WorldWideScience

Sample records for student media student

  1. Students' Media Preferences in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiko

    2017-01-01

    This study examined students' preferred media in online learning and its relationship with learner characteristics and online technology self-efficacy. One hundred six college students in a mid-size U.S. university responded to a survey. The frequency analysis showed that students did not necessarily favor rich media over lean media in online…

  2. Using Social Media for Student Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    The iGeneration is predisposed to communicating via social media, and oftentimes students' first instinct in classroom group work is to connect with members on social media. While some social networks allow for the creation of private groups, these students are still responsible for adapting the technology for this new purpose: collaborative…

  3. Social Media: It's What Students Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelm, Orlando R.

    2011-01-01

    In assessing the application of social media on the teaching of business communication, this article looks at MBA student use of blogs, online photo database contributions, and video contributions to YouTube channels. These assignments were part of their course activities, which included a 2-week study tour in China. The article looks at these…

  4. Engaging Students with Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Anjali S.; Grewal, Dhruv; Mills, Adam; Ottley, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The importance of social media for marketing professionals has grown immensely as consumers turn to it to connect with products, brands, and brand communities. Yet limited research investigates the uses of social media to teach core marketing concepts. This article analyzes coursework in foundational marketing classes, with a specific focus on the…

  5. The Klout Challenge: Preparing Your Students for Social Media Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacile, Todd J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a newly developed class project to aid students in their social media knowledge and experience. "The Klout Challenge" uses a social media influence metric from Klout.com to assess students' level of engagement with others through social media sites. This project produces multiple benefits for students. Students…

  6. Use of Social Media by Agricultural Undergraduate Students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    The study analysed the usage of social media sites by undergraduate agricultural students in ... with friends. Keywords: Social media, Agricultural Undergraduates, Nigeria ..... What we do about social media in tourism? A review. Tourism ...

  7. College Students' News Gratifications, Media Use, and Current Events Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Richard C.; Basil, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Results of testing uses and gratifications theory with college students show students' media use and surveillance needs increase college year. Demographic differences and gratifications sought drive news media use. Surveillance needs result in increased use of all news media, whereas entertainment needs result in television news and CNN viewing.…

  8. Selection of Learning Media Mathematics for Junior School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widodo, Sri Adi; Wahyudin

    2018-01-01

    One of the factors that determine the success of mathematics learning is the learning media used. Learning media can help students to create mathematical abstract mathematics that is abstract. In addition to media, meaningful learning is a learning that is adapted to the students' cognitive development. According to Piaget, junior high school…

  9. Australian health professions student use of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Kim; Woods, Cindy; Casellac, Evan; Glass, Nel; Wilson, Rhonda; Mayner, Lidia; Jackson, Debra; Brown, Janie; Duffy, Elaine; Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth; Irwin, Pauletta

    2014-01-01

    Increased bandwidth, broadband network availability and improved functionality have enhanced the accessibility and attractiveness of social media. The use of the Internet by higher education students has markedly increased. Social media are already used widely across the health sector but little is currently known of the use of social media by health profession students in Australia. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to explore health profession students' use of social media and their media preferences for sourcing information. An electronic survey was made available to health profession students at ten participating universities across most Australian states and territories. Respondents were 637 first year students and 451 final year students. The results for first and final year health profession students indicate that online media is the preferred source of information with only 20% of students nominating traditional peer-reviewed journals as a preferred information source. In addition, the results indicate that Facebook usage was high among all students while use of other types of social media such as Twitter remains comparatively low. As health profession students engage regularly with social media, and this use is likely to grow rather than diminish, educational institutions are challenged to consider the use of social media as a validated platform for learning and teaching.

  10. Experiences of Facebook among media students in northern Sweden:living in a social media culture

    OpenAIRE

    Juntti-Henriksson, Ann-Kristin

    2013-01-01

    University students enrolled on the “Media and communication program” in northern Sweden have been interviewed regarding their use of social media. By examining the resulting narratives through approaching poststructuralism, the study put emphasis on how the media students think and feel about their use of Facebook. Media students are heavy Facebook users who spend many hours on the social network. As future professional workers in the media industry they have a multidimensional interest in s...

  11. Higher Education Students' Perceptions of Environmental Issues and Media Coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinonen, Tuula; Palmberg, Irmeli; Kukkonen, Jari; Yli-Panula, Eija; Persson, Christel; Vilkonis, Rytis

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to find higher education students' perceptions about environmental issues and how the perceptions are related to perceptions of media coverage. This study investigates higher education students' perceptions of the seriousness of environmental issues and their relation to perceptions of media coverage. Higher education students…

  12. Mass Media Campaign Impacts Influenza Vaccine Obtainment of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shropshire, Ali M.; Brent-Hotchkiss, Renee; Andrews, Urkovia K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the effectiveness of a mass media campaign in increasing the rate of college student influenza vaccine obtainment. Participants/Methods: Students ("N" = 721) at a large southern university completed a survey between September 2011 and January 2012 assessing what flu clinic media sources were visualized and if they…

  13. Students' Perceptions and Experiences of Social Media in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neier, Stacy; Zayer, Linda Tuncay

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has discussed the opportunities associated with the use of social media tools in the classroom, but has not examined the perceptions students themselves hold about its usefulness in enhancing their educational experience. This research explores students' perceptions of social media as an effective pedagogical tool. Undergraduate…

  14. Building Authenticity in Social Media Tools to Recruit Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, Jean Kelso; Peña, Edlyn Vallejo

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of institutions utilize social media tools, including student-written blogs, on their admission websites in an effort to enhance authenticity in their recruitment marketing materials. This study offers a framework for understanding what contributes to prospective college students' perceptions of social media authenticity…

  15. Pittsburgh Student Veterans' Experience with Social Media in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsilio, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to understand how student veteran's experienced using social media in the context of higher education. It also explored how they used it for peer bonding and how student veterans perceived the benefits of using social media. This was a qualitative research study that used a phenomenological approach to data collection and…

  16. Mining of Social Media Data of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Archana

    2017-01-01

    The youth power to speak their mind, recommendations and opinions about various issues on social media cannot be ignored. There is a generated by students on social media websites like, facebook, Orkut, twitter etc. This paper focusses on the extraction of knowledge from the data floated by the University students on social websites in different…

  17. Student Reading Practices in Print and Electronic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foasberg, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a diary-based qualitative study on college students' reading habits with regard to print and electronic media. Students used a form to record information about their reading practices for twelve days, including length of reading event, location, format used, and the purpose of reading. Students tended to use print for academic…

  18. The Impact of Social Media on College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrodicasa, Jeanna; Metellus, Paul

    2013-01-01

    There are numerous ways, positive and negative, in which social media impact college students. Understanding sheer volume of time and the type of activities for which college students use social networking sites is crucial for higher education administrators. Researchers have begun to empirically examine impacts on students' well-being and have…

  19. Students' use of social media during the travel process

    OpenAIRE

    Nemec Rudež, Helena; Vodeb, Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of the study is to explore how students as an important travel segment are involved in social media during the travel process and explore the underlying dimensions of social media use by students during the travel process. Design/methodology/approach – The quantitative research focuses on the students’ use of social media in the three phrases of the travel process – before travel, during travel and after travel separately. Survey instrument was a structured questionna...

  20. The Student, the Private and the Professional Role: Students' Social Media Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, Pernilla; Hrastinski, Stefan; Pargman, Daniel; Pargman, Teresa C.

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that students perceive a distinct divide between educational and private use of social media. The present study explores this divide by focusing on master students' perception of roles when using social media in a higher education context. A qualitative method has been used, mainly comprising of analyses of home exams and…

  1. Unprofessional behaviour on social media by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Christopher J; Morrison, Stewart; Stephens, Hugh On; Jenkins, Emily; Bailey, Michael J; Pilcher, David

    2015-12-14

    To describe the social media usage patterns of medical students and to identify factors associated with their posting of unprofessional content on social media. Voluntary survey, delivered online. All students in all 20 Australian medical schools were eligible to participate (16 993 individuals). Of 1027 initial respondents during the study period (29 March - 12 August 2013), 880 completed the survey. Prevalence of unprofessional online behaviour on social media by medical students, as reported by students about their own and others' accounts. Posting of unprofessional content was self-reported by 306 students (34.7%), mainly depictions of intoxication (301 students, 34.2%) or illegal drug use (14 students, 1.6%), or posting of patient information (14 students, 1.6%). Posting of unprofessional content was associated with posting evidence of alcohol use and racist content online, MySpace use, and planning to change one's profile name after graduation. Factors associated with reduced unprofessional content included believing that videos depicting medical events with heavy alcohol use were inappropriate, and being happy with one's own social media portrayal. Exposure to guidelines on professional online conduct had no effect on posting behaviour. Social media use was nearly universal in the surveyed cohort. Posting of unprofessional content was highly prevalent despite understanding that this might be considered inappropriate, and despite awareness of professionalism guidelines. Medical educators should consider approaches to this problem that involve more than simply providing guidelines or policies, and students should be regularly prompted to evaluate and moderate their own online behaviour.

  2. Social Media Use in Journalism Education: Faculty and Student Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Ammina; Hickerson, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Social media use has become essential for journalists. Although previous research has explored how journalists use social media, less is known about how journalism and mass communication programs incorporate social media in their coursework. Based on our survey of 323 students and 125 faculty in American universities, this study offers a…

  3. Social Media in Nursing Education: The View of the Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riikka Tuominen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Social media usage in nursing education is limited and the active use of various new developed learning environments are left behind. The purpose of this research was to survey second-year nursing students’ social media usage in studies and in their free time. The research was also interested to know students' interest and skill level in using different social media applications. The research presented a descriptive survey research design. The data was collected from second-year nursing students (n=150 through electronic and paper questionnaire in 2012. The questionnaire contained 20 structured questions and was analyzed statistically. The response rate was 61.4%. Students used social media applications more in their free time than in their studies. The most used applications in studies were an e-learning environment. Web video and online community services were the most used applications in their free time. The least used application was online games, in studies and in free time. Students were evaluated as having an excellent skill level in using social media, and they felt that the social media application was interesting. The relationship between age and application skill level was statistically significant. Younger students had better skills in using social media applications than older students.

  4. Media Ethnographic Methods targeting students in a technical education (Medialogy)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Eva; Kofoed, Lise B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the process of designing, executing and evaluating a Bachelor “soft” skills based course, Media Ethnographic Methods targeting students in a technical education (Medialogy). The course was designed as a creative workshop encouraging innovation, group dynamics...

  5. Student nurses' unethical behavior, social media, and year of birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gloria Copeland; Knudson, Troy Keith

    2016-12-01

    This study is the result of findings from a previous dissertation conducted by this author on Student Nurses' Unethical Behavior, Boundaries, and Social Media. The use of social media can be detrimental to the nurse-patient relationship if used in an unethical manner. A mixed method, using a quantitative approach based on research questions that explored differences in student nurses' unethical behavior by age (millennial vs nonmillennial) and clinical cohort, the relationship of unethical behavior to the utilization of social media, and analysis on year of birth and unethical behavior. A qualitative approach was used based on a guided faculty interview and common themes of student nurses' unethical behavior. Participants and Research Context: In total, 55 Associate Degree nursing students participated in the study; the research was conducted at Central Texas College. There were eight faculty-guided interviews. Ethical considerations: The main research instrument was an anonymous survey. All participants were assured of their right to an informed consent. All participants were informed of the right to withdraw from the study at any time. Findings indicate a significant correlation between student nurses' unethical behavior and use of social media (p = 0.036) and a significant difference between student unethical conduct by generation (millennials vs nonmillennials (p = 0.033)) and by clinical cohort (p = 0.045). Further findings from the follow-up study on year of birth and student unethical behavior reveal a correlation coefficient of 0.384 with a significance level of 0.003. Surprisingly, the study found that second-semester students had less unethical behavior than first-, third-, and fourth-semester students. The follow-up study found that this is because second-semester students were the oldest cohort. Implications for positive social change for nursing students include improved ethics education that may motivate ethical conduct throughout students' careers

  6. Like, Comment, Retweet: Understanding Student Social Media Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Dee Winn; Michael Groenendyk; Melissa Rivosecchi

    2016-01-01

    The majority of academic libraries currently use one or more social media websites in their efforts to communicate and engage with students. Some of the most widely used sites are Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram. Education students at the University of British Columbia were surveyed and asked to rank whether they preferred receiving Library communications from Facebook, Twitter or WordPress (blogs). The results indicate that students ranked Facebook first, WordPress second and Twitte...

  7. Social Media as a Learning Technology for University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Irshad; Cakir, Ozlem; Candeger, Ümmügülsüm

    2018-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the role of social media as a learning technology for university students and highlights their problems associated with its use. The population of the study consisted of Masters' and Bachelor Studies students studying in their final semesters in the departments of Social Sciences at The Islamia University of Bahawalpur,…

  8. Mass Media Use by College Students during Hurricane Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2015-01-01

    There is a dearth of studies on how college students prepare for the threat of natural disasters. This study surveyed college students' preferences in mass media use prior to an approaching hurricane. The convenience sample (n = 76) were from a university located in the hurricane-prone area of the central Gulf of Mexico coast. Interestingly,…

  9. Engaging Students via Social Media: Is It Worth the Effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Rania B.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores for the first time the moderating effect of students' readiness for cocreation on the student social media engagement and perceived value relationship. Ping's and Cadogan et al.'s procedures for assessing the structural model with interaction terms were followed. Results based on a sample of 353 university students…

  10. Social Media as Source of Medical Information for Healthcare Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Anamaria CORDOȘ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The scope of the research was a more detailed understanding of the influence of social media and the importance of student’s usage of social media context in relation to medical information. The research aimed to increase the understanding of social media and the impact on medical information use, informing policy and practice while highlighting gaps in the literature and areas for further research. Methods: The search of PubMed database was performed in October 2015, using terms to identify peer-reviewed research in which social media technologies were an important feature for health occupations, premedical, pharmacy, nursing or medical students. A systematic approach was used to retrieve papers and extract relevant data. Results: There were initially identified 435 studies involving social media, healthcare information and medical students subject headings (MeSH terminology. After filtering for free full text articles, and exclusion of not students or social media specific ones, 33 articles were reviewed. The majority of the studies were interventional studies that either assessed the outcomes of online discussion groups or teaching methods through social media. The majority of studies focused on the use of social media as a teaching tool, how students use it and the implications upon their education. The largest number of original papers was published in 2013. Facebook, Podcasts, Multiplayer virtual worlds, Blogs, and Twitter were identified as being used by medical students. Conclusion: Social media is used as a tool of information for students mainly as the means for engaging and communicating with students.

  11. Serious Social Media: On the Use of Social Media for Improving Students' Adjustment to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAndrea, David C.; Ellison, Nicole B.; LaRose, Robert; Steinfield, Charles; Fiore, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A considerable body of research indicates that social support plays an integral role in determining students' successful adjustment to college. Unlike previous research that has evaluated face-to-face support interventions that occur during students' first semester at college, the current study reports on a student-centered social media site…

  12. Electronic Media: A Motivational Strategy for Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finamore, Dora C. D.; Hochanadel, Aaron J.; Hochanadel, Cathleen E.; Millam, Loretta A.; Reinhardt, Michelle M.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation, engagement, goal attainment and effective interaction are essential components for college students to be successful in the online educational environment. The popularity and influx of electronic media applications has allowed educators the opportunity to incorporate social media (Facebook, Twitter), and volitional messages (Simple…

  13. The Educational Use of Social Media Sites by Pharmacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Onge, Erin L.; Hoehn, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Social media sites are widely used among professional students and may offer an alternative means of communication for professors to utilize within their courses. Social media site usage has been characterized within healthcare education, however, data is lacking on its use within pharmacy programs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate social…

  14. Big News: The Indian Media and Student Attacks in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Wade

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available By any measure, 2009 was a big year for news in India. And yet the safety of Indian students in Australia ranked among the major news events in India that year. The India-Australia Poll 2013 found 65 per cent of respondents believed the Indian media had accurately reported the problems faced by Indian students in Australia in 2009-10. That implies two-thirds of Indians accepted the Indian media’s mostly negative depictions of Australia. Those who believed the media reporting about Australia had been accurate were more likely to be from large cities, be tertiary educated and have relatively high-incomes. The poll found 62 per cent of respondents thought Australia was a dangerous place for Indian students and that 61 per cent believed attacks on Indian students were motivated by racism. The results suggest negative perceptions about Australia created by the media’s portrayal of the student attacks linger in the Indian community. The timing of the initial attacks, and the imagery associated with them, helped attract and sustain media attention on the issue. The diplomatic tensions created by the crisis highlighted the growing influence of the broadcast media on India’s foreign relations. But the episode also exposed a deep lack of understanding about India in Australia. Governments were slow to comprehend how much damage media coverage of student attacks could do to Australia’s reputation in India.

  15. Integration of Education: Using Social Media Networks to Engage Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Blair

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Any educator today will tell you that the strategies used in the classroom have evolved and changed with the access everyone has to technology. In a world with constant changes and shifts because of immediate access to information, the way course content is delivered must evolve and adjust to the new ways students learn. Engagement of students in course content and reaching learning objectives are the key elements educators strive for in every course. Enter social media networks and the ability to leverage the user activity with these applications in education. Now, educators can provide content which engages students and meets learning objectives the way students want to learn. By reviewing social media networks: Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Blogs, Twitter, and Evernote, educators can position themselves to be as technology-savvy as today's students.

  16. Supporting Student Transition through Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Carolyn; Meredith, CaAtherine

    2012-01-01

    Views about the role of Facebook and other social networking sites in education are extremely varied. Facebook threatens academic success and yet "certain kinds of Facebook use" can support study; indeed, Facebooking students may perform better than their unwired peers (Ellison, Steinfield, and Lampe 2007). Facebook is emphatically a…

  17. Teaching Students about Violent Media Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushman, Brad J.

    2018-01-01

    Although violent entertainment has existed for centuries, the media have made it more accessible than ever before. In modern societies, people are immersed in media, like fish in water. Using hand-held devices, people can consume media just about anywhere they want, anytime they want. Moreover, violence is a common theme in the media, and research…

  18. SOCIAL MEDIA ADDICTION AND STUDY HABITS OF SENIOR HIGH STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandrino, Mara Philia R; Catipay, Jerico D; Concepcion, Prince Vincent Ace T; Flores, Sally Mae C; Palicte, Cherry Mae D; Seguiro, Arlene C

    2018-01-01

    This research was conducted to determine the significant influence of social media addiction on the study habits of the senior high students in selected school of Agusan del Sur. The researchers used a descriptive correlation method of research which involved the survey of a total of 150 senior high students. Questionnaires were the research instrument used in the gathering of data and was presented to the research adviser for approval and content validity. Mean, Pearson Product Moment Correl...

  19. Using social media to promote international student partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bernard M; Cutting, Roger

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes a project to establish and evaluate online study partnerships, using social networking applications, between final year Canadian nursing students at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and second year undergraduate science education students at the University of Plymouth (UoP) in the UK. The project took place between 2009 and 2010 and evaluated the use of social networking applications with international interdisciplinary partnerships between Canadian and UK students. A multi-method evaluation strategy incorporating questionnaires, online focus groups and web analytics was used to explore the value of social media to promote the exchange of ideas and discussion of scientific philosophy in different contexts, between students working in disciplines with differing philosophical perspectives principally modern/post-modern, quantitative/qualitative, empirical/theoretical. This project resulted in a very successful collaborative partnership between UK and Canadian students. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mediating the media discourse of health with high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Caetano da Silva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This research is the result of a completed dissertation held in the Physical Education Post Graduate Program at UFSC, in which goal was to reflect on the media discourse about health and physical activity among young high school students, in Physical Education, from a education intervention. The study was based on methodological elements of action research and was attended by 22 students. The intervention was carried out on the basis of school mediation strategies, along with the teacher who is responsible for the class. As a conclusion, the study indicates that media education can be associated to any knowledge of school culture, in a longitudinal basis, starting from students’ knowledge about the content transmitted by the media and the effort of a media education cannot be overlooked.

  1. 3D Image Display Courses for Information Media Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaka, Kazuhisa; Yamanouchi, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional displays are used extensively in movies and games. These displays are also essential in mixed reality, where virtual and real spaces overlap. Therefore, engineers and creators should be trained to master 3D display technologies. For this reason, the Department of Information Media at the Kanagawa Institute of Technology has launched two 3D image display courses specifically designed for students who aim to become information media engineers and creators.

  2. Student Perception of Social Media as a Course Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Richard V.; McCarthy, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    If a technology provides features that are useful then it will have a positive impact on performance. Social media has morphed into one of the preferred methods of communication for many people; much has been written to proclaim its benefits including its usefulness as a tool to help students achieve success within the classroom. But is it…

  3. Changing Technology = Empowering Students through Media Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Abreu, Belinha

    2010-01-01

    Background: As the world is changing quickly due to the technological advances, educators are looking at ways in which to empower their students' learning with digital platforms. Media literacy education is key for how this can happen in the 21st century classroom which seeks to promote learning without censoring the learner. Considering how media…

  4. Using Social Media to Engage Students and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Using social media in education requires putting some building blocks for success in place. A strong foundation for successful use of social networking in education starts by securing parent/guardian and student agreements. Social networking provides a powerful platform for learning and connecting. Facebook is not just for sharing status updates…

  5. How social media influence college students' smoking attitudes and intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Woohyun; Yang, JungHwan; Cho, Eunji

    2016-11-01

    Building on the influence of presumed influence (IPI) model, this study examines how smoking- related messages on social media influence college students' smoking. We surveyed 366 college students from three U.S. Midwestern universities in 2012 and examined the effects of expression and reception of smoking-related messages on smoking using path analysis. We found that the expression and reception of prosmoking messages not only directly affected smoking but also had indirect effects on smoking through (1) perceived peer expression of prosmoking messages and (2) perceived peer smoking norms. For antismoking messages, only reception had a significant indirect influence on smoking through (1) perceived peer reception of antismoking messages and (2) perceived peer smoking norms. In conclusion, social media function as an effective communication channel for generating, sharing, receiving, and commenting on smoking-related content and are thus influential on college students' smoking.

  6. A Case Study On Media Literacy Levels Of Secondary Students Who Attend Media Literacy Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan GÖRMEZ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the media literacy levels of secondary school students who attend media literacy courses. In this qualitative study, interview method was used to gather required data. In this qualitative study, interview method was used to gather required data. The interviews were conducted with 10 secondary school students of grade 8 attending media literacy courses by using semi-structured interview forms developed by the researcher. The questions used in semi-structured interview forms were prepared considering the outcomes of Media Literacy program related to units in Media Literacy Lesson Teacher Guide Book such as What is Communication?, Mass Communication, Media, Television, Newspaper and the Internet. The data gathered through the student's interviews were analyzed by applying content analysis method. Having evaluated the research results, it was concluded that the students who attend Media Literacy courses have a bit data and skills as knowing what communication is, using media and knowing its functions, telling the difference between TV program sorts in terms of their functions, knowing smart signs and explanations and obeying them, knowing basic concepts about newspaper and knowing and applying basic concepts concerning internet usage.

  7. Modern Media Criticism and Media Literacy Education: The Opinions of Russian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Alexander; Levitskaya, Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    The authors analyze the results of two universities students' survey aimed at finding out the respondents' media competence levels. The findings confirm a general tendency, that commonly, less than a quarter of the young audience reveals a high level development of the media competence's motivational index. A considerably larger part of…

  8. SOCIOLOGICAL MEDIA: MAXIMIZING STUDENT INTEREST IN QUANTITATIVE METHODS VIA COLLABORATIVE USE OF DIGITAL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick T. Tucker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available College sociology lecturers are tasked with inspiring student interest in quantitative methods despite widespread student anxiety about the subject, and a tendency for students to relieve classroom anxiety through habitual web browsing. In this paper, the author details the results of a pedagogical program whereby students at a New York City community college used industry-standard software to design, conduct, and analyze sociological surveys of one another, with the aim of inspiring student interest in quantitative methods and enhancing technical literacy. A chi-square test of independence was performed to determine the effect of the pedagogical process on the students’ ability to discuss sociological methods unrelated to their surveys in their final papers, compared with the author’s students from the previous semester who did not undergo the pedagogical program. The relation between these variables was significant, χ 2(3, N=36 = 9.8, p = .02. Findings suggest that community college students, under lecturer supervision, with minimal prior statistical knowledge, and access to digital media can collaborate in small groups to create and conduct sociological surveys, and discuss methods and results in limited classroom time. College sociology lecturers, instead of combatting student desire to use digital media, should harness this desire to advance student mastery of quantitative methods.

  9. Learning in Public: Faculty and Student Opinions about Social Media in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickerson, Andrea; Kothari, Ammina

    2017-01-01

    For communication instructors charged with safely and constructively educating students, incorporating social media in communication coursework presents a variety of problems. Among them are how to grade social media and how to respond to students' social media mistakes, knowing these mistakes and corrections could follow students into their…

  10. Climate Change Education: Student Media Production to Educate and Engage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney-Varga, J. N.; Brisk, A. A.; Ledley, T. S.; Shuldman, M.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change education offers many challenges, including the complexity of the natural and human systems involved, a need for a multi-disciplinary perspective, and the psychological barriers to learning that result from a problem that frequently elicits a sense of being overwhelmed and powerless. The implications of climate change impacts and/or solutions can be especially overwhelming for today's students, who are likely to be confronted with many projected changes within their lifetimes. We are developing approaches to incorporate video production by students at both the high school and university levels in order to overcome many of the challenges unique to climate change education. Through media production, students are asked to convey complex topics using clear, simple language and metaphor, so their content knowledge must be deep enough to educate others. Video production is a team effort (director, camera person, editor, etc.) and inherently creates an opportunity for learning in a social context, which has been shown to lead to better learning outcomes in climate change education. Video production also promotes the basic tenets of engagement theory, in which a small group of students is in constant contact with the content and, ideally, creates a product that can be disseminated broadly. Lastly, putting students behind the camera can give them a voice and a sense of empowerment, fostering active participation in the learning process. While video is a medium that is readily disseminated to a broad audience, our focus is on the process (i.e., learning outcomes of students directly involved in media production), not the product. However, we have found that providing students with a means to add their voices to the broader public's discussion of climate change has a positive impact on student engagement with climate change science and on public awareness this problem beyond the classroom. While student-produced media pieces are not intended to provide in

  11. Student creativity in creating cell organelles as media for learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatmawati, B.

    2018-04-01

    Creativity is not formed by itself but it is influenced by some others factors. Creativity is a . person’s ability to create / generate an idea embodied in the form of a product to solve problems which is accepted socially, spiritually, artificially, scientifically, and technologically. Learning media is a means of communication to deliver learning materials. There are three kinds of learning media produced by students such as books story, playdough, and the utilization of inorganic waste. The focus of this research is to know the students’ creativity in producing learnning media to understand an Abstract material especially on topic of cell organelles of animal and plant cell. Data analysis is using two ways that calculate the score of mastery in terms of concepts and creativity. The results showed the score of students’ understanding was increasing from 15 (average score of pre-test) to 31.1 (average score of post-test). It was categorized into three level, that are, high level with 21.4% of participants, medium with 64.3%, and low with 14.3%). Seven groups of students make learning media made of waste, playdough, and waste made in story form. The assessment of creativity involved four aspects, namely, color combinations, stringing, tidiness, and make (the accuracy of the concept with the form). Thus, it can be argued that self-created learning media helps in understanding the Abstract concepts of cell organelles.

