrated view on conventional and isotopic methods of measuring and modelling soil carbon dynamics, and the use nuclear and radioisotope tracer techniques in in-situ glasshouse and field labelling techniques to assess soil organic matter turnover and sequestration.

  14. On the origin of some red soils from Sardinia (Italy). A neutron activation analysis investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genova, N.; Meloni, S.; Oddone, M.; Pavia Univ.; Melis, P.

    2001-01-01

    In Sardinia, the Italian island in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, there are many red soils developed on limestone or dolomite. Soil and underlying bedrock samples from 5 different sites have been submitted to chemical and mineralogical characterization, by using standard X-ray diffraction analysis, spectrochemical methods and instrumental neutron activation analysis. Obtained results are presented and discussed in terms of precision and accuracy. Trace element concentration variation with depth is discussed as well as the enrichment/depletion ratios between soils and rocks, and the rare-earth element distribution. Data analysis suggests for some soils a formation process based on the evolution of the underlying bedrock, and for the other soils a formation process partly based on the evolution of the local rock but with meaningful contributions of external sources, both eolian and/or alluvial. (author)

  15. Synchrotron-based micro and nanotomographic investigations of soil aggregate microbial and pore structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemner, K. M.; O'Brien, S.; Whiteside, M. D.; Sholto-Douglas, D.; Antipova, O.; Bailey, V.; Boyanov, M.; Dohnalkova, A.; Gursoy, D.; Kovarik, L.; Lai, B.; Roehrig, C.; Vogt, S.

    2017-12-01

    Soil is a highly complex network of pore spaces, minerals, and organic matter (e.g., roots, fungi, and bacteria), making it physically heterogeneous over nano- to macro-scales. Such complexity arises from feedbacks between physical processes and biological activity that generate a dynamic, self-organizing 3D complex. Since we first demonstrated the utility of synchrotron-based transmission tomography to image internal soil aggregate structure [Kemner et al., 1998], we and many other researchers have made use of and have advanced the application of this technique. However, our understanding of how microbes and microbial metabolism are distributed throughout soil aggregates is limited, because no technique is available to image the soil pore network and the life that inhabits it. X-ray transmission microtomography can provide highly detailed 3D renderings of soil structure but cannot distinguish cells from other electron-light material such as air or water. However, the use of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) as a reporter of bacterial presence enables us to overcome this constraint, instilling bacterial cells with enough contrast to detect them and their metabolic functions in their opaque soil habitat, with hard x-rays capable of penetrating 3D soil structures at high resolution. Previous transmission tomographic imaging of soil aggregates with high energy synchrotron x-rays has demonstrated 700 nm3 voxel spatial resolution. These and recent results from nanotomographic x-ray transmission imaging of soil aggregates with 30 nm3 voxel resolution will be presented. In addition, results of submicron voxel-sized x-ray fluorescence 3D imaging to determine microbial distributions within soil aggregates and the critical role to be played by the upgrade of the Advanced Photon Source for 100-1000X increases in hard x-ray brilliance will also be presented. *Kemner, et al., SPIE 3449, 45-53, 1998

  16. A lysimeter experiment to investigate the leaching of veterinary antibiotics through a clay soil and comparison with field data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kay, Paul [Cranfield Centre for EcoChemistry, Cranfield University, Shardlow Hall, Shardlow, Derby DE72 2GN (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: paul.kay@adas.co.uk; Blackwell, Paul A. [Cranfield Centre for EcoChemistry, Cranfield University, Shardlow Hall, Shardlow, Derby DE72 2GN (United Kingdom); Boxall, Alistair B.A. [Cranfield Centre for EcoChemistry, Cranfield University, Shardlow Hall, Shardlow, Derby DE72 2GN (United Kingdom)

    2005-03-01

    Pharmaceuticals used in livestock production may be present in manure and slurry as the parent compound and/or metabolites. The environment may therefore be exposed to these substances due to the application of organic fertilisers to agricultural land or deposition by grazing livestock. For other groups of substances that are applied to land (e.g. pesticides), preferential flow in clay soils has been identified as an extremely important mechanism by which surface water pollution can occur. This lysimeter study was therefore performed to investigate the fate of three antibiotics from the sulphonamide, tetracycline and macrolide groups in a clay soil. Only sulphachloropyridazine was detected in leachate and soil analysis at the end of the experiment showed that almost no antibiotic residues remained. These data were analysed alongside field data for the same compounds to show that soil tillage which breaks the connectivity of macropores formed over the summer months, prior to slurry application, significantly reduces chemical mobility. - This paper describes one of the first studies to investigate the fate of veterinary medicines in cracking clay soils.

  17. A lysimeter experiment to investigate the leaching of veterinary antibiotics through a clay soil and comparison with field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kay, Paul; Blackwell, Paul A.; Boxall, Alistair B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals used in livestock production may be present in manure and slurry as the parent compound and/or metabolites. The environment may therefore be exposed to these substances due to the application of organic fertilisers to agricultural land or deposition by grazing livestock. For other groups of substances that are applied to land (e.g. pesticides), preferential flow in clay soils has been identified as an extremely important mechanism by which surface water pollution can occur. This lysimeter study was therefore performed to investigate the fate of three antibiotics from the sulphonamide, tetracycline and macrolide groups in a clay soil. Only sulphachloropyridazine was detected in leachate and soil analysis at the end of the experiment showed that almost no antibiotic residues remained. These data were analysed alongside field data for the same compounds to show that soil tillage which breaks the connectivity of macropores formed over the summer months, prior to slurry application, significantly reduces chemical mobility. - This paper describes one of the first studies to investigate the fate of veterinary medicines in cracking clay soils

  18. An investigation of the speciation of radionuclides in sediments and soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, M.B.; Stanney, K.A.; Williams, G.A.

    1981-08-01

    A sequential chemical extraction procedure has been used to investigate the speciation of the radionuclides 210 Pb and 226 Ra in three soil and sediment samples from the Mt. Brockman area in the Northern Territory. The analyses, by γ-ray spectrometry, are in terms of those species that are exchangeable, bound to carbonates, bound to iron or manganese oxides, bound to organic matter, and tightly bound in the crystal lattices of various minerals. The results for the radionuclides indicate significant differences between 210 Pb and 226 Ra in their distribution among the fractions, with very little 226 Ra present in all residual fractions. Very low concentrations of both radionuclides were present in the fractions representing species bound to carbonates, with 226 Ra concentrations greater that 210 Pb. Where the iron content of the sample is high, and in the form of iron oxides, both radionuclides are associated largely with the iron oxide phase. The fraction representing species bound to organic matter contained relatively high concentrations of both radionuclides in all samples

  19. Investigating the Impact of Lighting Educational Spaces on Learning and Academic Achievement of Elementary Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Gilavand

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background In modern education, physical space is considered as a dynamic factor in students' educational activities. This study was conducted to investigating the impact of lighting educational spaces on learning and academic achievement of elementary students. Materials and Methods At a cross-sectional study (2015-2016, a total of 210 students were selected randomly as sample of study. Cluster sampling was done by appropriate allocation and questionnaires were randomly divided among students. Data collection tools included Hermance’s achievement motivation questionnaire and researcher-constructed questionnaire (observation checklist to examine the physical parameters of learning environment lighting and interviews with students. Data of study were analyzed using SPSS- 21 software. Results Results of this study showed that lighting educational spaces has a significant impact on learning and academic achievement of elementary school students in Ahvaz, Iran (P

  20. An investigation of factors affecting elementary school students' BMI values based on the system dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tian-Syung; Chen, Kai-Ling; Chen, Pin-Chang; Ku, Chao-Tai; Chiu, Pei-Hsuan; Wang, Meng-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    This study used system dynamics method to investigate the factors affecting elementary school students' BMI values. The construction of the dynamic model is divided into the qualitative causal loop and the quantitative system dynamics modeling. According to the system dynamics modeling, this study consisted of research on the four dimensions: student's personal life style, diet-relevant parenting behaviors, advocacy and implementation of school nutrition education, and students' peer interaction. The results of this study showed that students with more adequate health concepts usually have better eating behaviors and consequently have less chance of becoming obese. In addition, this study also verified that educational attainment and socioeconomic status of parents have a positive correlation with students' amounts of physical activity, and nutrition education has a prominent influence on changing students' high-calorie diets.

  1. Exploring Patterns of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition with Students and the Public Through the Global Decomposition Project (GDP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, J. H.; Natali, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Global Decomposition Project (GDP) is a program designed to introduce and educate students and the general public about soil organic matter and decomposition through a standardized protocol for collecting, reporting, and sharing data. This easy-to-use hands-on activity focuses on questions such as "How do environmental conditions control decomposition of organic matter in soil?" and "Why do some areas accumulate organic matter and others do not?" Soil organic matter is important to local ecosystems because it affects soil structure, regulates soil moisture and temperature, and provides energy and nutrients to soil organisms. It is also important globally because it stores a large amount of carbon, and when microbes "eat", or decompose organic matter they release greenhouse gasses such as carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere, which affects the earth's climate. The protocol describes a commonly used method to measure decomposition using a paper made of cellulose, a component of plant cell walls. Participants can receive pre-made cellulose decomposition bags, or make decomposition bags using instructions in the protocol and easily obtained materials (e.g., window screen and lignin-free paper). Individual results will be shared with all participants and the broader public through an online database. We will present decomposition bag results from a research site in Alaskan tundra, as well as from a middle-school-student led experiment in California. The GDP demonstrates how scientific methods can be extended to educate broader audiences, while at the same time, data collected by students and the public can provide new insight into global patterns of soil decomposition. The GDP provides a pathway for scientists and educators to interact and reach meaningful education and research goals.

  2. Investigating the impact of temporal and spatial variation in spring snow melt on summer soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, G. P.; Papuga, S. A.; Wright, C. L.; Nelson, K.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    While soil respiration - the flux of carbon dioxide from the soil surface to the atmosphere - is the second largest terrestrial carbon flux, it is the least well constrained component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. This is in part because of its high variability in space and time that can become amplified under certain environmental conditions. Under current climate change scenarios, both summer and winter precipitation are expected to be altered in terrestrial ecosystems of the southwestern US. Precipitation magnitude and intensity influence soil moisture, which is a key control on ecosystem-scale respiration rates. Therefore understanding how changes in snow and rainfall translate to changes in soil moisture is critical to understanding climate change impacts on soil respiration processes. Our study took place within the footprint of a semiarid mixed-conifer flux measurement system on Mount Bigelow just north of Tucson, AZ. We analyzed images from three understory phenology cameras (pheno-cams) to identify areas that represented early and late snowmelt. Within the field of view of each of the three pheno-cams we established three early-melt and three late-melt soil respiration measurement “sites”. To understand the persistence of snowmelt conditions on summer soil respiration, we measured soil respiration, soil moisture, and soil temperature at all six sites on four days representing different summer periods (i.e. pre-monsoon, early monsoon, mid-monsoon, and late monsoon). Throughout the entire study period, at both early- and late-melt sites soil respiration was strongly correlated with amount of soil moisture, and was less responsive to temperature. Soil respiration generally increased throughout the rainy season, peaking by mid-monsoon at both early- and late-melt sites. Interestingly, early-melt sites were wetter than late-melt sites following rainfall occurring in the pre- and early monsoon. However, following rainfall occurring in the mid- to late

  3. Investigation about the efficiency of the bioaugmentation technique when applied to diesel oil contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Pinto Mariano

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the efficiency of the bioaugmentation technique when applied to diesel oil contaminated soils collected at three service stations. Batch biodegradation experiments were carried out in Bartha biometer flasks (250 mL used to measure the microbial CO2 production. Biodegradation efficiency was also measured by quantifying the concentration of hydrocarbons. In addition to the biodegradation experiments, the capability of the studied cultures and the native microorganisms to biodegrade the diesel oil purchased from a local service station, was verified using a technique based on the redox indicator 2,6 -dichlorophenol indophenol (DCPIP. Results obtained with this test showed that the inocula used in the biodegradation experiments were able to degrade the diesel oil and the tests carried out with the native microorganisms indicated that these soils had a microbiota adapted to degrade the hydrocarbons. In general, no gain was obtained with the addition of microorganisms or even negative effects were observed in the biodegradation experiments.Este trabalho investigou a eficiência da técnica do bioaumento quando aplicada a solos contaminados com óleo diesel coletados em três postos de combustíveis. Experimentos de biodegradação foram realizados em frascos de Bartha (250 mL, usados para medir a produção microbiana de CO2. A eficiência de biodegradação também foi quantificada pela concentração de hidrocarbonetos. Conjuntamente aos experimentos de biodegradação, a capacidade das culturas estudadas e dos microrganismos nativos em biodegradar óleo diesel comprado de um posto de combustíveis local, foi verificada utilizando-se a técnica baseada no indicador redox 2,6 - diclorofenol indofenol (DCPIP. Resultados obtidos com esse teste mostraram que os inóculos empregados nos experimentos de biodegradação foram capazes de biodegradar óleo diesel e os testes com os microrganismos nativos indicaram que estes solos

  4. Numerical investigation of soil and buried structures using finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Shirzad Shahrivar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Today the important of studying soil effect on behavior of soil  contacted structures such as foundations, piles,  retaining wall and other similar structures is so much that neglecting of soil-structure interaction effect can cause to untrue results. In this paper soil-structure interaction simulation was done by using Finite element method analysis with ABAQUS version 6.13-14.The results has been presented based on pile function in contact with soil, vertical stresses in soil and structures, pore pressure in drained and undrained condition and underground water level.Final conclusions revealed that pore pressure effect is not uniform on all parts of pile and amount of pore pressure increment in top elements is lower than down elements of  pile.Further it was proven that average amount of vertical stress on end of pile is    of this stress on top of the pile. thus it was concluded that 70% of pile bearing capacity is depend on friction of soil and pile contact surface.

  5. Investigation of biological destruction of benzo[a]pyrene andpolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of biochar in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunev, R. V.; Smirnova, E. V.; Sharipova, A. R.; Gilmutdinova, I. M.; Giniyatullin, K. G.

    2018-01-01

    The biological decomposition of benzo[a]pyrene in the concentrations exceeding the MAC (maximum permissible concentration) level in soils by 2, 5 and 10 times was studied in laboratory conditions. The gray forest soil samples were contaminated with benzo[a]pyrene and incubated in optimum for bacterial growth soil moisture for 30 and 60 days. The residual amount of contaminant was monitored by HPLC after extraction with acetone-cyclohexane (2:1). Soil microbial activity was evaluated by measuring basal respiration (BR) and substrate-induced respiration (SID) rates of the soil by gas chromatography. The results of the experiment showed that in 60 days the amount of benzo[a]pyrene in contaminated soils decreased; however, this time was not enough for complete decomposition of pollutant. In this case, benzo[a]pyrene has a negative effect on the BR and SIR rates. Soil contamination affected the BR rate only at high doses (10 MPC), whereas the SIR was a more sensitive indicator of the toxic effect of the pollutant and significantly reacts already at concentrations at the level of 2 MPC. The combination of PAHs isolated from biochar has a strong negative effect on the values of BR and SIR.

  6. Using 13C-labeled benzene and Raman gas spectroscopy to investigate respiration and biodegradation kinetics following soil contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Tobias; Popp, Juergen; Frosch, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil and groundwater contamination with benzene can cause serious environmental damages. However, many soil microorganisms are capable to adapt and known to strongly control the fate of organic contamination. Cavity enhanced Raman gas spectroscopy (CERS) was applied to investigate the short-term response of indigenous soil bacteria to a sudden surface contamination with benzene regarding the temporal variations of gas products and their exchange rates with the adjacent atmosphere. 13C-labeled benzene was spiked on a silty-loamy soil column (sampled from Hainich National Park, Germany) in order to track and separate the changes in heterotrophic soil respiration - involving 12CO2 and O2 - from the microbial process of benzene degradation, which ultimately forms 13CO2.1 The respiratory quotient (RQ) of 0.98 decreased significantly after the spiking and increased again within 33 hours to a value of 0.72. This coincided with maximum 13CO2 concentration rates (0.63 μ mol m-2 s-1), indicating highest benzene degradation at 33 hours after the spiking event. The diffusion of benzene in the headspace and the biodegradation into 13CO2 were simultaneously monitored and 12 days after the benzene spiking no measurable degradation was detected anymore.1 The RQ finally returned to a value of 0.96 demonstrating the reestablished aerobic respiration. In summary, this study shows the potential of combining Raman gas spectroscopy and stable isotopes to follow soil microbial biodegradation dynamics while simultaneously monitoring the underlying respiration behavior. Support by the Collaborative Research Center 1076 Aqua Diva is kindly acknowledged. We thank Beate Michalzik for soil analysis and discussion. 1. T. Jochum, B. Michalzik, A. Bachmann, J. Popp and T. Frosch, Analyst, 2015, 140, 3143-3149.

  7. Chromate Adsorption on Selected Soil Minerals: Surface Complexation Modeling Coupled with Spectroscopic Investigation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselská, V.; Fajgar, Radek; Číhalová, S.; Bolanz, R.M.; Göttlicher, J.; Steininger, R.; Siddique, J.A.; Komárek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 318, NOV 15 (2016), s. 433-442 ISSN 0304-3894 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : surface complexation modeling * chromate * soil minerals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.065, year: 2016

  8. 300-FF-1 operable unit remedial investigation phase II report: Physical separation of soils treatability study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the approach and results of physical separations treatability tests conducted at the Hanford Site in the North Process Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. Physical separation of soils was identified as a remediation alternative due to the potential to significantly reduce the amount of contaminated soils prior to disposal. Tests were conducted using a system developed at Hanford consisting of modified EPA equipment integrated with screens, hoppers, conveyors, tanks, and pumps from the Hanford Site. The treatability tests discussed in this report consisted of four parts, in which an estimated 84 tons of soil was processed: (1) a pre-test run to set up the system and adjust system parameters for soils to be processed; (2) a baseline run to establish the performance of the system - Test No. 1; (3) a final run in which the system was modified as a result of findings from the baseline run - Test No. 2; and (4) water treatment.

  9. Cold war legacy: sub-surface investigation of unsaturated prairie soil radiologically contaminated in 1951

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sims, D.J.; Andrews, W.S.; Wang, Z.; Creber, K.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    An unintentional release of fission products (FPs) from a buried storage tank in 1951 resulted in 6.7 L of liquid, bearing radioactive material, being spilled into unsaturated prairie soil at a depth of 3.7 m. Since then, the site has been undisturbed. In October 2001, boreholes were drilled and soil samples were recovered for analysis. Gamma well logging showed higher than background radiation readings at a depth of 3.5 m (corresponding to the storage container location) and a peak reading at 4.7 m (attributed to the breakthrough curve). The soil was determined to be predominantly lean clay with a silty sand layer between 4.4 and 5.1 m. Future work includes radiochemical analysis, soil column simulation, determination of distribution coefficients and transport modelling. (author)

  10. 300-FF-1 operable unit remedial investigation phase II report: Physical separation of soils treatability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the approach and results of physical separations treatability tests conducted at the Hanford Site in the North Process Pond of the 300-FF-1 Operable Unit. Physical separation of soils was identified as a remediation alternative due to the potential to significantly reduce the amount of contaminated soils prior to disposal. Tests were conducted using a system developed at Hanford consisting of modified EPA equipment integrated with screens, hoppers, conveyors, tanks, and pumps from the Hanford Site. The treatability tests discussed in this report consisted of four parts, in which an estimated 84 tons of soil was processed: (1) a pre-test run to set up the system and adjust system parameters for soils to be processed; (2) a baseline run to establish the performance of the system - Test No. 1; (3) a final run in which the system was modified as a result of findings from the baseline run - Test No. 2; and (4) water treatment

  11. Comparative resilience of soil and natural zeolite against adverse features of a municipal sewage. A preliminary investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buondonno, A.; Coppola, E.; Capra, G.F.; De Riso, S.; Duras, M.G.; Selis, G.; Vacca, S.; Colella, C.

    2008-01-01

    A research was started aiming at evaluating the possible use of natural zeolites as exchange conditioners to improve and make durable the soil resilience against the adverse effects of the use of anomalous waters for irrigation purposes. This paper deals with a preliminary investigation on the comparative resilience of an Entisol with poor exchange properties and of a Neapolitan yellow tuff (NYT) sample against the adverse features of a dirty municipal sewage (DSW). Results showed that NYT treatment largely and significantly improved the poor soil exchange activity. In particular. NYT exchange sites selectively took up ammonium from DSW. As a consequence, ammonium was trapped, then protected against losses in the environment and, concurrently, exchangeable cations, such as K and Ca, were made free as plant nutrients. The results highlight the possible positive role of zeolitized tuff in restoring and sustaining soil resilience.

  12. Investigation of the mobilizability of persistent pollutants in the system groundwater/soil/plant of a former fen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, D.; Goertz, W.; Leisner-Saaber, J.; Rathje, M.

    1993-01-01

    For a former fen situated at the eastern border of the Lower terraces of the river Rhine in the close neighbourhood of densely populated urban districts a biotope-managementplan suggests the rewetting and restauration of typical landscape forms. High concentrations of heavy metals and low pH-values of the soil imply a potential danger especially for the groundwater. In order to solve this conflict between the aims of protecting rare biotopes and of saving groundwater-resources investigations were carried out considering all environmental compartments concerned: groundwater, surfacewater, soil and plants. The results demonstate that a step-by-step rewetting of the area is possible without a previous exchange of soil. In addition, careful groundwater control has to be carried out. (orig.) [de

  13. Chemical stabilisation of lead in shooting range soils with phosphate and magnesium oxide: Synchrotron investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi; Lim, Jung Eun; Ok, Yong Sik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Quantitative speciation of Pb by XAS as a result of Phosphate and MgO treatment revealed Pb converted to pyromorphite was limited. • Subsequent MgO addition increased pyromorphite formation. • Pb was precipitated on the surface of MgO as PbO. • Bioaccessibility of Pb decreased with P treatments, but not with MgO only. - Abstract: Three Australian shooting range soils were treated with phosphate and magnesium oxide, or a combination of both to chemically stabilize Pb. Lead speciation was determined after 1 month ageing by X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with linear combination fitting in control and treated soils. The predominant Pb species in untreated soils were iron oxide bound Pb, humic acid bound Pb and the mineral litharge. Treatment with phosphate resulted in substantial pyromorphite formation in two of the soils (TV and PE), accounting for up to 38% of Pb species present, despite the addition of excess phosphate. In MgO treated soils only, up to 43% of Pb was associated with MgO. Litharge and Pb hydroxide also formed as a result of MgO addition in the soils. Application of MgO after P treatment increased hydroxypyromorphite/pyromorphite formation relative to soils teated with phosphate only. X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy revealed PbO precipitate on the surface of MgO. Soil pH, (5.3–9.3) was an important parameter, as was the solubility of existing Pb species. The use of direct means of determination of the stabilisation of metals such as by X-ray absorption spectroscopy is desirable, particularly in relation to understanding long term stability of the immobilised contaminants.

  14. Chemical stabilisation of lead in shooting range soils with phosphate and magnesium oxide: Synchrotron investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanderson, Peter [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, University Parade, 5095 Mawson Lakes (Australia); Naidu, Ravi, E-mail: ravi.naidu@crccare.com [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, University Parade, 5095 Mawson Lakes (Australia); Bolan, Nanthi [Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation and CRC for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of the Environment (CRC CARE), University of South Australia, University Parade, 5095 Mawson Lakes (Australia); Lim, Jung Eun; Ok, Yong Sik [Korea Biochar Research Center & Department of Biological Environment, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative speciation of Pb by XAS as a result of Phosphate and MgO treatment revealed Pb converted to pyromorphite was limited. • Subsequent MgO addition increased pyromorphite formation. • Pb was precipitated on the surface of MgO as PbO. • Bioaccessibility of Pb decreased with P treatments, but not with MgO only. - Abstract: Three Australian shooting range soils were treated with phosphate and magnesium oxide, or a combination of both to chemically stabilize Pb. Lead speciation was determined after 1 month ageing by X-ray absorption spectroscopy combined with linear combination fitting in control and treated soils. The predominant Pb species in untreated soils were iron oxide bound Pb, humic acid bound Pb and the mineral litharge. Treatment with phosphate resulted in substantial pyromorphite formation in two of the soils (TV and PE), accounting for up to 38% of Pb species present, despite the addition of excess phosphate. In MgO treated soils only, up to 43% of Pb was associated with MgO. Litharge and Pb hydroxide also formed as a result of MgO addition in the soils. Application of MgO after P treatment increased hydroxypyromorphite/pyromorphite formation relative to soils teated with phosphate only. X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy revealed PbO precipitate on the surface of MgO. Soil pH, (5.3–9.3) was an important parameter, as was the solubility of existing Pb species. The use of direct means of determination of the stabilisation of metals such as by X-ray absorption spectroscopy is desirable, particularly in relation to understanding long term stability of the immobilised contaminants.

