WorldWideScience

Sample records for students completed degrees

  1. Changes in Generic and Degree Completion Dental Hygiene Student Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Sandra; Rubinstein, Linda

    1989-01-01

    A study compared the characteristics of dental hygiene students in two programs (bachelor's degree and two-year professional dental hygiene training) in 1978 and 1987 to assess changes over time. Results are presented and the implications for enrollment management are discussed. (MSE)

  2. First-Generation Female College Students' Financial Literacy: Real and Perceived Barriers to Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Susan J.; Martin, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    First-generation female college students (FGFCS) make up a large portion of the diversity in higher education. Unfortunately "access" to education does not translate to success. Persistence and degree completion for these students is often undermined by seemingly insurmountable obstacles. The purposes of this study were to identify the financial…

  3. Pathways to a Four-Year Degree: Determinants of Degree Completion among Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Alberto F.; Burkum, Kurt R.; La Nasa, Steven M.

    The High School Sophomore Cohort of 1980 followed nine different pathways to a 4-year college degree. These paths were formed by a combination of different levels of academic preparation secured in high school and the first type of postsecondary institution attended. The pathway most likely to lead to a 4-year degree is one defined by acquiring…

  4. Cyclic efforts to improve completion rates of masters’ degree students in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth Roets

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Supervisors at Higher Education Institutions are challenged to shorten throughput of Master’s degree students in nursing as researchers are needed to improve the art and science of the nursing profession. Globally the completion time for a postgraduate degree in the health sciences varies between 4.7 and 5.5 years. The purpose of the study was to describe strategies that were implemented to shorten completion time and attrition rate of postgraduate students. A cyclic technical, scientific collaborative mode within an action research methodology was used to identify factors impeding completion time in this study. Contrary to other studies, supervision was not an inhibiting factor in this study. Physical, technical, academic and financial aspects were identified by postgraduate students through questionnaires and informal discussion groups with supervisors as well as progress reports. Strategies were implemented to address these. Following implementation of all strategies, 42% of the postgraduate students in the School of Nursing completed their Master’s degree within two years. This implies a 34% improvement. Although the completion rate improved it was still unsatisfactory and new challenges were identified during the second cycle, for example, the number of inexperienced supervisors increased and they needed mentoring. Speed mentoring is a possible solution to the problem.

  5. Identifying Important Career Indicators of Undergraduate Geoscience Students Upon Completion of Their Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C. E.; Keane, C. M.; Houlton, H. R.

    2012-12-01

    The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) decided to create the National Geoscience Student Exit Survey in order to identify the initial pathways into the workforce for these graduating students, as well as assess their preparedness for entering the workforce upon graduation. The creation of this survey stemmed from a combination of experiences with the AGI/AGU Survey of Doctorates and discussions at the following Science Education Research Center (SERC) workshops: "Developing Pathways to Strong Programs for the Future", "Strengthening Your Geoscience Program", and "Assessing Geoscience Programs". These events identified distinct gaps in understanding the experiences and perspectives of geoscience students during one of their most profound professional transitions. Therefore, the idea for the survey arose as a way to evaluate how the discipline is preparing and educating students, as well as identifying the students' desired career paths. The discussions at the workshops solidified the need for this survey and created the initial framework for the first pilot of the survey. The purpose of this assessment tool is to evaluate student preparedness for entering the geosciences workforce; identify student decision points for entering geosciences fields and remaining in the geosciences workforce; identify geosciences fields that students pursue in undergraduate and graduate school; collect information on students' expected career trajectories and geosciences professions; identify geosciences career sectors that are hiring new graduates; collect information about salary projections; overall effectiveness of geosciences departments regionally and nationally; demonstrate the value of geosciences degrees to future students, the institutions, and employers; and establish a benchmark to perform longitudinal studies of geosciences graduates to understand their career pathways and impacts of their educational experiences on these decisions. AGI's Student Exit Survey went through

  6. Determinants of timely completion : the impact of Bachelor's degree programme characteristics and student motivation on study progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhre, Cor J. M.; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Torenbeek, M.

    2013-01-01

    Timely completion of university degree programmes is a topic of growing concern to higher education institutions and their students. This paper reports on a study about the impact of degree programme characteristics and student motivation on study progress. The setting for the study is a Dutch law

  7. Distance Education in Dental Hygiene Bachelor of Science Degree Completion Programs: As Perceived by Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokris, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated student and faculty perceptions of their experiences with online learning in dental hygiene Bachelor of Science degree completion programs on the dimensions of: quality of learning, connectedness to the learning environment, technology factors and student satisfaction. The experiences of dental hygiene students who took…

  8. PhD Students' Excellence Scholarships and Their Relationship with Research Productivity, Scientific Impact, and Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lariviere, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between excellence scholarships and research productivity, scientific impact, and degree completion. Drawing on the entire population of doctoral students in the province of Quebec, this pa- per analyzes three distinct sources of data: students, excellence scholarships, and scientific publications. It shows…

  9. Predictive factors of premedical student retention and degree completion within a private undergraduate university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Frances E.

    Undergraduate retention and eventual graduation is of paramount importance to universities globally. Approximately 58% of students who began their college career at a four-year institution with the intention of receiving a bachelor's degree actually received that degree in a 6-year timeframe, according to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) annual report The Condition of Education 2009 (Planty, 2009). In certain subgroups of the undergraduate population, this graduation rate is even lower. This dissertation presents research into the academic integration of students in premedical programs subgroup based on Vincent Tinto's Integrationist Model of Student Departure. Pre-entry factors of interest for this study included incoming high school grade point average (GPA), incoming SAT total test scores, while post-matriculation factors included grade in organic chemistry, and the initial calculus course taken. A sample of 519 students from a private coeducational institution in the southeastern United States was examined. A logistic regression was performed to determine the effect of high school GPA, SAT total scores, organic chemistry grades, and calculus-readiness on graduation. A significant regression equation was found. The findings suggest that of the four predictor variables, high school GPA and organic chemistry grade were the only variables that showed significant predictive ability based on a significance level of p < .05. Further research should involve the examination of additional indicators of academic integration as well as information on the social integration of the student. Additionally, institutional leaders should continue to evaluate the premedical curriculum based on potential changes in medical school requirements.

  10. Distance education in dental hygiene bachelor of science degree completion programs: As perceived by students and faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokris, Maureen

    This study investigated student and faculty perceptions of their experiences with online learning in dental hygiene Bachelor of Science degree completion programs on the dimensions of: quality of learning, connectedness to the learning environment, technology factors and student satisfaction. The experiences of dental hygiene students who took their core BS dental hygiene (BSDH) courses completely online were compared and contrasted with the perceptions of dental hygiene students who had taken a portion of the BSDH courses online and a portion in a traditional face-to-face classroom setting. Furthermore, this study compared and contrasted the perceptions of faculty on these same four dimensions based on the position held by the faculty member and the course format they are teaching in: online or a combination of online and a traditional face-to-face classroom setting. This study revealed several important differences and similarities between students who had taken their courses online and those who had taken a portion of the BSDH courses online and a portion in a traditional face-to-face classroom setting. The results showed students who had taken their courses online described factors related to the instructor as important to the quality of the learning experience such as: the experience and qualifications of the professor, the examples they provided and the instructors prompt response to questions. Students who had taken courses in both formats described factors related to the amount of effort they put into the course, their classmates' preparedness, the course materials and assignments as important to the quality of the learning experience. Although students who completed courses online reported difficulty participating in group activities, they were more positive regarding the level of interaction they experienced with their classmates online Findings indicated students who had taken their courses in both formats would have liked more opportunities to interact

  11. The Relationship between the Employment of Part-Time Faculty and Student Degree and/or Certificate Completion in Two-Year Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongwei; Campbell, Dale; Mendoza, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Prior research studies associated the employment of part-time faculty with student degree and/or certificate completion (Benjamin, 2002; Ehrenberg & Zhang, 2005; Jacoby, 2006; Leslie & Gappa, 2002; Umbach, 2008; Umbach & Wawrzynski, 2005). To date, institutional-level data have been utilized to investigate whether such employment…

  12. Access to Four-Year Public Colleges and Degree Completion

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua Goodman; Michael Hurwitz; Jonathan Smith

    2015-01-01

    Does access to four-year colleges affect degree completion for students who would otherwise attend two-year colleges? Admission to Georgia’s four-year public sector requires minimum SAT scores. Regression discontinuity estimates show that access to this sector increases four-year college enrollment and college quality, largely by diverting students from two-year colleges. Access substantially increases bachelor’s degree completion rates for these relatively low-skilled students. SAT retaking ...

  13. Access to 4-Year Public Colleges and Degree Completion

    OpenAIRE

    Goodman, Joshua Samuel; Hurwitz, Michael; Smith, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Does access to 4-year colleges affect degree completion for students who would otherwise attend 2-year colleges? Admission to Georgia’s 4-year public sector requires minimum SAT scores. Regression discontinuity estimates show that access to this sector increases 4-year college enrollment and college quality, largely by diverting students from 2-year colleges. Access substantially increases bachelor’s degree completion rates for these relatively low-skilled students. SAT retaking behavior sugg...

  14. Underserved Students Who Earn Credit through Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) Have Higher Degree Completion Rates and Shorter Time-to-Degree. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    In 2010, the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) released a report on a multi-institutional study on prior learning assessment (PLA) and adult student outcomes. The study examined data from 62,475 adult students at 48 colleges and universities, following the students' academic progress over the course of seven years. The data from…

  15. Mentoring to Degree Completion: Expanding the Horizons of Doctoral Proteges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Linda; Creighton, Theodore; Parks, David

    2010-01-01

    The authors of this discussion identify one of the most pressing issues facing American universities: the number of graduate students who fail to graduate. We review the literature and further analyze the student and institutional factors most significant in predicting the degree completion rates of graduate students in education. Based on the…

  16. The risks of timely degree completion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarauw, Laura Louise; Madsen, Simon Ryberg

    2018-01-01

    In 2014, the Danish government introduced a reform with the aim to fast-track student completion. Today, three years after the reform, statistics show that the universities have almost accomplished the political objective. In this article, however, we question the success of the reform when looki...

  17. Predictors of Associate's Degree Completion in Engineering and Engineering Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reys-Nickel, Lynsey L.

    The purpose of this ex post facto study was to describe completers and non-completers of associate's degree programs in engineering and engineering technologies and determine whether and to what extent completion in these programs is a function of selected student-related variables and institutional variables. Data from the 2004/2009 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS: 04/09) of associate's degree completers and non-completers in engineering and engineering technologies were accessed and analyzed through PowerStats, a web-based data analysis tool from National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Descriptive data indicated that, proportionally, engineering and engineering technologies completers were mostly White, married, middle income, employed part-time, enrolled full-time, did not hold a high school diploma or certificate, completed Trigonometry/Algebra II, had a father who's highest education level was an associate's degree, but did not know their mother's highest level of education, completed remedial coursework, and started college with the goal of earning an associate's degree. While more males enrolled in the programs, males and females demonstrated similar completion rates, proportionally--with females showing a slightly higher percentage of completion. Results from the logistic regression further indicated that the variables significant to completion in associate's degree programs in engineering and engineering technologies were gender and enrollment size. Findings suggested that female students were more likely to earn the degree, and that the larger the institution, the more likely the student would become a completer. However, since a major limitation of the study was the small weighted sample size, the results of the study are inconclusive in terms of the extent to which the findings can be generalized to the population of students in associate's degree programs in engineering and engineering technologies. This study fills a

  18. Analyzing Student Aid Packaging To Improve Low-Income and Minority Student Access, Retention and Degree Completion. AIR 1999 Annual Forum Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Robert H.; Porter, John D.; DuBrock, Caryl P.

    This study examined the persistence of and financial aid to needy students, underrepresented minority students, and women students, especially those majoring in science, engineering, and mathematics at a large public research university. An institutional student tracking and student financial aid database was used to follow four freshmen cohorts…

  19. Isaac Newton and Student College Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinto, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Success in college is built upon classroom success, but success in the classroom does not in itself ensure college completion. Completion arises from success in a sequence of classes one after another over time. It does so most frequently when students are presented with coherent course pathways to degree completion, are able to gain degree credit…

  20. Motivation and degree completion in a university-based teacher education programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon; Canrinus, Esther Tamara

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated which factors determine degree completion in a Dutch university-based teacher education programme. We assumed that both student characteristics and characteristics of the learning environment affected degree completion. We included the following factors in our study:

  1. Timely Post-Graduate Degree Completion: A Case Study of Jamshoro Education City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagul Huma Lashari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study identifies the status of postgraduate students at the master degree level regarding their degree completion in the three public sector universities at Jamshoro Education City. The status is identified by analyzing enrolment of the postgraduate and comparing it with rate of their degree completion. In addition, the paper also discusses their characteristics which lead them towards the degree completion. For this paper, enrolment of the postgraduate students at the master level is compared with the degree completion rate of 2008 academic session only. The result shows the obvious difference between enrolment and rate of the degree completion. In total 417 postgraduate students were enrolled in 2008 session, however, only 60 (14% of students have completed their postgraduate degrees. Those who have completed their degrees, with respect to universities 6% students belong to US (University of Sindh, 22% belong to MUET (Mehran University of Engineering & Technology and 8% students belong to LUMHS (Liaquat University of Medical & Health Sciences. The demographical data of the postgraduate students has also shown some variations like gender, age, employment, and financial resources. In addition, the research requirements also vary for different postgraduate students. The research requirements include lab based, field based and library based resources. The characteristics of the postgraduate students of three public sector universities including financial resources, employment status, and working organization also show differences with each-other in terms of the degree completion.

  2. An Exploration of Factors Affecting Persistence to Degree Completion in an Undergraduate Music Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Russell B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of students (N = 26) in an undergraduate music education degree program in an attempt to identify commonalities among students persisting to degree completion. All participants were in their final year of the music education degree at the time of the study. Multiple data collection methods…

  3. Experimental Evidence on the Effect of Childhood Investments on Postsecondary Attainment and Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynarski, Susan; Hyman, Joshua; Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of early childhood investments on college enrollment and degree completion. We used the random assignment in Project STAR (the Tennessee Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio experiment) to estimate the effect of smaller classes in primary school on college entry, college choice, and degree completion. We improve on…

  4. Persistence of Women in Online Degree-Completion Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Müller

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Although online courses at postsecondary institutions promise adults access, flexibility, and convenience, many barriers to online learning remain. This article presents findings from a qualitative case study, which explored the phenomenon of undergraduate and graduate women learners’ persistence in online degree-completion programs at a college in the Northeast of the United States. Research questions asked why women learners persisted or failed to persist, and how factors supporting or hindering persistence influenced learners. Interviews with a purposeful sample of 20 participants revealed the complexity of variables affecting learners’ persistence to graduation. Findings suggested that multiple responsibilities, insufficient interaction with faculty, technology, and coursework ranked highest as barriers to women’s persistence. Strong motivation to complete degrees, engagement in the learning community, and appreciation for the convenience of an online degree-completion option facilitated persistence.

  5. Program Costs and Student Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Terri M.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges are under pressure to increase completion rates, prepare students for the workplace, and contain costs. Colleges need to know the financial implications of what are often perceived as routine decisions: course scheduling, program offerings, and the provision of support services. This chapter presents a methodology for estimating…

  6. The Effect of Community College Enrollment on Bachelor's Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Rouse [Rouse, C. E. (1995). "Democratization or diversion--the effect of community-colleges on educational-attainment." "Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, 13"(2), 217-224] finds that enrollment in a community college may divert students from attaining a bachelor's degree. However, this result may be due to selection…

  7. Does Degree of Work Task Completion Influence Retrieval Performance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter; Bogers, Toine; Lykke, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    their perception of task completion. Also, with the exception of full text records and across all document types, both measured at rank 10, no statistically significant correlation is observed with respect to retrieval performance influenced by degrees of perceived work task completion or individual types......In this contribution we investigate the potential influence between assessors’ perceived completion of their work task at hand and their actual assessment of usefulness of the retrieved information. The results indicate that the number of useful documents found by assessors does not influence...

  8. Leading Indicators: Increasing Statewide Bachelor's Degree Completion Rates at 4-Year Public Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jeffrey Cody

    2014-01-01

    For the United States to maintain national and global economic stability, colleges must graduate more students. Four-year completion rates have declined and less than one-third of full-time, degree-seeking students graduate in 4 years. Some researchers and policymakers have suggested "leading indicators" to track postsecondary…

  9. Latino Students and Degree Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Jacquelyn D.; Parks, Rodney

    2018-01-01

    Latinos are the largest growing population in America, and thus, have the potential to have the greatest impact on our nation's economy. However, Latinos also graduate college at a lower rate than their counterparts. This article focuses on the various cultural, social, and financial barriers Latino students face and provides recommendations for…

  10. Multiple Paths to Success: Degree Completion of 4-Year Starters Taking Various Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dai

    2016-01-01

    With the use of data from the institutional research office at a comprehensive public 4-year university, this chapter describes an in-depth analysis of the institutional attendance, transfer, and graduation of three first-time student cohorts, revealing that not all types of multi-institutional attendance hurt degree completion, and strategic…

  11. Latino Associate Degree Completion: Effects of Financial Aid over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jacob P. K.; Zerquera, Desiree; Inge, Brittany; Berry, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Lack of financial resources to pay for postsecondary education--perceived and actual--has been cited as a barrier to student access and persistence, particularly for Latino students. This study investigates the following question: "To what extent does financial aid affect the educational attainment of Latinos enrolled in Associate's degree…

  12. Pursuit of STEM: Factors shaping degree completion for African American females in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Ashlee N.

    The primary purpose of the study was to examine secondary data from the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) Freshman and College Senior Surveys to investigate factors shaping degree aspirations for African American female undergraduates partaking in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to analyze the data and identify relationships between independent variables in relation to the dependent variable. The findings of the study reveal four key variables that were predictive of degree completion for African American females in STEM. Father's education, SAT composite, highest degree planned, and self-perception were positive predictors for females; while independent variable overall sense of community among students remained a negative predictor. Lastly implications for education and recommendations for future research were discussed.

  13. Law Schools Customize Degrees to Students' Taste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Going to law school to get a law degree has become a little like going to an ice-cream parlor for a scoop of vanilla. Plenty of people still do it, but many schools' brochures--like the elaborate flavor-and-topping menus on ice-cream parlor walls--now tempt them with something different, something more. Law students can have their "juris doctor"…

  14. Latino Male Ethnic Subgroups: Patterns in College Enrollment and Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponjuan, Luis; Palomin, Leticia; Calise, Angela

    2015-01-01

    This chapter examines Latino male ethnic subgroups and their college enrollment and degree completion patterns. The chapter also offers recommendations to improve Latino male ethnic subgroups' educational achievement.

  15. Fostering completion of the doctor of philosophy degree through scholarly collegial support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancheri, Karen; Fowler, Debra L; Wiggs, Carol M; Schultz, Rebecca; Lewis, Patricia; Nurse, Rachelle

    2013-07-01

    The doctor of philosophy (PhD) degree in nursing science prepares nurses to be scientists through a rigorous program of scholarship and research. Nurses who complete this degree are recognized globally as researchers who are expected to pursue a career of intellectual inquiry. Today, the internationally small cohort of PhD-prepared nurses contributes empirically to the generation and development of nursing science. There is currently a shortage of doctorally prepared nurses to meet the increased demands for researchers and educators in schools of nursing and experts in patient care. The Institute of Medicine has recommended doubling the number of doctorally prepared nurses by 2020 and has emphasized that nurses achieve higher levels of education and training through an improved educational system that promotes seamless academic progression. However, in the United States, the overall PhD completion rate is only 57%. This article reports on the process undertaken by a collegial support group of students in a PhD in nursing science program who encouraged each other's progress through the dissertation process within a calendar year. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Negative Impact of Employment on Engineering Student Time Management, Time to Degree, and Retention: Faculty, Administrator, and Staff Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Will

    2012-01-01

    Interviews with faculty, administrators, staff, and students at four engineering programs reveal the role of undergraduate student employment on retention and timely degree completion among engineering students. Dueling narratives reveal how student approaches to earning an engineering degree differ greatly from faculty, administrator, and staff…

  17. Early Engagement in Course-Based Research Increases Graduation Rates and Completion of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbusch, Stacia E.; Hernandez, Paul R.; Simmons, Sarah L.; Dolan, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    National efforts to transform undergraduate biology education call for research experiences to be an integral component of learning for all students. Course-based undergraduate research experiences, or CUREs, have been championed for engaging students in research at a scale that is not possible through apprenticeships in faculty research laboratories. Yet there are few if any studies that examine the long-term effects of participating in CUREs on desired student outcomes, such as graduating from college and completing a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) major. One CURE program, the Freshman Research Initiative (FRI), has engaged thousands of first-year undergraduates over the past decade. Using propensity score–matching to control for student-level differences, we tested the effect of participating in FRI on students’ probability of graduating with a STEM degree, probability of graduating within 6 yr, and grade point average (GPA) at graduation. Students who completed all three semesters of FRI were significantly more likely than their non-FRI peers to earn a STEM degree and graduate within 6 yr. FRI had no significant effect on students’ GPAs at graduation. The effects were similar for diverse students. These results provide the most robust and best-controlled evidence to date to support calls for early involvement of undergraduates in research. PMID:27252296

  18. The perceived barriers and facilitators in completing a Master’s degree in Physiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette Comley-White

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Participating in postgraduate study is daunting and as yet there is a dearth of literature on what students’ experiences are when obtaining their Master’s degree in Physiotherapy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to gain insight into the perceived barriers and facilitators in completing a Master’s degree in Physiotherapy. Method: Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 10 physiotherapists who had completed a Master’s degree in Physiotherapy from a university in South Africa, representative of coursework and dissertation Master’s degrees, completed within the stipulated time period as well as taking longer to complete the degree. The topics covered a range of speciality areas. The interviews were transcribed, sent for member checking and analysed thematically. Results: Within 10 interviews data saturation was reached. Two themes were identified: research environment and support, both of which were seen as either a facilitator or a barrier, depending on the participant. The theme of research environment was divided into categories of workplace and data collection. The second theme, support, was also seen as either a barrier or a facilitator. This theme encapsulated the categories of supervisor support, workplace support and a personal support network. Conclusion: The research environment and support are two major factors that can influence the experience of obtaining a master’s degree in physiotherapy, both positively and negatively. Clinical implications: With increasing numbers of physiotherapists obtaining postgraduate degrees, universities need to facilitate the process of obtaining the degree, which will ensure more physiotherapists with postgraduate degrees, thereby strengthening the profession.

  19. Early Engagement in Course-Based Research Increases Graduation Rates and Completion of Science, Engineering, and Mathematics Degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbusch, Stacia E; Hernandez, Paul R; Simmons, Sarah L; Dolan, Erin L

    2016-01-01

    National efforts to transform undergraduate biology education call for research experiences to be an integral component of learning for all students. Course-based undergraduate research experiences, or CUREs, have been championed for engaging students in research at a scale that is not possible through apprenticeships in faculty research laboratories. Yet there are few if any studies that examine the long-term effects of participating in CUREs on desired student outcomes, such as graduating from college and completing a science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) major. One CURE program, the Freshman Research Initiative (FRI), has engaged thousands of first-year undergraduates over the past decade. Using propensity score-matching to control for student-level differences, we tested the effect of participating in FRI on students' probability of graduating with a STEM degree, probability of graduating within 6 yr, and grade point average (GPA) at graduation. Students who completed all three semesters of FRI were significantly more likely than their non-FRI peers to earn a STEM degree and graduate within 6 yr. FRI had no significant effect on students' GPAs at graduation. The effects were similar for diverse students. These results provide the most robust and best-controlled evidence to date to support calls for early involvement of undergraduates in research. © 2016 S. Rodenbusch et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  20. A study of the lived experiences of African American women STEM doctoral degree completers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Stephanie Michelle

    This study examined the lived experiences of African American women (AAW) who completed doctoral degrees in a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) discipline in the United States. This study sought to fill the gap in the literature by examining how AAW described and made meaning of lived STEM educational experiences during doctoral degree completion in the context of the intersection of being African American and a woman. This study utilized a theoretical perspective based upon three theories: (a) critical race theory as a framework to gather AAW's narratives about STEM doctorate education, (b) Black feminist thought as a framework to view the intersection of being African American and a woman in the United States, and (c) the science identity model as a framework to view how women of color successfully complete scientific graduate degrees. Participants revealed that being an African American and a woman in a STEM doctoral program often complicated an already difficult process of completing the doctoral degree. The participants described the educational experience as challenging, particularly the writing of the dissertation. The challenges that the participants faced were due to various factors such as difficult advisor/advisee relationships, tedious writing and revision processes, politics, and lack of information regarding the doctoral degree process. The findings suggested that AAW participants confronted intrinsic bias while completing STEM doctoral degrees, which led to isolation and feelings of being an impostor---or feelings of not belonging in scientific studies. The findings also indicated that the women in this study ascribed success in dissertation writing and degree completion to one or more of the following attributes: (a) having a clear plan, (b) taking ownership of the writing process, (c) having an engaged advisor, (d) learning the writing style of the advisor, (e) understanding the temperament of the advisor, (f) personal will

  1. Student satisfaction and academic performance in a dual PharmD/MBA degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumney, Elinor C G; Ragucci, Kelly R

    2006-04-15

    Evaluate the academic experience and satisfaction of students enrolled in the dual PharmD/MBA degree program between the South Carolina College of Pharmacy and The Citadel's School of Business Administration. Compare grade point averages of students enrolled in the dual degree program with those of traditional student colleagues. A standardized satisfaction survey instrument was administered to 32 students currently enrolled in the dual PharmD/MBA degree program. Grade point averages (GPAs) in both pharmacy and business coursework were also collected for analysis. There were slightly higher percentages of both female and minority students in the dual degree program compared to the pharmacy class as a whole. Eighteen (56%) of students completed the survey, and responses were generally positive. The mean GPA of students in the dual degree program was higher than that of both pharmacy (3.37 vs 3.08, p vs 3.64, not statistically significant) students not enrolled in the dual degree program. Students enrolled in the dual degree program did better academically than their counterparts and indicated an overall high level of satisfaction with the program.

  2. Perception of collaborative learning in associate degree students in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T L; Shek, Moses M W

    2013-01-01

    Although collaborative learning has been widely researched in Western contexts, no study has been carried out to understand how associate degree students look at collaborative learning in Hong Kong. In this study, perceptions of and attitudes to collaborative learning among associate degree students were studied. A total of 44 associate degree students completed an online questionnaire including measures of perceived benefits and attitudes to collaborative learning, and social-emotional competence. Results showed that there were no significant differences between male and female students on perceived benefits of and attitudes towards collaborative learning. Social-emotional competence was related to perceived benefits of and attitudes to collaborative learning. Attitudes were also related to perceived benefits of collaborative learning. This paper is the first known study looking at the relationships among perceived benefits and attitudes to collaborative learning and social-emotional competence in Chinese associate degree students in different Chinese contexts.

  3. Using Financial Aid to Speed Degree Completion: A Look at MDRC's Research. Issue Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    MDRC, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Financial aid has long been used to increase access to postsecondary education, particularly for underrepresented students. Given the size of the financial aid system and the widespread use of aid, it should also be thought of as a tool to improve academic success and postsecondary completion. Evidence suggests that using additional financial aid…

  4. What Works for Doctoral Students in Completing Their Thesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Siân

    2015-01-01

    Writing a thesis is one of the most challenging activities that a doctoral student must undertake and can represent a barrier to timely completion. This is relevant in light of current and widespread concerns regarding doctoral completion rates. This study explored thesis writing approaches of students post or near Ph.D. completion through…

  5. What We Know about Guided Pathways: Helping Students to Complete Programs Faster. Research Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Thomas; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Jenkins, Davis

    2015-01-01

    The idea behind guided pathways is straightforward. College students are more likely to complete a degree in a timely fashion if they choose a program and develop an academic plan early on, have a clear road map of the courses they need to take to complete a credential, and receive guidance and support to help them stay on plan. However, most…

  6. Responsibility among bachelor degree nursing students: A concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Saeed; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2018-01-01

    Responsibility is an important component of the professional values and core competencies for bachelor degree nursing students and has relationships with nursing education and professionalization. It is important for providing safe and high-quality care to the clients for the present and future performance of student. But there is no clear and operational definition of this concept for bachelor degree nursing students; however, there are extensive contents and debates about the definitions, attributes, domains and boundaries of responsibility in nursing and non-nursing literature. To examine the concept of responsibility among bachelor degree nursing students using the evolutionary approach to concept analysis. A total of 75 articles published between 1990 and 2016 and related to the concept of responsibility were selected from seven databases and considered for concept analysis based on Rogers' evolutionary approach. Ethical considerations: Throughout all stages of data collection, analysis and reporting, accuracy and bailment were respected. Responsibility is a procedural, spectral, dynamic and complex concept. The attributes of the concept are smart thinking, appropriate managerial behaviours, appropriate communicational behaviours, situational self-mandatory and task-orientation behaviours. Personal, educational and professional factors lead to the emergence of the responsible behaviours among bachelor degree nursing students. The emergence of such behaviours facilitates the learning and education process, ensures nursing profession life and promotes clients and community health level. Responsibility has some effects on nursing students. This concept had been changed over time since 1990-2016. There are similarities and differences in the elements of this concept in disciplines of nursing and other educational disciplines. Conclusion The analysis of this concept can help to develop educational or managerial theories, design instruments for better identification

  7. INSTRUMENTAL TRAINING OF THE BACHELOR DEGREE STUDENTS IN MUSIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Zerrate Rubio.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article is presented by the research team “Instrumental Didactic”, from the Faculty of Arts of the Universidad Pedagógica Nacional de Colombia, and brings out an analysis on the current instrumental training of its students in the bachelor degree in music. In the course of this research project, the team has specified some terms and topics such as “meaningful learning”, “didactic”, and “teaching-learning processes”. Then, using data-collection instruments such as audio and video recording and interviews, the pedagogical practices of the team’s teachers were analyzed. The key question for the research was: What sort of instrumental training might better enhance meaningful learning about pedagogy and musical didactics for the bachelor degree students in music at the UPN?The process of investigation allowed the group of teachers to strengthen the interaction inside of it as a research team, confirming, at the same time, the importance of instrumental didactics in the training of the bachelor degree students in music. Furthermore, the teachers as a team recognized the need of careful thought all along the research process, in order to clarify the knowledge that guides pedagogical action, and identified practical difficulties related to meaningful learning among the students, thus providing referents for the teacher’s didactic action in the instrumental training, such as the identification of widespread and common technical and attitudinal mistakes amidst the bachelor degree students.

  8. Relationships among grit, academic performance, perceived academic failure, and stress in associate degree students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wincy Wing Sze

    2017-10-01

    The present study examined the relationships among grit, academic performance, perceived academic failure, and stress levels of Hong Kong associate degree students using path analysis. Three hundred and forty-five students from a community college in Hong Kong voluntarily participated in the study. They completed a questionnaire that measured their grit (operationalized as interest and perseverance) and stress levels. The students also provided their actual academic performance and evaluated their perception of their academic performance as a success or a failure. The results of the path analysis showed that interest and perseverance were negatively associated with stress, and only perceived academic failure was positively associated with stress. These findings suggest that psychological appraisal and resources are more important antecedents of stress than objective negative events. Therefore, fostering students' psychological resilience may alleviate the stress experienced by associate degree students or college students in general. Copyright © 2017 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Completing College: A National View of Student Attainment Rates--Fall 2010 Cohort (Signature Report No. 12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Doug; Dundar, Afet; Wakhungu, Phoebe Khasiala; Yuan, Xin; Nathan, Angel; Hwang, Youngsik

    2016-01-01

    This fifth annual report on national college completion rates offers a look at the six-year outcomes for students who began postsecondary education in fall 2010, toward the end of the Great Recession. It looks at the various pathways students took toward degree completion, as well as the completion rates through May 2016 for the different student…

  10. Why Students Return for a Master's Degree in Sport Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Benjamin A.; Quarterman, Jerome

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relative importance of choice factors that were most important to students who decided to matriculate in the field of sport management for a master's degree. A survey questionnaire was mailed to the program or department chairs of 12 randomly selected universities listed on the NASSM web site during…

  11. Matriculation, Degree Structures, and Levels of Student Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Kevin F.; Biggs, John B.

    1983-01-01

    The functions of Australian higher education institutions are examined in terms of the knowledge and skill needs of each sector. A new evaluation technique that clarifies the complexity of student thinking required at each level is applied to the programs, producing a rationale for admission and degree structure. (MSE)

  12. Experimental Evidence on the Effect of Childhood Investments on Postsecondary Attainment and Degree Completion. NBER Working Paper No. 17533

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynarski, Susan; Hyman, Joshua M.; Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of early childhood investments on college enrollment and degree completion. We use the random assignment in the Project STAR experiment to estimate the effect of smaller classes in primary school on college entry, college choice, and degree completion. We improve on existing work in this area with unusually detailed…

  13. Can Completing a Mental Health Nursing Course Change Students' Attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Todd; Kroposki, Margaret; Williams, Gail

    2017-05-01

    Nursing program graduates rarely choose mental health nursing as a career. A quasi-experimental study was conducted to examine attitudes of 310 nursing students towards persons with mental illness. Students completed surveys on the first and last days of their program's psychiatric mental health nursing course. The pre- and post-test survey analysis indicated that students improved their attitude, knowledge and preparedness to care for persons with mental illness. However, students maintained little interest in working as a mental health nurse. Modifications in mental health nursing courses could be made to improve students' interest in choosing a career in mental health nursing.

  14. [Evidence-based practice competence in undergraduate Nursing Degree students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Molina-Salas, Yolanda; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) learning has become a key issue for nurses. An EPB subject was included in the 4(th) year in the new syllabus of the Nursing Degree at University of Murcia (UM). To know the competence level in EBP of undergraduate nursing students at UM and compare the results between all four years. Observational descriptive study with a cross-sectional approach. undergraduate nursing students from all four years at Nursing Degree at the Faculty of Social and Healthcare Science at UM in the year 2013-14. EBP evaluation of competence of the nursing students consisted of attitude, skills and knowledge on EBP. A validated questionnaire, the EBP-COQ, was used. The scale range is 1 point «lowest level» to 5 points «higher level».The SPSS 21.0 program has been used to carry out descriptive and bivariate analyses. 144 students were included, 76.4% was female, and the median age was 23 years, 84.7% attended more than 75% class hours. The mean differences in the questionnaire between first and fourth years were 0.58 points in attitude, 0.60 in skills, 1.6 in knowledge and 0.83 in global competence in EBP. Significant differences in mean scores between the fourth and the remaining years in the global competence in EBP were observed, as well as in the three dimensions (p <0.05). The undergraduate-nursing students studied here have acquired an appropriate competence level in EBP, with a gradual increase by year. The biggest increase was in the fourth year students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. The Benefits and Challenges Hospitality Management Students Experience by Working in Conjunction with Completing Their Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoffstall, Donald G.

    2013-01-01

    Previous researchers have suggested that in order to be successful in the hospitality industry, students need to obtain work experience in addition to completing their degrees. Although the benefit of gaining such experience from the industry viewpoint has been well documented, few studies have assessed the benefits and challenges faced by…

  16. Student Engagement and Completion in Precalculus Precalculus Mega Section: Efficiently Assisting Student Engagement and Completion with Communications and Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusi, Rima; Portnoy, Arturo; Toro, Nilsa

    2013-01-01

    The Precalculus Mega Section project was developed with the main purpose of improving the overall performance of the student body in Precalculus, an important gatekeeper course that affects student engagement and completion, with typical drop/failure rates of over 50 percent. Strategies such as integration of technology and additional practice…

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF DIGITAL COMPETENCES SKILLS IN TEACHER TRAINING DEGREE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Pino Juste

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Technologies of Information and Communication (ICT become in the information society a change agent. In this context, ICTs should become teaching tools in order to help the teacher to achieve quality education.Being aware of the importance of the teachers' mastery of the digital skills, we have conducted a study about the mastery of the ICTs that the students in the third year of the degree of teacher training of the University of Vigo have. In order to do this we have taken into account the knowledge acquired, the frequency of use of certain tools, their level of proficiency in four areas of knowledge: technological literacy, intellectual working tools, processing and dissemination of information and as communication tools. As well as their motivations, interests and obstacles found in their development in order to develop proposals for initial training.We can conclude that, in general, students do not have a specific training on the use of computers. About the degree of knowledge in the different skills, the students know the most basic and commonly used (open or download a file, create or print a document, install a program or send an e-mail. They usually use the mail as a working tool, while the messaging and social networks are more used for leisure time.Their attitudes towards ICTs are very positive and their motivations are focused essentially on the technologies which are useful for improving their learning and for their professional future.

  18. The Differential Effects of Financial Aid on Degree Completion by Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jacob P. K.; Berry, Matthew; Reynolds, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    Financial aid and student success are interrelated and essential components of strategic enrollment management. From an economic perspective, by reducing the price students pay, financial aid affects student demand for education. However, financial aid also has nonmonetary effects. For example, students receiving institutional scholarships may…

  19. The Drinkers Degree: Risk Taking Behaviours amongst Undergraduate Student Drinkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian O’Neill

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine risk taking behaviours associated with alcohol consumption amongst UK undergraduate students. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional web survey was used to assess attitudes and health behaviours. The survey included the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT. Students were also asked about why they drank alcohol; about their preferred alcoholic beverage; and if they had experienced any consequences associated with drinking alcohol as well as questions relating to sexual risk taking, drug use, and smoking. Results. 2779 (65% female; 84% White British students completed some part of the survey. Of these, 98% (n=2711 completed the AUDIT. Of the 92% that drank 66% (n=1,643 were categorised as being AUDIT positive. 8% (n=224 were categorised as probably alcohol dependent. Higher AUDIT scores were significantly associated with negative consequences such as unplanned sexual activity, physical injuries, and arguments. Other risk taking behaviours such as drug use and smoking were also found to be positively correlated with higher AUDIT scores; drug use; and smoking. Conclusions. The results from this study provide insight into students’ alcohol consumption and associated risk taking. University policies need to protect students’ overall health and wellbeing to ensure academic potential is maximised.

  20. Service Learning: Study on the degree of satisfaction of students in primary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Folgueiras Bertomeu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Service learning (SL is a pedagogical methodology that engages school and community in a common project. Based on this methodology the article presents the results of a comprehensive descriptive study completed with 93 primary education students in order to analyze the satisfaction they have regarding their participation in SL projects. By adapting a model of satisfaction 4 key dimensions are discussed. The main technique for data analysis is content analysis where we triangulate techniques as well as informants. The data analysis shows a high degree of satisfaction from participating students and opens to discussion the key aspects of SL methodology: reflection, evaluation and participation.

  1. Group Supervision and Japanese Students' Successful Completion of Undergraduate Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kiyomi

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores, from a sociocultural perspective, the nature and functions of "zemi" or seminars in which Japanese undergraduate students received group supervision for research and thesis writing. The study also investigates how the "zemi" contributed to completion of their theses. It was found that the "zemi"…

  2. Dyslexia and English: Degree of Difficulties Faced by the Students with Dyslexia while Learning English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Kaperoni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to investigate the hypothesis that students diagnosed with dyslexia face a greater amount of difficulty when they attempt to learn a foreign language and especially English. On a survey carried out in the form of a questionnaire, two groups of students completed the same questionnaire regarding their difficulty to learn the basic skills such as reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The questions mostly focused on the difficulty they may face in spelling, reading, and listening which are the main aspects of the language dyslexic students’ score lower than students without dyslexia. The answers were evaluated with the use of the statistical method of t-test. The findings of the survey displayed a great difference on the score chosen by the two teams, which indicates the greater degree of difficulty the dyslexic students face confirming the original hypothesis.

  3. Factors Influencing the Degree Progress of International PhD Students from Africa: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almoustapha Oumarou Soumana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades some countries of the Middle East have offered facilities to attract international students to pursue their higher education within their higher education institutions. The purpose of this study is to understand the difficulties faced by these students while conducting their studies abroad, and in doing so, to broaden the awareness of the challenges they face to complete their research. The participants of this qualitative study are international PhD students studying at a Middle Eastern public university. The university has reported increasing enrollment of international students, particularly from Africa in the last few years. Data were collected using a set of semi-structured interviews that drew out information on critical incidents that characterized the kind of difficulties students had faced in their studies. The data collected was further analyzed using a qualitative software package, NVivo (QSR International, 11. Six main themes came out from the content analysis of the interviews, which are the role of the adviser, student features, funding issues, family engagement, research and psychological obstacles which provide a holistic picture of student perspectives on the factors that influence degree progress. While these students might have faced difficulties mentioned in existing literature, this study argues that the participants have indicated experiencing psychological obstacles that were not described in earlier studies, such as the state of mind they were in as a result of being worried for family members due to war or violence in their home countries, and drop in currency exchange rates and difficulties in acquiring money due to international sanctions imposed against their countries. This study provides important thoughts on the factors that impact the degree progress of international PhD students from Africa, while at the same time revealing a serious gap in the advisers’ role which can contribute to the

  4. Complete N-Qubit Greenberger—Horne—Zeilinger States Analysis Assisted by Frequency Degree of Freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Zhi; Wang Chun; Li Xi-Han

    2014-01-01

    We present an efficient and simple protocol to unambiguously distinguish 2 N mutual orthogonal N-qubit Greenberger—Horne—Zeilinger states in polarization degree of freedom assisted by the frequency one. This scheme is based on N single photon Bell state measurements, which can be implemented non-locally. The success probability is 100% in principle and our scheme is feasible with current technology. All the advantages make our protocol meaningful and practical in quantum information processing. (general)

  5. The Impact of Adult Degree-Completion Programs on the Organizational Climate of Christian Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Leaders in Christian higher education are often unaware of how adult degree completion programs (ADCPs) impact a school's organizational behavior, and no research has examined employees' perceptions of its impact. This nonexperimental, descriptive study examined differences in employees' perceptions of the impact on organizational climate of the…

  6. Assessing Graduate Sustainability Capability Post-Degree Completion: Why Is It Important and What Are the Challenges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Orana; Holdsworth, Sarah; Thomas, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight both the need for measurement of graduate capabilities post-degree completion and the challenges posed by such a task. Higher education institutions provide an important site of learning that can equip future professionals with capabilities to manage and respond to complex sustainability…

  7. Student and high-school characteristics related to completing a science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) major in college

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, Brandon; Harwell, Michael; Monson, Debra; Dupuis, Danielle; Medhanie, Amanuel; Post, Thomas R.