  12. Media literacy between primary and secondary students in Andalusia (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Aguaded

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The media consumption by children and young people in our society is a fact. Since 2010 there has been an R&D project that aims to assess media literacy in compulsory education in Andalusia. The content was defined in terms of six dimensions developed to assess the skill levels of citizenship. This article analyzes the degree of media literacy in primary and secondary school population in Andalusia. It is an important challenge for the information society to prepare media literate students. The study reports the comparative results of two surveys conducted in a varied sample of Andalusian schools. Both tools are designed to be implemented online with real-time tracking of the platform, to identify needs and gaps and plan for future strategies at school. The study defines media literacy and analysis of its dimensions and various categories of the quantitative study. This research concludes that the population of primary and secondary media literacy lacks the dimensions analyzed. It is, therefore, necessary to develop a course in media education in the school curriculum.

  13. AN INVESTIGATION FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS' SELF PERCEPTIONS OF SOCIAL MEDIA ADDICTION

    OpenAIRE

    Necmi Esgi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine the self-perceptions of university students about social media addiction who are aged between 18 and 21 and up. In the research, the social media addiction scale was employed in order to determine students' self-perceptions. The scale was administered to 180 students. Of the participant students in the research, 25% described themselves as individuals experiencing problems in Social media addiction. On the other hand, it was determined that the factors of ag...

  14. Students, earthquakes, media: does a seismic crisis make a difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Musacchio

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available How do students use the big data flow of information form the Internet? What is their opinion and trust of scientists? How far is the influence of catastrophic earthquakes and environmental disasters on their opinion? In this study we present the results of a poll conducted on high school students (age 13-20 to assess young Italian citizens trust on geoscientists and theirs science. The sample of about 700 students is collected in areas prone to natural hazards from low to moderate intensity. The poll included only a very few questions to allow a fast compilation that could be held directly at school. Questions assessed the source from which information on catastrophes and natural phenomena is usually retrieved by the students, the role of scientists in everyday life and scientists ethical integrity. Although limited, this is the first poll of this kind and the collected up to now can be used for a rough picture of the present situation, compare results with recent disasters and project future results of on-going analysis. All information will also help us in a future analysis to understand if and how much a recent earthquake or environmental local crisis can affect the perception. Students do not completely trust that scientists are independent from outer urges. They also believe that media manipulate information with willful misconduct, to hide inconvenient realities or to get economic advantages.   Answers from our Emilia sample of students were unexpected: they did not show any specific bias after the 2012 seismic sequence. They show less skepticism towards scientists and scientific integrity in comparison to students from other regions. This suggests that the perception towards science and scientists might be driven by cultural and social background and not necessarily affected by recent seismic crisis. In this perspective this on-going study will be challenged as soon as poll after the Amatrice 2016 seismic sequence will be awailable.

  15. Digital Media Use and Social Engagement: How Social Media and Smartphone Use Influence Social Activities of College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yonghwan; Wang, Yuan; Oh, Jeyoung

    2016-04-01

    Social media and mobile phones have emerged as important platforms for college students' communication activities. This study examined how college students' psychological need to belong is associated with their use of social media and smartphones. In addition, it further investigated the effects of college students' digital media use on their social engagement. Findings revealed that students' need to belong was positively related with their use of social media and smartphones, which could further facilitate their social engagement. Moreover, the relationship between the need to belong and social engagement was mediated by college students' digital media use. This study offers empirical evidence of the positive effects of digital media on social behaviors and contributed to further understanding about the mechanisms by which need to belong leads to social engagement through digital media use.

  16. University student social media use and its influence on offline engagement in higher educational communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Sutherland

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has emphasised social media adoption by students and the implementation of social media by educators, yet few studies have explored whether students are using it to facilitate engagement in offline environments with peers within university communities. Studies suggest engagement in educational communities and extra-curricular activities can reduce student attrition. This study surveyed 106 undergraduate students to investigate whether students using social media to interact online with their university felt: (i connected to the broader university community, and (ii social media helped them engage offline by meeting up with peers and attending university events. The results indicated that the majority (82% never or rarely used the technology to facilitate offline engagement within their academic communities. Fourth year students were most likely to use social media to engage offline (66.7%. However, more than half of students (52.8% felt that university social media profiles helped them to feel part of their academic community.

  17. Social media and higher education: introversion and collaborative learning from the student's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piet Kommers; Ronald Voorn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand how social media contribute to face-to-face collaborative learning by introvert students in higher education. A total of 233 students participated. This study shows that more introvert students perceive that social media are more helpful for increasing their

  18. A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Domestic American and International Chinese Students' Social Media Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiong; Mocarski, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This survey of American and Chinese students at a state university in the southern United States measures Social Media (SM) use and attitudes toward SM. The purpose of this study was to investigate student perception and motivation of social media communication and the relationship between student cultural values and their social media…

  19. Student Media Usage Patterns and Non-Traditional Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Müskens, Wolfgang; Krause, Ulrike; Alturki, Uthman; Aldraiweesh, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    A total of 2,338 students at German universities participated in a survey, which investigated media usage patterns of so-called traditional and non-traditional students (Schuetze & Wolter, 2003). The students provided information on the digital devices that they own or have access to, and on their usage of media and e-learning tools and…

  20. Social media and higher education: Introversion and collaborative learning from the student's perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, Ronaldus Johannes Jan; Kommers, Petrus A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand how social media contribute to face-to-face collaborative learning by introvert students in higher education. A total of 233 students participated. This study shows that more introvert students perceive that social media are more helpful for increasing their

  1. Examination of the Attitudes of Middle School Students towards Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulu, Sanser; Numanoglu, Mustafa; Keser, Hafize

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify middle school students` general attitudes towards social media. Participants of this descriptive study were middle school students from three public schools (n = 367) in Ankara. Data was collected using "Demographic Information Form" and "Social Media Attitudes Survey for Students" developed by…

  2. Audio Visual Media Components in Educational Game for Elementary Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meilani Hartono

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to review and implement interactive audio visual media used in an educational game to improve elementary students’ interest in learning mathematics. The game was developed for desktop platform. The art of the game was set as 2D cartoon art with animation and audio in order to make students more interest. There were four mini games developed based on the researches on mathematics study. Development method used was Multimedia Development Life Cycle (MDLC that consists of requirement, design, development, testing, and implementation phase. Data collection methods used are questionnaire, literature study, and interview. The conclusion is elementary students interest with educational game that has fun and active (moving objects, with fast tempo of music, and carefree color like blue. This educational game is hoped to be an alternative teaching tool combined with conventional teaching method.

  3. Racial Identity in Online Spaces: Social Media's Impact on Students of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jason

    2017-01-01

    College students are frequent social media users. Heightened racial tensions across college campuses and the United States have increased the volume of racial discourse on social media, suggesting a need to understand social media's influence on how students make meaning of race. Using symbolic interactionism and racial identity theories, this…

  4. The Effect of Various Media Scaffolding on Increasing Understanding of Students' Geometry Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiarso, Sugeng; Coesamin, M.; Nurhanurawati

    2018-01-01

    This study is a quasi-experimental research with pretest-posttest control group design, which aims to determine (1) the tendency of students in using various media scaffolding based on gender, and (2) effect of media scaffolding on increasing understanding of students' geometry concepts. Media scaffolding used this study is chart, props, and…

  5. Environmental Issues in the Media--Students' Perceptions in the Three Nordic-Baltic Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinonen, Tuula; Yli-Panula, Eija; Svens, Maria; Vilkonis, Rytis; Persson, Christel; Palmberg, Irmeli

    2014-01-01

    The media, as a source of information, is supposed to have a significant role in effecting people's environmental knowledge and attitudes. The purpose of this study was to find students' perceptions of environmental issues as presented in the media and how students in Finland, Lithuania and Sweden used these media sources in the matters related to…

  6. Use of Social Media by University Accounting Students and Its Impact on Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tehmina; Kend, Michael; Robertson, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation in the use of social media, such as Facebook and Twitter, among university students is well documented. With many universities providing student resources in formats suitable for iPad, laptop, and mobile phone use, the use of social media for university activities has become easier. This study explores the use of social media by…

  7. Exploring How Digital Media Technology Can Foster Saudi EFL Students' English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altawil, Abdulmohsin

    2016-01-01

    Digital media technology has become an integral part of daily life for almost all young students, and for the majority of Saudi EFL (English as a Foreign Language) students. Digital media technology may not be limited to one or two kinds; it has various types such as software and programs, devices, application, websites, social media tools, etc.…

  8. THE ANALYSIS OF DETECTIVE GENRE IN MEDIA STUDIES IN THE STUDENT AUDIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Development of skills for the critical analysis of media texts - an important task of media education. However, media literacy practice shows that students have the problems with the discussion / analysis of entertainment genres in the early stages of media studies, for example, the difficulties in the process of understanding and interpreting the author's conception, plot and genre features. This article substantiates the methodological approaches to the analysis skills of detective/thriller genre in media studies in the student audience.

  9. Student Library Pages: Valuable Resource for the Library Media Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Eleanor

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of students as library pages at the Loudoun Country Day School (Virginia). Highlights include student selection procedures, including interviews; parental consent form; library page duties; benefits to students; benefits to the library; and parent attitudes. Copies of the student interview form and parental consent form are…

  10. Perceptions of nursing students regarding responsible use of social media in the Eastern Cape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyangeni, Thando; Du Rand, Suzette; Van Rooyen, Dalena

    2015-07-24

    Social media have become a popular communication system that has transformed communication from the traditional to the Web-based model. Because social media use has no limitations to place and time, it is now used extensively at clinical facilities. Social media useis becoming a popular activity amongst students at Nursing Education Institutions (NEI) in South Africa. However, lack of accountability and unethical use of social media by nursing students in South Africa has been reported. The aim of the study was to explore and describe the perceptions of nursing students regarding responsible use of social media. A qualitative, descriptive, explorative and contextual research design was used to explore and describe the perceptions of nursing students regarding the responsible use of social media. Twelve nursing students registered for the undergraduate nursing degree were purposely selected and interviewed individually using a semi-structured interview method. The results of this research study demonstrate that nursing students use socialmedia irresponsibly. Nursing students experience blurred boundaries between personal and professional lines and lack accountability when using social media. The extensive use of social media in the clinical environment, by healthcare students, requires a joint effort by Nursing Education Institutions and healthcare facilities to ensure that social media are used in an ethically acceptable manner. The implementation of the recommendations of this research study could positively influence legally and ethically acceptable use of social media at healthcare facilities.

  11. Like, Comment, Retweet: Understanding Student Social Media Preferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dee Winn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of academic libraries currently use one or more social media websites in their efforts to communicate and engage with students. Some of the most widely used sites are Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram. Education students at the University of British Columbia were surveyed and asked to rank whether they preferred receiving Library communications from Facebook, Twitter or WordPress (blogs. The results indicate that students ranked Facebook first, WordPress second and Twitter third. Students also provided explanations for their rankings, and Facebook was the top choice because it is the most widely used as well as the most convenient way to access Library information. Additional research in this area should be conducted at other academic libraries. La plupart des bibliothèques utilisent actuellement un ou plusieurs sites web des médias sociaux en essayant de communiquer et d’interagir avec les étudiants. Certains des sites les plus utilisés sont Facebook, Twitter, YouTube et Instagram. Un sondage a demandé aux utilisateurs de la bibliothèque éducative de l’Université de Colombie-Britannique s’ils préféraient recevoir les communications via Facebook, Twitter, ou WordPress (les blogs. Les résultats indiquent que les étudiants ont classé Facebook au premier rang, suivi de WordPress et Twitter au troisième rang. Les étudiants ont aussi expliqué leurs classements: Facebook est le premier choix, car il est le plus utilisé et aussi le moyen le plus pratique pour accéder aux informations de la bibliothèque. Les recherches supplémentaires traitant cette question devraient être menées par d’autres bibliothèques académiques.

  12. A Study on the Rationale of Social Media Use by the Students of King Khalid University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sayed Salahuddin; Hassan, Abdulkhaleq Q. A.

    2017-01-01

    Is not it deplorable that in a country that tops in the entire world in using several social media sites does not utilize the same media in acquiring knowledge and skills? In Saudi Arabia, undergraduate students spend a significant amount of time on social media every day, but they are reluctant (or not motivated enough) to use the same media for…

  13. The Development and Impact of a Social Media and Professionalism Course for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alexandra W; Butera, Gisela; Chretien, Katherine C; Kind, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate social media behavior can have detrimental effects on students' future opportunities, but medical students are given little opportunity to reflect upon ways of integrating their social media identities with their newly forming professional identities. In 2012, a required educational session was developed for 1st-year medical students on social media and professional identity. Objectives include identifying professionalism issues and recognizing positive social media use. The 2-hour large-group session uses student-generated social media examples to stimulate discussion and concludes with an expert panel. Students complete a postsession reflection assignment. The required social media session occurs early in the 1st year and is part of the Professionalism curriculum in The George Washington University School of Medicine. Reflection papers are graded for completion. The study began in 2012 and ran through 2014; a total of 313/505 participants (62%) volunteered for the study. Assessment occurred through qualitative analysis of students' reflection assignments. Most students (65%, 203/313) reported considering changes in their social media presence due to the session. The analysis revealed themes relating to a broader understanding of online identity and opportunities to enhance careers. In a 6-month follow-up survey of 76 students in the 2014 cohort who completed the entire survey, 73 (94%) reported some increase in awareness, and 48 (64%) made changes to their social media behavior due to the session (response rate = 76/165; 46%), reflecting the longer term impact. Opportunities for discussion and reflection are essential for transformational learning to occur, enabling understanding of other perspectives. Incorporating student-submitted social media examples heightened student interest and engagement. The social media environment is continually changing, so curricular approaches should remain adaptable to ensure timeliness and relevance. Including

  14. Student Media in U.S. Secondary Schools: Associations with School Demographic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkowski, Piotr S.; Goodman, Mark; Bowen, Candace Perkins

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an up-to-date counting of student media in U.S. public high schools. The analysis underscores the importance of school demographic characteristics in predicting whether schools offer student media. The disparities identified here should inform how journalism schools, scholastic journalism organizations, funding agencies, and…

  15. Political Engagement during a Presidential Election Year: A Case Study of Media Literacy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Elia; Moeller, Susan; Yuan, Yacong

    2016-01-01

    This exploratory, mixed-methods study uses data gathered during the previous U.S. presidential election in 2012 to evaluate student political engagement and digital culture. Survey results and media diary entries revealed that college students enrolled in a media literacy course during Super Tuesday or Election Day gravitated toward low-barrier…

  16. Value System Changes by Students as Result of Media Ethics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surlin, Stuart H.

    1987-01-01

    Investigates the values of mass communication students before and after undergoing formal training in mass media ethics. Claims that at the conclusion of the course students had adopted ethical mass media attitudes which incorporate a personal acceptance of democratic principles and a belief in equal rights for all. (MM)

  17. Utilizing Social Media to Increase Student Engagement: A Study of Kern County Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Steven Lance

    2011-01-01

    Social media has permeated almost every aspect of the lives of anyone who utilizes the internet. Teachers and students are no exception. Students are most likely to use social media sites such as MySpace, Facebook and Twitter. This research focuses on best practices related to augmenting school curriculum to utilize these tools to increase student…

  18. Social Media Use: An Exploratory Test of Effects on the Daily Lives of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Barbara; Cothern, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    This study covers the effects that social media use has on the daily lives of college students. More specifically, the current study focuses on college students' academic success, study habits, social interaction, and family interaction. Social media is a source of online tools that allow people from across the world to communicate with others.…

  19. College Students' Use of Social Media for Health in the USA and Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sanghee; Kim, Soojung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This exploratory study aims to understand college students' use and perception of social media for health information by comparing college students in the USA and Korea. Method. This study surveyed 342 college students from two state-level universities in the USA and Korea (one from each country) using a convenience sample. Analysis:…

  20. The Investigation of Human Values Perceived from the Use of Social Media of Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ahmet; Tekin, Hatice

    2017-01-01

    This research has been carried out to investigate the relation between social media usage of secondary school students and their perceived human values. The population of the research consisted of 1952 students, of which 48% were female and 52% were male, 7th and 8th grade students attending secondary schools in central Adiyaman in 2014-2015…

  1. Effects of Perceived Social Support and Psychological Resilience on Social Media Addiction among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Okan; Tas, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    This research investigated the effects of perceived social support and psychological resilience on social media addiction among university students. The research group was composed of 503 university students. The ages of participant students varied between 17 and 31 years old. 340 (67.6%) of the participants are female and 163 (32.4%) of them are…

  2. Educational Responses to Media Challenges to Self Esteem: Body Image Perceptions among Undergraduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Mindy; Venuti, John; Hodges, Jilda; Iannuzzelli, Jena; Chambliss, Catherine

    College students confront a variety of challenges on a daily basis. Living up to the standards prescribed by the media and other social groups leaves some students feeling distraught and many feeling vulnerable. Feelings of failure and self-loathing often lead college students to become preoccupied with their self-image and actions, motivating…

  3. Social Media Addiction Scale-Student Form: The Reliability and Validity Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Cengiz

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a valid and reliable measurement tool to determine the social media addictions of secondary school, high school and university students. 998 students participated in the study. 476 students from secondary schools, high schools and universities participated in the first application during which the…

  4. Student Awareness of the Use of Social Media Screening by Prospective Employers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Teri; McKay, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Hiring professionals are increasingly using social media sites as screening tools. The primary purpose of this study was to determine what students thought employers considered important information when researching profiles. A survey was given to students enrolled in College of Business classes at a university in the Southeast. Students were…

  5. Assessment of medical students' attitudes on social media use in medicine: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcı, Kadriye; Çelikden, Sevda Gerek; Eren, Semih; Aydenizöz, Doğukan

    2015-02-15

    Social media has created a revolution in health services. Information available on the Internet and via social media is now being used as reference guides for sensitive health issues by nonprofessionals, physicians, and medical students. When used by physicians and medical students, social media has the potential to raise issues such as the blurring of the line between professional and private lives, patient relations, and medical ethics. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the use of social media and attitudes toward its use in medicine among medical students. Medical students from Afyon Kocatepe University, Faculty of Medicine (Afyonkarahisar, Turkey) were asked to participate in a survey consisting of two sections, the first containing questions assessing the frequency of social media use and the second regarding attitudes toward the use of social media in medicine. Survey responses indicated that 93.4% of medical students used social media and 89.3% used social media for professional purposes. Factor analysis showed that attitudes toward social media are based on five factors: professional usefulness, popularity, ethics, barriers, and innovativeness. A structural equation model revealed the highest positive correlation between usefulness and innovativeness; ethics had a low but positive correlation with other factors. Although social media is being used extensively by medical students, they appear unaware of possible ethical issues. Therefore, social media guidelines should be developed.

  6. Graduating student pharmacists' perspectives on e-professionalism and social media: qualitative findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Genevieve Lynn; Sheehan, Amy Heck; Snyder, Margie E

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize students' views and opinions of professionalism on popular social media sites and compare responses about social media behavior among students in different groups. DESIGN Cross-sectional survey. SETTING Four colleges of pharmacy in midwestern United States. PARTICIPANTS 516 graduating student pharmacists. INTERVENTIONS Online survey with open-ended questions. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Qualitative analysis of responses and themes. RESULTS A total of 212 student pharmacists completed surveys (41% response rate). Mean (± SD) age was 25.2 ± 4.6 years, and 72% of respondents were women. Major overarching themes identified in the qualitative analysis were separation of personal and professional lives, how accountability for actions should vary by severity, and the extent of representation of the students' character on social media. CONCLUSION Identified themes provided important insights into the ways in which student pharmacists view social media and use this widely accessible means of personal communication.

  7. Collaboration Between Art Teacher Students and Communication and Digital Media Students Promoting Subject Specific Didactics in Digital Visual Learning Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Skov, Kirsten

    . Student art teachers and teacher trainers took part in the design process performed by communication students. The project took its point of the departure in the act of Danish teacher education where student teachers must be educated in the practical use of digital visual media for art practices aiming......, drawing or video. Thus, the project suggested the development of a visual learning design for achieving augmented reality (AR) experiences in urban environments and sharing them on social media. The purpose was to explore adequate approaches to work with digital media in visual arts education based...... on practices and reflective processes. The theoretical framework for our discussion of the empirical project draws on current discussions of learning designs and digital media in visual arts education (Peppler 2010, Rasmussen 2015, Buhl & Ejsing-Duun, 2015; Buhl, 2016). Methodology The choice of empirical...

  8. Use of Social Media By Nurse Educator Students: An Exploratory Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahti, Mari; Haapaniemi-Kahala, Heidi; Salminen, Leena

    2017-01-01

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) opens up new possibilities for introducing innovative teaching and learning methods to deliver education in different educational areas. Use of internet and social media has grown rapidly and is a key way in how nurses and nurse educator students find information. However, the evidence is still lacking how nurse educator students use social media. The aim of this study is to describe nurse educator students' use of social media and the ways in which their educational needs are related to social media. The data were collected using a structured questionnaire that included one open question. Altogether, 49 nurse educator students completed and returned the questionnaire (response rate 96%). The quantitative data were analysed using statistical programme SPPS and content analysis. While many nurse educator students reported using the tools of social media, others claimed that they do not use social media at all. Facebook was most common (53% use it every day) and YouTube (17%) the second most common form of social media used to support daily living. The participants reported using YouTube (6% use it every day) and Facebook (4%) most often as support in their studies. They reported using Second life as virtual reality form of social media, the least. The most common educational needs of nurse educator students include receiving more in-depth information about how to use social media, as well as more practice in using it. In the future, the education of the nurse educator students should include even more in-depth information about the forms of social media and about the advantages of using it in teaching. The education should encourage nurse educator students and provide them with more possibilities to train and make use of the benefits of social media as support in their daily lives and studies. There is need for more robust evidence of social media use in nurse educator students education.

  9. Go Home, Med Student: Comics as Visual Media for Students' Traumatic Medical Education Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Jeffrey

    2018-02-01

    A comic created by a medical student allows the reader to share the student's own unique perception of the medical education experience. Through the process of comic creation, medical students have opportunities to gain insight into how their relationships with patients and supervising physicians have shaped the physician they will become. The comic itself can be a safe space for expression and provides an opportunity for students and educators to share experiences. © 2018 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Nursing Students' Use of Electronic and Social Media: Law, Ethics, and E-Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the promotion of professionalism in nursing students with regard to the use of electronic and social media. Misuse of social media can lead to disciplinary actions and program dismissal for students and to legal actions and lawsuits for nursing programs. Programs are concemed about breaches of patient confidentiality and release of private or inappropriate information that jeopardizes clinical placements and relationships. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and National Council of State Boards of Nursing social media guidelines provide a foundation for promoting e-professionalism in students. Recent law cases involving students who were dismissed from nursing programs due to social media misuse are analyzed. Schools need policies that clearly establish expectations and the consequences of misuse of social media platforms. Lessons learned from the legal cases presented provide further guidance for both nursing students and nursing programs.

  11. Student Media Usage Patterns and Non-Traditional Learning in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Zawacki-Richter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2,338 students at German universities participated in a survey, which investigated media usage patterns of so-called traditional and non-traditional students (Schuetze & Wolter, 2003. The students provided information on the digital devices that they own or have access to, and on their usage of media and e-learning tools and services for their learning. A distinction was made between external, formal and internal, informal tools and services. Based on the students’ responses, a typology of media usage patterns was established by means of a latent class analysis (LCA. Four types or profiles of media usage patterns were identified. These types were labeled entertainment users, peripheral users, advanced users and instrumental users. Among non-traditional students, the proportion of instrumental users was rather high. Based on the usage patterns of traditional and non-traditional students, implications for media selection in the instructional design process are outlined in the paper.

  12. Nursing students' attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch-Sauer, Judith; Vandenbosch, Terry M; Kron, Frederick; Gjerde, Craig Livingston; Arato, Nora; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2011-09-01

    Little is known about Millennial nursing students' attitudes toward computer games and new media in nursing education and whether these attitudes differ between undergraduates and graduates. This study elicited nursing students' experience with computer games and new media, their attitudes toward various instructional styles and methods, and the role of computer games and new media technologies in nursing education. We e-mailed all nursing students enrolled in two universities to invite their participation in an anonymous cross-sectional online survey. The survey collected demographic data and participants' experience with and attitudes toward video gaming and multi-player online health care simulations. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression to compare the differences between undergraduates and graduates. Two hundred eighteen nursing students participated. Many of the nursing students support using new media technologies in nursing education. Nurse educators should identify areas suitable for new media integration and further evaluate the effectiveness of these technologies. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. The Use of Geometry Learning Media Based on Augmented Reality for Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohendi, D.; Septian, S.; Sutarno, H.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the geometry especially of three-dimensional space is still considered difficult by some students. Therefore, a learning innovation is required to overcome students’ difficulties in learning geometry. In this research, we developed geometry learning media based on augmented reality in android flatform’s then it was implemented in teaching three-dimensional objects for some junior high school students to find out: how is the students response in using this new media in geometry and is this media can solve the student’s difficulties in understanding geometry concept. The results showed that the use of geometry learning media based on augmented reality in android flatform is able to get positive responses from the students in learning geometry concepts especially three-dimensional objects and students more easy to understand concept of diagonal in geometry than before using this media.

  14. The wired generation: academic and social outcomes of electronic media use among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Wade C; Forste, Renata

    2011-05-01

    Little is known about the influence of electronic media use on the academic and social lives of university students. Using time-diary and survey data, we explore the use of various types of electronic media among first-year students. Time-diary results suggest that the majority of students use electronic media to multitask. Robust regression results indicate a negative relationship between the use of various types of electronic media and first-semester grades. In addition, we find a positive association between social-networking-site use, cellular-phone communication, and face-to-face social interaction.

  15. Undergraduate student nurses' attitudes towards using social media websites: A study from Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shdayfat, Noha M

    2018-07-01

    The use of social media by university students is recognized worldwide. Student nurses are no exception, yet no studies have been reported to investigate the nurse students' use and views of social media in Jordan. The current study aims to assess the validity and reliability of an Arabic version of the modified Students Nurses' Use and Views of Social Media survey. In a cross-sectional study conducted on 395 student nurses aged 19-39 enrolled at two universities (one public and one private) in north Jordan, information on their use and attitude to social media was obtained using the Arabic version of the Students Nurses' Use and Views of Social Media survey. Exploratory factor analysis and correlation matrices were conducted to assess the validity and reliability of the tool. The Arabic version of the tool had a 0.84 alpha of internal consistency indicating a high level of reliability. The scale showed multi-dimensionality with items loading on two factors. The Arabic version of the Students Nurses' Use and Views of Social Media questionnaire demonstrated initial reliability and validity. This study reports positive attitudes of Jordanian student nurses towards professional and academic use of social media. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Impact of Social Media on the Academic Development of School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Tarek A. El-Badawy; Yasmin Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Today, it is crucial to determine the impact of social media on the academic performance of students. Technology is booming rapidly from year to year, and the younger generations are the ones caught in this rapid change. Questionnaires were distributed through Facebook and E-mails, to find out whether students academic performance is impacted by social media or not. The findings demonstrate that there is no relationship between social media and academic performance; this is clearly projected ...