  15. Development of a Computerized Penetrometer System for Hazardous Waste Site Soils Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-30

    soil to prevent contaminant movement . o To preserve the standard electric cone geometry, i.e., 600 point, 1.4-in. (3.56-cm) OD, 1.54-in. 2 (9.9-cm2...considerable soil movements without cracking or rupturing. The second objective was to preserve the ASTM standard electric cone exterior geometry so as to...electrokinesis, and telluric current phenomena. Of these, the electrochemical and electrokinesis phenomena typically produce the largest voltage magnitude (on

  16. Experimental and numerical investigations of soil water balance at the hinterland of the Badain Jaran Desert for groundwater recharge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lizhu; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Hu, Bill X.; Shang, Jie; Wan, Li

    2016-09-01

    Quantification of groundwater recharge from precipitation in the huge sand dunes is an issue in accounting for regional water balance in the Badain Jaran Desert (BJD) where about 100 lakes exist between dunes. In this study, field observations were conducted on a sand dune near a large saline lake in the BJD to investigate soil water movement through a thick vadose zone for groundwater estimation. The hydraulic properties of the soils at the site were determined using in situ experiments and laboratory measurements. A HYDRUS-1D model was built up for simulating the coupling processes of vertical water-vapor movement and heat transport in the desert soil. The model was well calibrated and validated using the site measurements of the soil water and temperature at various depths. Then, the model was applied to simulate the vertical flow across a 3-m-depth soil during a 53-year period under variable climate conditions. The simulated flow rate at the depth is an approximate estimation of groundwater recharge from the precipitation in the desert. It was found that the annual groundwater recharge would be 11-30 mm during 1983-2012, while the annual precipitation varied from 68 to 172 mm in the same period. The recharge rates are significantly higher than those estimated from the previous studies using chemical information. The modeling results highlight the role of the local precipitation as an essential source of groundwater in the BJD.

  17. An investigation of sulfur concentrations in soils and pine needles in Bandelier National Monument, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladney, E.S.; Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Jones, E.A.; Bell, M.G.; Morgan, J.D.; Stallings, E.A.; Nelson, L.A.; Lundstrom, C.; Bowker, R.G.

    1993-03-01

    Sulfur measurements in different age groups of pinon pine needles and adjacent soil samples from ten sampling sites at Bandelier National Monument were determined using combustion elemental analysis and chromatographic techniques. The primary goal was to establish base-line levels for elemental sulfur in the Monument. Sulfur levels in foliage and soils were evaluated using analysis of variance techniques. Foliage sulfur concentrations differed significantly among the 10 sampling sites and among trees within sites; however, needles of different ages did not differ significantly in sulfur content. Average soil concentrations were very low, approximately 12% of the average needle concentrations. Soil sulfur concentrations also differed significantly among the 10 sampling sites and at different depths in the soil. No statistical differences were evident in soils sampled at the four compass points (N,S,E,W) around each tree. These differences imply that large numbers of samples are needed to identify small effects from anthropogenic inputs of sulfur into the system or that the effects must be large relative to the differences among sampling sites and individual trees in order to be detected

  18. An investigation of sulfur concentrations in soils and pine needles in Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladney, E.S.; Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Jones, E.A.; Bell, M.G.; Morgan, J.D.; Nelson, L.A.; Lundstrom, C.; Bowker, R.G.

    1993-03-01

    Sulfur measurements in different age groups of pinon pine needles and adjacent soil samples from ten sampling sites at Canyonlands National Park were determined using combustion elemental analysis and chromatographic techniques. The primary goal was to establish base-line levels for elemental sulfur in the Park. Sulfur levels in foliage and soils were evaluated using analysis of variance techniques. No significant differences were found in foliage sulfur concentrations among the 10 sampling sites; however, trees within sites were significantly different. Needles of different ages did not differ significantly in sulfur content. Average soil concentrations were very low, approximately 4% of the average needle concentrations. Soil sulfur concentrations also differed significantly among the 10 sampling sites and at different depths in the soil. No statistical differences were evident in soils sampled at the four compass points (N,S,E,W) around each tree. These differences imply that large numbers of samples are needed to identify small effects from anthropogenic inputs of sulfur into the system, or that the effects must be large relative to the differences among sampling sites and individual trees in order to be detected

  19. Experimental investigation of the seismic control of a nonlinear soil-structure system using MR dampers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental study conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and capability of magnetorheological (MR) dampers commanded by a decentralized control algorithm for seismic control of nonlinear civil structures considering soil-structure interaction (SSI). A two-story reinforced concrete (RC) frame resting in a laminar soil container is employed as the test specimen, and two MR dampers equipped in the first story are used to mitigate the response of this frame subjected to various intensity seismic excitations. A hyperbolic tangent function is used to represent the hysteretic behavior of the MR damper and a decentralized control approach for commanding MR dampers is proposed and implemented in the shaking table tests. Only the response of the first story is feedback for control command calculation of the MR dampers. The results indicate that the MR damper can effectively reduce the response of the soil-structure system, even when the soil-structure system presents complex nonlinear hysteretic behavior. The robustness of the proposed decentralized control algorithm is validated through the shaking table tests on the soil-structure system with large uncertainty. The most interesting findings in this paper are that MR dampers not only mitigate the superstructure response, but also reduce the soil response, pile response and earth pressure on the pile foundation

  20. Use of Cesium-137 Fallout in Soil Erosion Investigations in Protected Areas in Cienfuegos Province, Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibello Hernandez, Rita Y.

    2011-01-01

    The large-scale nuclear explosions that had taken place due to the nuclear weapons tests or as a result of nuclear accidents are the main causes of the great dispersion of artificial radionuclides around the world. One of these radionuclides is Cesium-137, which is strongly fixed to the fine soils particles. This fact, together with its half-life of 30 years and its easy detection by gamma spectrometry have converted Cesium-137, in a good radiotracer of the soils movement. This technique has been widely used and validated in different landscapes throughout the world. Its effectiveness was also previously validated and proved in Cienfuegos province too. This research was aimed at using the Cesium-137 technique to study soil redistribution and quantify erosion in the called Protected Areas in Cienfuegos province, where soil loss and sediment transport are the main causes of deterioration of these ecosystems with the consequent economic and / or environmental losses. The results were represented in a map using the software SURFER 8.0, achieving greater visibility of the soil redistribution in the plot studied. The methodology used in this study can be used in other places wherever it is necessary to know the magnitude of the erosion problems and to know the soil redistribution pattern in the landscape which can be very useful to draw the plans for reorganization of land use. (Author)

  1. Ways of Thinking Globalisation--Insights into a Currently Running Investigation of Students' Ideas of Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sebastian; Fischer, Florian; Kleinschmidt, Malte; Lange, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The investigation is about which ideas ninth form students at grammar schools and secondary modern schools have about globalisation. It shall be investigated if the perception of and judgement on globalisation-connected contexts happens along social structure-specific patterns. At first, by way of a questionnaire, the field of ideas is supposed to…

  2. Coastal Processes and Erosion, Student Guide and Teacher Guide. OEAGLS Investigation 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Beth A.; Fortner, Rosanne W.

    This investigation focuses on the major erosional forces affecting the shoreline which cause it to wear away and build up. The types of devices that protect the shoreline are also discussed. The investigation is presented in the form of a teachers' guide and a students' guide, both of which are included. In the teachers' guide, an overview of the…

  3. Using Soil Conservation Strategies in the Development of Learning Activities for the Students of Roi - Et College of Agriculture and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jariya Kanchanwong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were 1 to study nutrient content in soil samples taken from Roi - Et College of Agriculture and Technology Campus, 2 to study the social factors, economic factors and technological factors the effect on soil conservation of Roi - Et College of Agriculture and Technology students, 3 the development of soil conservation activities Learning package efficiency of 80/80, 4 to Study and to compare the knowledge, attitudes and skills regarding soil conservation of students of Roi - Et College of Agriculture and Technology. The student activities package of learning soil conservation was enrolled by 40 people in its club. These people were selected by purposive sampling. The instruments were used in this research as follows; 1 scientific analysis, 2 social questionnaire on economic and technological factors affecting soil conservation, 3 test of knowledge about soil conservation, 4 test of attitudes about soil conservation, 5 test of skill about soil conservation. The experimental research was designed to use students as key informants. The statistics analysis was used in the research as follows: frequency, percentage, average, standard deviation, test results, assumptions which included a dependent t-test statistical at the significance level of 0.05. The results of the study were as follows: 1 The study found that the amount of soil nutrient content (N: P: K around cultivated plants in an area of converted agriculture land have the significance: Soil checks collected in plots from soil containing morning glory, chrysanthemums, marigolds, corn and cassava, and had neutral pH. 2 The results of the analysis determing the factors that affected the conservation of soil found economic factors were at a high level Social factors and technology factors were moderate thus leading the approach that has come to create of learning activities package in soil conservation. 3 The results showed that the efficiency of the manual was 83

  4. Investigating Years 7 to 12 students' knowledge of linear relationships through different contexts and representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, Karina J.; Ayalon, Michal

    2018-02-01

    A foundational component of developing algebraic thinking for meaningful calculus learning is the idea of "function" that focuses on the relationship between varying quantities. Students have demonstrated widespread difficulties in learning calculus, particularly interpreting and modeling dynamic events, when they have a poor understanding of relationships between variables. Yet, there are differing views on how to develop students' functional thinking over time. In the Australian curriculum context, linear relationships are introduced to lower secondary students with content that reflects a hybrid of traditional and reform algebra pedagogy. This article discusses an investigation into Australian secondary students' understanding of linear functional relationships from Years 7 to 12 (approximately 12 to 18 years old; n = 215) in their approaches to three tasks (finding rate of change, pattern generalisation and interpretation of gradient) involving four different representations (table, geometric growing pattern, equation and graph). From the findings, it appears that these students' knowledge of linear functions remains context-specific rather than becoming connected over time.

  5. An Investigation of Factors Affecting Utilization of Information Technology (IT by Agricultural Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rezaei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out with the aim of investigating factors affecting utilization of information technology by students of agriculture. A survey approach was used in this study and a questionnaire was developed to gather the data. The study population was postgraduate students (MS and PhD of economic and agricultural development faculty in Tehran University who were selected by applying random sampling technique. Sample size for students was 61 persons. Data was analyzed by using SPSS/WIN software. The results of the research indicated that there was a positive significant relationship between using of information technology by students and their age, average, prior experience, information technology skills, innovativeness, perceived ease of use, attitude and self-efficacy. The relationship between computer anxiety and using of IT was negative. Stepwise Regression Analysis showed that innovativeness and attitude predict 53.2 percent of variations of IT use by students.

  6. Investigation on the learning interest of senior undergraduate students in optoelectronics specialty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenjiang; Wang, Na; Li, Dangjuan; Liu, Chanlao

    2017-08-01

    With the increasing number of the graduate students, many of them have some troubles in job finding. This situation make a huge pressure on the senior students and loss them the interesting in study. This work investigate the reasons by questionnaire survey, panel discussion, interview, etc. to achieve the factors influence their learning interesting. The main reason of students do not have the motivation on study is that they do not understand the development and competition of photoelectric specialty, lack of innovation and entrepreneurship training, hysteresis of the learning knowledge and practical application. Finally, the paper gives some suggestions through teaching reform on how to improve students' learning enthusiasm. This work will contribute to the teaching and training of senior undergraduate students of optoelectronics specialty.

  7. An isotopic investigation of the temperature response of young and old soil organic matter respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Nancy; Cloy, Joanna; Garnett, Mark; Reay, David; Smith, Keith; Otten, Wilfred

    2010-05-01

    The effect of temperature on rates of soil respiration is critical to our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle and potential feedbacks to climate change. The relative temperature sensitivity of labile and recalcitrant soil organic matter (SOM) is still controversial; different studies have produced contrasting results, indicating limited understanding of the underlying relationships between stabilisation processes and temperature. Current global carbon cycle models still rely on the assumption that SOM pools with different decay rates have the same temperature response, yet small differences in temperature response between pools could lead to very different climate feedbacks. This study examined the temperature response of soil respiration and the age of soil carbon respired from radiocarbon dated fractions of SOM (free, intra-aggregate and mineral-bound) and whole soils (organic and mineral layers). Samples were collected from a peaty gley soil from Harwood Forest, Northumberland, UK. SOM fractions were isolated from organic layer (5 - 17 cm) material using high density flotation and ultrasonic disaggregation - designated as free (aggregate (aggregates > 1.8 g cm-3) and mineral-bound (> 1.8 g cm-3) SOM. Fractions were analysed for chemical composition (FTIR, CHN analysis, ICP-OES), 14C (AMS), δ13C and δ15N (MS) and thermal properties (DSC). SOM fractions and bulk soil from the organic layer and the mineral layer (20 - 30 cm) were incubated in sealed vessels at 30 ° C and 10 ° C for 3 or 9 months to allow accumulation of CO2 sufficient for sampling. Accumulated respired CO2 samples were collected on zeolite molecular sieve cartridges and used for AMS radiocarbon dating. In parallel, material from the same fractions and layers were incubated at 10 ° C, 15 ° C, 25 ° C and 30 ° C for 6 months and sampled weekly for CO2 flux measurements using GC chromatography. Initial data have shown radiocarbon ages ranging from modern to 219 y BP in bulk soil from

  8. A pedological investigation of soils associated with rocks of the Ventersdorp supergroup in the western Transvaal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viljoen, J.N.J.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was the collecting of information pertaining to soils overlying the rocks of the Ventersdorp Supergroup and an evaluation of the influence of these rocks on soil formation. The area studied was divided into six sub-areas, and one or two sample areas were allocated to each of these sub-areas. In each sample area the soil was studied in catenary sequence. Profile pits were described and samples taken for physical and chemical analyses. The sand fraction was separated into light and heavy mineral fractions. The surface of quartz grains were studied with a petrographic microscope and the aid of an electron microscope. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the mineralogy of the silt and light mineral fractions and a number of selected clay mineral samples. The following characteristics were observed despite the universal presence of wind transported material: epidote, angular quartz grains with undulatory extinction as well as a high percentage silt, coarse and medium sand and fragments of amygdaloids. Aeolian sand in variable amounts is present in all the profiles, and is an important factor affecting the genesis of the soil. Aeolian sand of different ages was possibly distributed and deposited during dry phases in the Quaternary. The influence of aeolian sand on soil formation was evaluated on the basis of mineralogy, grain size distribution, surface characteristics and undulatory extinction of quartz grains as well as soil morphology. The weathering products of different origin were subsequently mixed in situ by bioturbation. The present soil mantle is a product of a number of processes associated with climatic changes in the past, the present climate and mixtures of parent materials of different origin

  9. Telephone survey to investigate relationships between onychectomy or onychectomy technique and house soiling in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, Amanda F; Larson, Mandy; Baldwin, Claudia J; Petersen, Christine

    2016-09-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether associations existed between onychectomy or onychectomy technique and house soiling in cats. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SAMPLE 281 owners of 455 cats in Polk County, Iowa, identified via a list of randomly selected residential phone numbers of cat owners in that region. PROCEDURES A telephone survey was conducted to collect information from cat owners on factors hypothesized a priori to be associated with house soiling, including cat sex, reproductive status, medical history, and onychectomy history. When cats that had undergone onychectomy were identified, data were collected regarding the cat's age at the time of the procedure and whether a carbon dioxide laser (CDL) had been used. Information on history of house soiling behavior (urinating or defecating outside the litter box) was also collected. RESULTS Onychectomy technique was identified as a risk factor for house soiling. Cats for which a non-CDL technique was used had a higher risk of house soiling than cats for which the CDL technique was used. Cats that had undergone onychectomy and that lived in a multicat (3 to 5 cats) household were more than 3 times as likely to have house soiled as were single-housed cats with intact claws. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this cross-sectional study suggested that use of the CDL technique for onychectomy could decrease the risk of house soiling by cats relative to the risk associated with other techniques. This and other findings can be used to inform the decisions of owners and veterinarians when considering elective onychectomy for cats.

  10. Investigating Turkish Primary School Students' Interest in Science by Using Their Self-Generated Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmakci, Gultekin; Sevindik, Hatice; Pektas, Meryem; Uysal, Asli; Kole, Fatma; Kavak, Gamze

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports on an attempt to investigate Turkish primary school students' interest in science by using their self-generated questions. We investigated students' interest in science by analyzing 1704 self-generated science-related questions. Among them, 826 questions were submitted to a popular science magazine called Science and Children. Such a self-selected sample may represent a group of students who have a higher level of motivation to seek sources of information outside their formal education and have more access to resources than the students of low social classes. To overcome this problem, 739 students were asked to write a question that they wanted to learn from a scientist and as a result 878 questions were gathered. Those students were selected from 13 different schools at 9 cities in Turkey. These schools were selected to represent a mixture of socioeconomic areas and also to cover different students' profile. Students' questions were classified into two main categories: the field of interest and the cognitive level of the question. The results point to the popularity of biology, astrophysics, nature of scientific inquiry, technology and physics over other science areas, as well as indicating a difference in interest according to gender, grade level and the setting in which the questions were asked. However, our study suggests that only considering questions submitted to informal learning environments, such as popular science magazines or Ask-A-Scientist Internet sites has limitations and deficiencies. Other methodologies of data collection also need to be considered in designing teaching and school science curriculum to meet students' needs and interest. The findings from our study tend to challenge existing thinking from other studies. Our results show that self-generated questions asked in an informal and a formal setting have different patterns. Some aspects of students' self-generated questions and their implications for policy, science

  11. Investigation of potential for occurrence of molten soil displacement events during in situ vitrification of combustible wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.S.; Strachan, C.W.; Luey, J.

    1993-02-01

    Computer simulations are used to investigate the application of in situ vitrification (ISV) for processing contaminated soil containing high loadings of solid, compressible waste material, typical of landfills and solid waste trenches. Specifically, these simulations predict whether significant displacement of molten soil, due to large, 1 to 2 m diameter, gas bubbles rising up through the ISV melt, are likely to occur during processing of combustible waste-loaded sites. These bubbles are believed to originate from high-pressure regions below the melt caused by vaporization of water and gases generated by the combustion, volatilization, or pyrolyzation of combustible materials in the waste. Simulations were run using the TOUGH2 computer code to predict pressures underneath the ISV melt TOUGH2 is an unsaturated groundwater modeling code capable of treating non-isothermal problems. These simulations include moving melt front and simple pyrolysis models and investigate how the gas pressure in the soil below the melt is affected by melt progression rate, soil permeability, combustible and impermeable material loading. The following, conclusions have been drawn based on the TOUGH2 simulations

  12. Use of soil moisture dynamics and patterns at different spatio-temporal scales for the investigation of subsurface flow processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Blume

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Spatial patterns as well as temporal dynamics of soil moisture have a major influence on runoff generation. The investigation of these dynamics and patterns can thus yield valuable information on hydrological processes, especially in data scarce or previously ungauged catchments. The combination of spatially scarce but temporally high resolution soil moisture profiles with episodic and thus temporally scarce moisture profiles at additional locations provides information on spatial as well as temporal patterns of soil moisture at the hillslope transect scale. This approach is better suited to difficult terrain (dense forest, steep slopes than geophysical techniques and at the same time less cost-intensive than a high resolution grid of continuously measuring sensors. Rainfall simulation experiments with dye tracers while continuously monitoring soil moisture response allows for visualization of flow processes in the unsaturated zone at these locations. Data was analyzed at different spacio-temporal scales using various graphical methods, such as space-time colour maps (for the event and plot scale and binary indicator maps (for the long-term and hillslope scale. Annual dynamics of soil moisture and decimeter-scale variability were also investigated. The proposed approach proved to be successful in the investigation of flow processes in the unsaturated zone and showed the importance of preferential flow in the Malalcahuello Catchment, a data-scarce catchment in the Andes of Southern Chile. Fast response times of stream flow indicate that preferential flow observed at the plot scale might also be of importance at the hillslope or catchment scale. Flow patterns were highly variable in space but persistent in time. The most likely explanation for preferential flow in this catchment is a combination of hydrophobicity, small scale heterogeneity in rainfall due to redistribution in the canopy and strong gradients in unsaturated conductivities leading to

  13. Investigating the prevalence of personality disorders and its relationship with personality traits among students

    OpenAIRE

    Davod Ghaderi; Ali Mostafaei; Saadi Bayazidi; Mahdi Shahnazari

    2016-01-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the prevalence of personality disorders and its relationship with personality traits among students. This research was among epidemiological-correlational descriptive studies. Method: For this purpose, 389 male students were selected via a multi-stage cluster sampling method. All subjects completed Millon's personality disorder (1987) and five-factor personality Costaand McCrae's questionnaires (1989). Results: The results showed that the prevalence ...

  14. Investigation of the relationship between students' problem solving and conceptual understanding of electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobanoglu Aktan, Derya

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between students' qualitative problem solving and conceptual understanding of electricity. For the analysis data were collected from observations of group problem solving, from their homework artifacts, and from semi-structured interviews. The data for six undergraduate students were analyzed by qualitative research methods. The students in the study were found to use tools (such as computer simulations and formulas) differently from one another, and they made different levels of interpretations for the electricity representations. Consequently each student had different problem solving strategies. The students exhibited a wide range of levels of understanding of the electricity concepts. It was found that students' conceptual understandings and their problem solving strategies were closely linked with one another. The students who tended to use multiple tools to make high level interpretations for representations to arrive at a single solution exhibited a higher level of understanding than the students who tended to use tools to make low level interpretations to reach a solution. This study demonstrates a relationship between conceptual understanding and problem solving strategies. Similar to the results of the existing research on students' quantitative problem solving, it was found that students were able to give correct answers to some problems without fully understanding the concepts behind the problem. However, some problems required a conceptual understanding in order for a student to arrive at a correct answer. An implication of this study is that careful selection of qualitative questions is necessary for capturing high levels of conceptual understanding. Additionally, conceptual understanding among some types of problem solvers can be improved by activities or tasks that can help them reflect on their problem solving strategies and the tools they use.

  15. Investigation of Exercise Self - Efficacy and Stage of Exercise Behavior Change in University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celal ORAL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study was to investigate self - efficacy and stage of exercise behavior change in students who were studying in school of physical education and sport (PES and students who were studying in other faculty and departments (OFD in Akdeniz University and to evaluate their sport participation habits. Par ticipants were 360 students who were studying in Akdeniz University. Stage of Exercise Behavior Change Questionnaire and Exercise Self - Efficacy Questionnaire were applied to the participants in classroom environment. Results: Results of statistical analyse s revealed that , 27.5 % of men and 19.2% of women were in preparation stage of exercise behavior. There were no significant differences between genders ( p>.05. According to the result of exercise self - efficacy analyses, there were no significant differen ces between male and female students ( p>.05. When examining exercise self - efficacy in student studying different department, there were significant differences between the PES and OFD students (p<.05. Discussion and According to the results o f present study, it was conclude that there were no significant gender differences in both exercise self - efficacy and stage of exercise behavior change. It was found that, PES students had significantly higher score in exercise self - efficacy and in highe r stage of exercise behavior than OFD students.

  16. Investigation of the Effectiveness of the Story-Map Method on Reading Comprehension Skills among Students with Mental Retardation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikdogan, Necla; Kargin, Tevhide

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the story-map technique on reading comprehension skills among students with mild mental retardation. The research group consisted of 14 students with mild mental retardation. The students in the research group were chosen from students who attended to an elementary school and a…

  17. An Investigation of Zimbabwe High School Chemistry Students' Laboratory Work-Based Images of the Nature of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vhurumuku, Elaosi; Holtman, Lorna; Mikalsen, Oyvind; Kolsto, Stein D.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the proximal and distal images of the nature of science (NOS) that A-level students develop from their participation in chemistry laboratory work. We also explored the nature of the interactions among the students' proximal and distal images of the NOS and students' participation in laboratory work. Students' views of the…

  18. Geophysical techniques for reconnaissance investigations of soils and surficial deposits in mountainous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C.G.; Doolittle, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two techniques were assessed for their capabilities in reconnaissance studies of soil characteristics: depth to the water table and depth to bedrock beneath surficial deposits in mountainous terrain. Ground-penetrating radar had the best near-surface resolution in the upper 2 m of the profile and provided continuous interpretable imagery of soil profiles and bedrock surfaces. Where thick colluvium blankets side slopes, the GPR could not consistently define the bedrock interface. In areas with clayey or shaley sediments, the GPR is also more limited in defining depth and is less reliable. Seismic refraction proved useful in determining the elevation of the water table and depth to bedrock, regardless of thickness of overlying material, but could not distinguish soil-profile characteristics.-from Authors

  19. INVESTIGATION OF HEAVY METAL CONTAMINATION IN THE ROADSIDE SOIL AT MORENA DISTRICT IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Laxmi Kant Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Pollution of natural environment due to release of heavy metals from various sources is a widespread problem throughout the world. This study explains the effect of heavy metal contaminants in Roadside soil of Morena district. Twelve air dried surface soil samples were collected from 50cm – 1m (point A) and twelve from 30m (point B) away from the roadside along a road with a distance of 50 km. Heavy metals were found in both points with highest concentration at 50cm – 1m (point A). Roadside s...