    2012-04-01

    Background: The importance of increasing the number of US college students completing degrees in science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) has prompted calls for research to provide a better understanding of factors related to student participation in these majors, including the impact of a student's high-school mathematics curriculum. Purpose: This study examines the relationship between various student and high-school characteristics and completion of a STEM major in college. Of specific interest is the influence of a student's high-school mathematics curriculum on the completion of a STEM major in college. Sample: The sample consisted of approximately 3500 students from 229 high schools. Students were predominantly Caucasian (80%), with slightly more males than females (52% vs 48%). Design and method: A quasi-experimental design with archival data was used for students who enrolled in, and graduated from, a post-secondary institution in the upper Midwest. To be included in the sample, students needed to have completed at least three years of high-school mathematics. A generalized linear mixed model was used with students nested within high schools. The data were cross-sectional. Results: High-school predictors were not found to have a significant impact on the completion of a STEM major. Significant student-level predictors included ACT mathematics score, gender and high-school mathematics GPA. Conclusions: The results provide evidence that on average students are equally prepared for the rigorous mathematics coursework regardless of the high-school mathematics curriculum they completed.

  8. Produção científica dos alunos egressos do curso de especialização da Universidade Estadual de Londrina Scientific production of students who completed the specialist degree course in the State University of Londrina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Marquezine

    2006-04-01

    was deemed necessary to revise the curriculum according to scientific parameters, it was suggested that the assessment of the students' scientific production should be one of the steps in the revision process. Since one of the objectives in the course was training teachers as researchers, it was decided that the study should analyze not only the students' scientific production (final papers, but also the development of their production process (theme choice, student's academic history, resonance with course proposal, correlation to student's professional career, or changes in task performance considering the aims of the study. The source of the data analyzed was the final papers written from 1987 to 2002 by 143 students who got their Specialist Degree in Special Education. The instrument used for collecting data was a form where information of various kinds was registered: general information to enable identification of the paper, name of supervisor, objectives, theme, target population, the context where the study was undertaken, type of research, type of references used in the research, and the publication date of the literature reviewed. The results showed that the research papers were developed mainly in schools, with special students, evenly divided between survey-type research and intervention-type research. The most common themes were investigations related to teaching procedures. All results were discussed.

  9. The time to degree or dropout amongst full-time master's students at University of KwaZulu-Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temesgen Zewotir

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Universities around the world are grappling with strategies to increase throughput and minimise dropout rates of postgraduate students. This study focuses on students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal and we attempt to estimate the time that it takes for these students to successfully complete or drop out from a master's programme. We used survival analysis to identify the factors which affect this. The results of this analysis showed that having some form of financial aid and/or being a student in the Faculties of Humanities or Management, all significantly shortened the length of time that it took to eventually drop out from a master's programme. For students who successfully completed a master's degree, having some form of financial aid, being of international origin and/or being registered in the Faculties of Health, Humanities, Law or Management, all helped to significantly shorten the length of time it took to successfully complete a master's programme. Students in the Faculty of Medicine, however, took longer to successfully complete their studies. Black Africans took less time to complete their master's degrees when compared with otherwise identical students from the other race groups.

  10. PROJECT WORK BY STUDENTS FOR FIRST DEGREE: AN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mofasony

    It is expected that after University education, student of law should write well as ... student's capability, topics should not be assigned to students collectively. .... This enables the student hone-in the theoretical course work in the university. There is no .... Benson O.A. Oluikpe, Thesis Writing, Africana Publishers Ltd, 1982, iv. 7.

  11. Are Dropout and Degree Completion in Doctoral Study Significantly Dependent on Type of Financial Support and Field of Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Haert, Margaux; Arias Ortiz, Elena; Emplit, Philippe; Halloin, Véronique; Dehon, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the determinants of "time to dropout" from doctoral studies and "time to PhD completion" are studied using a discrete-time competing risks survival analysis for a sample of 3092 doctoral candidates from the Université libre de Bruxelles. Not surprisingly, results show that students supported with research…

  12. Improving completion rates of students in biomedical PhD programs: an interventional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viđak, Marin; Tokalić, Ružica; Marušić, Matko; Puljak, Livia; Sapunar, Damir

    2017-08-25

    Analysis of graduation success at the University of Split School of Medicine PhD programs conducted in 2011 revealed that only 11% of students who enrolled and completed their graduate coursework between 1999 and 2011 earned a doctoral degree. In this prospective cohort study we evaluated and compared three PhD programs within the same medical school, where the newest program, called Translational Research in Biomedicine (TRIBE), established in the academic year 2010/11, aimed to increase the graduation rate through an innovative approach. The intervention in the new program was related to three domains: redefined recruitment strategy, strict study regulations, and changes to the curriculum. We compared performance of PhD students between the new and existing programs and analyzed their current status, time to obtain a degree (from enrolment to doctorate), age at doctorate, number of publications on which the thesis was based and the impact factor of journals in which these were published. These improvement strategies were associated with higher thesis completion rate and reduced time to degree for students enrolled in the TRIBE program. There was no change in the impact factor or number of publications that were the basis for the doctoral theses. Our study describes good practices which proved useful in the design or reform of the PhD training program.

  13. Students' Desired and Experienced Levels of Connectivity to an Asynchronous, Online, Distance Degree Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Shawnda; Baker, Mary; Terras, Katherine; Mahar, Patti; Chiasson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    This study examined graduate students' desired and experienced levels of connectivity in an online, asynchronous distance degree program. Connectivity was conceptualized as the students' feelings of community and involvement, not their level of access to the Internet. Graduate students enrolled in a distance degree program were surveyed on both…

  14. Third Space Strategists: International Students Negotiating the Transition from Pathway Program to Postgraduate Coursework Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzie, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Pathway programs exist to prepare students for progression into university degrees but the transition experience for many students may not be as smooth as is suggested by the notion of the pathway. While attending a pathway program and at the beginning of their university degree, students may be in a third space, a liminal space where they engage…

  15. Using Data Mining to Explore Why Community College Transfer Students Earn Bachelor's Degrees with Excess Credits. CCRC Working Paper No. 100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, John; Jenkins, Davis; Kopko, Elizabeth; Ran, Florence Xiaotao

    2018-01-01

    Community college transfer students encounter challenges progressing toward a bachelor's degree, leading to widespread transfer credit loss. This in turn may lower students' chances of credential completion and increase the time and costs for students, their families, and taxpayers. In this study we review three definitions of credit transfer…

  16. Drinking, Drug Use, and Related Consequences Among University Students Completing Study Abroad Experiences: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aresi, Giovanni; Moore, Simon; Marta, Elena

    2016-12-05

    University students who complete study abroad experiences are potentially exposed to behaviors, in particular alcohol and drug use, that place their health at risk. There is a need to identify risk and protective factors and highlight knowledge gaps. A systematic review adopting the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) methodology. Relevant bibliographic databases and online repositories were systematically searched for both qualitative and quantitative peer-reviewed studies. Eighteen articles were eligible for inclusion. Degree mobility students (DMSs-students pursuing a full bachelor or master degree in a foreign country) and Credit Mobility Students (CMSs-students participating in short term or semester study abroad programmes) show different patterns of at-risk behaviors compared to pre-departure, and to domestic or non-study abroad students. DMSs mostly consumed less alcohol and illicit substances compared to domestic students, but little information on pre-travel behavior and predictors of at-risk behaviors while abroad was available on DMSs. Most studies indicated that CMSs increased their alcohol use while abroad and reduced it when they returned home. However, there is no evidence of an increase in the negative consequences associated with alcohol misuse while abroad. Different pre-departure and abroad factors (e.g., perceptions of peer drinking norms, psychological and sociocultural adjustment abroad) were related to at-risk behaviors in the host country. University students who study abroad are understudied and potentially at risk from alcohol and drug use. Knowledge gaps are discussed in relation to possible future qualitative, mixed methods and longitudinal research.

  17. Benefits of a Graduate Business Degree: Students' Perspectives and Universities' Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Marion Stanton; Allen, Lida Cherie

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 1,499 graduate business students at 7 colleges and universities investigated perceptions of potential benefits of an advanced degree, and their relationships with degree type, school size/type, and student characteristics. Five perceived benefits included research and analytical skills, competitive advantage, monetary reward, career…

  18. Impact of degree program satisfaction on the persistence of college students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suhre, Cor J. M.; Jansen, Ellen P. W. A.; Harskamp, Evert

    Many theories on college retention recognize the significance of student satisfaction as a positive factor in students' persistence. Yet, there are few theories that address the relationship of degree program satisfaction to study behaviour and dropout. This paper explores the impact of degree

  19. How Do Students' Accounts of Sociology Change over the Course of Their Undergraduate Degrees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, Paul; Abbas, Andrea; McLean, Monica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we examine how students' accounts of the discipline of sociology change over the course of their undergraduate degrees. Based on a phenomenographic analysis of 86 interviews with 32 sociology and criminology students over the course of their undergraduate degrees, we constituted five different ways of accounting for sociology.…

  20. Accelerated second-degree nursing students: predictors of graduation and NCLEX-RN first-time pass rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penprase, Barbara B; Harris, Margaret A

    2013-01-01

    It is important to understand and identify factors that affect students' academic performance before entry into a nursing program and as they progress through the program. The authors discuss a study, and its outcomes, that assessed accelerated second-degree nursing students' prenursing and core nursing grades that served to predict their success at completing the nursing program and passing NCLEX-RN on first attempt. Strategies were identified to help at-risk students to be successful in the program and with first-time passage of NCLEX-RN.

  1. Exploring the acquisition of entry-to-practice competencies by second-degree nursing students during a preceptorship experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, Monique; Kellett, Peter; Kalischuck, Ruth Grant

    2014-03-01

    Nursing programs across Canada have begun to implement at an unprecedented rate second-degree nursing programs in response to consumer demands and a nursing shortage. While these types of programs are enjoying considerable popularity among prospective students and employers, it is imperative that nursing programs assess their graduates' ability to meet Registered Nursing entry-to-practice competencies (ETCs). This study sought to determine if second-degree undergraduate nursing students achieved the entry-to-practice competencies established by the provincial regulatory body for registered nurses of Alberta, Canada. The study took place in southern Alberta, Canada as the first cohort of second-degree undergraduate nursing students were completing the final practice course for the program. In this exploratory study, quantitative and qualitative data generation approaches were used. Quantitative data were collected using the nursing program's standardized Clinical Evaluation Tool which is mapped to the 119 ETCs established by the regulatory body. Qualitative data were generated by conducting focus group interviews with students, faculty advisors, and preceptors. A convenience sample consisting of both male and female students (n=14) submitted their mid-term and final clinical evaluations for inclusion in the dataset. Thirteen preceptors submitted mid-term and final clinical evaluations. Three students, three faculty advisors, and two preceptors participated in focus group interviews. At mid-term, statistically significant differences were noted on 31% of the indicators within the clinical evaluation tool between students and preceptors with preceptors consistently ranking students higher than the students' ratings of their performance. Student and preceptor ratings of students' clinical performance were more consistent on the final evaluation. However, where there were differences, preceptors rated students higher than student ratings. Qualitative data analysis

  2. Mentoring program for students newly enrolled in an Engineering Degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pedro Peña-Martín

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a mentoring program for first year engineering students in the Telecommunications Engineering College (ETSIT at the University of Malaga (UMA. Actors involved in the program are professors from staff, veterans mentoring students and, of course, freshmen. All of them has been organized trough the Moodle based Virtual Learning Environment Platform of the UMA. The program has gone through several phases over three years. This paper shows the main objectives of this mentoring program, the initial design to get them where professors played mentor role, and successive changes made to try to improve the results, including the assumption of the mentor role by senior students (peer mentoring. The tools used for program evaluation are shown too. Despite the low participation, it has been a framework for the development of various educational and socializing activities (for mentors and mentees focused on developing generic competences. Furthermore, it has been a research tool to get a better understanding of problems affecting students newly enrolled.

  3. 208 External Degree Programme Graduates' Perception of Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    1988-03-02

    Mar 2, 1988 ... face tutorials, provision of study materials to the learners, guidance and ... mathematics or combinations in which one of the subjects was mathematics ... Science, Commerce and Architecture (Young, 1976). ... accommodation and teaching space (University of Nairobi Students' ..... English/Literature. 7. 5.

  4. Medication Administration: Measuring Associate Degree Nursing Student Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    The American Nurse Association's (ANA) provisions outline the commitment expected of nurses to protect the community from harm. Medication administration coincides with patient safety as a compelling obligation in nursing practice. The study's purpose was to examine retention of medication safety knowledge among first year nursing students, after…

  5. Altered brain processing of decision-making in healthy first-degree biological relatives of suicide completers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Y; Pereira, F; Hoehne, A; Beaulieu, M-M; Lepage, M; Turecki, G; Jollant, F

    2017-08-01

    Suicidal behavior is heritable, with the transmission of risk being related to the transmission of vulnerability traits. Previous studies suggest that risky decision-making may be an endophenotype of suicide. Here, we aimed at investigating brain processing of decision-making in relatives of suicide completers in order to shed light on heritable mechanisms of suicidal vulnerability. Seventeen healthy first-degree biological relatives of suicide completers with no personal history of suicidal behavior, 16 relatives of depressed patients without any personal or family history of suicidal behavior, and 19 healthy controls were recruited. Functional 3 T magnetic resonance imaging scans were acquired while participants underwent the Iowa Gambling Task, an economic decision-making test. Whole-brain analyses contrasting activations during risky vs safe choices were conducted with AFNI and FSL. Individuals with a family history of suicide in comparison to control groups showed altered contrasts in left medial orbitofrontal cortex, and right dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. This pattern was different from the neural basis of familial depression. Moreover, controls in comparison to relatives showed increased contrast in several regions including the post-central gyrus, posterior cingulate and parietal cortices, and cerebellum (culmen) in familial suicide; and inferior parietal, temporal, occipital, anteromedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and cerebellum (vermis) in familial depression. These findings most likely represent a complex combination of vulnerability and protective mechanisms in relatives. They also support a significant role for deficient risk processing, and ventral and dorsal prefrontal cortex functioning in the suicidal diathesis.

  6. A Social Constructivist Approach to Introducing Skills for Employment to Foundation Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutt, L.; Gray, C.; Turner, R.; Swain, J.; Hulme, S.; Pomeroy, R.

    2013-01-01

    Expectations for higher education providers to produce graduates ready for the workplace have shaped provision, with the introduction of the Foundation Degree, and expectations of an employability component within higher education programmes. This paper reports on an intervention for three groups of foundation degree students, which introduces…

  7. SoTL and Students' Experiences of Their Degree-Level Programs: An Empirical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Kelly E.; Divan, Aysha; John-Thomas, Nicole; Lopes, Valerie; Ludwig, Lynn O.; Martini, Tanya S.; Motley, Phillip; Tomljenovic-Berube, Ana M.

    2013-01-01

    In the global higher education sector, government accountability initiatives are increasingly focused on degree-level competencies that may be expected from university graduates. The purpose of this paper was to examine the extent to which SoTL reflects this increased interest in student learning across the degree program. Articles (N = 136)…

  8. Opening up a Road to Somewhere: Development of Associate Degree Students in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wincy W. S.

    2014-01-01

    Associate (community college) degrees have expanded rapidly in the past decade in Hong Kong, but their value has been questioned due to the limited number of government-funded articulation opportunities available. This paper argues that associate degrees in Hong Kong are not valued solely for articulation purposes, but also for nurturing students'…

  9. The Perspectives of Two First-Generation College Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil, Martina; McCall, Joyce M.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this autoethnographic multiple case study was to compare experiences of two first-generation college students pursuing doctoral degrees in music education. Motivations for pursuing an advanced degree were to enact change in the field of music education and fulfill personal ambitions. Participants encountered two challenges,…

  10. The Impact of Dual Enrollment on College Degree Attainment: Do Low-SES Students Benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Brian P.

    2013-01-01

    Dual enrollment in high school is viewed by many as one mechanism for widening college admission and completion of low-income students. However, little evidence demonstrates that these students discretely benefit from dual enrollment and whether these programs narrow attainment gaps vis-a-vis students from middle-class or affluent family…

  11. The Aftermath of Remedial Math: Investigating the Low Rate of Certificate Completion among Remedial Math Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Peter Riley

    2013-01-01

    Nationally, a majority of community college students require remedial assistance with mathematics, but comparatively few students who begin the remedial math sequence ultimately complete it and achieve college-level math competency. The academic outcomes of students who begin the sequence but do not complete it are disproportionately unfavorable:…

  12. Student Loyalty toward Master's Degree Business Administration Curriculum at Srinakharinwirot University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulid, Nak

    2011-01-01

    This research aims to study mixed factors of service marketing affecting student loyalty toward the business administration curriculum at the master's degree level at Srinakharinwirot University. It also examines the relationship between student satisfaction and loyalty in the MBA program. The results show that service marketing mixed factors have…

  13. Students' Views on Thesis Supervision in International Master's Degree Programmes in Finnish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippou, Kalypso; Kallo, Johanna; Mikkilä-Erdmann, Mirjamaija

    2017-01-01

    This paper employs an intercultural perspective to examine students' views on master's thesis supervision and the roles and responsibilities of supervisors and students. The 302 respondents who answered the online questionnaire were enrolled in international master's degree programmes in four Finnish universities. The study revealed asymmetric…

  14. Happenstance and compromise: a gendered analysis of students' computing degree course selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Catherine

    2010-12-01

    The number of students choosing to study computing at university continues to decline this century, with an even sharper decline in female students. This article presents the results of a series of interviews with university students studying computing courses in Australia that uncovered the influence of happenstance and compromise on course choice. This investigation provides an insight into the contributing factors into the continued downturn of student diversity in computing bachelor degree courses. Many females interviewed made decisions based on happenstance, many males interviewed had chosen computing as a compromise course, and family helped in the decision-making to a large degree in both genders. The major implication from this investigation is the finding that students of both genders appear to be socialised away from this discipline, which is perceived as a support or insurance skill, not a career in itself, in all but the most technical-oriented (usually male) student.

  15. Degree Progress of Women Doctoral Students: Factors that Constrain, Facilitate, and Differentiate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Michelle A.; Ford, Martin E.; Thompson, Candace M.

    2004-01-01

    Using survey and qualitative data, this study identified emergent themes that remain consistent across or differentiate among reports of women earning their doctoral degree relatively quickly ("early-finishers") and those taking considerably longer ("late-finishers"). Emergent themes included commitment to timely degree completion, faculty…

  16. Guiding role of typical cases in clinical training for ophthalmology professional degree graduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available With the change of the concept of graduate enrollment, the recruiting proportion of clinical medicine professional degree graduate students is more and more, and the training of professional degree graduate students is increasingly focusing on practical. In our experience in clinical training for ophthalmology professional degree graduate students, increasing the ward clinical practice time is important. For particular emphasis on the guiding role of the typical cases, each professional group combined their professional characteristics of the typical cases to instruct the graduate students, training their clinical diagnosis and treatment ability, training their microsurgical techniques. From clinical medical writing, record summary, literature review, professional degree graduate students could expand their knowledge structure, practice their thesis writing ability. Based on the typical cases, expansion of knowledge coverage, they could improve the ability of diagnosis and treatment for special disease cases. In this rigorous training system, professional degree graduate students can learn by analogy, and focus on typical cases to get the most intuitive panoramic understanding of the diseases, with a minimum of time to master the most clinical knowledge, to enrich clinical experience, and to lay the foundation for future work in the assessment.

  17. REASONS FOR STUDENT DISCONTINUATION IN ENGINEERING DEGREE COURSES OFFERED AT A DISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Anbahan ARIADURAI

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Faculty of Engineering Technology of the Open University of Sri Lanka has been offering engineering programmes at a distance for the last two decades or so. However, completion rates in Faculty of Engineering Technology are lower compared to the other faculties of the University. This paper investigates the reasons for low completion rates in the faculty and suggests ways and means to overcome this problem. The study concludes that increasing student numbers will not necessarily increase percentage of students completing the programme though the number of students completing is increased. It is found that students offering courses for the first time in the system of distance education in their academic career perform poorer because they are not conversant with distance education techniques. It is recommended that the Faculty must offer an orientation programme on distance education to all the students enrolling for the first time, before they commence their regular programmes. Further, it has been found that considerable percentage of students who obtain eligibility to sit the final examination by completing the continuous assessments do not sit the final examination. This has been found to contribute towards non-completion of programmes as students sitting the final examination in the subsequent years perform poorly in their exams. To overcome this problem, it is recommended that current practise of allowing the student to carry forward their eligibility to unlimited period of time must be disbanded.

  18. Benefits of completing homework for students with different aptitudes in an introductory electricity and magnetism course

    OpenAIRE

    F. J. Kontur; K. de La Harpe; N. B. Terry

    2015-01-01

    We examine how student aptitudes impact how much students learn from doing graded online and written homework in an introductory electricity and magnetism course. Our analysis examines the correlation between successful homework completion rates and exam performance as well as how changes in homework completion correlate with changes in exam scores for students with different physics aptitudes. On average, successfully completing many homework problems correlated to better exam scores only fo...

  19. Turning Points: Improving Honors Student Preparation for Thesis Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is an action research study that had as its primary goal to increase retention of honors college students at Arizona State University by implementing an additional advising session during the fifth semester of their academic career. Introducing additional, strategically-timed support for the honors thesis and demystifying the…

  20. Successful Student Goal Completion: A Community College Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Sara C.

    2013-01-01

    Research studies have shown that one half of all students who begin college fail to realize their goals. This case study of one community college provided a comprehensive examination of best practices developed over several years through strategic enrollment planning. Additionally, this dissertation examined the decision-making processes that…

  1. Student Access and Completion: A Regional Strategic Enrollment Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    "Albert" told his story to special visitor Dr. Jill Biden in order to bring notice to a very unique tuition assistance program provided to Valencia College's homeless students. Not only was Albert homeless, his background was indicative of failure and through education he turned his life around and helped others with similar backgrounds.…

  2. Differences between Lab Completion and Non-Completion on Student Performance in an Online Undergraduate Environmental Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsi, Gianluca

    2011-12-01

    Web-based technology has revolutionized the way education is delivered. Although the advantages of online learning appeal to large numbers of students, some concerns arise. One major concern in online science education is the value that participation in labs has on student performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between lab completion and student academic success as measured by test grades, scientific self-confidence, scientific skills, and concept mastery. A random sample of 114 volunteer undergraduate students, from an online Environmental Science program at the American Public University System, was tested. The study followed a quantitative, non-experimental research design. Paired sample t-tests were used for statistical comparison between pre-lab and post-lab test grades, two scientific skills quizzes, and two scientific self-confidence surveys administered at the beginning and at the end of the course. The results of the paired sample t-tests revealed statistically significant improvements on all post-lab test scores: Air Pollution lab, t(112) = 6.759, p virtual reality platforms and digital animations. Future research is encouraged to investigate possible correlations between socio-demographic attributes and academic success of students enrolled in online science programs in reference to lab completion.

  3. Profiling students using an institutional information portal:a descriptive study of the Bachelor of Arts degree students,University of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omwoyo Bosire Onyancha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using data mining techniques, this study examines the Bachelor of Arts (General degree’s data available in the University of South Africa’s institutional information and analysis portal (IP maintained by the Department of Information and Strategic Analysis (DISA. The purpose of this was to draw a demographic profile of the students and demonstrate the potential use of an IP in monitoring and evaluating the performance of individual qualifications as far as registrations, cancellations and graduation rates are concerned. Data were analysed in order to determine the students’ age, gender, occupational, home language and geographic distributions and the relationships between the “incoming”, “re-entering”, “degree completed” and “graduation” headcounts. It was observed, among other findings, that the BA(G degree attracts students with diverse characteristics; there is a general continued decline in the number of students registering as well as completing the qualification; the number of students cancelling registrations in BA(G has continued to grow since 2005; and that there is a significant positive correlation between (a the “incoming” and “graduation” headcounts; (b “incoming” and “degree completed” headcounts; (c “degree completed” and “graduation” headcounts; and (d “graduation” and “total registration” headcounts. Other findings as well as conclusions and recommendations are offered.

  4. Understanding MOOC Students: Motivations and Behaviours Indicative of MOOC Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pursel, B. K.; Zhang, L.; Jablokow, K. W.; Choi, G. W.; Velegol, D.

    2016-01-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) continue to appear across the higher education landscape, originating from many institutions in the USA and around the world. MOOCs typically have low completion rates, at least when compared with traditional courses, as this course delivery model is very different from traditional, fee-based models, such as…

  5. Factors influencing a student's decision to pursue a communications degree in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Sierra Sánchez

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper analyzes the factors that influence secondary school students’ choice of higher education options in Spain today and explores the implications and benefits of establishing provider-client relationships between universities and students.Design/methodology/approach: A quantitative approach using questionnaires to demonstrate the hypothesis and achieve the objectives. We have prepared a questionnaire via telematic LimeSurvey application consisting of twenty-four closed questions.Findings: Results depict that the leading criteria for Spanish students interested in pursuing studies in communication sciences were a university’s reputation and excellence and the quality of its educational programmes. In terms of sources of information related to universities and their degree programmes, Spanish communication sciences students placed the highest value on direct and experiential sources. Spanish students interested in pursuing degrees in communication sciences preferred public universities over private universities.Research limitations: It is a descriptive paper. The sample could have been larger and have covered the entire universe of communication schools in Spain.Practical implications: Gain in-depth insight into the academic, cultural, and sociodemographic characteristics of students who choose to pursue an undergraduate degree in communications sciences in Spain.Ascertain which sources of information proved to be the most valuable to prospective students in choosing a university and degree programme and the other factors that influenced their choices by means of a survey involving first-year undergraduate communication sciences students. Use the results of this survey to rank the criteria used by students when choosing a university and degree programme. Gain a clearer picture of how parents and friends influence a student’s choice of degree programmes and universities.Social implications: Knowing the factors of choice

  6. Double nursing degree: potentialities and challenges of an international student academic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Carlise Rigon Dalla; Schaefer, Rafaela; Schveitzer, Mariana Cabral; Zoboli, Elma Lourdes Campos Pavone; Vieira, Margarida Maria

    2018-01-01

    Objective To share the experience of a Double Nursing degree promoted between the Nursing School of the Universidade de São Paulo and the Health Sciences Institute of the Universidade Católica Portuguesa, reflecting on the potentialities and challenges of this opportunity for graduate students. Method This is an experience report presented in chronological order and of a descriptive nature. The double degree in Nursing was accomplished over a period of 6 months in a different institution from the institution of origin. Results Among the activities developed during the Double Degree are: participating in examining boards, congresses, seminars, courses, meetings, lectures, colloquium, classes, research groups and technical visits to health services. A table presents and describes the main benefits of the experience experienced by the authors. Conclusion When well-planned and well-developed, a double degree can promote personal, cultural and professional development of the students, favoring internationalization and contributing to the qualification of graduate programs.

  7. Self-esteem and self-efficacy as predictors of attrition in associate degree nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson-Graziose, Virginia; Bryer, Jennifer; Nikolaidou, Maria

    2013-06-01

    There is a serious and growing shortage of nurses in the United States, and the high rate of student attrition from nursing programs has further added to this problem. The challenge for schools of nursing is to recruit increased numbers of qualified candidates into their programs and to determine ways to decrease the rate of student attrition. The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-esteem, self-efficacy, and life stressors were significantly related to student attrition in first-semester associate degree nursing students. A descriptive correlational design and nonprobability convenience sample of first-semester associate degree nursing students was used. Data were gathered using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the General Self-Efficacy Scale, and the Holmes and Rahe Social Readjustment Rating Scale. Findings indicated that self-esteem was significantly associated with student attrition. Results from this study provide the basis for targeted interventions designed to decrease student attrition rates in associate degree nursing programs. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. A Multiple Comparison Case Study of Factors Related to Success of Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieting, Shelley

    2017-01-01

    The nursing profession is facing a serious shortage of registered nurses based on current numbers, projected retirements, and estimates of future need. Nursing schools accept the largest numbers of students that they are able to accommodate, but many of these students do not complete the programs; this is especially true for associate degree…

  9. Benefits of Completing Homework for Students with Different Aptitudes in an Introductory Electricity and Magnetism Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontur, F.?J.; de La Harpe, K.; Terry, N.?B.

    2015-01-01

    We examine how student aptitudes impact how much students learn from doing graded online and written homework in an introductory electricity and magnetism course. Our analysis examines the correlation between successful homework completion rates and exam performance as well as how changes in homework completion correlate with changes in exam…

  10. Attitudes and Perceptions of Dual PharmD/MBA Degree Program Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, David M; Daly, Christopher J; Tierney, Sarah-Elizabeth L; O'Brien, Erin; Fiebelkorn, Karl D

    2017-05-01

    Objectives. To understand pharmacy students' reasons for pursuing a dual PharmD/MBA degree and their perceptions of the impact a dual degree will have on their careers. Methods. This was a cross-sectional survey of registered students in the University at Buffalo PharmD/MBA program. An electronic survey was developed through collaboration with the UB School of Management and administered in January 2015. Results. A total of 23/24 (96% response rate) students who were enrolled in the PharmD/MBA curriculum responded to the survey. Respondents identified employment opportunities following graduation and career advancement as the most influential determinants in deciding to pursue an MBA degree. All respondents (100%) felt the job marketplace for pharmacy graduates is becoming increasingly difficult, 96% believe they will earn a higher midpoint salary with a PharmD/MBA, and 82% would recommend a PharmD/MBA to first year pharmacy students. Conclusion. Students are increasingly perceptive of the challenges in the current job marketplace and are taking advantage of a dual PharmD/MBA degree.

  11. Motivated Strategies for Learning in Accelerated Second-Degree Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Banna, Majeda M; Tebbenhoff, Billinda; Whitlow, Malinda; Wyche, Karen Fraser

    Students in a second-degree accelerated BSN program experience a rigorous curriculum and fast-paced introduction to the nursing profession. This study examined the relationships among self-esteem, motivation, learning strategies, demographic characteristics, and academic achievement. The results indicated that all of the students had good self-esteem; some demographic characteristics influenced the type of motivation and learning strategies they endorsed but did not influence their current academic performance.

  12. Biosafety: degree of importance in the point of view of undergraduate dental students from Univille

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Dalva de S. SCHROEDER; Constanza MARIN; Fabio MIRI

    2010-01-01

    Introduction and objective: This study evaluated the degree ofimportance regarding biosafety in the point of view of undergraduatedental students from the University of the Region of Joinville– Univille. Material and methods: The sample was composed of142 undergraduate dental students from first to fifth year, who wereasked to sign the term of free and clarified assent in order to answera questionnaire with 13 closed-ended and 2 open-ended questionsregarding dental clinical practice and conce...

  13. Critical thinking skills of basic baccalaureate and Accelerated second-degree nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Sarah E; Moore, Gary

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the critical thinking (CT) skills of basic baccalaureate (basic-BSN) and accelerated second-degree (ASD) nursing students at nursing program entry. Many authors propose that CT in nursing should be viewed as a developmental process that increases as students' experiences with it change. However, there is a dearth of literature that describes basic-BSN and ASD students' CT skills from an evolutionary perspective. The study design was exploratory descriptive. The results indicated thatASD students had higher CT scores on a quantitative critical thinking assessment at program entry than basic-BSN students. CT data are needed across the nursing curriculum from basic-BSN and ASD students in order for nurse educators to develop cohort-specific pedagogical approaches that facilitate critical thinking in nursing and produce nurses with good CT skills for the future.

  14. Predicting Successful Completion Using Student Delay Indicators in Undergraduate Self-Paced Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Janine M.

    2016-01-01

    Self-paced online courses meet flexibility and learning needs of many students, but skepticism persists regarding the quality and the tendency for students to procrastinate in self-paced courses. Research is needed to understand procrastination and delay patterns of students in online self-paced courses to predict successful completion and…

  15. The students attending the physical education degrees: a study of the Faculdades Integradas Einstein of Limeira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Baccin Fiorante

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to evaluate the learning path of the students attending belong to low-income segment in Physical Education teacher degrees in Faculdades Integradas Einstein of Limeira through bibliography and field researches, using a semi structured interview. The results showed that, four of them students show similar answers related to habitus, cultural knowledge deficit, attendance at sporting events, empathy to Physical Education subject during academic life, sport activities during their childhood. We concluded that facts may help understand the professional choice made by the interviewed students.

  16. Reflection: Research by Design: Design-Based Research and the Higher Degree Research Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy-Clark, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    The article "Research by design: Design-based research and the higher degree research student" (Kennedy-Clark, 2013) appeared in the "Journal of Learning Design" Volume 6, Issue 2 in 2013. Two years on, Shannon Kennedy-Clark reflects upon her original article. Upon being asked to revisit this article the author reflected upon…

  17. A study of affecting factors on the degree of university students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There are different factors which affect the way people select and continue their attitudes towards products of certain brands. The main objective of the present study was investigating factors affecting the degree of University students' loyalty to Nike brand. This research is functional in regard with objective and ...

  18. Stressors Experienced by Nursing Students Enrolled in Baccalaureate Second Degree Accelerated Registered Nursing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Charlene

    2017-01-01

    A mounting concern throughout the country is a current and growing nursing shortage. In order to meet the growing demand of nurses, many colleges have created baccalaureate second degree accelerated registered nursing programs. Stressors, experienced by nursing students in these accelerated programs, may affect their retention. A deeper…

  19. The Top 100 Business, Education, Engineering and Social Sciences Degrees Conferred on Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Each year, "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" publishes lists of the Top 100 producers of associate, bachelor's and graduate degrees awarded to minority students based on research conducted by Dr. Victor M. H. Borden, professor of educational leadership and policy studies at Indiana University Bloomington. This article presents lists of the top…

  20. The Statistical Knowledge Gap in Higher Degree by Research Students: The Supervisors' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglin, James; Hart, Claire; Stow, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    This study sought to gain an understanding of the current statistical training and support needs for Australian Higher Degree by Research (HDR) students and their supervisors. The data reported herein are based on the survey responses of 191 (18.7%) eligible supervisors from a single Australian institution. The survey was composed of both…

  1. Students' Perceptions of Undertaking Workplace Tasks within a Foundation Degree--Health and Social Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurgate, Claire; MacGregor, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Foundation degrees (FDs) involve the fusion of academic and vocational paths in higher education (HE) qualifications; the challenge for academics and employers is the credible assessment of the student's workplace learning. Focusing to the workplace enables participants to learn from their daily routines encountered at work. The challenge is to…

  2. Support Services for Higher Degree Research Students: A Survey of Three Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pujitha; Woodman, Karen; Taji, Acram; Travelyan, James; Samani, Shamim; Sharda, Hema; Narayanaswamy, Ramesh; Lucey, Anthony; Sahama, Tony; Yarlagadda, Prasad K. D. V.

    2016-01-01

    A survey was conducted across three Australian universities to identify the types and format of support services available for higher degree research (HDR, or MA and Ph.D.) students. The services were classified with regards to availability, location and accessibility. A comparative tool was developed to help institutions categorise their services…

  3. How Well Does A-Level Mathematics Prepare Students for the Mathematical Demands of Chemistry Degrees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Ellie; Bowyer, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    332 undergraduate chemistry students were surveyed in order to establish whether they had found A-level Mathematics and/or Further Mathematics to be good preparation for their degree. Perceptions of both subjects were found to be positive, with more than 80% of participants describing Mathematics or Further Mathematics as good preparation. In…

  4. Do Courts Consider the Degree of Discipline When Adjudicating Off-Campus Student Speech?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagley, Amy L.; Weiler, Spencer C.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this legal analysis was to determine if there was evidence suggesting that courts, when ruling on off-campus student speech cases that result in on-campus discipline, take into consideration the degree of discipline imposed by school officials. The analysis consisted of reviewing the 34 adjudicated and published cases that…

  5. Students' Perceptions of Long-Functioning Cooperative Teams in Accelerated Adult Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favor, Judy

    2012-01-01

    This study examined 718 adult students' perceptions of long-functioning cooperative study teams in accelerated associate's, bachelor's, and master's business degree programs. Six factors were examined: attraction toward team, alignment of performance expectations, intrateam conflict, workload sharing, preference for teamwork, and impact on…

  6. Mental Health and Academic Performance among Associate Degree Nursing Students at a Technical College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliminski, Kerri

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this non-experimental cross-sectional quantitative study was to examine the relationship between mental health and academic performance among associate degree nursing (ADN) students at a Midwest technical college by identifying incidence of positive mental health, mental illness symptoms/distress, and mental illness; the…

  7. Students' Views of A-Level Mathematics as Preparation for Degree-Level Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Ellie; Bowyer, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    As part of a large-scale survey of over 4000 undergraduates at British universities, 238 economics students reported on their experiences of studying post-compulsory secondary mathematics qualifications (A-levels) and the preparation they provided for their degrees. Participants were positive about their experience of post-compulsory mathematics…

  8. Language and Content in the Modern Foreign Languages Degree: A Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieve, Simon; Cunico, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a small-scale qualitative study of students' experience of their Modern Foreign Languages (MFL) degrees with particular regard to the relationship between language and content learning. It is framed by the identification in the recent Worton Report on MFL studies in UK higher education and elsewhere of a dualism between…

  9. Motivational Orientations of Non-Traditional Adult Students to Enroll in a Degree-Seeking Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Emmanuel Jean

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the motivational orientations of non-traditional adult students to enroll in a degree-seeking program based on their academic goal. The Education Participation Scale (EPS) was used to measure the motivational orientations of participants. Professional advancement, cognitive interest, and educational…

  10. Personality Procrastination and Cheating in Students from different University Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clariana, Merce

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Personality, procrastination and dishonest behaviour in the classroom (or cheating) are variables that have been seen to have an important influence on learning. However, they have seldom been studied together and even less taking into account the gender of the student and their choice of degree course. This work analyses the…

  11. Lost in Translation: Preparing Students to Articulate the Meaning of a College Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRose, Lisa; Stebleton, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The authors contend that many undergraduate students lack the ability to deftly articulate the value of their college degree, including the competencies they acquire through classroom learning and extracurricular activities. Despite the positive impact of experiential education opportunities such as service learning and internships, there is a…

  12. Co-Articulating the Value of a Liberal Arts Degree with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    While most scholars and higher education professionals believe in the intrinsic value of a liberal arts degree, high school students and their parents often have a different bias as they seek to determine where to invest themselves and their resources. Anyone who has taught in or recruited for the social sciences or humanities will recognize the…

  13. Older Women, Deeper Learning, and Greater Satisfaction at University: Age and Gender Predict University Students' Learning Approach and Degree Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Mark; Scevak, Jill; Southgate, Erica; Macqueen, Suzanne; Williams, Paul; Douglas, Heather

    2018-01-01

    The present study explored the interactive effect of age and gender in predicting surface and deep learning approaches. It also investigated how these variables related to degree satisfaction. Participants were 983 undergraduate students at a large public Australian university. They completed a research survey either online or on paper. Consistent…

  14. Benefits of completing homework for students with different aptitudes in an introductory electricity and magnetism course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. J. Kontur

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We examine how student aptitudes impact how much students learn from doing graded online and written homework in an introductory electricity and magnetism course. Our analysis examines the correlation between successful homework completion rates and exam performance as well as how changes in homework completion correlate with changes in exam scores for students with different physics aptitudes. On average, successfully completing many homework problems correlated to better exam scores only for students with high physics aptitude. On the other hand, all other students showed zero or even a negative correlation between successful homework completion and exam performance. Low- and medium-aptitude students who did more homework did no better and sometimes scored lower on exams than their low- and medium-aptitude peers who did less homework. Our work also shows that long-term changes in homework completion correlated to long-term changes in exam scores only for students with high physics aptitude, but not for students with medium or low aptitude. We offer several explanations for the disparity in homework learning gains, including cognitive load theory, ineffective homework strategies, and various mismatches between homework and exams. Several solutions are proposed to address these possible deficiencies in graded online and written homework.

  15. Benefits of completing homework for students with different aptitudes in an introductory electricity and magnetism course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontur, F. J.; de La Harpe, K.; Terry, N. B.

    2015-06-01

    We examine how student aptitudes impact how much students learn from doing graded online and written homework in an introductory electricity and magnetism course. Our analysis examines the correlation between successful homework completion rates and exam performance as well as how changes in homework completion correlate with changes in exam scores for students with different physics aptitudes. On average, successfully completing many homework problems correlated to better exam scores only for students with high physics aptitude. On the other hand, all other students showed zero or even a negative correlation between successful homework completion and exam performance. Low- and medium-aptitude students who did more homework did no better and sometimes scored lower on exams than their low- and medium-aptitude peers who did less homework. Our work also shows that long-term changes in homework completion correlated to long-term changes in exam scores only for students with high physics aptitude, but not for students with medium or low aptitude. We offer several explanations for the disparity in homework learning gains, including cognitive load theory, ineffective homework strategies, and various mismatches between homework and exams. Several solutions are proposed to address these possible deficiencies in graded online and written homework.