  17. Comparative Study of Media Use Capacity for 8th Grade Students

    OpenAIRE

    川上, 善郎; 鈴木, 裕久

    1996-01-01

     The world is experiencing a variety of changes resulting from the widespread diffusion of information technology. It is very important to measure the information literacy which allows people to access or to use various information media including computers or wordprocessors. The purpose of this paper is to measure and compare the media use capacity of 8th grade students in Japan, Taiwan and the United States. Specifically, 1. to determine media availability, media knowledge, media skills and...

  18. Social media use and educational preferences among first-year pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauson, Kevin A; Singh-Franco, Devada; Sircar-Ramsewak, Feroza; Joseph, Shine; Sandars, John

    2013-01-01

    Social media may offer a means to engage students, facilitate collaborative learning, and tailor educational delivery for diverse learning styles. The purpose of this study is to characterize social media awareness among pharmacy students and determine perceptions toward integrating these tools in education. A 23-item survey was administered to 1st-year students at a multicampus college of pharmacy. Students (95% response rate; N = 196) most commonly used wikis (97%), social networking (91%), and videosharing (84%). Tools reported as never used or unknown included social bookmarking (89%), collaborative writing (84%), and RSS readers (73%). Respondents indicated that educational integration of social media would impact their ability to learn in a positive/very positive manner (75%) and make them feel connected/very connected (68%). Selectively targeting social media for educational integration and instructing pharmacy students how to employ a subset of these tools may be useful in engaging them and encouraging lifelong learning.

  19. I am no longer alone - How do university students perceive the possibilities of social media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusiautti, Satu; Määttä, Kaarina

    2014-07-03

    An increasing number of people have become users of social media, mostly looking for social contacts and networking. But what kind of social capital do social networking services (SNSs) provide? University students' ( N  = 90) experiences of and opinions on social media were studied through a semi-structured questionnaire. The following research questions were set for this study: (1) What kinds of benefits do university students perceive in the usage of social media? and (2) What kind of social capital does social media produce according to university students' opinions? Their answers were analysed with the qualitative content analysis method. The results revealed that SNSs can increase students' social capital in many ways, such as in the form of peer support groups and learning environments, and enhance bonding and communality in them. These possibilities should be better studied in educational contexts, as they can have a positive impact on students' well-being, engagement to studies and, thus, study success.

  20. Students' Frame Shifting--Resonances of Social Media in Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz-Andersson, Annika; Vigmo, Sylvi; Bowen, Rhonwen

    2016-01-01

    This case study explores how Swedish upper secondary students communicate in English as part of second language learning, in a blog shared with Thai students. Grounded in a sociocultural perspective on learning, the notions of Goffman's "frame shifting" and Bakhtin's concept of "carnival" are employed to analyse two specific…

  1. Media Images: Do They Influence College Students' Body Image?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Gina Jarman

    2009-01-01

    Body image perception and body mass index (BMI) among college students exposed and not exposed to photographs of models were compared. Classes were assigned to receive a presentation with or without photographs of models incorporated. Students (n = 184) completed a survey about body/weight satisfaction, height, weight, and the Contour Drawing…

  2. First year nursing students use of social media within education: Results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Ann M; Devis, Kate; LeMoine, Gayle; Crouch, Sarah; South, Nicole; Hossain, Rosa

    2018-02-01

    Social media rapidly disseminates information but is a controversial learning platform in nurse education. This study aimed to explore how students viewed the use of Twitter, and other social media, in their first year of a nursing degree. The aim of this study was to evaluate first year student nurses' use of social media, before and after commencing a pre-registration programme, where Twitter was used in a module. A cross-sectional approach using a descriptive survey was completed. An online survey, that included Likert scale and open questions, was open for one month in 2016. All students on Nursing Undergraduate Degrees, in Adult, Child and Mental Health, who were in the first year of their programme were eligible to participate. 121 students took part with a response rate of 32%. Most students were positive about using social media as they found it an engaging way to promote discussion and share information. Students use of Twitter changed in the first year with 19.8% using it once or more per week on commencement of the programme which increased to 45.5%; other social media platforms remained static. Most students (57.8%) understood the purpose of using Twitter although 14% reported that it was not used within their module; thus, not all students gained experience of using the social media. 81% of students said that using Twitter had been beneficial to increase awareness of nursing issues within their course. However, there were areas that students found difficult such as time, and not knowing what to say. The study suggests that teaching about social media, and incorporating it into learning activities, may be beneficial for students. However, more research into the subject using an experimental design to assess changes over time would be useful. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing android-based science instructional media to improve scientific literacy of junior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farida, I. I.; Jumadi; Wilujeng; Senam

    2018-04-01

    The aims of this study are: to develop android-based science instructional media and to reveal the characteristic, the quality, and the effectiveness of android-based science instructional media with global warming topic to increase junior high school students’ scientific literacy. This study is a development research. The instructional media were reviewed by a media expert, a material expert, science teachers, peer reviewers, and students. The data was collected using media evaluation questionnaires. The results of the study showed that: (1) the android-based science instructional media has characteristics including interesting visualization, easy to use, flexible, and practical, (2) the android-based science instructional media was appropriate for teaching, in terms of material evaluation aspects, media evaluation aspects, and based on student test results, and (3) the android-based science instructional media can effectively used for teaching.

  4. Social Media Influence and Intensity of Watching Television Drama on Achievement of Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Akbar Himawan; Basori Basori; Taufiq Lilo Adi Sucipto

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study are to get: (1) the influence of the social media use on achievement of students; (2) the influence of the watching television drama intensity on achievement of students grade X TKJ in SMK Batik 1 Surakarta; and (3) the influence both of social media use and the watching television drama intensity on achievement of students. The sample used was 78 from 100 student population based on Isaac and Michael table. This study was quantitative research using ex post facto metho...

  5. Factual accuracy and the cultural context of science in popular media: Perspectives of media makers, middle school students, and university students on an entertainment television program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Evan; Osborne, Jonathan; Patterson, Alexis D

    2017-07-01

    Popular media influences ideas about science constructed by the public. To sway media productions, public policy organizations have increasingly promoted use of science consultants. This study contributes to understanding the connection from science consultants to popular media to public outcomes. A science-based television series was examined for intended messages of the creator and consulting scientist, and received messages among middle school and non-science university students. The results suggest the consulting scientist missed an opportunity to influence the portrayal of the cultural contexts of science and that middle school students may be reading these aspects uncritically-a deficiency educators could potentially address. In contrast, all groups discussed the science content and practices of the show, indicating that scientific facts were salient to both media makers and audiences. This suggests popular media may influence the public knowledge of science, supporting concerns of scientists about the accuracy of fictional television and film.

  6. So Much Social Media, so Little Time: Using Student Feedback to Guide Academic Library Social Media Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookbank, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The majority of college students use social media of some kind, and academic libraries are increasingly using social media to reach them. Although studies have analyzed which platforms academic libraries most commonly use and case studies have provided examples of how libraries use specific platforms, there are few examinations of the usage habits…

  7. Social Media Influence and Intensity of Watching Television Drama on Achievement of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Himawan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study are to get: (1 the influence of the social media use on achievement of students; (2 the influence of the watching television drama intensity on achievement of students grade X TKJ in SMK Batik 1 Surakarta; and (3 the influence both of social media use and the watching television drama intensity on achievement of students. The sample used was 78 from 100 student population based on Isaac and Michael table. This study was quantitative research using ex post facto method. The data were collected by questionnaire and documentation. Data analysis used single and multi-linear regression. The result showed that there was significance influence between the used of social media towards the achievement of the students, there was significance influence between the intensity of watching television drama towards the achievement of the students, there was significance influence between the social media use and the intensity of watching television drama towards the achievement of students. Out of the two independent variables, the use of social media is a variable that contributes more influence to student learning outcomes.

  8. Academic Persistence of Online Students in Higher Education Impacted by Student Progress Factors and Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lint, Anna H.

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative study evaluated and investigated the theoretical underpinnings of the Kember's (1995) student progress model that examines the direct or indirect effects of student persistence in online education by identifying the relationships between variables. The primary method of data collection in this study was a survey by exploring the…

  9. Using Media in the Foreign Language. Case Study Media Use of the Students of the Babes- Bolyai University, Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meda MUCUNDORFEANU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, thanks to the Internet, access to foreign language media has become more and more easy, which is why the number of foreign language media users has increased. This research focuses on exploring the use of German speaking media by Romanian students from the German speaking departments of the Babes-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca. The theoretical background of the study is the Uses and Gratifications theory. The research methods applied were the focus group, followed by a survey applied to a representative number of students. Our research highlighted the fact that the students from German language programs often used German television and German websites. In regard to the German media in general, most respondents stated that they satisfy, in a very large mount, the needs described by the Uses and Gratifications model.

  10. The effects of a social media policy on pharmacy students' facebook security settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jennifer; Feild, Carinda; James, Kristina

    2011-11-10

    To examine how students entering a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program used Facebook privacy settings before and after the college's social media policy was presented to them. The Facebook profiles of all entering first-year pharmacy students across 4 campuses of a college of pharmacy were evaluated. Ten dichotomous variables of interest were viewed and recorded for each student's Facebook account at 3 time points: before the start of the semester, after presentation of the college's social media policy, and at the end of the semester. Data on whether a profile could be found and what portions of the profile were viewable also were collected. After introduction of the policy, a significant number of students increased their security settings (made information not visible to the public) related to Facebook walls, information pages, and links. Making pharmacy students aware of a college's social media policy had a positive impact on their behaviors regarding online security and privacy.

  11. The research of the level of social media addiction of university students

    OpenAIRE

    Gazi, Mehmet Ali; Çetin, Muharrem; Çakı, Caner

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, social media hasbecome an indispensable part of our daily lives. Although there are many usefulapplications of social media, the excessive use of this medium led to livepersonal, social and occupational problems. With these problems, it began tolead social media addiction which describes as a new kind of addiction. ın thisregard, the survey will be applied 350 students who study at communicationfaculty of ınonu university through social media selected via simple randomsampling onlin...

  12. A Study of the Impact of Media Consumption on the Social Identity of Isfahan University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Hosein Harsij; Reza Mahmoodoghli; Omid Isanejad; Mahmoodreza Rahbargazi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the impact of media consumption on social identity among students of Isfahan University is studied. Among different social groups, students are subject to wider identity changes. The variety of their behavior, manners, clothing, fashion, etc. illustrates these changes. A deeper understanding of the impact of media on Students’ social identity can help us better understand their political and social behavior. This study applied survey method to collect and analyze data about medi...

  13. Responsible use of social media by undergraduate student nurses / Ingrid van der Walt

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Walt, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The background and problem statement centre on the evolution of technology within teaching and learning, which involves undergraduate student nurses, as well as the use of social media as interactive teaching and communication tool. While examining the background to this topic, the researcher recognised a need to gain a deeper understanding of responsible social media use by undergraduate student nurses to the benefit of all the stakeholders, namely the Nursing Education Institution (NEI), ap...

  14. Development of Interactive Media for ICT Learning at Elementary School Based on Student Self Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Huning Anwariningsih; Sri Ernawati

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of information and comunication technology (ICT) curriculum at elementary school is the educational sector development. ICT subject is a practical subject which require a direct practice to make easier in the student understanding. Therefore, a teacher is demanded to make a learning media which helps the student to understand the material of study. This research is aimed at describing the model of ICT study in elementary school and using of learning media. Moreover, the des...

  15. New Media Learning: Student Podcasting and Blogging in an Intro to Meteorology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Current weather events and climate change are hot media topics discussed on television, the internet, and through social media. In this world of 'Tweets', 'Texts' and constant multi-media bombardment it is becoming increasingly difficult to engage students in the learning process by simply standing at a podium and lecturing in a darkened classroom. Educational research has found that lectures place students in a passive role, preventing them from actively engaging in the learning process. Through the innovative use of multi-media platforms this study assesses the potential to create active learning opportunities (podcasting and blogging) that connect theoretical 'textbook' atmospheric science with the 'real world.' This work focuses on students enrolled in the Introduction to Meteorology course (MET 101) at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. This study summarizes the impact of the 'course-casting' technique which utilizes podcasts of lectures and supplemental material. Lecture Podcasts are used mainly as a revision tool for students by providing on-demand portable (MP3) course content that supports independent student learning. Students also produced their own podcasts (research projects) to share with classmates throughout the course relating atmospheric science content to personal 'real world' experiences. Along with podcasting, students blogged about designated topics related to weather and climate, making their knowledge and understanding accessible to other students in the course and the general internet community. Student surveys, journals, and final exit interviews are used to assess the impact of the blogging and podcasting exercises on the student learning experience. The number of times each lecture podcast was downloaded is recorded to determine the interest level in using audio lectures as a review tool. Student blogs and podcasts are evaluated based on science content accuracy and student survey evaluations of the learning experience.

  16. Effects of Guided Writing Strategies on Students' Writing Attitudes Based on Media Richness Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yu-Feng; Hung, Chun-Ling; Hsu, Hung-Ju

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop different guided writing strategies based on media richness theory and further evaluate the effects of these writing strategies on younger students' writing attitudes in terms of motivation, enjoyment and anxiety. A total of 66 sixth-grade elementary students with an average age of twelve were invited to…

  17. Peer, Social Media, and Alcohol Marketing Influences on College Student Drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Angela A.; McKinney, Cliff; Walker, Courtney; Coleman, Ashley

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To investigate how alcohol marketing and peers may promote college students' alcohol use through social media. Participants: College students (N = 682) aged 18 to 22 years from a large Southern university completed paper surveys in April 2014. Methods: Structural equation modeling was used to investigate relationships among variables as…

  18. Teachers' Experiences with Literacy Instruction for Dual-Media Students Who Use Print and Braille

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Tina S.; Rosenblum, Penny; Robbins, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study analyzed survey responses from 84 teachers of students with visual impairments who had provided literacy instruction to dual-media students who used both print and braille. Methods: These teachers in the United States and Canada completed an online survey during spring 2015. Results: The teachers reported that they…

  19. Engaging Students in a Large-Enrollment Physics Class Using an Academically Focused Social Media Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrin, Andy; Lindell, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    There are many reasons for an instructor to consider using social media, particularly in a large introductory course. Improved communications can lessen the sense of isolation some students feel in large classes, and students may be more likely to respond to faculty announcements in a form that is familiar and comfortable. Furthermore, many…

  20. Who's misbehaving? Perceptions of unprofessional social media use by medical students and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsis, Elizabeth A; Milan, Felise B; Cohen, Hillel W; Myers, Daniel; Herron, Patrick; McEvoy, Mimi; Weingarten, Jacqueline; Grayson, Martha S

    2016-02-18

    Social media use by physicians offers potential benefits but may also be associated with professionalism problems. The objectives of this study were: 1) to examine and compare characteristics of social media use by medical students and faculty; 2) to explore the scope of self- and peer-posting of unprofessional online content; and 3) to determine what actions were taken when unprofessional content was viewed. An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to medical students and faculty in October, 2013 at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. Three-quarters of medical students reported using social media "very frequently" (several times a day), whereas less than one-third of faculty did so (p < .001). Medical students reported using privacy settings more often than faculty (96.5 % v. 78.1 %, p < .001). Most medical students (94.2 %) and faculty (94.1 %) reported "never" or "occasionally" monitoring their online presence (p = 0.94). Medical students reported self-posting of profanity, depiction of intoxication, and sexually suggestive material more often than faculty (p < .001). Medical students and faculty both reported peer-posting of unprofessional content significantly more often than self-posting. There was no association between year of medical school and posting of unprofessional content. Medical students reported spending more time using social media and posting unprofessional content more often than did faculty.

  1. Serving Special Needs Students in the School Library Media Center. Greenwood Professional Guides in School Librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Caren L., Ed.; Keefe, Margaret J., Ed.

    This collection of papers considers how the school library media specialist serves special needs students and classroom teachers in multiple roles as teacher, information specialist, and instructional consultant or collaborator. Included are the following papers: "Teaching Library and Information Skills to Special Needs Students" (Caren…

  2. How Social-Media Enhanced Learning Platforms Support Students in Taking Responsibility for Their Own Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pals Svendsen, Lisbet; Mondahl, Margrethe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – The paper is based on the chapter “How Social Media Enhanced Learning Platforms Challenge and Motivate Students to Take Charge of Their Own Learning Processes – A Few Examples” from the publication Increasing Student Engagement and Retention using Social Technologies: Facebook, e...

  3. Activism or Slacktivism? The Potential and Pitfalls of Social Media in Contemporary Student Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Matias, Cheryl E.; Montoya, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of social media has greatly influenced 21st-century student activism. It has also given rise to the birth of "slacktivism," an online form of self-aggrandizing, politically ineffective activism. This theoretical article delves into the conceptualizations of what constitutes student activism versus slacktivism in a digital…

  4. A Neglected Population: Media Consumption, Perceived Risk, and Fear of Crime Among International Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Luzi

    2018-03-01

    The 4.5 million international students worldwide bring in multifold benefits to the advancement of culture, economy, and national security in education host countries. Surprisingly, few prior studies have explored international students' fear of crime, which may harm their mental and physical health and undermine their educational achievements. The current study aims to fill in this research void by investigating international students' fear of crime in line with the cultivation theoretical framework, which postulates that media consumption cultivates fear of crime. The analyses draw on a sample of 398 international students attending nine different public and private universities across the United States. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), I investigate the extent and correlates of students' fear of crime. The findings reveal that international students are more fearful in the United States than in their home countries. SEM results show that controlling for students' fear in their home countries, attention paid to crime news is positively related to fear in the United States, through perceived victimization risk. The SEM results also suggest that exposure to non-U.S. social media (e.g., WeChat and Weibo) is positively related to respondents' fear of crime, whereas exposure to U.S. social media (e.g., Facebook and Twitter) is not related to fear of crime. The current study highlights the importance of studying the impact of fear of crime and social media use on international students.

  5. College Students' Experiences with Anonymous Social Media: Implications for Campus Racial Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Amanda; Thomas, Jaymi; Smith, Madeline

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory case study was to gather undergraduate students' perceptions of anonymous racist messages found on Yik Yak and to better understand the implications of anonymous platforms on campus racial climate. Given the limited research surrounding students' use of anonymous social media platforms, as well as the predominant…

  6. How Undergraduate Students Use Social Media Technologies to Support Group Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and become accessible to students in higher education. Concurrently, teamwork has become an important skill in academia and the workplace and students have adopted established technologies to support their learning in both individual and team project work. Given the emergence of social media technologies, I examined…

  7. Guided Note Taking and Student Achievement in a Media Law Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Robin

    2017-01-01

    In a quasi-experimental setting, a group of U.S. college students in an introductory media law course had higher test scores when the instructor provided access to guided worksheets than a group of students without access to guided worksheets. It also allows educators in journalism and mass communication to cover more materials during courses…

  8. Determining Effect of Digital And Media Activities On Media And Science Literacy Of Middle-School Students And Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge CAN

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research aims determining effect of digital and media activities on media and science literacy of middle-school students and parents and identifying the relationship between them. Quasi- experimental model has been used by which pretest-posttest studies have been held on one group by using quantitative data during research. The sample of the research consists of 60 students and 119 parents who attend a school in the province of Bursa in the academic year of 2013-2014. According to data analysis obtained in the research, there is a significant relation between pretests and posttests about scientific literacy of middle-school students and parents relating to Digital and Media Activities. There is a relation between media and scientific literacy of students and mothers as parents. There is a difference between the applied PISA and TIMSS exams and the students' science literacy. In the light of these results, some suggestion has been offered with regard to focusing on the importance of 21st century skills and literacy, developing scientific and media literacy level and obtaining more comprehensive results.

  9. Sexually explicit media exposure and the influence on college students' attitudes towards sex(Audio-Visual Education)

    OpenAIRE

    佐々木, 輝美; ササキ, テルヨシ; Teruyoshi, Sasaki

    2004-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to examine how sexually explicit media would affect college students' attitudes towards sex. Previous study results based on Gerbner's theory of cultivation would suggest that students exposed to sexually explicit media would accept distorted sexual information or behavior depicted in the media. A survey was conducted to investigate this relationship among college students (N=350). The survey consisted of eight items probing sexual media exposure and their a...

  10. Social media and college student risk behaviors: A mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Gabrielle G; Longo, Laura M; Martin, Jessica L

    2017-02-01

    Use of social media use is widespread and frequent among college students. Posting photos and text related to risk behaviors (e.g., problematic alcohol use, illicit drug use) on social media websites is common and has been linked to personal substance use and negative outcomes. This mini-review summarizes current findings related to associations between college students' social media use and engagement in risk behaviors. Conducting research on social media poses unique challenges for researchers; these challenges are reviewed and their impact on the state of the current literature discussed. Finally, implications for prevention and intervention efforts are discussed as well as recommendations regarding future research in the area of social media and college student risk behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Female College Students' Media Use and Academic Outcomes: Results from a Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jennifer L; Fielder, Robyn L; Carey, Kate B; Carey, Michael P

    2013-09-01

    This longitudinal study describes women's media use during their first year of college and examines associations between media use and academic outcomes. Female students ( N = 483, M age = 18.1 years) reported on their use of 11 media forms and their grade point average, academic behaviors, academic confidence, and problems affecting schoolwork. Allowing for multi-tasking, women reported nearly 12 hours of media use per day; use of texting, music, the Internet, and social networking was heaviest. In general, media use was negatively associated with academic outcomes after controlling for prior academics and demographics. Exceptions were newspaper reading and music listening, which were positively associated with academic outcomes. There were significant indirect effects of magazine reading and social networking on GPA via academic behaviors, confidence, and problems. Results show that female college students are heavy users of new media, and that some forms of media use may adversely impact academic performance.

  12. The Development of Media Literacy among Grade Five Teachers and Students - A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel McCabe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the first of two articles about a study of the implementation of a media literacy curriculum project in three inner city school Grade 5's in Montreal. The authors describe what the teachers and students learned about two key Media Literacy concepts: the media construct reality and audiences negotiate the meanings of media texts. The teaching featured the use of Internet and computer technology. Their findings suggest that it is possible to teach elementary students to read media critically and raises some issues that merit further investigation: the ideology of positivism that permeates the use of technology in education; the training of media education teachers; and the factors that characterize effective media education pedagogy.

  13. Development of an Instrument to Measure Pharmacy Student Attitudes Toward Social Media Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Spivey, Christina A; Jaeger, Melanie C; Williams, Jennifer; George, Christa

    2017-05-01

    Objectives. To develop and validate a scale measuring pharmacy students' attitudes toward social media professionalism, and assess the impact of an educational presentation on social media professionalism. Methods. A social media professionalism scale was used in a pre- and post-survey to determine the effects of a social media professionalism presentation. The 26-item scale was administered to 197 first-year pharmacy (P1) students during orientation. Exploratory factor analysis was applied to determine the number of underlying factors responsible for covariation of the data. Principal components analysis was used as the extraction method. Varimax was selected as the rotation method. Cronbach's alpha was estimated. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare pre- and post-scores of each item, subscale, and total scale. Results. There were 187 (95%) students who participated. The final scale had five subscales and 15 items. Subscales were named according to the professionalism tenet they best represented. Scores of items addressing reading/posting to social media during class, an employer's use of social media when making hiring decisions, and a college/university's use of social media as a measure of professional conduct significantly increased from pre-test to post-test. The "honesty and integrity" subscale score also significantly increased. Conclusion. The social media professionalism scale measures five tenets of professionalism and exhibits satisfactory reliability. The presentation improved P1 students' attitudes regarding social media professionalism.

  14. What is appropriate to post on social media? Ratings from students, faculty members and the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anuja; Petty, Elizabeth M; Jaber, Reda M; Tackett, Sean; Purkiss, Joel; Fitzgerald, James; White, Casey

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain what medical students, doctors and the public felt was unprofessional for medical students, as future doctors, to post on a social media site, Facebook(®) . The significance of this is that unprofessional content reflects poorly on a student, which in turn can significantly affect a patient's confidence in that student's clinical abilities. An online survey was designed to investigate the perceptions of University of Michigan medical students, attending physicians and non-health care university-wide employees (that serves as a subset of the public) regarding mock medical students' Facebook(®) profile screenshots. For each screenshot, respondents used a 5-point Likert scale to rate 'appropriateness' and whether they would be 'comfortable' having students posting such content as their future doctors. Compared with medical students, faculty members and public groups rated images as significantly less appropriate (p public' have different thresholds of what is acceptable on a social networking site. Our findings will prove useful for students to consider the perspectives of patients and faculty members when considering what type of content to post on their social media sites. In this way, we hope that our findings provide insight for discussions, awareness and the development of guidelines related to online professionalism for medical students. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Social media as a student response system: new evidence on learning impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitousness of social media renders it a potentially powerful tool in higher education. This study explores the use of Twitter as a tool to enhance active learning and improve feedback during large-sized lectures. Students in a final-year undergraduate accounting course at an Australian university engaged in Twitter-based synchronous activities, including answering in-lecture quizzes and posting questions. This study explores two key questions: (1 ‘what encourages students to actively utilise social media in their learning process?’ and (2 ‘what pedagogical advantages are offered by social media in enhancing students’ learning experiences?’ Results of a student survey administered at the end of the course show that (1 students are more likely to participate in in-lecture Twitter activities if they are familiar with the technology, (2 Twitter activities encourage students to participate in active learning, (3 Twitter provides a platform enabling two-way student–instructor communication and (4 students find Twitter activities helpful regardless of whether they attend the lecture in real time or view online lecture recordings. These findings deepen our understanding of the pedagogical benefits of using Twitter as a student response system, which will assist educators to better harness the power of social media in the learning–teaching process.