  20. Application of instrument neutron-activation analysis in a comparative investigation of soil samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrov, D. (Institute po Kriminalistika i Kriminologiya, Sofia (Bulgaria))

    1983-01-01

    A quantitative measurement of the contents of 17 chemical elements in soil samples, collected using the existing network from the surface of five cultivated areas in Bulgaria has been carried out. The values obtained have been used to calculate the evaluations psub(i) of the dispersions and for the ordering of the chemical elements according to their importance in criminology. The possibility for criminological comparison of single soil samples using the contents of the five most important elements - Th, Fe, Sc, Ce and Mn has been shown.

  1. Application of instrument neutron-activation analysis in a comparative investigation of soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, D.

    1983-01-01

    A quantitative measurement of the contents of 17 chemical elements in soil samples, collected using the existing network from the surface of five cultivated areas in Bulgaria has been carried out. The values obtained have been used to calculate the evaluations psub(i) of the dispersions and for the ordering of the chemical elements according to their importance in criminology. The possibility for criminological comparison of single soil samples using the contents of the five most important elements - Th, Fe, Sc, Ce and Mn has been shown. (author)

  2. A Molecular Investigation of Soil Organic Carbon Composition, Variability, and Spatial Distribution Across an Alpine Catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, H. T.; Lawrence, C. R.; Winnick, M.; Druhan, J. L.; Williams, K. H.; Maher, K.; Rainaldi, G. R.; McCormick, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    The cycling of carbon through soils is one of the least understood aspects of the global carbon cycle and represents a key uncertainty in the prediction of land-surface response to global warming. Thus, there is an urgent need for advanced characterization of soil organic carbon (SOC) to develop and evaluate a new generation of soil carbon models. We hypothesize that shifts in SOC composition and spatial distribution as a function of soil depth can be used to constrain rates of transformation between the litter layer and the deeper subsoil (extending to a depth of approximately 1 m). To evaluate the composition and distribution of SOC, we collected soil samples from East River, a shale-dominated watershed near Crested Butte, CO, and characterized relative changes in SOC species as a function of depth using elemental analysis (EA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and bulk C X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our results show that total organic carbon (TOC) decreases with depth, and high total inorganic carbon (TIC) content was found in deeper soils (after 75 cm), a characteristic of the bedrock (shale). The distribution of aliphatic C relative to the parent material generally decreases with depth and that polysaccharide can be a substantial component of SOC at various depths. On the other hand, the relative distribution of aromatic C, traditionally viewed as recalcitrant, only makes up a very small part of SOC regardless of depth. These observations confirm that molecular structure is not the only determinant of SOC turnover rate. To study other contributors to SOC decomposition, we studied changes in the spatial correlation of SOC and minerals using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). We found that aromatics mostly locate on the surface of small soil aggregates (1-10 μm). Polysaccharides and proteins, both viewed as labile traditionally, are more evenly distributed over the interior of the

  3. An investigation of student thinking regarding calorimetry, entropy, and the second law of thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Warren Michael

    This thesis constitutes an investigation into student understanding of concepts in thermal physics in an introductory calculus-based university physics course. Nearly 90% of students enrolled in the course had previous exposure to thermodynamics concepts in chemistry and/or high-school physics courses. The two major thrusts of this work are (1) an exploration of student approaches to solving calorimetry problems involving two substances with differing specific heats, and (2) a careful probing of student ideas regarding certain aspects of entropy and the second law of thermodynamics. We present extensive free-response, interview, and multiple-choice data regarding students' ideas, collected both before and after instruction from a diverse set of course semesters and instructors. For topics in calorimetry, we found via interviews that students frequently get confused by, or tend to overlook, the detailed proportional reasoning or algebraic procedures that could lead to correct solutions. Instead, students often proceed with semi-intuitive reasoning that at times may be productive, but more often leads to inconsistencies and non-uniform conceptual understanding. Our investigation of student thinking regarding entropy suggests that prior to instruction, students have consistent and distinct patterns of incorrect or incomplete responses that often persist despite deliberate and focused efforts by the instructor. With modified instruction based on research-based materials, significant learning gains were observed on certain key concepts, e.g., that the entropy of the universe increases for all non-ideal processes. The methodology for our work is described, the data are discussed and analyzed, and a description is given of goals for future work in this area.

  4. Growing Minority Student Interest in Earth and Space Science with Suborbital and Space-related Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation describes the transformative impact of student involvement in suborbital and Cubesat investigations under the MECSAT program umbrella at Medgar Evers College (MEC). The programs evolved from MUSPIN, a NASA program serving minority institutions. The MUSPIN program supported student internships for the MESSENGER and New Horizons missions at the Applied Physics Lab at John Hopkins University. The success of this program motivated the formation of smaller-scale programs at MEC to engage a wider group of minority students using an institutional context. The programs include an student-instrument BalloonSAT project, ozone investigations using sounding vehicles and a recently initiated Cubesat program involving other colleges in the City University of New York (CUNY). The science objectives range from investigations of atmospheric profiles, e.g. temperature, humidity, pressure, and CO2 to ozone profiles in rural and urban areas including comparisons with Aura instrument retrievals to ionospheric scintillation experiments for the Cubesat project. Through workshops and faculty collaborations, the evolving programs have mushroomed to include the development of parallel programs with faculty and students at other minority institutions both within and external to CUNY. The interdisciplinary context of these programs has stimulated student interest in Earth and Space Science and includes the use of best practices in retention and pipelining of underrepresented minority students in STEM disciplines. Through curriculum integration initiatives, secondary impacts are also observed supported by student blogs, social networking sites, etc.. The program continues to evolve including related student internships at Goddard Space Flight Center and the development of a CUNY-wide interdisciplinary team of faculty targeting research opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students in Atmospheric Science, Space Weather, Remote Sensing and Astrobiology primarily for

  5. Investigation of Hg uptake and transport between paddy soil and rice seeds combining Hg isotopic composition and speciation

    OpenAIRE

    C. Feng; Z. Pedrero; P. Li; B. Du; X. Feng; M. Monperrus; E. Tessier; S. Berail; D. Amouroux

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Human consumption of rice constitutes a potential toxicological risk in mercury (Hg) polluted areas such as Hg mining regions in China. It is recognized to be an important source of Hg for the local human diet considering the efficient bioaccumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) in rice seed. To assess Hg sources and uptake pathways to the rice plants, Hg speciation and isotopic composition were investigated in rice seeds and their corresponding paddy soils from different locations withi...

  6. Programmed Lab Experiments for Biochemical Investigation of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules in Rhizospheric Soil Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievas, Fiorela L.; Bogino, Pablo C.; Giordano, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Biochemistry courses in the Department of Molecular Biology at the National University of Río Cuarto, Argentina, are designed for undergraduate students in biology, microbiology, chemistry, agronomy, and veterinary medicine. Microbiology students typically have previous coursework in general, analytical, and organic chemistry. Programmed sequences…

  7. Investigation of vegetation history of buried chernozem soils using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vysloužilová, B.; Ertlen, D.; Šefrna, L.; Novák, T.; Virágh, K.; Rué, M.; Campaner, A.; Dreslerová, Dagmar; Schwartz, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 365, 16 April (2015), s. 203-211 ISSN 1040-6182 Institutional support: RVO:67985912 Keywords : Holocene * paleopedology * paleoecology * near-infrared spectroscopy * chernozem * buried paleosol Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 2.067, year: 2015

  8. Soil investigations for jack-ups, pile design, and fixed platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, E R

    1977-05-01

    With the exception of dynamically positioned vessels, all stationary structures used by the petroleum industry in the sea are, in one way or another, connected to the seabed to ensure their immobility or stability. Consequently, the ability of the marine soils to support the imposed loads must be determined to allow a safe and economic foundation design and method of structure installation. Two main types of tests are being carried out offshore more or less on a routine basis: the cone penetration and the in-situ vane. The standard cone penetrometer testing method consists essentially of an electric penetrometer which is pushed into the seabed at a constant speed by an hydraulic piston. Remotely operated from the sea surface, the cone penetrates into the ground and the resistance that the soil exerts against the tip and sides of the cone are separately and continuously measured and recorded. The resulting continuous graph provides a detailed picture of the soil profile. In addition, soils data currently required for foundation design and installation can be derived from the test results based on existing correlations.

  9. Microbial Chlorination of Organic Matter in Forest Soil: Investigation Using Cl-36-Chloride and Its Methodology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rohlenová, Jana; Gryndler, Milan; Forczek, Sándor; Fuksová, Květoslava; Handová, V.; Matucha, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 10 (2009), s. 3652-3655 ISSN 0013-936X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/05/0636 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : BOUND CHLORINE * CHLOROACETIC ACIDS * HUMIC SUBSTANCES Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science Impact factor: 4.630, year: 2009

  10. Investigation of soil potentially contaminated by monazite processing by-products: case study and suggestion for protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briquet, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    This work describes a characterization of soil potentially contaminated by monazite chemical processing residues. For case study it was selected a country area of Sao Paulo State, containing a monazite processing by-product depository. The main objective was to evaluate the soil contamination in an area of approximately 18,000 m 2 and esteem the total effective dose equivalent. During the development of this work, it was verified necessity of an investigation protocol, in order to standardize actions of regulatory authorities. A survey of the applicable legislation was carried out, as a tool to support decision making process. The methodology was based on the 'Manual de Gerenciamento de Areas Contaminadas' of CETESB (2001 a), a national document to guide studies of contaminated areas. It was also considered the 'Multi Agency Radiation Survey and Site Manual Investigation - MARSSIM' (2000), a U.S. government document that provides a nationally consensus approach to conduct investigations at potentially contaminated sites. The developed activities had been divided in three general stages: data-collecting and information on the place, identification of soil contamination and its distribution until the depth of 3 meters and evaluation of the associated dose. The evaluation of the radiological impact was carried out considering the worst-case use scenario (most restrictive future use), standing out that the final decision fits to the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN. CNEN's scope of responsibility includes determining the site release criteria and the cleanup necessity. (author)

  11. Investigations involving oxidation-reduction (REDOX) pretreatment in conjunction with biological remediation of contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montemagno, C.D.; Peters, R.W.; Tyree, A.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidation-reduction (REDOX) reactions are among the most important reactions involved in the environmental engineering field. Oxidation is a reaction in which the oxidation state of the treated compound is increased, i.e., the material loses electrons. Reduction involves the addition of a chemical (reducing) agent which lowers the oxidation state of a substance, i.e., the material gains electrons. Both processes of oxidation and reduction occur together. All REDOX reactions are thermodynamically based. There are a number of oxidizing agents which have been reported in the technical literature for treatment of refractory organic compounds. Common oxidizing agents include: hydrogen peroxide, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and combinations thereof, such as UV/ozone and UV/peroxide. A gradient of REDOX reactions is possible, depending on such factors as the oxidation-reduction reaction conditions, the availability of electron donors and acceptors, and the nature of the organic compounds involved. A review of the technical literature revealed that the majority of the oxidation-reduction applications have been in the areas of wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation, with very little attention devoted to the potential of using REDOX technologies for remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils. In this particular study, feasibility studies were performed on gasoline- contaminated soil. These studies focused on three major phases: 1) containment of the contamination by addition of tailoring agents to the soil, 2) biological remediation either performed in situ or on-site (using a slurry reactor system), and 3) pretreatment of the contaminated soils using REDOX systems, prior to biological remediation. This particular paper focuses on the third phase of the project, aimed at ''softening'' the refractory organics resulting in the formation of organic compounds which are more amenable to biological degradation. This paper focuses its attention on the use of

  12. Further investigations on the resilience capacity of Taraxacum officinale Weber growing on mine soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleci, Laura; Bini, Claudio; Spiandorello, Massimo; Wahsha, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    Heavy metal accumulation produces significant physiological and biochemical responses in vascular plants. Plants growing on abandoned mine sites are of particular interest, since they are genetically tolerant to high metal concentrations. In this work we examined the effect of heavy metals (HM) on the morphology of T. officinale growing on mine soils, with the following objectives: - to determine the fate of HM within the soil-plant system; - to highlight possible damage at anatomical and cytological level; - to assess the resilience capacity of Taraxacum officinale after three years of pot cultivation. Wild specimens of Taraxacum officinale Web, with their soil clod, were gathered from four sites with different contamination levels by heavy metals (Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn) in the abandoned Imperina Valley mine (Northeast Italy). Plants were cultivated in pots at the botanical garden of the University of Florence (HBF), and appeared macroscopically not affected by toxic signals (e.g. reduced growth, leaf necrosis) possibly induced by soil HM concentration. Leaves and roots taken at the same growing season were observed by light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Light microscopy observations show a clear difference in the cell organization of not-contaminated and contaminated samples. The unpolluted samples present a well organized palisade tissue and spongy photosynthetic parenchyma. Samples from contaminated sites, instead, present a palisade parenchyma less organized, and a reduction of leaf thickness proportional to HM concentration. The poor structural organisations, and the reduced foliar thickness of the contaminated plants, are related to soil contamination. Differences in roots micromorphology concern the cortical parenchyma. Moreover, all the samples examined present mycorrhiza. Ultrastructure observations of the parenchyma cells show mitochondrial structure alteration, with lacking or reduced cristae of the internal membrane at increasing

  13. Investigations involving oxidation-reduction (REDOX) pretreatment in conjunction with biological remediation of contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montemagno, C. D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Peters, R. W.; Tyree, A.

    1991-07-01

    Oxidation-reduction (REDOX) reactions are among the most important reactions involved in the environmental engineering field. Oxidation is a reaction in which the oxidation state of the treated compound is increased, i.e., the material loses electrons. Reduction involves the addition of a chemical (reducing) agent which lowers the oxidation state of a substance, i.e., the material gains electrons. Both processes of oxidation and reduction occur together. All REDOX reactions are thermodynamically based. There are a number of oxidizing agents which have been reported in the technical literature for treatment of refractory organic compounds. Common oxidizing agents include: hydrogen peroxide, ozone, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and combinations thereof, such as UV/ozone and UV/peroxide. A gradient of REDOX reactions is possible, depending on such factors as the oxidation-reduction reaction conditions, the availability of electron donors and acceptors, and the nature of the organic compounds involved. A review of the technical literature revealed that the majority of the oxidation-reduction applications have been in the areas of wastewater treatment and groundwater remediation, with very little attention devoted to the potential of using REDOX technologies for remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated soils. In this particular study, feasibility studies were performed on gasoline- contaminated soil. These studies focused on three major phases: 1) containment of the contamination by addition of tailoring agents to the soil, 2) biological remediation either performed in situ or on-site (using a slurry reactor system), and 3) pretreatment of the contaminated soils using REDOX systems, prior to biological remediation. This particular paper focuses on the third phase of the project, aimed at ''softening'' the refractory organics resulting in the formation of organic compounds which are more amenable to biological degradation. This paper focuses its attention on the use of

  14. Investigations of dynamic interactions coupled by soil between neighbouring nuclear power plants of high mass in case of seismic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthees, W.; Magiera, G.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitivity study for the interaction effects for adjacent structures of nuclear power plants i.e. for main buildings and auxiliary buildings has been performed due to horizontal seismic excitation. An interaction measuring rule for response spectra has been defined as the ratio of amplitude of response calculated inclusive the auxiliary building to the amplitude calculated without the auxiliary building in respect to the proper eigen-frequencies. The calculations of the three-dimensional effects are approximated with the program FLUSH. The accuracy of the achievable response herewith calculated is proven in comparison with other suitable methods. The interaction measuring rule is determined by a parameter investigation including the mathematical model consisting of the soil, the main building, and the auxiliary building. The following assumptions are asserted: 1. the soil characteristics are temporarily constant. Ignorance of the accuracy of the realistic i.e. stress depending soil values is encountered by variation of the decisive characteristics within their applicable band-width. 2. The fineness of the mathematical-mechanical modelling for the structural systems i.e. the number of the degrees of freedom is limited to a minimum. Attention is hereby paid that the eigen-frequencies of the main building as well as the eigen-frequencies of the layered soil system in the range of 0 to 10 Hz are computed with sufficient accuracy. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Preliminary Investigations of Some Engineering Properties for the Use of Different Soils in Waste Disposal Cover System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Rahman, R.O.

    2008-01-01

    Near surface disposal facilities are designed to provide long term isolation for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes from the human environment by means of multi-barriers system, which consists of a combination of natural and engineering barriers that act passively to isolate the waste. Adequate and reliable multi-layer engineered cover system is required by the long-term safety concept for waste disposal to control moisture and percolation, promote surface water runoff, minimize erosion, and prevent direct exposure to the waste. In this work, investigations of some engineering properties that are utilized in hydrological and geotechnical design of capillary barrier have been estimated for different local soil textures. Measurements of the physical properties of the studied soil textures have been conducted to determine their suitability for the utilization in engineered cover system for near surface disposal facility. The soil water characteristics have been estimated from the measured physical properties using Vereeckens pedotransfer functions. The critical pressure head for different combinations of soils have been evaluated and the thickness of the finer layer has been calculated. Also some mechanical properties, angle of internal friction and the cohesion, have been estimated using pedotransfer function. The pre-compression stresses have been evaluated and the slope stability of the designed barriers has been quantified by comparing the factor of safety for each studied case for different slope values

  16. An Investigation of Secondary Students' Mental Models of Climate Change and the Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Begoña; Sesto, Vanessa; García-Rodeja, Isabel

    2018-03-01

    There are several studies dealing with students' conceptions on climate change, but most of them refer to understanding before instruction. In contrast, this study investigates students' conceptions and describes the levels of sophistication of their mental models on climate change and the greenhouse effect. The participants were 40 secondary students (grade 7) in Spain. As a method of data collection, a questionnaire was designed with open-ended questions focusing on the mechanism, causes, and actions that could be useful in reducing climate change. Students completed the same questionnaire before and after instruction. The students' conceptions and mental models were identified by an inductive and iterative analysis of the participants' explanations. With regard to the students' conceptions, the results show that they usually link climate change to an increase in temperature, and they tend to mention, even after instruction, generic actions to mitigate climate change, such as not polluting. With regard to the students' mental models, the results show an evolution of models with little consistency and coherence, such as the models on level 1, towards higher levels of sophistication. The paper concludes with educational implications proposed for solving learning difficulties regarding the greenhouse effect and climate change.

  17. Helping students make meaning of authentic investigations: findings from a student–teacher–scientist partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Erin

    2013-01-01

    As student–teacher–scientist partnerships become more widespread, there is a need for research to understand the roles assumed by scientists and teachers as they interact with students in general and in inquiry learning environments in particular. Although teacher roles during inquiry learning have been studied, there is a paucity of research about the roles that scientists assume in their interactions with students. Socio-cultural perspectives on learning emphasize social interaction as a means for students to make meaning of scientific ideas. Thus, this naturalistic study of classroom discourse aims to explore the ways scientists and teachers help high school students make meaning during authentic inquiry investigations. Conversational analysis is conducted of video recordings of discussions between students and teachers and students and scientists from two instances of a student–teacher–scientist partnership program. A social semiotic analytic framework is used to interpret the actions of scientists and teachers. The results indicate a range of common and distinct roles for scientists and teachers with respect to the conceptual, social, pedagogical, and epistemological aspects of meaning making. While scientists provided conceptual and epistemological support related to their scientific expertise, such as explaining scientific phenomena or aspects of the nature of science, teachers played a critical role in ensuring students' access to this knowledge. The results have implications for managing the division of labor between scientists and teachers in partnership programs. PMID:23828722

  18. Use of tritium-labeled PCBs for investigation of PCBs biodegradation by soil bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.A.; Djuraeva, G.T.; Takhtobiri, K.S.; Yadgarov, H.T.; Zinovev, P. V.; Abdukarimov, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The method for tritium labelling of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was developed. The strains of soil bacteria - destructors of chloro organic compounds was studied with the help of test-system based on the using of tritium-labeled PCBs. The strains of bacteria were grown on the agar synthetic medium and then were introduced into the synthetic medium containing tritium-labeled mixture of PCBs (commercial mark - SOVOL) as alone source of carbon. The samples were analysed after one and two months period of incubation. PCBs were extracted by hexane from fraction of bacteria and fraction of cultural medium and radioactivity was measured. The samples were analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) with following radioautography. Additionally samples were analyzed by gas chromatography. It was found that all selected strains survived in the medium with PCBs as alone source of carbon and bacteria accumulated PCBs from cultural medium. Accumulation of PCBs by strains of bacteria was different. The TLC analysis detected additional compounds labeled by tritium, that prove the degradation of PCBs in presence of bacteria. The gas chromatography analysis of cultural medium and bacteria detected redistribution in the system and qualitative changes of PCBs in bacteria. The strains of bacteria also were grown in model condition on the soil with tritium labeled PCBs. We found that some strains effectively destroy PCBs with decreasing level of tritium label in the soil. The using of tritium labeled PCBs' allows to introduce precise quantitative characteristics for study of accumulation and biodegradation PCBs by soil bacteria strains. Developed test-system is very useful tool for selection of new strains of soil bacteria - destructors of PCBs

  19. Radioecological investigations in the food-chain air-soil-vine-wine. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.

    1989-10-01

    This Part 2 presents all of the results, including the harvest of 1986 and 1987; it thus describes the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. H-3, C-14, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were determined in soil, vine leaves, grapes and wine at different locations. In some of the samples Cs-134, K-40 and Ra-226 were also measured. Site-specific transfer factors were calculated for Sr-90 and for the Cs radionuclides. The mean content of Cs-137 before Chernobyl (after Chernogyl) was about 4 (9) Bq/kg dry matter in soil (top 30 cm), 0.07 (3) Bq/kg fresh matter in leaves, 0.02 (0.4) Bq/kg FM in grapes, and 0.008 (0.9) Bq/l in wine. As comapred to 1986 distinctly lower levels were found in leaves, grapes and wine from 1987. The content of Cs-134 was about half that of Cs-137 in 1986. Due to its shorter half-life Cs-134 had fallen below detection limit in many of the 1987 samples. Mean Sr-90 levels were 1-2 Bq/kg in soil and in leaves (dry matter and fresh matter, respectively), 19-56 mBq/kg in grapes, and 3-11 mBq/l in wine. Samples obtained in the fall of 1986 showed no increase of Sr-90 in soil and leaves, whereas a slight increase was found in grapes and wine as a consequence of Chernobyl. Site-specific influences such als soil parameters, climate, cultivation, vinification and differences between years had no pronounced effects on transfer factors. No influence of the nuclear power station Neckarwestheim has been found in any of the radionuclides. (orig./HP) [de

  20. Radioecological investigations in the food-chain air-soil-vine-wine. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, A.

    1989-01-01

    This Part 2 presents all of the results, including the harvest of 1986 and 1987; it thus describes the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. H-3, C-14, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were determined in soil, vine leaves, grapes and wine at different locations. In some of the samples Cs-134, K-40 and Ra-226 were also measured. Site-specific transfer factors were calculated for Sr-90 and for the Cs radionuclides. The mean content of Cs-137 before Chernobyl (after Chernobyl) was about 4 (9) Bq/kg dry matter in soil (top 30 cm), 0.07 (3) Bq/kg fresh matter in leaves, 0.02 (0.4) Bq/kg FM in grapes, and 0.008 (0.9) Bq/l in wine. As compared to 1986 distinctly lower levels were found in leaves, grapes and wine from 1987. The content of Cs-134 was about half that of Cs-137 in 1986. Due to its shorter half-life Cs-134 had fallen below detection limit in many of the 1987 samples. Mean Sr-90 levels were 1-2 Bq/kg in soil and in leaves (dry matter and fresh matter, respectively), 19-56 mBq/kg in grapes, and 3-11 mBq/l in wine. Samples obtained in the fall of 1986 showed no increase of Sr-90 in soil and leaves, whereas a slight increase was found in grapes and wine as a consequence of Chernobyl. Site-specific influences such als soil parameters, climate, cultivation, vinification and differences between years had no pronounced effects on transfer factors. No influence of the nuclear power station Neckarwestheim has been found in any of the radionuclides. (orig./HP) [de

  1. An investigation of difficulties experienced by students developing unified modelling language (UML) class and sequence diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sien, Ven Yu

    2011-12-01

    Object-oriented analysis and design (OOAD) is not an easy subject to learn. There are many challenges confronting students when studying OOAD. Students have particular difficulty abstracting real-world problems within the context of OOAD. They are unable to effectively build object-oriented (OO) models from the problem domain because they essentially do not know "what" to model. This article investigates the difficulties and misconceptions undergraduate students have with analysing systems using unified modelling language analysis class and sequence diagrams. These models were chosen because they represent important static and dynamic aspects of the software system under development. The results of this study will help students produce effective OO models, and facilitate software engineering lecturers design learning materials and approaches for introductory OOAD courses.