  16. 34 CFR 668.48 - Report on completion or graduation rates for student-athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Institutional and Financial Assistance Information for Students § 668.48 Report on completion or graduation... Management and Budget under control number 1845-0004) (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1092) [60 FR 61788, Dec. 1, 1995...

  17. Roads to Success in the Belgian French Community's Higher Education System: Predictors of Dropout and Degree Completion at the Université Libre De Bruxelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Ortiz, Elena; Dehon, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we study the factors that influence both dropout and (4-year) degree completion throughout university by applying the set of discrete-time methods for competing risks in event history analysis, as described in Scott and Kennedy (2005). In the French-speaking Belgian community, participation rates are very high given that higher…

  18. An Application of Break-Even Analysis To Determine the Costs Associated with the Implementation of an Off-Campus Bachelor Degree Completion Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterlee, Brian

    This paper applies the management science tool of break-even analysis to determine the costs of implementing an off-campus bachelor degree completion program at a four-year private liberal arts college. The first section describes break-even analysis which, in this application, is calculated by dividing the total annual cost for a cohort of…

  19. Masseter muscle surface electromyography in college students with a high degree of anxiety and temporomandibular disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda de Lima Amarante

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the electrical activity of masseter muscles, bilaterally, according to the presence or absence of Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD in college students with a high degree of anxiety. Methods: the study was conducted with a randomized sample of 31 Speech Therapy students aged between 17 and 32 years; 61.3% (n = 19 were females and 38.7% (n = 12 were males. They were divided into two groups, Group 1 (G1, comprising 11 students with TMD, and Group 2 (G2, composed of 20 students without TMD. The college students answered the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI for anxiety investigation, and were evaluated by the protocol Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD for TMD diagnosis. The evaluation of muscular electrical activity took into account the records in the conditions of rest, Sustained Maximum Voluntary Activity (SMVA and habitual chewing (HC. The data were analyzed using the version 22 IBM Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS software. The statistical analysis was performed using Student t test to compare means between groups, considering < 0,05 as the significant p-value. Results: college students, of both groups, presented high levels of anxiety traits. Significant statistical differences were observed on the percentage of electrical activity of right masseter muscle in chewing function, as well as muscle fibers recruitment during chewing, which were higher on the group without TMD. Conclusion: college students with TMD and a high degree of anxiety presented lower means of masseter muscle electromyografic activity during chewing, in most conditions assessed, as compared to volunteers without TMD, except for the left masseter muscle in rest and chewing.

  20. [Inclusion of patient safety into the Medical degree electives: Description of the experience and student perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladenheim, R; Macchiavello, D; Milberg, M

    One of the factors identified to reduce medical errors has been the organisational culture. Education is proposed as a tool for its modification, but this does not have a unique way of being achieved. This paper sought to describe a patient safety elective for medical students and to determine their perceptions on the subject. A descriptive study was performed in the Center of Medical Education and Clinical Investigations, in Argentina. Every student who participated in the elective was included, and there were no exclusion criteria. An online survey was conducted on all participants, and individual interviews were conducted on a convenience sample. The subject was chosen by 54 students out of a total of 274 students between 2011 and 2014. All (100%) of the students completed the course and passed the exam, and stated that they would recommend the elective. Most of the students (n=26) agreed that patient safety content should be mandatory, that its content was novel, and that the subject's structure seemed appropriate, with 21 saying that it was the first time they had been talked about these issues. From the individual interviews, students emphasised the novelty of the subject, and that their perception on patient safety issues had increased. The proposed elective had a good reception among students. The methodology planned for its teaching seemed appropriate. Inter-professional education in patient safety should be implemented to improve student competencies in the subject. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Why Do Students Choose Not to Follow All Instructions When Completing Assessment Tasks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    As academics we often assume that allocating marks to a task will influence student decision-making when it comes to completing that task. Marks are used by lecturers to indicate the relative importance of each of the criteria used for marking the assessment task and we expect the student to respond to the marks' allocation. This Postcard suggests…

  2. An Event to Encourage High School Students to Pursue College Degrees in Physics and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukiet, Bruce; Thomas, Gordon

    2003-04-01

    We discuss a Math and Physics Day for high school students and teachers, with hands-on activities and seminars involving mathematics and physics. Participants also learn about careers for those who go on to major in physics and mathematics in college. The New York State Section of the APS has provided generous support for this workshop through its Outreach grant program. Approximately a dozen high schools and 100 students attend each year. The program, which runs from 9:15 AM until 2:15 PM, includes an introduction to undergraduate degree programs in Mathematics, Statistics, Optics, Actuarial Science and Applied Physics, a group physics experiment/contest, brief talks over lunch by speakers from industry who have degrees in Math or Physics, and an afternoon seminar. Teachers earn Professional Development credit.

  3. Networks for Success: Preparing Mexican American AVID College Students for Credentials, Completion, and the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Richard; Watt, Karen M.

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative study examines how Mexican American students participating in an AVID for Higher Education course perceived their preparation for the workforce and efficacy of completing a college credential. A focus group approach was used to explore how social and cultural networks (networks for success) contribute to college completion. The…

  4. [TUBERCULOSIS INFECTION PREVALENCE AMONG NURSING DEGREE STUDENTS IN LA RIOJA UNIVERSITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perianes Rivada, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease of contagious and infectious character that has harassed humanity throughout its history. Many studies say that health professionals and health degrees students as degree in nursing are exposed to a higher risk of transmission of TB to deal with patients who suffer from this disease in their jobs. Knowing the risk of acquiring infection by M. tuberculosis among students of the degree in nursing (GUE) from the University of La Rioja (UR); contrasting outcomes as they have made their formative period of clinical practice in hospitals or not. MEHODOLOGY: Observational study, descriptive, transversal and cutting, for which has been taken a representative sample of 106 students who carried an epidemiological-clinical questionnaire. After, according to criteria of participation and under informed consent, has been practiced them tuberculin test to see if they are infected or not causing by the tuberculosis bacillus. RESULTs: The final sample was 85 people, which were highly represented by women, whose average age was between 20 and 23 years old. The reading of the PT was managed to do in 28 from 37 students from 1st grade (75.7 %) and 45 from 48 students from 4th grade (93.75 %). The other participants not attended appointment agreed with them to perform reading, which accounted for 14.1% of abstention in the second part of the study. Response to the tuberculin globally compared, without taking into account other variables, didn't show differences in distribution between 1st and 4th grade students. The percentage of positive PT was 0 % between 1st grade students, while in 4th grade the percentage of infected with M. tuberculosis amounted to 2.22 %. The average size of indurdtions was 1.03 mm (±1.87) in students of 1st grade and 1.46 mm (±2.98) in the 4th grade, so that difference is not significant. The number of confirmed contacts with TB patients, or their samples, was more often in 4th grade students than 1st grade students (52 % vs

  5. Prediction of Participation of Undergraduate University Students in a Music and Dance Master’s Degree Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Bebetsos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was the investigation of students’ attitudes and intention towards their possible participation in a graduate Music and Dance Distance Learning Master’s Degree Program. The sample consisted of consisted of 229 undergraduate University students, between the ages of 20 to 63 yrs. of age (M=34.24, SD=10.70. More specifically, 134 were students of the Hellenic Open University and 95 were students of the School of Physical Education and Sport Science, of the Democritus University of Thrace. The sample completed the version the “Planned Behavior Theory” questionnaire. Results revealed differences among students of both Universities, between experienced and less experienced ones, and also among age groups. On the contrary, no sex differences in any of the questionnaire’s factors were indicated. In conclusion, the findings of this research allow a better understanding of the distance education process, which explains the attitudes and intention(s of students’ participation, and the factors that might influence theirparticular participation.

  6. Strategies for Teaching Professional Ethics to IT Engineering Degree Students and Evaluating the Result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miñano, Rafael; Uruburu, Ángel; Moreno-Romero, Ana; Pérez-López, Diego

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents an experience in developing professional ethics by an approach that integrates knowledge, teaching methodologies and assessment coherently. It has been implemented for students in both the Software Engineering and Computer Engineering degree programs of the Technical University of Madrid, in which professional ethics is studied as a part of a required course. Our contribution of this paper is a model for formative assessment that clarifies the learning goals, enhances the results, simplifies the scoring and can be replicated in other contexts. A quasi-experimental study that involves many of the students of the required course has been developed. To test the effectiveness of the teaching process, the analysis of ethical dilemmas and the use of deontological codes have been integrated, and a scoring rubric has been designed. Currently, this model is also being used to develop skills related to social responsibility and sustainability for undergraduate and postgraduate students of diverse academic context.

  7. Associate Degree Nursing: Model Prerequisites Validation Study. California Community College Associate Degree Programs by The Center for Student Success, A Health Care Initiative Sponsored Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brad C.; Spurling, Steven; Armstrong, William A.

    California faces a severe nursing shortage, with the number of registered nurses far below what is required to avert a potential state health care crisis. The Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) Project is a joint project involving scholars, educational researchers, and analysts from the Center for Student Success (CSS) housed at City College of San…

  8. Isoniazid completion rates for latent tuberculosis infection among college students managed by a community pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Karl; Goad, Jeffery; Wu, Joanne; Johnson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    The authors' objective was to document 9-month and previously recommended 6-month treatment completion rates for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in a pharmacist-managed LTBI clinic in a community pharmacy on a college campus, and to describe patient characteristics. Participants were university students diagnosed with LTBI. The authors conducted a retrospective review of pharmacy records from 2000 to 2006. Main outcome measures included 6-month and 9-month LTBI treatment completion rates, total isoniazid (INH) tablets taken, characteristics of completers versus noncompleters, average time to treatment completion, and reported adverse drug events. The 9-month completion rate was 59%, and the 6-month completion rate was 67%. Among those not completing treatment, 15.2% experienced fatigue and 2.2% experienced a rash (p=.04 and p=.03, respectively). LTBI clinics are a unique niche for community pharmacies and can provide individualized patient care to ensure LTBI treatment adherence, monitoring for disease progression, and safety of INH.

  9. An Evaluation of Employability in Maritime Degree Programmes: The Undergraduate Students' Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet ŞEREMET

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the main aim is to investigate opinions of the students who study in 4th grade of the department of maritime transportation and management engineering of the maritime faculty on employability potential of the maritime degree programmes. In accordance with this purpose, in 2014-2015 academic year, opinions of 154 final year students (candidate seafarer from three different universities were qualitatively assessed. The major finding of the study is that professional experience based on internship causes various differences in the perception of seafarer candidates towards the profession and in their choice of profession. Moreover, the students' self-assessment on their transferable skills development showed that foreign language skills were not well improved, which is principally one of the most necessities in the job market. As a result, according to the opinions of the students it can be said that practical education and internship opportunities of the department make the biggest contribution to the profession. Nevertheless, after graduation, they feel that they might meet some challenges in the job market such as job shortages and tendency to lowering rates in the wages. The study was finalised by a set of suggestions which might help to improve employability potential of the programmes as well as the quality of student's learning experience in maritime programmes.

  10. Leadership in Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Programs: A Pilot Study Comparing Stand-Alone Leadership Courses and Leadership-Infused Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle L; Gurenlian, JoAnn R; Freudenthal, Jacqueline J; Farnsworth, Tracy J

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to define the extent to which leadership and leadership skills are taught in dental hygiene degree completion programs by comparing stand-alone leadership courses/hybrid programs with programs that infuse leadership skills throughout the curricula. The study involved a mixed-methods approach using qualitative and quantitative data. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with program directors and faculty members who teach a stand-alone leadership course, a hybrid program, or leadership-infused courses in these programs. A quantitative comparison of course syllabi determined differences in the extent of leadership content and experiences between stand-alone leadership courses and leadership-infused curricula. Of the 53 U.S. dental hygiene programs that offer degree completion programs, 49 met the inclusion criteria, and 19 programs provided course syllabi. Of the program directors and faculty members who teach a stand-alone leadership course or leadership-infused curriculum, 16 participated in the interview portion of the study. The results suggested that competencies related to leadership were not clearly defined or measurable in current teaching. Reported barriers to incorporating a stand-alone leadership course included overcrowded curricula, limited qualified faculty, and lack of resources. The findings of this study provide a synopsis of leadership content and gaps in leadership education for degree completion programs. Suggested changes included defining a need for leadership competencies and providing additional resources to educators such as courses provided by the American Dental Education Association and the American Dental Hygienists' Association.

  11. 2008 Key Student Outcomes Indicators for BC Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Programs: Survey Results by Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The BC Diploma, Associate Degree, and Certificate Student Outcomes (DACSO) Survey (formerly the BC College and Institute Student Outcomes Survey) collects and disseminates information about former students' post-secondary experiences and their subsequent labour market and further education experiences. The survey is administered annually to former…

  12. Preferred Methods of Learning for Nursing Students in an On-Line Degree Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Debra; Pearce, Patricia F; Moser, Debra K

    Investigators have demonstrated that on-line courses result in effective learning outcomes, but limited information has been published related to preferred teaching strategies. Delivery of on-line courses requires various teaching methods to facilitate interaction between students, content, and technology. The purposes of this study were to understand student teaching/learning preferences in on-line courses to include (a) differences in preferred teaching/learning methods for on-line nursing students across generations and (b) which teaching strategies students found to be most engaging and effective. Participants were recruited from 2 accredited, private school nursing programs (N=944) that admit students from across the United States and deliver courses on-line. Participants provided implied consent, and 217 (23%) students completed the on-line survey. Thirty-two percent of the students were from the Baby Boomer generation (1946-1964), 48% from Generation X (1965-1980), and 20% from the Millennial Generation (born after 1980). The preferred teaching/learning methods for students were videos or narrated PowerPoint presentations, followed by synchronous Adobe Connect educations sessions, assigned journal article reading, and e-mail dialog with the instructor. The top 2 methods identified by participants as the most energizing/engaging and most effective for learning were videos or narrated PowerPoint presentations and case studies. The teaching/learning method least preferred by participants and that was the least energizing/engaging was group collaborative projects with other students; the method that was the least effective for learning was wikis. Baby Boomers and Generation X participants had a significantly greater preference for discussion board (PBaby Boomer and Generation X students and rated on-line games as significantly more energizing/engaging and more effective for learning (PBaby Boomer and Generation X students. In conclusion, the results of this

  13. The current status of education and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs in Japan: a survey by the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Karasawa, Kumiko; Sumida, Iori; Arimura, Hidetaka; Yamada, Syogo

    2015-07-01

    To standardize educational programs and clinical training for medical physics students, the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification (JBMP) began to accredit master's, doctorate, and residency programs for medical physicists in 2012. At present, 16 universities accredited by the JBMP offer 22 courses. In this study, we aimed to survey the current status of educational programs and career paths of students after completion of the medical physicist program in Japan. A questionnaire was sent in August 2014 to 32 universities offering medical physicist programs. The questionnaire was created and organized by the educational course certification committee of the JBMP and comprised two sections: the first collected information about the university attended, and the second collected information about characteristics and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs from 2008 to 2014. Thirty universities (16 accredited and 14 non-accredited) completed the survey (response rate 94 %). A total of 209, 40, and 3 students graduated from the master's, doctorate, and residency programs, respectively. Undergraduates entered the medical physicist program constantly, indicating an interest in medical physics among undergraduates. A large percentage of the students held a bachelor's degree in radiological technology (master's program 94 %; doctorate program 70 %); graduates obtained a national radiological technologist license. Regarding career paths, although the number of the graduates who work as medical physicist remains low, 7 % with a master's degree and 50 % with a doctorate degree worked as medical physicists. Our results could be helpful for improving the medical physicist program in Japan.

  14. Conversation as Academic Practice: Tutors' Strategies in Integrating Student Learning in a Professional Training Degree Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Bowden

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tutors are generally considered to be an additional resource in teaching and learning, as a means of augmenting that of the lecturer. This article explores tutors as academic staff with responsibilities for developing practice competencies and integrating student learning in a social care professional training degree programme. The research is small-scale, based upon data from a purposive sample of five interviews; and upon insider-participant observation notes and reflections in one single setting. The author deployed a situated ethnographic methodology alongside a frame analytic approach. The research found that in their academic practice, tutors reveal how their student contact is oriented to developing a reflective practitioner and they discuss how programme inputs impact on the student’s professional self. Simultaneously, tutors seek to create cross programme integration through finding overlaps with academic programme strands.

  15. Student Workload and Degree Profiles: the experience of CLAR credit in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Alarcón

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is growing consensus in Latin America on the necessity to reorganize the degree profiles in a competence-based and student-centred system, with identified learning outcomes, innovative learning and teaching strategies, and new methodologies for assessing competences which could be useful for students. There is also agreement on the need to build up a solid Latin America Higher Education Area —based on common benchmarks—among which a shared regional academic credit system is highly relevant. Not all Latin American higher education institutions are familiar with an academic credit system. In the countries where academic credits do exist they are generally based on traditional views which focus on teaching and transmission, rest on different concepts and definitions and consider diverse scopes for their application. With few exceptions, these countries do not use a credit system as a unit of measure of student workload to achieve learning outcomes and competences. This paper sheds light on a proposal for a common academic credit system for Latin America (CLAR which comes out of one of the many nuances of Tuning discussion and is referred to the expected outcome 6: “Political-and educational orientations for the establishment of a system of academic credits for Latin America” (Proyecto Alfa Tuning América Latina: Innovación Educativa y Social, 2011-2013. The new credit system that this paper advocates for Latin America is based on the principle that 60 credits measure the workload of a full-time student during one academic year. As such, a CLAR credit is conceived as a unit of value that estimates the student workload, measured in hours, which he/she typically requires to achieve learning outcomes and pass a course or a semester. In order to calculate the value of CLAR credit two elements are considered: the duration of the academic year and the annual student workload. To estimate the annual student workload, a specific survey was

  16. Degrees of systematic thoroughness: A text analysis of student technical science writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Catherine Julia

    This dissertation investigates student technical science writing and use of evidence. Student writers attended a writing-intensive undergraduate university oceanography course where they were required to write a technical paper drawing from an instructor-designed software program, Our Dynamic Planet. This software includes multiple interactive geological data sets relevant to plate tectonics. Through qualitative text analysis of students science writing, two research questions frame the study asking: How are the papers textually structured? Are there distinctions between high- and low-rated papers? General and specific text characteristics within three critical sections of the technical paper are identified and analyzed (Observations, Interpretations, Conclusions). Specific text characteristics consist of typical types of figures displayed in the papers, and typical statements within each paper section. Data gathering consisted of collecting 15 student papers which constitute the population of study. An analytical method was designed to manage and analyze the text characteristics. It has three stages: identifying coding categories, re-formulating the categories, and configuring categories. Three important elements emerged that identified notable distinctions in paper quality: data display and use, narration of complex geological feature relationships, and overall organization of text structure. An inter-rater coding concordance check was conducted, and showed high concordance ratios for the coding of each section: Observations = 0.95; Interpretations = 0.93; and Conclusions = 0.87. These categories collectively reveal a larger pattern of general differences in the paper quality levels (high, low, medium). This variation in the quality of papers demonstrates degrees of systematic thoroughness, which is defined as how systematically each student engages in the tasks of the assignment, and how thoroughly and consistently the student follows through on that systematic

  17. Isoniazid Completion Rates for Latent Tuberculosis Infection among College Students Managed by a Community Pharmacist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Karl; Goad, Jeffery; Wu, Joanne; Johnson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors' objective was to document 9-month and previously recommended 6-month treatment completion rates for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in a pharmacist-managed LTBI clinic in a community pharmacy on a college campus, and to describe patient characteristics. Participants: Participants were university students diagnosed with…

  18. Topologies of an Effective Mentoring Model: At the Intersection of Community Colleges, Underrepresented Students, and Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Janet Lee

    2012-01-01

    This evidenced-based study was conducted using a systemic review of the literature to verify scholarly consensus about the effectiveness of mentoring as an intervention to impact college completion for underrepresented students in a community college setting. The study explored the impact of having access to mentors for the target population:…

  19. Texas Student Success Council: Finding Common Ground to Increase Community College Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, a prominent Texas business group erected provocative billboards condemning low completion rates at the state's community colleges and questioning the value of tax dollars spent there. The Texas Association of Business put up the signs to prod community colleges to do more to increase student success and help create a better educated…

  20. Reducing Racism, Sexism, and Homophobia in College Students by Completing a Psychology of Prejudice Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, Terry F., II; Walzer, Amy S.

    2008-01-01

    Students enrolled in Psychology of Prejudice and Introductory Psychology courses completed measures of racism, sexism, and attitudes toward homosexuals at the beginning and end of the term. We predicted that those who took part in the Psychology of Prejudice class would have significantly reduced prejudice as a result of the course experience. We…

  1. Predicting High School Completion Using Student Performance in High School Algebra: A Mixed Methods Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiado, Wendy S.

    2012-01-01

    Too many of our nation's youth have failed to complete high school. Determining why so many of our nation's students fail to graduate is a complex, multi-faceted problem and beyond the scope of any one study. The study presented herein utilized a thirteen-step mixed methods model developed by Leech and Onwuegbuzie (2007) to demonstrate within a…

  2. Generational diversity in associate degree nursing students: Teaching styles and preferences in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitko, Jennifer V.

    2011-12-01

    Nursing educators face the challenge of meeting the needs of a multi-generational classroom. The reality of having members from the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations in a classroom with Generation X and Y students provides an immediate need for faculty to examine students' teaching method preferences as well as their own use of teaching methods. Most importantly, faculty must facilitate an effective multi-generational learning environment. Research has shown that the generation to which a person belongs is likely to affect the ways in which he/she learns (Hammill, 2005). Characterized by its own attitudes, behaviors, beliefs, and motivational needs, each generation also has distinct educational expectations. It is imperative, therefore, that nurse educators be aware of these differences and develop skills through which to communicate with the different generations, thereby reducing teaching/learning problems in the classroom. This is a quantitative, descriptive study that compared the teaching methods preferred by different generations of associate degree nursing students with the teaching methods that the instructors actually use. The research study included 289 participants; 244 nursing student participants and 45 nursing faculty participants from four nursing departments in colleges in Pennsylvania. Overall, the results of the study found many statistically significant findings. The results of the ANOVA test revealed eight statistically significant findings among Generation Y, Generation X and Baby boomers. The preferred teaching methods included: lecture, self-directed learning, web-based course with no class meetings, important for faculty to know my name, classroom structure, know why I am learning what I am learning, learning for the sake of learning and grade is all that matters. Lecture was found to be the most frequently used teaching method by faculty as well as the most preferred teaching methods by students. Overall, the support for a variety of

  3. Value Education Through Distance Learning: Opinions of Students who already Completed Value Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan DEVECI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals in a society should be systematically trained on value education so that they can appreciate values such as love, respect, tolerance, and honesty. Employment of value training approaches within Anadolu University Open and Distance Learning System will make it possible to educate many people on values. The purpose of this research is to determine the opinions of university students about providing value education through distance learning system. This study has been completed via use of semi-structured interview technique based on qualitative research approach. The participants are registered students studying at Social Studies Teacher Training Program, Faculty of Education, Anadolu University during the fall term of 2013-2014 academic years. Based on the selection criteria, 15 students who had already completed value education course and who were familiar with Anadolu University’s open and distance learning system partook in the study. Research data was analyzed through content analysis. Participating students believe that value education is a necessary component of social life and that students within distance learning system should be provided with value education. Furthermore, participants stated that value education could be integrated into distance learning. Based on the findings, it is possible to conclude that offering value education to students through distance learning system may significantly contribute to social life as it facilitates maintaining social order and raising effective citizens.

  4. The New Sphere of International Student Education in Chinese Higher Education: A Focus on English-Medium Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Chiharu

    2014-01-01

    This empirical study explores the current features of English-medium instructed master's degree programs for international students (EMIMDPs-ISs) in Chinese higher education. Since the mid-2000s, a significant number of Chinese universities have proactively engaged in establishing English-medium instructed degree programs for international…

  5. Exploring the Value of MBA Degrees: Students' Experiences in Full-Time, Part-Time, and Executive MBA Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Grady D.

    2010-01-01

    Critics of the overall value of the MBA have not systematically considered the attitudes of MBA students about the value of their degree. The author used data from a large sample of graduates (N = 16,268) to do so, and to explore predictors of overall degree value. The author developed separate regression models for full-time, part-time, and…

  6. An Investigation of the Impact of Instructional Fading Using Completion Problems on Student Performance in Principles of Accounting Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingry, Mary Ann

    2012-01-01

    The effects of instructional fading using completion problems on student performance were investigated in this study. Instructional fading is the gradual withdrawal of the amount of assistance provided to the student and was accomplished in this study using completion problems. They were used to gradually transition the student from completely…

  7. Completion of an Online Library Module Improves Engineering Student Performance on Information Literacy Skills Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Scott

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Zhang, Q., Goodman, M., & Xie, S. (2015. Integrating library instruction into the Course Management System for a first-year engineering class: An evidence-based study measuring the effectiveness of blended learning on students’ information literacy levels. College & Research Libraries, 76(7, 934-958. http://dx.doi.org/10.5860/crl.76.7.934 Objective – To assess the efficacy of an online library module and of blended learning methods on students’ information literacy skills. Design – Multi-modal, pre- and posttests, survey questionnaire, and focus groups. Setting – Public research university in London, Ontario, Canada. Subjects – First-year engineering students. Methods – Of 413 students enrolled in Engineering Science (ES 1050, 252 volunteered to participate in the study. Participants were asked to complete the online module, a pretest, a posttest, an online follow-up survey, and to take part in a focus group. Researchers generated a pretest and a posttest, each comprised of 15 questions:; multiple choice, true or false, and matching questions which tested students’ general and engineering-specific information literacy skills. The pretest and posttest had different, but similarly challenging, questions to ensure that students involved in the study would not have an advantage over those who had opted out. While all components of the study were voluntary, the posttest was a graded course assignment. In-person tutorials were offered on 4 occasions, with only 15 students participating. Both tutorial and module content were designed to cover all questions and competencies tested in the pretest and the posttest, including Boolean operators, peer review, identifying plagiarism, engineering standards, engineering handbooks, search strategies, patents, article citations, identifying reliable sources, and how to read journal articles. The posttest survey was delivered in the CMS immediately after the posttest was completed. It

  8. Toward a More Complete Picture of Student Learning: Assessing Students' Motivational Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A. Beghetto

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the assessment of students' motivational beliefs. The..body of the article is focused on a particular type of motivational belief, namely, beliefs involving..achievement goal orientations. I explain why these beliefs are an important aspect of academic learning,..and suggest how teachers can incorporate assessments of them within existing classroom routines.

  9. Toward a More Complete Picture of Student Learning: Assessing Students' Motivational Beliefs

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald A. Beghetto

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the assessment of students' motivational beliefs. The..body of the article is focused on a particular type of motivational belief, namely, beliefs involving..achievement goal orientations. I explain why these beliefs are an important aspect of academic learning,..and suggest how teachers can incorporate assessments of them within existing classroom routines.

  10. Experiences of Students with Specific Learning Disorder (Including ADHD) in Online College Degree Programs: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Seleta LeAnn

    2016-01-01

    Enrollment in online degree programs is rapidly expanding due to the convenience and affordability offered to students and improvements in technology. The purpose of this hermeneutical phenomenological study was to understand the shared experiences of students with documented specific learning disorders (including Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity…

  11. "Publish SCI Papers or No Degree": Practices of Chinese Doctoral Supervisors in Response to the Publication Pressure on Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyan

    2016-01-01

    Publishing English papers in journals listed in Science Citation Index (SCI) has become a requirement for degree conferment for doctoral science students at many universities in China. The publication requirement engenders high pressure for doctoral students and their supervisors and shapes the politics of the relationship between the two parties.…

  12. Assessing the Degree of Possessing Study Skills by the Students of Tafila Technical University from Their Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Roud, Atallah A.; Thawabiah, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the degree of possessing study skills (SS) by the students of Tafila Technical (TTU) University from their perspectives. The population of the study consisted of 5015 students in TTU for the second semester of the academic year 2015/2016. The sample of the study was chosen randomly from the population of the study with…

  13. What Works Clearinghouse Quick Review: "The Impact of Dual Enrollment on College Degree Attainment: Do Low-SES Students Benefit?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study reviewed in this report used data from the National Education Longitudinal Study (NELS:88) to examine the effects of dual enrollment programs for high school students on college degree attainment. The study further reported on whether the impacts of dual enrollment were different for first generation college students. Dual enrollment…

  14. Degree program changes and curricular flexibility: Addressing long held beliefs about student progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, George Dante

    In higher education and in engineering education in particular, changing majors is generally considered a negative event - or at least an event with negative consequences. An emergent field of study within engineering education revolves around understanding the factors and processes driving student changes of major. Of key importance to further the field of change of major research is a grasp of large scale phenomena occurring throughout multiple systems, knowledge of previous attempts at describing such issues, and the adoption of metrics to probe them effectively. The problem posed is exacerbated by the drive in higher education institutions and among state legislatures to understand and reduce time-to-degree and student attrition. With these factors in mind, insights into large-scale processes that affect student progression are essential to evaluating the success or failure of programs. The goals of this work include describing the current educational research on switchers, identifying core concepts and stumbling blocks in my treatment of switchers, and using the Multiple Institutional Database for Investigating Engineering Longitudinal Development (MIDFIELD) to explore how those who change majors perform as a function of large-scale academic pathways within and without the engineering context. To accomplish these goals, it was first necessary to delve into a recent history of the treatment of switchers within the literature and categorize their approach. While three categories of papers exist in the literature concerning change of major, all three may or may not be applicable to a given database of students or even a single institution. Furthermore, while the term has been coined in the literature, no portable metric for discussing large-scale navigational flexibility exists in engineering education. What such a metric would look like will be discussed as well as the delimitations involved. The results and subsequent discussion will include a description of

  15. Assessment of Written Expression Skills of University Students in Terms of Text Completion Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkadir KIRBAŞ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Writing is to transfer the visualised ideas on the paper. Writing, one of the language skills, is a significant tool of communication which provides the permanency of information conveying emotions and thoughts. Since writing has both cognitive and physical aspects, it makes writing the hardest and the latest language skill to improve. The studies show that writing activity is the most difficult skill students have difficulty. In higher education, in order to improve writing skills of students and give basic information and skills about writing skills written expression, composition and writing education lessons are taught both in the department of Turkish Language and Literature and in the departments of Turkish Language in the Faculties of Education. One of the aims of these lessons is to teach students written expression techniques together with the purposes and practices. One of the written expression techniques is text completion skill that improves student’s creativity and enhances her/his imaginary world. The purpose of this study is to assess students’ skills of using text completion technique with reference to the writing studies of students in higher education. the sample of the study consists of 85 college students studying in the department of Turkish Language and Literature in Gümüşhane University in 2016-2017 academic year. The data of the study were obtained from the written expression studies of the students. The introduction part of the article ‘On Reading’ by F. Bacon was given to the students and they were required to complete the text. ‘Text Completion Rating Scale in Writing Expression’ was developed to assess the data of the study by taking opinions of lecturers and Turkish education experts. The data of the study were presented with percentage and frequency rates. At the end of the study, it was concluded that students had weakness in some skills such as writing an effective body part about the topic given

  16. Help to new students of ICT Systems Engineering Degree at EPSEM-UPC: Mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roser Gorchs

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available 120 800x600 New students at the Manresa School of Engineering (EPSEM, Escola Politècnica Superior d'Enginyeria de Manresa of the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC are voluntarity provided with the mentoring service during their initial period at University. Mentoring gives academic, teaching and self-organizational support. It improves academic results and reduces the desertion of the studies. In particular, the mentor is an experimented learner which studies in the last year of his/her Degree. Here we expose such mentoring applied to ICT (Information, Communication and Technology Systems Engineering Degree at EPSEM, studies of new creation which are probably unique in Spain, and we also present a treatment and analysis of the performance and possible actions of continuous improvement. Normal 0 21 false false false CA X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";}

  17. The 360-degree evaluation model: A method for assessing competency in graduate nursing students. A pilot research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormack, Carrie L; Jensen, Elizabeth; Durham, Catherine O; Smith, Gigi; Dumas, Bonnie

    2018-05-01

    The 360 Degree Evaluation Model is one means to provide a comprehensive view of clinical competency and readiness for progression in an online nursing program. This pilot project aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of implementing a 360 Degree Evaluation of clinical competency of graduate advanced practice nursing students. The 360 Degree Evaluation, adapted from corporate industry, encompasses assessment of student knowledge, skills, behaviors and attitudes and validates student's progression from novice to competent. Cohort of advanced practice nursing students in four progressive clinical semesters. Graduate advanced practice nursing students (N = 54). Descriptive statistics and Jonckheere's Trend Test were used to evaluate OSCE's scores from graded rubric, standardized patient survey scores, student reflection and preceptor evaluation. We identified all students passed the four OSCEs during a first attempt or second attempt. Scaffolding OSCE's over time allowed faculty to identify cohort weakness and create subsequent learning opportunities. Standardized patients' evaluation of the students' performance in the domains of knowledge, skills and attitudes, showed high scores of 96% in all OSCEs. Students' self-reflection comments were a mix of strengths and weaknesses in their self-evaluation, demonstrating themes as students progressed. Preceptor evaluation scores revealed the largest increase in knowledge and learning skills (NONPF domain 1), from an aggregate average of 90% in the first clinical course, to an average of 95%. The 360 Degree Evaluation Model provided a comprehensive evaluation of the student and critical information for the faculty ensuring individual student and cohort data and ability to analyze cohort themes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Using a socioecological framework to understand the career choices of single- and double-degree nursing students and double-degree graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Noelene; Harrison, Linda; Sumsion, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Untested changes in nursing education in Australia, such as the introduction of double degrees in nursing, necessitate a new research approach to study nursing career pathways. A review of the literature on past and present career choice theories demonstrates these are inadequate to gain an understanding of contemporary nursing students' career choices. With the present worldwide shortage of nurses, an understanding of career choice becomes a critical component of recruitment and retention strategies. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how an ecological system approach based on Bronfenbrenner's theory of human development can be used to understand and examine the influences affecting nursing students' and graduates' career development and career choices. Bronfenbrenner's socioecological model was adapted to propose a new Nursing Career Development Framework as a way of conceptualizing the career development of nursing students undertaking traditional bachelor of nursing and nontraditional double-degree nursing programs. This Framework is then applied to a study of undergraduate nurses' career decision making, using a sequential explanatory mixed method study. The paper demonstrates the relevance of this approach for addressing challenges associated with nursing recruitment, education, and career choice.

  19. [Burnout, work disruptions, interpersonal and psychosomatic problems--degree-specific comparison of students at a German university].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumz, A; Brähler, E; Heilmann, V K; Erices, R

    2014-03-01

    In the context of the public debate on psychological strain among students, the prevalence of burnout, procrastination, test anxiety, other work disruptions, interpersonal problems and psychic symptoms were analyzed depending on academic degree. The data of 358 college students (of Leipzig University) were examined. The academic degree had only a marginal effect on burnout- and work disruptions-related variables. In terms of interpersonal problems and psychic symptoms, differences between students were identified, depending on the academic degree. Diploma students reported many complaints, whereas undergraduates aspiring for a State Examination, were comparatively less affected. Knowledge of the population-specific psychological load is useful in order to develop preventive and therapeutic measures. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Combining program visualization with programming workspace to assist students for completing programming laboratory task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvina Elvina

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous Program Visualization tools (PVs have been developed for assisting novice students to understand their source code further. However, none of them are practical to be used in the context of completing programming laboratory task; students are required to keep switching between PV and programming workspace when they need to know how their code works. This paper combines PV with programming workspace to handle such issue. Resulted tool (which is named PITON has 13 features extracted from PythonTutor, PyCharm, and student’s feedbacks about PythonTutor. According to think-aloud and user study, PITON is more practical to be used than a combination of PythonTutor and PyCharm. Further, its features are considerably helpful; students rated these features as useful and frequently used.

  1. [The supervisor has a crucial role in the medical student's degree projects. Experiences from seven semesters at Karolinska Institutet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Riitta; Shoshan, Maria; Ponzer, Sari

    2015-01-13

    In Sweden degree projects have a central role in evaluation of higher education, wherefore significant resources are spent on developing students' research competence. The undergraduate medical program at Karolinska Institutet introduced its degree project course in 2010. This paper gives an overview of the course and summarizes experiences from the first seven terms. In order to finalize their projects within one term, most students need substantial support. A highly structured course and frequent progress monitoring are advantageous. Other crucial factors are the quality of the supervision and students' verbal skills as well as support in scientific writing. In addition, increased awareness of the learning outcomes already at the beginning of the course may help students to achieve the expected results. Finally, students need to recognize their own responsibility for learning. 

  2. Increasing Completion Rate of an M4 Emergency Medicine Student End-of-Shift Evaluation Using a Mobile Electronic Platform and Real-Time Completion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C. Tews

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical students on an emergency medicine rotation are traditionally evaluated at the end of each shift with paper-based forms, and data are often missing due to forms not being turned in or completed. Because students’ grades depend on these evaluations, change was needed to increase form rate of return. We analyzed a new electronic evaluation form and modified completion process to determine if it would increase the completion rate without altering how faculty scored student performance. Methods: During fall 2013, 29 faculty completed paper N=339 evaluations consisting of seven competencies for 33 students. In fall 2014, an electronic evaluation form with the same competencies was designed using an electronic platform and completed N=319 times by 27 faculty using 25 students’ electronic devices. Feedback checkboxes were added to facilitate collection of common comments. Data was analyzed with IBM® SPSS® 21.0 using multi-factor analysis of variance with the students’ global rating (GR as an outcome. Inter-item reliability was determined with Cronbach alpha. Results: There was a significantly higher completion rate (p=0.001 of 98% electronic vs. 69% paper forms, lower (p=0.001 missed GR rate (1% electronic. vs 12% paper, and higher mean scores (p=0.001 for the GR with the electronic (7.0±1.1 vs. paper (6.8±1.2 form. Feedback checkboxes were completed on every form. The inter-item reliability for electronic and paper forms was each alpha=0.95. Conclusion: The use of a new electronic form and modified completion process for evaluating students at the end of shift demonstrated a higher faculty completion rate, a lower missed data rate, a higher global rating and consistent collection of common feedback. The use of the electronic form and the process for obtaining the information made our end-of-shift evaluation process for students more reliable and provided more accurate, up-to-date information for student feedback and when

  3. The Use of Expert Judgment in the Assessment of Demonstrated Learning in the Antioch College-Yellow Springs Adult Degree Completion Program. CAEL Institutional Report No. 1. Antioch College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Robert

    The implementation of the Adult Degree Completion Program (ADCP) at Antioch-Yellow Springs is described. The ADCP is a transfer program designed to enable adults who have never finished colege to complete their undergraduate degree work, often without having to abandon their obligations to families or to professions. To enroll in the program,…

  4. A quantitative analysis of factors that influence and predict students' intention to major in and complete an undergraduate program in STEM or non-STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuemei

    2005-11-01

    The goal of this study was to explore and understand the factors that influence students' intention to major in and complete an undergraduate program in a science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) discipline, in a non-STEM field, and how students' gender directly and indirectly affects their success in college. A quantitative study of three thousand four (3004) ACT-tested students who entered a Midwestern, land-grant university as freshmen in fall, 1999 was conducted based on their ACT Assessment information and their enrollment and graduation status after five years. A wide variety of variables were considered and logistic regression, factor analysis, and path analysis were used to analyze the data. The results show that students who intended to major in or completed STEM programs generally have better academic qualifications than their counterparts who intended to major in non-STEM fields. Students who intended to major in or completed STEM programs came from lower income families and smaller communities than those who intended to major in or graduated from non-STEM programs. In this study, gender's direct effect on students' college achievement is eleven times the total of gender's indirect effects through several major factors for students in both STEM fields and non-STEM fields. Perhaps nature has favored females when students' achievement is measured as their college GPA. The results also show that the overall high dropout rate is strongly associated with students' inadequate preparation in high school and family income. Out-of-school accomplishment in community service is a negative influence on their completion of a college degree. ACT scores are not necessary for prediction of college graduation.

  5. Factors motivating Latino college students to pursue STEM degrees on CSU campuses in the southern San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Gabriel

    The purpose of this study was to determine what factors were motivating Latino/a students in the southern San Joaquin Valley to pursue STEM degrees and whether these factors were specific to the Latino/a culture. A 12-question survey was administered to STEM majors at California State University, Bakersfield and California State University, Fresno and interviews were conducted with those survey respondents who agreed to be part of the process. The results of the survey suggested that factors such as STEM subject matter, STEM career knowledge, the possibility of a high paying salary, high school STEM grades, and family influence were significant in motivating Latino/a students to pursue STEM degrees. The results of the Chi Square Test suggested the Latino/a students' responses about college STEM degree granting statistics, the possibility of a high salary, and the effects of setbacks were significantly different to those of their non-Latino/a counterparts.

  6. Veteran Student Persistence: The Lived Experiences of Veteran Students Coping with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder While Enrolled in Online Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson-White, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Persistence as it pertained to traditional college students had been widely researched, but little was known about persistence and the role of resilience and engagement for veteran students experiencing post-traumatic stress disorder while enrolled in online degree programs. The focus of the study was to understand the lived experiences of veteran…

  7. Developing Responsibility for Completing and Handing in Daily Homework Assignments for Students in Grades Three, Four, and Five.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Joan M.