  16. Social Media's Use in Postgraduate Students' Decision-Making Journey: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galan, Mianda; Lawley, Meredith; Clements, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Universities globally are showing increased interest in the potential of social media as a marketing recruitment tool. This paper explores how and why potential postgraduate business students looking to study internationally use social media in their educational decision-making process. Due to a lack of existing research, this study adopted an…

  17. Social Media Use, Loneliness, and Academic Achievement: A Correlational Study with Urban High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Roque; Golz, Nancy; Polega, Meaghan

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the association between social media use, loneliness, and academic achievement in high school students and identified the demographic characteristics associated with these three elements. This study also aimed to identify the percentage of variance in loneliness accounted for by social media use and GPA. Participants were 345…

  18. Social Media Challenges and Affordances for International Students: Bridges, Boundaries, and Hybrid Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeman, Jade; Lang, Catherine; Lemon, Narelle

    2016-01-01

    Many higher education institutions around the world are increasingly motivated to incorporate social media for pedagogical benefit. At the same time, many institutions are also attracting an ever-growing number of students from overseas countries. With this in mind, researching how the use of social media applications impact on international…

  19. Student Interactions in Online Discussion Forum: Empirical Research from "Media Richness Theory" Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, M. S.; Chakrabarti, Diganta

    2010-01-01

    The present study contributes to the understanding of the effectiveness of online discussion forum in student learning. A conceptual model based on "theory of online learning" and "media richness theory" was proposed and empirically tested. We extend the current understanding of media richness theory to suggest that use of…

  20. Technology Trumping Sleep: Impact of Electronic Media and Sleep in Late Adolescent Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulin, Kerry L.; Chung, Chia-Jung

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore with what impact evening media use interfered with either schoolwork and/or sufficient healthy sleep. In addition, the study examined with what impact there may be a compromise in students' ability or aptitude for positive academic success, related to either lack of sleep or electronic media use.…

  1. Building an Understanding of the Role of Media Literacy for Latino/a High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boske, Christa; McCormack, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Popular media is a social phenomenon, especially for young audiences. This qualitative study examined how eleven Latino/a high school students and a Latino teacher understood the impact of media messages in an animated children's film. Findings suggest participants identified negative cultural messages embedded throughout the film regarding…

  2. Exploring Education-Related Use of Social Media: Business Students Perspectives in a Changing India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharucha, Jehangir

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Within a connectivist learning model, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption of social media for educational purposes in India, a hitherto unexplored area of research. The basic research thrust is on students' experiences when social media is incorporated into higher education. This research tries to gather evidence on…

  3. The Internet Is Forever: Student Indiscretions Reveal the Need for Effective Social Media Policies in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Carolyn; Silvestri, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Students' imprudent use of social media might threaten their employability and undermine their emerging professional identities. Most professions acknowledge that any benefits of social media must be balanced against its potential to negatively affect workers' professional lives and the public trust. Professional bodies have developed social media…

  4. How Many "Friends" Do You Need? Teaching Students How to Network Using Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Michael Alan; Graves, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    Student reliance on social media is undeniable. However, while we largely regard social media as a new phenomena, the concepts underlying it come directly from social network theory in sociology and organizational behavior. In this article, the authors examine how the social network concepts of size, quality, complexity, diffusion, and distance…

  5. The Influence of Social Media on Addictive Behaviors in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steers, Mai-Ly N; Moreno, Megan A; Neighbors, Clayton

    2016-12-01

    Social media has become a primary way for college students to communicate aspects of their daily lives to those within their social network. Such communications often include substance use displays (e.g., selfies of college students drinking). Furthermore, students' substance use displays have been found to robustly predict not only the posters' substance use-related outcomes (e.g., consumption, problems) but also that of their social networking peers. The current review summarizes findings of recent literature exploring the intersection between social media and substance use. Specifically, we examine how and why such substance use displays might shape college students' internalized norms surrounding substance use and how it impacts their substance use-related behaviors. Additional social media-related interventions are needed in order to target reduction of consumption among this at-risk group. We discuss the technological and methodological challenges inherent to conducting research and devising interventions in this domain.

  6. HOW SFG INCREASE STUDENTS ABILITY TO PRODUCE AND ANALYSE TEXT MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd. Ghofur

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the use of Systemic Functional Grammar for students of english language teaching entitled Analysing Media Texts. This is aims at assisting students to produce their own texts and to help them develop an understanding of the linguistic choices they make. Students are introduced to the key principles of CDA and to Halliday’s SFG to provide them with tools to assist them to understand the social and constructed nature of discourses, especially those typically found in media texts. This article focuses on students’ interpretation of media texts, their ability to read with greater understanding and to apply key concepts that they had learnt to their analyses. The students demonstrated clearly that they had developed an understanding of CDA, acquired the basic metalanguage necessary for Hallidayan analysis and some of them could produce much more rigorous textual analyses than before.

  7. An Evaluation of the Impact of E-Learning Media Formats on Student Perception and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Karl; Stankov, Ivo; Datsenka, Rastsislau

    Factors influencing student evaluation of web-based courses are analyzed, based on student feedback from an online distance-learning graduate program. The impact of different media formats on the perception of the courses by the students as well as on their performance in these courses are examined. In particular, we studied conventional hypertext-based courses, video-based courses and audio-based courses, and tried to find out whether the media format has an effect on how students assess courses and how good or bad their grades are. Statistical analyses were performed to answer several research questions related to the topic and to properly evaluate the factors influencing student evaluation.

  8. Use of Social Media and Its Impact on Academic Performance of Tertiary Institution Students: A Study of Students of Koforidua Polytechnic, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Acheaw, M.; Larson, Agatha Gifty

    2015-01-01

    The study sought to assess students' use of social media and its effect on academic performance of tertiary institutions students in Ghana with a focus on Koforidua Polytechnic students. Questionnaire was used for collecting data. Out of one thousand five hundred and seventy-eight copies of the questionnaire distributed, one thousand five hundred…

  9. Interactive Media to Support Language Acquisition for Deaf Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Becky Sue; Hancock, Robert; Crain-Dorough, Mindy; Oescher, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Tangible computing combines digital feedback with physical interactions - an important link for young children. Through the use of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology, a real-world object (i.e. a chair) or a symbolic toy (i.e. a stuffed bear) can be tagged so that students can activate multimedia learning modules automatically. The…

  10. A school-wide assessment of social media usage by students in a US dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, M R; Christensen, H L; Nelson, B A

    2014-11-01

    Social media sites have become an established means of communication due to the exponential growth in number of users across the world and the encouragement of interaction between users through site features. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which Loma Linda University School of Dentistry students use social media accounts, the types of accounts they prefer, their interest in incorporating social media into courses and their perceptions of the usefulness of social media in private practice. In addition, we wanted to determine the degree of student interest in the integration of these social tools into their instruction. One thousand one hundred and sixty-two students from Loma Linda University School of Dentistry were invited by e-mail to complete a confidential 18 item multiple choice survey through Surveymonkey.com. The overall response rate was 30% (n = 351) from the pooled response periods; the first in 2011 and the second in 2013. Similar to other studies, Facebook was used by 91% of the School of Dentistry students, and less than half used Google+, Twitter and LinkedIn. Of the respondents, 68% of students reported communicating on social media daily and 80% saw value for practising dentists to operate accounts. Time and privacy concerns were the largest barriers to usage at 16% and 12% respectively. One third of respondents were in favour of the incorporation of social media in their courses.

  11. INVESTIGATING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN UNIVERSITY STUDENTS' USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA, LONELINESS AND DEPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Yağmur Çerkez; Dönay Kara

    2017-01-01

    It is observed that the relationship between the use of the social media by people and the loneliness and depression increases day by day. The main aim of this study is to examine the loneliness, depression and use of the social media by university students with different variables. The study group of the research consists of a total of 530 students during the spring term of the academic year 2014-2015. There was a significant difference among the faculties in terms of using the social media ...

  12. Exploring college students' use of general and alcohol-related social media and their associations with alcohol-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric W; Pinkleton, Bruce E; Weintraub Austin, Erica; Reyes-Velázquez, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol marketers have increasingly moved their advertising efforts into digital and social media venues. As a result, the purpose of this study is to investigate associations between students' use of social media, their exposure to alcohol marketing messages through social media, and their alcohol-related beliefs and behaviors. Public and private university students (N = 637) participated November and December 2011 and April 2012. College students completed online surveys to measure their exposure to social and online media generally, as well as their alcohol-related digital media use and alcohol use. Use of social media related to alcohol marketing predicted alcohol consumption and engaging in risky behaviors, whereas the use of social media more generally did not. Students' use of alcohol-related social media-marketing content associates with their problem drinking. Results have implications for alcohol abuse reduction efforts targeted at college students and suggest the importance of considering social, cultural, and cognitive factors in campaign planning and design.

  13. Factors and Processes That Influence E-Professionalism among Pre-Licensure Baccalaureate Nursing Students When Utilizing Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrabal, Julie

    2017-01-01

    There is limited research related to nursing students' social media use. Because of this, there was a need to further explore how they were using social media and their ability to maintain e-professionalism. This study discovered that pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing students are actively using multiple social media accounts on a daily basis.…

  14. May It Please the Court: Two Legal Cases to Teach Students about Social Media Based Terminations of Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kimberly W.; Schmidt, Gordon B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent data suggest that 83% of individuals, aged 18 to 29 years, frequent social media sites (Drouin et al., 2015). This statistic confirms the need for universities to teach important issues regarding personal social media usage to students. At the forefront of these issues is how personal social media usage can affect students' future…

  15. Association of school social networks' influence and mass media factors with cigarette smoking among asthmatic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Mariano; Beck, Kenneth H; Carter-Pokras, Olivia

    2015-03-01

    Around 10% of adolescent students under 18 years have current asthma. Asthmatic adolescents smoke as much or more than non-asthmatic adolescents. We explored the association between exposure to mass media and social networks' influence with asthmatic student smoking, and variations of these exposures by sex. This study included 9755 asthmatic and 38,487 non-asthmatic middle and high school students. Secondary data analysis incorporated the complex sample design; and univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression statistics. Asthmatic students had greater odds of smoking than non-asthmatic students. Asthmatic female students were more likely than asthmatic male students to have been exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms or cars and to smoking actors, but less likely to associate smoking with intent to wear tobacco-marketing products, or with looking cool/fitting in. Asthmatic male and female students, who have smoking friends, were exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms (only girls) or cars, intended to smoke if best friends offered cigarettes, or received/bought tobacco marketing products had greater odds of smoking than other asthmatic students. The observed associations suggest the need for general interventions to reduce middle and high school students' cigarette smoking as well as targeted interventions for asthmatic adolescent students. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  16. Social Media Etiquette for the Modern Medical Student: A Narrative Review

    OpenAIRE

    Brittany Harrison; Jeewanjit Gill; Alireza Jalali

    2014-01-01

    Most medical students worldwide are using some form of social media platform to supplement their learning via file sharing and to stay up-to-date on medical events. Often, social media may blur the line between socialization and educational use, so it is important to be aware of how one is utilizing social media and how to remain professional. Research has yielded some troublesome themes of misconduct: drunken behaviour, violations of confidentiality and defamation of institutions. Because th...

  17. Social media use, attitudes, behaviours and perceptions of online professionalism amongst dental students

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Philip; Johnson, Ilona Gail

    2016-01-01

    Use of social media has increased amongst health professionals. This has benefits for patient care but also introduces risks for confidentiality and professional fitness to practise. This study aimed to examine dental student attitudes towards professional behaviour on social media. The secondary aim was to establish the extent and nature of social media use and exposure to potentially unprofessional behaviours.\\ud \\ud A cross-sectional study was carried out in one dental school. Data were co...

  18. Social Politics: Social Media as a public sphere for Jamaican University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The growth of social media use in Jamaica has changed how people communicate with each other and how they participate in the democratic process. To date, minimal research has been done to ascertain the relationship between social media use and the political process, specifically with younger members of the population. Through a survey and focus group interviews, this dissertation seeks to identify whether Jamaican university students are using social media to participate in the political proc...

  19. Social media and impression management: Veterinary Medicine students? and faculty members? attitudes toward the acceptability of social media posts

    OpenAIRE

    KEDROWICZ, APRIL A.; ROYAL, KENNETH; FLAMMER, KEVEN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students’ and faculty members’ perceptions of the acceptability of various social media postings. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. All students and faculty member...

  20. TV, Social Media, and College Students' Binge Drinking Intentions: Moderated Mediation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Zhao, Xinyan

    2018-01-01

    Many studies to date have examined how media influence health-related behavior through social norms. However, most studies focused on traditional media. In the era of traditional and social media integration, our study advances health and mass communication scholarship by examining the influence of both traditional and social media mediated through social norms. Also, we examined a boundary condition for the norms-mediated media influence process. Namely, in the context of college binge drinking, we predict that exposure to TV and social media prodrinking messages can influence college students' binge drinking intentions through perceived peer descriptive and injunctive norms. We also predict that group identification will moderate this indirect effect. Our moderated mediation models were tested via structural equation modeling (N = 609). We found that college students' exposure to social media prodrinking messages indirectly influenced their binge drinking intentions via perceived injunctive norms, and students' identification with their peers moderated this indirect effect. However, neither descriptive nor injunctive norms mediated the influence of students' exposure to TV prodrinking messages on their binge drinking intentions. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  1. Ethical media competence as a protective factor against cyberbullying and cybervictimization among german school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christin R; Pfetsch, Jan; Ittel, Angela

    2014-10-01

    The use of digital information and communication technologies is an integral part of adolescents' everyday life. Besides various opportunities for information, entertainment, and communication, media use is associated with risks such as cyberbullying. Cyberbullying refers to aggressive behavior in the context of computer-mediated communication, characterized by repetition, an intention to harm, and power imbalance. Previous studies have shown that increased media use is a major risk factor for cyberbullying and cybervictimization. Given that restricting media use is not a practical way to reduce the negative effects inherent in media use, the present study examines the relevance of ethical media competence. We expected ethical media competence to buffer the effect of increased media use on cyberbullying and cybervictimization. A survey was conducted with 934 students (53% female) aged 10-17 years (M=13.26, SD=1.63). As expected, hierarchical regression analyses showed a positive main effect of media use, a negative main effect of ethical media competence, and a negative interaction effect of media use and media competence on cyberbullying and cybervictimization. Simple slope analyses revealed that at high levels of ethical media competence, media use has almost no effect on cybervictimization and a significant negative effect on cyberbullying. Consequently, promoting ethical media competence constitutes a potential measure to prevent the risks of increased media use for cyberbullying and cybervictimization.

  2. Association of School Social Networks’ Influence and Mass Media Factors With Cigarette Smoking Among Asthmatic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Mariano; Beck, Kenneth H.; Carter-Pokras, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Around 10% of adolescent students under 18 years have current asthma. Asthmatic adolescents smoke as much or more than non-asthmatic adolescents. We explored the association between exposure to mass media and social networks’ influence with asthmatic student smoking, and variations of these exposures by sex. METHODS This study included 9755 asthmatic and 38,487 non-asthmatic middle and high school students. Secondary data analysis incorporated the complex sample design; and univariate, bivariate, and logistic regression statistics. RESULTS Asthmatic students had greater odds of smoking than non-asthmatic students. Asthmatic female students were more likely than asthmatic male students to have been exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms or cars and to smoking actors, but less likely to associate smoking with intent to wear tobacco-marketing products, or with looking cool/fitting in. Asthmatic male and female students, who have smoking friends, were exposed to secondhand smoke in rooms (only girls) or cars, intended to smoke if best friends offered cigarettes, or received/bought tobacco marketing products had greater odds of smoking than other asthmatic students. CONCLUSIONS The observed associations suggest the need for general interventions to reduce middle and high school students’ cigarette smoking as well as targeted interventions for asthmatic adolescent students. PMID:25611937

  3. Social media and impression management: Veterinary Medicine students' and faculty members' attitudes toward the acceptability of social media posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedrowicz, April A; Royal, Kenneth; Flammer, Keven

    2016-10-01

    While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students' and faculty members' perceptions of the acceptability of various social media postings. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. All students and faculty members at the College of Veterinary Medicine were invited to participate. The sample size included 140 students and 69 faculty members who completed the Social Media Scale (SMS), a 7-point semantic differential scale. The SMS consisted of 12 items that measured the extent to which a variety of behaviors, using social media, constituted acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. Items appearing on the SMS were an amalgamation of modified items previously presented by Coe, Weijs, Muise et al. (2012) and new items generated specifically for this study. The data were collected during the spring semester of 2015 using Qualtrics online survey software and analyzed using t-tests and ANOVA. The results showed that statistically significant differences existed between the students' and faculty members' ratings of acceptable behavior, as well as gender differences and differences across class years. These findings have implications for the development of policy and educational initiatives around professional identity management in the social sphere.

  4. Social Media and Impression Management: Veterinary Medicine Students' and Faculty Members' Attitudes toward the Acceptability of Social Media Posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedrowicz, April A.; Royal, Kenneth; Flammer, Keven

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: While social media has the potential to be used to make professional and personal connections, it can also be used inappropriately, with detrimental ramifications for the individual in terms of their professional reputation and even hiring decisions. This research explored students' and faculty members' perceptions of the…

  5. An Analysis of NCAA Division 1 Student Athlete Social Media Use, Privacy Management, and Perceptions of Social Media Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    The intercollegiate athletic subculture knows very little about how social media policies are perceived by students-athletes. Athletic department administrators, conference commissioners, and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) who are in charge of creating new policies lack any meaningful data to help understand or negotiate new…

  6. Use of media technology to enhance the learning of student nurses in regards to auditory hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Kerry

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if simulation aided by media technology contributes towards an increase in knowledge, empathy, and a change in attitudes in regards to auditory hallucinations for nursing students. A convenience sample of 60 second-year undergraduate nursing students from an Australian university was invited to be part of the study. A pre-post-test design was used, with data analysed using a paired samples t-test to identify pre- and post-changes on nursing students' scores on knowledge of auditory hallucinations. Nine of the 11 questions reported statistically-significant results. The remaining two questions highlighted knowledge embedded within the curriculum, with therapeutic communication being the core work of mental health nursing. The implications for practice are that simulation aided by media technology increases the knowledge of students in regards to auditory hallucinations. © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  7. Development of an Android-based Learning Media Application for Visually Impaired Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Azmi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to develop the English for Disability (EFORD application, on Android-based learning english media for Visually Impaired students and determine its based this on assessment of matter expert, media expert, special needs teacher and students. The research method adopted in this research is Research and Development (R&D. The development of this application through five phases: (1 Analysis of problems, through observation and interviews. (2 Collecting information as product planning / analysis of the needs of the media as required of blind children. (3 The design phase of products such as the manufacture of flow and storyboard navigation map.(4 Design validation phase form of an expert assessment of the media is developed. (5 testing products phase, such as assessment of the application by blind students. The results of this research is EFORD application which is feasible to be used as English learning media for visual impairment application based on assessment: 1Media expert it's obtained a percentage scored 95%, include for very worthy category, 2Subject matter, expert its obtained percentage scored 75% include for worthy category and 3 Special needs teacher it's obtained a percentage scored 83% include for very worthy category. Upon demonstration, students indicated the positive response of ≥ 70% in each indicator. Therefore English learning media with Android based application English for Disability (EFORD is very feasible to be used as an English learning media especially grammar and speaking English content for students of visual impairment for a number of reasons. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

  8. Is there a crack epidemic among students in Brazil?: comments on media and public health issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappo, Solange Aparecida; Sanchez, Zila M; Ribeiro, Luciana Abeid

    2012-09-01

    In the past year, the Brazilian Federal Government and society have reported and acted on a crack use epidemic, which has been exacerbated by the media. This study hypothesized that crack use has not increased at the rate suggested by the Brazilian media. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in 2010 using a multistage probabilistic representative sample of Brazilian middle and high school students in the country's 27 state capitals. A total of 50,890 valid questionnaires were weighted, analyzed and results compared to the 2004 national school survey dataset. Considering lifetime and past year crack use, no change in consumption was found between 2004 and 2010. Official data in Brazil on middle and high school students does not support the assertion of a crack epidemic widely publicized by the media. Government measures to treat and prevent crack use are encouraged; however, the term epidemic has been inappropriately used to represent the static prevalence of crack consumption among students.

  9. Peer, social media, and alcohol marketing influences on college student drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Angela A; McKinney, Cliff; Walker, Courtney; Coleman, Ashley

    2018-07-01

    To investigate how alcohol marketing and peers may promote college students' alcohol use through social media. College students (N = 682) aged 18 to 22 years from a large Southern university completed paper surveys in April 2014. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate relationships among variables as well as moderation by gender and race. Drinking behavior was directly related to perceived norms and attitudes toward alcohol that develop, in part, from direct and indirect interactions with their online and offline peers, as well as engagement with alcohol-related content on social media. Gender and ethnicity moderated some effects. College student drinking is influenced by friends' alcohol-related content posted on social networking sites and by greater engagement with traditional and online alcohol marketing. College campus alcohol misuse interventions should include components to counter peer influences and alcohol marketing on social media.

  10. The Influence of Social Media on Addictive Behaviors in College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Steers, Mai-Ly N.; Moreno, Megan A.; Neighbors, Clayton

    2016-01-01

    Social media has become a primary way for college students to communicate aspects of their daily lives to those within their social network. Such communications often include substance use displays (e.g., selfies of college students drinking). Furthermore, students’ substance use displays have been found to robustly predict not only the posters’ substance use-related outcomes (e.g., consumption, problems) but also that of their social networking peers.

  11. Social media as a student response system: new evidence on learning impact

    OpenAIRE

    Chelsea Liu

    2018-01-01

    The ubiquitousness of social media renders it a potentially powerful tool in higher education. This study explores the use of Twitter as a tool to enhance active learning and improve feedback during large-sized lectures. Students in a final-year undergraduate accounting course at an Australian university engaged in Twitter-based synchronous activities, including answering in-lecture quizzes and posting questions. This study explores two key questions: (1) ‘what encourages students to actively...

  12. The analysis of mathematics literacy on PMRI learning with media schoology of junior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardono; Mariani, S.

    2018-03-01

    Indonesia as a developing country in the future will have high competitiveness if its students have high mathematics literacy ability. The current reality from year to year rankings of PISA mathematics literacy Indonesian students are still not good. This research is motivated by the importance and low ability of the mathematics literacy. The purpose of this study is to: (1) analyze the effectiveness of PMRI learning with media Schoology, (2) describe the ability of students' mathematics literacy on PMRI learning with media Schoology which is reviewed based on seven components of mathematics literacy, namely communication, mathematizing, representation, reasoning, devising strategies, using symbols, and using mathematics tool. The method used in this research is the method of sequential design method mix. Techniques of data collection using observation, interviews, tests, and documentation. Data analysis techniques use proportion test, appellate test, and use descriptive analysis. Based on the data analysis, it can be concluded; (1) PMRI learning with media Schoology effectively improve the ability of mathematics literacy because of the achievement of classical completeness, students' mathematics literacy ability in PMRI learning with media Schoology is higher than expository learning, and there is increasing ability of mathematics literacy in PMRI learning with media Schoology of 30%. (2) Highly capable students attain excellent mathematics literacy skills, can work using broad thinking with appropriate resolution strategies. Students who are capable of achieving good mathematics literacy skills can summarize information, present problem-solving processes, and interpret solutions. low-ability students have reached the level of ability of mathematics literacy good enough that can solve the problem in a simple way.

  13. Social media and tomorrow's medical students--how do they fit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Niamh M; Maher, Bridget M; Corrigan, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of our study was to establish the prevalence of social networking accounts among a group of second-level students (aged 15-18 years), to determine whether they used privacy settings, and to examine their attitudes to various aspects of social media use in medicine. A descriptive study design was employed. The questionnaire was constructed specifically to address the attitudes of students to social media. No similar suitable validated questionnaire could be identified. The questionnaire consisted of 20 questions with a mixture of open answer, yes/no, and Likert scale response options. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Second-level school children interested in studying medicine and aged between 15 and 18 years took part. An annual open day organized by the School of Medicine in University College Cork, Ireland, formed the setting. The day comprised a mixture of lectures, demonstrations, and practical sessions designed to give the students insight into life as a medical student. A total of 96 students attended, and all were handed the questionnaires. Of them, 88 students completed the survey. Overall, 90.9% of students had Facebook accounts and 53% had Twitter accounts. Of those with social media accounts, 14.8% reported having no privacy settings. Most respondents felt that unprofessional behavior on social media sites should be a factor considered in admission to medical schools. Serious consequences can result from lapses in best practice relating to social media behavior. Dedicated reflective learning modules need to be incorporated into undergraduate and postgraduate training programs as a matter of urgency. © 2013 Published by Association of Program Directors in Surgery on behalf of Association of Program Directors in Surgery.

  14. Use of Learning Media by Undergraduate Medical Students in Pharmacology: A Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Joanna; Kühbeck, Felizian; Berberat, Pascal O.; Fischer, Martin R.; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sarikas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquity of the internet and computer-based technologies has an increasing impact on higher education and the way students access information for learning. Moreover, there is a paucity of information about the quantitative and qualitative use of learning media by the current student generation. In this study we systematically analyzed the use of digital and non-digital learning resources by undergraduate medical students. Daily online surveys and semi-structured interviews were conducted with a cohort of 338 third year medical students enrolled in a general pharmacology course. Our data demonstrate a predominant use of digital over non-digital learning resources (69 ± 7% vs. 31 ± 7%; p students. Most used media for learning were lecture slides (26.8 ± 3.0%), apps (22.0 ± 3.7%) and personal notes (15.5 ± 2.7%), followed by textbooks (> 300 pages) (10.6 ± 3.3%), internet search (7.9 ± 1.6%) and e-learning cases (7.6 ± 3.0%). When comparing learning media use of teaching vs. pre-exam self-study periods, textbooks were used significantly less during self-study (-55%; p learning cases (+176%; p learning resources by undergraduate medical students, in particular mobile applications. PMID:25849565

  15. The study perception of social sciences and law faculty students for hoax in social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyanto, T.; Zen, IM.; Prasetyo, K.; Isbandono, P.; Gamaputra, G.; Purba, IP.

    2018-01-01

    News in the information age is currently supported by advanced equipment in the field of information and communication. Digital skills are required to use social media responsibly and ethically. According to citizenship perspective, this is a category of citizen skills. This research is done to four departments of education. It is named Bachelor Program of Pancasila and Citizenship Education and Bachelor Program Education of Geography. The rest are non education department. It is named Bachelor Program Public Administration and Diploma Program of Public administration. Fifty (50) students was taken from each department. There are 200 students totally were obtained. Data collection techniques used questionnaire and interviews. Data analysis technique was used in research is descriptive statistics. The results of this study indicate that freshman FISH 2017 has a negative perception of hoax in social media. The average number earned is 84% of FISH new students in 2017 have media awareness, media literacy skills, and high social responsibilities. Thus the improvement of student character in the form of social responsibility as a student needs to be done continuously as an effort to realize smart and good citizenship citizens.

  16. Social Media and Population Health Virtual Exchange for Senior Nursing Students: An International Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Paula M; Brixey, Juliana J; Honey, Michelle L L; Todhunter, Fern

    2016-01-01

    The authors have all engaged in using social media with students as a means for collaboration across national and international boundaries for various educational purposes. Following the explosion of big data in health the authors are now moving this concept forward within undergraduate and postgraduate nursing curricula for the development of population health virtual exchanges. Nursing has a global presence and yet it appears as though students have little knowledge of the health and social care needs and provision outside their local environment. This development will allow for explorative exchange amongst students in three countries, enhancing their understanding of their own and the selected international population health needs and solutions through asking and responding to questions amongst the learning community involved. The connection of the students will be recorded for their use in reflection; of particular interest will be the use of information included by the students to answer questions about their locality.