  2. Investigating the Impact of Schools' Open Space on Learning and Educational Achievement of Elementary Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Gilavand

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background It is obvious that most of informal learnings of social skills and constructive plays occur in school yards and play-fields where children spend much of their non-official time of teaching. This study aimed to investigate the impact of schools' open space on learning and educational achievement of elementary students in Ahvaz, Southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods At a cross-sectional study, 210 students were selected randomly as sample of study. Data collection tools included Hermance’s achievement motivation questionnaire and researcher-constructed questionnaire (observation checklist to examine the physical parameters of learning schools' open space and interviews with students. Data of study were analyzed in SPSS- 21 software. Results Results of this study showed that schools' open space has a significant impact on learning and academic achievement of elementary school students in Ahvaz- Iran (P

  3. Investigating Student Use of Technology for Engaged Citizenship in A Global Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad M. Maguth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study undertook a five month qualitative investigation into technology use amongst twelve high school social studies students in two different sites in the Midwestern United States. This study examined students’ use of technology and its relationship to three dimensions of citizenship in a global age: understand global events, issues, and perspectives, participate in global networks to communicate and collaborate with global audiences, and advocate on global problems and issues to think and act globally. Collecting data through semi-structured student interviews, online-threaded discussions and document analysis, I triangulated findings, and employed a qualitative approach. The study finds a relationship between student participants’ use of technology and their serving as engaged citizenship in a global age. In using technology, students accessed international news and information, joined global networks to communicate and collaborate with global audiences, and produced digital content for international audiences.

  4. Investigating student difficulties on integral calculus based on critical thinking aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Nursyahidah

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Students of Mathematics education often struggle with integration problem, but yet the root of the problem related to critical thinking is rarely investigated. This article reports research where the first-year students of Mathematics Education of PGRI University Semarang were given an integral problem, then individually they were interviewed related to the answer they have made. The findings of students' difficulties in working on integration problem were confirmed through several questions in the interview which aimed to uncover their critical thinking process related to concepts, procedures, and problem solving. This study shows that student difficulties in Integration by disc method such as failure in identifying radius of a rotary object, specify partition, and integration bounds are closely related to their failure to think critically related to concept, skills, and problem solving aspects of critical thinking.

  5. Investigating Elementary Teachers' Thinking About and Learning to Notice Students' Science Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Melissa Jo

    Children naturally use observations and everyday thinking to construct explanations as to why phenomena happen in the world. Science instruction can benefit by starting with these ideas to help children build coherent scientific understandings of how the physical world works. To do so, science teaching must involve attending to students' ideas so that those ideas become the basis for learning. Yet while science education reform requires teachers to pay close attention to their students' ideas, we know little about what teachers think this means in practice. To examine this issue, my dissertation research is two-fold. First, I examine teacher thinking by investigating how teachers understand what it means to pay attention to students' science ideas. Specifically, using new digital technology, three participating teachers captured moments of student thinking in the midst of instruction. Analysis of these moments reveals that teachers capture many different kinds of moments containing students' ideas and think about students' science ideas in different ways at different times. In particular, these three teachers most often think about students' ideas as being (a) from authority, (b) from experience, and (c) under construction. Second, I examine teacher learning through the development of an innovative science teaching video club model. The model differs from previous research on video clubs in several key ways in an attempt to focus teachers on student thinking in a sustained way. I investigate the ways in which this model was effective for engaging teachers in noticing and making sense of their students' science ideas during one implementation. Results indicate that teachers talked about student thinking early, often, and in meaningful ways. Science education leaders have recognized the potential of science teaching video clubs as a form of professional development, and the model presented in this work promotes the conditions for successful teacher learning. This

  6. The Impacts of Student-, Teacher- and School-Level Factors on Mathematics Achievement: An Exploratory Comparative Investigation of Singaporean Students and the USA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ker, H. W.

    2016-01-01

    Reports from the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) consistently show that there is a substantial gap in average mathematics achievement between Singapore and the USA. This study conducts an exploratory comparative investigation on the multilevel factors influencing the mathematics achievement of students from these two…

  7. Students come to medical schools prepared to cheat: a multi-campus investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukolja Taradi, Sunčana; Taradi, Milan; Knežević, Tin; Đogaš, Zoran

    2010-11-01

    To investigate high school cheating experiences and attitudes towards academic misconduct of freshmen at all four medical schools in Croatia, as a post-communist country in transition, with intention of raising awareness of academic (dis)honesty. Students were given an anonymous questionnaire containing 22 questions on the atmosphere of integrity at their high school, self-reported educational dishonesty, their evaluation of cheating behaviour, and on their expectations about the atmosphere of integrity at their university. All schools of medicine of Croatian universities (Zagreb, Rijeka, Split and Osijek). Descriptive statistics and differences in students' self-reported educational dishonesty, perception of cheating behaviour, and perception of the high school integrity atmosphere. Of the 761 freshmen attending the four medical schools, 508 (67%) completed the questionnaire: 481 Croatian and 27 international students. Of the Croatian respondents, almost all (>99%) self-reported engaging in at least one behaviour of educational dishonesty, and 78% of respondents admitted to having frequently cheated in at least one form of assessed academic misconduct. Only three students admitted to having reported another student for cheating. For most of the questions, there was no significant difference in the responses among Croatian students. However, significant differences were found in most responses between Croatian students and their international counterparts, who were significantly less likely to engage in dishonest behaviours. No individual factor was found to correlate with the incidence of self-admitted dishonest behaviour. Frequent cheaters evaluated academic dishonesty significantly more leniently than those who did not cheat. Academic dishonesty of university students does not begin in higher education; students come to medical schools ready to cheat.

  8. Data Mining Student Answers with Moodle to Investigate Learning Pathways in an Introductory Geohazards Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, S. M.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Colella, H. V.

    2012-12-01

    The recent growth of online learning in higher education is primarily motivated by a desire to (a) increase the availability of learning experiences for learners who cannot, or choose not, to attend traditional face-to-face offerings, (b) assemble and disseminate instructional content more cost-efficiently, or (c) enable instructors to handle more students while maintaining a learning outcome quality that is equivalent to that of comparable face-to-face instruction. However, a less recognized incentive is that online learning also provides an opportunity for data mining, or efficient discovery of non-obvious valuable patterns from a large collection of data, that can be used to investigate learning pathways as opposed to focusing solely on assessing student outcomes. Course management systems that enable online courses provide a means to collect a vast amount of information to analyze students' behavior and the learning process in general. One of the most commonly used is Moodle (modular object-oriented developmental learning environment), a free learning management system that enables creation of powerful, flexible, and engaging online courses and experiences. In order to examine student learning pathways, the online learning modules we are constructing take advantage of Moodle capabilities to provide immediate formative feedback, verifying answers as correct or incorrect and elaborating on knowledge components to guide students towards the correct answer. By permitting multiple attempts in which credit is diminished for each incorrect answer, we provide opportunities to use data mining strategies to assess thousands of students' actions for evidence of problem solving strategies and mastery of concepts. We will show preliminary results from application of this approach to a ~90 student introductory geohazard course that is migrating toward online instruction. We hope more continuous assessment of students' performances will help generate cognitive models that can

  9. [Investigation of the cognition and behavior on drug safety in Beijing middle school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y C; Pan, Y P; Zhang, Y; Pan, Y T; Ding, C Y; Cao, Y; Zhuo, L; Fang, R F; Gao, A Y; Guo, J; Li, A J; Fu, Q; Ma, J; Zhan, S Y

    2017-12-18

    To understand the cognition and behavior of drug safety in Beijing middle school students and provide advice for relevant education. A cross-sectional survey using paper questionnaires was carried out on the student body of nine Beijing middle schools. Multi-stage proportionate stratified cluster sampling was adopted to enroll participants. In addition to demographic questions, the questionnaire included 17 questions assessing the cognition and behavior of safe drug use, prioritizing questions that aligned with the health education guideline for primary and secondary school students from Chinese Ministry of Education. Descriptive statistical methods were applied using the SAS 9.2 software. Of the 4 220 students investigated, 2 097(49.7%) were males and 2 123(50.3%) were females. The average age was (14.3±1.7) years. 2 030(48.1%) students were from downtown areas, 1 511(35.8%) were from urban-rural linking areas and 679(16.1%) were from rural areas. Half (51.5%) of the respondents were junior high school students, and the others were from senior high schools (34.2%) and vocational high schools (14.3%). Most of the students (89.6%) lived off campus. The awareness rate of drug safety knowledge was 74.4%, the median score of drug safety behavior was 4 points (full score was 5 points) and there was a statistically positive correlation between the two (Spearman's correlation coefficient was 0.156, Pmiddle school students is good, but problems still exist in medication adherence, the management of expired drugs and the antibiotics cognition, which need to be fixed through specific, pointed way of education. And more efforts should be made to improve the cognition in rural regions, vocational high schools and on campus students.

  10. An econometric investigation of impacts of sustainable land management practices on soil carbon and yield risk: A potential for climate change mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Edward; Nkonya, Ephraim; Place, Frank; Mwanjalolo, Majaliwa

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the impacts of sustainable land management practices on soil carbon stocks and also impacts of soil carbon on the mean and variance of crop production using econometric tools. Using a cross-sectional plot-level dataset collected from three agroecological zones of Uganda with soil carbon measured at a depth of 0 to 15 centimeters, our results have robustly shown that irrigation, fertilizers, improved fallow, crop residues, mulching, and trash lines are positively and significant...

  11. Modeling soil CO2 production and transport to investigate the intra-day variability of surface efflux and soil CO2 concentration measurements in a scots pine forest (Pinus Sylvestris, L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Goffin, Stéphanie; Wylock, Christophe; Haut, Benoît; Maier, Martin; Longdoz, Bernard; Aubinet, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Aimed:The main aim of this study is to improve the mechanistic understanding of soil CO2 efflux (Fs), especially its temporal variation at short-time scales, by investigating, through modeling, which underlying process among CO2 production and its transport up to the atmosphere is responsible for observed intra-day variation of Fs and soil CO2 concentration [CO2].Methods:In this study, a measurement campaign of Fs and vertical soil [CO2] profiles was conducted in a Scots Pine Forest soil in H...

  12. Compulsive Buying among College Students: An Investigation of Its Antecedents, Consequences, and Implications for Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, James A.

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the incidence, antecedents, consequences, and policy implications of compulsive buying among college students (n=300). Details contributing factors and discusses the relationship between credit card use and compulsive buying. Discusses the implications for consumer policy and suggestions for further research. (JOW)

  13. Students' Personal Connection with Science: Investigating the Multidimensional Phenomenological Structure of Self-Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Matthew; Kaplan, Avi

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a two-phase mixed methods study investigating the phenomenological structure of self-relevance among ninth-grade junior high school biology students (Phase 1: N = 118; Phase 2: N = 139). We begin with a phenomenological multidimensional definition of self-relevance as comprising three dimensions: the academic…

  14. Force Concept Inventory-Based Multiple-Choice Test for Investigating Students' Representational Consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Pasi; Savinainen, Antti; Viiri, Jouni

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates students' ability to interpret multiple representations consistently (i.e., representational consistency) in the context of the force concept. For this purpose we developed the Representational Variant of the Force Concept Inventory (R-FCI), which makes use of nine items from the 1995 version of the Force Concept Inventory…

  15. Investigating the Development of Chinese Oral Explanation and Justification in Singapore Primary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Explanation and justification require cognitive ability which selects and organises relevant information in a logical way, and linguistic ability which enables speakers to encode the information with linguistic knowledge. This study aims to investigate the development of Chinese oral explanation and justification in Singapore primary students. The…

  16. Self-Esteem and Social Appearance Anxiety: An Investigation of Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ertugrul; Barut, Yasar; Ersanli, Ercümend; Kumcagiz, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study published in "Elementary Education Online", Dogan (2011) examined the psychometric properties of the social appearance anxiety scale in an adolescent sample after his first adaptation study on undergraduate students in Turkey (Dogan, 2010). He recommended that researchers do further research to investigate the…

  17. An Investigation on Changing Behaviours of University Students Switching from Using Classical Cell Phones to Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    In this study, it was tried to comprehend whether there occur any changes in behaviours of university students switching from classical cell phones to smartphones. The investigation was carried out according to quantitative research method. Questionnaire was employed as data collection tool. The datum of the study was limited with the information…

  18. Investigating Metacognitive Awareness and Reading Strategy Use of EFL Korean University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-Nam, Kay; Page, Larkin

    2014-01-01

    The metacognitive awareness and reading strategy use by Korean university students in Korea was investigated. The relationships between reading strategy use, self-rated English proficiency, and self-rated reading proficiency were examined. Differences in reading strategy use were also explored by gender and academic classification. Problem-solving…

  19. Problematic Internet Use among Turkish University Students: A Multidimensional Investigation Based on Demographics and Internet Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekinarslan, Erkan; Gurer, Melih Derya

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the Turkish undergraduate university students' problematic Internet use (PIU) levels on different dimensions based on demographics (e.g., gender, Internet use by time of day), and Internet activities (e.g., chat, entertainment, social networking, information searching, etc.). Moreover, the study explored some predictors of…

  20. An Investigation of Mathematics Anxiety among Sixth through Eighth Grade Students in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgin, Osman; Baloglu, Mustafa; Catlioglu, Hakan; Gurbuz, Ramazan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate mathematics anxiety among 220 sixth through eighth grade Turkish students in terms of mathematics achievement levels, perceived enjoyment of the mathematics teaching method, perceived enjoyment of mathematics, and perceived help with mathematics from parents. The Mathematics Anxiety Scale for…

  1. Investigating the Relationship between Internet Addiction and Strengthening Students' Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Nazanin

    2015-01-01

    The present study is about "Investigating the relationship between internet addictions and strengthening students' social skill reinforcement." One of the social elements in all cultures is social skill or ability to communicate with others effectively. One of the factors that affect this skill is addiction to Internet which has recently…

  2. Investigation of Writing Strategies, Writing Apprehension, and Writing Achievement among Saudi EFL-Major Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Asmari, AbdulRahman

    2013-01-01

    The tenet of this study is to investigate the use of writing strategies in reducing writing apprehension and uncovering its effect on EFL students' writing achievement. It also attempts to explore associations between foreign language apprehension, writing achievement and writing strategies. The primary aims of the study were to explore the…

  3. Teaching Ethics in Communication Courses: An Investigation of Instructional Methods, Course Foci, and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canary, Heather E.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the impact of ethics instruction in communication courses on students' moral reasoning competence. Using a quasi-experiment, participants in interpersonal conflict courses and communication ethics courses were exposed to different levels of ethics instruction through a variety of instructional methods. Results indicate that…

  4. Tropics in Antarctica? Crustal Evaluation Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…

  5. Group Investigation Effects on Achievement, Motivation, and Perceptions of Students in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ivy Geok Chin; Sharan, Shlomo; Lee, Christine Kim Eng

    2007-01-01

    In an experiment conducted in 7 eighth-grade (Ages 13-14) classes in Singapore, the authors evaluated the effects of the group investigation method of cooperative learning versus the effects of the traditional whole-class method of instruction on students' academic achievement and on their motivation to learn. The authors also investigated…

  6. An Investigation of Students' Embodied Discourses in Physical Education: A Gender Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzarito, Laura; Solmon, Melinda

    2009-01-01

    Despite significant theoretical and practical progress over the past 20 years, the social construction of gender and its link to youths' participation in physical activity in school contexts remain critical issues that call for further socioeducational scrutiny. In this study, researchers investigated the ways students' embodiment of discursive…

  7. Amotivation and the Occupational Decision: An Investigation of Australian Senior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Yup; McCormick, John

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the occupational decision-related processes of senior high school students, in terms of the extent to which they may be amotivated in choosing a future occupation. Data were gathered using a newly developed questionnaire, which was largely adapted from a number of psychometrically proven instruments, and…

  8. Children and Discipline: Investigating Secondary School Students' Perception of Discipline through Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadik, Fatma

    2018-01-01

    This is a descriptive study investigating the perception of children about discipline through metaphors developed by them. A total of 445 students participated in the research and the data was collected with the "Discipline Metaphors Survey (DMS)" developed by the researchers. At the end of the study, 143 metaphors, 94 positive and 49…

  9. Investigating Conditions for Student Success at an American University in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Karma El

    2014-01-01

    It is of great significance to an institution of higher education to meet its goals and to establish its institutional effectiveness and that it has a framework for discussing its institutional performance results, accordingly this study aims to investigate a) the conditions for student success at the University with respect to the five benchmarks…

  10. Feet Wet, Hands Dirty: Engaging Students in Science Teaching and Learning with Stream Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Stream investigation and restoration projects offer unique experiential opportunities to engage students in outdoor learning experiences that are relevant to the communities in which they live. These experiences promote an understanding of watershed issues and establish positive attitudes and behaviors that benefit local watersheds and help to…

  11. The Investigation of Research-Based Home Parental Involvement Practices, Parental Style, and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Myron Jamal

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship of home parental involvement practices, parental style and student achievement. Dimensions of parental involvement practices are parental instruction, parental reinforcement, parental modeling, and parental encouragement. Dimensions of parental style are authoritarian, permissive, and…

  12. An Investigation of the Goals for an Environmental Science Course: Teacher and Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Erica N.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation uses an ethnographic case study approach to explore the benefits and challenges of including a variety of goals within a high school Environmental Science curriculum. The study focuses on environmental education (EE) goals established by the Belgrade Charter (1975), including developing students' environmental awareness and…

  13. Investigating Students' Acceptance of a Statistics Learning Platform Using Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanjie; Kong, Siu-Cheung

    2017-01-01

    The study aims at investigating university students' acceptance of a statistics learning platform to support the learning of statistics in a blended learning context. Three kinds of digital resources, which are simulations, online videos, and online quizzes, were provided on the platform. Premised on the technology acceptance model, we adopted a…

  14. Drifting Continents and Wandering Poles. Crustal Evolution Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…

  15. Drifting Continents and Magnetic Fields. Crustal Evolution Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…

  16. Investigation of Primary Education Second Level Students' Motivations toward Science Learning in Terms of Various Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert Çibik, Ayse

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the primary education second level students' motivations towards science learning in terms of various factors. Within the research, the variation of the total motivational scores in science learning according to the gender, class, socio-economic levels, success in science-technology course and…

  17. An Investigation into How Students Respond to Being Victimized by Peer Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkowski, Michael L.; Bauman, Sheri A.; Dinner, Stephanie; Nixon, Charisse; Davis, Stan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how students respond to peer aggression. Results indicate that boys tend to use more retaliatory responses to peer aggression compared with girls, who are more likely to confide in their friends. The use of humor in response to being victimized also was found to be a promising way to respond to being victimized, especially…

  18. Volcanoes: Where and Why? Crustal Evolution Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…

  19. Evaluating Writing Instruction through an Investigation of Students' Experiences of Learning through Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert A.; Taylor, Charlotte E.; Drury, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Learning through writing is a way of learning not only the appropriate written expression of disciplinary knowledge, but also the knowledge itself through reflection and revision. This study investigates the quality of a writing experience provided to university students in a first-year biology subject. The writing instruction methodology used is…

  20. Hot Spots in the Earth's Crust. Crustal Evolution Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…

  1. Investigating High-School Chemical Kinetics: The Greek Chemistry Textbook and Students' Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegios, Theodoros; Salta, Katerina; Koinis, Spyros

    2017-01-01

    In this study we present an analysis of how the structure and content of the Greek school textbook approaches the concepts of chemical kinetics, and an investigation of the difficulties that 11th grade Greek students face regarding these concepts. Based on the structure and content of the Greek textbook, a tool was developed and applied to…

  2. High School Students' Engagement in Planning Investigations: Findings from a Longitudinal Study in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crujeiras-Pérez, B.; Jiménez-Aleixandre, M. P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the process of high school students' planning investigations in the chemistry laboratory across two consecutive academic years in terms of their actions and their progress. The context is a set of five inquiry-based laboratory tasks in which participants (9th and 10th graders, 14-15 and 15-16 years of age) are required to plan…

  3. Investigating Foreign Language Learning Anxiety among Students Learning English in a Public Sector University, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopang, Illahi Bux; Bughio, Faraz Ali; Pathan, Habibullah

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated foreign language anxiety among students of Lasbela University, Baluchistan, Pakistan. The study adopted the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (Horwitz et al., 1986). The respondents were (N = 240) including 26 female and 214 male. The data was run through the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS)…

  4. An Investigation of the Prevalence of Insomnia in College Students and Its Relationship to Trait Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadigh, Micah R.; Himmanen, Sharon A.; Scepansky, James A.

    2014-01-01

    A number of empirical studies have established that insomnia, poor or inefficient sleep, can significantly impact physical and psychological well-being of college students, as well as interfere with their academic success. A major contributor to the experience of insomnia is that of persistent anxiety. In this study, we investigated the prevalence…

  5. Women's Self-Efficacy Perceptions in Mathematics and Science: Investigating USC-MESA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Rebecca C.; Jun, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Higher education institutions have struggled with the underrepresentation of female students in the STEM majors. The authors investigate the USC-MESA program and the role of women's self-efficacy perceptions in mathematics and science. It is crucial to understand the theory of self-efficacy in examining historically underrepresented populations in…

  6. An Investigation of Teacher Impact on Student Inquiry Science Performance Using a Hierarchical Linear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ou Lydia; Lee, Hee-Sun; Linn, Marcia C.

    2010-01-01

    Teachers play a central role in inquiry science classrooms. In this study, we investigate how seven teacher variables (i.e., gender, experience, perceived importance of inquiry and traditional teaching, workshop attendance, partner teacher, use of technology) affect student knowledge integration understanding of science topics drawing on previous…

  7. Experimental and Numerical Investigations of Soil Desiccation for Vadose Zone Remediation: Report for Fiscal Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Andy L.; Oostrom, Mart; Bacon, Diana H.

    2008-02-04

    Apart from source excavation, the options available for the remediation of vadose zone metal and radionuclide contaminants beyond the practical excavation depth (0 to 15 m) are quite limited. Of the available technologies, very few are applicable to the deep vadose zone with the top-ranked candidate being soil desiccation. An expert panel review of the work on infiltration control and supplemental technologies identified a number of knowledge gaps that would need to be overcome before soil desiccation could be deployed. The report documents some of the research conducted in the last year to fill these knowledge gaps. This work included 1) performing intermediate-scale laboratory flow cell experiments to demonstrate the desiccation process, 2) implementing a scalable version of Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases–Water-Air-Energy (STOMP-WAE), and 3) performing numerical experiments to identify the factors controlling the performance of a desiccation system.

  8. Investigation of the radioactive and heavy metal pollution of the danube Delta lacustrine sediments and soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinescu, L.C.; Ciortea, C.; Fluerasu, D.; Stoica, P.; Duliu, O.G.; Stoica, P.

    2005-01-01

    Results obtained for five lacustrine sediment cores and three soil samples, collected in 1996 from Danube Delta, by using INAA, ICP-MS, and TTPIXE analytical methods, are presented. The measured vertical profiles identified as possible pollutants the following elements: Al, Cu, Zn, As, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Hg, Tl, Pb, and Bi. In the sediment cores, the determined elements, except V and Ni, show near-surface enrichment relative to the lower part (1.3-3 enrichment factor, except 5 - 7 for Cd and Hg). In some few cases, As, Cd, Cu, Cr, Mn, and Pb exceeded the minimum threshold of safety defined by the Romanian legislation. For soil samples, increased (1.5-3 times) values at surface in comparison with the 30 cm depth was also found, but values much lower compared to lacustrine sediments, indicating the riverine transport as the main source of heavy-metal near-surface contamination of the lacustrine sediments

  9. Investigation on the photocatalytic degradation of pyrene on soil surfaces using nanometer anatase TiO2 under UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Dianbo; Li Peijun; Li Xiaojun; Zhao Qing; Zhang Yinqiu; Jia Chunyun; Li Peng

    2010-01-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of pyrene on soil surfaces was investigated in the presence of nanometer anatase TiO 2 under a variety of conditions. After being spiked with pyrene, soil samples loaded with different amounts of TiO 2 (0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4%, w/w) were exposed to UV irradiation for 25 h. The results indicated that the photocatalytic degradation of pyrene followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. TiO 2 accelerated the degradation of pyrene generally as indicated by the half-life reduction from 45.90 to 31.36 h, corresponding to the TiO 2 amounts from 0% to 4%, respectively. The effects of H 2 O 2 , light intensity and humic acids on the degradation of pyrene were also investigated. The degradation of pyrene increased along with increasing the concentration of H 2 O 2 , light intensity and the concentration of humic acids. All results indicated that the photocatalytic method in the presence of nanometer anatase TiO 2 was an advisable choice for the treatments of PAHs polluted soil in the future.