    This practicum was designed to increase responsibility for completing and handing in homework among students in grades three, four, and five in a mid-Atlantic school district. Of a total of 128 students in these grades, 28 were identified to learn strategies to aid in completing homework. Nine solution strategies were employed: (1) provide…

  8. Complexities and Challenges of Researching Student Completion and Non-Completion of HE Programmes in Europe: A Comparative Analysis between England and Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Liz; Hovdhaugen, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest in policy research on student completion and non-continuation and bodies such as the European Commission and OECD are focusing on the subject. There is also increasing national interest in the issue in many countries and they are looking to each other for input on effective policies. However, there are significant…

  9. Vasovagal syncope in medical students and their first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, Anna; Rose, Sarah; Sheldon, Aaron G; Sheldon, Robert S

    2006-08-01

    To determine the effect of family history on the likelihood of vasovagal syncope. Sixty-two medical students and 228 first-degree relatives were studied. Vasovagal syncope was ascertained with the Calgary syncope symptom score. The effects of the sex of the subject and parental syncope history on the likelihood of offspring fainting were described using Kaplan-Meier estimates and analysed using proportional hazards regression. The prevalence of vasovagal syncope was 32% and the median age of first faint in those who fainted was 14 years. More females than males fainted [42 vs. 31%; P=0.02; hazard ratio (HR) 1.34 (95% CI 1.07-1.68)]. An individual with two fainting parents was more likely to faint than one with no fainting parents [P<0.0001; HR 3.4 (95% CI 1.7-7.03)]. In the proportional hazards model, offspring of either sex whose mother faints are more likely to faint than those whose mother does not faint [HR 2.86 (95% CI 1.54-5.31)]. Having a father who faints significantly increases the risk of syncope in sons [HR 4.12 (95%CI 1.39-12.31)], but not in daughters [HR 1.18 (95% CI 0.56-3.34)]. Family history and sex of subject are important predictors of vasovagal syncope in offspring.

  10. Academic Performance, Course Completion Rates, and Student Perception of the Quality and Frequency of Interaction in a Virtual High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Abigail; Graham, Charles R.; Sudweeks, Richard R.; Barbour, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between students' perceptions of teacher-student interaction and academic performance at an asynchronous, self-paced, statewide virtual high school. Academic performance was measured by grade awarded and course completion. There were 2269 students who responded to an 18-item survey designed to measure student…

  11. Benefits Access for College Completion: Lessons Learned from a Community College Initiative to Help Low-Income Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke-Benfield, Amy Ellen; Saunders, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    This report analyzes how students were served by Benefits Access for College Completion (BACC), a 2.5-year initiative designed to increase access to public benefits (such as SNAP or Medicaid) for eligible low-income students. These crucial supports reduce students' unmet financial needs and help them finish school. Launched in 2011, BACC funded…

  12. The Use of TOC Reconciliation as a Means of Establishing the Degree to Which Chromatographic Screening of Plastic Material Extracts for Organic Extractables Is Complete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Dennis; Couch, Thomas R; Robinson, Sarah J; Volz, Trent J; Colton, Raymond H

    2014-01-01

    systems') organic extractables profile. Such testing typically consists of multiple chromatographic approaches whose differences help to ensure that all organic extractables are revealed, measured, and identified. Nevertheless, this rigorous screening process is not infallible and certain organic extractables may elude detection. If the extraction medium is aqueous, the process of total organic carbon (TOC) reconciliation is proposed as a means of establishing when some organic extractables elude detection. In the reconciliation, the TOC of the extracts is both directly measured and calculated from the chromatographic data. The measured and calculated TOC is compared (or reconciled), and the degree of reconciliation is an indication of the completeness and accuracy of the organic extractables profiling. If the reconciliation is poor, then the extractables profile is either incomplete or inaccurate and additional testing must be performed to establish the complete and accurate profile. This article demonstrates the TOC reconciliation process by considering aqueous extracts of 10 different test articles. Incomplete reconciliations were augmented with additional testing to produce a more complete TOC reconciliation. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  13. Where Next?: Mapping and Understanding the Post First Degree Destinations of Mature Disadvantaged Students in three Higher Education Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Aidan; Loxley, Andrew; Fleming, Ted; Finnegan, Fergal

    2009-01-01

    Executive summary (draft for An Pobal conference 24/Sept/09,). The study explored the post first-degree destinations (employment, postgraduate education or otherwise) of students designated as being ‘mature disadvantaged’ in three Irish higher education institutions: NUI Maynooth, Trinity College Dublin and Dublin Institute of Technology. This research attempts to fill a noticeable gap in the ‘access story’ which firmly supports the entry of mature disadvantaged students to HE and has devised...

  14. Strengthening cancer biology research, prevention, and control while reducing cancer disparities: student perceptions of a collaborative master's degree program in cancer biology, preventions, and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillson, I A; Cousin, C E; Blancato, J K

    2013-09-01

    This article provides the findings of a survey of previous and current students in the UDC/GU-LCCC master's degree program. This master's degree program, Cancer Biology, Prevention, and Control is administered and taught jointly by faculty of a Minority Serving Institution, the University of the District of Columbia, and the Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center to incorporate the strengths of a community-based school with a research intensive medical center. The program was initiated in 2008 through agreements with both University administrations and funding from the National Cancer Institute. The master's degree program is 36 credits with a focus on coursework in biostatistics, epidemiology, tumor biology, cancer prevention, medical ethics, and cancer outreach program design. For two semesters during the second year, students work full-time with a faculty person on a laboratory or outreach project that is a requirement for graduation. Students are supported and encouraged to transition to a doctoral degree after they obtain the master's and many of them are currently in doctorate programs. Since the inception of the program, 45 students have initiated the course of study, 28 have completed the program, and 13 are currently enrolled in the program. The survey was designed to track the students in their current activities, as well as determine which courses, program enhancements, and research experiences were the least and most useful, and to discern students' perceptions of knowledge acquired on various aspects of Cancer Biology Prevention, and Control Master's Program. Thirty of the 35 individuals to whom email requests were sent responded to the survey, for a response rate of 85.7%. The results of this study will inform the strengthening of the Cancer Biology program by the Education Advisory Committee. They can also be used in the development of comparable collaborative master's degree programs designed to address the significant disparities in prevalence of

  15. Design Research and the Solo Higher Degree Research Student: Strategies to Embed Trustworthiness and Validity into the Research Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy-Clark, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    This paper puts forward a set of criteria for ensuring trustworthiness in design research studies undertaken by Higher Degree Research (HDR) students. Design research is aimed at exploring educational problems and refining theory and practice by defining a pedagogical outcome and is a methodological approach often associated with the Learning…

  16. Research and Development for a Course in Ethics in Nursing Practice for Community College Associate Degree Nursing Students. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, Jeanette

    A project was undertaken to research and acquire the instructional sources needed for a course in ethics for community college associate degree nursing students and to develop such a course. Addressed in the individual units of the course were the following topics: bioethics and ethical decision making, basic ethical concepts and principles,…

  17. The Effects of Moderate- and High-Fidelity Patient Simulator Use on Critical Thinking in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieck, Jana

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of moderate- and high-fidelity patient simulator use on the critical thinking skills of associate degree nursing students. This quantitative study used a quasi-experimental design and the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) to evaluate the critical thinking skills of third semester nursing…

  18. Chasing a Moving Target: Perceptions of Work Readiness and Graduate Capabilities in Music Higher Research Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Scott; Grant, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Recent efforts to increase workplace readiness in university students have largely centred on undergraduates, with comparatively few strategies or studies focusing on higher research degree candidates. In the discipline of music, a wide diversity of possible career paths combined with rapidly changing career opportunities makes workplace readiness…

  19. The Effects of Webopac Self Training Tool with Guided Exploration on Information Literacy Skills among First Year Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohd Nasir; Mamat, Nurfaezah; Jamaludin, Adnan

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate effects of WebOPAC Self Training Tool with Guided Exploration (WSTTG), WebOPAC Self Training Tool with non-guided exploration (WSTT) and Traditional (T) groups as the learning strategies on information literacy (IL) skills standards among first year degree students in Malaysian public university. The…

  20. Physical activity students of the medical and non-medical degree courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucyna Sochocka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recognition of the multiple positive effects of the physical activity confirms its influence on human’s health. Undertaking of the health oriented conducts plays an important role in the promotion of the health and in the creating of the healthier future. Academic youth should be aware of the influence of certain activities on health. The aim of the research was to analyse the physical activity performed by the full-time students of the medical and nonmedical degree courses. Material and methods: The research was conducted at the turn of 2012 and 2013. The research group, containing 553 person (n4553, consisted of the students from six Polish, both medical and non-medical, university colleges. The research utilizes the method of the diagnostic survey. Technique of the research based on the poll whose questionnaire had been created by the authors for the purpose of the research. Accuracy of the research tool was established within the method of objective judges, splithalf method was used to determine reliability (according to Spearman-Brown result 0.86. In order to define the existence of the differences or correlations between analysed immeasurable parameters chi-squared and Fisher’s exact tests were used. Results: The substantial majority of the respondents – 79,5% (n4439 described themselves as physically active. The forms of activity that are performed most often among the students are: cycling – 40,5% (n4220, team sport – 27,1% (n4147, dog walking – 27,1% (n4147, group activities (aerobics, zumba, salsa – 21,2% (n4115 and swimming – 20,8% (n4113. The sex and the faculty of the studies are both important variables that have got statistically significant impact on the choice of the form of activity. Majority of the respondents – 78,3% (n4432 chooses the type of the physical activity basing on their likings and the amount of the spare time – 42,9% (n4237. Exercising of the physical activity is regarded as a

  1. Time to Degree: A National View of the Time Enrolled and Elapsed for Associate and Bachelor's Degree Earners. (Signature Report No. 11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Doug; Dundar, Afet; Wakhungu, Phoebe Khasiala; Yuan, Xin; Nathan, Angel; Hwang, Youngsik

    2016-01-01

    This report examines time to degree completion for a cohort of students who earned an associate degree as their first and only postsecondary degree or a bachelor's degree as their first four-year degree between July 1, 2014, and June 30, 2015. Overall, the average time enrolled for associate and bachelor's degree earners was 3.3 years and 5.1…

  2. Student Perspectives on the Teaching of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Geography Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seremet, Mehmet; Chalkley, Brian

    2015-01-01

    In an era when graduate employability is a key concern, the teaching of geographical information systems (GIS) has become a subject of considerable interest. This paper reports on a study of the GIS student learning experience using student survey data from six UK geography undergraduate programmes. The findings show that although students'…

  3. Explaining Academic Success in Engineering Degree Programs : Do Female and Male Students Differ?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphorst, Jan C.; Hofman, W.H. Adriaan; Jansen, Ellen P.W.A.; Terlouw, Cees

    2015-01-01

    Background In Dutch engineering education, female students outperform male students. Using an interactionalist framework, this study explores factors that contribute to this gender-based difference. Purpose This study aims to answer two questions: Do female and male students differ in background

  4. Students' Perceptions of Volunteering during the First Two Years of Studying a Social Work Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Sherryl; Kruger, Mellissa L.

    2014-01-01

    There are benefits to volunteering for both the community and the student undertaking the volunteering, it can help to enhance the students understanding of the area they are moving into, or it can show them where they do not want to work. It can assist the student to connect with the community and develop an awareness of the society around them.…

  5. Challenges of University Adjustment in the UK: A Study of East Asian Master's Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenli; Hammond, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the adjustment of East Asian Master's level students who came to study at a campus-based university in the UK during 2004-05. International students face challenges in respect to language proficiency, academic expectations and social participation. In this longitudinal study the experiences of a group of students from East…

  6. Predicting Long-Term College Success through Degree Completion Using ACT[R] Composite Score, ACT Benchmarks, and High School Grade Point Average. ACT Research Report Series, 2012 (5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radunzel, Justine; Noble, Julie

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of ACT[R] Composite score and high school grade point average (HSGPA) for predicting long-term college success. Outcomes included annual progress towards a degree (based on cumulative credit-bearing hours earned), degree completion, and cumulative grade point average (GPA) at 150% of normal time to degree…

  7. Factors Affecting Adult Student Dropout Rates in the Korean Cyber-University Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Jun; Kim, Byoung Uk

    2018-01-01

    Few empirical studies of adult distance learners' decisions to drop out of degree programs have used large enough sample sizes to generalize the findings or data sets drawn from multiple online programs that address various subjects. Accordingly, in this study, we used a large administrative data set drawn from multiple online degree programs to…

  8. Using Social Cognitive Theory to Explain the Intention of Final-year Pharmacy Students to Undertake a Higher Degree in Pharmacy Practice Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Stephen R; Moles, Rebekah J; Krass, Ines; Kritikos, Vicki S

    2016-08-25

    Objective. To develop and test a conceptual model that hypothesized student intention to undertake a higher degree in pharmacy practice research (PPR) would be increased by self-efficacy, outcome expectancy, and the social influence of faculty members. Methods. Cross-sectional surveys were completed by 387 final-year pharmacy undergraduates enrolled in 2012 and 2013. Structural equation modeling was used to explore relationships between variables and intention. Results. Fit indices were good. The model explained 55% of the variation in intention. As hypothesized, faculty social influence increased self-efficacy and indirectly increased outcome expectancy and intention. Conclusion. To increase pharmacy students' orientation towards a career in PPR, faculty members could use their social influence by highlighting PPR in their teaching.

  9. Reply to "Comment on "Benefits of Completing Homework for Students with Different Aptitudes in an Introductory Electricity and Magnetism Course""

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontur, F. J.; de La Harpe, K.; Terry, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    We reply to Rieger, Reinsberg, and Wieman's forgoing Comment [Phys. Rev. Phys. Educ. Res., Comment on "Benefits of completing homework for students with different aptitudes in an introductory electricity and magnetism course" 12, 028001 (2016)].

  10. The moral courage of nursing students who complete advance directives with homeless persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Woods; Mixer, Sandra J; McArthur, Polly M; Mendola, Annette

    2016-11-01

    Homeless persons in the United States have disproportionately high rates of illness, injury, and mortality and tend to believe that the quality of their end-of-life care will be poor. No studies were found as to whether nurses or nursing students require moral courage to help homeless persons or members of any other demographic complete advance directives. We hypothesized that baccalaureate nursing students require moral courage to help homeless persons complete advance directives. Moral courage was defined as a trait of a person or an action that overcomes fears or other challenges to achieve something of great moral worth. The hypothesis was investigated through a qualitative descriptive study. Aside from the pre-selection of a single variable to study (i.e. moral courage), our investigation was a naturalistic inquiry with narrative hues insofar as it attended to specific words and phrases in the data that were associated with that variable. A total of 15 baccalaureate nursing students at a public university in the United States responded to questionnaires that sought to elicit fears and other challenges that they both expected to experience and actually experienced while helping homeless persons complete advance directives at a local, non-profit service agency. The study was approved by the Internal Review Board of the authors' university, and each participant signed an informed consent form, which stated that the study involved no reasonably foreseeable risks and that participation was voluntary. Before meeting with homeless persons, participants reported that they expected to experience two fears and a challenge: fear of behaving in ways that a homeless person would deem inappropriate, fear of discussing a homeless person's dying and death, and the challenge of adequately conveying the advance directive's meaning and accurately recording a homeless person's end-of-life wishes. In contrast, after their meetings with homeless persons, relatively few participants

  11. What are students who earned a bachelor's degree in physics doing one year after graduation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan C.

    2015-03-01

    Each year we attempt to contact each person who received a bachelor's degree in physics one year earlier to ask them what they are doing. New degree recipients typically follow one of two paths: enrolling in graduate school or entering the employment market. For the classes of 2011 and 2012 combined, nearly 60% chose to enroll in a graduate program; almost 40% of those opting for graduate school went into a field other than physics or astronomy. Only 4% of physics bachelor's degree recipients from the classes of 2011 and 2012 were still seeking employment one year after graduation.

  12. Evolving social responsibility understandings, motivations, and career goals of undergraduate students initially pursuing engineering degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulifson, Gregory A.

    Engineers impact the lives of every person every day, and need to have a strong sense of social responsibility. Understanding what students think about social responsibility in engineering and their futures is very important. Further, by identifying influences that change these ideas and shape their conceptualizations, we can intervene to help prepare students for their responsibilities as part of the profession in the future. This thesis presents the experiences, in their own words, of 34 students who started in engineering. The study is composed of three parts: (i) engineering students' ideas about socially responsible engineering and what influenced these ideas, (ii) how students see themselves as future socially responsible engineers and how this idea changes over their first three years of college, and (iii) what social responsibility-related reasons students who leave engineering have for choosing a new major. Results show that students are complicated and have varied paths through and out of engineering studies. Students came up with their own ideas about socially responsible engineering that converged over the years on legal and safety related aspects of the profession. Relatedly, students identified with the engineering profession through internships and engineering courses, and rarely described socially responsible aspirations that could be accomplished with engineering. More often, those students who desired to help the disadvantaged through their engineering work left engineering. Their choice to leave was a combination of an unsupportive climate, disinterest in their classes, and a desire to combine their personal and professional social responsibility ambitions. If we want engineering students to push the engineering profession forward to be more socially responsible, we can identify the effective influences and develop a curriculum that encourages critical thinking about the social context and impacts of engineering. Additionally, a social

  13. A Study of the Significant Factors That Affect the Job Placement Rates of Students Who Have Completed a HERO Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instructional Development and Evaluation Associates, Inc., Berkeley, MI.

    A three-year study examined the significant factors that affect the job placement rates of students completing a Home Economics Related Occupations (HERO) program. Other purposes of the study were to develop and pilot test a model that could be used to determine factors related to student placement in a variety of vocational education programs and…

  14. Comparing the Factors That Predict Completion and Grades among For-Credit and Open/MOOC Students in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeda, Ma. Victoria; Zuech, Joshua; Utz, Chris; Higgins, Greg; Reynolds, Rob; Baker, Ryan S.

    2018-01-01

    Online education continues to become an increasingly prominent part of higher education, but many students struggle in distance courses. For this reason, there has been considerable interest in predicting which students will succeed in online courses and which will receive poor grades or drop out prior to completion. Effective intervention depends…

  15. Demographics of new Undergraduate Medical Imaging and Medical Sonography degree students at CQUniversity, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spuur, Kelly M.; Falconi, Caroline L.; Cowling, Cynthia M.; Bowman, Anita L.; Maroney, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To report the student demographics of the inaugural intake into the Bachelor of Medical Imaging and Bachelor of Medical Sonography/Graduate Diploma of Medical Sonography at CQUniversity, Mackay, Australia. Method: Surveys were distributed to students enrolled in the course MEDI11001 Fundamentals of the Imaging Professions; this course is common to both cohorts in Term 1 of the programs. All students enrolled at the time of the survey were present to participate in the survey. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were developed from responses and thematic analysis applied to open-ended questions. Results: A total of 44 students were enrolled in the programs. The most common place of residence on enrolment was within 40 km of the Mackay campus (16/36.4%); mature age students (30/68.2%); live on campus in the purpose built residences (18/40.9%) and were influenced by the location of the programs in Mackay to enrol (27/61.2%), with the primary justification for this being that the programs were offered close to home. The university website was identified as the primary source of information regarding the programs (15/34.1%) followed by family and friends (11/25%). The programs were first preference for 31 students (70.5%). The majority (23/52.3%) undertakes some type of paid work. Conclusion: Both programs have attracted a diverse student cohort. The majority of students were mature age students from outside of the area local to the Mackay campus of CQUniversity.

  16. Medical Students Who Pursue a Joint MD/MBA Degree: Who Are They and Where Are They Heading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupat, Edward; Dienstag, Jules L; Kester, W Carl; Finkelstein, Stan N

    2016-01-21

    Increasingly, health care is being delivered in large, complex organizations, and physicians must learn to function effectively in them. As a result, several medical and business schools have developed joint programs to train physician leaders who receive both medical degree (MD) and master of business administration (MBA) degrees. We examined several themes in relation to these programs, revolving around concerns about who is attracted to them and whether exposure to the differing cultures of medicine and business have an impact on the professional identities of their graduates as manifested in their motivations, aspirations, and careers. We addressed these issues by studying students in the joint MD/MBA program at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and Harvard Business School (HBS). Our data came from several internal sources and a survey of all students enrolled in the joint program in spring 2013. We found relatively few differences between joint program students and equivalent cohorts of HMS students in terms of personal characteristics, preadmission performance, and performance at HMS and HBS. Contrary to the concerns that such programs may draw students away from medicine, the vast majority embraced careers involving extensive postgraduate medical training, with long-term plans that leveraged their new perspectives and skills to improve health care delivery. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. How Does the Degree of Guidance Support Students' Metacognitive and Problem Solving Skills in Educational Robotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmatzidou, Soumela; Demetriadis, Stavros; Nika, Panagiota

    2018-02-01

    Educational robotics (ER) is an innovative learning tool that offers students opportunities to develop higher-order thinking skills. This study investigates the development of students' metacognitive (MC) and problem-solving (PS) skills in the context of ER activities, implementing different modes of guidance in two student groups (11-12 years old, N1 = 30, and 15-16 years old, N2 = 22). The students of each age group were involved in an 18-h group-based activity after being randomly distributed in two conditions: "minimal" (with minimal MC and PS guidance) and "strong" (with strong MC and PS guidance). Evaluations were based on the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory measuring students' metacognitive awareness and on a think-aloud protocol asking students to describe the process they would follow to solve a certain robot-programming task. The results suggest that (a) strong guidance in solving problems can have a positive impact on students' MC and PS skills and (b) students reach eventually the same level of MC and PS skills development independently of their age and gender.

  18. Studying Computer Science in a Multidisciplinary Degree Programme: Freshman Students' Orientation, Knowledge, and Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautz, Karlheinz; Kofoed, Uffe

    2004-01-01

    Teachers at universities are facing an increasing disparity in students' prior IT knowledge and, at the same time, experience a growing disengagement of the students with regard to involvement in study activities. As computer science teachers in a joint programme in computer science and business administration, we made a number of similar…

  19. Generational Diversity in Associate Degree Nursing Students: Teaching Styles and Preferences in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitko, Jennifer V.

    2011-01-01

    Nursing educators face the challenge of meeting the needs of a multi-generational classroom. The reality of having members from the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations in a classroom with Generation X and Y students provides an immediate need for faculty to examine students' teaching method preferences as well as their own use of teaching methods.…

  20. Qualitative Literature Review of the Prevalence of Depression in Medical Students Compared to Students in Non-medical Degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Stephen; Licinio, Julio

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to review studies published in English between 1 January 2000 and 16 June 2014, in peer-reviewed journals, that have assessed the prevalence of depression, comparing medical students and non-medical students with a single evaluation method. The databases PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and Scopus were searched for eligible articles. Searches used combinations of the Medical Subject Headings medical student and depression. Titles and abstracts were reviewed to determine eligibility before full-text articles were retrieved, which were then also reviewed. Twelve studies met eligibility criteria. Non-medical groups surveyed included dentistry, business, humanities, nursing, pharmacy, and architecture students. One study found statistically significant results suggesting that medical students had a higher prevalence of depression than groups of non-medical students; five studies found statistically significant results indicating that the prevalence of depression in medical students was less than that in groups of non-medical students; four studies found no statistically significant difference, and two studies did not report on the statistical significance of their findings. One study was longitudinal, and 11 studies were cross-sectional. While there are limitations to these comparisons, in the main, the reviewed literature suggests that medical students have similar or lower rates of depression compared to certain groups of non-medical students. A lack of longitudinal studies meant that potential common underlying causes could not be discerned, highlighting the need for further research in this area. The high rates of depression among medical students indicate the continuing need for interventions to reduce depression.

  1. Effects of 8Ps of Services Marketing on Student Selection of Self-Financing Sub-Degree Programmes in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Melissa May Yee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the effects of 8Ps of services marketing affect students' selection of self-financing sub-degree programmes in Hong Kong. The factors that affect students' selection of self-financing sub-degree programmes have not been studied in higher education market of Hong Kong. This research is to…

  2. Longitudinal evaluation of the importance of homework assignment completion for the academic performance of middle school students with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langberg, Joshua M; Dvorsky, Melissa R; Molitor, Stephen J; Bourchtein, Elizaveta; Eddy, Laura D; Smith, Zoe; Schultz, Brandon K; Evans, Steven W

    2016-04-01

    The primary goal of this study was to longitudinally evaluate the homework assignment completion patterns of middle school age adolescents with ADHD, their associations with academic performance, and malleable predictors of homework assignment completion. Analyses were conducted on a sample of 104 middle school students comprehensively diagnosed with ADHD and followed for 18 months. Multiple teachers for each student provided information about the percentage of homework assignments turned in at five separate time points and school grades were collected quarterly. Results showed that agreement between teachers with respect to students assignment completion was high, with an intraclass correlation of .879 at baseline. Students with ADHD were turning in an average of 12% fewer assignments each academic quarter in comparison to teacher-reported classroom averages. Regression analyses revealed a robust association between the percentage of assignments turned in at baseline and school grades 18 months later, even after controlling for baseline grades, achievement (reading and math), intelligence, family income, and race. Cross-lag analyses demonstrated that the association between assignment completion and grades was reciprocal, with assignment completion negatively impacting grades and low grades in turn being associated with decreased future homework completion. Parent ratings of homework materials management abilities at baseline significantly predicted the percentage of assignments turned in as reported by teachers 18 months later. These findings demonstrate that homework assignment completion problems are persistent across time and an important intervention target for adolescents with ADHD. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mentoring in the acquisition of professional skills through practices in companies by degree students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Maria Monllau Jaques

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work has had as objective to analyze the skills acquired through internships in business companies by gender that have made the students of the Faculty of Economics and Business at the University Pompeu Fabra. The internship is a basic item in order to obtain a hard connection between the University and social-economic world where University and Enterprises develop their activity. In this study we want to know about two aspects. The first one, we want to know the profit that is obtained from the Student as a consequence of internship and mentoring. Also, we want to study about the importance of mentoring as a principal element that establish the relationship between the Student and the Company. Moreover, it has sought to analyze if certain factors such as the size of the company where the practices has been performed, the study rank level that was achieved or the fact of being a man or a woman, were among the determining factors at the time of acquiring the skills. The results presented here indicate that the size of the company that have been making the practices and the gender of the student are related to the acquisition of certain skills. There was not a statistically significant relationship related to the rank level have by the students in the practice. In the future we are going to study if the labor market Integration is easier if the Student has performed work placement.

  4. Mixing Research Methods in Health Professional Degrees: Thoughts for Undergraduate Students and Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaf, Sophie; Sheppard, Lorraine A.

    2007-01-01

    This commentary considers some of the challenges of applying mixed methods research in undergraduate research degrees, especially in professions with a clinical health focus. Our experience in physiotherapy academia is used as an example. Mixed methods research is increasingly appreciated in its own right as a "third paradigm," however the success…

  5. U.S. Engineering Degrees for Improving South Indian Graduate Students' Marriage and Dowry Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakaboski, Tamara; Sheridan, Robyn Stout; Dade, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    The article examines improved marriage opportunities as an unexplored motivator for pursuing international education via U.S. graduate engineering degrees and stresses the need to centralize gender in analyzing academic mobility and international education. This interdisciplinary qualitative study explores how South Indian men and women's…

  6. Women's Doctoral Student Experiences and Degree Progress in Education versus Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterman, Ann Katherine

    2014-01-01

    This study's purpose was to compare the lived experiences of doctoral women studying Education, a prototypically female field, with women studying Engineering, a prototypically male field to illustrate the phenomenon of doctoral degree progress in the two fields. Using critical feminist theory and Valian's (1999) concept of gender schemas, this…

  7. Degree of mycotoxicological contamination of feed and complete feed mixtures for pigs and poultry during the period 2007-2012. on the territory of the republic of serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Stamen S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common producers of mycotoxins are fungi of the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium and Penicillium. Toxins are of extreme importance because it can be transmitted from animals to humans through milk and animal products, some of which are carcinogenic and teratogenic. Mycotoxins cause a health disturbance of all animals, but the effects are more noticeable in highly productive animals in the farm way of keeping considering the much greater consumption of concentrate feeds, although forages also can be contaminated with mycotoxins in a significant manner. Mycotoxicoses are the most com­mon seasonal illnesses, and are an important diagnostic problem in veterinary practice, because its characteristics often resemble diseases caused by pathogens or nutritional deficiency or imbalance. The degree of health disturbances depends on the amount of toxins in feed and the length of intaking as on types and categories of animals. The presence of mycotoxins in animal feed is inevitable and therefore testing of raw materials and products is necessary so that feed for humans and animals can be safe for use. Damages arising as consequences of mycotoxicosis in poultry and swine production, due to the direct loss because of animals lossor, more commonly, indirectly due to the fall productive and reproductive performances of animals, imposed the need for continuous monitoring of the hygienic quality of feed mixtures for feeding these animals. During a five year period (2007-2012 were analyzed a total of 104 samples from the territory of Republic of Serbia intended for nutrition of all categories of poultry and mixtures for the initial and final fattening broilers (50 samples and laying hens (54. The analysis included 57 samples of feed mixtures intended for all categories of swine - feed mixture for young (20 samples and the old categories (37 samples and 196 of the samples, which are commonly used in formulating rations for listed species (maize, soybean and

  8. Environmental Education: Concepts and Approaches for Degree of Students of the Federal University Fluminense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Marcondes de Souza

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern society and its way of life resulted in an environmental crisis, and environmental education emerges as one of the tools to contribute to build a new model of society. As proposed in the National Curriculum Parameters (PCN, the environment is a crosscutting theme and, therefore, Environmental Education must be present in all learning spaces. This work intends to make a critical assessment of the perceptions and theoretical concepts and practices of environmental education by undergraduate students in Biology, Physical Education, Physics, Geography, History, Literature, Mathematics, Pedagogy and Chemistry Education from Fluminense Federal University. The responses of these students to a semi-open questionnaire were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. In the statements, naturalistic and anthropocentric views predominated. A contextualized view of the environment was more evident in the courses of Biology and Geography, which were considered to produce the most suitable professionals as environmental educators. Students from other courses feel very distant from environmental issues.The analyzed students showed ignorance, fragmentation and lack of discussion on environmental education. Thus, it is necessary to insert lectures on environmental education in all the undergraduate courses of Fluminense Federal University.

  9. Career Interests of Students in Psychology Specialties Degrees: Psychometric Evidence and Correlations with the RIASEC Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Aristides I.; Rodrigues, Rosa I.; da Costa Ferreira, Paula

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we present the development of a vocational interest scale for university students studying psychology. Three dimensions were extracted through principal component analysis, namely, organizational, educational, and clinical psychology. A second study with confirmatory factor analysis replicated the same three factors obtained in the…

  10. Sharing Responsibility for College Success: A Model Partnership Moves Students to Diplomas and Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Joel

    2014-01-01

    In order to prepare the large number of postsecondary-educated youth our economy demands, high schools and higher education must break through the boundaries that have traditionally separated them and assume joint responsibility for student success. This brief describes an unusual school district partnership with colleges that has achieved…

  11. Colleges Offer New Alternative-Energy Degrees, Fueled by Student Demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basken, Paul

    2009-01-01

    More U.S. college students are enrolling in power- and energy-engineering courses, but the increase is not enough to meet the need, says a new report by the IEEE, the professional association of electrical engineers. About 45% of engineers at electric utilities are expected to retire or leave their jobs within five years, creating as many as…

  12. Research Degrees in Information and Communication Technology (ICT): Why so Few Doctoral Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Cally; Jayatilaka, Asangi; Ranasinghe, Damith; McCulloch, Alistair; Calder, Paul

    2017-01-01

    A "knowledge society" relies on a workforce with high-level skills in Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Continuing development of ICT will arise partly from research undertaken by doctoral graduates. However, compared to other cognate disciplines, ICT has relatively few students taking up doctoral studies. This article…

  13. Reasons for Attending, Expected Obstacles, and Degree Aspirations of Asian Pacific American Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Winnie W.; Chang, June C.; Lew, Jonathan W.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how the academic aspirations of Asian Pacific Americans (APAs) attending community colleges are influenced by their demographic and educational background, reasons for attending, and obstacles they expect to encounter. The sample consisted of 846 APAs out of a total student sample of 5,000 in an urban community college…

  14. University Students and Sustainability Skills in Occupational Health and Safety Master Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Míguez-Álvarez, Carla; Arce, Maria Elena; Souto-Gestal, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Education is one of the key instruments to achieving global sustainability. In fact, sustainable development has to be integrated into higher education curricula. One of the difficulties of this challenge is to know if students are able to achieve the basic skills, something that is extremely important in emergency management. Thus, assessment of…

  15. Factors Determining Student Retention of Economic Knowledge after Completing the Principles-of-Microeconomics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Andrew I.; Kipps, Paul H.

    1979-01-01

    Reports results of a study of economics students to test the effect of time and other factors affecting retention, to develop an instrument to measure the rate of depreciation of the student's stock of economic knowledge, and to explore the implications of findings for the student's academic planning. (Author/KC)

  16. College Choice: Informing Students' Trade-Offs between Institutional Price and College Completion. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pender, Matea; Hurwitz, Michael; Smith, Jonathan; Howell, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Empirical research on the returns to postsecondary education provides a near universal consensus that college confers numerous advantages for both individuals and society. Not only do individuals with a college degree earn more money than their peers with only a high school degree, they lead healthier lifestyles, experience greater job…

  17. Students' voices: the lived experience of faculty incivility as a barrier to professional formation in associate degree nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prato, Darlene

    2013-03-01

    Nursing faculty play an important role in constructing learning environments that foster the positive formation of future nurses. The students' construction of a nursing identity is grounded in social interactions with faculty and is shaped by values and norms learned in both the formal and informal curriculum. The informal curriculum is communicated in faculty teaching practices and relationships established with students. To acquire an understanding of the students' lived experience in associate degree nursing education and identify educational practices that support students' professional formation. A phenomenological design was chosen to study the lived experience of nursing education. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 participants. Five students participated in second interviews for a total of 18 interviews. Symbolic interactionism guided data analysis. Participants represented three ADN programs in the northeastern U.S. and were diverse in terms of gender and age and to a lesser extent race, and sexual orientation. Faculty incivility included demeaning experiences, subjective evaluation, rigid expectations, and targeting and weeding out practices. Targeting practices contributed to a perceived focus on clinical evaluation and inhibited clinical learning. Faculty incivility hindered professional formation by interfering with learning, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and confidence. Faculty who model professional values in the formal and hidden curriculum contribute to the positive formation of future nurses. Nursing faculty should be formally prepared as educators to establish respectful, connected relationships with students. Faculty should role model professional values, deemphasize their evaluative role, provide constructive formative feedback, and remain open to the student's potential for growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Science Majors and Degrees among Asian-American Students: Influences of Race and Sex in "model Minority" Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yu; Hanson, Sandra L.

    Both race and sex continue to be factors that stratify entry into science education and occupations in the United States. Asian-Americans (men and women) have experienced considerable success in the sciences and have earned the label of "model minority." The complexities and patterns involved in this success remain elusive. We use several concepts coming out of the status attainment framework and a multicultural gender perspective to explore the way in which race and sex come together to influence choices of science major and degree. Our sample consists of Asian-American and white students in the National Educational Longitudinal Study. Findings suggest that being male and being Asian-American are both associated with higher chances of pursuing majors and degrees in science. The male advantage is greater than the Asian-American advantage. Findings also suggest that race and sex interact in the science decision. For example, race differences (with an Asian-American advantage) in choice of science major are significant for women but not men. Sex differences (with a male advantage) in choice of science major are significant in the white, but not the Asian-American sample. A different set of race and sex patterns is revealed in the science degree models. Processes associated with family socioeconomic status and student characteristics help to explain race and sex patterns. Findings suggest that when Asian-American youths have closer ties to the Asian culture, they are more likely to choose science majors and degrees. Implications for policy, practice, and research in science education are discussed.

  19. Opinions of Students Completing Master Thesis in Turkish Education Field about Academic Writing and Thesis Formation Process

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Onur KAN; Fatma Nur GEDİK

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of this research is to evaluate opinions of students completing master thesis in the field of Turkish education about academic writing and process of forming thesis. The study has been devised using phenomenological design within the qualitative research methods. The study group of research is consisted of 9 participants completed master thesis in the field of Turkish education at Mustafa Kemal University Instıtute of Social Sciences in 2015. In this study, semi-structured int...

  20. Improving Homework Completion and Motivation of Middle School Students through Behavior Modification, Graphing, and Parent Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Dawn L.; Wimer, Sandra L.

    2007-01-01

    An action research project report was complete to discuss how homework completion and motivation is an ongoing issue and debate within the public schools. This is especially true in the middle school setting. The teacher researchers of this project chose to conduct a study in order to increase homework completion and motivation of middle school…

  1. Perceptions of Ghanaian medical students completing a clinical elective at the University of Michigan Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, Nauzley C; Danso-Bamfo, Sandra; Moyer, Cheryl A; Danso, Kwabena A; Mäkiharju, Heather; Donkor, Peter; Johnson, Timothy R B; Kolars, Joseph C

    2014-07-01

    International medical electives typically represent a unidirectional flow of students from economically advantaged countries in the global "North" to resource-poor nations in the global "South." Little is known about the impact of bilateral exchanges on students from less affluent nations. Since 2007, students from the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) and medical schools in Ghana have engaged in a bilateral clinical exchange program. A 45-item online survey was distributed to all 73 Ghanaian medical students who had rotated at UMMS from 2008 to 2010 to assess perspectives on the value and impact of their participation. Incoming Ghanaian students outnumbered outgoing UMMS students 73 to 33 during the study period. Of eligible Ghanaian students, 70% (51/73) participated in the survey, with 40 of 51 providing valid data on at least 50% of questions. Ninety-seven percent (37/38) reported that the UMMS rotation was valuable to their medical training, 90% (35/39) reported changes in how they approach patient care, and 77% (24/31) reported feeling better equipped to serve patients in their home community. Eighty-five percent of students (28/33) felt more inclined to pursue training opportunities outside of their home country after their rotation at UMMS. More studies are needed to determine the feasibility of bidirectional exchanges as well as the short-term and long-term impact of rotations on students from underresourced settings and their hosts in more resource-rich environments.

  2. Prevalence of substance abuse among regular degree health science students in Sheba University College in Mekelle Town, Tigray - Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagos, Esietu Gebregazabher; Asfeha, Gebrekidan Gebregzabher; Berihu, Birhane Alem

    2016-01-01

    Substance abuse (SA) refers to the harmful or hazardous use of psychoactive substances, including alcohol and illicit drugs. The most common substances which are usually abused are alcohol and tobacco. Herein, we assessed the prevalence of SA among regular degree health science students of the Sheba University College (SUC). A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 1076 SUC students using self-administered structured questionnaire. The simple sampling technique was used to select students. Descriptive statistics, bivariate, and multivariate analysis were done. The overall prevalence of "ever used substance" for at least one was 45.5%. The most commonly used drugs in descending order were alcohol (25.1%), cigarette (11.4%), and khat (9.2%). Male participants, urban setting, peer pressure, personal pleasure, and academic dissatisfaction and pocket money were highly associated with SA. This study showed a lower magnitude (45.6% ever use and 21% still using) of SA among students' compared to other studies. Even if a considerable decrease in SA among study subjects, the creation of awareness and health education should be continued to fully combat the problem of abuse.

  3. Prevalence of substance abuse among regular degree health science students in Sheba University College in Mekelle Town, Tigray - Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esietu Gebregazabher Hagos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Substance abuse (SA refers to the harmful or hazardous use of psychoactive substances, including alcohol and illicit drugs. The most common substances which are usually abused are alcohol and tobacco. Herein, we assessed the prevalence of SA among regular degree health science students of the Sheba University College (SUC. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 1076 SUC students using self-administered structured questionnaire. The simple sampling technique was used to select students. Descriptive statistics, bivariate, and multivariate analysis were done. Results: The overall prevalence of “ever used substance” for at least one was 45.5%. The most commonly used drugs in descending order were alcohol (25.1%, cigarette (11.4%, and khat (9.2%. Male participants, urban setting, peer pressure, personal pleasure, and academic dissatisfaction and pocket money were highly associated with SA. Conclusion: This study showed a lower magnitude (45.6% ever use and 21% still using of SA among students' compared to other studies. Even if a considerable decrease in SA among study subjects, the creation of awareness and health education should be continued to fully combat the problem of abuse.

  4. The Effects of Automated Prompting and Self-Monitoring on Homework Completion for a Student with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blicha, Amy; Belfiore, Phillip J.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intervention consisting of automated prompting and self-monitoring on the level of independent homework task completion for an elementary-age student with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Instituting a single subject, within series ABAB design, the results showed a consistent increase and…

  5. Benefits Access for College Completion: Innovative Approaches to Meet the Financial Needs of Low-Income Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Postsecondary and Economic Success, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Benefits Access for College Completion (BACC) was designed to help colleges develop new policies that increase low-income students' access to public benefits, easing their financial burden to allow them to finish school and earn postsecondary credentials. Colleges participating in BACC have developed and institutionalized scalable, sustainable…

  6. Comment on "Benefits of Completing Homework for Students with Different Aptitudes in an Introductory Electricity and Magnetism Course"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, G. W.; Reinsberg, S. A.; Wieman, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    We present a comment on "Benefits of completing homework for students with different aptitudes in an introductory electricity and magnetism course", by F. J. Kontur, K. de La Harpe, and N. B. Terry PRST-PER 11, 010105 (2015). Our data show that the conclusions Kontur and coworkers draw from their data may not be generally applicable.