  17. Spiderman and science: How students' perceptions of scientists are shaped by popular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aik-Ling; Jocz, Jennifer Ann; Zhai, Junqing

    2017-07-01

    This study addresses the influence of popular media on how young children perceive science and the work of scientists. Using an adapted version of the Draw-A-Scientist Test, 15 classes of fourth graders (9-10 years old) at three different schools in Singapore were sampled ( n =  266). The students' drawings as well as their identification of three sources from which they obtained inspiration for their drawings were analyzed. Our results showed a strong relationship between students' drawings of scientists and their reported sources of inspiration. The results suggest that popular media play a large role in shaping how young children view scientists.

  18. Integrating Media Production By Students Into Climate Change Education: Within and Beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney-Varga, J. N.; Brisk, A. A.; Grogan, M.; Ledley, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    Through the Climate Education in an Age of Media (CAM) Project (http://cleanet.org/cced_media/), we have developed approaches to integrate media production by students into climate change education in ways that are engaging, empowering, and can be readily adopted in a wide range of instructional environments. These approaches can be used to overcome many of the challenges that climate change education presents and provide a means to evoke experiential, affective, and social learning pathways. Video production combines many key twenty-first century literacy skills, including content research, writing, an understanding of the power of images and sounds, the ability to use that power, and the ability to manipulate, transform, and distribute digital media. Through collaboration, reflection, and visual expression of concepts, video production facilitates a deeper understanding of material and, potentially, shifts in mental models about climate change. Equally importantly, it provides a means to bridge formal and informal learning by enabling students to educate those beyond the classroom. We have piloted our approach in two intensive summer programs (2011 and 2012) for high school students, during which students learned about climate change science content in lessons that were paired with the production of short media pieces including animations, public service announcements, person-on-the-street interviews, mock trailers, mock news programs, and music videos. Two high school teachers were embedded in the program during the second year, providing feedback and assessment of the feasibility, accessibility, and utility of the approach. The programs culminated with students presenting and discussing their work at public screening events. The media lessons and climate change science content examples used in these programs form the backbone of a toolkit and professional development workshops for middle and high school teachers, in which teachers learn how to incorporate

  19. Enhancing learning with the social media: student teachers’ perceptions on Twitter in a debate activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Tur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research focused on the educational experience of students using the microblogging platform Twitter for debate activities in three groups in different teacher education programmes at the University of the Balearic Islands, Spain. The implementation of this technology-based task in a face-to-face class was introduced as an innovative experience as a way of enhancing student learning and fostering participation in the context of formal learning. The educational objectives of these activities, besides working on the topics of the debate, were to empower student teachers’ Personal Learning Environments, engage student participation and enhance their use of social media and mobile devices for learning. Student perceptions were assessed by means of a questionnaire completed by them at the end of the courses. Tweets related to the debate were also collected in order to obtain some statistical data on student participation. Data collected allowed the researchers to observe student teacher engagement with the use of Twitter for the debate activity and its impact on their learning and understanding of the debate topic. Results also showed positive perceptions towards the use of social media in education and students’ willingness for future use, learning opportunities from Twitter and the use of mobile technology were also envisioned. Finally, conclusions argue the implications for practice of the current study and highlight some issues for further research, such as the exploration of new and innovative uses for teachers’ professional development and the empowerment of new activities and habits in learning on the move.

  20. "I Don't Like Hearing Angel and Not Seeing Her! Why Did We Do That?" An Exploration of Students' Media Literacy Development through Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchs, Michele; Emery, Winston

    2004-01-01

    In this exploratory case study we look at student media production to find out what students know and have learned about the media through production work. We used a media education conceptual framework developed by Dick as a means of describing the day to day media learning of a group of ten students, four girls and six boys, producing a video…

  1. Development of an Instrument to Measure Pharmacy Student Attitudes Toward Social Media Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Christina A.; Jaeger, Melanie C.; Williams, Jennifer; George, Christa

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To develop and validate a scale measuring pharmacy students’ attitudes toward social media professionalism, and assess the impact of an educational presentation on social media professionalism. Methods. A social media professionalism scale was used in a pre- and post-survey to determine the effects of a social media professionalism presentation. The 26-item scale was administered to 197 first-year pharmacy (P1) students during orientation. Exploratory factor analysis was applied to determine the number of underlying factors responsible for covariation of the data. Principal components analysis was used as the extraction method. Varimax was selected as the rotation method. Cronbach’s alpha was estimated. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare pre- and post-scores of each item, subscale, and total scale. Results. There were 187 (95%) students who participated. The final scale had five subscales and 15 items. Subscales were named according to the professionalism tenet they best represented. Scores of items addressing reading/posting to social media during class, an employer’s use of social media when making hiring decisions, and a college/university’s use of social media as a measure of professional conduct significantly increased from pre-test to post-test. The “honesty and integrity” subscale score also significantly increased. Conclusion. The social media professionalism scale measures five tenets of professionalism and exhibits satisfactory reliability. The presentation improved P1 students’ attitudes regarding social media professionalism. PMID:28630506

  2. It is time to improve the quality of medical information distributed to students across social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucker, Benjamin E; Kontovounisios, Christos

    2018-01-01

    The ubiquitous nature of social media has meant that its effects on fields outside of social communication have begun to be felt. The generation undergoing medical education are of the generation referred to as "digital natives", and as such routinely incorporate social media into their education. Social media's incorporation into medical education includes its use as a platform to distribute information to the public ("distributive education") and as a platform to provide information to a specific audience ("push education"). These functions have proved beneficial in many regards, such as enabling constant access to the subject matter, other learners, and educators. However, the usefulness of using social media as part of medical education is limited by the vast quantities of poor quality information and the time required to find information of sufficient quality and relevance, a problem confounded by many student's preoccupation with "efficient" learning. In this Perspective, the authors discuss whether social media has proved useful as a tool for medical education. The current growth in the use of social media as a tool for medical education seems to be principally supported by students' desire for efficient learning rather than by the efficacy of social media as a resource for medical education. Therefore, improvements in the quality of information required to maximize the impact of social media as a tool for medical education are required. Suggested improvements include an increase in the amount of educational content distributed on social media produced by academic institutions, such as universities and journals.

  3. The role of mass media campaigns in reducing high-risk drinking among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, William

    2002-03-01

    This article categorizes and describes current media campaigns to reduce college student drinking, reviews key principles of campaign design and outlines recommendations for future campaigns. The article describes three types of media campaigns on student drinking: information, social norms marketing, and advocacy. Key principles of campaign design are derived from work in commercial marketing, advertising, and public relations and from evaluations of past public health campaigns. Information campaigns on the dangers of high-risk drinking are common, but none has been rigorously evaluated. Quasi-experimental studies suggest that social norms marketing campaigns, which correct misperceptions of campus drinking norms, may be effective, but more rigorous research is needed. As of this writing, only one major media campaign has focused on policy advocacy to reduce college student drinking, but it is still being evaluated. Lessons for campaign design are organized as a series of steps for campaign development, implementation and assessment: launch a strategic planning process, select a strategic objective, select the target audience, develop a staged approach, define the key promise, avoid fear appeals, select the right message source, select a mix of media channels, maximize media exposure, conduct formative research, and conduct process and outcome evaluations. Future campaigns should integrate information, social norms marketing, and advocacy approaches to create a climate of support for institutional, community and policy changes that will alter the environment in which students make decisions about their alcohol consumption.

  4. The Opinions of Russian School Students and Teachers about Media Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of media violence upon Russian teenagers is rather significant. About half the teenagers were positive about its demonstration: they enjoyed films, television shows, and computer games containing on-screen violence and they admired the characters - including "bad guys". A third of the teenagers were not sure about their opinion of on-screen violence, although they claimed to not be attracted by it. Just 18% of teenagers discuss and share their opinions with their parents. The influence of Russian schools upon the teenage relationship with on-screen violence is minimal. The findings of our analysis: - on the whole students are more tolerant than the teachers to screen violence (men outnumber women. - entertainment is the leading factor attracting audiences to violent scenes in both groups; - watching violent programs in high spirits is for students three times oftener than for teachers; - both students and teachers are most likely to watch and discuss violent scenes together with friends; - students do not like watching violent programs alone; - 1 out of 5 teachers is eager to watch violent content media with their students, 1 out of 3 teachers is ready to discuss it with the students; - on the average, 1 in 10 students would like to share this activity with the teacher; - students talk about violence on the screen twice as much as teachers; - 3 times more students than teachers reported that their aggressiveness increases after the violence seen on the screen; - images of the screen violence linger in girls’/women’ mind longer than in boys’/ men’; - about half of the respondents reported that they remember scenes of violence for a long time; - both the majority of students and teachers tend to believe that screen violence affects the increase of crime in society; - one third of teachers and students agree that most violent media texts should be banned; - quarter of teachers and students think it is necessary to prohibit all

  5. High School Students' Social Media Usage Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezci, Erdogan; Içen, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Social media which is an important product of Computer and Internet Technologies has a growing usage level day by day. Increasing social media usage level gives opportunity for new software developments and making investments in this area. From this aspect, therefore, social media has not only economic function but also make persons participate in…

  6. Media Stereotypes Analysis in the Classroom at the Student Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Media Stereotypes Analysis is the identification and analysis of stereotypical images of people, ideas, events, stories, themes and etc. in media texts. Media stereotype reflects the well-established attitudes towards a particular object, it is schematic averaged, familiar, stable representation of genres, social processes/events, ideas, people,…

  7. Social Network Perspective: Model of Student Knowledge Sharing On Social Network Media

    OpenAIRE

    Bentar Priyopradono; Danny Manongga; Wiranto H. Utomo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the role and development of information technology especially the internet, gives impact and influence in social relationship especially for social network site services users. The impact and influence the use of Internet which is related to exchange information and knowledge sharing still become one of the interesting topics to be researched. Now, the use of social media network by students are the best way to them to increase their knowledge as communication media such as, exchang...

  8. Music and Deaf Culture: Images from the Media and Their Interpretation by Deaf and Hearing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow; Loomis

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was threefold: (a) to examine how the visual media have portrayed the subject of music and the deaf, (b) to verify the validity of these portrayals with members of the deaf community, and (c) to compare and contrast deaf and hearing audiences' impressions of these portrayals. An additional purpose of the research was to examine the results in light of possible misconceptions that may be construed by music therapists and music educators based upon the media's representation of the relationship between music and deaf culture. Since music therapists and music educators are the primary persons responsible for the music instruction of students in school programs for deaf and hard-of-hearing students, it is particularly important that they receive accurate messages about the relationship of music to deaf culture. Fifty deaf (n = 25) and hearing (n = 25) undergraduate college students individually viewed motion picture and television excerpts related to music and the deaf. Subjects were instructed to take notes as needed regarding the content of each excerpt and their impressions. Students were then interviewed in their native language, English or American Sign Language, as to their interpretations and perceptions regarding these excerpts and their accuracy. Interviews of the deaf students were translated into English from American Sign Language by trained interpreters. Written transcriptions were then made of the interpreters' English translations of the interviews with deaf students and of the verbal interviews with hearing students. Interview transcripts from both groups were coded and analyzed for recurring themes and patterns using content analysis. Data analysis revealed cultural patterns for the two groups, impressions specific to individual subjects, and trends in communication style and content for the two groups. Implications for music therapists and music educators are given regarding the influence of the media, characteristics of deaf

  9. Naive Bayes as opinion classifier to evaluate students satisfaction based on student sentiment in Twitter Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candra Permana, Fahmi; Rosmansyah, Yusep; Setiawan Abdullah, Atje

    2017-10-01

    Students activity on social media can provide implicit knowledge and new perspectives for an educational system. Sentiment analysis is a part of text mining that can help to analyze and classify the opinion data. This research uses text mining and naive Bayes method as opinion classifier, to be used as an alternative methods in the process of evaluating studentss satisfaction for educational institution. Based on test results, this system can determine the opinion classification in Bahasa Indonesia using naive Bayes as opinion classifier with accuracy level of 84% correct, and the comparison between the existing system and the proposed system to evaluate students satisfaction in learning process, there is only a difference of 16.49%.

  10. The Effect of 5E-Learning Model Supported with Webquest Media on Students' Achievement and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Semsettin M. S.; Baturay, Meltem Huri

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research study is to investigate the effect of the 5E-learning model supported with WebQuest media on the achievement and satisfaction of students. Therefore, two groups of students were compared in an experimental research design model. The experimental group was exposed to the 5E-learning model supported with WebQuest media;…

  11. Building Professional Social Media Communications Skills: A STEM-Originated Course with University-Wide Student Appeal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baim, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    Routine correspondence with the author's business technology students indicated the need for increased skill and professionalism in social media communications as a key driver of successful career development strategies. A new course designed to assist students in transitioning from typical, casual social media use to the more rigorous and…

  12. "Digitize Me": Generating E-Learning Profiles for Media and Communication Students in a Jamaican Tertiary-Level Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart-McKoy, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop an e-learning profile for a group of media and communication students enrolled in a Jamaican tertiary-level institution in order to make informed decisions most the appropriate [online] learning complement for these students. The objectives sought to determine the e-learning profile of media and…

  13. Finding New Ways to Reach Older Students: Creating a Social Media Marketing Plan for Professional and Continuing Higher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, Marilyn Martin; Johnson, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    Although traditional student enrollment is declining, the nontraditional segment of students is growing. This enrollment pattern will require recruitment strategies that speak directly to the adult learners. There is robust adoption of social media use by individuals and by organizations for marketing purposes. Social media marketing includes…

  14. The Role of Social Media for Collaborative Learning to Improve Academic Performance of Students and Researchers in Malaysian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rahmi, Waleed Mugahed; Othman, Mohd Shahizan; Yusuf, Lizawati Mi

    2015-01-01

    Social media is widely considered to improve collaborative learning among students and researchers. However, there is a surprising lack of empirical research in Malaysian higher education to improve performance of students and researchers through the effective use of social media that facilitates desirable outcomes. Thus, this study offers a…

  15. The Influence of Social Media Use on Male College Students' Gender Identity and Gendered Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Lawrence Charles

    2017-01-01

    To better understand the influence of social media use on male college students' gender identity and male gendered performance, this research examined existing research on digital identity and social networking sites, male gender identity development, college student development theory, and the effects of living arrangements on college students.…

  16. "My Voice Is Definitely Strongest in Online Communities": Students Using Social Media for Queer and Disability Identity-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ryan A.

    2017-01-01

    In this qualitative study I explored the social media activities of 25 lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer students with disabilities at a research-intensive university. Using a framework of identity-making that accounts for students' reflections, narrations, and actions, I detail students' experiences exploring queer/ disability…

  17. What's Our Position? A Critical Media Literacy Study of Popular Culture Websites with Eighth-Grade Special Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Ted; Tinio, Pablo P. L.; Nolan, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an action research project with 9 eighth-grade special education students in a self-contained classroom in an urban public school. The 1st author, in collaboration with the classroom teacher (3rd author), taught the students a critical media literacy framework to explore popular culture websites. Students learned to analyze…

  18. Social Media as Source of Medical Information for Healthcare Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ariana Anamaria CORDOȘ; Sorana D. BOLBOACĂ; Tudor C. DRUGAN

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The scope of the research was a more detailed understanding of the influence of social media and the importance of student’s usage of social media context in relation to medical information. The research aimed to increase the understanding of social media and the impact on medical information use, informing policy and practice while highlighting gaps in the literature and areas for further research. Methods: The search of PubMed database was performed in October 2015, using term...

  19. A course for developing interprofessional skills in pre-professional honor students using humanities and media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Therese I; Stamper-Carr, Connie; Newman, Kate

    2017-09-01

    To design and implement an undergraduate honors course for pre-health professional students that develops interpersonal skills through use of a variety of humanities. A three credit hour course in an honors seminar sequence was developed by pharmacy practice faculty and with input from faculty in mass communications, philosophy, applied communication studies and history. The course utilized a variety of media such as literature, film, and podcasts to foster student discussion about a variety of health-related topics. Topics included public health, stigmatization, portrayals of health care providers, patient experiences, health care ethics, aging, and death and dying. Students were assessed using pre-class assignments and reflective writings as well as a formal written and oral presentation on a selected health-related book. A quasi-experimental design was used to assess the impact of the course on desired course outcomes. The first course offering was to 22 undergraduate pre-health professional honors students. Pre- and post-course surveys on students' perceptions and students' reflective writings revealed achievement of desired course outcomes. Post-course evaluations also revealed positive perceptions about the course. The design of this course provided an outlet for students to read and enjoy various forms of media, while also meeting its goal of exposing students to a variety of humanities. The course allowed students to think critically about various health care issues, and to begin to develop interpersonal skills. The course could be adapted for pharmacy by developing affective domains of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Engaging Students in a Large-Enrollment Physics Class Using an Academically Focused Social Media Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrin, Andy; Lindell, Rebecca

    2017-03-01

    There are many reasons for an instructor to consider using social media, particularly in a large introductory course. Improved communications can lessen the sense of isolation some students feel in large classes, and students may be more likely to respond to faculty announce-ments in a form that is familiar and comfortable. Furthermore, many students currently establish social media sites for their classes, without the knowledge or participation of their instructors. Such "shadow" sites can be useful, but they can also become distributors of misinformation, or venues for inappropriate or disruptive discussions. CourseNetworking (CN) is a social media platform designed for the academic environment. It combines many features common among learning management systems (LMS's) with an interface that looks and feels more like Facebook than a typical academic system. We have recently begun using CN as a means to engage students in an introductory calculus-based mechanics class, with enrollments of 150-200 students per semester. This article presents basic features of CN, and details our initial experiences and observations.

  1. Brand community integration and customer satisfaction of social media network sites among students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayford Amegbe

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine how consumers integrate into brand communities on social media network sites (SNSs and how it affects overall satisfaction of social media sites users among students. The study depends on the service-dominant logic (SDL to develop the constructs for hypotheses testing. The study used a cross-sectional survey research design. The data were col-lected using a web-based survey of university of Nairobi Students. In all, a total of 608 students participated in the survey. The data was analyzed using structural equation modeling with AMOS software. The results revealed that frequency of usage of SNSs and duration of usage positively affect the self –perceived relevance of SNSs. Also, the self-perceived relevance leads to building brand community which finally leads to customer satisfaction. The research was limited to only students of Nairobi and selecting students in itself, which is a limitation as well as limiting it to uni-versity of Nairobi. The younger or the millennial are not the only users of SNSs. We have older generations as well, who also use SNSs for various activities such as professional development among others. Understanding why consumers of social media network site would integrate brand community is seminal for both local and foreign firms doing business in a developing country. This would enable marketing practitioners to craft marketing strategies best for community brand build-ing.

  2. Academic Dishonesty: Does Social Media Allow for Increased and More Sophisticated Levels of Student Cheating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Linda M.; Shelley, Daniel J.

    2018-01-01

    This article examines the effects of the social media applications Facebook, Twitter, Snap Chat/Instagram, Texting and various smartphone applications on academic dishonesty in higher education. The study employed a mixed-methods approach conducted through an emailed question-pro student survey consisting of 20 questions. The results of the study…

  3. Engagement with Electronic Screen Media among Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineo, Beth A.; Ziegler, William; Gill, Susan; Salkin, Donna

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relative engagement potential of four types of electronic screen media (ESM): animated video, video of self, video of a familiar person engaged with an immersive virtual reality (VR) game, and immersion of self in the VR game. Forty-two students with autism, varying in age and expressive communication ability, were…

  4. Beauty and the Beast--Can Life Drawing Support Female Students in Challenging Gendered Media Imagery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Clare

    2013-01-01

    How does life drawing impact on a group of 14-16-year-old female art and design students and their perception of body image? In contemporary Western society, we are bombarded with advertising, social media and celebrity culture on a daily basis, often with a focus on body image. This article questions whether, due to this visual assault, young…

  5. Students' Misconceptions about the Ozone Layer and the Effect of Internet-Based Media on It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungordu, Nahide; Yalcin-Celik, Ayse; Kilic, Ziya

    2017-01-01

    In this study, students' misconceptions about the ozone layer were investigated, looking specifically at the effect internet-based media has on the formation of these misconceptions. Quantitative and qualitative research approaches were used to perform the research. As part of the quantitative portion of the research, the descriptive survey…

  6. HyperGLOB/Freedom: Preparing Student Designers for a New Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawson, Brian

    The HyperGLOB project introduced university-level graphic design students to interactive multimedia. This technology involves using the personal computer to display and manipulate a variety of electronic media simultaneously (combining elements of text and speech, music and sound, still images, motion video, and animated graphics) and allows…

  7. How Students Perceived Social Media as a Learning Tool in Enhancing Their Language Learning Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchakarn, Orachorn

    2016-01-01

    Social media like Facebook has been used for teaching and learning for quite some time. Since it allows for better participation in the learning activities, a fundamental English course at a private university integrated Facebook as a learning platform making it possible for students to do self-study, exchange ideas, give comments, and submit the…

  8. Journalism and Mass Communication Textbook Representations of Verbal Media Skills: Implications for Students with Speech Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Elia M.; Haller, Beth

    2017-01-01

    This study examines representation of disabilities by conducting a qualitative content analysis of how 41 journalism/mass communication textbooks frame the ideal standards of verbal communication for media professionals. Textbooks are integral to students' understanding of professional norms and may influence career decisions. Results show that…

  9. Social Teaching: Student Perspectives on the Inclusion of Social Media in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    The traditional teaching methodologies employed within universities, comprising of lectures and seminars, have come to be scrutinised for their impersonal approach. Recently, social media and networking sites have become increasingly popular as learning and teaching resources in higher education, providing students with increased opportunities for…

  10. Computer Skills and Digital Media Uses among Young Students in Rio de Janeiro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Rosalia; Cazelli, Sibele; Migliora, Rita; Coimbra, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is provide information relevant for the formulation of new policies for the integration of technology in education from the discussion of research results that analyse computer skills and digital media uses among students (between 12 to 18 years old) from schools in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The schools…

  11. International Students' Engagement in Their University's Social Media: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Momoko; Harrigan, Paul; Soutar, Geoffrey Norman

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand the lived experiences of the international students using their university's social media, through a lens of customer engagement (CE) in the services marketing literature. Design/methodology/approach: A case study was conducted in an Australian university. Three semi-structured focus groups with…

  12. Exploring the Influence of the Mass Media on Primary Students' Conceptual Understanding of Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jenny; Venville, Grady

    2012-01-01

    The new Australian Curriculum ignites debate about science content appropriate for primary school children. Abstract genetics concepts such as genes and DNA are still being avoided in primary school, yet research has shown that, by age 10, many students have heard of DNA and/or genes. Scientific concepts appear in the mass media, but primary…

  13. Social Media and Academic Performance of Business Education Students in South-East Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwazor, Joseph Chukwudi; Godwin-Maduike, Chinwe Constance

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze effects of social media on academic performance of business education students in south-east Nigeria. To achieve this, an instrument was designed and sent out to four universities in south-east Nigeria. Out of the 600 copies of the questionnaire distributed, 520 were completely filled and returned giving a…

  14. Social Media Addition and Undergraduate Students' Self-Perception ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A questionnaire named “Social Media Utilisation, Addiction and Self-Perception Questionnaire” (r=0.77) was used for data collection. Seven research questions were answered in the study. Facebook (751 or 90.2%) and Twitter (646 or 77.6%) were the most commonly accessible social media networks while meeting with ...

  15. Empowering Students through Critical Media Literacy: This Means War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodesiler, Luke

    2010-01-01

    Media messages are increasingly packaged in ways that blur distinctions between genres. The U.S. Army National Guard's recent campaign incorporating rock stars and popular music to appeal to potential recruits exemplifies this trend, as commercials and music videos become one and the same. Given this increasing trend, critical media literacy…

  16. A Pedagogy of Inquiry: Toward Student-Centered Media Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Donna

    2010-01-01

    Background: Almost three decades have passed since the Grunwald Declaration on Media Education was issued by the representatives of 19 nations at UNESCO's International Symposium on Media Education in Germany (UNESCO 1982). Cycles of information revolution and education reform over this period have led to significant changes in the sectors of…

  17. Using Media to Broaden Students' Knowledge about Career Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Chantal; Reckker, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Today's media have great influence on young people. Television programs, for instance, play a big role in the stereotyping of many occupations, and this affects the way the youth view these careers. This article highlights some of the stereotypes and what can be done to foster media literacy. The authors stress that CTE instructors should make it…

  18. Development of Interactive Media for ICT Learning at Elementary School Based on Student Self Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Huning Anwariningsih

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of information and comunication technology (ICT curriculum at elementary school is the educational sector development. ICT subject is a practical subject which require a direct practice to make easier in the student understanding. Therefore, a teacher is demanded to make a learning media which helps the student to understand the material of study. This research is aimed at describing the model of ICT study in elementary school and using of learning media. Moreover, the description can be bocome one of the basic from the development of interactive study model base on student self learning. Besides, the arraging of this study model is hoped to make habitual and self learning.

  19. THE EFFECTS OF INQUIRY TRAINING ASSIST MEDIA OF HANDOUT AND ATTITUDE SCIENTIFIC TOWARDS SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS IN PHYSICS STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halimatus Sakdiah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research has described difference: (1 skill of student science process between inquiry training assist media of handout and direct instruction, (2 skill of student science process between student possess attitude scientific upon and under of mean, and (3 interaction of inquiry training assist media handout and direct instruction with attitude scientific increase skill of student science process. Type of this research is experiment quasi, use student of senior high school Private sector of  Prayatna as population and chosen sample by cluster sampling random. The instrument used essay test base on skill of science process which have valid and reliable. Data be analysed by using ANAVA two ways. Result of research show that any difference of skill of student science process (1 between inquiry training assist media of handout and direct instruction, where inquiry training assist media of handout better then direct instruction, (2 between student possess attitude scientific upon and under of mean, where possess attitude scientific upon of mean better then student possess attitude scientific under of mean and (3 any interaction between inquiry training assist media of handout and direct instruction with attitude scientific increase skill of student science process, where interaction in class direct instruction better then inquiry training assist media of handout.

  20. Mass media influence on students' professional illusion formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermakov V.A.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available this article presents mass media activities as a possible source of professional socialization, adequateness of social process informative display in the sphere of young people professional identity. It describes pattern distortion of occupational structure, presents the problem of mass media inadequate influence on students’ understanding about the choice and perspectives of their profession. The main factors which help to create student’s understanding about their professional future are examined.

  1. Social Media Etiquette for the Modern Medical Student: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Harrison

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Most medical students worldwide are using some form of social media platform to supplement their learning via file sharing and to stay up-to-date on medical events. Often, social media may blur the line between socialization and educational use, so it is important to be aware of how one is utilizing social media and how to remain professional. Research has yielded some troublesome themes of misconduct: drunken behaviour, violations of confidentiality and defamation of institutions. Because there is no universal policy to monitor online professionalism, there exists the potential for indiscretions to occur. It has been reported that misdemeanours can affect future residency placements and employment for medical students. Accordingly, studies suggest that educators need to recognize this new era of professionalism and adapt policies and reprimands to meet modern outlets where professionalism may be violated.