  10. Investigation of Pore Scale Processes That Affect Soil Vapor Extraction. Final Technical Report EMSP 70045

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles W.; Webb, Andrew W.

    2004-01-01

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination in the vadose zone is a significant problem at Department of Energy sites. Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is commonly used to remediate DNAPLs from the vadose zone. In most cases, a period of high recovery has been followed by a sustained period of low recovery. This behavior has been attributed to multiple processes including slow interphase mass transfer, retarded vapor phase transport, and diffusion from unswept zones of low permeability. This research project used a combination of laboratory experimentation and mathematical modeling to determine how these various processes interact to limit the removal of DNAPL components in heterogeneous porous media during SVE. Our results were applied to scenarios typical of the carbon tetrachloride spill zone at the Hanford Site. Our results indicate that: (a) the initial distribution of the spilled DNAPL (i.e., the spill-zone architecture) has a major influence upon the performance of any subsequent SVE operations; (b) while the pattern of higher and lower conductivity soil zones has an important impact upon spill zone architecture, soil moisture distribution plays an even larger role when there are large quantities of co-disposed waste-water (as in the Hanford scenario); (c) depending upon soil moisture dynamics, liquid DNAPL that is trapped by surrounding water is extremely difficult to remove by SVE; (d) natural barometric pumping can remove a large amount of the initial DNAPL mass for spills occurring close to the land surface, and hence the initial spilled inventory will be over-estimated if this process is neglected

  11. Land characterisation for soil-based constructed wetlands: Adapting investigation methods to design objectives

    OpenAIRE

    Petitjean, A.; Forquet, N.; Choubert, J.M.; Coquery, M; Bouyer, M.; Boutin, C.

    2015-01-01

    Buffer zones between wastewater treatment plants and receiving water bodies have recently gained interest in France. These soil-based constructed wetland (SBCW) systems receive treated wastewater and may have various designs aiming to mimic 'natural' wetlands. Research is needed to assess the treatment efficiency of such systems. To this aim, a comprehensive study is carried out to understand the fate of water, conventional pollutants (suspended solids, organic carbon, ammonium, and phosph...

  12. INVESTIGATION OF GEOTECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS OF SAND DUNE SOIL: A CASE STUDY AROUND BAIJI IN IRAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas J. Al-Taie

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: While more than half the land surface of Iraq consists of deserts covered mainly with sand dunes, little research has taken place to study the characteristics and the behavior of dune soils. This paper directed toward studying the geotechnical properties of dune sands taken from Baiji city (northwest of Iraq. A vast laboratory testing program was carried out to achieve the purpose of this paper. The physical tests, chemical tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, permeability test, compaction characteristics, compressibility and collapsibility tests; and shear strength tests were included in this program. The results indicate that soil of Baiji sand dune exhibits prefer engineering properties according to their state. As such, this soil is considered suitable for use in geotechnical constructions. ABSTRAK: Walaupun lebih separuh daripada bumi Iraq terdiri daripada gurun yang dipenuhi dengan bukit-bukit pasir, tidak banyak penyelidikan dijalankan untuk mengkaji sifat-sifat dan ciri-ciri tanah pasir  tersebut. Kertas kerja ini menyelidik sifat geoteknikal bukit pasir yang diambil dari pekan Baiji (di bahagian barat utara Iraq.  Program penyelidikan makmal yang menyeluruh telah  dijalankan bagi mencapai objektif kajian ini. Ujian fizikal, ujian kimia, analisis belauan sinar-x, ujian kebolehtelapan, ciri pemadatan, faktor ketermampatan, ujian keruntuhan dan ujian kekuatan ricih diambilkira dalam program ini. Keputusan menunjukkan bahawa tanih bukit pasir Baiji mengutamakan ciri kejuruteraan berdasarkan keadaannya. Oleh itu, tanah ini dianggap sesuai untuk kegunaan pembinaan geoteknikal.

  13. An investigation of soil-structure interaction effects observed at the MIT Green Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taciroglu, Ertugrul; Çelebi, Mehmet; Ghahari, S. Farid; Abazarsa, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    The soil-foundation impedance function of the MIT Green Building is identified from its response signals recorded during an earthquake. Estimation of foundation impedance functions from seismic response signals is a challenging task, because: (1) the foundation input motions (FIMs) are not directly measurable, (2) the as-built properties of the super-structure are only approximately known, and (3) the soil-foundation impedance functions are inherently frequency-dependent. In the present study, aforementioned difficulties are circumvented by using, in succession, a blind modal identification (BMID) method, a simplified Timoshenko beam model (TBM), and a parametric updating of transfer functions (TFs). First, the flexible-base modal properties of the building are identified from response signals using the BMID method. Then, a flexible-base TBM is updated using the identified modal data. Finally, the frequency-dependent soil-foundation impedance function is estimated by minimizing the discrepancy between TFs (of pairs instrumented floors) that are (1) obtained experimentally from earthquake data and (2) analytically from the updated TBM. Using the fully identified flexible-base TBM, the FIMs as well as building responses at locations without instruments can be predicted, as demonstrated in the present study.

  14. Investigation of soils affected by burnt hospital wastes in Nigeria using PIXE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ephraim P, Inyang; Ita, Akpan; Eusebius I, Obiajunwa

    2013-12-01

    Improper management of hospital waste has been reported to be responsible for several acute outbreaks like the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). In spite of these challenges, hospital wastes are sometimes not properly handled in Nigeria. To date, there has not been an adequate study on the effect and fate of burnt hospital waste on agricultural soil. The effect of burnt hospital wastes on the agricultural soil was conducted on soils sampled around farm settlement near Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife, South West Nigeria. PIXE technique was employed with a 1.7 MV 5SDH Tandem Pelletron accelerator available at Centre for Energy Research and Development O.A.U Ile-Ife, Nigeria. Eleven elements- Si, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zr and Pb were detected and their concentrations and enrichment factors determined. The presence of Pb and Cl at the elevated concentrations range of (77.8 ± 3.5 - 279.6 ± 97.6 and 102.2 ± 37.4 -167.2±17.43) ppm respectively in this study, is of serious health concern because of the agricultural practices in the neighborhoods of the study sites. There is a need for proper handling of hospital and other related hazardous wastes because of the possibility of such posing serious environmental pollution problems.

  15. Development of a GIS-based failure investigation system for highway soil slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Raghav; Aydilek, Ahmet H.; Tanyu, Burak F.

    2015-06-01

    A framework for preparation of an early warning system was developed for Maryland, using a GIS database and a collective overlay of maps that highlight highway slopes susceptible to soil slides or slope failures in advance through spatial and statistical analysis. Data for existing soil slope failures was collected from geotechnical reports and field visits. A total of 48 slope failures were recorded and analyzed. Six factors, including event precipitation, geological formation, land cover, slope history, slope angle, and elevation were considered to affect highway soil slope stability. The observed trends indicate that precipitation and poor surface or subsurface drainage conditions are principal factors causing slope failures. 96% of the failed slopes have an open drainage section. A majority of the failed slopes lie in regions with relatively high event precipitation ( P>200 mm). 90% of the existing failures are surficial erosion type failures, and only 1 out of the 42 slope failures is deep rotational type failure. More than half of the analyzed slope failures have occurred in regions having low density land cover. 46% of failures are on slopes with slope angles between 20° and 30°. Influx of more data relating to failed slopes should give rise to more trends, and thus the developed slope management system will aid the state highway engineers in prudential budget allocation and prioritizing different remediation projects based on the literature reviewed on the principles, concepts, techniques, and methodology for slope instability evaluation (Leshchinsky et al., 2015).

  16. Ecological investigations on plant associations in differently disturbed heavy-metal contaminated soils of Great Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, W

    1968-01-01

    In different areas of Great Britain comparing ecological studies have been made on disturbed and undisturbed heavy metal contaminated soils. In Grizedale (Pennine), sampling of an undisturbed transect having high levels of major nutrients showed marked differentiation within a small area, only related to the plant available levels of zinc, copper, and lead. However, studies on disturbed heavy metal soils and spoil-heaps revealed a low water capacity and a low supply of major nutrients, particularly of N and P. These suggest that here both the enrichment of heavy metals and the considerable decrease of other nutrients are important in determining the heavy metal vegetation, and in maintaining it against other species. The quantity of zinc in plants is not related to the total or plant-available amount of zinc in soil, but confirmed physiological experiments on the influence of phosphorus and different zinc compounds (complexed or inorganic) on the uptake and distribution of zinc in Thlaspi alpestre and Minnartia rerum. Also an antagonism between lead and copper was revealed. 24 references.

  17. A molecular investigation of soil organic carbon composition across a subalpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Tieh; Lawrence, Corey R.; Winnick, Matthew J.; Bargar, John R.; Maher, Katharine

    2018-01-01

    The dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover are a critical component of the global carbon cycle. Mechanistic models seeking to represent these complex dynamics require detailed SOC compositions, which are currently difficult to characterize quantitatively. Here, we address this challenge by using a novel approach that combines Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and bulk carbon X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to determine the abundance of SOC functional groups, using elemental analysis (EA) to constrain the total amount of SOC. We used this SOC functional group abundance (SOC-fga) method to compare variability in SOC compositions as a function of depth across a subalpine watershed (East River, Colorado, USA) and found a large degree of variability in SOC functional group abundances between sites at different elevations. Soils at a lower elevation are predominantly composed of polysaccharides, while soils at a higher elevation have more substantial portions of carbonyl, phenolic, or aromatic carbon. We discuss the potential drivers of differences in SOC composition between these sites, including vegetation inputs, internal processing and losses, and elevation-driven environmental factors. Although numerical models would facilitate the understanding and evaluation of the observed SOC distributions, quantitative and meaningful measurements of SOC molecular compositions are required to guide such models. Comparison among commonly used characterization techniques on shared reference materials is a critical next step for advancing our understanding of the complex processes controlling SOC compositions.

  18. Earthquake simulation, actual earthquake monitoring and analytical methods for soil-structure interaction investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, H T [Seismic Center, Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1988-07-01

    Approaches for conducting in-situ soil-structure interaction experiments are discussed. High explosives detonated under the ground can generate strong ground motion to induce soil-structure interaction (SSI). The explosive induced data are useful in studying the dynamic characteristics of the soil-structure system associated with the inertial aspect of the SSI problem. The plane waves generated by the explosives cannot adequately address the kinematic interaction associated with actual earthquakes because of he difference in wave fields and their effects. Earthquake monitoring is ideal for obtaining SSI data that can address all aspects of the SSI problem. The only limitation is the level of excitation that can be obtained. Neither the simulated earthquake experiments nor the earthquake monitoring experiments can have exact similitude if reduced scale test structures are used. If gravity effects are small, reasonable correlations between the scaled model and the prototype can be obtained provided that input motion can be scaled appropriately. The key product of the in-situ experiments is the data base that can be used to qualify analytical methods for prototypical applications. (author)

  19. EarthLabs Modules: Engaging Students In Extended, Rigorous Investigations Of The Ocean, Climate and Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, J.; Chegwidden, D.; Mote, A. S.; Ledley, T. S.; Lynds, S. E.; Haddad, N.; Ellins, K.

    2016-02-01

    EarthLabs, envisioned as a national model for high school Earth or Environmental Science lab courses, is adaptable for both undergraduate middle school students. The collection includes ten online modules that combine to feature a global view of our planet as a dynamic, interconnected system, by engaging learners in extended investigations. EarthLabs support state and national guidelines, including the NGSS, for science content. Four modules directly guide students to discover vital aspects of the oceans while five other modules incorporate ocean sciences in order to complete an understanding of Earth's climate system. Students gain a broad perspective on the key role oceans play in fishing industry, droughts, coral reefs, hurricanes, the carbon cycle, as well as life on land and in the seas to drive our changing climate by interacting with scientific research data, manipulating satellite imagery, numerical data, computer visualizations, experiments, and video tutorials. Students explore Earth system processes and build quantitative skills that enable them to objectively evaluate scientific findings for themselves as they move through ordered sequences that guide the learning. As a robust collection, EarthLabs modules engage students in extended, rigorous investigations allowing a deeper understanding of the ocean, climate and weather. This presentation provides an overview of the ten curriculum modules that comprise the EarthLabs collection developed by TERC and found at http://serc.carleton.edu/earthlabs/index.html. Evaluation data on the effectiveness and use in secondary education classrooms will be summarized.

  20. Blended Learning and Student Satisfaction: An Investigation into an EAP Writing Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab Ibrahim Abbas

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates students satisfaction in a blended English writing course for Academic Purposes in Iraq. Blended learning is a novel mode of approaching education and learning in Iraq so it is very relevant to attempt to determine what factors can help it its success. Its novelty comes not from its use of online platforms such as Moodle but blending the traditional face-to face approach and distance teaching in a way that foster critical thinking and ongoing participation of the students. Different factors were emphasized and investigated regarding satisfaction, among them, the instructor-student and student-student interaction, in addition to the pedagogical aspect of the course. Student’s background such as their job and age and family status were not considered in this study. A modified questionnaire of student’s satisfaction in an online course was used to determine the approximate of satisfaction. The result of the research helped the administration office to apply some improvements to the newly-founded Blended courses in Iraq.

  1. Wine from the Netherlands: investigating the effect of soil-type on taste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vis, Geert-Jan; Maljers, Denise; Beurskens, Stan

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade professional viticulture has seen a strong increase in the Netherlands, reaching 270 ha in 2015. Although on a European scale this is a small area, the number of prize-winning quality wines is steadily growing. This growth can largely be ascribed to new grape varieties from Germany and Switzerland, that are better adapted to the cooler and moister climate at the northern fringe of the viticultural zone, as well as to increasing viticultural expertise. The distribution of vineyards across the Netherlands shows that they occur on a plethora of substrates. Dutch substrate is dominated by typical lowland deposits such as fluvial and marine sands and clays and aeolian sands. Unlike many European countries, bedrock is scarce. Only in the south-eastern extremity and in the east of the country, carbonate bedrock is present at or near the surface. This wide variety of substrate triggered our interest in the effect of the various soil-types on the smell and taste characteristics of wines. An effect which is often mentioned concerning well-known foreign wines. We wondered whether an Auxerrois wine from carbonate rocks tastes significantly different from a wine from the same grape variety from loess. And how about a Johanniter wine from fluvial deposits versus windblown sands? And what happens if you make wine in exactly the same way with the same grape variety and from the same vineyard, but with three different yeast types? To answer our questions, we selected ten Dutch vineyards with varying soil-types and the grape varieties Auxerrois and Johanniter. In October 2014 we harvested the grapes and wine was made under controlled identical conditions (in a double setup). The wines were scientifically tested at the institute of Viticulture and Oenology in Neustadt, Germany. The results show no significant effect of soil-type on the smell and taste of Dutch wines in our experiment. Varying yeast types (Cryarome, 3079, VL2) used on Souvignier Gris grapes from

  2. Investigating the Digital Literacy Needs of Healthcare Students when using Mobile Tablet Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Evangelinos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of two case studies that investigated the digital attitudes, skills and development needs of healthcare students when using mobile tablet devices to assess student-nurse competencies in clinical practice and when used in the classroom to facilitate digitally enabled learning. Participants have been asked to complete a bespoke scenariobased digital competence self-assessment questionnaire based on the EU DIGCOMP framework; this enabled a baseline for individual and group practice. The first case study documented the individual perceptions and experiences on the digital literacy of students by analysing the students’ reflective diaries. In the second a questionnaire documented the student experience of utilising tablet devices to support the delivery of technology-enhanced learning designs in the classroom. The results showed a complex, highly-individual profile for each student, while the group exhibited some common trends and characteristics. The majority of students felt capable in using tablet technologies for learning but there was no clear consensus as to whether technology-enhanced learning should be introduced on a larger scale. Further work is proposed to model a curriculum-development process for embedding digital literacies into curriculum delivery through the utilisation of technology-enhanced, activity-based learning designs.

  3. Investigating the effect of emotional intelligence education on baccalaureate nursing students' emotional intelligence scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orak, Roohangiz Jamshidi; Farahani, Mansoureh Ashghali; Kelishami, Fatemeh Ghofrani; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Banihashemi, Sara; Havaei, Farinaz

    2016-09-01

    Nursing students, particularly at the time of entering clinical education, experience a great deal of stress and emotion typically related to their educational and clinical competence. Emotional intelligence is known to be one of the required skills to effectively cope with such feelings. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of training on first-year nursing students' levels of emotional intelligence. This was a quasi-experiment study in which 69 first-year nursing students affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences were assigned to either the control or the experimental groups. The study intervention included of an emotional intelligence educational program offered in eight two-hour sessions for eight subsequent weeks. In total, 66 students completed the study. The study groups did not differ significantly in terms of emotional intelligence scores before and after educational program. Although the educational program did not have an effect on students' emotional intelligence scores, this study finding can be explained. Limited time for exercising the acquired knowledge and skills may explain the non-significant findings. Moreover, our participants were exclusively first-year students who had no clinical experience and hence, might have felt no real need to learn emotional intelligence skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An investigation on normal school students’ learning burnout – A case study of English normal students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjing Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Learning burnout is a phenomenon in which students hold a negative attitude to curriculum learning, which manifests in aspects of physiology, psychology, behavior and interpersonal communication. China attaches great importance to higher education, colleges and universities shoulder the important task of training national modernization personnel. The problem of university students’ learning burnout has become a social phenomenon that cannot be ignored. Normal university students are one of the important groups of college students, and this phenomenon of learning burnout may also occur among them. English majors are the backbone of English teachers in primary and secondary schools in the future. The learning status of these groups affects the overall quality of teaching in normal colleges and universities and, more importantly, the quality of teachers in primary and secondary schools in the future. This paper first reviews the definition of learning burnout and the research methods of measurement. Subsequently, it investigates the learning burnout of English matriculation students by taking the first-year English majors of Jiangxi Normal University as an example. In this way, this research is hoped to promote the study on learning burnout not only among English normal students but also other normal students.

  5. A university system-wide qualitative investigation into student physical activity promotion conducted on college campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, Jeffrey J; Wyrick, David L; Bibeau, Daniel L; Strack, Robert W; Davis, Paul G

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine college student physical activity promotion. A cross-sectional approach to qualitative research was used. Southeastern state university system. Fourteen of 15 (93%) universities recruited were included in this study; 22 university employees participated in a semistructured interview. Nonprobabilistic purposive and snowball sampling strategies were used to recruit individuals who were likely to be engaged in physical activity promotion efforts on their respective campuses. Thematic analyses lead to the identification of emerging themes that were coded and analyzed using NVivo software. Themes informed three main areas: key personnel responsible for promoting physical activity to students, actual physical activity promotion efforts implemented, and factors that influence student physical activity promotion. Results suggest that ecological approaches to promote physical activity on college campuses are underused, the targeting of mediators of physical activity in college students is limited, and values held by university administration influence campus physical activity promotion. Findings support recommendations for future research and practice. Practitioners should attempt to implement social ecological approaches that target scientifically established mediators of physical activity in college students. Replication of this study is needed to compare these findings with other types of universities, and to investigate the relationship between promotion activities (type and exposure) and physical activity behaviors of college students.

  6. Investigating Knowledge and Attitude of Nursing Students Towards Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasgani, Sahar Rabani; Moghtadaie, Leila

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed at Investigating the knowledge and attitude of Nursing Students towards Iranian Traditional Medicine in universities of Tehran in 2012-2013. 300 students of nursing studying at different universities in Tehran participated in this descriptive, cross-sectional study. The data was collected through a standard questionnaire with an acceptable validity and reliability. The questionnaire was made of five sections including demographic, general knowledge of the Iranian traditional medicine, general attitude towards it, resources of the Iranian traditional medicine and the barriers to it. The results revealed that general knowledge of the students about Iranian traditional medicine and complementary medicine is low. The attitude of the students towards including Iranian traditional medicine and complementary medicine in their curriculum is positive. General attitude of students towards Iranian traditional medicine is positive too. The majority of the participants had not passed any course on Iranian traditional medicine. There was no relationship between participants’ attitude towards Iranian traditional medicine and the number of semesters they had passed. Considering the participants’ positive attitude and their low level of knowledge, it seems necessary for the university policy makers to provide nursing students with different training courses on Iranian traditional medicine and complementary medicine in order to increase their knowledge. PMID:25363119

  7. Whiteboard Confessionals: Investigating a New Model Using Student Representations in Teaching Astro 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Edward

    2018-01-01

    Astronomy education researchers in the Department of Astronomy at the University of Arizona have been investigating a new framework for getting students to engage in discussions about fundamental astronomy topics. This framework is intended to also provide students with explicit feedback on the correctness and coherency of their mental models on these topics. This framework builds upon our prior efforts to create productive Pedagogical Discipline Representations (PDR). Students are asked to work collaboratively to generate their own representations (drawings, graphs, data tables, etc.) that reflect important characteristics of astrophysical scenarios presented in class. We have found these representation tasks offer tremendous insight into the broad range of ideas and knowledge students possess after instruction that includes both traditional lecture and actively learning strategies. In particular, we find that some of our students are able to correctly answer challenging multiple-choice questions on topics, however, they struggle to accurately create representations of these same topics themselves. Our work illustrates that some of our students are not developing a robust level of discipline fluency with many core ideas in astronomy, even after engaging with active learning strategies.

  8. The Effect of Group Investigation Learning Model with Brainstroming Technique on Students Learning Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astiti Kade kAyu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effect of group investigation (GI learning model with brainstorming technique on student physics learning outcomes (PLO compared to jigsaw learning model with brainstroming technique. The learning outcome in this research are the results of learning in the cognitive domain. The method used in this research is experiment with Randomised Postest Only Control Group Design. Population in this research is all students of class XI IPA SMA Negeri 9 Kupang year lesson 2015/2016. The selected sample are 40 students of class XI IPA 1 as the experimental class and 38 students of class XI IPA 2 as the control class using simple random sampling technique. The instrument used is 13 items description test. The first hypothesis was tested by using two tailed t-test. From that, it is obtained that H0 rejected which means there are differences of students physics learning outcome. The second hypothesis was tested using one tailed t-test. It is obtained that H0 rejected which means the students PLO in experiment class were higher than control class. Based on the results of this study, researchers recommend the use of GI learning models with brainstorming techniques to improve PLO, especially in the cognitive domain.

  9. A Multilevel, Statewide Investigation of School District Anti-Bullying Policy Quality and Student Bullying Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Amy L; Cousin, Molly; Borowsky, Iris W

    2017-03-01

    Although nearly all states in the United States require school districts to adopt anti-bullying policies, little research examines the effect of these policies on student bullying and health. Using a statewide sample, we investigated associations between the quality of school district anti-bullying policies and student bullying involvement and adjustment. School district anti-bullying policies (N = 208) were coded for their quality based on established criteria. District-level data were combined with student reports of bullying involvement, emotional distress, and school connectedness from a state surveillance survey of 6th, 9th, and 12th grade students (N = 93,437). Results indicated that policy quality was positively related to bullying victimization. Furthermore, students reporting frequent perpetration/victimization who also attended districts with high-quality policies reported more emotional distress and less school connectedness compared with students attending districts with low quality policies. Although statistically significant, the magnitude of these associations was small. Having a high-quality school district anti-bullying policy is not sufficient to reduce bullying and protect bullying-involved young people. Future studies examining policy implementation will inform best practices in bullying prevention. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  10. An investigation to find strategies to improve student nurses' maths skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kerri

    Being able to perform drug calculations accurately is an essential skill for nurses. Many studies, however, have demonstrated that nurses need to improve this area of their practice and in particular their mathematical skills. Several strategies have been implemented to develop the drug calculation skills of nurses, with mixed success. This article reports on a study that was carried out to investigate whether strategies implemented within a second-year pre-registration course were perceived by students to be helpful in improving their mathematical skills for drug calculations. The results demonstrated that students felt their mathematics and confidence improved as a result of these strategies. The students' evaluation of the learning strategy that they found most helpful in learning drug calculation gave a mixed result, indicating that students have differing learning styles and needs. The study also indicates that student nurses were able to integrate the mathematical skills into their nursing practice by having different strategies that allowed them to develop conceptual, mathematical and practical skills concurrently. The study recommends the implementation of integrated strategies to address drug calculation skills in student nurses, although further research is still required.