  7. The analysis of probability task completion; Taxonomy of probabilistic thinking-based across gender in elementary school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Dwi Ivayana; Budayasa, I. Ketut; Juniati, Dwi

    2017-08-01

    Formulation of mathematical learning goals now is not only oriented on cognitive product, but also leads to cognitive process, which is probabilistic thinking. Probabilistic thinking is needed by students to make a decision. Elementary school students are required to develop probabilistic thinking as foundation to learn probability at higher level. A framework of probabilistic thinking of students had been developed by using SOLO taxonomy, which consists of prestructural probabilistic thinking, unistructural probabilistic thinking, multistructural probabilistic thinking and relational probabilistic thinking. This study aimed to analyze of probability task completion based on taxonomy of probabilistic thinking. The subjects were two students of fifth grade; boy and girl. Subjects were selected by giving test of mathematical ability and then based on high math ability. Subjects were given probability tasks consisting of sample space, probability of an event and probability comparison. The data analysis consisted of categorization, reduction, interpretation and conclusion. Credibility of data used time triangulation. The results was level of boy's probabilistic thinking in completing probability tasks indicated multistructural probabilistic thinking, while level of girl's probabilistic thinking in completing probability tasks indicated unistructural probabilistic thinking. The results indicated that level of boy's probabilistic thinking was higher than level of girl's probabilistic thinking. The results could contribute to curriculum developer in developing probability learning goals for elementary school students. Indeed, teachers could teach probability with regarding gender difference.

  8. Why Do Students Have Difficulties Completing Homework? The Need for Homework Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong

    2013-01-01

    Homework is a common and widespread educational activity. Yet, as homework often takes place amidst the pull of more attractive and competing after-school activities, doing homework presents multiple challenges for many students, even for those students who find their assignments meaningful and interesting. In this article, I first examine five…

  9. ADHD Coaching with College Students: Exploring the Processes Involved in Motivation and Goal Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevatt, Frances; Smith, Shannon M.; Diers, Sarah; Marshall, Diana; Coleman, Jennifer; Valler, Emilee; Miller, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    College students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often experience increased academic difficulties, which can negatively impact graduation rates, employment, self-esteem, and mental health. ADHD coaching assists students with ADHD to reduce such difficulties. The present study evaluated the processes involved in ADHD coaching…

  10. Using a Personal Digital Assistant to Increase Independent Task Completion by Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Gast, David L.; Seid, Nicole H.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, a personal digital assistant (PDA) with picture, auditory, and video prompts with voice over, was evaluated as a portable self-prompting device for students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Using a multiple probe design across three cooking recipes and replicated with three students with ASD, the system was tested for its…

  11. The Development of Inquiry Learning Materials to Complete Content Life System Organization in Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayasari, F.; Raharjo; Supardi, Z. A. I.

    2018-01-01

    This research aims to develop the material eligibility to complete the inquiry learning of student in the material organization system of junior high school students. Learning materials developed include syllabi, lesson plans, students’ textbook, worksheets, and learning achievement test. This research is the developmental research which employ Dick and Carey model to develop learning material. The experiment was done in Junior High School 4 Lamongan regency using One Group Pretest-Posttest Design. The data collection used validation, observation, achievement test, questionnaire administration, and documentation. Data analysis techniques used quantitative and qualitative descriptive.The results showed that the developed learning material was valid and can be used. Learning activity accomplished with good category, where student activities were observed. The aspects of attitudes were observed during the learning process are honest, responsible, and confident. Student learning achievement gained an average of 81, 85 in complete category, with N-Gain 0, 75 for a high category. The activities and student response to learning was very well categorized. Based on the results, this researcher concluded that the device classified as feasible of inquiry-based learning (valid, practical, and effective) system used on the material organization of junior high school students.

  12. Impact of Delivery Modality, Student GPA, and Time-Lapse since High School on Successful Completion of College-Level Math after Taking Developmental Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Diane; North, Teresa Lynn; Avella, John

    2016-01-01

    This study considered whether delivery modality, student GPA, or time since high school affected whether 290 students who had completed a developmental math series as a community college were able to successfully complete college-level math. The data used in the study was comprised of a 4-year period historical student data from Odessa College…

  13. Prefrontal hemodynamic responses and the degree of flow experience among occupational therapy students during their performance of a cognitive task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuki Hirao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Although flow experience is positively associated with motivation to learn, the biological basis of flow experience is poorly understood. Accumulation of evidence on the underlying brain mechanisms related to flow is necessary for a deeper understanding of the motivation to learn. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between flow experience and brain function using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS during the performance of a cognitive task. Methods: Sixty right-handed occupational therapy (OT students participated in this study. These students performed a verbal fluency test (VFT while 2-channel NIRS was used to assess changes in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (oxygenated hemoglobin [oxy-Hb] in the prefrontal cortex. Soon after that, the OT students answered the flow questionnaire (FQ to assess the degree of flow experience during the VFT. Results: Average oxy-Hb in the prefrontal cortex had a significant negative correlation with the satisfaction scores on the FQ. Conclusion: Satisfaction during the flow experience correlated with prefrontal hemodynamic suppression. This finding may assist in understanding motivation to learn and related flow experience.

  14. Effectiveness of a Selective Advising Program in Reducing the Degree of Compulsive Buying Behavior among Umm Al-Qura Female Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyouni, Sawzan S.

    2018-01-01

    The present study is an attempt to investigate the effectiveness of a selective advising program in reducing the degree of Compulsive Buying Behavior among female students, Faculty of Education at Umm al-Qura University. The sample consisted of (200) female students to verify the validity and reliability of the tool. The quasi-experimental method…

  15. An Examination of How Academic Advancement of U.S. Journalism Students Relates to Their Degree Motivations, Values, and Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Serena; Hoag, Anne; Grant, August E.; Bowe, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    The newsroom is a powerful influence in a journalist's identity formation. Research has yet to verify the socializing impact of academia. This research utilized the quantitative survey method applying it to undergraduate journalism students (n = 798) to assess how academic status relates to students' degree motivations, life values, and technology…

  16. The validity and reliability of the cross-national comparison of degree programme levels in European countries : What have students learnt?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rexwinkel, Trudy; Haenen, Jacques; Pilot, Albert

    2017-01-01

    A cross-national comparison of degree programme levels became relevant when the borders of European countries opened for students and graduates, and higher education institutions were restructured into bachelor’s and master’s programmes. This new situation foregrounded the questions of what students

  17. Evaluating Augmented Reality to Complete a Chain Task for Elementary Students with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cihak, David F.; Moore, Eric J.; Wright, Rachel E.; McMahon, Don D.; Gibbons, Melinda M.; Smith, Cate

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of augmented reality to teach a chain task to three elementary-age students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Augmented reality blends digital information within the real world. This study used a marker-based augmented reality picture prompt to trigger a video model clip of a student…

  18. International Students' Motivation to Pursue and Complete a Ph.D. in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    This study explores what motivates 19 international students to pursue a Ph.D. at a public research university in the U.S. and, more importantly, what motivates them to persist despite unsatisfying socialization. Based on value-expectancy achievement motivation theory, four motivations emerged: intrinsic interest in research, intrinsic interest in…

  19. A Study of Student Completion Strategies in a Likert-Type Course Evaluation Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Nick

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the motivations and strategies employed by respondents to a Likert-style course evaluation at a UK university. These attitude surveys, generating large amounts of quantitative data, are commonly used in quality assurance procedures across UK higher education institutions. Similar student survey results are now scrutinised…

  20. SSR: Its Effects on Students' Reading Habits after They Complete the Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesendanger, Katherine D.; Bader, Lois

    1989-01-01

    Studies the effect of sustained silent reading (SSR) on recreational reading habits after termination of instruction. Finds that SSR students read more than those not in the program, and that SSR has no impact on above average readers, great impact on average readers, and little impact on below average readers. (RS)

  1. Changes in nursing students' perceptions of research and evidence-based practice after completing a research course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keib, Carrie N; Cailor, Stephanie M; Kiersma, Mary E; Chen, Aleda M H

    2017-07-01

    Nurses need a sound education in research and evidence-based practice (EBP) to provide patients with optimal care, but current teaching methods could be more effective. To evaluate the changes in nursing students 1) perceptions of research and EBP, 2) confidence in research and EBP, and 3) interest in research participation after completing a course in research and EBP. A pre-post assessment design was utilized to compare changes in students. This project was conducted at a small, private liberal arts institution with Bachelor of Science (BSN) students. Two cohorts of third-year BSN students (Year 1 N=55, Year 2 N=54) who were taking a required, semester-long Nursing Research and EBP course. Students' perceptions of and confidence in research and EBP were assessed pre- and post-semester using the Confidence in Research and EBP survey, which contained 7 demographic items, 9 Research Perceptions items, and 19 Confidence in Research items (5-point Likert scale; 1=Not at all confident, 5=Extremely confident). Two years of data were collected and analyzed in SPSS v.24.0. Wilcoxon signed-ranks tests and Mann-Whitney-U tests were utilized to examine the data. Students had significant improvements in perceptions of and confidence in research and EBP (pnursing practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The Effect of Emotional Intelligence on Program Completion among Adult Basic Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiste, Mildred M.

    2014-01-01

    Program completion among adult learners attending adult basic education programs has been found to be an area of struggle. Cognitive ability has always been the primary factor for determining an individual's ability. However, non-cognitive ability has been proposed as a significant factor in academic success. Many attrition models have been…

  3. Overseas Student Teaching and National Identity: Why Go Somewhere You Feel Completely Comfortable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppen, Frans H.

    2010-01-01

    One of the major goals of teacher education programs is to prepare globally competent teachers who hold inspiring dreams for the future and who contribute to the betterment of our world and planet (Cushner & Brennan, 2007). This study presents the emerging perceptions of national identity held by preservice teachers who completed their student…

  4. The Use of Gap Analysis to Increase Student Completion Rates at Travelor Adult School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Blanca Estela

    2013-01-01

    This project applied the gap analysis problem-solving framework (Clark & Estes, 2008) in order to help develop strategies to increase completion rates at Travelor Adult School. The purpose of the study was to identify whether the knowledge, motivation and organization barriers were contributing to the identified gap. A mixed method approached…

  5. Web-Enhanced General Chemistry Increases Student Completion Rates, Success, and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Katie E.; Shank, John D.; Shibley, Ivan A., Jr.; Shibley, Lisa R.

    2013-01-01

    General Chemistry I historically had one of the highest failure and withdrawal rates at Penn State Berks, a four-year college within the Penn State system. The course was completely redesigned to incorporate more group work, the use of classroom response systems, peer mentors, and a stronger online presence via the learning management system…

  6. A study of empathy decline in physician assistant students at completion of first didactic year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Ellen D; Schweinle, William E

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated empathy trends among physician assistant (PA) students through their education and included gender differences and specialty job interest. This research partially replicates similar studies of medical and other health professions students. The Jefferson Scale on Physician Empathy (SPE) was administered to PA students three times: (1) during matriculation, (2) near the end of their didactic training and (3) during their clinical education phase. Data were analyzed using both parametric (ANOVA) and nonparametric (binomial) methods. A total of 328 survey responses (270 females, 57 males, and one nonindicator) from the graduating classes of 2009 through 2014 at a northeastern university were collected and analyzed. Reliability for the JSPE was .80 (Cronbach) in this sample. Sixty-two percent had lower median JSPE empathy scores toward the end of their didactic training than at the time of matriculation (P = .0001), while the difference between empathy scores from years two and three was not significant (P = .37). Women were significantly more empathetic (mean = 5.05) at the time of matriculation than men (mean = 4.70, P = .0003), while both genders appeared to lose empathy in a parallel fashion during didactic training (P = .76). There was no association between empathy scores and prospective job category interest. These findings illustrate a decline in empathy among both genders during PA training, similar to other health care providers' educations, and support the need for further conversation regarding a role for empathy assessment and curricula in PA education.

  7. GLORIOUS DISCOURSES AND COMPLETE IGNORANCE: STUDENT PERCEPTION ON CANTEMIR’S WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria CERNAT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the works of Dimitrie Cantemir and his son Antiloh are consideed among the most important in the fields of history and litterature, nowadays it is hard to find a research initiative or a research program specialized in the study of Dimitrie Cantemir’s work. It is the indisputable merit of a Romanian born historian like Stefan Lemny to offer a very complex and profound account on the life and work of Dimitrie and Antioh Cantemir. But, like other remarkable efforts, this is an individual research. It is my intention to focus on the recent works regarding the life and work of Dimitrie Cantemir in order to prove that beside the moments of celebration there is little or no interest in the work of this remarkable Romanian intellectual. I parallel this situation with the information students have on Dimitrie Cantemir. In the first section of my article I shall focus on how much information on Cantemir do our students rely have. Thus I shall make an empirical research questioning the students of the first year on the most common facts about Cantemir’s work and life. In the second section of my article, I shall try to answer questions like how many volumes having as main subject matter the works of Cantemir have been published recently. In what branches of science the works of Cantemir have been mostly analyzed? What is the ratio between the works concerning his personality and those concerning specific topics in specific works of Dimitrie Cantemir.

  8. Secondary Prevention of Visual Impairment in Students with Medium Degree Myopia by Means of Physical Therapy in a Vocational School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    С. А. Пашкевич

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to implement a visual impairment prevention program into a vocational school’s academic process for the risk group students and to determine its effectiveness based on the dynamics of comprehensive scoring assessment of the degree of visual pathology risk. Materials and methods. Observed were 91 students (35 boys and 56 girls. For the formative experiment purposes, a study group (SG consisting of 10 persons (4 boys and 6 girls with a visual organ pathology who performed the designed preventive program and a reference group (RG consisting of 10 persons (5 boys and 5 girls with a visual organ pathology who studied under the usual program were selected The program effectiveness was evaluated by changes in the students’ subjective evaluation of their visual comfort. The Relative Risk Index (RR was used to perform a rough evatuation of the cause-effect relations between the acting factor and the effect appearance. The output characteristics were compared between the groups using χ2 tests (binary variables, t-tests (continuous variables, Mann-Whitney test for comparing the distribution of ordinal variables, and Wilcoxon test (related sampling. Results. The dynamics in the RG over the academic year showed an increase in the scoring assessment of the visual fatigue, which constituted 90.6 ± 10.3%. At the same time, the students in the SG demonstrated a reduced intensity and number of complaints about the visual analyzer fatigue. In the SG, the complex scoring assessment reliably decreased from 9.8 ± 0.8 to 7.2 ± 0.9 c.u. The implemented preventive program had a positive effect on the complaints: “the desire to bring the text closer to the eyes” (relative risk (RR = 6.0, χ2 = 5.6, p <0.05, “the feeling of existence of certain periods of change in the visual acuity” (relative risk (RR = 3.5; χ2 = 5.1; p <0.05, and the overall assessment of the questionnaire (relative risk (RR = 7.0; χ2 = 7.5; p <0.01. The

  9. Degree Completion: Responding to a National Priority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersole, John

    2010-01-01

    America does not have the workforce it needs for the economy that it has. That was a conclusion of the Commission on the Future of Higher Education in 2006. The Commission went on to note that if current trends are not reversed, the US economy and per capita income will actually decrease over the next 15 years, for the first time in US history. In…

  10. Identifying motivators and barriers to student completion of instructor evaluations: A multi-faceted, collaborative approach from four colleges of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, James W; Backo, Jennifer Lynn; Sobota, Kristen Finley; Metzger, Anne H; Ulbrich, Timothy

    To identify motivators and barriers to pharmacy student completion of instructor evaluations, and to develop potential strategies to improve the evaluation process. Completed at four Ohio Colleges of Pharmacy, Phase I consisted of a student/faculty survey and Phase II consisted of joint student/faculty focus groups to discuss Phase I data and to problem solve. In Phase I, the top three student-identified and faculty-perceived motivators to completion of evaluations were to (1) make the course better, (2) earn bonus points, and (3) improve the instructor's teaching. The top three student-identified barriers to completion of evaluations were having to (1) evaluate multiple instructors, (2) complete several evaluations around the same time, and (3) complete lengthy evaluations. Phase II focus groups identified a number of potential ways to enhance the motivators and reduce barriers, including but not limited to making sure faculty convey to students that the feedback they provide is useful and to provide examples of how student feedback has been used to improve their teaching/the course. Students and faculty identified motivators and barriers to completing instructor evaluations and were willing to work together to improve the process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Failure of college students to complete an online alcohol education course as a predictor of high-risk drinking that requires medical attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Gina Baral; Kolligian, John; Mills, Douglas Lane; DeJong, William

    2011-11-01

    AlcoholEdu® for College and other computer-based education programs have been developed to reduce alcohol use and related problems among students. This study investigated whether the failure of incoming first-year students to complete AlcoholEdu predicts future high-risk drinking that requires medical attention. A review of clinical records kept by a single university's health service identified 684 undergraduates (classes of 2007-2011) who had presented for an alcohol event (September 2003 through June 2008). We used survival analysis to determine whether students who partially completed the course or failed to take it were disproportionately represented among student patients who presented with elevated blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Students who failed to take the online course were 4.64 times more likely than those who completed it to experience an alcohol event (p students who had partially completed the course were 1.52 times more likely (p alcohol education and gender were not significantly related to students' measured BAC level. Students who had completed AlcoholEdu were less likely to present for an alcohol event than were students who partially completed or failed to take the course. Campus administrators should consider whether students who fail to complete an online alcohol course should be flagged for more focused interventions (e.g., brief motivational interview, mandatory education classes). This is the first study to show a relationship between first-year college students' non-completion of an online alcohol course and subsequent high-risk drinking that requires medical attention.

  12. Teaching Translational Research to Medical Students: The New York University School of Medicine's Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation Dual‐Degree Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillinger, Michael; Plottel, Claudia S.; Galeano, Claudia; Maddalo, Scott; Hochman, Judith S.; Cronstein, Bruce N.; Gold‐von Simson, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To develop the next generation of translational investigators, New York University School of Medicine (NYUSOM) and the NYU‐NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NYU‐HHC CTSI) developed the Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation dual‐degree (MD/MSCI) program. This 5‐year program dedicates 1 year to coursework and biomedical research, followed by a medical school/research overlap year, to prepare students for academic research careers. This paper details the MD/MSCI program's curriculum and approach to mentorship, describes the research/professional interests of students, and reports student productivity. In the first 4 years of the program (2010–2014) 20 students were matriculated; 7 (35%) were women, and 12 (60%) research projects were in surgical specialties. To date, 14 students have applied to residency, and half pursued surgical residency programs. Our students have produced 68 accepted abstracts, 15 abstracts in submission, 38 accepted papers, and 24 papers in submission. Despite the time‐limited nature of this program, additional training in research design and implementation has promoted a high level of productivity. We conclude that dual‐degree training in medicine and translational research is feasible for medical students and allows for meaningful participation in valuable projects. Follow‐up is warranted to evaluate the academic trajectory of these students. PMID:26365704

  13. Teaching Translational Research to Medical Students: The New York University School of Medicine's Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation Dual-Degree Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Jennifer; Pillinger, Michael; Plottel, Claudia S; Galeano, Claudia; Maddalo, Scott; Hochman, Judith S; Cronstein, Bruce N; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle

    2015-12-01

    To develop the next generation of translational investigators, New York University School of Medicine (NYUSOM) and the NYU-NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NYU-HHC CTSI) developed the Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation dual-degree (MD/MSCI) program. This 5-year program dedicates 1 year to coursework and biomedical research, followed by a medical school/research overlap year, to prepare students for academic research careers. This paper details the MD/MSCI program's curriculum and approach to mentorship, describes the research/professional interests of students, and reports student productivity. In the first 4 years of the program (2010-2014) 20 students were matriculated; 7 (35%) were women, and 12 (60%) research projects were in surgical specialties. To date, 14 students have applied to residency, and half pursued surgical residency programs. Our students have produced 68 accepted abstracts, 15 abstracts in submission, 38 accepted papers, and 24 papers in submission. Despite the time-limited nature of this program, additional training in research design and implementation has promoted a high level of productivity. We conclude that dual-degree training in medicine and translational research is feasible for medical students and allows for meaningful participation in valuable projects. Follow-up is warranted to evaluate the academic trajectory of these students. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Experiencing ERASMUS: Reflections on Integrating Polish Psychology Students onto a Year of a Degree in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The European Community Action Scheme for the Mobility of University Students (ERASMUS) supports students to pursue temporary periods of study in other European universities. During the academic year 2007/08 the UK received 15, 975 ERASMUS students. Although much research exists about the experiences of international students less attention has…

  15. Body-Building: A Female Student's Use of the Transitional Spaces of a Painting Degree Course to Explore Her Sexual Desirability and Aesthetics as a "Grotesque" Female Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittenden, Tara

    2013-01-01

    Whilst a part of the fine art degree course is about teaching technical skills and learning from tutor/peer group crits, a larger part is about the facilitation of a "safe" and structured space in which students gain the confidence to experiment with personal ideas, to hone a self-critical reflection and understand who they are as individuals,…

  16. The Relationship of Relaxation Technique, Test Anxiety, Academic Stress, and Nursing Students Intention to Stay in a Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manansingh, Sherry

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of relaxation techniques among first semester Baccalaureate Degree nursing students' test anxiety and academic stress. Additionally, this study examined if there was a relationship among demographic characteristics of the respondents and test anxiety and academic stress. The pretest and posttest…

  17. Development of teaching materials on "Environmental risk assessment" in English for master students Double Degree program "Ecology and natural resource management"

    OpenAIRE

    Осипова, Нина Александровна; Матвеенко, Ирина Алексеевна

    2014-01-01

    The experience in development of learning package for teaching courses in joint Master curricula in English is presented. The developed teaching manuals on “Environmental Risk Assessment” in English for 347 Master students learning joint Double Degree Program of TPU and Paris-11 University reflects the international experience accumulated in this sphere taking into account the latest scientific achievements.

  18. Degrees of Co-Creation: An Exploratory Study of Perceptions of International Students' Role in Community Engagement Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischman, David; Raciti, Maria; Lawley, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    Increased competition for the international student market has motivated universities to modernize their marketing strategies. Community engagement is an important component of students' international university experience and represents a potential point of competitive advantage. Developing marketing strategies around university-student-community…

  19. How Does the Degree of Guidance Support Students' Metacognitive and Problem Solving Skills in Educational Robotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmatzidou, Soumela; Demetriadis, Stavros; Nika, Panagiota

    2018-01-01

    Educational robotics (ER) is an innovative learning tool that offers students opportunities to develop higher-order thinking skills. This study investigates the development of students' metacognitive (MC) and problem-solving (PS) skills in the context of ER activities, implementing different modes of guidance in two student groups (11-12 years…

  20. Uncovering degrees of workplace bullying: A comparison of baccalaureate nursing students' experiences during clinical placement in Australia and the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birks, Melanie; Cant, Robyn P; Budden, Lea M; Russell-Westhead, Michele; Sinem Üzar Özçetin, Yeter; Tee, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    Bullying in health workplaces has a negative impact on nurses, their families, multidisciplinary teams, patient care and the profession. This paper compares the experiences of Australian and UK baccalaureate nursing students in relation to bullying and harassment during clinical placement. A secondary analysis was conducted on two primary cross-sectional studies of bullying experiences of Australian and UK nursing students. Data were collected using the Student Experience of Bullying during Clinical Placement (SEBDCP) questionnaire and analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The total sample was 833 Australian and 561 UK students. Australian nursing students experienced a higher rate of bullying (50.1%) than UK students (35.5%). Students identified other nurses as the main perpetrators (Aust 53%, UK 68%), although patients were the main source of physical acts of bullying. Few bullied students chose to report the episode/s. The main reason for non-reporting was fear of being victimised. Sadly, some students felt bullying and harassment was 'part of the job'. A culture of bullying in nursing persists internationally. Nursing students are vulnerable and can question their future in the 'caring' profession of nursing after experiencing and/or witnessing bullying during clinical placement. Bullying requires a zero tolerance approach. Education providers must develop clearer policies and implement procedures to protect students - the future nursing workforce. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparison of classroom and online asynchronous problem-based learning for students undertaking statistics training as part of a Public Health Masters degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, N; Verstegen, D M L; Tan, F E S; O'Connor, S J

    2013-05-01

    This case-study compared traditional, face-to-face classroom-based teaching with asynchronous online learning and teaching methods in two sets of students undertaking a problem-based learning module in the multilevel and exploratory factor analysis of longitudinal data as part of a Masters degree in Public Health at Maastricht University. Students were allocated to one of the two study variants on the basis of their enrolment status as full-time or part-time students. Full-time students (n = 11) followed the classroom-based variant and part-time students (n = 12) followed the online asynchronous variant which included video recorded lectures and a series of asynchronous online group or individual SPSS activities with synchronous tutor feedback. A validated student motivation questionnaire was administered to both groups of students at the start of the study and a second questionnaire was administered at the end of the module. This elicited data about student satisfaction with the module content, teaching and learning methods, and tutor feedback. The module coordinator and problem-based learning tutor were also interviewed about their experience of delivering the experimental online variant and asked to evaluate its success in relation to student attainment of the module's learning outcomes. Student examination results were also compared between the two groups. Asynchronous online teaching and learning methods proved to be an acceptable alternative to classroom-based teaching for both students and staff. Educational outcomes were similar for both groups, but importantly, there was no evidence that the asynchronous online delivery of module content disadvantaged part-time students in comparison to their full-time counterparts.

  2. Opinions of Students Completing Master Thesis in Turkish Education Field about Academic Writing and Thesis Formation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Onur KAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The overall aim of this research is to evaluate opinions of students completing master thesis in the field of Turkish education about academic writing and process of forming thesis. The study has been devised using phenomenological design within the qualitative research methods. The study group of research is consisted of 9 participants completed master thesis in the field of Turkish education at Mustafa Kemal University Instıtute of Social Sciences in 2015. In this study, semi-structured interview form developed by the researcher was used to collect data. In order to ensure the reliability of the scope and structure, table of specification was constituted and expert views were consulted. For analyzing data descriptive analysis method was used. According to results of the research, it was obtained that participants experience various diffuculties in writing the basic sections of the thesis. In addition, it was seen that participants can not benefit enough from the studies written in foreign language. Participants reported that they find themselves more enough about academic writing and process of forming thesis after postgraduate education, but also they stated that academic writing courses should take part in program.

  3. Trends in Algebra II Completion and Failure Rates for Students Entering Texas Public High Schools. REL 2018-289

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, Ginger; Mellor, Lynn; Sullivan, Kate

    2018-01-01

    This study examines Algebra II completion and failure rates for students entering Texas public high schools from 2007/08 through 2014/15. This period spans the time when Texas students, beginning with the 2007/08 grade 9 cohort, were required to take four courses each in English, math (including Algebra II), science, and social studies (called the…

  4. Improving the Comprehension of Students with Significant Developmental Disabilities: Systematic Instruction on the Steps for Completing and Using a Graphic Organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Alexander P.

    2015-01-01

    A single-subject, multiple-baseline across participants design was used to examine the functional relation between systematic instruction and the ability to complete a graphic organizer and recall facts about informational texts by students with significant development disabilities. Four high school students enrolled in an adapted academic program…

  5. A Study of the Significant Factors That Affect the Job Placement Rates of Students Who Have Completed a HERO Program. Year 2 Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instructional Development and Evaluation Associates, Inc., Berkeley, MI.

    A three-year study examined the significant factors that affect the job placement rates of students completing a Home Economics Related Occupations (HERO) program. Other purposes of the study were to develop and pilot test a model that could be used to determine factors related to student placement in a variety of vocational education programs and…

  6. A Study of the Significant Factors That Affect the Job Placement Rates of Students Who Have Completed a HERO Program. Year Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instructional Development and Evaluation Associates, Inc., Berkeley, MI.

    A three-year study examined the significant factors that affect the job placement rates of students completing a Home Economics Related Occupations (HERO) program. Other purposes of the study were to develop and pilot test a model that could be used to determine factors related to student placement in a variety of vocational education programs and…

  7. Using the Five Senses of Success framework to understand the experiences of midwifery students enroled in an undergraduate degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, M; Fenwick, J; Carter, A; Gamble, J

    2015-01-01

    developing a student's sense of capability, purpose, resourcefulness, identity and connectedness (five-senses of success) are key factors that may be important in predicting student satisfaction and progression within their university program. the study aimed to examine the expectations and experiences of second and third year midwifery students enroled in a Bachelor of Midwifery program and identify barriers and enablers to success. a descriptive exploratory qualitative design was used. Fifty-six students enroled in either year 2 or 3 of the Bachelor of Midwifery program in SE Queensland participated in an anonymous survey using open-ended questions. In addition, 16 students participated in two year-level focus groups. Template analysis, using the Five Senses Framework, was used to analyse the data set. early exposure to 'hands on' clinical midwifery practice as well as continuity of care experiences provided students with an opportunity to link theory to practice and increased their perception of capability as they transitioned through the program. Students' sense of identity, purpose, resourcefulness, and capability was strongly influenced by the programs embedded meta-values, including a 'woman centred' approach. In addition, a student's ability to form strong positive relationships with women, peers, lecturers and supportive clinicians was central to developing connections and ultimately a sense of success. A sense of connection not only fostered an ongoing belief that challenges could be overcome but that students themselves could initiate or influence change. the five senses framework provided a useful lens through which to analyse the student experience. Key factors to student satisfaction and retention within a Bachelor of Midwifery program include: a clearly articulated midwifery philosophy, strategies to promote student connectedness including the use of social media, and further development of clinicians' skills in preceptorship, clinical teaching and

  8. CONCEPT OF DIRECTION: WHAT DO STUDENTS OF A MASTER’S DEGREE SAY? / CONCEITO DE DIREÇÃO: O QUE DIZEM MESTRANDOS A RESPEITO?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pinto Leivas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper approaches a qualitative study with seven students of a master’s degree. The aim was to investigate how knowledge theirs about the concept of direction in mathematics. The investigation occurred when started the discipline where one of the researchers is the holder. On this discipline we study Linear Algebra and Analytic Geometry. We proposed three open questions without answer choices for the students answer freely. The results showed that students relate the concept basically to vectors and they confuse with sense and they don’t emphasizing geometric aspects involved. None of the students related the concept of direction as something existing in a common bundle of parallel lines, or tangent to a curve or tangent plane to a surface. The article suggests some possibilities for relate direction with others topics in geometry.

  9. SWOT analysis to evaluate the programme of a joint online/onsite master's degree in environmental education through the students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Gutierrez, Miguel; Jimenez-Liso, M Rut; Martinez-Chico, Maria

    2016-02-01

    This study shows the use of SWOT to analyse students' perceptions of an environmental education joint master's programme in order to determine if it runs as originally planned. The open answers given by students highlight the inter-university nature of the master's, the technological innovation used as major points, and the weaknesses in the management coordination or the duplicate contents as minor points. The external analysis is closely linked with the students' future jobs, their labour opportunities available to them after graduation. The innovative treatment of the data is exportable to the evaluation of programmes of other degrees because it allows the description linked to its characteristics and its design through the students' point of view. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Investigation of the teaching cognition and capabilities of clinical advisers for masters degree level nursing specialty graduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Lei Zhao

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Clinical advisers for nursing specialty graduate students in our survey were generally inexperienced with regarding to training and culturing nursing graduate students. These advisers were prepared for core teaching competency, but were not qualified to conduct scientific research. Based on these results, it would be beneficial to provide the clinical advisers more training on teaching cognition for graduate students and improve their competency to perform scientific research.

  11. Decision-Tree Analysis for Predicting First-Time Pass/Fail Rates for the NCLEX-RN® in Associate Degree Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiu-Chin; Bennett, Sean

    2016-08-01

    Little evidence shows the use of decision-tree algorithms in identifying predictors and analyzing their associations with pass rates for the NCLEX-RN(®) in associate degree nursing students. This longitudinal and retrospective cohort study investigated whether a decision-tree algorithm could be used to develop an accurate prediction model for the students' passing or failing the NCLEX-RN. This study used archived data from 453 associate degree nursing students in a selected program. The chi-squared automatic interaction detection analysis of the decision trees module was used to examine the effect of the collected predictors on passing/failing the NCLEX-RN. The actual percentage scores of Assessment Technologies Institute®'s RN Comprehensive Predictor(®) accurately identified students at risk of failing. The classification model correctly classified 92.7% of the students for passing. This study applied the decision-tree model to analyze a sequence database for developing a prediction model for early remediation in preparation for the NCLEXRN. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(8):454-457.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Examining the Relationship between Degree of Religiousness and Attitudes toward Elderly Sexual Activity in Undergraduate College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds-Raacke, Jennifer M.; Raacke, John

    2011-01-01

    Research has been conducted on individual's knowledge and attitudes toward older adult sexuality. This includes investigating attitudes and knowledge of nursing home staff, college students, and the elderly themselves. The current experiment sought to replicate previous research findings by comparing college students' attitudes and knowledge of…

  13. Experiences of Student Support in the Distance Mode Bachelor of Nursing Science Degree at the University of Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Plessis, Carol Denise; Alexander, Lucy; Ashipala, Daniel Opotamutale; Kamenye, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the way in which students experienced the support services offered by the University of Namibia's distance education unit--the Centre for External Studies. The study explored students' experiences and their perceptions of the administrative, social and academic support services provided by the University of…

  14. Examining the Influence of Campus Climate on Students' Time to Degree: A Multilevel Discrete-Time Survival Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; Castellanos, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data of 3477 students from 28 institutions, we examine the effects of structural diversity and quality of interracial relation on students' persistence towards graduation within six years. We utilize multilevel discrete-time survival analysis to account for the longitudinal persistence patterns as well as the nested…

  15. In Pursuit of the American Degree: Internationalization, National Security, and the Making of South Asian Foreign Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Susan

    2013-01-01

    My dissertation examines how global neoliberal forces intersect with racialized state security practices to shape the transnational subjectivities of South Asian overseas students studying in the U.S. in the post-9/11 moment. These students' movement across national borders to pursue higher education in the United States positions them as ideal…

  16. The simulation method in learning interpersonal communication competence--experiences of masters' degree students of health sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaranen, Terhi; Vaajoki, Anne; Kellomäki, Marjaana; Hyvärinen, Marja-Leena

    2015-02-01

    This article describes the experiences of master students of nursing science in learning interpersonal communication competence through the simulation method. The exercises reflected challenging interactive situations in the field of health care. Few studies have been published on using the simulation method in the communication education of teachers, managers, and experts in this field. The aim of this study is to produce information which can be utilised in developing the simulation method to promote the interpersonal communication competence of master-level students of health sciences. This study used the qualitative, descriptive research method. At the Department of Nursing Science, the University of Eastern Finland, students major in nursing science specialise in nursing leadership and management, preventive nursing science, or nurse teacher education. Students from all three specialties taking the Challenging Situations in Speech Communication course participated (n=47). Essays on meaningful learning experiences collected using the critical incident technique, underwent content analysis. Planning of teaching, carrying out different stages of the simulation exercise, participant roles, and students' personal factors were central to learning interpersonal communication competence. Simulation is a valuable method in developing the interpersonal communication competence of students of health sciences at the masters' level. The methods used in the simulation teaching of emergency care are not necessarily applicable as such to communication education. The role of teacher is essential to supervising students' learning in simulation exercises. In the future, it is important to construct questions that help students to reflect specifically on communication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Why Do Student Teachers Enrol for a Teaching Degree? A Study of Teacher Recruitment in Portugal and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Maria Assunção; Niklasson, Laila

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from an exploratory study carried out in Portugal and Sweden, concerning student teacher recruitment to Initial Teacher Education (ITE) programmes. It addresses issues such as the motivations and expectations of the student teachers regarding the teaching profession. Drawing upon existing related literature, a…

  18. State adaptation reserves cardiorespiratory system first-year students with varying degrees of physical fitness in terms of treadmill test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Levchenko

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to examine the state of the cardiorespiratory system in terms of the stress test in first-year students with different levels of fitness. Material : the study involved 43 students, of which 18 boys and 25devushek basic medical group. The study used a treadmill, a pulse oximeter, spirometer. Results : more adjustment disorders were detected in students that are not involved in physical education at school. Decreased ability of the cardiorespiratory system to maintain proper oxygen supply of the organism in the stress test. This is not observed in students who were attending school in addition sports clubs. Found that students with low tolerance to physical exercise need a separate program of physical training, the dynamic control of the teachers and the need for additional medical examination. Conclusions : the treadmill test is an ideal way of revealing hidden maladjustment cardiorespiratory system in adolescence.

  19. An examination of Chinese students'decision making behavior on the choice of UK University for a master’s degree

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Junqing

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the factors which can influence Chinese students’ intention to study in the UK for a master’s degree. Variables to be investigated include attitudes, subjective norms, internal control, external control, and intention. In addition, the effects of past experience were also examined. This dissertation employed questionnaire survey to collect primary data in both Chinese campus and UK campus of Nottingham University. A total of 100 students part...

  20. A survey of birth order status of students studying for medical degree at the University of Sheffield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Sarah; Apperley, Elizabeth; Hannon, Fergus; Karia, Anika; Baxter, Victoria; Julious, Steven A

    2014-09-01

    It is hypothesised that firstborn children and only children are more intelligent with higher intelligence scores having been observed in firstborn or only children. Evidence of the increased intelligence has been suggested by the fact that 21/23 (91%) of US astronauts, 23/43 (53%) of US presidents and between 75 and 80% of students at Harvard are firstborn or only children. It is of interest to investigate, therefore, whether a high achieving career such as medicine has a disproportionate number of firstborn or only children. A survey of medical students. The University of Sheffield Medical School. All students studying medicine in the academic year 2011-2012. The proportion of firstborn or only children. THERE WAS A DISPROPORTIONATE NUMBER OF STUDENTS WHO WERE FIRSTBORN OR ONLY CHILDREN: 53% (95% CI 49 to 58%). The expected percentage is 39.8% and therefore we can reject the null hypothesis. The results were consistent across all phases of study. There is a higher than expected proportion of medical students at the University of Sheffield who are firstborn or only children. The data though highlight the issue of comparing populations. Here we are comparing a population of medical students with a general population. A comparison which may not be appropriate as medical students may be drawn from a subsample of the general population.

  1. Current Trends in Adult Degree Programs: How Public Universities Respond to the Needs of Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gast, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Although many adult students turn to online degree programs due to their flexibility and convenience, a majority of prospective adult learners prefer to take classes on traditional brick-and-mortar campuses. This chapter examines how public research universities create pathways to degree attainment and boost degree completion rates among adult…

  2. HRD Degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Beverly

    1987-01-01

    The author describes the growing movement toward accreditation for human resources development professionals. She covers the issue of diversity, undergraduate versus graduate degrees, and future trends. (CH)

  3. STUDENT’S PERCEPTION TOWARDS FINANCIAL LITERACY – A STUDY WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO DEGREE STUDENTS OF SDM COLLEGE UJIRE

    OpenAIRE

    Gurudath Shenoy; Prasad Kumar; S. N. Sandesh

    2016-01-01

    Today students are future pillars of our nation. When they start their own careers and plan for savings and investments they should have adequate knowledge about savings and investments. To inculcate the habits of savings it is very essential for every students to know and understand how financial investments are and what benefits they can receive by parking their own funds and also the funds received from parents in the form of gifts, pocket money etc. due to changing conditions in employmen...

  4. Fast and Focused: Accelerated Degree Programs Keep Students Locked in on Learning. Lumina Foundation Focus™. Fall 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giegerich, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Employers point to a large and growing "skills gap," saying thousands of jobs are already going unfilled because applicants lack the skills and knowledge they need. Forecasters say that, by the end of this decade, two-thirds of all jobs will require some form of high-quality postsecondary credential such as a degree or certificate. The…

  5. Reasons which Influence on the Students' Decision to Take a University Course: Differences by Gender and Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Bonilla, Jesus Manuel; Barrera, Ramon Barrera; Serrano, Ma Angeles Rodriguez; Lopez-Bonilla, Luis Miguel; Florencio, Beatriz Palacios; Rodriguez, Ma Carmen Reyes; Altamira, Borja Sanz

    2012-01-01

    After compulsory secondary education; many teenagers face the process of choosing a university degree. This process involves uncertainties referred to their personal abilities, interests, social expectations and professional future. The present work is aimed at determining whether the reasons behind the selection of a particular university degree…

  6. [Abandonment of nursing courses: a survey regarding the motivations which lead the students to the abandonment of the nursing degree course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destrobecq, Anne; Destefani, Chiara; Sponton, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The Authors made a survey regarding the motivations which make the students leave the nursing degree course (NDC). The statistical data regarding the abandonment of university courses in Italy say that a 19/20% of the students leave the courses. As regards the whole University of Milan, the amount of those students (18,3%) lays under the national average. The authors made a survey about the motivations which lead the students of nursing to the abandonment of their academic path; via the offices of the nursing schools they collected the telephone numbers of the students enroled between 2000 and 2006, then they made a structured telephonic interview. An 87,7% of the interviewed students said that he/she had abandoned during the first year; the motivations are the following, in order of frequency: Too much engagement (30.1%), Other (26%), this item offers several answers, for example pregnancy, emotive problems, personal problems, Change of the academic path (23,3%) Expectations Disappointment (12,4%), Economic problems (8.2%). The survey is qualitative; it wants to be a first-step study to deeply analyze a topic of major interest in the field of nursing courses management.

  7. Choosing Science: A Mixed-Methods Study of Factors Predicting Latino and Latina High School Students' Decisions to Pursue Science Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Rachel S.