  2. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about

  3. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kron Frederick W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1 demographic characteristics; 2 differences between the two universities; 3 how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4 characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%. Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%, felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%, and believed that video games can have educational value (80%. A majority (77% would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%, and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%. However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly

  4. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Frederick W; Gjerde, Craig L; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2010-06-24

    Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about the use of video games and related new

  5. Edugamifying Media Studies: Student Engagement, Enjoyment, and Interest in Two Multimedia and Social Media Undergraduate Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajko, Robert; Hodson, Jaigris; Seaborn, Katie; Livingstone, Pamela; Fels, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Gamification is an increasingly acceptable alternative to traditional classroom structures and practices that is based on the notion that games can be engaging to students. Gamification consists of applying game concepts such as challenges, rewards, and leaderboards to educational materials and courses. While gamification in the classroom is not…

  6. What Immigrant Students Can Teach Us about New Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wan Shun Eva

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents who have immigrant backgrounds are developing language, literacy, and social skills across national borders as they use social media and online tools to interact with people and information sources in different communities across their countries of origin and settlement. These transnational digital practices have the potential to serve…

  7. Middle School Students' Social Media Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Wang, Chuang; Petty, Teresa; Wang, Weichao; Wilkins, Patti

    2018-01-01

    Cyber bullying, digital identity, impact of digital footprints, and use of inappropriate social media are topics that are gaining attention in K-12 schools. As more schools and school districts are implementing 1-1 and "bring your own technology" initiatives, attention to these topics is becoming increasingly important. A total of 593…

  8. Use of social media in education among medical students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuraihi, Anas Khaleel; Almaqati, Ahmed Saeed; Abughanim, Sultan Adnan; Jastaniah, Nisreen Abdulrahman

    2016-12-01

    Social media (SM), a virtual place where people can share, exchange, and communicate their ideas and knowledge, has become the new trend in communication and learning. This study aims to explore Saudi Arabian medical students' usage of SM and to discover the most common resources used in medical education. Furthermore, it aims to illustrate students' belief about the influence of SM on their learning. This cross-sectional study administered validated questionnaires to medical students from different universities in Saudi Arabia, via emails, Twitter, Facebook, and short message service. A non-probability sampling technique was utilized and a sample size of 381 students was arrived at, using 95% confidence interval and 5% margin of error, since the total number of medical students in Saudi Arabia is approximately 36,000. The total respondents were 657 students from 23 different Saudi Arabian medical schools (females: 60.5%, n=397; males: 39.5%, n=260). The questionnaires of 21% of the students (n=139) were excluded from the analysis since they were incomplete. The most common website used by both genders was YouTube (42.3%, n=185); however, males preferred using Twitter and Wikis (p=0.001). With regard to utilizing SM for learning, 95.8% (n=419) of the students believed that it is beneficial. Females stated that SM helps them link basic and clinical science (p=0.003). Medical schools need to improve the utilization of SM by their faculty and students by developing activities and encouraging the usage of SM in education.

  9. THE COMPARISON OF USING SNAKE LADDERS AND SCRABBLE MEDIA TOWARDS VOCABULARY MASTERY OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Pra Setiawati

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Vocabulary is an essential component in learning English. It influences four English skills; they are listening, speaking, reading, and writing, for getting a good result in English. In teaching learning process, the teacher often implements the less interesting method, technique, or even media of vocabulary mastery in teaching and learning process which make the students to be bored, inactive, an uniterested in memorizing English vocabulary. Some media can be interested as the solutions in vocabulary mastery, they are Snake Ladders media and Scrabble media. The investigation was undergone by quantitative research. The researcher applied experimental research. This research underwent pre-test post-test control group design. To analyze data, t-test formula is used to measure the result of collected data. From the t-test measurement, it showed that t-test is 3.15 and t-table is 2.66. It means that t-hit > t-table. Based on the collected data, there is different result of using Snake Ladders from Scrabble media toward students’ vocabulary mastery. It was found that the students who are taught by using Snake Ladders resulted significant outcome than those are instructed by Scrabble media. It means that Snake Ladders is effective to improve the students’ vocabulary mastery.

  10. Quartet cards as the media of career exploration for lower-grade primary school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Ayriza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A career developed through the optimization of one’s potentials will irrevocably play a role in the development of self-identity as well as the psychological well-being of the individual. When children are introduced and allowed to explore as many career options as possible during their developmental stage, they are more likely to have a fruitful career development in the future. The preceding study showed that the career interests and knowledge of lower-grade primary students fit the Holland Career Categories: realistic, investigative, artistic, social, enterprising, and conventional (RIASEC. It was also found that the students’ career interest and knowledge levels varied, with most in the low level. This second-year study aims to expand the results of the previous study by developing the use of Quartet cards as the media of career exploration for lower-grade primary students. By using the research and development method, this study develops Quartet Career Cards into three difficulty levels: low, medium, and high. The Quartet cards media have undergone feasibility tests conducted by experts in theory and media, as well as a series of field testing consisting of preliminary, main, and operational stages among a total of 266 primary students of grades 1, 2, and 3. A revision was made on several components including the images, information, colors, font sizes, illustration styles, and card sizes. The findings show that Quartet Career Cards meet the feasibility standards for the media of career exploration

  11. Exploring College Students' Use of General and Alcohol-Related Social Media and Their Associations with Alcohol-Related Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric W.; Pinkleton, Bruce E.; Weintraub Austin, Erica; Reyes-Velázquez, Wanda

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol marketers have increasingly moved their advertising efforts into digital and social media venues. As a result, the purpose of this study is to investigate associations between students' use of social media, their exposure to alcohol marketing messages through social media, and their alcohol-related beliefs and behaviors.…

  12. [Mass media influence and risk of developing eating disorders in female students from Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo Montoya, Yessenia; Quenaya, Alejandra; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2015-12-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) are a public health problem, and their relationship to mass media is still controversial. To assess whether there is an association between models of body image shown in mass media and the risk of developing EDs among female adolescent students from Lima, Peru. Cross-sectional study conducted in three schools located in the district of La Victoria, Lima, Peru. The risk of developing EDs was measured using the Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26), while mass media influence was measured using the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-3 (SATAQ-3), which was categorized into tertiles both in the overall score and its subscales (information, pressure, general internalization, and athletic internalization). Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) for EDs were estimated. Four hundred and eighty-three students were included, their median age was 14 ? 3 years old. A risk of developing an ED was observed in 13.9% of them. Students who are more influenced by mass media (upper tertile of the SATAQ-3) have a higher probability of having a risk of developing an ED (aPR: 4.24; 95% confidence interval |-CI-|: 2.10-8.56), as well as those who have a greater access to information (PR: 1.89; 95% CI: 1.09-3.25), suffer more pressure (PR: 4.97; 95% CI: 2.31-10.69), show a greater general internalization (PR: 5.00; 95% CI: 2.39-10.43), and show a greater level of athletic internalization (PR: 4.35; 95% CI: 2.19-8-66). The greater the influence of mass media, the greater the probability of having a risk of developing an ED among female students from Lima, Peru.

  13. Cross-sectional study of use of electronic media by secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatrungrit, Komsan; Hongsanguansri, Sirichai

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing concern about the negative psychological effects of excessive use of various electronic media by adolescents but the monitoring of these behaviors in low- and middle-income countries has some methodological flaws. Assess the use of all types of electronic media among secondary school students in Bangkok, Thailand. A stratified random sample of students from four schools in Bangkok completed a modified version of a questionnaire used in a major study in the United States. Among the 768 participants, 443 (57.7%) were female and 325 (42.3%) were male; their mean (sd) age was 15.4 (1.5) years. Almost all respondents had easy access to multiple types of electronic media; 94% had mobile phones, 77% had a television in their bedroom, and 47% had internet access in their bedroom. Over the prior day 39% had watched television shows or movies for more than 3 hours, 28% spent more than 3 hours on social networking sites, 25% listened to music for more than 3 hours, and 18% played computer games for more than 3 hours. Overall, 27% reported using electronic devices for more than 12 hours in the previous day. Only 19% reported parental rules about the use of electronic devices in the home that were regularly enforced. Time engaged in the various activities was not related to parental education or, with the exception of time playing computer games, to students' grade point average. Younger students and male students spent less time than older students and female students using these devices to engage in interactive social activities (e.g., talking on the phone or social networking), while male students spent much more time than female students playing games on the devices. Adolescents spend a substantial part of every single day using different types of electronic devices. Longitudinal studies with precise time logs of device usage and descriptions of the type of content accessed are needed to determine the extent to which these activities have negative (or

  14. First year nursing students' experiences of social media during the transition to university: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Caleb; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Saliba, Bernard; Green, Janet; Moorley, Calvin; Wyllie, Aileen; Jackson, Debra

    2016-10-01

    Social media platforms are useful for creating communities, which can then be utilised as a mean for supportive, professional and social learning. To explore first year nursing student experiences with social media in supporting student transition and engagement into higher education. Qualitative focus groups. Ten 1st year Bachelor of Nursing students were included in three face-to-face focus groups. Data were analysed using qualitative thematic content analysis. Three key themes emerged that illustrates the experiences of transition and engagement of first year student nurses using social media at university. (1) Facilitating familiarity and collaboration at a safe distance, (2) promoting independent learning by facilitating access to resources, and (3) mitigating hazards of social media. This study has demonstrated the importance of social media in supporting informal peer-peer learning and support, augmenting online and offline relationships, and building professional identity as a nurse.

  15. Social media in health professional education: a student perspective on user levels and prospective applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-12-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within health professional curricula. Students enrolled in an undergraduate physiotherapy program were invited to take part in an anonymous, online questionnaire at the end of 2012. The survey consisted of 20 items, gathering demographic data, information on current use of SNS, and opinions regarding the application of SNS into education. Both quantitative and qualitative data were gathered. A total of 142 students, from all years of study, completed the online questionnaire. Only two participants were not current users of social media. Facebook and YouTube had been utilised for educational purposes by 97 and 60 % of participants respectively; 85 % believed that SNS could benefit their learning experience. Only five respondents were not interested in following peers, academic staff, clinicians or professional associations on Facebook. Four key themes emerged: peer collaboration, need for separation between personal and professional realms, complimentary learning and enhanced communication. Students wish to make educational connections via SNS, yet expressed a strong desire to maintain privacy, and a distinction between personal and professional lives. Educational utilisation of SNS may improve communication speed and accessibility. Any educator involvement should be viewed with caution.

  16. Evaluation of social media channel preference for student engagement improvement in universities using entropy and TOPSIS method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyliana Meyliana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze students’ social media preference in order to improve student engagement with university by examining social media implementation quality in terms of information and service quality. Design/methodology/approach: Research methodology is started with the hierarchy creation of student engagement with university which then translated into questionnaire. This questionnaire was distributed to 58 universities in Jakarta (Indonesia’s capital. The questionnaire result was analyzed with entropy and TOPSIS method. Findings: In social media implementation quality, information quality is more important than service quality because in social media, a good information quality is really relevant with the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the information. On the other hand regarding service quality, the system availability will help students in their interaction process with university, on top of the service’s efficiency and fulfillment. This directly impacts the cooperation between students, active learning process, and students’ expectation. The social medias students preferred to improve student engagement with universities respectively are LINE, Facebook, Twitter, Wiki, Blog, Instagram, YouTube, Path, LinkedIn, and Podcast. Research limitations/implications: Social media’s role is not only to create student engagement in the learning process, but also other aspects included by Chickering & Gamson (1987. Practical implications: The Social CRM channel shift from electronic into social media shows that social media holds an important role for university since it eases up the communication between university and the students. The good social media management has been an issue that needs to be solved by university by creating a unit or delegate a person that can manage the social media correctly and quickly so the students feel that they get the good service they want. Originality/value: The other researches focus on observing

  17. Media exposure and the sexual attitudes and behaviors of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, J S; Buerkel-rothfuss, N L

    1987-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between popular media consumption and sexual attitudes and behavior for 475 college students, while controlling for commonly related social-psychological variables. Results indicate that females consume more sexually suggestive media (TV soap operas and pop music) than males. General media consumption was not a powerful predictor of permissiveness. Regression analyses revealed that Music Television consumption was the only media variable significantly associated with permissiveness for females. Self-esteem was positively associated with permissive attitudes and behavior for both males and females. Soap opera consumption was significantly associated with permissive behavior for males but not for females. Sexual permissiveness for females was more significantly related to religiosity but less significantly related to self-esteem than for males. No important extraneous variable influences were found. Findings are discussed in terms of gender differences, the normative context hypothesis, social scripts, the double standard, the sexual revolution, and the cultivation hypothesis.

  18. Social Media and Student Engagement in a Microgravity Planetary Science Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, S. S.; Lai, K.; Hoover, B.; Whitaker, A.; Tiller, C.; Benjamin, S.; Dove, A.; Colwell, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Collisional Accretion Experiment (CATE) is a planetary science experiment funded by NASA's Undergraduate Instrumentation Program (USIP). CATE is a microgravity experiment to study low-velocity collisions between cm-sized particles and 0.1-1.0 mm-sized particles in vacuum to better understand the conditions for accretion in the protoplanetary disk as well as collisions in planetary ring systems. CATE flew on three parabolic airplane flights in July, 2014, using NASA's "Weightless Wonder VI" aircraft. A significant part of the project was documenting the experience of designing, building, testing, and flying spaceflight hardware from the perspective of the undergraduates working on the experiment. The outreach effort was aimed at providing high schools students interested in STEM careers with a first-person view of hands-on student research at the university level. We also targeted undergraduates at the University of Central Florida to make them aware of space research on campus. The CATE team pursued multiple outlets, from social media to presentations at local schools, to connect with the public and with younger students. We created a website which hosted a blog, links to media publications that ran our story, videos, and galleries of images from work in the lab throughout the year. In addition the project had Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts. These social media outlets had much more traffic than the website except during the flight week when photos posted on the blog generated significant traffic. The most effective means of communicating the project to the target audience, however, was through face-to-face presentations in classrooms. We saw a large increase in followers on Twitter and Instagram as the flight campaign got closer and while we were there. The main source of followers came after we presented to local high school students. These presentations were made by the undergraduate student team and the faculty mentors (Colwell and Dove).

  19. What does media use reveal about personality and mental health? An exploratory investigation among German students

    OpenAIRE

    Brailovskaia, Julia; Margraf, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between personality traits, mental health variables and media use among German students. The data of 633 participants were collected. Results indicate a positive association between general Internet use, general use of social platforms and Facebook use, on the one hand, and self-esteem, extraversion, narcissism, life satisfaction, social support and resilience, on the other hand. Use of computer games was found to be negatively related t...

  20. The Relationship between Using Social Media with Internet Addiction and Anxiety among University Students

    OpenAIRE

    Farahnaz Pirouz

    2016-01-01

    The global network of Internet, as one of the most outstanding communication and information technologies, indicates the technological development of the modern man, and its role in making changes social changes cannot be ignored. The present study aims to investigate the relationship between the using social media, Internet addiction and anxiety among university students. The study is a cross-sectional survey of correlational type. The statistical population of the study consisted of all ...

  1. Patient-targeted Googling and social media: a cross-sectional study of senior medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Chester, Aaron N.; Walthert, Susan E.; Gallagher, Stephen J.; Anderson, Lynley C.; Stitely, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Social media and Internet technologies present several emerging and ill-explored issues for a modern healthcare workforce. One issue is patient-targeted Googling (PTG), which involves a healthcare professional using a social networking site (SNS) or publicly available search engine to find patient information online. The study’s aim was to address a deficit in data and knowledge regarding PTG, and to investigate medical student use of SNSs due to a close association with PTG. Metho...

  2. Social Media Providing an International Virtual Elective Experience for Student Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M. Procter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The advances in social media offer many opportunities for developing understanding of different countries and cultures without any implications of travel. Nursing has a global presence and yet it appears as though students have little knowledge of the health and social care needs and provision outside their local environment. Our collaboration across three countries, New Zealand, United Kingdom, and the United States of America, brought the two themes together with the aim of senior student nurses having a communication channel to explore public health issues in each country. Using a closed Facebook™ page, third year undergraduate adult nursing students were invited to take part in a three month pilot study to test the feasibility of virtual collaboration through exchanging public health issues. Here we report upon the collaboration, operation of the social media, and main findings of the study. Three core areas will be reported upon, these being the student’s views of using social media for learning about international perspectives of health, seeing nursing as a global profession and recommendations for future development of this positively reviewed learning technique. To conclude consideration will be given to further development of this work by the collaborative team expanding the countries involved.

  3. The impact of social media on the academic performance of second year medical students at College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Tawfeeq Alahmar

    2016-01-01

    Social media applications and their use among students have witnessed dramatic increase in the last decade and data on their effect on students academic performance are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of social media on the academic performance and grades of second year medical students at the College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Iraq. Second year medical students (n=57) completed online questionnaire about the type of social media they use frequently, time...

  4. Quantifying the persistence of pro-smoking media effects on college students' smoking risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setodji, Claude M; Martino, Steven C; Scharf, Deborah M; Shadel, William G

    2014-04-01

    To quantify the persistence of pro-smoking media exposure effects on college students' intentions to smoke and smoking refusal self-efficacy. A total of 134 college students (ages 18-24 years) were enrolled in an ecological momentary assessment study in which they carried handheld data collection devices for 3 weeks and reported their exposures to pro-smoking media as they occurred in the real world. Smoking intentions and smoking refusal self-efficacy were assessed after each exposure to pro-smoking media and at random prompts during each day of the 3-week assessment period. A generalized additive model was used to determine how long the effect of an exposure to pro-smoking media persisted. The effect of pro-smoking media exposures persisted for 7 days. After exposure, smoking intentions immediately increased (.56; 95% confidence interval [CI]: [.26, .87]) and then steadily decreased (-.12; 95% CI: [-.19, -.05]) each day for 7 days, while smoking refusal self-efficacy immediately decreased (-.42; 95% CI: [-.75, -.10]) and then steadily increased (.09; 95% CI: [.02, .16]) each day for 7 days. Daily changes occurring after 7 days were not statistically significant, suggesting that smoking intentions and refusal self-efficacy had stabilized and were no longer affected by pro-smoking media exposure. Exposures to pro-smoking media may have strong implications for emerging young adults smoking risk as the impact of an individual exposure appears to persist for at least a week. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. Actions improving the image of a nurse in electronic media. Opinion of students at medical courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowska Klaudia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of study was to define actions improving the image of nurses in electronic media. Material and method. 219 women and 44 men took part in a survey. They were the students of the following courses: nursing, medical rescue, obstetrics, medicine, dentistry, pharmaceutics, physiotherapy, public health. The studies were undertaken with use of own questionnaire in 2015. Results. Majority of respondents 64,6% (n=169 stated that improvement of image of their own profession belongs to the nurses, and only 35,4% (n=93 respondents indicated that the professional organizations of nurses and midwives have their impact on it. According to the students, the most crucial action that should be undertaken by professional organizations in order to improve the image of profession in electronic media was the improvement of wages and working conditions (72,2%, n=189 and better promotion of the profession in electronic media (73,8%, n=193. The nurses can influence the improvement of their image in media by taking care of the good opinion about the profession by setting good example (32%, n=84, and also by creating blogs, social forum, online information services, etc. (26,2%, n=69. Conclusions. According to the respondents, the image of a nurse in electronic media is shaped by the television and radio. The mentioned media tend to present nursing environment in a negative light. The data analysis shows that according to the respondents, the professional organizations of nurses and midwives and nurses themselves should be responsible for improvement of the situation. In order to improve the image, the nurses should promote professional achievements, change the stereotype used in shows and movies, and familiarize the public with the profession. The following branches of mass media should be used: internet websites, television and radio.

  6. Interactive fundamental physics. [THE REAL STUFF: The New Expanded Media Physics Course for secondary school students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.L.

    1992-11-24

    THE REAL STUFF is an Expanded Media Physics Course aimed at students still in the formative early years of secondary school. Its consists of a working script for an interactive multimedia study unit in basic concepts of physics. The unit begins with a prologue on the Big Bang that sets the stage, and concludes with a lesson on Newton's first law of motion. The format is interactive, placing the individual student in control of a layered hypermedia'' structure that enables him or her to find a level of detail and difficulty that is comfortable and meaningful. The intent is to make physics relevant, intellectually accessible and fun. On-screen presenters and demonstrators will be females and males of various ages, ethnicities and backgrounds, and will include celebrities and physicists of note. A lean, layered design encourages repeated, cumulative study and makes the material useful for self-directed Teaming even by college students. THE REAL STUFF introduces a new science teaching paradigm, a way to teach science that will engage even students who have declined'' to be interested in science in the past. Increased participation in science by women, African-Americans and Spanish-speaking students is a particular goal.

  7. Use of social media in education among medical students in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas Khaleel Alsuraihi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose Social media (SM, a virtual place where people can share, exchange, and communicate their ideas and knowledge, has become the new trend in communication and learning. This study aims to explore Saudi Arabian medical students’ usage of SM and to discover the most common resources used in medical education. Furthermore, it aims to illustrate students’ belief about the influence of SM on their learning. Methods This cross-sectional study administered validated questionnaires to medical students from different universities in Saudi Arabia, via emails, Twitter, Facebook, and short message service. A non-probability sampling technique was utilized and a sample size of 381 students was arrived at, using 95% confidence interval and 5% margin of error, since the total number of medical students in Saudi Arabia is approximately 36,000. The total respondents were 657 students from 23 different Saudi Arabian medical schools (females: 60.5%, n=397; males: 39.5%, n=260. Results The questionnaires of 21% of the students (n=139 were excluded from the analysis since they were incomplete. The most common website used by both genders was YouTube (42.3%, n=185; however, males preferred using Twitter and Wikis (p=0.001. With regard to utilizing SM for learning, 95.8% (n=419 of the students believed that it is beneficial. Females stated that SM helps them link basic and clinical science (p=0.003. Conclusion Medical schools need to improve the utilization of SM by their faculty and students by developing activities and encouraging the usage of SM in education.

  8. Findings on Student Use of Social Media at the Collegiate, Undergraduate, and Graduate Levels: Implications for Post-Secondary Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Tyler W. S.; Remillard, Chaseten; Aucoin, Robert; Takenishi, Akari

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present findings on social media use by students at two institutions in three levels of postsecondary programs. We find that students are almost universally using at least one social network, with Facebook as the most popular, and Instagram second. Many respondents are simultaneously active on several social networks. However,…

  9. Digital Immigrant Teacher Perceptions of Social Media as It Influences the Affective and Cognitive Development of Students: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert Warren

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study is to describe how digital immigrant teachers perceive the influence of social media on the affective and cognitive development of students at three high schools in Alabama. As the prevalence of social technologies is increasing, educators must understand how it is affecting students in…

  10. Perceptions of the News Media's Societal Roles: How the Views of U.K. Journalism Students Changed during Their Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Mark; Sanders, Karen

    2012-01-01

    A longitudinal study of U.K. journalism undergraduates records how their attitudes on societal roles of the news media changed during university education. Students became more likely to endorse an adversarial approach toward public officials and businesses as extremely important. Yet students did not support these roles as strongly as an older…

  11. Social Media and Peer Feedback: What Do Students Really Think about Using Wiki and Facebook as Platforms for Peer Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirbilek, Muhammet

    2015-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools are becoming increasingly pervasive in higher education, and as a result, there is increasing interest in the use of online feedback activities. This study investigated students' actual experiences and perceptions using social media, Wiki and Facebook, tools to provide peer feedback on students' instructional material projects and to…

  12. Improving Student Employee Training: A Study of Web 2.0 Social Media Tools as a Delivery Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sharon D.

    2012-01-01

    Training student employees in Educational Outreach and Student Services (EOSS) at Arizona State University's West campus is important to maintaining a knowledgeable and productive workforce. This dissertation describes the results of an action research study in which social media tools were utilized as a delivery mechanism for training student…

  13. Students' Perceptions, Attitudes, and Incorporation of Demonstrations, Popular Media Videos, and Animations Concerning Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Students often struggle with learning complex chemistry concepts. In today's society with the advances in multimedia technology, educators have a variety of tools available to help students learn these concepts. These tools include demonstrations, videos in the popular media, and animations; referred to collectively as multimethods. With the…

  14. Association of School Social Networks' Influence and Mass Media Factors with Cigarette Smoking among Asthmatic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, Mariano; Beck, Kenneth H.; Carter-Pokras, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Around 10% of adolescent students under 18 years have current asthma. Asthmatic adolescents smoke as much or more than non-asthmatic adolescents. We explored the association between exposure to mass media and social networks' influence with asthmatic student smoking, and variations of these exposures by sex. Methods: This study…

  15. The mass media exposure and disordered eating behaviours in Spanish secondary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, María; Lameiras, María; Sepulveda, Ana R; Rodríguez, Yolanda; Carrera, María V

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between disordered eating behaviours/attitudes and mass media exposure in a cross-sectional national survey of 1165 Spanish secondary students (age between 14 and 16 years). A battery of questionnaires were used to investigate mass media influence, body dissatisfaction, physical appearance, sociocultural attitudes and self-esteem. Likewise, the EAT-26 questionnaire was used to assess disordered eating behaviours/attitudes, identifying that 6.6% (n = 32) of the male and 13.6% (n = 68) of the female students reached a cut-off point of 20 or above. The main finding was that female and male adolescents with disordered eating showed an increased exposure to TV and magazine sections related to body image, specifically regarding music video channels, in comparison with those without eating disordered, gender-matched counterparts. However, findings indicate that media exposure was different to some degree between males and females with disordered eating behaviour. Males with disordered eating behaviours and attitudes were associated with higher TV and magazine exposure to health sections and also greater body dissatisfaction, internalisation of the thin-ideal and social and appearance comparison. In females, disordered eating was associated with higher TV and magazine exposure to dieting, fashion and sport sections, greater body dissatisfaction, internalisation and awareness of the thin-ideal and lower self-esteem. Understanding the mechanism involved in the media exposure's influence on adolescents is critical in preventing disordered eating.

  16. Learning Quantum Chemical Model with Learning Media Concept Map and Power Point Viewed from Memory and Creativity Skills Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Wahidi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This research is experimental, using first class learning a quantum model of learning with concept maps media and the second media using real environments by power point presentation. The population is all class XI Science, number 2 grade. The sampling technique is done by purposive random sampling. Data collection techniques to test for cognitive performance and memory capabilities, with a questionnaire for creativity. Hypothesis testing using three-way ANOVA different cells with the help of software Minitab 15.Based on the results of data processing, concluded: (1 there is no influence of the quantum model of learning with media learning concept maps and real environments for learning achievement chemistry, (2 there is a high impact memory ability and low on student achievement, (3 there is no the effect of high and low creativity in student performance, (4 there is no interaction learning model quantum media learning concept maps and real environments with memory ability on student achievement, (5 there is no interaction learning model quantum media learning concept maps and real environments with creativity of student achievement, (6 there is no interaction memory skills and creativity of student achievement, (7 there is no interaction learning model quantum media learning concept maps and real environments, memory skills, and creativity on student achievement.