  11. Experience in organization of soil science–biogeographical part of educational natural science practical work of students-geographers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлія Прасул

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the experience of practical field training of students- geographers, defines its role in training geographers, looks at the ways of rational organization of soil science, biogeographic section of natural science educational practices in terms of training at high school stationary practice grounds. The educational natural science practice of the 1st year-students-geographers of V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University takes place on the educational and scientific geographical grounds «Gaidary» in Zmiiv district, Kharkiv region. The location of the base allows to explore a typical structure of the Siversky Donets river valley, select a variety of elements and components to form an understanding in students of both the knowledge of the individual components of nature, and the processes of natural complexes functioning as a whole, to introduce the elements of environmental knowledge and factors of anthropogenic impact on the environment. The soil-biogeographical section of practical work focuses on acquiring skills of field research methods of soil and ecological communities by the students; planning of the routes, taking into account the conditions and landscape features of the territory; cameral treatment of the data and samples collected in the field; identification of cause-and-effect relationships of soil and vegetation development. Landscape diversity of the territory in the area of practice allows to study the soil and vegetation within the natural systems of the watershed, its slopes, gullies and gully areas of the floodplain, the first floodplain terrace during 5-6 days of soil-biogeographic section of the practical work through the daily radial routes. During the practice traditional classical techniques of field studies of soils and ecological communities (primarily tab and a description of soil profiles and geo-botanical areas are combined with new, present-day approaches (use of GPS-navigators, GIS

  12. Engaging High School Students in Investigative STEM Activities Based on Field Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J.; Sheriff, M. M.; Washington, D. S.; Putnam, A. E.; Strand, P.; Radue, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The lead author, an Environmental Science teacher at Gary Comer High School (GCHS), a public charter on the South Side of Chicago, accompanied two students over the course of two summers to conduct field research in remote mountain ranges of interior Asia. The expeditions were funded by the National Science Foundation and orchestrated collaboratively with PI Putnam with the purposes of bringing along high school students and teachers (1) to introduce students from urban areas to practical Earth Science and (2) to bolster the Environmental Science curriculum at GCHS by providing real world events to relate to classroom learning. During the first field trip, a student from GCHS and the lead author traveled to western Mongolia to participate in collecting samples for cosmogenic-nuclide dating of glacial landforms. The student performed all parts of sample collection and used the data to create a poster analyzing the rate of recession of the Potanin Glacier. She went on to present her findings at the AGU Fall Meeting 2016. At GCHS, she assisted the teacher in lessons about climate change. Next year she will be attending the University of Vermont to pursue a major in a STEM field. The second student traveled to the Tibetan Plateau in China and also participated fully in sampling activities. She plans on presenting her project on creating 3D models of sample boulders at the AGU Meeting in 2017. She will present her findings to the rest of the student body at GCHS, assist with pertinent Environmental Science lessons for Freshmen, and explain her experience at the Gary Comer Middle School. The lead author faced several restrictions in the classroom due to standardized testing requirements, leading to more focus on testing skills rather than investigative learning. Next year the focus will switch from ACT to SAT standards, allowing more freedom to pursue investigative lessons. The success of adding information on the field experience will be assessed at the end of the 2017

  13. Investigating students' view on STEM in learning about electrical current through STS approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupsai, Jiraporn; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate Grade 11 students' views on Science Technology Engineering Mathematics (STEM) with the integration of learning about electrical current based on Science Technology Society (STS) approach [8]. The participants were 60 Grade 11 students in Demonstration Secondary School, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand. The methodology is in the respect of interpretive paradigm. The teaching and learning about Electrical Current through STS approach carried out over 6 weeks. The Electrical Current unit through STS approach was developed based on framework[8] that consists of five stages including (1) identification of social issues, (2) identification of potential solutions, (3) need for knowledge, (4) decision making, and (5) socialization stage. To start with, the question "what if this world is lack of electricity" was challenged in the class in order to move students to find the problem of how to design Electricity Generation from Clean Energy. Students were expected to apply scientific and other knowledge to design of Electricity Generation. Students' views on STEM were collected during their learning by participant' observation and students' tasks. Their views on STEM were categorized when they applied their knowledge for designing the Electricity Generation. The findings indicated that students cooperatively work to solve the problem when applying knowledge about the content of Science and Mathematics and processing skill of Technology and Engineering. It showed that students held the integration of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to design their possible solutions in learning about Electrical Current. The paper also discusses implications for science teaching and learning through STS in Thailand.

  14. Investigating the Relationships Among Resilience, Social Anxiety, and Procrastination in a Sample of College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chen-Yi Amy; Chang, Yuhsuan

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships among resilience, social anxiety, and procrastination in a sample of college students. Specifically, structural equation modeling analyses were applied to examine the effect of resilience on procrastination and to test the mediating effect of social anxiety. The results of this study suggested that social anxiety partially mediated the relationship between resilience and procrastination. Students with higher levels of resilience reported a lower frequency of procrastination behavior, and resilience had an indirect effect on procrastination through social anxiety. The results of this study clarify the current knowledge of the mixed results on resilience and procrastination behaviors and offer practical learning strategies and psychological interventions.

  15. Investigation of ratio 'strontium-calcium' in the plants and in the corresponding soil solution for 90Sr and for natural total strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prorok, V.V.; Makarenko, T.Yi.; Mel'nichenko, L.Yu.; Mason, K.F.V.; Ganushevich, A.P.; Ostashko, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    Ratios Sr/Ca for natural total strontium and 90 Sr/Ca in the plants and in the corresponding soil solutions for three experimental lands with 'fuel' type of pollution for several plants at natural conditions are determined. The lands with tree different types of soil are at the Exclusive Zone of the Chernobyl Power Station. The obtained experimental results shown that ratio Sr/Ca in plant is equal to this ratio in the corresponding soil solution for all investigated lands and plants. Ratio 90 Sr/Ca in plant exceeds this ratio at the corresponding soil solution

  16. Science Students Creating Hybrid Spaces when Engaging in an Expo Investigation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarain, Umesh; de Beer, Josef

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the experiences of three 9th-grade South African students (13-14 years) in doing open science investigation projects for a science expo. A particular focus of this study was the manner in which these students merge the world of school science with their social world to create a hybrid space by appropriating knowledge and resources of the school and home. Within this hybrid space they experienced a deeper, more meaningful and authentic engagement in science practical work. This hybrid space redefined the landscape of the science learning experience for these students, as they could derive the twofold benefit of appropriating support when necessary and at the same time maintain their autonomy over the investigation. For South Africa and quite probably other countries; these findings serve as a guideline as to how opportunities can be created for students to do open science investigations, against prevailing school factors such as large classes, a lack of physical resources, the lack of time for practical work and the demands of syllabus coverage.

  17. An investigation of the impact of selected prereading activities on student content learning through laboratory activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Jesse (Shaya)

    This study investigated whether two prereading activities impacted student learning from hands-on science activities. The study was based on constructivist learning theory. Based on the work of Piaget, it was hypothesized that students who activated prior knowledge would learn more from the activities. Based on the work of Vygotsky it was hypothesized that students who talk more and write more would learn more from the activity. The K-W-L chart and anticipation guide strategies were used with eighth grade students at Graves Middle School in Whittier, California before learning about levers and convection currents. D. M. Ogle (1986) created the three-column K-W-L chart to have students activate prior knowledge. In the first column, the students write what they already know about a subject, in the second column, the students write what they want to know about the subject, and the students complete the third column after learning about a subject by writing answers to the questions that they asked in the second column. Duffelmeyer (1994) created the anticipation guide based on Herber's (1978) reasoning guide. In the anticipation guide, the teacher creates three or four sentences that convey the major ideas of the topic and the students either agree or disagree with the statements. After learning about the topic, students revisit their answers and decide if they were correct or incorrect and they must defend their choices. This research used the Solomon (1947) four-square design and compared both the experimental groups to a control group that simply discussed the concepts before completing the activity. The research showed no significant difference between the control group and either of the treatment groups. The reasons for the lack of significant differences are considered. It was hypothesized that since the students were unfamiliar with the prereading activities and did not have much experience with using either writing-to-learn or talking-to-learn strategies, the

  18. On-site investigations of hydrocarbon contaminated soil by the Pollut-Eval methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoit, Y.; Prigent, S.; Haeseler, F.

    2005-01-01

    The Pollut-Eval method is based on the Rock-Eval pyrolysis method, founded on an IFP patent that has been used for decades for oil prospecting in sedimentary basins all over the world. This equipment provides data on the quantity and the quality of organic matter in sedimentary rocks. With the increasing demand for cost effective and rapid contaminated site diagnosis, it became obvious that the field of application of the Rock-Eval technology should be enlarged to environmental problematic. The Pollut-Eval methodology was developed since 1996 and firstly qualified through the design of a laboratory version. Compared to the previous apparatus dedicated to the geochemistry, innovations allow acquisition of data for accurate quantification of complex organic pollutants and mineral carbon distribution. New methods were developed especially for the characterisation of hydrocarbon pollutants in soil. Compared to kerogen analysis, the characterisation of light petroleum cuts entrapped in soil as pollutants was available by the design of an adapted refrigerated auto-sampler. The prevention of the loss of the high vapour tension pollutants couldn't be avoided for the new environmental field of applications. Site after site, the various experiments involving the 'laboratory' version of the Pollut-Eval analyser extended the application field of the methodology. The efficiency of the thermal extraction applied directly on the soil showed useful advantages compared to conventional solvent extraction techniques, especially for pollutants originating from former gas plants. The method was especially suitable for the determination of the complete carbon mass balance in the case of non-extractable organic pollutant such as coal tar or for heavy petroleum cut such as heavy fuel, vacuum distillation residue and bitumen. By the way, the Pollut-Eval method became rapidly complementary to more conventional GC quantification dedicated to complex organic pollution characterisation. By the

  19. Investigation of soil fertility at a remote site in karachi, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirin, K.; Shafiq, S.; Imad, S.; Alvi, S.K.; Khan, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    This study reveals chemical and physical properties of soils collected from a remote site at Karachi, Pakistan. Altogether 23 parameters were determined. Out of 12 soil samples 11 were categorised as sand or sandy barns, p1-I varied between 7.35-8.49, density ranged between 1.61-2.39 gm/cm3, the conductivity of 1:2 water extracts varied up to a great extent i.e., between 0.437-16.47 MS/M3. Sodium (Na) contents were higher in ammonium acetate extract when compared with 1:2 water extract. The bicarbonate (HCO/sub 3/) contents were ranged between 0. 17-1.73 ppm. The organic matter contents were low (0.81 -2,21%), these soils were also deficient in their macronutrient contents. Specifically, the ranges of nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg) and sulphur (S) were 0.04-i. 16%, 0.25-15.99 ppm, 4.40-135.89 ppm, 0.001-0.199%, 0.001-0.019% and 0.01-0.143%, respectively. Heavy metals were determined in diethylene--triamine-pentaacctic acid (DTPA) extracts and the levels of iron (Fe), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn). and zinc (Zn) in these samples were I.86-3280 ppm, 1.68-7.69 ppm, 16.51-75.28 and 0.25-20.75 ppm, respectively. Toxic heavy metals, lead (Pb) and nickel (Ni) contents were also estimated and their concentration was found low ranging between 0.91-563 ppm and 0.32-1.26 ppm, respectively. (author)

  20. Chemical and microbiological investigations on mineral-oil contaminated soils following on-site regeneration measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollerbach, A.; Teschner, M.; Bosecker, K.; Wehner, H.; Kassner, H.

    1992-01-01

    In the site of a former petroleum refinery, where bombing during the second World War has caused in part deep-down contamination of the ground with petroleum and its products, a pilot study with five on-site biological treatment beds was carried through by different firms with the aim to reduce the hydrocarbon content of the soil to 1 gramme per kilogramme of dry weight. Thus, good comparability of the different regeneration measures was given. Sampling was done at the end of the regeneration experiments by obtaining an average sample. (orig.) [de

  1. Investigating Students' Ideas About X-rays While Developing Teaching Materials for a Medical Physics Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalita, Spartak; Zollman, Dean

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the Modern Miracle Medical Machines project is to promote pre-med students' interest in physics by using the context of contemporary medical imaging. The X-ray medical imaging learning module will be a central part of this effort. To investigate students' transfer of learning in this context we have conducted a series of clinical and teaching interviews. In the latter interview, some of the proposed learning materials were used. The students brought to our discussion pieces of knowledge transferred from very different sources such as their own X-ray experiences, previous learning and the mass media. This transfer seems to result in more or less firm mental models which often are not always internally consistent or coherent

  2. Investigating students' conceptual change about colour in an innovative research-based teaching sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Lopes Mota

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the second part of a multiphase study investigating the impact of a mathematical model, the Addition Table of Colours (ATC, in the learning of colour phenomena. The ATC instruction was undertaken in several 8th grade classes in three different Portuguese schools (250 students and included collaborative activities through Lab stations model. In the control group (204 students, the colour phenomena were taught in the traditional way, with the goals set by the teachers, without any intervention of the project. The two groups of students were compared in terms of content knowledge acquired in the learning of this subject through comparison and analysis of their pre and post-tests. Quantitative analyses of the pre/post-tests revealed five variants of students’ representations about this phenomenon. We found that the ATC model, inserted in an interactive and carefully designed teaching environment, is more effective in promoting conceptual change and scientific understandings of colour phenomena.

  3. A Laboratory Investigation on Shear Strength Behavior of Sandy Soil: Effect of Glass Fiber and Clinker Residue Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouaricha Leyla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken to investigate the shear strength parameters of treated sands reinforced with randomly distributed glass fibers by carrying out direct shear test after seven days curing periods. Firstly, we studied the fiber content and fiber length effect on the peak shear strength on samples. The second part gives a parametric analysis on the effect of glass fiber and clinker residue content on the shear strength parameters for two types of uniform Algerian sands having different particle sizes (Chlef sand and Rass sand with an average relative density Dr = 50%. Finally, the test results show that the combination of glass fiber and clinker residue content can effectively improve the shear strength parameters of soil in comparison with unreinforced soil. For instance, there is a significant gain for the cohesion and friction angle of reinforced sand of Chlef. Compared to unreinforced sand, the cohesion for sand reinforced with different ratios of clinker residue increased by 4.36 to 43.08 kPa for Chlef sand and by 3.1 to 28.64 kPa for Rass sand. The feature friction angles increased from 38.73° to 43.01° (+4.28°, and after the treatment, clinker residue content of soil evaluated to 5% (WRC = 5%.

  4. A Laboratory Investigation on Shear Strength Behavior of Sandy Soil: Effect of Glass Fiber and Clinker Residue Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaricha, Leyla; Henni, Ahmed Djafar; Lancelot, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A study was undertaken to investigate the shear strength parameters of treated sands reinforced with randomly distributed glass fibers by carrying out direct shear test after seven days curing periods. Firstly, we studied the fiber content and fiber length effect on the peak shear strength on samples. The second part gives a parametric analysis on the effect of glass fiber and clinker residue content on the shear strength parameters for two types of uniform Algerian sands having different particle sizes (Chlef sand and Rass sand) with an average relative density Dr = 50%. Finally, the test results show that the combination of glass fiber and clinker residue content can effectively improve the shear strength parameters of soil in comparison with unreinforced soil. For instance, there is a significant gain for the cohesion and friction angle of reinforced sand of Chlef. Compared to unreinforced sand, the cohesion for sand reinforced with different ratios of clinker residue increased by 4.36 to 43.08 kPa for Chlef sand and by 3.1 to 28.64 kPa for Rass sand. The feature friction angles increased from 38.73° to 43.01° (+4.28°), and after the treatment, clinker residue content of soil evaluated to 5% (WRC = 5%).

  5. Heavy metal contamination of surface soil in electronic waste dismantling area: site investigation and source-apportionment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinhui Li; Huabo Duan; Pixing Shi

    2011-07-01

    The dismantling and disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) in developing countries is causing increasing concern because of its impacts on the environment and risks to human health. Heavy-metal concentrations in the surface soils of Guiyu (Guangdong Province, China) were monitored to determine the status of heavy-metal contamination on e-waste dismantling area with a more than 20 years history. Two metalloids and nine metals were selected for investigation. This paper also attempts to compare the data among a variety of e-waste dismantling areas, after reviewing a number of heavy-metal contamination-related studies in such areas in China over the past decade. In addition, source apportionment of heavy metal in the surface soil of these areas has been analysed. Both the MSW open-burning sites probably contained invaluable e-waste and abandoned sites formerly involved in informal recycling activities are the new sources of soil-based environmental pollution in Guiyu. Although printed circuit board waste is thought to be the main source of heavy-metal emissions during e-waste processing, requirement is necessary to soundly manage the plastic separated from e-waste, which mostly contains heavy metals and other toxic substances.

  6. Investigating the Status of Tablet Computers and E-Books Use of Open Education Faculty Students: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçak, Ömer; Yildirim, Önder; Kursun, Engin; Yildirim, Gürkan

    2016-01-01

    The increase in tablet computers and e-books use brings to mind the question of how users benefited from these technologies. In this sense, the present study investigated the status of students' tablet computers and e-books use and the reasons why students prefer to use and not use of tablet computers and e-books. Students' study habits while…

  7. An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Increasing Academic Learning Time for College Undergraduate Students' Achievement in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shammari, Zaid; Mohammad, Anwar; Al-Shammari, Bandar

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the effectiveness of increasing ALT for college students' achievement in Kuwait. In Phase 1, 37 students participated (22, experimental; 15, control); in Phase 2, 19 students participated (8, sub-experimental; 11, sub-control). Several experimental research methods used in conducting this study, including development of a…

  8. An Investigation of the Impact of Instructional Fading Using Completion Problems on Student Performance in Principles of Accounting Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingry, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    The effects of instructional fading using completion problems on student performance were investigated in this study. Instructional fading is the gradual withdrawal of the amount of assistance provided to the student and was accomplished in this study using completion problems. They were used to gradually transition the student from completely…

  9. Why Are Students (Not) Motivated to Change Academic Procrastination? An Investigation Based on the Transtheoretical Model of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunschel, Carola; Schopenhauer, Lena

    2015-01-01

    In light of the drawbacks of academic procrastination, it is surprising that not all students want to decrease academic procrastination. To find out why students are motivated (or not) to change academic procrastination, we investigated the characteristics of 377 German students with different motivations to change based on the Transtheoretical…

  10. International Field Research with Undergraduate Students: Investigating Active Tectonics of the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J. S.; Gardner, T. W.; Protti, M.

    2005-12-01

    Over the past eight years, 18 undergraduate students from 12 U.S. and Costa Rican universities and colleges have participated in field research projects investigating coastal tectonics on the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. These projects have been organized around two different models: 1) a month-long "field camp" with 10 students and 5 project faculty (Keck Geology Consortium Project, 1998), and 2) several two-week field projects with 1-3 students and one faculty advisor (Cal Poly Pomona University and Trinity University). Under the direction of the authors, each of these projects has been carefully designed to provide a new piece to a larger research puzzle. The Nicoya Peninsula lies along Costa Rica's northern Pacific coast inboard of the Middle America Trench where the Cocos and Caribbean plates converge at 10 cm/yr. In 1950, the peninsula was shaken by a ~M 7.7 subduction earthquake that produced widespread damage and 0.5-1.0 m of coseismic coastal uplift. With a large slip deficit since 1950, the Nicoya Peninsula is viewed as a high-potential seismic gap. Field study of uplifted Quaternary marine terraces along the Nicoya coastline provides undergraduate students with a unique opportunity to examine rapid forearc deformation related to large subduction earthquakes. The field research conducted by each of these students provides the basis for a senior thesis at their home institution. In most cases, the students have focused their individual work on separate, but adjacent field areas. Collectively, each of these projects has generated significant data that contribute toward of an ongoing investigation of fore arc tectonics and subduction cycle earthquakes along the Costa Rican Pacific margin.

  11. Investigation of the radioactivity in air, water and soil in the Estado de Chihuahua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montero C, M.E.; Renteria V, M.; Herrera P, E.F.; Villalba, M.L.; Colmenero S, L.H.

    2004-01-01

    The results of the determinations of activities of the series of U-238, Th-232 and the K-40 in soils, of the Rn-222 in the air of the domiciles, and in underground water are presented, as well as the total uranium activity in underground water, product of an extensive sampling in the state of Chihuahua. In two of the aquifers a positive correlation was obtained among the concentration of total uranium and the Rn-222 dissolved in the water of each well. Also it was finds a positive tendency among the averages of the concentration of U-238 in the soil and of the concentration of Rn-222 in the air of the domiciles in different towns, and among the averages of the concentration of U-238 in the floor and of the concentration of the Rn-222 dissolved in the well water in different aquifer. It is suggested that the constitution for rocks more or less uraniferous of the alluvial valleys gives explanation to the observed correlations. (Author)

  12. Application of PIXE analysis to investigation of plants cultivated with contaminated soil of Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, K., E-mail: keizo.ishii@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Living Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Terakawa, A.; Matsuyama, S.; Ishizaki, A.; Arai, H.; Osada, N.; Sugai, H.; Takahashi, H. [Research Center for Remediation Engineering of Living Environments Contaminated with Radioisotopes, Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Sera, K. [Cyclotron Research Center, Iwate Medical University, 348-58 Tomegamori, Takizawa, Iwate 020-0173 (Japan); Sasaki, H.; Sasaki, K.; Sawamura, T. [Sasaki Taro memorial PIXE Center, Asano-cho 5, Hakodate 040-0076 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We present a method to research low radioactive cesium contaminated plants by the use of PIXE analysis. Highly contaminated regions still remain in the Fukushima prefecture. We collected wild plants growing in this area, that is, Butterbur, Welsh onion, Alpine leek and White clover and measured their specific activities of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K. We also measured {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K specific activities of soil under these plants. Soil-to-plant transfer factors of {sup 137}Cs were ∼0.02 for 4 wild plants and those of {sup 40}K were ∼0.5 except for White clover. Using PIXE analysis, we measured the concentration of mineral elements in these plants. Among mineral elements, we noted the concentrations of additional alkali metal elements such as Na, K and Rb. The experimental results showed that the concentration of Rb was proportional to the specific activities of {sup 137}Cs except for Welsh onion and other elements had no strong correlation with {sup 137}Cs. These results indicate that there may be correlations between the adsorption of Cs and Rb.

  13. Analysis of plant soil seed banks and seed dispersal vectors: Its potential and limits for forensic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šumberová, Kateřina; Ducháček, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Plant seeds exhibit many species-specific traits, thus potentially being especially helpful for forensic investigations. Seeds of a broad range of plant species occur in soil seed banks of various habitats and may become attached in large quantities to moving objects. Although plant seeds are now routinely used as trace evidence in forensic practice, only scant information has been published on this topic in the scientific literature. Thus, the standard methods remain unknown to specialists in such botanical subjects as plant ecology and plant geography. These specialists, if made aware of the forensic uses of seeds, could help in development of new, more sophisticated approaches. We aim to bridge the gap between forensic analysts and botanists. Therefore, we explore the available literature and compare it with our own experiences to reveal both the potential and limits of soil seed bank and seed dispersal analysis in forensic investigations. We demonstrate that habitat-specific and thus relatively rare species are of the greatest forensic value. Overall species composition, in terms of species presence/absence and relative abundance can also provide important information. In particular, the ecological profiles of seeds found on any moving object can help us identify the types of environments through which the object had travelled. We discuss the applicability of this approach to various European environments, with the ability to compare seed samples with georeferenced vegetation databases being particularly promising for forensic investigations. We also explore the forensic limitations of soil seed bank and seed dispersal vector analyses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterisation of agricultural waste-derived biochars and their sorption potential for sulfamethoxazole in pasture soil: A spectroscopic investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Prakash; Sarmah, Ajit K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of feedstock type and pyrolysis temperatures on the sorptive potential of a model pastoral soil amended with biochars for sulfamethoxazole (SMO), using laboratory batch sorption studies. The results indicated that high temperature chars exhibited enhanced adsorptive potential, compared to low temperature chars. Pine sawdust (PSD) biochar produced at 700 °C using the steam gasification process exhibited the highest sorptive capacity (2-fold greater than the control treatment) for SMO among the three biochars used. Soils amended with green waste (GW) biochars produced at three different pyrolysis temperatures showed a small increase in SMO sorption with the increases in temperature. The NMR spectra, the elemental molar ratios (H/C, O/C) and polarity index (O + N)/C of the biochars revealed that PSD biochar possessed the highest degree of aromatic condensation compared to CC and GW chars. These results correlated well with the sorption affinity of each biochar, with effective distribution coefficient (K d eff ) being highest for PSD and lowest for GW biochars. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results for the biochars showed a relatively large difference in oxygen containing surface functional groups amongst the GW biochars. However, they exhibited nearly identical sorption affinity to SMO, indicating negligible role of oxygen containing surface functional groups on SMO sorption. These observations provide important information on the use of biochars as engineered sorbents for environmental applications, such as reducing the bioavailability of antibiotics and/or predicting the fate of sulfonamides in biochar-amended soils. - Highlights: • High temperature chars showed enhanced adsorptive potential, compared to low temperature chars. • Oxygen containing acidic functional groups of biochar play negligible role in sorption. • Biochar properties like specific surface area and aromaticity enhanced its sorption capacity. • Amendment of

  15. Characterisation of agricultural waste-derived biochars and their sorption potential for sulfamethoxazole in pasture soil: A spectroscopic investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Prakash; Sarmah, Ajit K., E-mail: a.sarmah@auckland.ac.nz

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of feedstock type and pyrolysis temperatures on the sorptive potential of a model pastoral soil amended with biochars for sulfamethoxazole (SMO), using laboratory batch sorption studies. The results indicated that high temperature chars exhibited enhanced adsorptive potential, compared to low temperature chars. Pine sawdust (PSD) biochar produced at 700 °C using the steam gasification process exhibited the highest sorptive capacity (2-fold greater than the control treatment) for SMO among the three biochars used. Soils amended with green waste (GW) biochars produced at three different pyrolysis temperatures showed a small increase in SMO sorption with the increases in temperature. The NMR spectra, the elemental molar ratios (H/C, O/C) and polarity index (O + N)/C of the biochars revealed that PSD biochar possessed the highest degree of aromatic condensation compared to CC and GW chars. These results correlated well with the sorption affinity of each biochar, with effective distribution coefficient (K{sub d}{sup eff}) being highest for PSD and lowest for GW biochars. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results for the biochars showed a relatively large difference in oxygen containing surface functional groups amongst the GW biochars. However, they exhibited nearly identical sorption affinity to SMO, indicating negligible role of oxygen containing surface functional groups on SMO sorption. These observations provide important information on the use of biochars as engineered sorbents for environmental applications, such as reducing the bioavailability of antibiotics and/or predicting the fate of sulfonamides in biochar-amended soils. - Highlights: • High temperature chars showed enhanced adsorptive potential, compared to low temperature chars. • Oxygen containing acidic functional groups of biochar play negligible role in sorption. • Biochar properties like specific surface area and aromaticity enhanced its sorption capacity.