    Latino/as are an increasingly large subset of the United States population; however, they continue to be underrepresented in science careers. Because of this increase, research regarding Latino/as has improved, but there are still many gaps in regards to gender-specific predictors to pursue science careers. To address this lack of literature, the purpose of this study is to extend previous research and to develop a model of variables that significantly contribute to science career choice among Latino and Latina students when they graduate from high school. In particular the study addressed the following research questions: (1) What are the differences in science outcomes for Latino and Latina students? (2) What are the differences in factors involved in science outcomes for Latino and Latina students? (3) For Latino and Latina students what are the differences in the factors that predict students' choice to pursue a science degree and/or high scores on the Future Plans in Science Scale? (4) What are the differences in how Latino and Latina students experience science, which account for high achieving students to choose to pursue a science major? This study utilized an explanatory mixed-method approach to examine how cognitive, institutional, and motivational factors may be interrelated and play a role in Latino/as choice to pursue science. The first phase of the study incorporated the collection of survey and database information from 12th grade students at two Southern California high schools. The second phase of the study utilized follow-up focus group interviews to explore the specific differential experiences and views of Latino and Latina students. The results of the study demonstrated multiple significant predictors. Science self-concept and views towards science outside of school were the most significant predictors of students' choice to pursue science. Male students also had major predictors of Spanish proficiency, teacher encouragement, religious views

  8. Tracking Transfer: New Measures of Institutional and State Effectiveness in Helping Community College Students Attain Bachelor's Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Davis; Fink, John

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the effectiveness of two- to four-year college transfer is critical for meeting national goals for college attainment and promoting upward social mobility. Efforts to improve institutional effectiveness in serving transfer students and state transfer policy have been hampered by a lack of comparable metrics for measuring transfer…

  9. Students' Choice of Sub-Degree Programmes in Self-Financing Higher Education Institutions in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Phoebe; Ng, Peggy M. L.; Mak, Connie K. Y.; Chan, Jason K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The higher education sector in Hong Kong has restructured substantially from elite to mass higher education since the introduction of education reform by the Hong Kong government in 2000. To stay ahead in this competitive environment in the education sector, management teams of self-financing institutions have to compete for students and identify…

  10. Generalised Ethnocentrism among High-School Students in a Multicultural Setting: The Role of the Degree of Multilingualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göncz, Lajos

    2018-01-01

    Within psychological consequences of multiculturalism, it is often emphasised that multiculturalism and interculturalism decreases ethnocentrism, and increases openness towards other cultures, and, consequently, ethnic, linguistic and religious tolerance. We tested this empirically poorly supported assumption on high-school students from South…

  11. Enhancement in Evaluating Small Group Work in Courses with Large Number of Students. Machine Theory at Industrial Engineering Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordi Nebot, Lluïsa; Pàmies-Vilà, Rosa; Català Calderon, Pau; Puig-Ortiz, Joan

    2013-01-01

    This article examines new tutoring evaluation methods to be adopted in the course, Machine Theory, in the Escola Tècnica Superior d'Enginyeria Industrial de Barcelona (ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya). These new methods have been developed in order to facilitate teaching staff work and include students in the evaluation process.…

  12. Education and Knowledge in the Use of Financial Products and Services in Bachelor's Degree Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Santillán, Arturo; Moreno-García, Elena; Molchanova, Violetta S.

    2017-01-01

    This study seeks to determine a university student's knowledge and culture in relation to money; the way they plan their budget, their economic independence and consumer habits, the level of debt, and the use of financial services and products. The instrument designed by Aravena-Collao and Mendoza-Letelier (2010) was used for the query among the…

  13. Exploring depression, self-esteem and verbal fluency with different degrees of internet addiction among Chinese college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jia; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Ying

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to explore depression, self-esteem and verbal fluency functions among normal internet users, mild internet addictions and severe internet addictions. The survey sample consisted of 316 college students, and their internet addiction symptoms, depression and self-esteem symptoms were assessed using the Revised Chen Internet Addiction Scale (CIAS-R), Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (ZSDS), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), respectively. From this sample, 16 students with non-addictions, 19 students with mild internet addiction (sub-MIA) and 15 students with severe internet addiction (sub-SIA) were recruited and subjected to the classical verbal fluency tests, including the semantic and phonemic fluency task. The results indicated that severe internet addiction in the survey sample showed the highest tendency towards depressive symptoms and lowest self-esteem scores, and sub-SIA showed poor performance on the semantic fluency task. In conclusion, severe internet addiction was significantly associated with depression, low self-esteem and semantic verbal fluency problems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Learning based on library automation in mobile devices: The video production by students of Universidade Federal do Cariri Library Science Undergraduate Degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vernon VIEIRA

    Full Text Available Abstract The video production for learning has been evident over the last few years especially when it involves aspects of the application of hardware and software for automation spaces. In Librarianship Undergraduate Degrees the need for practical learning focused on the knowledge of the requirements for library automation demand on teacher to develop an educational content to enable the student to learn through videos in order to increase the knowledge about information technology. Thus, discusses the possibilities of learning through mobile devices in education reporting an experience that took place with students who entered in March, 2015 (2015.1 Bachelor Degree in Library Science from the Universidade Federal do Cariri (Federal University of Cariri in state of Ceará, Brazil. The literature review includes articles publicated in scientific journals and conference proceedings and books in English, Portuguese and Spanish on the subject. The methodology with quantitative and qualitative approach includes an exploratory study, where the data collection was used online survey to find out the experience of the elaboration of library automation videos by students who studied in that course. The learning experience using mobile devices for recording of technological environments of libraries allowed them to be produced 25 videos that contemplated aspects of library automation having these actively participated in production of the video and its publication on the Internet.

  15. 76 FR 50198 - Committee on Measures of Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-12

    ...-year degree-granting institutions of higher education in meeting the completion or graduation rate... completion or graduation rates of entering certificate/ degree-seeking, full-time, undergraduate students by... graduation rates of entering degree-seeking full-time undergraduate students and that consider the mission...

  16. PERCEPTIONS OF CULTURE CARE IN HUMANITARIAN WORK BY THE STUDENTS OF MASTERS' DEGREE IN GLOBAL HEALTH CARE

    OpenAIRE

    Kering, Naomy

    2016-01-01

    As the world is increasingly becoming multicultural, the need for cultural competence education to students of health care is essential to ensure a culturally competent workforce. The main purpose of this study is to determine the students’ perceptions of culture care and its importance in their work contexts. The main aim is to identify how students’ worldview, cultural and socio-cultural factors influence the way of care to people of diverse cultures. Qualitative method was used in this stu...

  17. [The German academic degree "Dr. med." is better than its reputation. Results of a questionnaire of doctoral students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, R; Park, D-H; Paulmann, V

    2012-11-01

    Recently there were mostly emotional debates about the scientific background and relevance of the German academic title "Dr. med.", while objective data are scarce. When submitting their doctoral thesis at the Medical School of Hannover students were asked anonymously about the type, topic, duration, quality of supervision as well as frequency and type of publication of the results. 180 doctoral candidates (62% women) participated in the study. The supervision was graded as good by the majority of students. The duration working on the thesis was equivalent to 47 weeks of a full time employment. There was some negative influence in participating in lectures and courses. Nearly all participants (98%) would recommend younger students to work on a dissertation as they had done themselves in parallel to the curriculum. The ability of how to interprete scientific data was assumed to be positively influenced. About two thirds stated that the results had been published in original articles at the time of submitting the thesis. More data from other medical faculties are needed to document the relevance of the medical dissertation to replace the emotional by a more rational debate. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. The Effects of a Self-Monitoring Package on Homework Completion and Accuracy of Students with Disabilities in an Inclusive General Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, Carol Ann; Barbetta, Patricia M.

    2013-01-01

    This study used a multiple baseline design across subjects to investigate the effects of a self-monitoring package on the math and spelling homework completion and accuracy rates of four fourth-grade students (two boys and two girls) with disabilities in an inclusive general education classroom. Throughout baseline and intervention, participants…

  19. Late Hebrew Immersion at Mt. Scopus College, Melbourne: Towards Complete Hebrew Fluency for Jewish Day School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorch, S. C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates a Hebrew immersion program for Jewish day school students at Mt. Scopus College in Melbourne, Australia. Specific sections address the following: (1) the first year; (2) the second year; (3) designing the evaluation of the program; (4) results of the evaluation (including academic outcomes, student and parent…

  20. Self-Reported Student Confidence in Troubleshooting Ability Increases after Completion of an Inquiry-Based PCR Practical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Anthony L.; Snow, Elizabeth T.; Binns, Henrica; Cook, Peta S.

    2015-01-01

    Inquiry-based learning (IBL) activities are complementary to the processes of laboratory discovery, as both are focused on producing new findings through research and inquiry. Here, we describe the results of student surveys taken pre- and postpractical to an IBL undergraduate practical on PCR. Our analysis focuses primarily student perceptions of…

  1. An Analysis of the Relationship between Distance from Campus and GPA of Commuter Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Danielle; Misra, Kaustav; Sype, Gail E.; Mackie, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    A variety of factors influence a student's ability to succeed in college and complete a degree program. Students who live on-campus, at least during their freshman year, have been shown to be more likely to complete their degrees than are students who live off-campus. Students who are commuters may have more demands on their time and may have…

  2. Effects of interest-major congruence, motivation, and academic performance on timely degree attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jeff; Robbins, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Using longitudinal student data from 15 four-year (n = 3,072) and 13 (n = 788) two-year postsecondary institutions, the authors tested the effects of interest-major congruence, motivation, and 1st-year academic performance on timely degree completion. Findings suggest that interest-major congruence has a direct effect on timely degree completion at both institutional settings and that motivation has indirect effects (via 1st-year academic performance). The total effects of both interest-major congruence and motivation on timely degree completion underscore the importance of both constructs in understanding student adjustment and postsecondary success. Implications for theory and counseling practice are discussed.

  3. Simulation With Debriefing and Guided Reflective Journaling to Stimulate Critical Thinking in Prelicensure Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padden-Denmead, Mary L; Scaffidi, Rose M; Kerley, Regina M; Farside, Amy Lee

    2016-11-01

    Simulation and guided reflective journaling have been identified as effective teaching and learning methods to develop critical thinking (CT) and clinical reasoning skills in nursing students. A descriptive correlational design was used to determine the relationship between CT and level of reflection using the Holistic Critical Thinking Skills Rubric (HCTSR) and the level of reflection on action assessment (LORAA), respectively, to evaluate 23 baccalaureate student-guided reflective journal entries after a simulation exercise with guided debriefing and after two subsequent clinical experiences. A statistically significant positive relationship (p < .01) was found between mean HCTSR and LORAA scores on all three journal entries, but no relationship to CT during simulation or on standardized test scores. The results also indicated support for use of the guided reflection after significant learning experiences. The LORAA and the HCTSR are effective measures of level of reflection and CT to evaluate learning from simulation and clinical experiences. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(11):645-650.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. ANALYSIS OF THE DEGREE AND THE STRUCTURE OF THE USE OF MARKET-ORIENTED ACTIVITIES IN ADULT EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS WITH A DIFFERENT NUMBER OF ENROLLED STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Mihanović

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, public and/or nonprofit institutions of adult education in Croatia have been analyzed. The issue of the degree and the structure of the use of market-oriented activities in the mentioned institutions has been raised as the main subject matter of this research. The degree and the relationship will be studied and differences in the use of market-oriented activities in institutions with small and large number of enrolled students will be established. Verification of research objectives is based on measuring two constructs by a specially designed questionnaire. The relationship implied by research objectives will be empirically analyzed and partially confirmed on a random sample of Croatian institutions of adult education. The most important limitation of the research is related to the summarized self-reporting of marketing behavior by the analyzed institutions, which should be addressed by future studies. However, it is expected that the results of this study imply the existence of a relationship between different institutions of adult education with a different number of students and market activities which the mentioned institutions develop within the specific context of adult education ‘industry’. Special considerations should therefore be applied to the universal applicability of the obtained results in other fields of education.

  5. Uncooked rice of relatively low gelatinization degree resulted in lower metabolic glucose and insulin responses compared with cooked rice in female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eun Young; Suh, Hyung Joo; Hong, Wan Soo; Kim, Dong Geon; Hong, Yang Hee; Hong, In Sun; Chang, Un Jae

    2009-07-01

    Cooking processes that gelatinize granules or disrupt structure might increase the glucose and insulin responses because a disruption of the structure of starch by gelatinization increases its availability for digestion and absorption in the small intestine. We hypothesized that the uncooked form of rice, which has a relatively low degree of gelatinization even though in powder form, would result in lower metabolic glucose and insulin responses compared with cooked rice (CR). To assess the effects of the gelatinization of rice on metabolic response of glucose and insulin, we investigated the glucose and insulin responses to 3 rice meals of different gelatinization degree in female college students (n = 12): CR (76.9% gelatinized), uncooked rice powder (UP; 3.5% gelatinized), and uncooked freeze-dried rice powder (UFP; 5.4% gelatinized). Uncooked rice powders (UP and UFP) induced lower glucose and insulin responses compared with CR. The relatively low gelatinization degree of UPs resulted in low metabolic responses in terms of the glycemic index (CR: 72.4% vs UP: 49.7%, UFP: 59.8%) and insulin index (CR: 94.8% vs UP: 74.4%, UFP: 68.0%). In summary, UPs that were less gelatinized than CR induced low postprandial glucose and insulin responses.

  6. The Benefits of Completing Homework for Students with Different Aptitudes in an Introductory Electricity and Magnetism Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-17

    number of students into pursuing science and technology careers, it is important for physics educators to know how beneficial their pedagogical tools...essentially no effect on total exam scores. We assign homework because we expect there is a causative relationship between homework and learning. The...correlations in Fig. 2 and Fig. 3 suggest that this anticipated causative relationship shou ld be reevaluated for major segments of our student

  7. RESEARCH INTO INFLUENCE OF HARMONISATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION ON BACHELOR DEGREE STUDENTS SPECIALISING IN “PEDAGOGICAL EDUCATION”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady I. Sarantsev

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: this article continues the discussion of the problems of harmonization of higher education in the direction of “Teacher Education”. The influence of harmonisation on the students learning process. The choice of the magazine “Integration of Education” to highlight the results of the study is due to compliance of his subjects scientific profile of the journal. Materials and Methods: the results of the analysis of the current state of training of the teacher, study the phenomenon of mismatch between the fundamental and practical orientation of vocational education in the direction of “Teacher Education” search means eliminate it, study of modern methodical thinking as a basis for harmonisation of vocational education teacher, presentation of methodical thinking set of professional competences. Methods: modeling, system analysis, activity approach, the interpretation of the provisions of Pedagogy and Psychology in the plane subject methods, concretization of the general provisions to a level guidelines. Results: the main place in training of a teacher is teaching methods. Methodical thinking is an attribute of his professional activity. Professional competencies that embody methodical thinking, constitute the main content of the harmonization of training of the bachelor. Harmonisation of fundamentality and practical orientation of the bachelor makes adjustments to all components of its learning process. Requirements to educational literature, lectures, practical sessions, the main methodological competences, the role and content of the tasks. The training should take the task of simulating real learning situations, which are associated with non-traditional forms of learning. Lectures from means of translating knowledge needs to be transformed into a source of production problems and engage students to research activities, the role of which is amplified and practical training. Discussion and Conclusions: article summarizes

  8. The Relationship between Learning Styles and Information Seeking Behavior in Master Degree Students of Medical Sciences in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Parsaeian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Learning styles influence the methods and ways of obtaining information and lead to the variety of information seeking behaviors from the searchers. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between learning styles and information seeking behavior in master degree students of medical science in Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional analytic study. The population of the study was 601 master degree students of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd in 2013-2015. They were all freshmen. The sample size of 234 students was determined using Cochran formula. Data were collected by two questionnaires (Kolb questionnaire and researcher-made seeking behavior questionnaire. The validity of questionnaires was confirmed by a panel of experts and their reliability was confirmed by Cronbach`s alpha. Data analysis was done by inferential statistics and statistical software SPSS (version 18. Measuring the significant relationship between learning styles and information seeking behavior was done with Pierson correlation coefficient. The significant difference between learning styles and information seeking behavior in terms of gender and faculty was examined by Fisher`s test. Results: Learning styles had effect on information seeking behavior; also correlation coefficients between the learning styles and information seeking behavior had significant difference, but there was no difference in terms of faculty. Conclution: Recognition of learning styles and including it into designing of information systems may increase system`s interactivity that it may lead to have better and faster accessibility to information resources.

  9. The effectiveness of the Pilates method: reducing the degree of non-structural scoliosis, and improving flexibility and pain in female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves de Araújo, Maria Erivânia; Bezerra da Silva, Elirez; Bragade Mello, Danielli; Cader, Samária Ali; Shiguemi Inoue Salgado, Afonso; Dantas, Estélio Henrique Martin

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates with regard to the degree of scoliosis, flexibility and pain. The study included 31 female students divided into two groups: a control group (CG = 11), which had no therapeutic intervention, and an experimental group (EG = 20), which underwent Pilates-based therapy. We used radiological goniometry measurements to assess the degree of scoliosis, standard goniometry measurements to determine the degree of flexibility and the scale of perceived pain using the Borg CR 10 to quantify the level of pain. The independent t test of the Cobb angle (t = - 2.317, p = 0.028), range of motion of trunk flexion (t = 3.088, p = 0.004) and pain (t = -2.478, p = 0.019) showed significant differences between the groups, with best values in the Pilates group. The dependent t test detected a significant decrease in the Cobb angle (Δ% = 38%, t = 6.115, p = 0.0001), a significant increase in trunk flexion (Δ% = 80%, t = -7.977, p = 0.0001) and a significant reduction in pain (Δ% = 60%, t = 7.102, p = 0.0001) in the EG. No significant difference in Cobb angle (t = 0.430, p = 0.676), trunk flexion, (t = 0.938p = 0.371) or pain (t = 0.896, p = 0.391) was found for the CG. The Pilates group was better than control group. The Pilates method showed a reduction in the degree of non-structural scoliosis, increased flexibility and decreased pain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparative analysis of ethical development of student nurses registered for a basic degree and basic diploma programme in KwaZulu Natal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NG Mtshali

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A comparative descriptive study was conducted to establish whether the Comprehensive Basic Nursing Course (CBNC is able to develop students ethically, and how educational preparation from two different programmes (basic degree and basic diploma influence their ethical development. This study was conducted because of the concerns on the escalating number of litigations instituted against nurses. Several studies have indicated that some of these litigations are as a result of the growing complexity of the health care system and the society’s increasing awareness of their human rights. Some studies have shown that nurses are failing to make principled and ethically sound decisions because they are inadequately prepared to handle ethical issues in an ethically responsible manner. A purposively selected sample of third and fourth year students from both programmes was used. Data was collected from both groups through the use of questionnaires. The findings revealed that the students are developing ethically in a CBNC but the level of ethical development is influenced by their educational preparation, teaching approaches and strategies used, clinical environment, hospital bureaucracy, rules and policies.

  11. Information and Communication Technology Skills of Students Using the Distant Education Management System to Complete Their Theology Undergraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalman, Murat; Basaran, Bulent; Gonen, Selehattin

    2016-01-01

    Considering several variables, the present study aimed at examining the information and communication technology skills of university students taking their courses with the distant education system. In the study, the singular and relational survey model, one of general survey models, was used. The research sample was made up of 381 students…

  12. Optimizing Technical Education Pathways: Does Dual-Credit Course Completion Predict Students' College and Labor Market Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, L. Allen; Chan, Hsun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Post-recession Federal policy initiatives, such as secondary/postsecondary career pathways and gainful employment higher education accountability standards, prioritize the alignment of education practices with market-driven outcomes. Using longitudinal student record data merged from college and state K-12 data systems with the Unemployment…

  13. Does Poor Quality Schooling and/or Teacher Quality Hurt Black South African Students Enrolling for a Degree at the University of KwaZulu-Natal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Murray

    Full Text Available Wealthy schools appoint better qualified teachers, less wealthy schools under qualified teachers. Added to this mix is a powerful teacher's union whose policies attempt to entrench the job security of teachers in the less wealthy schools irrespective of whether they can teach their subjects or not. Can one isolate these effects from that of other socio-demographic factors that may also be affecting the performance of students when they enrol for a degree at the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN? An outcome variable that subtracts the number of courses that have been failed from the number of courses that have been passed, dividing this by the total number of years that they have spent studying for a particular degree will be used as a response variable for this paper.The system of secondary education in South Africa is highly polarized. On the one hand, we have a group of mainly Black African students, forming about 80% of the total student population, that come from a vastly under-resourced rural or township based community. On the other hand, we have a group of predominantly White and Indian students who are able to attend a far better resourced set of private schools. Added to this mix, we have 240,000 of South Africa's total number of 390,000 primary and secondary school teachers who belong to a powerful teacher's union which enjoys a strong political alliance with the ruling party in South Africa. With most of their union members teaching in the less wealthy schools in South Africa, `school background' now includes a politically motivated component that focuses on teacher self-interest rather than the education of the child. What sort of effect does school background have on the performance of students when they enter an institution of higher learning? More importantly, can one isolate the effect of school background from that of other possibly confounding factors such as gender, financial aid and the receipt of some form of residence based

  14. Does Poor Quality Schooling and/or Teacher Quality Hurt Black South African Students Enrolling for a Degree at the University of KwaZulu-Natal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Wealthy schools appoint better qualified teachers, less wealthy schools under qualified teachers. Added to this mix is a powerful teacher's union whose policies attempt to entrench the job security of teachers in the less wealthy schools irrespective of whether they can teach their subjects or not. Can one isolate these effects from that of other socio-demographic factors that may also be affecting the performance of students when they enrol for a degree at the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN)? An outcome variable that subtracts the number of courses that have been failed from the number of courses that have been passed, dividing this by the total number of years that they have spent studying for a particular degree will be used as a response variable for this paper. The system of secondary education in South Africa is highly polarized. On the one hand, we have a group of mainly Black African students, forming about 80% of the total student population, that come from a vastly under-resourced rural or township based community. On the other hand, we have a group of predominantly White and Indian students who are able to attend a far better resourced set of private schools. Added to this mix, we have 240,000 of South Africa's total number of 390,000 primary and secondary school teachers who belong to a powerful teacher's union which enjoys a strong political alliance with the ruling party in South Africa. With most of their union members teaching in the less wealthy schools in South Africa, `school background' now includes a politically motivated component that focuses on teacher self-interest rather than the education of the child. What sort of effect does school background have on the performance of students when they enter an institution of higher learning? More importantly, can one isolate the effect of school background from that of other possibly confounding factors such as gender, financial aid and the receipt of some form of residence based accommodation

  15. Should Students Have a Gap Year? Motivation and Performance Factors Relevant to Time Out after Completing School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Increasingly, school leavers are taking time out from study or formal work after completing high school--often referred to as a "gap year" (involving structured activities such as "volunteer tourism" and unstructured activities such as leisure). Although much opinion exists about the merits--or otherwise--of taking time out after completing…

  16. College Completion and Participation in a Developmental Math Course for Hispanic and White Non-Hispanic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, Stephen Gene

    2011-01-01

    Purpose, Scope, and Method of Study. The population of interest in the study consisted of white and Hispanic high school graduates in the United States who attended college and completed a college developmental mathematics course. Data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study of 1988 were employed, and a longitudinal, quasi-experimental…

  17. [Doctoral thesis projects for medical students? Retrospective estimation of the fraction of successfully completed medical doctoral thesis projects at Witten/Herdecke University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfenberg, Janna; Schaper, Katharina; Krummenauer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The German "Dr med" plays a specific role in doctoral thesis settings since students may start the underlying doctoral project during their studies at medical school. If a Medical Faculty principally encourages this approach, then it should support the students in performing the respective projects as efficiently as possible. Consequently, it must be ensured that students are able to implement and complete a doctoral project in parallel to their studies. As a characteristic efficiency feature of these "Dr med" initiatives, the proportion of doctoral projects successfully completed shortly after graduating from medical school is proposed and illustrated. The proposed characteristic can be estimated by the time period between the state examination (date of completion of the qualifying medical examination) and the doctoral examination. Completion of the doctoral project "during their medical studies" was then characterised by a doctoral examination no later than 12 months after the qualifying medical state examination. To illustrate the estimation and interpretation of this characteristic, it was retrospectively estimated on the basis of the full sample of all doctorates successfully completed between July 2009 and June 2012 at the Department of Human Medicine at the Faculty of Health of the University of Witten/Herdecke. During the period of investigation defined, a total number of 56 doctoral examinations were documented, 30 % of which were completed within 12 months after the qualifying medical state examination (95% confidence interval 19 to 44 %). The median duration between state and doctoral examination was 27 months. The proportion of doctoral projects completed parallel to the medical studies increased during the investigation period from 14 % in the first year (July 2009 till June 2010) to 40 % in the third year (July 2011 till June 2012). Only about a third of all "Dr med" projects at the Witten/Herdecke Faculty of Health were completed during or close to

  18. Effects of Interest-Major Congruence, Motivation, and Academic Performance on Timely Degree Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jeff; Robbins, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Using longitudinal student data from 15 four-year (n = 3,072) and 13 (n = 788) two-year postsecondary institutions, the authors tested the effects of interest-major congruence, motivation, and 1st-year academic performance on timely degree completion. Findings suggest that interest-major congruence has a direct effect on timely degree completion…

  19. Physics to a degree

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, EG

    2014-01-01

    Physics to a Degree provides an extensive collection of problems suitable for self-study or tutorial and group work at the level of an undergraduate physics course. This novel set of exercises draws together the core elements of an undergraduate physics degree and provides students with the problem solving skills needed for general physics' examinations and for real-life situations encountered by the professional physicist. Topics include force, momentum, gravitation, Bernoulli's Theorem, magnetic fields, blackbody radiation, relativistic travel, mechanics near the speed of light, radioactive

  20. Can Financial Aid Help to Address the Growing Need for STEM Education? The Effects of Need-Based Grants on the Completion of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Courses and Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Benjamin L.; Long, Bridget Terry; Mabel, Zachary

    2018-01-01

    Although workers in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields earn above-average wages, the number of college graduates prepared for STEM jobs lags behind employer demand. A key question is how to recruit and retain college students in STEM majors. We offer new evidence on the role of financial aid in supporting STEM attainment.…

  1. Income and financial aid effects on persistence and degree attainment in public colleges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia C. Dowd

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the distribution of financial aid among financially dependent four-year college students and the effectiveness of different types of financial aid in promoting student persistence and timely bachelor’s degree attainment. The findings of descriptive statistical and logistic regression analyses using the NCES Beginning Postsecondary Students (1990-94 data show that subsidized loans taken in the first year of college have a positive effect on persistence. The first-year distribution of aid does not close the income gap in bachelor’s degree attainment. Living on campus and first-year grade point average are the most important predictors of timely degree completion.

  2. Transition from High School to Associate Degree Nursing Education: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kathy Jessee

    2012-01-01

    Nursing is facing a critical shortage and retention of nursing students is of paramount importance. Much research has been completed related to retention in nursing education and student success, but there is very little in current literature related to issues associated with the transition from high school to associate degree nursing (ADN)…

  3. Para- and Pre-Professionals in Student Development Services: Part Three. Training Paraprofessionals in Human Services at the AAS Degree Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, John C.

    This presentation describes a program being developed at South Plains College (SPC) of Lubbock to train paraprofessional helpers at the two-year degree level. As an interface between the training of helpers at the four-year and graduate degree levels of preparation and the non-degree or extra-degree level of preparation in the helping professions,…

  4. Expectations Compared of First-Year Students in Pre-School and Primary School Education Degrees at the University of Burgos in Relation to Characteristics and Practices in University Teaching most Desired

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime IBÁÑEZ QUINTANA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this work is to detect and analyse the desired characteristics and teaching practices that first year students will be taught in different subjects, comparing Pre-school with Primary Education degree at Burgos University. For that purpose, we have analysed data obtained from 120 surveys (60 others the Pre-school degree and 60 from the Primary Education degree, the surveys are based on the five basic aspects that we consider fundamental of a university education: personal and professional characteristics, evaluation, tutorial, information and communications technology (ICT and methodologies of education/learning. The results show that the student body values more the professional characteristics of its teaching staff than the personal ones; and the image transmitted by the teaching staff that uses ICT is always positive, creating a favourable opinion of his teaching, and the student body reaches to consider that ICTs are indispensable to nowadays education.

  5. Completing a PhD by Publication: A Review of Australian Policy and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing impetus for higher-degree-by-research students to publish during candidature. Research performance, including higher degree completions and publication output, commonly determines university funding, and doctorates with publishing experience are better positioned for a career in softening academic labour markets. The PhD by…

  6. Protagonismo de los alumnos en el aprendizaje: Una experiencia en el primer curso de medicina Role of students in learning: An experience in the first year of Medicine Degree

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    Agustín Hidalgo

    2012-12-01

    -6 to perform the proposed assignments in form of seminars and problem based learning (PBL, using, among other materials, short literary texts and images of paintings whose analysis and discussion were presented orally. Practical lessons introduced the students to the search and evaluation of information. An essay and lectures complete the methods used. All materials used were available in the virtual campus. Results. Attendance at workshops, seminars and PBL sessions was close to 100% and 67% for lecture sessions. The students expressed intellectual interest on the tasks performed. The method showed high student involvement in the process of self-learning, ability of self-regulation at work, degree of concept acquisition and ability to draw up documents. The adequacy of the contents to the objectives has been considered suitable by more than 70% of the students. The acquisition of competences was favorable in 80% of cases. Conclusions. The characteristics of the subject might be useful to promote scientific inquiry and medical humanism among students. Literature and description of paintings might help to identify aspects of medical act, as well as to develop the observation of physical and behavioral characteristics in patients.

  7. How Adult Online Graduates Portray Their Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study investigated how adult graduates of online Bachelor's degree programs describe the online aspect of their degree. Online education is promoted as a method for adult students to access the benefits of a college degree. Therefore, it is important for prospective online students, higher education institutions and…

  8. Language configurations of degree-related denotations in the spoken production of a group of Colombian EFL university students: A corpus-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilder Yesid Escobar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing that developing the competences needed to appropriately use linguistic resources according to contextual characteristics (pragmatics is as important as the cultural-imbedded linguistic knowledge itself (semantics and that both are equally essential to form competent speakers of English in foreign language contexts, we feel this research relies on corpus linguistics to analyze both the scope and the limitations of the sociolinguistic knowledge and the communicative skills of English students at the university level. To such end, a linguistic corpus was assembled, compared to an existing corpus of native speakers, and analyzed in terms of the frequency, overuse, underuse, misuse, ambiguity, success, and failure of the linguistic parameters used in speech acts. The findings herein describe the linguistic configurations employed to modify levels and degrees of descriptions (salient sematic theme exhibited in the EFL learners´ corpus appealing to the sociolinguistic principles governing meaning making and language use which are constructed under the social conditions of the environments where the language is naturally spoken for sociocultural exchange.

  9. IDENTIFICATION OF DIGITAL COMPETENCES SKILLS IN TEACHER TRAINING DEGREE STUDENTS IDENTIFICACIÓN DEL DOMINIO DE COMPETENCIAS DIGITALES EN EL ALUMNADO DEL GRADO DE MAGISTERIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Pino Juste

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Technologies of Information and Communication (ICT become in the information society a change agent. In this context, ICTs should become teaching tools in order to help the teacher to achieve quality education.Being aware of the importance of the teachers' mastery of the digital skills, we have conducted a study about the mastery of the ICTs that the students in the third year of the degree of teacher training of the University of Vigo have. In order to do this we have taken into account the knowledge acquired, the frequency of use of certain tools, their level of proficiency in four areas of knowledge: technological literacy, intellectual working tools, processing and dissemination of information and as communication tools. As well as their motivations, interests and obstacles found in their development in order to develop proposals for initial training.We can conclude that, in general, students do not have a specific training on the use of computers. About the degree of knowledge in the different skills, the students know the most basic and commonly used (open or download a file, create or print a document, install a program or send an e-mail. They usually use the mail as a working tool, while the messaging and social networks are more used for leisure time.Their attitudes towards ICTs are very positive and their motivations are focused essentially on the technologies which are useful for improving their learning and for their professional future.Las Tecnologías de la información y comunicación (TIC se convierten en la sociedad de la Información en un agente de cambio. En este contexto las TIC deben transformarse en herramientas pedagógicas al servicio del profesor con el fin de lograr una educación de calidad. Conscientes de la importancia de que los profesores dominen las competencias digitales, hemos realizado un estudio sobre el dominio de las tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC que poseen los estudiantes de

  10. Jacobi fields of completely integrable Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giachetta, G.; Mangiarotti, L.; Sardanashvily, G.

    2003-01-01

    We show that Jacobi fields of a completely integrable Hamiltonian system of m degrees of freedom make up an extended completely integrable system of 2m degrees of freedom, where m additional first integrals characterize a relative motion

  11. The lifetime cost to English students of borrowing to invest in a medical degree: a gender comparison using data from the Office for National Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolani, Marco G; Vohra, Ravinder S; Carmichael, Fiona; Mangat, Karanjit; Alderson, Derek

    2015-04-21

    To evaluate this impact on male and female English medical graduates by estimating the total time and amount repaid on loans taken out with the UK's Student Loans Company (SLC). UK. 4286 respondents with a medical degree in the Labour Force Surveys administered by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) between 1997 and 2014. Age-salary profiles were generated to estimate the repayment profiles for different levels of initial graduate debt. 2195 female and 2149 male medical graduates were interviewed by the ONS. Those working full-time (73.1% females and 96.1% males) were analysed in greater depth. Following standardisation to 2014 prices, average full-time male graduates earned up to 35% more than females by the age of 55. The initial graduate debt from tuition fees alone amounts to £39,945.69. Owing to interest charges on this debt the average full-time male graduate repays £57,303 over 20 years, while the average female earns less and so repays £61,809 over 26 years. When additional SLC loans are required for maintenance, the initial graduate debt can be as high as £81,916 and, as SLC debt is written off 30 years after graduation, the average female repays £75,786 while the average male repays £110,644. Medical graduates on an average salary are unlikely to repay their SLC debt in full. This is a consequence of higher university fees and as SLC debt is written off 30 years after graduation. This results in the average female graduate repaying more when debt is low, but a lower amount when debt is high compared to male graduates. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Women Engineers: Factors and Obstacles Related to the Pursuit of a Degree in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentling, Rose Mary; Camacho, Cristina

    Research on women in engineering confirms the presence of gender barriers that affect the recruitment and retention of women in engineering. These barriers stop some women from choosing engineering as a field of study, and impede some women from completing a degree in engineering. However, there are some young female students who complete their engineering education despite the presence of obstacles throughout their college years. This study addressed the factors that have hindered, motivated, and assisted women who graduated with a degree in engineering. By studying and understanding the barriers that hinder women in deciding to pursue and in completing a degree in engineering, as well as the factors that assist and encourage them, we can learn how to break down the barriers and how to facilitate the educational journey of female engineering students. This study provides valuable insights and created a framework from which high schools, universities, researchers, and female students can directly benefit.

  13. Return on Investment: Strategies for Improving Remedial Education. Complete to Compete Briefing Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandal, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Every year millions of students enroll in colleges with the goal of completing a college degree or certificate so they can find a well-paying job. Unfortunately, many arrive on college campuses, take a college placement exam and discover they will need to complete remedial education courses in math, reading, or writing that won't count toward a…

  14. Prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients wearing bimaxillary complete dentures, removable partial dentures and in students with natural dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, Thaisa B; Conci, Ricardo A; Pezzini, Maristela M G; Pezzini, Rolando P; Mendonça, Márcio J

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD) has attained a prominent role within the context of dental care due to its high prevalence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMD in students at the State University of West of Paraná (UNIOESTE) with natural dentition, and in patients with removable partial dentures and double complete dentures. A total of 210 randomly selected individuals of both genders were evaluated, being divided into three groups: seventy students at the UNIOESTE with natural dentition (Group 1), seventy patients with removable partial dentures (Group 2) and seventy patients with bimaxillary complete dentures (Group 3). The data were collected by a single examiner using the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire for triage, where a single affirmative response to any of the situations mentioned was enough to carry out clinical evaluation. Kolmogorov Smirnov, Mann Whitney, Chi-Square, ANOVA and Tukey's statistical tests were performed. The most prevalent signs and symptoms of TMD in Group 1 were pain or difficulty in chewing or talking, perception of recent change in bite and deviations during the course of mandibular movements. In Group 2 they were perceptions of recent changes in the bite, deflections in the mandibular movements, presence of joint sounds, pain during excursive movements and muscle tenderness. The most prevalent signs and symptoms in Group 3 were limited to mouth opening and poor stability and retention of at least one of the prostheses. Group 3 also reported having received treatment for headaches or facial pain with a high prevalence. Group 2 had the highest prevalence of signs and symptoms. Prevalence was similar in Groups 1 and 3.

  15. Who Studies STEM Subjects at a Level and Degree in England? An Investigation into the Intersections between Students' Family Background, Gender and Ethnicity in Determining Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codiroli Mcmaster, Natasha

    2017-01-01

    The relative lack of students studying post-compulsory STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects is a key policy concern. A particular issue is the disparities in uptake by students' family background, gender and ethnicity. It remains unclear whether the relationship between student characteristics and choice can be…

  16. The Relationship between Medical Students' Cognitive Method of Thinking, Their Sex Their Academic Level and the Degree of Their Creative Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qutami, Nayfeh

    2005-01-01

    The sample of the study consisted of all the students in the Faculty of Medicine. The study was conducted using 290 students. The performance of 279 students of the total were analyzed. 141 were males and 135 were females. The results showed an influence in the interaction of different variables such as sex, academic level, and the cognitive…

  17. Coping and Its Relation to Retention among Male Minority Nursing Students in an Associate Degree Nursing Program in a South Texas Community College: An Explanatory Sequential Mixed Methods Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggs, Gwendolyn Smith

    2013-01-01

    In Texas, there is an increase in the enrollment of men of various ethnicities in nursing schools, especially Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs. As these men strive to complete the nursing education, they face many concerns that center on barriers that are encountered in what is still a predominately Caucasian and female environment. In…

  18. Astronautics Degrees for Space Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntman, M.; Brodsky, R.; Erwin, D.; Kunc, J.

    The Astronautics Program (http://astronautics.usc.edu) of the University of Southern California (USC) offers a full set of undergraduate and graduate degree programs in Aerospace Engineering with emphasis in Astronautics. The Bachelor of Science degree program in Astronautics combines basic science and engineering classes with specialized astronautics classes. The Master of Science degree program in Astronautics offers classes in various areas of space technology. The Certificate in Astronautics targets practicing engineers and scientists who enter space-related fields and/or who want to obtain training in specific space-related areas. Many specialized graduate classes are taught by adjunct faculty working at the leading space companies. The Master of Science degree and Certificate are available through the USC Distance Education Network (DEN). Today, the Internet allows us to reach students anywhere in the world through webcasting. The majority of our graduate students, as well as those pursuing the Certificate, work full time as engineers in the space industry and government research and development centers. The new world of distance learning presents new challenges and opens new opportunities. We show how the transformation of distance learning and particularly the introduction of webcasting transform organization of the program and class delivery. We will describe in detail the academic focus of the program, student reach, and structure of program components. Program development is illustrated by the student enrollment dynamics and related industrial trends; the lessons learned emphasize the importance of feedback from the students and from the space industry.

  19. A Lakatosian Conceptual Change Teaching Strategy Based on Student Ability to Build Models with Varying Degrees of Conceptual Understanding of Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaz, M.

    The main objective of this study is to construct a Lakatosian teaching strategy that can facilitate conceptual change in students'' understanding of chemical equilibrium. The strategy is based on the premise that cognitive conflicts must have been engendered by the students themselves in trying to cope with different problem solving strategies. Results obtained (based on Venezuelan freshman students) show that the performance of the experimental group of students was generally better (especially on the immediate post tests) than that of the control group. It is concluded that a conceptual change teaching strategy must take into consideration the following aspects: a) core beliefs of the students in the topic (cf. ''hard core'', Lakatos 1970); b) exploration of the relationship between core beliefs and student alternative conceptions (misconceptions); c) cognitive complexity of the core belief can be broken down into a series of related and probing questions; d) students resist changes in their core beliefs by postulating ''auxiliary hypotheses'' in order to resolve their contradictions; e) students'' responses based on their alternative conceptions must be considered not as wrong, but rather as models, perhaps in the same sense as used by scientists to break the complexity of a problem; and f) students'' misconceptions be considered as alternative conceptions (theories) that compete with the present scientific theories and at times recapitulate theories scientists held in the past.

  20. Internationalisation of Degree Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurford, Donna; Jensen, Anne Skov

    The focus of this presentation’s contribution to the Symposium is how SDU is addressing the incorporation of international dimensions into its courses in order to enhance all students’ learning. Currently SDU implements two international dimensions: to recruit international students and to facili......The focus of this presentation’s contribution to the Symposium is how SDU is addressing the incorporation of international dimensions into its courses in order to enhance all students’ learning. Currently SDU implements two international dimensions: to recruit international students...... international students are bringing their own international dimensions to SDU, which may be overlooked. Secondly, although studying abroad has the potential to build confidence, widen perspectives and enhance employability most Danish students prefer to complete their studies at SDU. This preference for home-based....... The course has been developed in collaboration with SDU’s international dimension project team and will be led by pedagogic consultants who are based in SDU’s Centre for Teaching and Learning’. However, as evidenced in Harrison’s (2015) review of universities’ ‘internationalisation at home’ strategies...

  1. Set our Master's degrees free

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padman, Rachael

    2010-04-01

    Making UK undergraduate physics degrees longer must have seemed like a good idea at the time. Back in the early 1990s the standard three-year Bachelor's physics degree (four years in Scotland) was under pressure at both ends. The A-level curriculum - one of the requirements for entry onto a degree course - was being increasingly modularized, and dumbed down. Physics students were arriving at university less well prepared than in the past and there was an increasing awareness that graduates of five-year continental degree courses were better equipped for a professional scientific career than those in the UK. At the same time, local education authorities in the UK were required to provide full funding for a first degree, whether for three or four years.