  17. Facebook dethroned: Revealing the more likely social media destinations for college students' depictions of underage drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Sarah C; Earle, Andrew M; LaBrie, Joseph W; Ballou, Kayla

    2017-02-01

    Studies examining representations of college drinking on social media have almost exclusively focused on Facebook. However, recent research suggests college students may be more influenced by peers' alcohol-related posts on Instagram and Snapchat, two image-based platforms popular among this demographic. One potential explanation for this differential influence is that qualitative distinctions in the types of alcohol-related content posted by students on these three platforms may exist. Informed by undergraduate focus groups, this study examined the hypothesis that, of the three platforms, students tend to use Instagram most often for photos glamourizing drinking and Snapchat for incriminating photos of alcohol misuse and negative consequences. Undergraduate research assistants aided investigators in developing hypothetical vignettes and photographic examples of posts both glamorizing and depicting negative consequences associated with college drinking. In an online survey, vignette and photo stimuli were followed by counterbalanced paired comparisons that presented each possible pair of social media platforms. Undergraduates (N=196) selected the platform from each pair on which they would be more likely to see each post. Generalized Bradley-Terry models examined the probabilities of platform selections. As predicted, Instagram was seen as the most probable destination (and Facebook least probable) for photos depicting alcohol use as attractive and glamorous. Conversely, Snapchat was selected as the most probable destination (and Facebook least probable) for items depicting negative consequences associated with heavy drinking. Results suggest researchers aiming to mitigate the potential influences associated with college students' glamorous and consequential alcohol-related photos posted social media posts should shift their focus from Facebook to Instagram and Snapchat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Professional image creation by students on social media sites (in the light of empirical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stankiewicz Janina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Internet has become an important way of our image creation, including the professional one. By participating in social media, it is possible to shape our own image not only in eyes of private persons, but also of potential employers. The aim of the article is to identify activities which were undertaken by young participants in labour market (students associated with creating their own professional image in social media. It was found that they usually concentrated on shaping private relationships, as well as the development of their knowledge of the subjects which were not connected with work or job and also on sharing that knowledge with other users of social media. In contrast, much less attention they paid on creating their own professional image and the development of their careers.

  19. SOCIAL MEDIA USE AND PERCEPTION OF LIVE LECTURES BY MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Narendran

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The current generation is rightly described as generation M (edia highlighting the increasing time spent with media on any given day. The availability of mobiles and the absence of mobile jammers in lecture classes will seriously interfere with lecture attendance or concentration in lecture hours. We intend to take a survey on the level of social media use or use of smartphone for other non-academic uses by medical students during their lecture hours. We expect them to put forward their views as to how they perceive live lectures and what can be done to improve the effect of live lectures in this era of widespread and anytime media use. Aims of the study were- 1. To conduct a survey among medical students in preclinical postings regarding use of social media use during live lecture hours. 2. To assess their perception regarding conventional lecture duration and the factors, which could improve their concentration during lecture hours. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted among the participants. Approval was obtained from the Institutional Research Committee. All the 135 participants of the study were administered a semi-structured prevalidated questionnaire to assess their perception regarding live lecture and a survey regarding use of social media was taken. The collected data was entered into MS Excel and analysed using Epiinfo version 7. Percentages were used to quantify the results. Settings and Design- The study was conducted among third semester students attending pharmacology lectures in Government Medical College, Thrissur. RESULTS 77 (57% participants agreed of using social media regularly in lecture hours. Majority used it to chat or connect with friends and in gaming either because of addiction or to avoid boredom. They were a majority in opinion that the hot noon time lectures should be cut short in duration. They preferred the use of newer technology based methods to be adopted for

  20. EFFECTS OF COOPERATIVE LEARNING MODEL TYPE NUMBERED HEADS TOGETHER USING SIMULATION MEDIA PHET AND ACTIVITIES TOWARD STUDENT RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Mawaddah Lubis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the differences in learning outcomes of students taught by cooperative learning model NHT using simulation PhET and conventional learning, analyzing the differences in learning outcomes of students who have high activity and low activity, as well as the  interaction between learning model with the level of student activity in  influencing the outcome students learn physics. This research is a quasi experimental. The population in this study were students of class X SMK Tritech Informatika Medan. The tests were used to obtain the data is in the form of multiple choice. Test requirements have been carried out in the form of normality and homogeneity, which showed that the normal data and homogeneous. The data were analyzed using Anova analysis of two paths. The results showed that: The physics learning outcomes of students who use cooperative learning model NHT using PhET simulations media is better than students who use conventional learning models. The physics learning outcomes of students who have high learning activities is better than students who have Low learning activities. There is an interaction between cooperative learning model NHT PhET simulations using the media and the level of learning activity in influencing student learning outcomes. Average increase learning outcomes in the control class is greater than the experimental class.

  1. The Analysis of Stereotypes of Politically Engaged Media Texts in Media Studies in Student Audience (by the Example of Renny Harlin’s films “Born American” (1986 and “Five Days of War” (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Fedorov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of skills for the analysis of media texts is an important task of media education. However, media literacy practice shows that students have problems with the discussion / analysis of some genres in the early stages of media studies, for example, the difficulties in the process of understanding and interpreting the author's conception, plot and genre features. This article substantiates the methodological approaches to the analysis of politically engaged media texts in media studies in the student audience.

  2. "Kalosara" Revitalization as an Ethno-Pedagogical Media in the Development of Character of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar; Suardika, I. Ketut; Mursidin, T.; Suleiman, Abdul Rauf; Syukur, Muhammad

    2018-01-01

    The aims of the research are (1) to identify types of character through "kalosara" revitalization as an ethno-pedagogical media in social sciences (IPS) learning at junior high school (SMP), (2) to develop strategy of "kalosara" revitalization as an ethno-pedagogical media in the development of characters of students, and (3)…

  3. Social Media Use for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in Educational Settings: A Systematic Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toofaninejad, Ehsan; Zaraii Zavaraki, Esmaeil; Dawson, Shane; Poquet, Oleksandra; Sharifi Daramadi, Parviz

    2017-01-01

    The pedagogical benefits of the social media may be most pronounced when they impact groups of learners who are at a disadvantage in conventional face-to-face contexts. Among such disadvantaged groups are the deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) students who may experience new opportunities with the help of the social media. This paper stems from the…

  4. Development of an Android Application in the Form of a Simulation Lab as Learning Media for Senior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astra, I Made; Nasbey, Hadi; Nugraha, Aditiya

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to create learning media for senior high school students through an android application in the form of a simulation lab. The method employed in the study is research and development. A simulation lab which has been made subsequently validated by concept and media experts, further empirical testing by teachers and…

  5. Subjective Norms as a Driver of Mass Communication Students' Intentions to Adopt New Media Production Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Toby M.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the impact of subjective norms on mass communication students' intentions to adopt new media production technologies was explored. The results indicated that subjective norms play an instrumental role in explaining behavioral intentions to adopt new media technologies. Moreover, the data indicated that public relations students…

  6. An Examination of the Relationships among United States College Students' Media Use Habits, Need For Cognition, and Grade Point Average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jacob Stephen; Croucher, Stephen Michael

    2014-01-01

    The current study uses survey methods to understand how US college students' use of various types of social media, such as social networking websites and text messaging on smart phones, as well as consumption of traditional media, such as watching television and reading books for pleasure, is (or is not) related to intellectual cognitive…

  7. ORGANIZATION OF SEMINARS WORK FOR STUDENT WITH USING MEDIA INSTRUMENTS OF IKPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Tarasich

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available creates a space of interaction of the student and the teacher. This environment is a information and communication pedagogical environment (IKPE. Using IKPE funds at classroom avoids the monotony of their conduct, to raise students' interest in the learning process and intensify their activities. Seminars helps to ensure a student the basic knowledge, helps develop logical thinking, to form beliefs. In line with the growth of teachers' understanding of the need to introduce information and communication technology and electronic media for educational purposes in the learning process , as well as the students get used to the appropriate provision of information, we are seeing increased of the quality of educational services and thus the quality of knowledge. Constant monitoring of IKPE in universities let us to evaluate not only the quantity and quality of the implementation of new technologies in the educational environment of the university, but also to prioritize of their development. Evaluation of the results of research indicates an increase in the level of ICT using and therefore, in a sense, of improving the quality of education in compliance with the rapid process of society informatization.

  8. Role of obesity and media in body weight concern among female university students in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Al-Mannai, Mariam

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to find out the association of media and obesity status with body weight concern among female university students in Kuwait. 228 female students, aged 19-25 years, were selected at convenience from the Women's College in Kuwait. A previously validated questionnaire was used to collect information on the role of media in body concern and how parents, peers and the girls themselves perceived girls' body shapes. Weight and height were gathered by self-reporting. Use of internet and reading women's magazines had a significant impact on dieting by the girls to lose weight (Pobese girls than non-obese girls. Only watching television had a significant impact on girls' body shape concern (Pobese and 81% of obese girls were dissatisfied with their current weight. There were significant differences between obese and non-obese girls regarding the girls' views and the views of their peers and parents about the body weight of the girls (P<0.000 for all). The pressure from peers and parents, in addition to the mass media, may lead to disturbed attitudes towards eating among Kuwaiti girls. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of media analysis on attitudes and behaviors regarding body image among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabak-Wagener, J; Eickhoff-Shemek, J; Kelly-Vance, L

    1998-07-01

    Particular strategies of media advocacy can help people contest the dominant body images of fashion advertisements and reframe them to include a broader array of "normal" images. A study with an intervention group (n = 60) and a comparison group (n = 45) of undergraduate college students was conducted to investigate whether analyzing and reframing fashion advertisements changed the students' attitudes and behaviors regarding their own body images. Results from the posttest showed a significant change in beliefs among those in the intervention group but no significant change in behaviors. The comparison group showed no significant change in beliefs or behaviors. Posttest results from the women in the intervention group (n = 44) indicated a significant change in the study participants' beliefs that adult models in advertisements have an ideal body size and shape and that the participants' decisions about dieting or exercising should be based more on looks rather than on health status.

  10. The Influence of Social Media Towards Student Political Participation During the 2014 Indonesian Presidential Election

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Kholid

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This research attempts to examine the political par- ticipation of social media users particularly of Facebook and Twitter during the 2014 Indonesian presidential election. The data collection was per- formed through survey with accidental sampling methods. Samples were taken from population of undergraduate students of political and social sci- ences faculty at five universities in Yogyakarta namely UGM, UIN Sunan Kalijaga, UMY, UNY and UPN “Veteran” Yogyakarta. Using statistic descriptive, this research conceptualizes the political participation of social media users while the relations of social me- dia and political participation is analyzed through OLS Regression. The findings indicated that the level of political participation of the social media users during the election was categorized as good. How- ever, the facilities offered by the two social media applications were not maximally used to supporting political participation activities. On the other hand, the result OLS regression shows that there were positive and significant correlations and influences of social media towards the political participation of its users during the election even though the per- centage was small.

  11. THE EFFECT OF INQUIRY TRAINING MODEL USE THE MEDIA PHET AGAINST SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS AND LOGICAL THINKING SKILLS STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajrul Wahdi Ginting

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Purpose of The study: science process skills and logical thinking ability of students who use inquiry learning model training using PhET media; science process skills and logical thinking ability of students who use conventional learning model; and the difference science process skills and logical thinking ability of students to use learning model Inquiry Training using PhET media and conventional learning models. This research is a quasi experimental. Sample selection is done by cluster random sampling are two classes of classes VIII-E and class VIII-B, where the class VIII-E is taught by inquiry training model using media PhET and VIII-B with conventional learning model. The instrument used consisted of tests science process skills such as essay tests and tests of the ability to think logically in the form of multiple-choice tests. The data were analyzed using t test. The results showed that physics science process skills use Inquiry Training models using PhET media is different and showed better results compared with conventional learning model, and logical thinking skills students use Inquiry Training model using PhET media is different and show better results compared with conventional learning, and there is a difference between the ability to think logically and science process skills of students who use Inquiry Training model using PhET media and conventional learning models.

  12. The Amount of Media and Information Literacy Among Isfahan University of Medical Sciences' Students Using Iranian Media and Information Literacy Questionnaire (IMILQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi-Rizi, Hasan; Ramezani, Amir; Koupaei, Hamed Aghajani; Kazempour, Zahra

    2014-12-01

    Media and Information literacy (MIL) enables people to interpret and make informed judgments as users of information and media, as well as to become skillful creators and producers of information and media messages in their own right. The purpose of this research was to determine the amount of Media and Information Literacy among Isfahan University of Medical Sciences' students using Iranian Media and Information Literacy Questionnaire (IMILQ). This is an applied analytical survey research in which the data were collected by a researcher made questionnaire, provided based on specialists' viewpoints and valid scientific works. Its validity and reliability were confirmed by Library and Information Sciences specialists and Cronbach's alpha (r=0.89) respectively. Statistical population consisted of all students in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (6000 cases) and the samples were 361. Sampling method was random stratified sampling. Data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings showed that the mean level of Media and Information Literacy among Isfahan University of Medical Sciences' students was 3.34±0.444 (higher than average). The highest mean was promotion of scientific degree with 3.84±0.975 and the lowest mean was difficulties in starting research with 2.50±1.08. There was significant difference between educational degree, college type and family's income and amount of Media and Information Literacy. The results showed that the students didn't have enough skills in starting the research, defining the research subject as well as confining the research subject. In general, all students and education practitioners should pay special attention to factors affecting in improving Media and Information Literacy as a main capability in using printed and electronic media.

  13. Using social media as a strategy to address 'sophomore slump' in second year nursing students: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tower, Marion; Blacklock, Eddie; Watson, Bernadette; Heffernan, Catherine; Tronoff, Glenyss

    2015-11-01

    An important contributing factor to the shortfall in the nursing workforce is the high attrition rate of students from nursing programmes. Recently, researchers have begun to examine the 'sophomore slump' phenomenon, related to students' sense of low self-efficacy associated with learning in their second year of study, that may be related to attrition. Academic success is heavily influenced by self-efficacy, or a student's belief in their ability to be successful. Strategies that enhance self-efficacy include peer learning, which increases students' engagement and reinforces self-regulated learning. Social networking sites such as Facebook provide students the opportunity to take part in peer learning and may promote students' self-efficacy. The aim of the study was to develop a Facebook forum that utilised peer learning, to build self-efficacy related to learning, of students commencing into the second year of a three year nursing programme. Students commencing into year two of a Bachelor of Nursing programme were invited to join a Facebook forum to support their study. One hundred and ninety-eight students accepted the invitation. Data was collected over a twelve-week period. Text from the Facebook forum was downloaded and analysed thematically. Analysis suggests that Facebook forums may be a useful peer learning strategy to build students' self-efficacy related to study in the second year of nursing study. Students shared mastery experiences, provided modelling experiences, and used verbal persuasion to reframe problems which suggested that it helped build students' self-efficacy, and alleviated some of the physiological response associated with stress. The findings suggest that social media platforms are important tools by which students can engage in peer learning to build self-efficacy around their nursing studies. This may in part help address the 'sophomore slump' phenomenon, enhance students' learning experiences more widely, and impact on students

  14. Snooping and Sexting: Digital Media as a Context for Dating Aggression and Abuse Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Lauren A; Tolman, Richard M; Ward, L Monique

    2016-11-01

    Digital dating abuse (DDA) is a pattern of behaviors that control, pressure, or threaten a dating partner using a cell phone or the Internet. A survey of 365 college students was conducted, finding that digital monitoring behaviors were especially common. There were no gender differences in number of DDA behaviors experienced, but women reported more negative hypothetical reactions to sexual messaging than men. DDA was associated with measures of physical, sexual, and psychological dating violence. Results suggest that digital media are a context for potentially harmful dating behaviors, and the experience of DDA may differ by gender for sexual behaviors. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Enhancing Student Engagement Through Social Media A School of Business Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Glowatz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available While many universities have been deploying both electronic learning (eLearning and social media applications for academic purposes, there is currently little research on the impact on their use on students’ overall learning experiences and associated learning possibilities. This paper elaborates on several online academic activities, such as Facebook, Twitter and quizzes for one classroom taught school of business undergraduate (UG module. The similarities and differences discovered across all aspects of this paper’s research findings are examined against Chickering & Gamson’s [1] seven principles of good practice teaching and Astin’s [2] five tenets of engagement. Online activities were tracked over a period of one academic semester (fifteen weeks and results insinuate that innovative and sustainable social media can indeed be utilised in higher education to enhance student learning and engagement.

  16. Impact of today's media on university student's body image in Pakistan: a conservative, developing country's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amad N; Khalid, Salema; Khan, Hussain I; Jabeen, Mehnaz

    2011-05-24

    Living in a world greatly controlled by mass media makes it impossible to escape its pervading influence. As media in Pakistan has been free in the true sense of the word for only a few years, its impact on individuals is yet to be assessed. Our study aims to be the first to look at the effect media has on the body image of university students in a conservative, developing country like Pakistan. Also, we introduced the novel concept of body image dissatisfaction as being both negative and positive. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 7 private universities over a period of two weeks in the city of Karachi, Pakistan's largest and most populous city. Convenience sampling was used to select both male and female undergraduate students aged between 18 and 25 and a sample size of 783 was calculated. Of the 784 final respondents, 376 (48%) were males and 408 (52%) females. The mean age of males was 20.77 (+/- 1.85) years and females was 20.38 (+/- 1.63) years. Out of these, 358 (45.6%) respondents had a positive BID (body image dissatisfaction) score while 426 (54.4%) had a negative BID score. Of the respondents who had positive BID scores, 93 (24.7%) were male and 265 (65.0%) were female. Of the respondents with a negative BID score, 283 (75.3%) were male and 143 (35.0%) were female. The results for BID vs. media exposure were similar in both high and low peer pressure groups. Low media exposure meant positive BID scores and vice versa in both groups (p media exposure and negative body image dissatisfaction. Finally, we looked at the association between gender and image dissatisfaction. Again a statistically significant association was found between positive body image dissatisfaction and female gender and negative body image dissatisfaction and male gender (p media to have an overall negative effect on individuals' body image. A striking feature of our study, however, was the finding that negative body image dissatisfaction was found to be more prevalent in

  17. A guide for using social media in environmental science and a case study by the Students of SETAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Sarah R; Biermans, Geert; Hicks, Andrea; Jevtić, Dragan M; Rodriguez-Gil, Jose Luis; Brockmeier, Erica K

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, the use of social media has gradually become an important part of our daily lives. While some might see this as a threat to our productivity or as a source of procrastination, social media as a whole have unquestionably changed the way in which information and knowledge disseminate in our society. This article is meant to serve as a guide for scientists who would like to establish their online presence and includes an outline of the benefits of using social media as well as strategies for establishing and improving your presence in social media. Environmental scientists in particular can benefit enormously from this approach, since this field of science deals with topics that directly impact our daily lives. To highlight these approaches for our fellow scientists in the field of environmental science and toxicology and in order to better engage with our own peers, we describe the outreach methods used by the student advisory councils of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) and how we have worked towards an improved social media presence. In this article we present our initiatives to increase social media usage and engagement within SETAC. This includes joint social media accounts organized by the SETAC student advisory councils from various SETAC geographical units. We also led a course on social media usage at the SETAC Nashville meeting in 2013 and are currently developing other outreach platforms, including high school student-oriented science education blogs. The Students of SETAC will continue to increase communication with and among SETAC students on a global level and promote the use of social media to communicate science to a wide variety of audiences.

  18. "iM Ready to Learn": Undergraduate Nursing Students Knowledge, Preferences, and Practice of Mobile Technology and Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Benjamin; Carr, Peter J; Dawe, Lydia; Clark-Burg, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify in what way social media and mobile technology assist with learning and education of the undergraduate nurse. The study involved undergraduate nursing students across three campuses from the University of Notre Dame Australia. Participants were invited to complete an online questionnaire that related to their current knowledge, preferences, and practice with mobile technology and social media within their undergraduate nursing degree. A quantitative descriptive survey design was adapted from an initial pilot survey by the authors. A total of 386 nursing students (23.47% of the total enrolment) completed the online survey. Overall, results suggested that students are more supportive of social media and mobile technology in principle than in practice. Students who frequently use mobile technologies prefer to print out, highlight, and annotate the lecture material. Findings suggest that nursing students currently use mobile technology and social media and are keen to engage in ongoing learning and collaboration using these resources. Therefore, nursing academia should encourage the appropriate use of mobile technology and social media within the undergraduate curriculum so that responsible use of such technologies positively affects the future nursing workforce.

  19. Simulation Of Social Reality Through New Media Study On YOGYAKARTA Students Smartphones Users (Simulasi Realitas Sosial melalui New Media Studi pada Mahasiswa YOGYAKARTA Pengguna Smartphone)

    OpenAIRE

    Astuti, Yanti Dwi

    2017-01-01

    This research is tries to uncover the simulation of social reality of social media and instant messaging application through smartphone that removed the student communication landscape become borderless in Yogyakarta. Smartphone application has creating a new space which brought a second reality for the student to communicate. Transformation phenomena from the real interaction society towards virtual society are important and interesting study further. In terms of analyzing this study uses th...

  20. The remote, the mouse, and the no. 2 pencil: the household media environment and academic achievement among third grade students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzekowski, Dina L G; Robinson, Thomas N

    2005-07-01

    Media can influence aspects of a child's physical, social, and cognitive development; however, the associations between a child's household media environment, media use, and academic achievement have yet to be determined. To examine relationships among a child's household media environment, media use, and academic achievement. During a single academic year, data were collected through classroom surveys and telephone interviews from an ethnically diverse sample of third grade students and their parents from 6 northern California public elementary schools. The majority of our analyses derive from spring 2000 data, including academic achievement assessed through the mathematics, reading, and language arts sections of the Stanford Achievement Test. We fit linear regression models to determine the associations between variations in household media and performance on the standardized tests, adjusting for demographic and media use variables. The household media environment is significantly associated with students' performance on the standardized tests. It was found that having a bedroom television set was significantly and negatively associated with students' test scores, while home computer access and use were positively associated with the scores. Regression models significantly predicted up to 24% of the variation in the scores. Absence of a bedroom television combined with access to a home computer was consistently associated with the highest standardized test scores. This study adds to the growing literature reporting that having a bedroom television set may be detrimental to young elementary school children. It also suggests that having and using a home computer may be associated with better academic achievement.

  1. The pattern of social media use and its association with academic performance among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlFaris, Eiad; Irfan, Farhana; Ponnamperuma, Gominda; Jamal, Amr; Van der Vleuten, Cees; Al Maflehi, Nassr; Al-Qeas, Sairaa; Alenezi, Awtan; Alrowaished, Mashael; Alsalman, Reem; Ahmed, Abdullah M A

    2018-05-06

    There are concerns that the use of social media (SM) among medical students could affect academic performance. The objectives of the study were to investigate the pattern and reasons for SM use and their association with academic performance. A stratified random sample, frequency distribution and comparison of categorical variables with Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used. Of the 97% who responded, 98% used SM. The most popular were Whatsapp (87.8%), You tube (60.8%) and Twitter (51.8%) for general use; while You tube (83.5%), Whatsapp (35.5%) and Twitter (35.3%) for learning. For general use, there was a significant higher number of visits to You tube and Facebook among male students, while the reverse was true for Instagram and Path. Around 71% visited SM >4 times/day and 55% spent 1-4 hours/day. The main reasons for SM use were entertainment (95.8%), staying up-to-date with news (88.3%), and socializing (85.5%); for academic studies (40%). There was no significant association between Grade Point Average and the frequency of daily SM use or use during lectures. While almost all the students used SM, only a minority used them for academic purposes. SM use was not associated with academic performance.

  2. Empowering students to respond to alcohol advertisements: results from a pilot study of an Australian media literacy intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Chloe S; Jones, Sandra C; Kervin, Lisa; Lee, Jeong Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol media literacy programs in the United States have increased students' media literacy skills and lowered pre-drinking behaviour. In Australia, no such programs have yet been implemented or evaluated. This pilot study aimed to examine the feasibility and potential impact of an alcohol media literacy program for Australian upper-primary school children. Thirty-seven Year 5 and 6 students (aged 10-12) from one school in the Sydney region participated in 10 one-hour media lessons. Teacher interviews, student exit slips, teacher observations and a researcher reflective journal were analysed to examine the implementation process, while a pre- and post-questionnaire was analysed to measure outcome. Key factors in implementation were the importance of school context; attainment of English and PDHPE learning outcomes to differing extents; program's useability provided flexibility; perceived complexity and achievability of the lessons and program's engagement and relevance for the students. The program significantly increased media literacy skills and understanding of persuasive intent; decreased interest in alcohol branded merchandise; and lowered perception of drinking norms. An Australian alcohol media literacy program for upper-primary school children appears feasible, and has potential to lead to measurable outcomes. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  3. Impact of today's media on university student's body image in Pakistan: a conservative, developing country's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Hussain I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Living in a world greatly controlled by mass media makes it impossible to escape its pervading influence. As media in Pakistan has been free in the true sense of the word for only a few years, its impact on individuals is yet to be assessed. Our study aims to be the first to look at the effect media has on the body image of university students in a conservative, developing country like Pakistan. Also, we introduced the novel concept of body image dissatisfaction as being both negative and positive. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 7 private universities over a period of two weeks in the city of Karachi, Pakistan's largest and most populous city. Convenience sampling was used to select both male and female undergraduate students aged between 18 and 25 and a sample size of 783 was calculated. Results Of the 784 final respondents, 376 (48% were males and 408 (52% females. The mean age of males was 20.77 (+/- 1.85 years and females was 20.38 (+/- 1.63 years. Out of these, 358 (45.6% respondents had a positive BID (body image dissatisfaction score while 426 (54.4% had a negative BID score. Of the respondents who had positive BID scores, 93 (24.7% were male and 265 (65.0% were female. Of the respondents with a negative BID score, 283 (75.3% were male and 143 (35.0% were female. The results for BID vs. media exposure were similar in both high and low peer pressure groups. Low media exposure meant positive BID scores and vice versa in both groups (p Conclusions Our study confirmed the tendency of the media to have an overall negative effect on individuals' body image. A striking feature of our study, however, was the finding that negative body image dissatisfaction was found to be more prevalent in males as compared to females. Likewise, positive BID scores were more prevalent amongst females.

  4. Matching Level between Professors’ Selected Media and Emotional-Perception Preferences of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedayati N

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Considering individual differences and different learning styles in the learners is necessary in more effective learning. If the used learning style may be fully correspond with the students’ preffered style, there is a better learning performance. The aim of this study was to assess the conformity of the students’ learning styles with educational media and technologies used by the teachers at Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Instrument & Methods: In the descriptive-correlational study, 90 medicine and dentistry students of Isfahan University were randomly selected via Stratified Sampling method in 2014-15 academic year. The study tool was a researcher-made questionnaire to investigate the learning styles and technologies used by the teachers. Data was analyzed in SPSS 22 software using Hotelling’s T test, and Somers’, Kendall’s, and Gamma Agreement Coefficients. Findings: From the students’ viewpoints, visual and auditory styles were the most and the least preffered styles, respectively. A combination of the technologies was used by the teachers. In addition, visual and kinesthetic/motion mediae were the most and the least used technologies by the teachers, respectively. There was no significant conformity between read/write, aural, and kinesthetic/motion styles of the students and the technologies used by the teachers (p>0.05. Neverheless, there was a significant conformity between the students’ visual style and the visual technologies used by the teachers (p<0.05. Conclusion: There is conformity between the technologies used by the teachers of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and the students’ viual learning style. However, the technologies are not compatible with read/write, aural, and kinesthetic/motion styles of the students.