  16. Investigating the Impact of Using a CAD Simulation Tool on Students' Learning of Design Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleyarkhan, Manaz; Dasgupta, Chandan; Garcia, John Mendoza; Magana, Alejandra J.

    2018-02-01

    Engineering design thinking is hard to teach and still harder to learn by novices primarily due to the undetermined nature of engineering problems that often results in multiple solutions. In this paper, we investigate the effect of teaching engineering design thinking to freshmen students by using a computer-aided Design (CAD) simulation software. We present a framework for characterizing different levels of engineering design thinking displayed by students who interacted with the CAD simulation software in the context of a collaborative assignment. This framework describes the presence of four levels of engineering design thinking—beginning designer, adept beginning designer, informed designer, adept informed designer. We present the characteristics associated with each of these four levels as they pertain to four engineering design strategies that students pursued in this study—understanding the design challenge, building knowledge, weighing options and making tradeoffs, and reflecting on the process. Students demonstrated significant improvements in two strategies—understanding the design challenge and building knowledge. We discuss the affordances of the CAD simulation tool along with the learning environment that potentially helped students move towards Adept informed designers while pursuing these design strategies.

  17. Investigating and improving student understanding of quantum mechanical observables and their corresponding operators in Dirac notation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshman, Emily; Singh, Chandralekha

    2018-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, for every physical observable, there is a corresponding Hermitian operator. According to the most common interpretation of quantum mechanics, measurement of an observable collapses the quantum state into one of the possible eigenstates of the operator and the corresponding eigenvalue is measured. Since Dirac notation is an elegant notation that is commonly used in upper-level quantum mechanics, it is important that students learn to express quantum operators corresponding to observables in Dirac notation in order to apply the quantum formalism effectively in diverse situations. Here we focus on an investigation that suggests that, even though Dirac notation is used extensively, many advanced undergraduate and PhD students in physics have difficulty expressing the identity operator and other Hermitian operators corresponding to physical observables in Dirac notation. We first describe the difficulties students have with expressing the identity operator and a generic Hermitian operator corresponding to an observable in Dirac notation. We then discuss how the difficulties found via written surveys and individual interviews were used as a guide in the development of a quantum interactive learning tutorial (QuILT) to help students develop a good grasp of these concepts. The QuILT strives to help students become proficient in expressing the identity operator and a generic Hermitian operator corresponding to an observable in Dirac notation. We also discuss the effectiveness of the QuILT based on in-class evaluations.

  18. Investigating the Information Needs of University Students in Foundational Foreign Language Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenna Westwood

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This investigation seeks to address two issues: first, to discover if there is evidence that university students in foundational language courses need information resources to support their language learning and second, if such evidence exists, what the specific information resource needs might be and how important those resources are to students’ language learning. After engaging in a year of foreign language study, the author used the evidence gathered to develop and conduct a survey of the user needs of language students at the Self Access Centre (CAADI of the University of Guanajuato, Mexico. Results of the survey supported the personal learning experiences of the author. Over 80% of students surveyed reported using the information resources in the CAADI at least once a week with general grammar books, course text books and films being reported as the most important resources. This investigation provides a starting point for research in to the collection development practices of academic libraries supporting the learning of foreign languages. By examining the information needs of one population, evidence has been provided that these students do indeed need information resources to support their language learning. The study suggests specific resource types that could be important for these users.

  19. Digging up your dirt. High school students combine small-scale respiration and soil carbon measurements with satellite imagery in hands-on inquiry activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, K.; Throop, H.

    2015-12-01

    One of the greatest impacts on the global carbon cycle is changes in land use. Making this concept relevant and inquiry-based for high school students is challenging. Many are familiar with reconstructing paleo-climate from ice core data, but few have a connection to current climate research. Many students ask questions like 'What will our area be like in 20 years?' or 'How much does planting trees help?' while few have the scientific language to engage in a discussion to answer these questions. Our work connects students to climate change research in several ways: first, teacher Keska Kemper engaged in field research with Dr. Heather Throop creating a 'teacher in the field' perspective for students in the classroom. Dr. Throop met with Keska Kemper's students several times to develop an inquiry-based field study. Students predicted and then measured rates of respiration between different soil types in an urban park close to their school. Students then could compare their results from Portland, Oregon to Throop's work across a rain gradient in Australia. Discussions about percent tree cover and soil carbon helped students see connections between land use changes and changes in carbon cycling. Last, students examined satellite imagery to determine percent tree cover and numberss of trees to compare to soil carbon in the same region. Students were able to examine imagery over the last 30 years to visualize land use changes in the greater Portland area.

  20. An Ongoing Investigation of Science Literacy: Results of a 22-Year Study Probing Students' Knowledge and Attitude Towards Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impey, C.; Buxner, S.; Antonellis, J.; CATS

    2013-04-01

    This talk presents findings related to our ongoing work investigating students' knowledge and attitudes towards science and technology. We present an overview of research studies and findings including a comparison of the science literacy measures of University of Arizona students compared to national studies, conceptions related to astrology, views of radiation, and students' pseudoscience and religious beliefs. We discuss implications for instructors and researchers interested in improving students' science literacy scores and diagnosing alternative beliefs.

  1. A cross-cultural investigation of multiple intelligences in university-level nutrition students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Joy E.

    Effective strategies for the recruitment and retention of a diverse student body in undergraduate nutrition and dietetics programs are needed in order for graduates to effectively meet the health and nutrition needs of a diverse clientele. One way to promote diversity and improve teaching methods in dietetics education is through a framework based on Howard Gardner's Theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI). The theory suggests that individuals possess varying degrees of eight different intelligences which are shaped by genetics and cultural context. Relatively little research has been conducted to investigate MI approaches in the areas of higher education, cross-cultural education, or dietetics education. Therefore, this study investigated the MI profiles of students within undergraduate nutrition programs at Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City, Mexico and Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri, United States. Data were collected through the Multiple Intelligences Developmental Assessment Scales (MIDAS). The findings provide a profile of the intellectual dispositions for the study population and suggest that dietetics students in this cross-cultural study population score highest for the MIDAS scale measuring interpersonal intelligence, with significant differences occurring between scores for the eight intelligences measured by the MIDAS. Not only were there significant differences between scale scores when analyzing the population as a whole, there were also significant differences in scale scores when comparing American and Mexican students. This phenomenon was also true when scores were grouped into five ordinal categories. In addition, the findings suggest that differences exist among the particular skills associated with the intelligences for the students at each university. Results indicate that skills related to social sensitivity and persuasion are significantly higher than many other skills for dietetics students. Further, when comparing the

  2. Investigation of the Possibility of Phytoremediating a Soil Contaminated with Anthracene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ahmadi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs are one of the most important organic pollutants frequently found in the environment. In this experiment, the effect of phytoremediation as a cost effective method was studied on the concentration of anthracene (C14H10 which is one of PAHs. The effect of sorghum (V1, hairy vetch (V2 and oat (V3 was studied under four concentrations of anthracene (S1, S2, S3 and S4 in soil. In S1 level which pollution was the lowest, the three plants had the highest reduction rate. The reduction rate was decreased by increasing the pollution level (S2 and S3,; the lowest reduction rate was observed in S4 level which had the highest pollution level. There was significant difference between the three plants and the fallow. Generally, hairy vetch had the highest phytoremediating capacity and resistance compared with the other plants.

  3. What does media use reveal about personality and mental health? An exploratory investigation among German students

    OpenAIRE

    Brailovskaia, Julia; Margraf, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between personality traits, mental health variables and media use among German students. The data of 633 participants were collected. Results indicate a positive association between general Internet use, general use of social platforms and Facebook use, on the one hand, and self-esteem, extraversion, narcissism, life satisfaction, social support and resilience, on the other hand. Use of computer games was found to be negatively related t...

  4. Comprehension of marketing research textbooks among South African students: An investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Berndt, Adele; Petzer, Daniel; Wayland, Jane P.

    2014-01-01

    Reading is a skill people require in order to operate successfully in all spheres of life.  Mastering this skill is even more critical when pursuing academic studies. This study investigated the reading comprehension of final year undergraduate marketing students at a South African higher education institution (HEI) relating to their comprehension of marketing research textbooks. Two measurement instruments were used to test their reading comprehension. One instrument contained two passages f...

  5. An investigation on image of nuclear energy from the view of Japanese high school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Reiko; Nakayama, Kazuhiko.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have conducted an investigation on Japanese high school students' knowledge, recognition and interest on energy issues. How they are currently recognizing the 'Nuclear Energy' and whether there is a difference in the way of recognition with their attributes have been revealed in this investigation. A questionnaire based on a word association (WA) method and a cluster analysis have been carried out. Using these statistical methodologies, a picture of energy issues from the view of young generations has been cleared. The authors believe that the analysis in the field of nuclear energy by means of such techniques has been done for the first time in Japan. (author)

  6. Preliminary study on the use of the 137Cs method for soil erosion investigation in the pampean region of Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujan, A.; Yanez, M.S.; Santanatoglia, O.J.; Chagas, C.; Massobrio, M.; Castiglioni, M.; Ciallella, H.; Fernandez, J.

    2000-01-01

    Soil erosion is the most important degradation process in Argentine. According to the estimation of 4.9 million ha in Pampa Ondulada Region, 1.600.000 ha (36% of agricultural soils) are affected by the erosion. Field measurements of soil erosion and sediment deposition using classical techniques are difficult, time consuming, and expensive but indispensable to feed the prediction models for conservation practices design and farm planning. Many authors have reported that the measurement of fallout nuclides is useful tool to characterize geomorphical processes. Walling and He proposes models for converting 137 Cs depletion/enrichment amounts to net soil loss/deposition. These models are based in the comparison between a reference 137 Cs profile in a long term undisturbed site (control site) and the 137 Cs profiles in the suspected eroded or deposited sites in the landscape. The aim of this study is to provide a complete and well representative set of data on the erosion intensity in topographical conditions for the Pampa Ondulada Region in Argentine by using a tracer technique. The study area is a small watershed (about 300 ha), located in Arroyo del Tala medium basin, within Partido of San Pedro in Buenos Aires Province, Argentine. This paper presents a group of results from a detailed investigation of erosion and sediment delivery, within a 49 ha cultivated field study site in this watershed. The base of sampling strategy is the grid approach. A reference inventory, representing the local fallout input, was searched for at a site experiencing neither erosion nor deposition. Radiocaesium analyses were made at the Nuclear Regulatory Authority Laboratory by a GE Hp detector. To make an interpretation of 137 Cs distribution of soil losses and sedimentation, the Mass Balance Model 2 was used (Walling and He 1997). The erosion/deposition rates from Mass Balance Model 2 are in the range of 0 to -30 t·ha -1 ·y -1 for erosion, and 0 to 19 t·ha -1 ·y -1 for deposition

  7. Investigating the use of smartphones for learning purposes by Australian dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rung, Andrea; Warnke, Frauke; Mattheos, Nikos

    2014-04-30

    Mobile Internet devices and smartphones have at present a significant potential as learning tools and the development of educational interventions based on smartphones have attracted increasing attention. The objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight in the nature of students' use of smartphones, as well as their attitudes towards educational use of mobile devices in order to design successful teaching interventions. A questionnaire was designed, aiming to investigate the actual daily habitual use, as well as the attitudes of dental students towards smartphones for their university education purposes. The survey was used to collect data from 232 dental students. Of the 232 respondents, 204 (87.9%) owned a smartphone, and 191 (82.3%) had access to third generation (3G) mobile carriers. The most popular devices were the iPhone and Android. Most of the respondents had intermediate smartphone skills and used smartphones for a number of learning activities. Only 75/232 (32.3%) had specific educational applications installed, while 148/232 (63.7%) used smartphones to access to social media and found it valuable for their education (Psocial media with their smartphones also showed significantly more advanced skills with smartphones than those who did not (Psmartphone skills. There was positive correlation between smartphone skills and students' attitudes toward improving access to learning material (r=.43, Psmartphones by teaching staff (r=.45, Psmartphones and social media for their education even though this technology has not been formally included in the curriculum. This might present an opportunity for educators to design educational methods, activities, and material that are suitable for smartphones and allow students to use this technology, thereby accommodating students' current diverse learning approaches.

  8. Academic provenance: Investigation of pathways that lead students into the geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlton, Heather R.

    Pathways that lead students into the geosciences as a college major have not been fully explored in the current literature, despite the recent studies on the "geoscience pipeline model." Anecdotal evidence suggests low quality geoscience curriculum in K-12 education, lack of visibility of the discipline and lack of knowledge about geoscience careers contribute to low geoscience enrollments at universities. This study investigated the reasons why college students decided to major in the geosciences. Students' interests, experiences, motivations and desired future careers were examined to develop a pathway model. In addition, self-efficacy was used to inform pathway analyses, as it is an influential factor in academic major and career choice. These results and interpretations have strong implications for recruitment and retention in academia and industry. A semi-structured interview protocol was developed, which was informed by John Flanagan's critical incident theory. The responses to this interview were used to identify common experiences that diverse students shared for reasons they became geoscience majors. Researchers used self-efficacy theory by Alfred Bandura to assess students' pathways. Seventeen undergraduate geoscience majors from two U.S. Midwest research universities were sampled for cross-comparison and analysis. Qualitative analyses led to the development of six categorical steps for the geoscience pathway. The six pathway steps are: innate attributes/interest sources, pre-college critical incidents, college critical incidents, current/near future goals, expected career attributes and desired future careers. Although, how students traversed through each step was unique for individuals, similar patterns were identified between different populations in our participants: Natives, Immigrants and Refugees. In addition, critical incidents were found to act on behavior in two different ways: to support and confirm decision-making behavior (supportive critical

  9. An Investigation into Aspects of Thai Culture and Its Impact on Thai Students in an International School in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveney, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    This article describes research undertaken to investigate aspects of Thai culture and its effects on Thai students in an international school in Thailand. Using a variety of data gathering methods, the investigation looks at how Thai culture manifests itself in the classroom in the form of student behaviour and attitudes. The research also…

  10. An Investigation into the Involvement of California Central Valley High School Students with Disabilities in the IEP Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Cheryle Ann

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of California Central Valley high school students with disabilities in the Individual Education Plan (IEP) process. Specifically, this study investigated the involvement of students with disabilities in the development of the IEP and IEP meetings. In addition, this study explored the…

  11. Grade 8 students' capability of analytical thinking and attitude toward science through teaching and learning about soil and its' pollution based on science technology and society (STS) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonprasert, Lapisarin; Tupsai, Jiraporn; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    This study reported Grade 8 students' analytical thinking and attitude toward science in teaching and learning about soil and its' pollution through science technology and society (STS) approach. The participants were 36 Grade 8 students in Naklang, Nongbualumphu, Thailand. The teaching and learning about soil and its' pollution through STS approach had carried out for 6 weeks. The soil and its' pollution unit through STS approach was developed based on framework of Yuenyong (2006) that consisted of five stages including (1) identification of social issues, (2) identification of potential solutions, (3) need for knowledge, (4) decision-making, and (5) socialization stage. Students' analytical thinking and attitude toward science was collected during their learning by participant observation, analytical thinking test, students' tasks, and journal writing. The findings revealed that students could gain their capability of analytical thinking. They could give ideas or behave the characteristics of analytical thinking such as thinking for classifying, compare and contrast, reasoning, interpreting, collecting data and decision making. Students' journal writing reflected that the STS class of soil and its' pollution motivated students. The paper will discuss implications of these for science teaching and learning through STS in Thailand.

  12. Understanding the soil underfoot: building a national postgraduate soils cohort through participative learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinton, John; Haygarth, Phil; Black, Helaina; Allton, Kathryn

    2015-04-01

    Many of the PhD students starting Soil Science PhDs have only a limited understanding of the wider importance of soils, the state -of-art in other sub disciplines, and have often never seen a soil profile in the field. As the number of students nationally in the UK is also small compared to some other disciplines there is also a need to build a cohort of early career researchers. To address these issues, Lancaster University and the James Hutton Institute together with support from the British Society of Soil Science and the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), ran a 5 day residential foundation soil science 'Summer School' in March 2015. The training school was an intense programme for ambitious and energetic post-graduate students. The course was specifically designed for students who were keen to develop skills in the development of inter-disciplinary research ideas and proposals. Specifically the course addressed: • the different functions in land uses and across landscapes • novel approaches for investigating how soils function • the basics of making a soil description and soil sampling in the field; • the current key challenges in soil science research • the requirements of, and approaches to, soil science research that requires multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches • the essentials of developing and planning a research project Our approach was to provide a space for the students to both learn from, but also work with some of the leading UK Soil Science experts. We used workshop style lectures, including some delivered via the internet, combined with student research teams working alongside research mentors to produce research proposals to be 'pitched' to a panel at the end of the course. These proposals formed the focus for engagement with the 'experts' making the time the students spent with them concentrated and productive. Feedback from the students was excellent and a variant of the course will be repeated by Cranfield

  13. When does nursing burnout begin? An investigation of the fatigue experience of Australian nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rella, Samantha; Winwood, Peter C; Lushington, Kurt

    2009-11-01

    Investigation of chronic maladaptive fatigue evolution among a large group of Australian Bachelor of Nursing (BN) degree students. The training of Australian nurses has changed from a salaried, 'apprenticeship' structure (usually including accommodation) to a University-based (fee paying) degree. Relatively little is known about how these changes have impacted on the strain and fatigue experience of nursing students. A large group of Australian nursing students across 3 years of a BN course (n = 431) participated in an internet-based cross-sectional design study. Levels of maladaptive fatigue, and poor recovery, increased across the course. By its completion, up to 20% of graduates were reporting signs of serious maladaptive fatigue/stress. Contemporary nurse training places many students under significant psycho-social stress. Need to work for personal support as well as study and absence of adequate training in managing these strains appears to underpin this experience. Nurse Managers need to be alert to the fact that new Graduate Nurse Probationer (GNP) year (or its local equivalent) nurses may already be suffering from significant stress/fatigue. To prevent this progressing to more severe states and potential premature quitting the profession, provision of adequate mentoring and guidance in effective stress management may be essential.

  14. Investigation on the Relationship between Information Communication Technology and Reading Literacy for Northeast Asian Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Yi-Horng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of internet communication technologies (ICT usage and reading literacy of Northeast Asian Students in PISA 2009. ICT was crucial for all governments in the world towards promoting equity. ICT had been considered a low cost opportunity towards equalizing educational systems. A multilevel modelling (MLM was applied to identify at which school-level the largest variations in the three indicators exist in this study. With MLM, it could be examine simultaneously the effects of different hierarchical school-level variables; to take account of possible correlations of students’ reading literacy in this study within higher levels (Urbanization, Total number of students Computers for education which may otherwise lead to incorrect standard errors and inefficient estimates; to treat higher levels as related; and to examine inter-area variations at each level. The empirical results include the different between group components was significant. Self-confidence in ICT high level tasks was positive with students’ reading literacy, and self-confidence in ICT high level tasks was negative with students’ reading literacy. The urbanization of schools’ area and total number of students of schools were positive with students’ reading literacy. The urbanization of schools’ area was negative with the relationship of ICT for school related tasks and students’ reading literacy. Total number of students was negative with the relationship of ICT for school related tasks and students’ reading literacy, and ICT availability in school and students’ reading literacy.

  15. Investigating the prevalence of personality disorders and its relationship with personality traits among students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davod Ghaderi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed to investigate the prevalence of personality disorders and its relationship with personality traits among students. This research was among epidemiological-correlational descriptive studies. Method: For this purpose, 389 male students were selected via a multi-stage cluster sampling method. All subjects completed Millon's personality disorder (1987 and five-factor personality Costaand McCrae's questionnaires (1989. Results: The results showed that the prevalence of personality disorders is among students. It was also found that there existed a positive correlation between schizoid, avoidant, dependent, schizotypal, borderline and paranoid personality disorders with Neuroticism factor (r = .1. There was a significant negative correlation between schizoid, avoidant and schizotypal personality disorders with extraversion factor (r = .1 and significant positive correlation between histrionic disorders and extraversion (r = .1. There was a significant negative correlation between dependent personality disorder and Openness factor (r = .1 , significant negative correlation between narcissistic, antisocial and paranoid personality disorders with agree ableness factor (r = .1 and finally, significant negative correlation between antisocial, passive-aggressive and borderline personality disorders with accountability factor (r = .1and a significant positive correlation between accountability factor and compulsive personality disorder (r = .1. Conclusion: The results suggest a prevalence of personality disorders among students and significant correlation between some disorders with personality factors. Further studies in this area could provide more insightful findings in the field.

  16. Investigation of antioxidative and anticancer potentials of Streptomyces sp. MUM256 isolated from Malaysia mangrove soil

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    Tan Loh eTeng Hern

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A Streptomyces strain, MUM256 was isolated from Tanjung Lumpur mangrove soil in Malaysia. Characterization of the strain showed that it has properties consistent with those of the members of the genus Streptomyces. In order to explore the potential bioactivities, extract of the fermented broth culture of MUM256 was prepared with organic solvent extraction method. DPPH and SOD activity were utilized to examine the antioxidant capacity and the results have revealed the potency of MUM256 in superoxide anion scavenging activity in dose-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity of MUM256 extract was determined using cell viability assay against 8 different panels of human cancer cell lines. Among all the tested cancer cells, HCT116 was the most sensitive toward the extract treatment. At the highest concentration of tested extract, the result showed 2.3, 2.0 and 1.8 folds higher inhibitory effect against HCT116, HT29 and Caco-2 respectively when compared to normal cell line. This result has demonstrated that MUM256 extract was selectively cytotoxic towards colon cancer cell lines. In order to determine the constituents responsible for its bioactivities, the extract was then subjected to chemical analysis using GC-MS. The analysis resulted in the identification of chemical constituents including phenolic and pyrrolopyrazine compounds which may responsible for antioxidant and anticancer activities observed. Based on the findings of this study, the presence of bioactive constituents in MUM256 extract could be a potential source for the development of antioxidative and chemopreventive agents.

  17. A Range-Wide Experiment to Investigate Nutrient and Soil Moisture Interactions in Loblolly Pine Plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney E. Will

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The future climate of the southeastern USA is predicted to be warmer, drier and more variable in rainfall, which may increase drought frequency and intensity. Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda is the most important commercial tree species in the world and is planted on ~11 million ha within its native range in the southeastern USA. A regional study was installed to evaluate effects of decreased rainfall and nutrient additions on loblolly pine plantation productivity and physiology. Four locations were established to capture the range-wide variability of soil and climate. Treatments were initiated in 2012 and consisted of a factorial combination of throughfall reduction (approximate 30% reduction and fertilization (complete suite of nutrients. Tree and stand growth were measured at each site. Results after two growing seasons indicate a positive but variable response of fertilization on stand volume increment at all four sites and a negative effect of throughfall reduction at two sites. Data will be used to produce robust process model parameterizations useful for simulating loblolly pine growth and function under future, novel climate and management scenarios. The resulting improved models will provide support for developing management strategies to increase pine plantation productivity and carbon sequestration under a changing climate.