  2. Doxorubicin-induced second degree and complete atrioventricular block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilickap, Saadettin; Akgul, Ebru; Aksoy, Sercan; Aytemir, Kudret; Barista, Ibrahim

    2005-05-01

    Doxorubicin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of malignancies. Cardiotoxicity is the most important dose-limiting toxicity of doxorubicin. Although cardiomyopathy is the most well known side effect of doxorubicin, it usually occurs many years after the treatment and relates to cumulative doxorubicin dosage. Another form of doxorubicin cardiotoxicity is arrhythmia which may occur at any time and after any dosage. However, doxorubicin-induced arrhythmia is rarely a life-threatening side effect. In this report, we present a case in which there were doxorubicin-induced life-threatening arrhythmias.

  3. An Analysis of the Academic Behaviors and Beliefs of Division I Student-Athletes: The Impact of the Increased Percentage toward Degree Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulics, Jennifer M.; Kornspan, Alan S.; Kretovics, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the academic decision making beliefs of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Championship Series (FBS) student-athletes and to determine if the variables of gender and type of sport related to academic decision making behavior of student-athletes. Participants…

  4. The Attainment of a Science Degree by African American College Students at Arizona State University: An Investigation to Identify the Barriers and Affordances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Quintin

    2012-01-01

    Historically, African American students have been underrepresented in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). If African American students continue to be underrepresented in STEM fields, they will not have access to valuable and high-paying sectors of the economy. Despite the number of African Americans in these…

  5. Student Loan Debt in Kentucky: An Analysis of Debt Levels and Their Relationship to Earnings for Baccalaureate Degree Holders of Public Universities, 2010-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Student loans can be a good investment in an individual's future, providing financial access to higher education and improved chances of economic success after college. However, avoiding undue financial obligations and maximizing the return on investment require careful planning and prudent borrowing. Estimating whether the student loan debt…

  6. Nuclear engineering enrollments and degrees, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.R.; Shirley, D.L.

    1982-05-01

    This report presents data on the number of students enrolled and the degrees awarded in academic year 1980-81 from 73 US institutions offering degree programs in nuclear engineering or nuclear options within other engineering fields. Presented here are historical data for the last decade, which provide information such as trends by degree level, foreign national student participation, female and minority student participation, and placement of graduates. Also included is a listing of the universities by type of program and number of students

  7. The Moderating Effect of Personality Traits on Advisor Relationships in Predicting Doctoral Student Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosh, Emily P.

    2014-01-01

    Personality affects relationships. During the doctoral education, the second most important factor in degree completion, after financial support, is the student-advisor relationship. Approximately half of doctoral students do not finish their degrees. While it is known mentors have a profound impact on the success of doctoral students, the effect…

  8. Actively Encouraging Learning and Degree Persistence in Advanced Astrophysics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Daniel H.

    2018-01-01

    The need to grow and diversify the STEM workforce remains a critical national challenge. Less than 40% of college students interested in STEM achieve a bachelor's degree. These numbers are even more dire for women and URMs, underscoring a serious concern about the country's ability to remain competitive in science and tech. A major factor is persistent performance gaps in rigorous 'gateway' and advanced STEM courses for majors from diverse backgrounds leading to discouragement, a sense of exclusion, and high dropout rates. Education research has clearly demonstrated that interactive-engagement (`active learning') strategies increase performance, boost confidence, and help build positive 'identity' in STEM. Likewise, the evidence shows that traditional science education practices do not help most students gain a genuine understanding of concepts nor the necessary skill set to succeed in their disciplines. Yet, lecture-heavy courses continue to dominate the higher-ed curriculum, thus, reinforcing the tired notion that only a small percentage of 'special' students have the inherent ability to achieve a STEM degree. In short, very capable students with less experience and confidence in science, who belong to groups that traditionally are less identified with STEM careers, are effectively and efficiently 'weeded out' by traditional education practices. I will share specific examples for how I successfully incorporate active learning in advanced astrophysics courses to encourage students from all backgrounds to synthesize complex ideas, build bedrock conceptual frameworks, gain technical communication skills, and achieve mastery learning outcomes all necessary to successfully complete rigorous degrees like astrophysics. By creating an inclusive and active learning experience in junior-level extragalactic and stellar interiors/atmospheres courses, I am helping students gain fluency in their chosen major and the ability to 'think like a scientist', both critical to

  9. Examination Phase of the Master's Thesis: A Plausible Cause of Delayed Completion of Graduate Studies at Makerere University, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oonyu, Joseph C.; Wamala, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the examination stage of student theses on the completion time of graduate studies at Makerere University, Uganda. The assessment is based on the administrative data of 504 Master's degree students in the 2000 to 2008 enrollment cohorts at the School of Education, Makerere University. The total elapsed time…

  10. A Parallel Controlled Study of the Effectiveness of a Partially Flipped Organic Chemistry Course on Student Performance, Perceptions, and Course Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Organic chemistry is very challenging to many students pursuing science careers. Flipping the classroom presents an opportunity to significantly improve student success by increasing active learning, which research shows is highly beneficial to student learning. However, flipping an entire course may seem too daunting or an instructor may simply…

  11. Gender Differences in Educational Attainment: The Case of Doctoral Degrees in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastekaasa, Arne

    2005-01-01

    Despite strong trends in most Western countries towards gender equality in educational attainments, men are still considerably more likely to obtain doctoral degrees. Using data comprising nearly all students graduating from Norwegian universities during 1981-1996, separate event history analyses are carried out of recruitment to and completion of…

  12. Maintaining quality control in a nontraditional nuclear technology degree program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSain, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    Regents College, created by the Board of Regents of the University of The State on New York in 1971, has been offering, since January 1985, AS and BS degrees in nuclear technology. The impetus for establishing the nuclear technology degrees came from nuclear utility management and had to do with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission proposed rule regarding degreed operators on shift. There are a variety of ways to earn credits in Regents College degree programs: (1) college courses taken for degree-level credit from regionally accredited colleges; (2) courses sponsored by business, industry, or government that have been evaluated and recommended for credit by the New York National or American Council on Education (ACE's) Program on Noncollegiate Sponsored Instruction (PONSI); (3) military education that has been evaluated by ACE PONSI; (4) approved college-proficiency examinations; and (5) special assessment: an individualized examination of college-level knowledge gained from experience or independent study. Nuclear technology students primarily use college course work, evaluated military education, and proficiency examinations to complete degree programs. However, an increasing number of utilities are having training programs PONSI evaluated, resulting in an increased use of these courses in the nuclear technology degrees. Quality control is a function of several factors described in the paper

  13. The contribution of phonological awareness and receptive and expressive english to the reading ability of deaf students with varying degrees of exposure to accurate english.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetke-Stahlman, Barbara; Nielsen, Diane Corcoran

    2003-01-01

    This study was planned with the knowledge that the tasks of reading require the same acquisition of skills, whether a child is hearing or deaf, monolingual, or bilingual. Reading and language research literature was reviewed. Subjects were 31 deaf students (7.9-17.9 years of age) who attended one of three U.S. programs. Performance on 15 language and literacy measures was analyzed. Results were that students who scored highest on a passage-comprehension measure also were more able (a) to provide synonyms, antonyms, and analogies of read words and phrases, (b) to read more listed words, and (c) to substitute one phoneme more correctly for another to create new words than were readers with lower scores. Two groups of students also were compared: a Longer Exposure to English Group (n = 22) who used Signing Exact English (SEE) for 5 years or more and a Shorter Exposure Group (n = 8) exposed to SEE for less than 2 years. A correlational analysis revealed that there were no significant relationships among 14 background variables with the exception of "age of identification of hearing loss," a variable then covaried in subsequent analysis of covariance. Students in the Longer Exposure Group scored higher on all measures. Significant differences were found between groups for short-term memory, receptive and expressive English, and five phonological subtests. Mini-case studies and the performance of eight students in the Longer Exposure Group who scored lowest on the comprehension measure also are discussed.

  14. Nontraditional Student Graduation Rate Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan B.

    2014-01-01

    The prominence of discourse on postsecondary degree completion, student persistence, and retention has increased in the national dialogue. Heightened attention to college completion rates by the federal government and pressure to tie state funding to performance metrics associated with graduation rates are catalysts for the discussion.…

  15. Improvement in Knowledge Level of Associate Degree Nursing Students in Zarqa University College Regarding Care for Patients With Indwelling Urinary Catheters After Joining an Educational Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Yahya W; Hdaib, Maha T; Al-Momany, Siham M

    2015-03-25

    Care for patients with indwelling urinary catheter is one of the most important factors in preventing problems associated with indwelling urinary catheters. Caregiver education about caring of indwelling urinary catheters is important the same as patient education to prevent urinary catheters problems. A pre test post test control group design was used with nursing students of Zarqa University College. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaire. Experimental group did not do better in the posttest than the control group after they joined an educational session about caring for patients with indwelling urinary catheter. Level of student (first year vs. second year) has been identified as a covariate that may have distorted the results. One educational session is insufficient to change level of knowledge regarding caring for patients with indwelling urinary catheter, in addition to considering the level of nursing student when conducting the educational session.

  16. Impact of a dual PharmD/MBA degree on graduates' academic performance, career opportunities, and earning potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumney, Elinor C G; Ragucci, Kelly R; Jones, Kathy J

    2008-04-15

    To evaluate the academic experience and satisfaction of students who completed a dual PharmD/MBA degree program and the program's long-term impact on the students' career choice and earning potential. GPAs, job placement, and starting job salaries were compared between graduates who completed the dual PharmD/MBA program and those who completed only the PharmD program. A satisfaction survey instrument was administered to 17 students who completed the dual PharmD/MBA degree program in May 2007. Data from a standardized job placement and starting salary survey instrument completed by all PharmD graduates were also obtained, as well as all students' final grade point averages (GPAs). GPAs, job placement, and starting job salaries were compared between graduates who had completed the dual PharmD/MBA program and those who had completed only the PharmD program. The graduating GPAs of dual-degree students were higher than those of both pharmacy (3.52 vs 3.41, p > 0.10) and business (3.82 vs. 3.68, p = 0.018) students not enrolled in the dual-degree program. Dual-degree students were slightly less likely to enter a residency (17% vs. 27%, p = 0.44) than other pharmacy graduates. Among those who elected not to pursue a residency, both mean starting salaries ($111,090 vs. $101,965) and mean total first-year compensation ($127,290 vs. $110,388) were significantly higher for dual-degree graduates compared to the PharmD graduates. Students enrolled in the dual-degree program did slightly better academically than students who completed only the MBA or PharmD programs and indicated a high level of satisfaction with the program. Dual-degree graduates reported increased career opportunities and were slated to earn significantly more during their first year in the workforce. These results affirm continuation of our program and make the case for support of similar programs across the nation.

  17. Figuring It out on Their Own: How Rural Adult Online Students Negotiate Barriers to Learning Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peich, Alysia

    2017-01-01

    The health of rural communities depends, in part, on the education level of rural adults. Economic vitality is impacted by degree completion, and the rate of degree completion by rural adults lags behind that of their urban and suburban counterparts. Low completion rates suggest that there are conditions for rural students that prevent them from…

  18. Impacts of Integrating the Repertory Grid into an Augmented Reality-Based Learning Design on Students' Learning Achievements, Cognitive Load and Degree of Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Han; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Yang, Mei-Ling; Chen, Chih-Hung

    2018-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) offers potential advantages for intensifying environmental context awareness and augmenting students' experiences in real-world environments by dynamically overlapping digital materials with a real-world environment. However, some challenges to AR learning environments have been described, such as participants' cognitive…

  19. The influences of nursing education on the socialization and professional working relationships of Canadian practical and degree nursing students: A critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoges, Jacqueline; Jagos, Kim

    2015-10-01

    Little evidence exists about how education influences the ways that registered nurses (RN) and registered practical nurses (RPN) negotiate their professional work relationships. This qualitative study used interviews and reflective writing from 250 Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BScN) and Practical Nursing (PN) students to explore how education constructs intraprofessional relations. The data were collected after two joint BScN/PN education events - one held in the first semester and one in the fourth semester. The findings reveal how education conveys and establishes dominant discourses about the tiers in nursing and the boundary work and professional closure strategies used by the two groups. In addition, although the two education programs are largely segregated and education about how to work with each other is rarely discussed, PN and BScN students strive to understand the differences and perceived inequities between the two designations of nurse. The data show how students attempt to reconcile the tensions and disjunctures they experience from the power relations by activating socially constructed and hegemonic positions that have been problematic for nursing. Findings will assist nurse educators to understand how education can be used to negotiate professional boundaries and working relationships that foster equity and social inclusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An Examination of Different Motivational Orientations That Drive Graduate Students to Continue/Complete Their Education in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayigit, Cebrail

    2017-01-01

    Different types and levels of motivation can play an important role for graduate students to continue their studies. The current research study was one of the few studies that examined if domestic and international graduate students differ on their level of different motivational orientations to continue their education. This study employs a…

  1. Prenatal pedagogy in the studies of Teaching Degree of Infant Education in the University of Huelva: study of the analysis of didactic guides and the perspective of the students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cinta AGUADED GÓMEZ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to offer a different vision of the concept of prenatal pedagogy, deeply linked to children’s sanitary need. We will try to find out its importance in the university scope through students’ opinions and the analysis of the didactic program of Early Childhood Education Degree.In order to achieve this, we have set ourselves the general objective of gathering information from university students of the Early Education Degree about the importance of training in prenatal education for their future work as teachers, considering that they are the most involved in the education of children in their early stages. Furthermore, we intend to reckon the relevance given to this content by the University of Huelva, one of the educational institutions responsible for teacher training.The data were collected through questionnaires applied to a sample of 58 3rd-4th level students of Early Childhood Education at the University of Huelva. This instrument was selected for the suitability of its application collectively. Moreover, an analysis of the didactic programs of the courses of this degree was carried out to verify the existence of contents of prenatal pedagogy within them.From this research it is derived that certain notions of prenatal pedagogy are essential to become future nursery teachers, thus providing a greater amount of resources when facing our students’ learning process.In conclusion, we checked that the university students surveyed believe that it is necessary to have notions of prenatal pedagogy so as to become efficient teachers. The lack of this notion in the didactic programs represents a formative gap that will have negative repercussions on their initial formation and, consequently, on their educational practice. Therefore, the educational institutions in charge of the preparation of new teachers should consider including prenatal pedagogy within their didactic programs.

  2. Using the factors that have a positive impact on the retention of low socioeconomic students to prepare accelerated enrolled nurses for the science units of a nursing degree. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Doggrell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available At a campus in a low socioeconomic (SES area, our University allows enrolled nurses entry into the second year of a Bachelor of Nursing, but attrition is high.  Using the factors, described by Yorke and Thomas (2003 to have a positive impact on the attrition of low SES students, we developed strategies to prepare the enrolled nurses for the pharmacology and bioscience units of a nursing degree with the aim of reducing their attrition.  As a strategy, the introduction of review lectures of anatomy, physiology and microbiology, was associated with significantly reduced attrition rates. The subsequent introduction of a formative website activity of some basic concepts in bioscience and pharmacology, and a workshop addressing study skills and online resources, were associated with a further reduction in attrition rates of enrolled nursing students in a Bachelor of Nursing

  3. Application for Smartphones using the App Inventor 2 Platform: evaluating the degree of student satisfaction through an instrument of analysis using the Likert scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raminelli, U. J.; de Souza Filho, M. P.; de P. Raminelli, C. M.

    2017-06-01

    Mobile devices in high schools are increasingly present. The teacher instead of rejecting, should make use of this tool. In order to offer a contribution to the discussion about the dilemma, we present in this article the results related to the acceptance by the students, of an application developed by us, destined to an electrodynamics course. Such an application had its employment organized by a didactic sequence. The research was developed in the second half of 2015, in E. E. Dep. "Felício Tarabay". The sample was composed of 39 students of the 3rd year of high school. Our analysis is based on 3 closed questions from our data collection instrument. The participants reported that using the application makes the content more attractive and they would like this type of feature to be incorporated into other disciplines. They argued that the use of the applications contributed greatly to the improvement of content comprehension. Thus, we understand that the smartphone should be used in activities aimed at teaching physics, but, like any other didactic resources, it should not be the only one.

  4. A four-session acceptance and commitment therapy based intervention for depressive symptoms delivered by masters degree level psychology students: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohtala, Aino; Lappalainen, Raimo; Savonen, Laura; Timo, Elina; Tolvanen, Asko

    2015-05-01

    Depressive symptoms are one of the main reasons for seeking psychological help. Shorter interventions using briefly trained therapists could offer a solution to the ever-rising need for early and easily applicable psychological treatments. The current study examines the effectiveness of a four-session Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) based treatment for self-reported depressive symptoms administered by Masters level psychology students. This paper reports the effectiveness of a brief intervention compared to a waiting list control (WLC) group. Participants were randomized into two groups: ACT (n = 28) and waiting list (n = 29). Long-term effects were examined using a 6-month follow-up. The treatment group's level of depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory) decreased by an average of 47%, compared to an average decrease of 4% in the WLC group. Changes in psychological well-being in the ACT group were better throughout, and treatment outcomes were maintained after 6 months. The posttreatment "between-group" and follow-up "with-in group" effect sizes (Cohen's d) were large to medium for depressive symptoms and psychological flexibility. The results support the brief ACT-based intervention for sub-clinical depressive symptoms when treatment was conducted by briefly trained psychology students. It also contributes to the growing body of evidence on brief ACT-based treatments and inexperienced therapists.

  5. The Degree Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    , empirical data relevant to the development of the degree adverb function is presented and possible relevant constructions identified. It is argued that the degree adverb function of that possibly occurs later than the historical dictionaries indicate. The degree adverb function of this is challenging...

  6. University Experiences and Women Engineering Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, LoAnn Debra Gienger

    Riverside University (a pseudonym), like many universities, has not significantly increased the number of women who graduate with bachelor's degrees in engineering. The purpose of the study is to understand how the university experiences of women students influence the decision to persist in an undergraduate engineering degree and to understand the role of self-perception in how the students perceive experiences as supporting or hindering their persistence in the major. Archival data, documents and artifacts, observations, individual interviews, and a focus group with women engineering students provide insights into students' perceived barriers and supports of student success. Analysis of the data results in two major themes. First, students' self-confidence and self-efficacy influence how women assimilate university experiences as either supportive or diminishing of academic success. Second, university policies and practices shape the campus environment within which student experiences are formed and influence a student's level of institutional, academic, and social integration. The results of the study indicate opportunities for university leadership to enhance strategies that positively shape students' institutional, academic and social integration as precursors toward increasing the number of women students who successfully complete undergraduate engineering degrees at Riverside University. Future research is indicated to better understand how gender and gender identity intersects with other demographic factors, such as socio-economic status, immigration status, and life stage (e.g., traditional versus non-traditional students), to support or deter the persistence of engineering students to degree completion.

  7. Next-Term Student Performance Prediction: A Recommender Systems Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Mack; Rangwala, Huzefa; Lester, Jaime; Johri, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    An enduring issue in higher education is student retention to successful graduation. National statistics indicate that most higher education institutions have four-year degree completion rates around 50%, or just half of their student populations. While there are prediction models which illuminate what factors assist with college student success,…

  8. ESTRES ACADEMICO Y BURNOUT ESTUDIANTIL. ANÁLISIS DE SU RELACIÓN EN ALUMNOS DE LICENCIATURA - ACADEMIC STRESS AND STUDENT BURNOUT. ANALYSIS OF ITS RELATIONSHIP WITHIN STUDENTS OF DEGREE COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTURO BARRAZA MACÍAS

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was the central objectives: a establish the descriptive profile of academic stress manifesting undergraduates, b to establish the descriptive profile of the burnout syndrome manifested by undergraduates c determine the type of relationship between academic stress and the burnout syndrome manifested by undergraduates. To achieve these objectives, a study transactional and corrections by applying the Stress Inventory SISCO Academic and Student Burnout Unidimensional Scale on a sample of 243 undergraduate students of the Pedagogical University of Durango. The results support the conclusion that academic stress influences the Student Burnout.

  9. Perceived Benefits of an Undergraduate Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Cole; Martini, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    Canadian university students tend to endorse employment-related reasons for attending university ahead of other reasons such as personal satisfaction or intellectual growth. In the present study, first- and fourth-year students from a mid-sized Canadian university reported on the benefits they expected to receive from their degree and rated their…

  10. The Economic Payoff for Closing College-Readiness and Completion Gaps: Why States Should Invest in Accelerating Low-Income Youth to and through Postsecondary Credentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Joel

    2013-01-01

    The low rates at which U.S. college students complete a degree and the amount time they spend in remedial coursework are national problems. The situation is particularly acute for low-income and other underserved youth, including populations such as Hispanic students that are growing the fastest in the country and that have some of the lowest…

  11. Implementation of Online Peer Assessment in a Design for Learning and Portfolio (D4L+P) Program to Help Students Complete Science Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttisela, Karntarat; Wuttiprom, Sura; Phonchaiya, Sonthi; Saengsuwan, Sayant

    2016-01-01

    Peer assessment was one of the most effective strategies to improve students' understanding, metacognitive skills, and social interaction. An online tool, "Designing for Learning and Portfolio (D4L+P)", was developed solely to support the T5 (tasks, tools, tutorials, topicresources, and teamwork) method of teaching and learning. This…

  12. "Go Somewhere, Do Something". How Students Responded to the Opportunity to Complete an Unstructured, Five-Day, Wilderness Solo in the Cantabrian Mountains, Northern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Liz

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the response of 28, second year undergraduate students to an innovative approach to a five-day solo. Periods of solitude are more likely to lead to positive outcomes when they are freely chosen than when they are programmed as part of a course. The extent to which a programmed solo can be "freely chosen" by the…

  13. Improving Scientific Writing in Undergraduate Geosciences Degrees Through Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, E. A.; Collins, G. S.; Craig, L.

    2016-12-01

    In the British educational system, students specialise early. Often geoscience undergraduates have not taken a class that requires extended writing since they were sixteen years old. This can make it difficult for students to develop the written skills necessary for a geoscience degree, which often has assessments in the form of essays and reports. To improve both the writing and editing skills of our undergraduates we have introduced a peer review system, in which seniors review the work of first year students. At Imperial College London we set written coursework in every year of the degree. Communication is taught and assessed in many courses. There are two major modules with substantial written components that bookend the undergraduate degree at Imperial; the freshmen all write an assessed essay, while all seniors take 'Science Communication', a course that aims to prepare them for a range of possible careers. In the 2015-16 academic year we linked these courses by introducing a modified form of peer marking and instruction. Seniors had to complete reviews of draft first year essays for credit in Science Communication. These reviews are completed for the department 'journal' and introduce the first and fourth years to the nature of peer review. Seniors learn how to critically, but kindly, evaluate the work of other students, and are also prepared for potentially submitting their senior theses to journals. Reviews were managed by volunteer seniors, who acted as associate editors. They allocated anonymous reviewers and wrote decision letters, which were sent to the freshmen before their final assessed essay submission. Ultimately the fourth year reviews were formally assessed and graded by members of staff, as were the revised and resubmitted first year essays. Feedback for both courses has improved since the introduction of student reviews of essays. The markers of the freshman essay have also commented on the improvement in the standard of the writing and a

  14. Improving professional IT doctorate completion rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kisalay Burmeister

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Professional doctorates in Information Technology (IT have been a relatively recent phenomenon, giving IT professionals career management choices not previously available to them. However, successful completion rates are the lowest of all disciplines. Completed doctorates rate in quality equivalent to PhDs, and retention has been identified as a major obstacle to completion. This qualitative study, involving 44 semi-structured interviews with students, supervisors and institutional support personnel, investigated the obstacles. Amongst the strategies discovered to improve completion rates were retention, student engagement with supervisors, feedback on progress, student engagement in the course, and student involvement in institutional communities of practice.

  15. Are Universities Providing Non-STEM Students the Mathematics Preparation Required by Their Programs?: A Case Study of A Quantitative Literacy Pathway and Vertical Alignment from Remediation to Degree Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Informed by Gagne's belief in the necessity of prerequisite knowledge for new learning, and Bruner's Spiral Curriculum Theory, the objective of this case study was to explore the postsecondary pathway from remedial mathematics, through one gateway mathematics course, and into the quantitative literacy requirements of various non-STEM programs of…

  16. Mentoring Graduate Students: The Good, Bad, and Gray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Jeanne H.; Jolly-Ballantine, John-Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Good mentoring of graduate students influences their perseverance and success to completion, whereas bad mentoring can result in negative outcomes, including delayed degree completion or non-completion. What the authors refer to as the gray zone is that which falls between good and bad mentoring. Examples are partial mentoring or changes in…

  17. Meeting the 2020 American Graduation Initiative (AGI) Goal of Increasing Postsecondary Graduation Rates and Completions: A Macro Perspective of Community College Student Educational Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotamraju, Pradeep; Blackman, Orville

    2011-01-01

    The paper uses the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data system (IPEDS) data to simulate the 2020 American Graduation Initiative (AGI) goal introduced by President Obama in the summer of 2009. We estimate community college graduation rates and completion numbers under different scenarios that include the following sets of variables: (a) internal…

  18. Why do most Gitano/Romani students not complete compulsory secondary education in Spain? Uncovering the view of the educational community using concept mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results of research that used Concept Mapping to study the causes of the high rates of school failure among the students of the Gitano or Spanish Romani minority. A sample of 52 members of a school community—pupils, families and teachers—participated in the research. Data were collected in focus groups. Generated ideas were sorted and rated by participants. A multidimensional scaling of sorted data resulted in a map of points. A cluster analysis with the points’ coordinates was run. The results uncovered a model of six clusters: ethnic differences, families, adolescent risk behaviours, students’ attitudes and values, curriculum gap, and finally effects of compensatory education and attention to diversity programmes. The relationships among the clusters point to three sources of concern: cultural and gender issues within the family setting that encourage girls to drop out of school; lack of motivation and educational orientation of the students; and structural problems of the educational system that contribute to maintain the educational gap between minority and majority students.

  19. Motivación, necesidades y expectativas de los estudiantes del Grado en Enfermería en el aprendizaje del inglés como segunda lengua Motivation, needs and expectations of nursing degree students towards English language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Camacho Bejarano

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Los nuevos estudios de Grado, Máster y Doctorado consideran que el manejo de la lengua inglesa es una competencia transversal fundamental. Este trabajo tiene como objetivo conocer la motivación, necesidades y expectativas del alumnado del Grado en Enfermería de la Universidad de Huelva en el aprendizaje del inglés como segunda lengua. Se ha realizado un estudio observacional descriptivo de corte transversal. El alumnado otorga una gran importancia a la formación en inglés para su futuro desempeño con diferencias significativas en cuanto a su aplicabilidad en los diferentes ámbitos profesionales. A pesar de su alta motivación, un alto porcentaje considera que la oferta académica universitaria no cubre sus necesidades formativas. Se cuestiona por tanto la necesidad de ampliar y reorientar la formación de manera que se cumplan las expectativas del alumnado, las demandas profesionales y conseguir potenciar el aprendizaje de otras lenguas como vehículo de desarrollo académico y profesional.The new Degree, Master and Doctorate studies considers English language use as an essential competency. This paper aims to get a better knowledge of first and second year students Nursing Degree students within the University of Huelva in terms of motivation, needs and expectations regarding learning English as second language. An observational descriptive study from a cross-sectional approach has been performed. Students consider highly important English language learning for their future professional development while showing important significant differences about its applicability on the different professional settings. Despite their high motivation, a high percentage consider than the academic catalogue do not cover their learning needs. These results justify the need for further research and for a potential reorientation of the English language educative programs to match students' expectations, their professional needs and to enhance other

  20. Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2006 Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2007-01-01

    This annual survey collects 2006 data on the number of health physics degrees awarded as well as the number of students enrolled in health physics academic programs. Thirty universities offer health physics degrees; all responded to the survey

  1. Can Exceptional, Visually Impaired Graduate Students, Educationally Funded by their use of Initially Profit-free Franchised Naturoptics, be Recruited to Proposed Native American Universities, and their Mentor Partners with Joint-degree Agreements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Nadja; McLeod, David; McLeod, Roger

    2006-10-01

    Naturoptic Vision Improvement Methods developed and first propagated in the Americas can be transferred to other locales, particularly to Germany, Austria, and German-speaking areas of Switzerland, and to British (or former) Commonwealth areas, France, Greece, Russia, and diverse areas of Africa and Asia, particularly Japan. The method will attempt to mimic any successful transplants already in progress, or in the planning stages. It will consist primarily in recruiting visually impaired students who have finished their undergraduate work, and who are outstanding enough to be admitted into an appropriate university of their choice. Joint-degree linkages with universities in mentoring agreements with any potential universities, naturopathic or otherwise, are among our favorites. Potential faculty for proposed universities will have longer term use of an appropriate franchise in some profit- free franchisor agreements.

  2. The Impact of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation on the Academic Achievement of Non-Traditional Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, Alma Lorenia

    2017-01-01

    Non-traditional students have become a growing component of the student population in today's college systems. Research has shown that non-traditional students are less likely to achieve academically and complete their degree programs compared to traditional students. The purpose of this quantitative, correlational study was to investigate the…

  3. Admitting At-Risk Students into a Principal Preparation Program: Predicting Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Bobby G.; Nelson, Jacquelyn S.; Nelson, C. Van

    2001-01-01

    Study of graduation rates of at-risk students admitted to a master's degree program at a doctoral-degree-granting university found that the best predictor of degree completion was the product of the undergraduate GPA multiplied by the GRE Verbal score. (Contains 41 references.)

  4. Prior Work and Educational Experience Are Not Associated With Successful Completion of a Master's-Level, Distance Education Midwifery Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemczyk, Nancy A; Cutts, Alison; Perlman, Dana B

    2018-03-01

    In order to increase and diversify the midwifery workforce, admissions criteria for midwifery education programs must not contain unnecessary barriers to entry. Once accepted, students need to successfully complete the program. Many admissions criteria commonly used in midwifery education programs in the United States are not evidence based and could be unnecessary barriers to education. The primary objective of this study was to identify factors known during the admission process that were related to successful completion or failure to complete a midwifery program educating both student nurse-midwives (SNMs) and student midwives (SMs); a secondary objective was to quantify reasons for program noncompletion. This master's-level, distance education program educates a diverse group of both SNMs and SMs. A pilot, retrospective cohort study examined all students matriculating at the program from fall 2012 on and scheduled to graduate by summer 2016 (N = 58). Demographic information, admissions information, academic records, and advising notes were reviewed. Reasons for noncompletion were identified, and characteristics were compared between students who did and did not complete the program. Program completion was not significantly associated with students' status as nurses prior to admission, labor and delivery nursing experience, length of nursing experience, nursing degree held, presence of children at home, working while in school, or undergraduate grade point average. Being a nurse, years of nursing experience, type of nursing degree, or labor and delivery nursing experience were not associated with completion of this midwifery program. © 2018 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  5. The Deviant University Student: Historical Discourses about Student Failure and "Wastage" in the Antipodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manathunga, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of academic development in Anglophone higher education was linked to post Second World War massification and concerns about student failure. These concerns were driven by increasing statistical investigations into student attrition and degree times to completion, particularly in Australia and Aotearoa, New Zealand. There was a…

  6. Attitudes of Brazilian Medical Students Towards Psychiatric Patients and Mental Illness: A Quantitative Study Before and After Completing the Psychiatric Clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha Neto, Helio Gomes; Rosenheck, Robert A; Stefanovics, Elina A; Cavalcanti, Maria Tavares

    2017-06-01

    The authors evaluated whether a psychiatric clerkship reduces stigmatized attitudes towards people with mental illness among medical students. A 56-item questionnaire was used to assess the attitudes of medical students towards patients with mental illness and their beliefs about its causes before and after their participation in their psychiatric clerkship at a major medical school in Rio de Janeiro. Exploratory factor analysis identified four factors, reflecting "social acceptance of people with mental illness," "normalizing roles for people with mental illness in society," "non-belief in supernatural causes for mental illness," and "belief in bio-psychosocial causes for mental illness." Analysis of variance was used to evaluate changes in these factors before and after the clerkship. One significant difference was identified with a higher score on the factor representing social acceptance after as compared to before the clerkship (p = 0.0074). No significant differences were observed on the other factors. Participation in a psychiatric clerkship was associated with greater social acceptance but not with improvement on other attitudinal factors. This may reflect ceiling effects in responses before the clerkship concerning supernatural and bio-psychosocial beliefs about causes of mental illness that left little room for change.

  7. Licenciatura e bacharelado em enfermagem: experiências e expectativas de estudantes Licenciatura y bachillerato en enfermería: experiencias y expectativas de estudiantes Bachelor and teaching degree in nursing: experiences and expectations of nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueli Maria dos Reis Santos

    2011-12-01

    estudiantes y que genera expectativas relacionadas a la actuación profesional. Sin embargo, existen lagunas que precisan ser revistas por los que actúan en la enseñanza de enfermería, para considerar las especificidades teórico-prácticas exigidas en la formación del enfermero.This is a phenomenological study that aimed to understand the experience of the student enrolled in both the Bachelor and the teaching undergraduate degree in nursing at the same time. Interviews with eight nursing students from a public university of Minas Gerais, Brazil, were undertaken. Analyses were conducted based on the social phenomenology of Alfred Schütz. Results showed that according to the pupils, there is no connection between the teaching courses and the Bachelor ones, but they also highlighted that the teaching degree helps educational activities in nursing. The students have interest in working with health education and to become nursing teachers. They also consider that the dual degree allows the expansion of knowledge and generates better expectations related to professional practice. However, it has gaps which need to be reviewed by those who work in nursing education, addressing the specific theoretical and practical needs of nursing students.

  8. ESTRES ACADEMICO Y BURNOUT ESTUDIANTIL. ANÁLISIS DE SU RELACIÓN EN ALUMNOS DE LICENCIATURA - ACADEMIC STRESS AND STUDENT BURNOUT. ANALYSIS OF ITS RELATIONSHIP WITHIN STUDENTS OF DEGREE COURSES

    OpenAIRE

    ARTURO BARRAZA MACÍAS

    2009-01-01

    This research was the central objectives: a) establish the descriptive profile of academic stress manifesting undergraduates, b) to establish the descriptive profile of the burnout syndrome manifested by undergraduates c) determine the type of relationship between academic stress and the burnout syndrome manifested by undergraduates. To achieve these objectives, a study transactional and corrections by applying the Stress Inventory SISCO Academic and Student Burnout Unidimensional Scale on a ...

  9. Astronomy Enrollments and Degrees: Results from the 2012 Survey of Astronomy Enrollments and Degrees. Focus On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Patrick; Nicholson, Starr

    2014-01-01

    Interest in astronomy degrees in the U.S. remains strong, with astronomy enrollments at or near all-time highs for the 2012-13 academic year. The total number of students taking an introductory astronomy course at a degree-granting physics or astronomy department is approaching 200,000. Enrollments in introductory astronomy courses have been…

  10. Lessons Learned: Creating an Online Business Degree from a Successful On-Campus Business Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, William P.; Muraoka, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    The horse has left the barn. Distance education is here to stay and the number of degree programs offered online is growing rapidly. California State University Channel Islands (CI) admitted its first students in 2002, and the undergraduate and graduate degrees in business were among its first program offerings. From its inception, the…

  11. From student internship to academic degrees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslennikov, I.A.; Romanovskij, V.N.; Smirnov, I.V.; Kopyrin, A.A.; Nechaev, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    One of the key issues of staffing in the nuclear science is the aging of staff. The authors emphasize that the industry's demand for young qualified professionals can be supplied through a number of measures ranging from financial incentives to long-term attractiveness of the nuclear industry. For younger-generation specialists, some other factors are is also important, such as how their profession is looked upon in the society, availability of specific job offers, and short-term effectiveness of their employment. The practice of interaction of the Saint Petersburg Technology Institute and the Khlopin Institute of Radium in selection and training of future employees is described [ru

  12. Establishing Baseline Data: Using Institutional Data to Learn More about Completion Factors at One New Zealand University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Austina; van der Meer, Jacques; van Koten, Chikako

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses demographic and study-related factors that contribute to completion of degrees in one university in New Zealand. Although much can be learned from nationwide and cross-institutional studies, it is important that each institution comes to an understanding of its own particular student population and the factors that impact on…

  13. Teacher Immediacy and Decreased Student Quantitative Reasoning Anxiety: The Mediating Effect of Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Stephanie; Rice, Christopher; Wyatt, Bryce; Ducking, Johnny; Denton, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    There is global concern regarding the increased prevalence of math anxiety among college students, which is credited for a decrease in analytical degree completion rates and lower self-confidence among students in their ability to complete analytical tasks in the real world. The present study identified that, as expected, displays of instructional…

  14. ESTILOS DE APRENDIZAJE, ELECCIÓN DE CARRERA Y PERFIL CURRICULAR EN ESTUDIANTES DE COMUNICACIÓN HUMANA / LEARNING STYLES, DEGREE CHOICE, AND CURRICULAR PROFILE IN HUMAN COMMUNICATION STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Gabriela Martínez-Flores

    2017-06-01

    Study program. These students had also provided their admittance average and information on whether they had been placed on a more suitable degree program. The results reflect significant differences in learning styles in both cohorts; there are no differences between the high school average between them; in the 2016 cohort, a moderate negative correlation was found between high school average and active style: the higher the active style, the lower the average. The dominant styles in the cohorts were active and pragmatic, which corresponds to the curricular profile of the study program, where an increase of practice hours over theory hours is more significant each semester.

  15. Use of a student support group to reduce student stress in a nurse anesthesia program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kless, J R

    1989-02-01

    Stress in nurse anesthesia programs may be excessive at times, especially in new students. While some degree of stress is necessary to motivate learning, excessive or prolonged stress can interfere with the normal learning process, thereby prolonging a student's clinical and academic progress. In the extreme, excessive stress may even preclude a student's successful completion of the educational program. Active faculty intervention through a student support group is advocated as a method for controlling stress levels and facilitating student learning. The positive effects of such intervention also increase the overall productivity of a program and better prepare nurse anesthesia students for their future careers.

  16. Increasingly Global: Combining an International Business Degree with a Post-Degree Designation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel; Terry, Andy; Vibhakar, Ashvin

    2006-01-01

    In the increasingly complex and competitive global marketplace, many students seek to gain multiple skills and credentials that can aid them in their career goals. One such career strategy weds a general overarching comprehensive degree with a specific and targeted skill set. This paper provides a viable curriculum path for students who seek…

  17. Making Sense of the Combined Degree Experience: The Example of Criminology Double Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimshurst, Kerry; Manning, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Little research has been undertaken on student experiences of combined degrees. The few studies report that a considerable number of students experienced difficulty with the contrasting epistemic/disciplinary demands of the component programmes. A mixed-methods approach was employed to explore the experiences of graduates from four double degrees…

  18. Improving on the American Dream: Mathematics Pathways to Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyburn, Gay M.

    2013-01-01

    Developmental mathematics is one of the most serious barriers to educational and economic achievement. Over 60 percent of all students entering community colleges in the United States are required to complete remedial/developmental courses as a first step towards earning associate's or bachelor's degrees. Then, to earn a degree,…

  19. Completely continuous and weakly completely continuous abstract ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An algebra A is called right completely continuous (right weakly completely continuous) ... Moreover, some applications of these results in group algebras are .... A linear subspace S(G) of L1(G) is said to be a Segal algebra, if it satisfies the.

  20. Degree-based graph construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyunju; Toroczkai, Zoltan; Erdos, Peter L; Miklos, Istvan; Szekely, Laszlo A

    2009-01-01

    Degree-based graph construction is a ubiquitous problem in network modelling (Newman et al 2006 The Structure and Dynamics of Networks (Princeton Studies in Complexity) (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press), Boccaletti et al 2006 Phys. Rep. 424 175), ranging from social sciences to chemical compounds and biochemical reaction networks in the cell. This problem includes existence, enumeration, exhaustive construction and sampling questions with aspects that are still open today. Here we give necessary and sufficient conditions for a sequence of nonnegative integers to be realized as a simple graph's degree sequence, such that a given (but otherwise arbitrary) set of connections from an arbitrarily given node is avoided. We then use this result to present a swap-free algorithm that builds all simple graphs realizing a given degree sequence. In a wider context, we show that our result provides a greedy construction method to build all the f-factor subgraphs (Tutte 1952 Can. J. Math. 4 314) embedded within K n setmn S k , where K n is the complete graph and S k is a star graph centred on one of the nodes. (fast track communication)

  1. Astronautics degrees for the space industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntman, M.; Brodsky, R. F.; Erwin, D. A.; Kunc, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    The Astronautics Program (http://astronautics.usc.edu) of the University of Southern California (USC) offers a full set of undergraduate and graduate degree programs in Aerospace Engineering with emphasis in Astronautics. The Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degree programs in Astronautics combine basic science and engineering classes with specialized classes in space technology. The Certificate in Astronautics targets practicing engineers and scientists who enter space-related fields and/or who want to obtain training in specific space-related areas. Many specialized graduate classes are taught by adjunct faculty working at the leading space companies. The Master of Science degree and Certificate are available entirely through the USC Distance Education Network (DEN). Today, the Internet allows us to reach students anywhere in the world through webcasting. The majority of our graduate students, as well as those pursuing the Certificate, work full time as engineers in the space industry and government research and development centers while earning their degrees. The new world of distance learning presents new challenges and opens new opportunities. Distance learning, and particularly the introduction of webcasting, transform the organization of the graduate program and class delivery. We describe in detail the program's academic focus, student reach, and structure of program components. Program development is illustrated by the student enrollment dynamics and related industrial trends; the lessons learned emphasize the importance of feedback from the students and from the space industry.

  2. Der Einfluss von Anonymität in der Lehrevaluation durch Studierende [The Effects of Anonymity on Student Ratings of Teaching and Course Quality in a Bachelor Degree Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaffner, Noemi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Research Question: Are there any clear differences between the outcomes of anonymous and personalised student evaluations of teaching quality?Methods: During a two-year period students were randomly divided into two separate groups, “anonymous” and “personalised”, for end-of-module evaluations. The quality of the module was assessed using a standardised questionnaire. Additionally, students were given the option to add “further comments” if they wanted to highlight specifics.These optional comments were independently assessed by three people, using a five-dimensional rating instrument: positive/negative; differentiated/absolute; naming a person/general; containing an order/neutral; visually accentuated/blank.The database consisted of 615 evaluation forms, of which 306 were completed anonymously. In order to identify whether there were any differences between the anonymous and personalised data, a multivariate variance analysis was performed. Based on the scale, the answers to the questions and the quality of the comments were evaluated. Furthermore, an assessment was made to determine if there were any differences in the number of optional comments between the two groups. Results: No significant differences were identified in the informative quality of data between the anonymous and personalised student evaluations. However, students in the personalised group had a tendency to include more details in their written answers.Conclusion: Personalised evaluations do not generate more biased results in terms of social desirability, as long as the evaluation concept is characterised by a closed-circle process and is transparent. In other words, it is imperative that the outcomes of the evaluation are reported back to the students. Moreover, there has to be an opportunity for students to discuss any further suggestions and/or future desires in an open environment. In this way the students respect and understand that their feedback

  3. ALICE Zero Degree Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    De Marco, N

    2013-01-01

    Two identical sets of calorimeters are located on both sides with respect to the beam Interaction Point (IP), 112.5 m away from it. Each set of detectors consists of a neutron (ZN) and a proton (ZP) Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC), positioned on remotely controlled platforms. The ZN is placed at zero degree with respect to the LHC beam axis, between the two beam pipes, while the ZP is positioned externally to the outgoing beam pipe. The spectator protons are separated from the ion beams by means of the dipole magnet D1.

  4. Modeling Success: Using Preenrollment Data to Identify Academically At-Risk Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansemer-Topf, Ann M.; Compton, Jonathan; Wohlgemuth, Darin; Forbes, Greg; Ralston, Ekaterina

    2015-01-01

    Improving student success and degree completion is one of the core principles of strategic enrollment management. To address this principle, institutional data were used to develop a statistical model to identify academically at-risk students. The model employs multiple linear regression techniques to predict students at risk of earning below a…

  5. Working toward More Engaged and Successful Accounting Students: A Balanced Scorecard Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredin, Amy; Fuchsteiner, Peter; Portz, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Prior research indicates that student engagement is the key to student success, as measured by college grades, degree completion, and graduate school enrollment. We propose a set of goals and objectives for accounting students, in particular, to help them become engaged not only in the educational process, but also in the accounting profession.…

  6. [Medical degree earned with a thesis in medical schools of Lima, 2011: characteristics, motivations and perceptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Christian R; Inga-Berrospi, Fiorella; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2014-01-01

    We surveyed physicians who obtained their medical degree with a thesis in 2011 from the seven medical schools in Lima to know the characteristics of the degree by thesis process, as well as participants’ motivations and perceptions of that process. We included 98 students who did a thesis (87% of total); 99% conducted observational thesis, 30% did so in groups of three. The main motivation was that it was good for their curriculum vitae (94%). At the university where the thesis is compulsory, the process began with the choice of topic and adviser. Perceived “greatest” and “least” difficulty in the process was the completion of administrative procedures (53%) and selection of their advisor (11%), respectively. Administrative timeliness and processes should be reviewed so as not to impede the completion of thesis, since the new University Act requires the completion of a thesis to graduate.

  7. Mentoring from Different Social Spheres: How Can Multiple Mentors Help in Doctoral Student Success in Ed.D Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Tarae; Ghosh, Rajashi

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral students leave their programs early due to lack of mentoring relationships needed to support degree completion and success. However, how mentoring contributes to Ed.D degree completion is not widely studied. In this qualitative narrative study, we sought to explore how multiple mentoring relationships reduced attrition in an Ed.D program.…

  8. A Correlation of Community College Math Readiness and Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jayna Nicole

    Although traditional college students are more prepared for college-level math based on college admissions tests, little data have been collected on nontraditional adult learners. The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between math placement tests and community college students' success in math courses and persistence to degree or certificate completion. Guided by Tinto's theory of departure and student retention, the research questions addressed relationships and predictability of math Computer-adaptive Placement Assessment and Support System (COMPASS) test scores and students' performance in math courses, persistence in college, and degree completion. After conducting correlation and regression analyses, no significant relationships were identified between COMPASS Math test scores and students' performance (n = 234) in math courses, persistence in college, or degree completion. However, independent t test and chi-squared analyses of the achievements of college students who tested into Basic Math (n = 138) vs. Introduction to Algebra (n = 96) yielded statistically significant differences in persistence (p = .039), degree completion (p college students' math competencies and degree achievement.

  9. Epilogue: degrees of transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this epilogue the results of the analyses of four different languages in the preceding papers are compared. It is shown that the degrees of transparency of these languages can be represented on an implicational scale, and that the features themselves can be ranked on a transparency scale as well.

  10. Registered Nurse (Associate Degree).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of registered nurse (with an associate degree), lists technical competencies and competency builders for 19 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 5 units specific to the occupation of registered nurse. The following…

  11. El campus virtual como recurso útil: un estudio de estudiantes universitarios de carreras humanísticas [The virtual learning platform as a useful resource: a research among university students of humanistic degrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Luján-García

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:Este artículo, realizado con estudiantes universitarios de dos carreras humanísticas en la Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria: Filología Inglesa y Geografía, investiga el grado de familiaridad y utilidad del campus virtual en el mundo académico. Los resultados demuestran que es una herramienta útil, aunque percibida más como un apoyo a la enseñanza presencial que con validez en sí misma. La variable género revela que los hombres valoran mejor esta herramienta, mientras que los informantes de geografía perciben más positivamente el campus virtual que los de filología inglesa. Abstract:This paper presents the results of a study carried out among undergraduate students of English Language and Literature and Geography at the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria to investigate their degree of familiarity with and the general usefulness of the virtual learning platform in Higher Education. The results show that whilst this is indeed a useful tool, it is used to best effect when seen as a supportive resource for regular education. The variation in responses from men and women reveals that men are more familiar with and value this tool more highly than women. It was also found that the Geography Undergraduates have a more positive view of virtual learning platforms than English Language and Literature Undergraduates.

  12. Choir Singing as a Cross-cutting Focal Point of Knowledge, Attitudes and Values: A Proposal aimed at Students on the Degree in Early Childhood Education and Primary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llorenç Gelabert Gual

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Singing in a choir comprises a number of specific musical aspects including the technical part of the singing voice; vocal ensemble; harmonies; aesthetics and musical taste. In practice, however, there are many cross-cutting elements that are not specifically musical but do play an important role in a choir. The preparation and development period for a concert is, in essence, a process of collective growth, where each component becomes an important foundation to enhancing the ensemble performance, and to a greater or lesser extent, offers a wide range of parameters in which to work. This procedure is a recurrent theme in early childhood education and primary teaching, but appears to occur less frequently during the training of music teachers or in higher-grade musical education. In this vein, a group of undergraduate students on the Degree in Early Childhood Education and Primary Education at the University of the Balearic Islands participated voluntarily in a collective singing trial. In consequence, they came to recognise the special psychosocial and attitudinal value of the experience. The opinions in this article are based on existing documents and relevant studies regarding the importance of collective singing. In the process, we also set out the experiment carried out at the University of the Balearic Islands.

  13. Degree distribution in discrete case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Li-Na; Chen, Bin; Yan, Zai-Zai

    2011-01-01

    Vertex degree of many network models and real-life networks is limited to non-negative integer. By means of measure and integral, the relation of the degree distribution and the cumulative degree distribution in discrete case is analyzed. The degree distribution, obtained by the differential of its cumulative, is only suitable for continuous case or discrete case with constant degree change. When degree change is not a constant but proportional to degree itself, power-law degree distribution and its cumulative have the same exponent and the mean value is finite for power-law exponent greater than 1. -- Highlights: → Degree change is the crux for using the cumulative degree distribution method. → It suits for discrete case with constant degree change. → If degree change is proportional to degree, power-law degree distribution and its cumulative have the same exponent. → In addition, the mean value is finite for power-law exponent greater than 1.

  14. Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2005 Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2006-01-01

    This annual report details the number of nuclear engineering bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees awarded at a sampling of academic programs from 1998-2005. it also looks at nuclear engineering degrees by curriculum and the number of students enrolled in nuclear engineering degree programs at 30 U.S. universities in 2005

  15. Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2005 Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2006-01-01

    This annual report details the number of health physics bachelor's, master's, and postdoctoral degrees awarded at a sampling of academic programs from 1998-2005. It also looks at health physics degrees by curriculum and the number of students enrolled in health physics degree programs at 30 U.S. universities in 2005

  16. Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2004 Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2005-01-01

    This annual report details the number of health physics bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees awarded at a sampling of academic programs from 1998-2004. It also looks at health physics degrees by curriculum and the number of students enrolled in health physics degree programs at 28 U.S. universities in 2004

  17. At-Risk Medical Students: Characteristics and Possible Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.M. Stegers-Jager (Karen)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractHigher education institutions worldwide are faced with large numbers of dropouts and students taking too long to complete their courses. On average almost a third of students in OECD countries withdraw from higher education before obtaining a degree. A substantial proportion of

  18. Exploring the Success of Transfer Programs for Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, Reginald S.; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2011-01-01

    The state's educational systems must collaborate together to enable transfer students to gain the necessary skills that support degree completion strategies. Given the current economic state, an investment in California community college transfer students in order to provide the best possible university transition would seem wise and fiscally…

  19. Students' Understanding of Alkyl Halide Reactions in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is…

  20. Degree Compass: The Preferred Choice Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Leah S.; Sanders, Anthony R.; Stewart, J. Gary

    2013-01-01

    While engaged in academic reading, a college provost converged on an idea to use a preferential approach to students' selection of college courses, similar to the recommendation ideas based on Netflix and Amazon. The result of this idea came to be known as Degree Compass and was implemented on the campus of Austin Peay State University in 2011.…

  1. The Value of a College Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Although parents, high school students, and most civic leaders in this country and around the world see a college degree as important, this perspective has been attacked over the last five years. Once the Great Recession began in December 2007, there were far fewer good jobs available for new college graduates. The soaring price of college had…

  2. Factors that influence MSc (Med) (Pharmacy) completion rates at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %). Only 35.5% of part-time postgraduates and those who communicated more frequently with their supervisors received their degree. Those who completed their degree also scored higher on quality of communication with and accessibility of ...

  3. Factors affecting attrition from associate degree nursing programs in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraher, Erin; Belsky, Daniel W; Gaul, Katie; Carpenter, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Projected nursing shortfalls have spurred the state of North Carolina to initiate a series of strategies to increase the number of graduates from pre-licensure Registered Nurse (RN) programs. These efforts have been largely successful, but attrition rates from Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) programs remain high. Only 58% of students entering ADN programs complete the degree. While policy makers are keenly aware that attrition from ADN programs is problematic, there is a lack of empirical evidence to identify the specific factors contributing to student attrition. In late 2007, the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) asked the Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research to conduct a study of Associate Degree Nursing program attrition and its causes. This paper summarizes the findings from that study and identifies the student- and program-level characteristics associated with more and less successful ADN programs. While this study was conducted in a single state in the US, the substantive findings--as well as the methodological approach--may be useful to other states and other countries. The study revealed that socioeconomically disadvantaged students (those with GEDs and those who received Pell Grants), non-white students, and younger and older students were less likely to graduate on-time. When programs were grouped into high and low performance categories on the basis of risk adjusted graduation rates, high performing programs were distinguished by more stringent admissions policies and better educated faculties. Nursing shortages have garnered significant attention and resources from state and national workforce planners in recent years. But to date, investments in expanding program capacity have not been matched by attention to program completion rates, with the result that we have enlarged the pipeline without fixing the leaks. Faculty shortages and recession-induced resource constraints limit further program expansion. Addressing attrition

  4. Cornerstones of Student Success: Institutions Yielding High Return on Investment for Underserved Students. Policy Research 2017-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Janet K.; Duffy, Daniel Q.

    2017-01-01

    The Illinois Board of Higher Education (IBHE) sought to identify those institutions helping students overcome barriers to college completion and achieve a livable wage. This analysis of Illinois 4-year postsecondary institutions highlights those institutions which fostered degree completion and job success with less debt for underrepresented…

  5. Cornerstones of Student Success: Institutions Yielding High Return on Investment for Underserved Students. Executive Summary. Policy Research 2017-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Janet K.; Duffy, Daniel Q.

    2017-01-01

    The Illinois Board of Higher Education (IBHE) sought to identify those institutions helping students overcome barriers to college completion and achieve a livable wage. This analysis of Illinois 4-year postsecondary institutions highlights those institutions which fostered degree completion and job success with less debt for underrepresented…

  6. Why do different people choose different university degrees? Motivation and the choice of degree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anya eSkatova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Different people choose which undergraduate degree to study at the university for different reasons. To date, there have been limited attempts to identify individual differences in motivation that drive the undergraduate degree choice. We identified that people choose university degrees for four reasons: career concerns (Career, intrinsic interest (Interest in the subject, an opportunity to help others (Helping and because they are looking for an easy option into higher education (Loafing. We investigated whether these motivation apply to the choice of undergraduate degree in two samples: (1 undergraduate (N = 989 and (2 prospective (N = 896 students. We developed the Motivations Influencing Course Choice (MICC questionnaire to measure these motivations. Scales of Helping, Career, Loafing and Interest showed good psychometric properties, showed validity with respect to general life goals and personality traits, and predicted actual and prospective degree choices. We demonstrated that medical degrees were chosen due to a mixture of Helping and Career, while engineering degrees were associated with Career and low interest in the degree. The choice of art and humanities degrees was driven by Interest and low concern about future career, accompanied with high Loafing. We also demonstrated gender differences: females were high in Helping (both samples and Interest (only in undergraduate sample motivation, while males scored higher in Career (only in undergraduate sample and Loafing (both samples. The findings can feed into both theoretical accounts of proximal motivation as well as help to improve degree programmes at universities and provide better career advice.

  7. Why do different people choose different university degrees? Motivation and the choice of degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skatova, Anya; Ferguson, Eamonn

    2014-01-01

    Different people choose undergraduate degrees to study at university for different reasons. To date, there have been limited attempts to identify individual differences in motivation that drive undergraduate degree choice. We identified that people choose university degrees for four reasons: career concerns (Career), intrinsic interest in the subject (Interest), an opportunity to help others (Helping) and because they are looking for an easy option to get into higher education (Loafing). We investigated whether these motivations apply to the choice of undergraduate degree in two samples: (1) undergraduate (N = 989) and (2) prospective (N = 896) students. We developed the Motivations Influencing Course Choice (MICC) questionnaire to measure these motivations. Scales of Helping, Career, Loafing, and Interest showed good psychometric properties, showed validity with respect to general life goals and personality traits, and predicted actual and prospective degree choices. We demonstrated that medical degrees were chosen due to a mixture of Helping and Career, while engineering degrees were associated with Career and low Interest in the degree. The choice of arts and humanities degrees was driven by Interest and low concern about future career, accompanied with high Loafing. We also demonstrated gender differences: females were high in Helping (both samples) and Interest (only in the undergraduate sample) motivation, while males scored higher in Career (only in the undergraduate sample) and Loafing (both samples). The findings can feed into both theoretical accounts of proximal motivation as well as provide help to improve degree programmes at universities and support better career advice.

  8. When Graduate Degrees Prostitute the Educational Process: Degrees Gone Wild

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumadue, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    Graduate degrees prostitute the educational process when they are sold to consumers by unaccredited degree/diploma mills as being equivalent to legitimate, bona-fide degrees awarded by accredited graduate schools. This article carefully analyzes the serious problems of bogus degrees and their association with the religious higher education…

  9. Degrees of democraticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Bergström

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available People have tended to load their different conceptions of democracy with their own political ideals; in this paper it is argued that normative and definitional questions should rather be separated, so that political philosophers and political scientists may adopt the same concept of democracy, even if they disagree normatively or politically. Moreover, it is argued that we should replace an absolute notion of democracy by a relativized notion, which allows for different degrees of democraticity. This facilitates the separation of normative and conceptual issues and it is convenient in contexts in which “democratic deficits” are discussed – as e.g. when democracy is to be implemented on a supranational level. Moreover, it has the consequence that democratic deficits are not necessarily bad. DOWNLOAD THIS PAPER FROM SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1837342

  10. Subnucleon freedom degrees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1985-03-01

    The nucleon is nothing but the fundamental state of a complex object, the Baryon. It has a great number of excited states which are significative of its quark structure. The aim of nuclear physics today is to understand the interaction dynamics in nuclei of particles whose existence is known by high energy physics. This lecture aims at defining the frontier of current comprehension in this field by some examples. First quarks and gluons are presented. Proofs of existence of pinpoint particles inside the nucleus are given. Then a direct proof of the concept validity of the nucleon orbit in the nucleus is given. Mesonic freedom degrees are also studied. Some experience examples in which meson exchange exist clearly are shown. At last, the role of subnucleonic effects in the nuclear reactions is shown [fr

  11. Longitudinal Predictors of High School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Melissa; Reschly, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined predictors of dropout assessed in elementary school. Student demographic data, achievement, attendance, and ratings of behavior from the Behavior Assessment System for Children were used to predict dropout and completion. Two models, which varied on student sex and race, predicted dropout at rates ranging from 75%…

  12. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE TECHNICAL EDUCATION STUDENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MILLER, AARON J.

    THE POST-HIGH SCHOOL TRAINEE SHOULD BE A HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE OR THE EQUIVALENT. A FAIR DEGREE OF PROFICIENCY IN MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE IS REQUIRED. IT IS REASONABLE TO EXPECT THE COMPLETION OF 2 YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL MATHEMATICS AND 1 YEAR OF HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE. SOME BACKGROUND IN DRAFTING AND SHOP IS DESIRABLE. THE STUDENT SHOULD BE AVERAGE OR…

  13. Degree-degree correlations in random graphs with heavy-tailed degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstad, van der R.W.; Litvak, N.

    2014-01-01

    Mixing patterns in large self-organizing networks, such as the Internet, the World Wide Web, social, and biological networks are often characterized by degree-degree dependencies between neighboring nodes. In assortative networks, the degree-degree dependencies are positive (nodes with similar

  14. Degree-Degree Dependencies in Random Graphs with Heavy-Tailed Degrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hofstad, Remco; Litvak, Nelly

    2014-01-01

    Mixing patterns in large self-organizing networks, such as the Internet, the World Wide Web, social, and biological networks are often characterized by degree-degree dependencies between neighboring nodes. In assortative networks, the degree-degree dependencies are positive (nodes with similar

  15. Influence of year-on-year performance on final degree classification in a chiropractic master's degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, Philip; Rix, Jacqueline; Newell, David

    2016-03-01

    We explored if any predictors of success could be identified from end-of-year grades in a chiropractic master's program and whether these grades could predict final-year grade performance and year-on-year performance. End-of-year average grades and module grades for a single cohort of students covering all academic results for years 1-4 of the 2013 graduating class were used for this analysis. Analysis consisted of within-year correlations of module grades with end-of-year average grades, linear regression models for continuous data, and logistic regression models for predicting final degree classifications. In year 1, 140 students were enrolled; 85.7% of students completed the program 4 years later. End-of-year average grades for years 1-3 were correlated (Pearson r values ranging from .75 to .87), but the end-of-year grades for years 1-3 were poorly correlated with clinic internship performance. In linear regression, several modules were predictive of end-of-year average grades for each year. For year 1, logistic regression showed that the modules Physiology and Pharmacology and Investigative Imaging were predictive of year 1 performance (odds ratio [OR] = 1.15 and 0.9, respectively). In year 3, the modules Anatomy and Histopathology 3 and Problem Solving were predictors of the difference between a pass/merit or distinction final degree classification (OR = 1.06 and 1.12, respectively). Early academic performance is weakly correlated with final-year clinic internship performance. The modules of Anatomy and Histopathology year 3 and Problem Solving year 3 emerged more consistently than other modules as being associated with final-year classifications.

  16. Nursing Student Perceptions of Structural Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Shelley C; Ward, Karen S

    To meet role expectations for nurses, nurses must feel empowered. Faculty contributions to the learning environment for nursing students are critical. A descriptive analysis of student perceptions of empowerment within the learning environment was conducted using a form of Kanter's Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire; 203 participants from schools in 17 different states completed surveys. Subjects demonstrated moderate degrees of structural empowerment in their learning environment. This positive finding can be further investigated and used to fully prepare future nurses.

  17. Projective modules and complete intersections

    CERN Document Server

    Mandal, Satya

    1997-01-01

    In these notes on "Projective Modules and Complete Intersections" an account on the recent developments in research on this subject is presented. The author's preference for the technique of Patching isotopic isomorphisms due to Quillen, formalized by Plumsted, over the techniques of elementary matrices is evident here. The treatment of Basic Element theory here incorporates Plumstead's idea of the "generalized dimension functions". These notes are highly selfcontained and should be accessible to any graduate student in commutative algebra or algebraic geometry. They include fully self-contained presentations of the theorems of Ferrand-Szpiro, Cowsik-Nori and the techniques of Lindel.

  18. Latino College Completion: Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  19. Latino College Completion: Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Completeness, supervenience and ontology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maudlin, Tim W E

    2007-01-01

    In 1935, Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen raised the issue of the completeness of the quantum description of a physical system. What they had in mind is whether or not the quantum description is informationally complete, in that all physical features of a system can be recovered from it. In a collapse theory such as the theory of Ghirardi, Rimini and Weber, the quantum wavefunction is informationally complete, and this has often been taken to suggest that according to that theory the wavefunction is all there is. If we distinguish the ontological completeness of a description from its informational completeness, we can see that the best interpretations of the GRW theory must postulate more physical ontology than just the wavefunction

  1. Completeness, supervenience and ontology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maudlin, Tim W E [Department of Philosophy, Rutgers University, 26 Nichol Avenue, New Brunswick, NJ 08901-1411 (United States)

    2007-03-23

    In 1935, Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen raised the issue of the completeness of the quantum description of a physical system. What they had in mind is whether or not the quantum description is informationally complete, in that all physical features of a system can be recovered from it. In a collapse theory such as the theory of Ghirardi, Rimini and Weber, the quantum wavefunction is informationally complete, and this has often been taken to suggest that according to that theory the wavefunction is all there is. If we distinguish the ontological completeness of a description from its informational completeness, we can see that the best interpretations of the GRW theory must postulate more physical ontology than just the wavefunction.

  2. African American Doctoral Students at For-Profit Colleges and Universities: A Critical Race Theory Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jodi

    2010-01-01

    Many people regard the doctorate as the pinnacle of success. Despite the challenges of completing the terminal degree, the dream of earning the doctoral degree remains a goal for many every year. Understanding the phenomenon of African American student enrollment at for-profit colleges and universities (FPCUs) is necessary because many African…

  3. Nuclear engineering enrollments and degrees, 1994: Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This survey is designed to include those programs sponsored by the Department of Energy. The survey is designed to include those programs offering a major in nuclear engineering or course work equivalent to a major in other engineering disciplines that prepare the graduates to perform as nuclear engineers. This survey provides data on nuclear engineering enrollments and degrees for use in labor market analyses, information on education programs for students, and information on new graduates to employers, government agencies, academia and professional societies

  4. Degree of Success? A Review of Delivering BSc Honours Degrees in an FE College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Colin; Lloyd, Mary Golding

    2009-01-01

    Widening participation initiatives led by the government encourage non-traditional students to enrol in higher education courses usually offered through a franchising arrangement between a Higher Education Institution (HEI) and a local Further Education Institution (FEI). The focus has been on the development of foundation degrees with most…

  5. Marketing and Retention Strategies for Adult Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joann A.

    2004-01-01

    Four marketing strategies are critical to the success of adult degree programs: integrating marketing, knowing your students (research), shaping programs and services for adults, and staying the course (retention).

  6. The master degree: A critical transition in STEM doctoral education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Sheila Edwards

    The need to broaden participation in the nation's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) undergraduate and graduate programs is currently a matter of national urgency. The small number of women and underrepresented minorities (URM) earning doctoral degrees in STEM is particularly troubling given significant increases in the number of students earning master's degrees since 1990. In the decade between 1990 and 2000, the total number of master's recipients increased by 42%. During this same time period, the number of women earning master's degrees increased by 56%, African Americans increased by 132%, American Indians by 101%, Hispanics by 146%, and Asian Americans by 117% (Syverson, 2003). Growth in underrepresented group education at the master's level raises questions about the relationship between master's and doctoral education. Secondary data analysis of the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED) was used to examine institutional pathways to the doctorate in STEM disciplines and transitions from master's to doctoral programs by race and gender. While the study revealed no significant gender differences in pathways, compared to White and Asian American students, URM students take significantly different pathways to the doctorate. URM students are significantly more likely to earn the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees at three different institutions. Their path is significantly more likely to include earning a master's degree en route to the doctorate. Further, URM students are more likely to experience transition between the master's and doctoral degrees, and the transitions are not limited to those who earn master's degrees at master's-only institutions. These findings suggest that earning a master's degree is more often a stepping stone to the doctorate for URM students. Master's degree programs, therefore, have the potential to be a valuable resource for policymakers and graduate programs seeking to increase the diversity of URM students

  7. Pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research degree-granting PhD programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slejko, Julia F; Libby, Anne M; Nair, Kavita V; Valuck, Robert J; Campbell, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is missing on showcasing current practices of degree programs specific to the field of pharmaceutical outcomes research. To measure current practices of pharmacoeconomics and outcomes research PhD programs in the United States and synthesize recommendations for improving the success of programs and prospective students. A 23-question online survey instrument was created and distributed to 32 program directors identified in the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research educational directory. Descriptive statistics summarized both the program characteristics (including observed and desired number of faculty and students) and training recommendations (traits of program and student success). Of 30 eligible programs that conferred a PhD in pharmacoeconomics, pharmaceutical outcomes research, or a related field, 16 respondents (53%) completed the survey. Seventy-five percent of respondents were located in a school of pharmacy. The average observed number of faculty (7.5) and students (11.5) was lower than the average desired numbers (8.1) and (14.7), respectively. Reputation of faculty research and a collaborative environment with other disciplines were rated highest for a program's success. Faculty's mentoring experience and reputation and student funding opportunities were rated highest for prospective students' success. Existing and emerging programs as well as prospective students can use these findings to further their chances of success. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Complete Ureteral Avulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Gupta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete avulsion of the ureter is one of the most serious complications of ureteroscopy. It requires open or laparoscopic intervention for repair. This case report emphasizes its management and presents recommendations for prevention in current urological practice.

  9. The End of the Botany Degree in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drea, Sinead

    2011-01-01

    The last student enrolled in a pure "Botany" degree in the UK began in the University of Bristol this year, 2010. In recent years only the University of Reading also offered the Botany degree, before it was dropped there 3 years ago. This short article is written to draw attention to this fact and to a more general relative decline in…

  10. Student and Faculty Outcomes of Undergraduate Science Research Projects by Geographically Dispersed Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Lawton; Kennepohl, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    Senior undergraduate research projects are important components of most undergraduate science degrees. The delivery of such projects in a distance education format is challenging. Athabasca University (AU) science project courses allow distance education students to complete research project courses by working with research supervisors in their…

  11. Adolescent obesity and future college degree attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler-Brown, Angela G; Ngo, Long H; Phillips, Russell S; Wee, Christina C

    2010-06-01

    The current impact of adolescent obesity on educational attainment is not clear. The objectives of our study were to determine whether adolescent obesity is associated with college degree attainment and how this association may have changed over time. We used data from a contemporary national cohort of over 4,000 persons who were adolescents (aged 14-18) in 1997 to assess the relationship between adolescent obesity and education. To assess for changes in this relationship over time, we also analyzed an older, similarly structured cohort of over 3,000 persons who were adolescents (aged 16-18) in 1981. Our primary outcome was college degree completion. We found that in the older cohort (adolescents in 1979), there were no differences in college degree attainment by adolescent weight status before and after adjustment. However, unadjusted analysis of the contemporary cohort (adolescents in 1997) demonstrated that those who were normal weight as adolescents had a higher prevalence of college degree attainment at follow-up compared to obese adolescents (24% vs. 10%). After adjustment for socio-demographic variables (age, sex, race, height, parental income-to-poverty ratio, parental education, aptitude test scores), obese adolescents were less likely to have attained a college degree compared to normal weight peers (adjusted risk ratio 0.61 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.83). Expectations for a future college degree did not vary by weight status and did not explain this observation. In conclusion, adolescent obesity is associated with lower likelihood of college completion. This relationship was not observed in an older cohort of adolescents.

  12. DOE/PSU Graduate Student Fellowship Program for Hydropower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimbala, John M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2014-03-30

    The primary objective of this project is to stimulate academic interest in the conventional hydropower field by supplying research support for at least eight individual Master of Science (MS) or Doctoral (PhD) level research projects, each consisting of a graduate student supervised by a faculty member. We have completed many of the individual student research projects: 2 PhD students have finished, and 4 are still working towards their PhD degree. 4 MS students have finished, and 2 are still working towards their MS degree, one of which is due to finish this April. In addition, 4 undergraduate student projects have been completed, and one is to be completed this April. These projects were supervised by 7 faculty members and an Advisory/Review Panel. Our students and faculty have presented their work at national or international conferences and have submitted several journal publications. Three of our graduate students (Keith Martin, Dan Leonard and Hosein Foroutan) have received HRF Fellowships during the course of this project. All of the remaining students are anticipated to be graduated by the end of Fall Semester 2014. All of the tasks for this project will have been completed once all the students have been graduated, although it will be another year or two until all the journal publications have been finalized based on the work performed as part of this DOE Hydropower project.

  13. Perceptions of Students at a Rural Mississippi Community College Regarding Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrris, Cortney R.

    2013-01-01

    Research studies show that there is a skills gap in American society today. This research study examined employability perceptions of community college students at a rural community college in Mississippi. Students were asked to complete an online survey that questioned the degree of importance placed on several employability skills, as well as…

  14. The First Year in Higher Education--Critical Requirements from the Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautwein, Caroline; Bosse, Elke

    2017-01-01

    While study success and completion rates are important issues in educational policy, research highlights the particular relevance of the first year in higher education (HE) for students' future academic performance and achievement. In Germany, the recent reform of degree programmes appears to have created new challenges related to students'…

  15. Students' Perceptions of an Online Graduate Program in Special Education for Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader-Janssen, Elizabeth M.; Nordness, Philip D.; Swain, Kristine D.; Hagaman, Jessica L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate graduate students' perceptions of a completely online master's degree program in special education for emotional and behavioral disorders. The Community of Inquiry survey was used to examine graduate students' perceptions of the online program in the areas of teaching, cognitive, and social presences. The…

  16. Beacon of Hope: Award-Winning Program Redesign for Post-Traditional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherrstrom, Catherine A.; Boden, Carrie J.

    2018-01-01

    Many Americans dream of completing a college degree, positively influencing wages and economic mobility. The number of students entering college or returning to college later in life is growing. Up to 75% of university enrollments are comprised of students in one or more of the following circumstances: 25 years old or older, attend school…

  17. Modeling Racial Differences in the Effects of Racial Representation on 2-Year College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Museus, Samuel D.; Jayakumar, Uma M.; Robinson, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The failure of many 2-year college students to persist and complete a post-secondary credential or degree remains a problem of paramount importance to higher education policymakers and practitioners. While racial representation--or the extent to which a student's racial group is represented on their respective campus--might be one factor that…

  18. Interrogating Reality in Terms of Retention and Student Success at a South Texas University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Steve F.; Gandy, Rex F.; Golightly, Vivian H.

    2012-01-01

    Student retention has become the most significant issue facing American colleges and universities. For the student, retention has everything to do with academic success and the completion of the most lofty of educational goals--the acquiring of a degree. For the educational institution, college, or university, retention impacts federal funding,…

  19. Content of Curriculum in Physical Education Teacher Education: Expectations of Undergraduate Physical Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spittle, Michael; Spittle, Sharna

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of university physical education students of the importance of physical education curriculum content areas and how those perceptions related to the reasons for course choice and motivation. Physical education degree students (n = 188) completed measures of their perceptions of physical education content areas,…

  20. Voices of Family Therapy Doctoral Students of Color: Aspirations and Factors Influencing Careers in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John K.; Stone, Dana J.

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined factors influencing career aspirations of doctoral students of color in family therapy doctoral programs across the country, with a special focus on careers in the professoriate. Qualitative interviews were conducted with students at varying levels of degree completion. Respondents discussed barriers to careers in academia as…

  1. Across Borders and across Cultures: Vietnamese Students' Positioning of Teachers in a University Twinning Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Ha; Doyle, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    How do teachers and teaching appear to international students moving from the home country component of a twinning programme to the overseas partner university? This narrative study explored the perspectives of five Vietnamese students in their first months of studying for a commerce degree at a New Zealand university, having completed the first…

  2. Student Motivation in Graduate Music Programmes: An Examination of Personal and Environmental Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Moreno, Patricia Adelaida

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing number of students in music education graduate programmes, attrition rates suggest a lack of success in retaining and assisting them to the completion of their degree. Based on the expectancy-value theory, the aim of this study was to examine students' motivations (values and competence beliefs) and their complex interaction…

  3. Relationships between Academic Stress, Social Support, Optimism-Pessimism and Self-Esteem in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-González, L.; González-Hernández, A.; Trianes-Torres, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This research aims to analyse how optimism, self-esteem and social support help to predict academic stress. Method: The sample consisted of 123 students aged 20 to 31 years old, from the 3rd Year in the Psychology Degree. Students completed the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, the Life Orientation Optimism Questionnaire (LOT-R), the…

  4. Students' Understanding of Alkyl Halide Reactions in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Ramírez de Arellano, Daniel; Towns, Marcy H.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is…

  5. Predictive Modeling to Forecast Student Outcomes and Drive Effective Interventions in Online Community College Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vernon C.; Lange, Adam; Huston, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges continue to experience growth in online courses. This growth reflects the need to increase the numbers of students who complete certificates or degrees. Retaining online students, not to mention assuring their success, is a challenge that must be addressed through practical institutional responses. By leveraging existing student…

  6. Exploring the Role of Accreditation in Supporting Transfer and Student Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Pamela Petrease; Arleth, Megan T.

    2016-01-01

    Student mobility and transfer between two-year and four-year institutions are critical issues when considering student success and degree completion. College and university administrators continually work to identify opportunities that align policy and practice with accreditation standards in an effort to facilitate self-study initiatives and meet…

  7. Completing the Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marland, S. P., Jr.

    In this speech, given at the inauguration of Dr. Frank Angel as President of New Mexico Highlands University, Mr. S. P. Marland, Jr., U.S. Commissioner of Education, discusses both the shortcomings and accomplishments of the American education system when it comes to educating Mexican American students. It is noted that even though the Federal…

  8. Self Completeness of Einstein Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2010-01-01

    We argue, that in Einsteinian gravity the Planck length is the shortest length of nature, and any attempt of resolving trans-Planckian physics bounces back to macroscopic distances due to black hole formation. In Einstein gravity trans-Planckian propagating quantum degrees of freedom cannot exist, instead they are equivalent to the classical black holes that are fully described by lighter infra-red degrees of freedom and give exponentially-soft contribution into the virtual processes. Based on this property we argue that pure-Einstein (super)gravity and its high-dimensional generalizations are self-complete in deep-UV, but not in standard Wilsonian sense. We suggest that certain strong-coupling limit of string theory is built-in in pure Einstein gravity, whereas the role of weakly-coupled string theory limit is to consistently couple gravity to other particle species, with their number being set by the inverse string coupling. We also discuss some speculative ideas generalizing the notion of non-Wilsonian sel...

  9. Completeness of Lyapunov Abstraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    the vector field, which allows the generation of a complete abstraction. To compute the functions that define the subdivision of the state space in an algorithm, we formulate a sum of squares optimization problem. This optimization problem finds the best subdivisioning functions, with respect to the ability......This paper addresses the generation of complete abstractions of polynomial dynamical systems by timed automata. For the proposed abstraction, the state space is divided into cells by sublevel sets of functions. We identify a relation between these functions and their directional derivatives along...

  10. The IB Diploma and UK University Degree Qualifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Gemmill, Gerda

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma has become widely accepted as a university-entry qualification in the UK, but there has been little quantitative research into the achievements of IB students at degree level. This study investigates IB students from one selective independent school who entered UK universities between…

  11. Construction completion report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This Construction Completion Report documents the major construction projects at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site and related information on contracts, schedules, and other areas which affected construction. This report is not intended to be an exhaustive detailed analysis of construction, but is a general overview and summary of the WIPP construction. 10 refs., 29 figs

  12. Complete Rerouting Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Thomas K.; Kjærulff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a new protection method: Complete Rerouting. This is the most capacity e cient protection method for circuit switched networks and it is, to the best of our knowledge, the first time it has been described. We implement a column generation algorithm and test the performance...

  13. Complete French Teach Yourself

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Gaelle

    2010-01-01

    The best-selling complete course for a fun and effective way to learn French. This ISBN is for the paperback book. The corresponding audio support (ISBN: 9781444100068) is also available. The book and audio support can also be purchased as a pack (ISBN: 9781444100051).

  14. Completeness of Lyapunov Abstraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Wisniewski

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we continue our study on discrete abstractions of dynamical systems. To this end, we use a family of partitioning functions to generate an abstraction. The intersection of sub-level sets of the partitioning functions defines cells, which are regarded as discrete objects. The union of cells makes up the state space of the dynamical systems. Our construction gives rise to a combinatorial object - a timed automaton. We examine sound and complete abstractions. An abstraction is said to be sound when the flow of the time automata covers the flow lines of the dynamical systems. If the dynamics of the dynamical system and the time automaton are equivalent, the abstraction is complete. The commonly accepted paradigm for partitioning functions is that they ought to be transversal to the studied vector field. We show that there is no complete partitioning with transversal functions, even for particular dynamical systems whose critical sets are isolated critical points. Therefore, we allow the directional derivative along the vector field to be non-positive in this work. This considerably complicates the abstraction technique. For understanding dynamical systems, it is vital to study stable and unstable manifolds and their intersections. These objects appear naturally in this work. Indeed, we show that for an abstraction to be complete, the set of critical points of an abstraction function shall contain either the stable or unstable manifold of the dynamical system.

  15. Dual completion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamedov, N Ya; Kadymova, K S; Dzhafarov, Sh T

    1963-10-28

    One type of dual completion method utilizes a single tubing string. Through the use of the proper tubing equipment, the fluid from the low-productive upper formation is lifted by utilizing the surplus energy of a submerged pump, which handles the production from the lower stratum.

  16. A complete woman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lawrence

    treated me like a son in the way he encouraged my education, while my mother ... cine gives me a lot of satisfaction when I see my patients getting cured. Teaching ... thing in life as a complete woman in different roles – daughter, wife, mother ...

  17. Pharmacy students' perceptions of natural science and mathematics subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Julie; Wilson, Sarah Ellen; Wan, Kai-Wai

    2014-08-15

    To determine the level of importance pharmacy students placed on science and mathematics subjects for pursuing a career in pharmacy. Two hundred fifty-four students completed a survey instrument developed to investigate students' perceptions of the relevance of science and mathematics subjects to a career in pharmacy. Pharmacy students in all 4 years of a master of pharmacy (MPharm) degree program were invited to complete the survey instrument. Students viewed chemistry-based and biology-based subjects as relevant to a pharmacy career, whereas mathematics subjects such as physics, logarithms, statistics, and algebra were not viewed important to a career in pharmacy. Students' experience in pharmacy and year of study influenced their perceptions of subjects relevant to a pharmacy career. Pharmacy educators need to consider how they can help students recognize the importance of scientific knowledge earlier in the pharmacy curriculum.

  18. Mental Health Nursing Practicum: Student and Mentor Perspectives on Stress and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelabert-Vilella, Sandra; Bonmati-Tomàs, Anna; Bosch-Farré, Cristina; Malagón-Aguilera, M. Carmen; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció; Ballester-Ferrando, David

    2014-01-01

    Nursing students begin to complete practicum experiences during their first year, increasing the number of applied credits as they progress toward degree completion. This contributes to integrating knowledge and skills from all of their courses and to obtaining the basic competencies of the nursing profession. It is also essential to identify the…

  19. The Relationship among Health Education Systems, Inc. Progression and Exit Examination Scores, Day or Evening Enrollment, Final Grade Point Average and NCLEX-RN® Success in Associate Degree Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwell-Sanders, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Graduates of associate degree (AD) nursing programs form the largest segment of first-time National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN®) test takers, yet also experience the highest rate of NCLEX-RN® failures. NCLEX-RN® failure delays entry into the profession, adding an emotional and financial toll to the unsuccessful…

  20. Using debate to teach pharmacy students about ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Lezley-Anne; Barry, Johanne; Donnelly, Ryan; Hughes, Fiona; Jones, David; Laverty, Garry; Parsons, Carole; Ryan, Cristin

    2014-04-17

    To create, implement, and evaluate debate as a method of teaching pharmacy undergraduate students about ethical issues. Debate workshops with 5 hours of contact with student peers and facilitators and 5 hours of self-study were developed for second-year pharmacy students. Student development of various skills and understanding of the topic were assessed by staff members and student peers. One hundred fifty students completed the workshops. The mean score for debating was 25.9 out of 30, with scores ranging from 23.2 to 28.7. Seventy percent of students agreed that the debates were a useful teaching method in the degree program. A series of workshops using debates effectively delivered course content on ethical issues and resulted in pharmacy students developing skills such as teamwork, peer assessment, communication, and critical evaluation. These findings suggest that pharmacy students respond favorably to a program using debates as a teaching tool.