  18. Investigation on the Binding of Polycyclic AromaticHydrocarbons with Soil Organic Matter: A Theoretical Approach

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    Patchreenart Saparpakorn

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are ubiquitous contaminants of the terrestrial environment that have been designated as Environmental Protection Agency (EPA Priority Pollutants. In this study, molecular modeling was used to examine the physical and chemical characteristics of soil organic matter (SOM, fulvic acid (FA and humic acid (HA, as well as their binding interactions with PAHs. The molecular structures of 18 PAHs were built by using the SYBYL 7.0 program and then fully optimized by a semiempirical (AM1 method. A molecular docking program, AutoDock 3.05, was used to calculate the binding interactions between the PAHs, and three molecular structure models including FA (Buffle’s model, HA (Stevenson’s model and SOM (Schulten and Schnitzer’s model. The π-π interactions and H-bonding interactions were found to play an important role in the intermolecular bonding of the SOM/PAHs complexes. In addition, significant correlations between two chemical properties, boiling point (bp and octanol/water partition coefficient (Log Kow and final docking energies were observed. The preliminary docking results provided knowledge of the important binding modes to FA, HA and SOM, and thereby to predict the sorption behavior of PAHs and other pollutants.

  19. USDA-ARS and US EPA scientific investigations concerning biochars impact on soil health characteristics, microbial transport, and environmental restoration of mine-impacted soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar is being evaluated by scientists from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) for its potential to sequester soil C, to improve soil health, and to increase crop yields. ARS scientists from multiple locations (Florence SC, K...

  20. APPROACHES IN INVESTIGATING ROMANIA’S IMAGE AS A TOURIST DESTINATION AMONG THE TURKISH STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia BAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The image of the tourist destination plays an essential role in the decision making process regarding the choice of a holiday. Image has a crucial role in the success of the destination because it influences the consumers’ satisfaction and helps in drawing up a promotion strategy for the positioning/repositioning on a certain market, branding/rebranding the tourist destination. Information from different sources contribute to the formation of the image of a certain destination, information which can be distributed into: the promotion performed by the destination; the other’s opinions (direct or indirect; mass-media and the popular culture. We intended to investigate Romania’s image a a tourist destination among the Turkish students. The results showed that the students had very poor knowledge of our country.

  1. Investigating Middle School Math and Primary Teachers' Judgments of the Characteristics of Mathematically Gifted Students

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    Şule Güçyeter

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate teachers’ judgments of mathematically gifted students’ characteristics with respect to various variables. Data were collected from primary school teachers and middle school math teachers (N=161 by using a survey instrument. According to research findings most of the teachers tended to think that mathematical giftedness is being observed more frequently within boys than girls. There was a statistically significant relationship between teachers’ responses about whether mathematical giftedness could be developed or not who have mathematically gifted students and those who have not. But there was no statistically significant relationship among teachers’ branch, teaching experience and their answers about the development of mathematical giftedness. Results showed that there was a statistically significant relationship between teachers’ selfperception of being mathematically gifted and their experience with mathematically gifted students. Total scores of more popular and most popular characteristics that were determined by teachers had a positive correlation with teachers’ experience. Key Words:

  2. Laboratory test investigations on soil water characteristic curve and air permeability of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianyong; Wu, Xun; Ai, Yingbo; Zhang, Zhen

    2018-05-01

    The air permeability coefficient has a high correlation with the water content of municipal solid waste. In this study, continuous drying methodology using a tension meter was employed to construct the soil water characteristic curve of municipal solid waste (M-SWCC). The municipal solid waste air permeability test was conducted by a newly designed apparatus. The measured M-SWCC was well reproduced by the van Genuchten (V-G) model and was used to predict the parameters of typical points in M-SWCC, including saturated water content, field capacity, residual water content and water content at the inflection point. It was found that the M-SWCC was significantly influenced by void ratio. The final evaporation and test period of M-SWCC increase with the increase in void ratio of municipal solid waste. The evolution of air permeability coefficient with water content of municipal solid waste depicted three distinct characteristic stages. It was observed that the water contents that corresponded to the two cut-off points of the three stages were residual water content and water content at the inflection point, respectively. The air permeability coefficient of municipal solid waste decreased with the increase of the water content from zero to the residual water content. The air permeability coefficient was almost invariable when the water content increased from residual water content to the water content at the inflection point. When the water content of municipal solid waste exceeded the water content at the inflection point, the air permeability coefficient sharply decreased with the increase of water content.

  3. Investigation of the variation of the specific heat capacity of local soil samples from the Niger delta, Nigeria with moisture content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofoegbu, C.O.; Adjepong, S.K.

    1987-11-01

    Results of an investigation of the variation, with moisture content, of the specific heat capacity of samples of three texturally different types of soil (clayey, sandy and sandy loam) obtained from the Niger delta area of Nigeria, are presented. The results show that the specific heat capacities of the soils studied, increase with moisture content. This increase is found to be linear for the entire range of moisture contents considered (0-25%), in the case of the sandy loam soil while for the clayey and sandy soils the specific heat capacity is found to increase linearly with moisture content up to about 15% after which the increase becomes parabolic. The rate of increase of specific heat capacity with moisture content appears to be highest in the clayey soil and lowest in the sandy soil. It is thought that the differences in the rates of increase of specific heat capacity with moisture content, observed for the soils, reflect the soils' water-retention capacities. (author) 3 refs, 5 figs

  4. Measuring student engagement in science classrooms: An investigation of the contextual factors and longitudinal outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, Justina Judy

    This dissertation includes three separate but related studies that examine the different dimensions of student experiences in science using data from two different datasets: the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09), and a dataset constructed using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM). This mixed-dataset approach provides a unique perspective on student engagement and the contexts in which it exists. Engagement is operationalized across the three studies using aspects of flow theory to evaluate how the challenges in science classes are experienced at the student level. The data provides information on a student's skill-level and efficacy during the challenge, as well as their interest level and persistence. The data additionally track how situations contribute to optimal learning moments, along with longitudinal attitudes and behaviors towards science. In the first part of this study, the construct of optimal moments is explored using in the moment data from the ESM dataset. Several different measures of engagement are tested and validated to uncover relationships between various affective states and optimal learning experiences with a focus on science classrooms. Additional analyses include investigating the links between in the moment engagement (situational), and cross-situational (stable) measures of engagement in science. The second part of this dissertation analyzes the ESM data in greater depth by examining how engagement varies across students and their contextual environment. The contextual characteristics associated with higher engagement levels are evaluated to see if these conditions hold across different types of students. Chapter three more thoroughly analyzes what contributes to students persisting through challenging learning moments, and the variation in levels of effort put forth when facing difficulty while learning in science. In chapter four, this dissertation explores additional outcomes associated with student engagement in science

  5. Investigation of Different Forms of Potassium as a Function of Clay Mineralogy and Soil Evolution in Some Soils of Fars Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sadri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The optimum and sustainable use of soil is only possible with a correct and complete understanding of its properties. Potassium (K+ is an essential element for plant growth and is a dynamic ion in the soil system and its importance in agriculture is well recognized. According to increasing order of plant availability, soil K exists in four forms: mineral (5000-25000 ppm, nonexchangeable (50-750 ppm, exchangeable (40-600 ppm, and solution (1-10 ppm. K cycling or transformations among the K forms in soils are dynamic. The objectives of the present research were to study the relationship between different forms of potassium and clay mineralogy as well as soil evolution of 14 surface soil samples from some selected locations of Fars Province. Materials and methods: Fars provinces, with an area of 122000 km2 located in southern Iran. The elevation varies from 500 m to 4400 m above mean sea level. Mean annual precipitation ranges from about 350 mm to 850 mm. Mean annual temperature ranges from 10°C to 24°C. According to Soil Moisture and Temperature Regime Map of Iran, the soils comprise xeric, and ustic moisture regimes along with mesic, thermic and hyperthemic temperature regimes. Based on the previous soil survey maps of Fars province, 14 surface soil samples were collected. Routine physicochemical analyses and clay mineralogy were performed on soil samples. Soil reaction, texture, electrical conductivity, calcium carbonate, and gypsum were identified. Soluble potassium, exchangeable potassium, non exchangeable potassium, and mineral potassium were measured. The amounts of K forms in each sample were determined. Total K was determined following digestion (110°C of soil with 48 % HF and 6 M HCl. Water soluble K was measured in the saturated extract. Exchangeable K was extracted with 20 ml 1.0 M NH4OAc (pH 7.0 for 5 min. Nitric acid-extractable K was measured by extraction of a soil sample with boiling 1.0 M HNO3 for 1 h. Potassium

  6. INVESTIGATION ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

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    O. V. Kotomina

    2017-01-01

    intelligence and academic achievement of students. However, contrary to the hypothesis, that interrelation turned out to be negative. With reference to the established facts, it has been suggested that students with the high level of emotional intelligence treat their academic grades more calmly, building full-fledged balance between studies, work and private life.Practical significance. The present findings of the research and results of the first stage of a longitudinal panel investigation of opportunities of psychology and pedagogical influence on development of university students’ emotional intelligence can be used by academic teaching staff of higher education institutions for further work with students.

  7. Investigation of the copper contents in vineyard soil, grape must and wine and the relationship among them in the Huaizhuo Basin Region, China: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangyu; Ma, Tingting; Yu, Jing; Huang, Weidong; Fang, Yulin; Zhan, Jicheng

    2018-02-15

    The copper contents in vineyard soil, grape must and wine and the relationship among them in the Huaizhuo Basin Region, China, were investigated. The results showed that the copper pollution status in vineyard soils, grapes and wines in the investigated area in China is under control, with only 4 surface soil (0-20cm) samples over maximum residue limits (MRL) and no grape or wine samples over MRL. Different vineyards, grape varieties, vine ages, and training systems all significantly influenced the copper contents in the vineyard soils, grape and wines. Additionally, the copper levels in the vineyard soils, grapes and wines all had some correlation. In wine samples, the copper contents ranged from 0.52 to 663μg/L, which is only approximately one percent the level found in grapes and one ten-thousandth that found in soils. Of the wine samples, red wines showed a significantly higher copper content than white wines, while in the red/white grape and soil samples, no significant differences were observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Investigating the extent to which mobile phones reduce Knowledge Transfer barriers in Student Project Teams

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    Michael E. Kyobe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Group learning plays a key role in the transfer of knowledge. In institutions of learning, it enhances students’ understanding, critical thinking, integration of knowledge and knowledge sharing. However, the transfer of knowledge in group projects is often impeded by factors such as time and budget constraints, individual and social barriers, and a lack of motivation.Institutions of learning are increasingly adopting information and communication technologies (e.g. mobile technologies to provide solutions to the challenges facing them. Whilst the integration of the mobile context and technologies in learning environment has been encouraged over the years, and indeed many students today can use mobile phones, the effectiveness of these technologies in reducing impediments to knowledge transfer in group learning has not been investigated.This study investigated the extent to which mobile phones reduce the barriers to knowledge transfer in project groups. The impediments examined include the nature of knowledge, social barriers, lack of time and lack of motivation. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to collect and analyse the data. The sample consisted of 85 students engaged in group projects in the departments of Information Systems, Civil Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Engineering.The results show that mobile phones reduce all four knowledge transfer barriers investigated in the project groups. We found no significant difference in the nature of knowledge shared by teams with weak and strong ties. This suggests that teams with weak social ties who normally experience difficulty sharing complex (tacit knowledge can easily do so with the aid of mobile facilities. In addition, frequent users of mobile phones were motivated to share explicit knowledge with their peers whilst those who often work with tacit knowledge could convert it to explicit form and share it with others. Mobile features like short messaging

  9. Investigating the extent to which mobile phones reduce Knowledge Transfer barriers in Student Project Teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Kyobe

    2011-10-01

    Institutions of learning are increasingly adopting information and communication technologies (e.g. mobile technologies to provide solutions to the challenges facing them. Whilst the integration of the mobile context and technologies in learning environment has been encouraged over the years, and indeed many students today can use mobile phones, the effectiveness of these technologies in reducing impediments to knowledge transfer in group learning has not been investigated. This study investigated the extent to which mobile phones reduce the barriers to knowledge transfer in project groups. The impediments examined include the nature of knowledge, social barriers, lack of time and lack of motivation. Quantitative and qualitative approaches were used to collect and analyse the data. The sample consisted of 85 students engaged in group projects in the departments of Information Systems, Civil Engineering, Computer Science and Construction Engineering. The results show that mobile phones reduce all four knowledge transfer barriers investigated in the project groups. We found no significant difference in the nature of knowledge shared by teams with weak and strong ties. This suggests that teams with weak social ties who normally experience difficulty sharing complex (tacit knowledge can easily do so with the aid of mobile facilities. In addition, frequent users of mobile phones were motivated to share explicit knowledge with their peers whilst those who often work with tacit knowledge could convert it to explicit form and share it with others. Mobile features like short messaging service and multimedia messaging service (SMS & MMS or what some people refer to as ‘texting’, and email were mainly used to share knowledge and were perceived to reduce knowledge transfer time more than voice facilities. Our findings indicate that most students do not utilise the affordances of mobile phones for tacit knowledge transfer. Sharing of tacit knowledge needs to be encouraged

  10. Soil-Transmitted Helminths and Schistosoma mansoni Infections in Ethiopian Orthodox Church Students around Lake Tana, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afework Bitew, Aschalew; Abera, Bayeh; Seyoum, Walle; Endale, Befekadu; Kiber, Tibebu; Goshu, Girma; Admass, Addiss

    2016-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminths (STH) and Schistosoma mansoni infections are the major neglected tropical diseases that result in serious consequences on health, education and nutrition in children in developing countries. The Ethiopian Orthodox church students, who are called Yekolotemari in Amharic, live in areas with poor sanitation and hygiene. Moreover, they are not included in the national STH control programs. Thus, STH and S. mansoni infections prevalence is unknown. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 384 students in June 2014 to determine STH and S. mansoni infections prevalence. Moreover, the knowledge of students about STH and S. mansoni was assessed. Data on knowledge and clinical symptoms were collected using structured questionnaires via face to face interview. Stool specimens were examined by formol-ether concentration method. The overall prevalence of intestinal helminths infections was 85.9% (95% confidence interval (CI): 82.1-89%). STHs infections prevalence was 65.6% (95% CI: 60.7-70.2%). The prevalence of hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura were 31.8% (95% CI: 27.3-36.6%), 29.4% (25-31%) and 3.1% (1.8-5.4%), respectively. On the other hand, S. mansoni prevalence was 14.3% (95% CI: 11.1-18.1%). Majority of students infected with S. mansoni had bloody stool with crud odds-ratio of 2.9 (95% CI: 1.5-5.5). Knowledge assessment showed that 50 (13%) and 18 (4.9%) of the respondents knew about transmission of STH and S. mansoni, respectively. The prevalence of STH and S. mansoni infections were high thus de-worming program should include the students of Ethiopian Orthodox churches. Furthermore, provision and use of sanitary facilities, health education for students to create awareness of parasitic infections and improved personal hygiene should be in place.

  11. An in situ investigation of the influence of a controlled burn on the thermophysical properties of a dry soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. J. Massman; J. M. Frank

    2004-01-01

    High soil temperatures associated with fire influence forests and their ability to regenerate after a fire by altering soil properties and soil chemistry and by killing microbes, plant roots, and seeds. Because intense wild fires are an increasingly common component of the landscape (Graham 2003) and because fire is frequently used by land managers to reduce surface...

  12. Investigation into macroscopic and microscopic behaviors of wet granular soils using discrete element method and X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Vinh-Du; Tang, Anh-Minh; Roux, Jean-Noël; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Aimedieu, Patrick; Bornert, Michel

    2017-06-01

    We present an investigation into macroscopic and microscopic behaviors of wet granular soils using the discrete element method (DEM) and the X-ray Computed Tomography (XRCT) observations. The specimens are first prepared in very loose states, with frictional spherical grains in the presence of a small amount of an interstitial liquid. Experimental oedometric tests are carried out with small glass beads, while DEM simulations implement a model of spherical grains joined by menisci. Both in experiments and in simulations, loose configurations with solid fraction as low as 0.30 are prepared under low stress, and undergo a gradual collapse in compression, until the solid fraction of cohesionless bead packs (0.58 to 0.6) is obtained. In the XRCT tests, four 3D tomography images corresponding to different typical stages of the compression curve are used to characterize the microstructure.

  13. Investigation into health science students' awareness of occupational therapy: implications for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Naser; Shayea, Abdulaziz; Nadar, Mohammed; Abu Tariah, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the level of awareness of the occupational therapy profession among final-year health sciences students at Kuwait University. This study utilized a survey targeting final-year students in the Health Sciences Center at Kuwait University schools of medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, and allied health sciences. The survey addressed awareness of occupational therapy, its scope of practice, work environments, and preference for learning more about the profession. Of the 244 surveys distributed, 132 were returned, for a 54% response rate. The proportion of those who knew about occupational therapy ranged from 94% (radiologic science) to a low of 17% (medicine). Most respondents learned about occupational therapy from colleagues (77.1%), rather than from their academic programs (28.1%). RESULTS indicated that about one fifth of students (21.4%) were unsure about the role of occupational therapists as members of the health care team. Preferences for learning more about the profession were consistent with interprofessional opportunities, such as observing an occupational therapy session (64.5%) and attending a workshop (63.6%) or presentation (59.8%). Although most respondents had some awareness of occupational therapy, specifics about its scope of practice and relevance to the health care team were lacking. Preferences for learning more about occupational therapy were consistent with the current trend for interprofessional education in health care. Implications for interprofessional education are presented.

  14. Motivational factors associated with drowsy driving behavior: a qualitative investigation of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kenneth H; Lee, Clark J; Weiner, Talia

    2018-02-01

    This qualitative investigation sought to identify the motivational factors that contribute to drowsy driving in college students and to discover important messaging strategies that may help prevent or reduce this behavior in this population. Four focus groups of college students. A large university in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area during the Fall 2016 term. Twenty-six undergraduate students between the ages of 18 and 25 years. Notes and transcripts from the focus group sessions were analyzed to identify recurring themes regarding attitudes, motivations, experiences, influences, and potential preventive messaging strategies related to drowsy driving. Although most participants had heard of drowsy driving and were concerned about it, they did not associate it with legal risks and were more concerned about alcohol-impaired and distracted driving as crash risks. Participants viewed drowsy driving as a normal and unavoidable part of their lives over which they had little control. For potential anti-drowsy driving messaging strategies, participants preferred messages delivered via audiovisual or social media that featured graphic and emotional portrayals of crashes and their consequences. Participants also voiced strong support for preventive messaging strategies equating various degrees of sleep deprivation to known impairing levels of alcohol, as well as messages providing cues to action to actual drowsy drivers on roadways. Increased enforcement, education, and public messaging campaigns are needed to increase knowledge and influence attitudes and opinions among young drivers about the dangers and social unacceptability of drowsy driving. Copyright © 2018 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An investigation into e-learning acceptance and gender amongst final year students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willie Chinyamurindi

    2015-08-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the acceptance of the e-learning system within a South African HE setting, including the influential role of gender in the acceptance of such a system. Method: Quantitative data was collected through a cross-sectional survey using 113 registered final year students at a South African university who were making use of an e-learning system as part of their teaching delivery. The measuring instrument used was the technology acceptance instrument (TAI and included measures of computer self-efficacy (CSE, perceived ease of use (PEU, perceived usefulness (PU, and behavioural intention to use (BIU. Results: The presence of a gender divide was found to exist in this study. Women’s ratings of the acceptance of e-learning systems were found to be slightly higher than those of the male respondents. In addition to this, elements of the TAI were found to be related to one another. Conclusion: The study concludes by arguing that lecturers and facilitators need to pay attention to usage patterns of e-learning systems as they affect how such systems are adopted by their students. Therefore, preceding student acceptance of electronic learning systems should be efforts to address any issues that affect the acceptance and effective utilisation of such systems.

  16. Investigating Senior Secondary School Students' Beliefs about Further Mathematics in a Problem-Based Learning Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Fatade

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the effect of problem-based learning (PBL on senior secondary school students' beliefs about Further Mathematics in Nigeria within the blueprint of pre-test-post-test non-equivalent control group quasi-experimental design. Intact classes were used and in all, 96 students participated in the study (42 in the experimental group taught with the PBL and 54 in the control group taught using the Traditional Method (TM. One research instrument tagged Beliefs about Further Mathematics Questionnaire (BFMQ, Cronbach alpha (α=.86 was developed and used for the study and data collected were analysed using the descriptive statistics of mean and standard deviation which served as precursor to testing the null hypothesis for the study using an independent samples t-test and analysis of variance. Results showed that participants held strong beliefs about further mathematics and there was a statistically significant difference in the mean post-treatment scores on BFMQ (t=-6.22, p=.000 for t-test and (F(1,95=38.49; p<.001 for ANOVA between students exposed to the PBL and those exposed to the TM, in favour of the PBL group. Based on the results, the study recommended that PBL should be adopted as an instructional strategy for promoting meaningful learning in and enhancing beliefs about further mathematics and efforts should be made to integrate the philosophy of PBL into the preservice teachers' curriculum at the teacher-preparation institutions in Nigeria.

  17. An Investigation of the Perceptions and Practices of Nursing Students Regarding Spirituality and Spiritual Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Kalkim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine Turkish nursing students’ knowledge, practices and perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care and to investigate the relationship between their perceptions and their demographics. This study was a descriptive survey conducted at a nursing school providing degree-level education in the city of Manisa, in the western part of Turkey. The sample of the study consisted of the 400 nursing students. A nursing student sociodemographic form, a form on nursing students’ knowledge and practices of spirituality and spiritual care, and the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale were used to collect the data. Half of the students could meet patients’ or individuals’ spiritual needs, and the spiritual care that they gave was most frequently listening, empathy, and psychological support. The research findings were that nursing students’ perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care were “sufficiently” although not “very sufficiently” defined. Being female, being in the second year of education and seeing spiritual care education as necessary were determinants of their perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care.

  18. Preliminary investigations to assess the usefulness of Be-7 as a radiotracer in soil covered by vegetation [Activities of the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iurian, Andra-Rada; Dercon, Gerd; Adu-Gyamfi, Joseph; Mabit, Lionel; Kis-Benedek, Gyula; Ceccatelli, Alessia; Tarjan, Sandor; Blake, William

    2014-01-01

    Different factors may affect the extent of radionuclides’ interception by plants and therewith their inventories in soil covered areas. In particular, there is interest in assessing the impact of the vegetation factor for different soil coverage conditions, when using 7 Be as radiotracer of soil redistribution in cropped farmland. Our results suggest that 7 Be foliar interception of bean plants is likely to affect the radionuclide inventories and their spatial uniformity in covered soil. Reliable results on short-term erosion using 7 Be can be obtained in cropped farmland with limited cover, but only when taking into account the interception factor. The impact of the interception factor is highly dependent on rainfall intensity and duration, crop species and the growing stage of the plants. Further investigations into these variables are required

  19. Preliminary investigations to assess the usefulness of Be-7 as a radiotracer in soil covered by vegetation [Activities of the Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Seibersdorf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iurian, Andra-Rada [Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dercon, Gerd; Adu-Gyamfi, Joseph; Mabit, Lionel [Soil and Water Management and Crop Nutrition Laboratory, Joint FAO/IAEA Division for Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Seibersdorf (Austria); Kis-Benedek, Gyula; Ceccatelli, Alessia; Tarjan, Sandor [3Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, IAEA Environment Laboratories, Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Seibersdorf (Austria); Blake, William [School of Geography, University of Plymouth, Plymouth (United Kingdom); others, and

    2014-07-15

    Different factors may affect the extent of radionuclides’ interception by plants and therewith their inventories in soil covered areas. In particular, there is interest in assessing the impact of the vegetation factor for different soil coverage conditions, when using {sup 7}Be as radiotracer of soil redistribution in cropped farmland. Our results suggest that {sup 7}Be foliar interception of bean plants is likely to affect the radionuclide inventories and their spatial uniformity in covered soil. Reliable results on short-term erosion using {sup 7}Be can be obtained in cropped farmland with limited cover, but only when taking into account the interception factor. The impact of the interception factor is highly dependent on rainfall intensity and duration, crop species and the growing stage of the plants. Further investigations into these variables are required.

  20. Mobility and retention of micronutrients in soil : Part III. Investigation on the influence of various external factors, NPK-fertilizers and soil amending agents on the mobility and retention of manganese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Santikari, A.K.; Banerji, K.C.

    1980-01-01

    Investigations on the mobility and retention of manganese through Sindri red sandy clay loam of pH 7.4 and Ranchi clay loam of pH 5.6 have been carried out using the radiotracer 54 Mn. The vertical distribution of manganese in these soils showed almost sharp fall upto a depth of 12 to 14 cm and thereafter it tended to attain the saturation. Variations have been marked in the degrees of manganese retention at the top surface layers of the concerned soils. Influence of various NPK fertilizers and soil amending agents, at various application levels, have been studied on the mobility, retention and leaching loss of manganese in the prementioned soils. Marked variations have been recorded and discussed. (author)