  5. Using Social Media to Measure Student Wellbeing: A Large-Scale Study of Emotional Response in Academic Discourse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkova, Svitlana; Han, Kyungsik; Corley, Courtney D.

    2016-11-15

    Student resilience and emotional well-being are essential for both academic and social development. Earlier studies on tracking students' happiness in academia showed that many of them struggle with mental health issues. For example, a 2015 study at the University of California Berkeley found that 47% of graduate students suffer from depression, following a 2005 study that showed 10% had considered suicide. This is the first large-scale study that uses signals from social media to evaluate students' emotional well-being in academia. This work presents fine-grained emotion and opinion analysis of 79,329 tweets produced by students from 44 universities. The goal of this study is to qualitatively evaluate and compare emotions and sentiments emanating from students' communications across different academic discourse types and across universities in the U.S. We first build novel predictive models to categorize academic discourse types generated by students into personal, social, and general categories. We then apply emotion and sentiment classification models to annotate each tweet with six Ekman's emotions -- joy, fear, sadness, disgust, anger, and surprise and three opinion types -- positive, negative, and neutral. We found that emotions and opinions expressed by students vary across discourse types and universities, and correlate with survey-based data on student satisfaction, happiness and stress. Moreover, our results provide novel insights on how students use social media to share academic information, emotions, and opinions that would pertain to students academic performance and emotional well-being.

  6. The impact of social media on the academic performance of second year medical students at College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Tawfeeq Alahmar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Social media applications and their use among students have witnessed dramatic increase in the last decade and data on their effect on students academic performance are inconsistent. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of social media on the academic performance and grades of second year medical students at the College of Medicine, University of Babylon, Iraq. Second year medical students (n=57 completed online questionnaire about the type of social media they use frequently, time spent on these media in hours per day, the reasons for use of these media and the effect of social media on their grades. Students were also asked to provide the cumulative grades of physiology and anatomy courses. Time spent by students on social media and facebook messenger was correlated with combined grades of physiology and anatomy courses. All students have been using facebook and 96.5% have been using facebook messenger. Other popular applications were telegram, instagram and ask.fm. Average time spent on social media was 5.07+/- 2.93 and on facebook messenger was 1.80 +/-1.45 hours per day. Forty-two percent of students reported that social media have positive effect on their academic performance. No correlation has been found between time spent on social media or facebook messenger and students combined grades of physiology and anatomy. To conclude, social media and in particular facebook and facebook messenger are very popular among second year medical students. Time spent on social media seems to have no influence on second year medical students grades and academic performance. [J Med Allied Sci 2016; 6(2.000: 77-83

  7. Patient-targeted Googling and social media: a cross-sectional study of senior medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Aaron N; Walthert, Susan E; Gallagher, Stephen J; Anderson, Lynley C; Stitely, Michael L

    2017-12-04

    Social media and Internet technologies present several emerging and ill-explored issues for a modern healthcare workforce. One issue is patient-targeted Googling (PTG), which involves a healthcare professional using a social networking site (SNS) or publicly available search engine to find patient information online. The study's aim was to address a deficit in data and knowledge regarding PTG, and to investigate medical student use of SNSs due to a close association with PTG. The authors surveyed final year medical students at the Otago Medical School, University of Otago in January 2016. A subset completed focus groups that were analysed using thematic analysis to identify key themes relating to students' attitudes towards PTG, and reasons why they might engage in PTG. Fifty-four students completed the survey (response rate = 65.1%), which showed that PTG was uncommon (n = 9, 16.7%). Attitudes were varied and context dependent. Most participants saw problems with PTG and favoured more explicit guidance on the issue (n = 29, 53.7%). SNS usage was high (n = 51, 94.4%); participants were concerned by the content of their SNS profiles and who they were connecting with online. Participants showing high SNS use were 1.83 times more likely to have conducted PTG than lower use groups. The diverse attitudes uncovered in this study indicated that teaching or guidelines could be useful to healthcare professionals considering PTG. Though ethically problematic, PTG may be important to patient care and safety. The decision to conduct PTG should be made with consideration of ethical principles and the intended use of the information.

  8. The Relation of Smart Phone Addiction to Social Media Usage and Five Factor Personality Trait: A Research on University Students

    OpenAIRE

    IŞIK, Metin; KAPTANGİL, İrem

    2018-01-01

    In today’s society, social media usage through smartphones has becomean indispensable part of everyday life, especially among university students.This situation brings up the smartphone addiction problem with it and it isthought that it can be explained by associating the case with personalitytraits. Therefore, in this research; smartphone dependency levels and socialmedia usage in students' relation to the Five Factor Personality traits havebeen reviewed. To acquire the relevant researc...

  9. Investigate the relation between the media literacy and information literacy of students of communication science and information science and knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Esmaeil Pounaki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The new millennium is called Information Age, in which information and communication technologies have been developed. The transfer from industrial society to information society has changed the form and level of education and information from those of the past times. In the past, literacy meant the ability of reading and writing, but today the meaning of literacy has been changed through the time and such a type of literacy is not enough to meet people’s needs in the industrial society of the 21st century. Today’s life requires media and information literacy especially for the students, whose duty is to research and who have a significant role in the development of their country from any perspective. This research aims to study the relation between the media literacy and information literacy of the students of the fields of communication science and information science and knowledge. This is an applied research in terms of its objective and uses a survey-correlation method. The statistical population of this research consists of the postgraduate students studying in the fields of study of information science and knowledge and communication science at Tehran University and Allameh Tabatabai University. The data required for this research were collected by a researcher-made questionnaire. The reliability of the questionnaire has been evaluated by Cronbach’s Alpha, which was equal to 0.936. The data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistic methods. The results showed that the level of media literacy and information literacy of students is desirable. There is a significant relationship between the economic status of students and their media literacy. However, the social status of students was directly related to their "ability to communicate" variable of media literacy. Also the Pearson correlation test showed a significant relationship between the variables of media literacy and information literacy.

  10. PENERAPAN METODE STUDENT ACTIVE LEARNING (SAL MELALUI MULTI MEDIA POWER POINT UNTUK MENINGKATKAN KEAKTIFAN, KETERAMPILAN BERDISKUSI, DAN HASIL BELAJAR MATEMATIKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustinah Rustinah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is find math learning scenarios format with active student learning method of learning mathematics by using multimedia power point to determine how much influence can enhance the activity, discuss the skills and student learning outcomes. Subjects examined or samples studied were students who study at grade students geometry IX.2 SMP Negeri 3 Batanghari, East Lampung. This study occurred during the three months using three cycles. The variables measured in the study include the involvement of the student in the learning process, skills in using media power point and student learning outcomes. Conclusions of this research is that it can increase the creativity of teachers using a variety of learning resources and selection methods that can encourage the creation of a learning process student active learning with contextual approach through multimedia. Can enhance the activity, and fun atusiasme students during the learning process, improve students' skills in solving problems and improve learning outcomes, especially the material geometry.

  11. THE EFFECT OF THE PICTORIAL NUMERIC CARD MEDIA TOWARD IMPROVEMENT OF THE SUMMATION COMPUTATION ABILITY FOR STUDENT WITH INTELLECTUAL DISSABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isna Nur Hikmah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The reseach’s purpose was to analyze the effect of picture numeric card media toward improvement of the summation computation ability for student with intellectual disability of grade IV in SDLB. Data collected was analyzed with experiment technique and single subject research A-B design. Research result showed that: after being analyzed between condition overlap persentase was 0%. Thus, it could be concluded that there was effect of pictorial numeric card media toward summation computation ability of student with intellectual disability

  12. Motivational Videos and the Library Media Specialist: Teachers and Students on Film--Take 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohot, Cameron Brooke; Pfortmiller, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Today's students are bombarded with digital imagery and sound nearly 24 hours of the day. Video use in the classroom is engaging, and a teacher can instantly grab her students' attention. The content of the videos comes from many sources; the curriculum, the student handbook, and even the school rules. By creating the videos, teachers are not only…

  13. Using Social Media to Improve Student-Instructor Communication in an Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Rong; Shen, Yide; Li, Lei

    2018-01-01

    The lack of effective faculty-student interaction has been identified as a main contributor to the high dropout rate in online education. For this paper, the authors conducted an empirical study using a social networking tool, specifically Facebook, to improve student-instructor communication and student performance in an online learning…

  14. Social Media in Health Professional Education: A Student Perspective on User Levels and Prospective Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within…

  15. Sexual Encounters: Gay Male College Students' Use of the Internet and Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, Rinardo Lamon

    2012-01-01

    There have been many studies that focus on understanding various aspects of human sexuality and how it relates to college students. However, the current research focuses on heterosexual students, leaving a void in the research that focuses on gay male college students. Even more crucially, there is a void in research that focuses on the sexual…

  16. Academic and Social Media Practices of Arabic Language among Malaysian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Wail; Zailani, Muhammad Azhar; Awad, Zakaria Alcheikh Mahmoud; Hussin, Zaharah; Faisal, Mohd; Saad, Rahimi

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, more and more countries are paying attention to graduates' language skill and sending their students abroad to learn languages. As an Islamic country, Malaysia has sent many students to learn Arabic language and Islamic knowledge. This paper aims at examining the level of practice of Arabic language among Malaysian students in Jordanian…

  17. Tourism-themed internet portals – are new media creating a new tourist? A case study of Polish students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jażdżewska Iwona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Internet media have an influence on many tourism-related issues. This article presents the results of research into the role of tourism-themed portals in the trips taken by Polish university students between 2010 and 2012. The research sought to answer the following questions: whether tourism-related internet media have an influence on the students’ behaviour before, during the trip and when they arrive at their destination; how often they are used by the respondents during their trips; and whether Polish students actively participate in internet media by voicing their opinions. As it appears, internet media serve as one of the “travel companions” for young people. They are used when preparing the trip, the vast majority “take them” with them and check them during the trip, while almost half of them check them on vacation, e.g. to share their experience over the internet.

  18. THE EFFECT OF THE PICTORIAL NUMERIC CARD MEDIA TOWARD IMPROVEMENT OF THE SUMMATION COMPUTATION ABILITY FOR STUDENT WITH INTELLECTUAL DISSABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Isna Nur Hikmah; Usep Kustiawan

    2016-01-01

    The reseach’s purpose was to analyze the effect of picture numeric card media toward improvement of the summation computation ability for student with intellectual disability of grade IV in SDLB. Data collected was analyzed with experiment technique and single subject research A-B design. Research result showed that: after being analyzed between condition overlap persentase was 0%. Thus, it could be concluded that there was effect of pictorial numeric card media toward summation computation a...

  19. What does media use reveal about personality and mental health? An exploratory investigation among German students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Brailovskaia

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between personality traits, mental health variables and media use among German students. The data of 633 participants were collected. Results indicate a positive association between general Internet use, general use of social platforms and Facebook use, on the one hand, and self-esteem, extraversion, narcissism, life satisfaction, social support and resilience, on the other hand. Use of computer games was found to be negatively related to these personality and mental health variables. The use of platforms that focus more on written interaction (Twitter, Tumblr was assumed to be negatively associated with positive mental health variables and significantly positively with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. In contrast, Instagram use, which focuses more on photo-sharing, correlated positively with positive mental health variables. Possible practical implications of the present results for mental health, as well as the limitations of the present work are discussed.

  20. What does media use reveal about personality and mental health? An exploratory investigation among German students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margraf, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between personality traits, mental health variables and media use among German students. The data of 633 participants were collected. Results indicate a positive association between general Internet use, general use of social platforms and Facebook use, on the one hand, and self-esteem, extraversion, narcissism, life satisfaction, social support and resilience, on the other hand. Use of computer games was found to be negatively related to these personality and mental health variables. The use of platforms that focus more on written interaction (Twitter, Tumblr) was assumed to be negatively associated with positive mental health variables and significantly positively with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. In contrast, Instagram use, which focuses more on photo-sharing, correlated positively with positive mental health variables. Possible practical implications of the present results for mental health, as well as the limitations of the present work are discussed. PMID:29370275

  1. What does media use reveal about personality and mental health? An exploratory investigation among German students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailovskaia, Julia; Margraf, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between personality traits, mental health variables and media use among German students. The data of 633 participants were collected. Results indicate a positive association between general Internet use, general use of social platforms and Facebook use, on the one hand, and self-esteem, extraversion, narcissism, life satisfaction, social support and resilience, on the other hand. Use of computer games was found to be negatively related to these personality and mental health variables. The use of platforms that focus more on written interaction (Twitter, Tumblr) was assumed to be negatively associated with positive mental health variables and significantly positively with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms. In contrast, Instagram use, which focuses more on photo-sharing, correlated positively with positive mental health variables. Possible practical implications of the present results for mental health, as well as the limitations of the present work are discussed.

  2. What Drives Students' Loyalty-Formation in Social Media Learning within a Personal Learning Environment Approach? The Moderating Role of Need for Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arquero, José L.; del Barrio-García, Salvador; Romero-Frías, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Our study analyzes an educational experience based on the integrated use of social media within a higher education course under a personal learning environment approach and investigates the factors that determine students' loyalty to social media learning. We examined the moderating role of need for cognition (NFC) in students' formation of…

  3. Understanding the Use and Impact of Social Media Features on the Educational Experiences of Higher-Education Students in Blended and Distance-Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, Michael John

    2014-01-01

    Students are increasingly expecting social media to be a component of their educational experiences both outside and inside of the classroom. The phenomenon of interest in this dissertation is understanding how the educational experiences of students are affected when social media are incorporated into online and blended course activities.…

  4. Influence of the Use of Online Communications Media on Perceptions of Transactional Distance and Student Satisfaction in a Hybrid Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullwood, Elicia Dynae

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the uses of online communications media in an undergraduate hybrid course that yielded the least transactional distance perceived by students and the highest student satisfaction with distance education. The study was based on student responses to the Distance Education Learning Environment Survey having…

  5. An Exploration of the Associations of Alcohol-Related Social Media Use and Message Interpretation Outcomes to Problem Drinking Among College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Eric W; Austin, Erica Weintraub; Pinkleton, Bruce E; Austin, Bruce W

    2017-07-01

    College students' use of digital communication technology has led to a rapid expansion of digital alcohol marketing efforts. Two surveys (total usable n = 637) were conducted to explore college students' experiences with alcohol-related social media, their decision making related to alcohol use, and their problematic drinking behaviors. Study results indicated that students' use of alcohol-related social media predicted their problem drinking behaviors. In addition, students' wishful identification, perceived desirability, perceived similarity, and normative beliefs predicted their expectancies for drinking alcohol. Finally, students' expectancies for drinking alcohol predicted their problematic drinking behaviors.

  6. How students use Facebook

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseling-Weijers, N.F.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the way in which first year students use Facebook. An overview of recent studies on Facebook usage and a survey is presented. The latter is an online questionnaire on the Facebook activities of 618 students (78.6 % of all first year students) of the Media department of

  7. "Digitize Me": Generating E-Learning Profiles for Media and Communication Students in a Jamaican Tertiary-Level Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A. Stewart-McKoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this project was to develop an e-learning profile for a group of media and communication students enrolled in a Jamaican tertiary-level institution in order to make informed decisions most the appropriate [online] learning complement for these students. The objectives sought to determine the e-learning profile of media and communication students but more specifically, the profile examined students’ demographic data, their technology access, usage, proficiency and comfort levels as well as their learning styles, preferences, behaviours, strategies and their preferences for specific teaching styles. The research utilised a survey research design and the participants involved in the research were ninety-eight students from all year groups in the programme. Findings reveal that the “typical” media and communication student is a young Jamaican adult with limited technology access, usage and proficiency, who stays connected with others largely by phone texts, phone calls, emails, instant messages and posts via the Facebook social network, who has a visual-learning orientation, is a sequential learner who is extrinsically motivated and who readily employs surface learning strategies.

  8. A Problem-Based Learning Approach of Teaching Mathematics to Media Technology Students Using a Game Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Evangelia; Misfeldt, Morten; Timcenko, Olga

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we present our idea of using a game engine (Unity) to teach Media Technology students mathematics-related concepts. In order to observe how the introduction of a technological tool, namely the game engine, changes the practices in mathematical work, we adopted the anthropological...

  9. Determining Advanced and Basic Financial Literacy Relations and Overconfidence, and Informative Social Media Association of University Students in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaa, Ibrahim E.; Kugu, Tayfun D.

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of the paper are, first, to investigate financial literacy in university students and to determine the relationship between basic and advanced financial literacy; second, to present a positive association between social media usage and financial literacy; third, to examine demographic factors consistent with previous studies; and,…

  10. Take a Break: Examining College Students' Media Multitasking Activities and Motivations during Study- or Work-Related Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononova, Anastasia G.; Yuan, Shupei

    2017-01-01

    A survey (N = 524) examined how frequently college students engage in multitasking with social media, texting/instant messaging (IM), and music while studying/working and what motivates them to multitask with each medium. Four out of five participants multitasked with Facebook and texting/IM, and two out of three multitasked with music. Habit was…

  11. What Counts as Writing? An Examination of Students' Use of Social Media Platforms as Alternative Authoring Paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Olivia Grace

    2017-01-01

    In this article-style dissertation, I explore how students used digital technologies, specifically three social media platforms, as multimodal writing platforms while creating a digital portfolio in a senior English class. These platforms are 1) Weebly pages: a website building platform, 2) Weebly Blogs: a feature of Weebly, and 3) Instagram: a…

  12. Exploring Adolescents' Multimodal Responses to "The Kite Runner": Understanding How Students Use Digital Media for Academic Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocius, Robin

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how adolescent high school students in an AP English class used multiple forms of media (the internet, digital video, slide show software, video editing tools, literary texts, and writing) to respond to and analyze a contemporary novel, "The Kite Runner". Using a multimodal analysis framework, the author explores…

  13. Using SurveyMonkey® to teach safe social media strategies to medical students in their clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramstedt, Katrina A; Ierna, Ben N; Woodcroft-Brown, Victoria K

    2014-01-01

    Social media is a valuable tool in the practice of medicine, but it can also be an area of 'treacherous waters' for medical students. Those in their upper years of study are off-site and scattered broadly, undertaking clinical rotations; thus, in-house (university lecture) sessions are impractical. Nonetheless, during these clinical years students are generally high users of social media technology, putting them at risk of harm if they lack appropriate ethical awareness. We created a compulsory session in social media ethics (Doctoring and Social Media) offered in two online modes (narrated PowerPoint file or YouTube video) to fourth- and fifth-year undergraduate medical students. The novelty of our work was the use of SurveyMonkey® to deliver the file links, as well as to take attendance and deliver a post-session performance assessment. All 167 students completed the course and provided feedback. Overall, 73% Agreed or Strongly Agreed the course session would aid their professionalism skills and behaviours, and 95% supported delivery of the curriculum online. The most frequent areas of learning occurred in the following topics: email correspondence with patients, medical photography, and awareness of medical apps. SurveyMonkey® is a valuable and efficient tool for curriculum delivery, attendance taking, and assessment activities.

  14. Teacher and Student Perceptions on High School Science Flipped Classrooms: Educational Breakthrough or Media Hype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunley, Rebecca C.

    For years educators have struggled to ensure students meet the rigors of state mandated tests. Challenges that often impede student success are student absences, school closings due to weather, and remediation for students who need additional help while advanced students can move ahead. Many educators, especially secondary math and science teachers, have responded to these issues by implementing a teaching strategy called the flipped classroom where students view lectures, power points, or podcasts outside of school and class time shifts to allow opportunities for collaborative learning. The purpose of this research was to evaluate teacher and student perceptions of high school flipped science classrooms. A qualitative phenomenological study was conducted to observe 3 high school science teachers from Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee selected through purposeful sampling who have used the flipped classroom method for a minimum of 2 years. Analysis of data from an online survey, direct observation, teacher interviews, and student focus groups helped to identify challenges and benefits of this teaching and learning strategy. Findings indicated that teachers find the flipped classroom beneficial to build student relationships but requires a significant amount of time to develop. Mixed student reactions revealed benefits of a flipped classroom as a successful learning tool for current and future endeavors for college or career preparation.

  15. Virtual laboratory learning media development to improve science literacy skills of mechanical engineering students on basic physics concept of material measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannati, E. D.; Setiawan, A.; Siahaan, P.; Rochman, C.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to determine the description of virtual laboratory learning media development to improve science literacy skills of Mechanical Engineering students on the concept of basic Physics. Quasi experimental method was employed in this research. The participants of this research were first semester students of mechanical engineering in Majalengka University. The research instrument was readability test of instructional media. The results of virtual laboratory learning media readability test show that the average score is 78.5%. It indicates that virtual laboratory learning media development are feasible to be used in improving science literacy skill of Mechanical Engineering students in Majalengka University, specifically on basic Physics concepts of material measurement.

  16. The ability to produce media presentation among beauty study program students to prepare competence vocational school teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widowati, Trisnani

    2018-03-01

    One of the challenges of this 21st century teachers are teachers who are professionals and always use it in creative ways to convey the subject matter, including the creative use of media in learning. Problems that arise are as Vocational School teachers, Beauty Study Program students have not mastered the manufacture of media presentations. Class action research conducted in three phases with the learning cycle include planning actions, implementation measures, observation/evaluation of the action, and reflection, showed an increase in the results of the study are seen from the average value derived from 55.76 on Cycle I became 71.59 on cycle II and 78.33, in cycle 3. The obstacles encountered in the process of learning that is a limited time for any learning, students are not used to plan the creation of media presentations, limitations of materials supporting the creation of student-owned media presentations: images, animations, videos and the custom copy-paste material. The given solution to overcome the barriers that is emphasized again the steps of making a media presentation, the granting of duty as an exercise, and evaluation.

  17. HYPERCONNECTED YOUTH. COMMUNICATION AND VITUAL SOCIABILITY CASE STUDY ABOUT DISCONNECTION IN MEDIA FOR 24 HOURS IN SPANISH COLLEGE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Cáceres Zapatero

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This collaboration presents the results of a study conducted with 190 college students who had a 24 hours media disconnection experience. The aim was to know the feelings experienced and how the situation affected their interpersonal and communication relationships. We wanted that students could learn, reflect and analyze their own communication habits in order to identify opportunities, challenges and risks; and also become aware of their dependence on media every day. The work tried to promote responsible use of the Internet and other media. Young people were invited to express, through a questionnaire, their feelings. Answers were coded and processed with SPSS software. The results show that hyperconnection is their way of relating and being in the world, that its absence causes discomfort and technologically mediated communication has replaced a major part of the face to face communication.

  18. Social media and anatomy education: Using twitter to enhance the student learning experience in anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Catherine M; Kirkpatrick, Emma; Smith, Claire F; Border, Scott

    2016-11-01

    Neuroanatomy is a difficult subject in medical education, with students often feeling worried and anxious before they have even started, potentially decreasing their engagement with the subject. At the University of Southampton, we incorporated the use of Twitter as a way of supporting students' learning on a neuroanatomy module to evaluate how it impacted upon their engagement and learning experience. The #nlm2soton hashtag was created and displayed (via a widget) on the university's virtual learning environment (VLE) for a cohort of 197 Year 2 medical students studying neuroanatomy. Student usage was tracked to measure levels of engagement throughout the course and frequency of hashtag use was compared to examination results. Student opinions on the use of Twitter were obtained during a focus group with eleven students and from qualitative questionnaires. The hashtag was used by 91% of the student cohort and, within this, more students chose to simply view the hashtag rather than make contributions. The completed questionnaire responses (n = 150) as well as focus group outcomes revealed the value of using Twitter. A negligible correlation was found between student examination scores and their viewing frequency of the hashtag however, no correlation was found between examination scores and contribution frequency. Despite this, Twitter facilitated communication, relieved anxieties and raised morale, which was valued highly by students and aided engagement with neuroanatomy. Twitter was successful in creating and providing a support network for students during a difficult module. Anat Sci Educ 9: 505-515. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. EFFECT OF INFORMATION SERVICES USING THE MEDIA FILM TO SELF-CONFIDENCE STUDENT OF CLASS VIII SMP NEGERI 8 METRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUDAIM MUDAIM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Pessimism and attitudes that consider themselves weak and does not have the ability when facing a problem will make individual impediment in the task of development. Problems confidence that underlies the research are: a Students are less confident in the ability it has, b Students feel pessimistic when faced with an issue, c Student perception subjectively, d Students still do not do the work independently, and e negative minded students with a state-owned. The problems of this study are whether there is an influence of information services using the medium of film to the confidence of eighth-grade students of SMP Negeri 8 Metro. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is an influence of information services using the medium of film to the self-confidence of students in class VIII SMP Negeri 8 Metro. Subject participant is graders VIII-E total 30 students. Data were collected by questionnaire self-confidence and analyzed the data used is the t-test. The results of this study, shown by the difference in change scores of confidence from the pre-test and post-test of 17.1. Testing the hypothesis obtained calculation results thitung6,036> table = 1.699. The conclusion is that the information services implemented using the film medium can be a positive influence on self-esteem, especially students of class VIII. The advice given is to use the medium of film should be done intensively and more creative by BK teachers in giving information service. Keywords: Confidence, Service Information Using Media Film.

  20. Distance Students and Online Research: Promoting Information Literacy through Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Vord, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Today's college students, particularly distance students, are increasingly dependent on the Web for their research needs. At the same time they lack the critical thinking skills required to successfully evaluate the actual credibility of online information, a critical aspect of information literacy. Furthermore, rather than access the online…

  1. Students' Playful Tactics: Teaching at the Intersection of New Media and the Official Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Julie

    2015-01-01

    By examining the ways in which high school students in two different English classes take up virtual self-representation tactics in school-based social networking sites, this article explores how young people carefully juggle the digital identities they adopt for the eyes of both peers and teachers. The data reveals that the students'…

  2. Assessing Strategic Cultural Competency: Holistic Approaches to Student Learning through Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Judith; Swaffar, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigated the impact of a German television program on changes in 4th-semester German students' reflections on cultural perceptions over the course of 1 semester. Sixty-nine students at the University of Texas at Austin watched 4 episodes of the popular German television program "Lindenstrasse". After viewing,…

  3. Journalism Educators, Their Students, and Local Media Practitioners: A Case Study Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Journalism educators must make critical decisions about their undergraduate curricula, determining how to best prepare their students for professional careers. Present scholarship indicates that a disconnect exists in what journalism students think they ought to know and/or be able to do upon graduation, what educators think they must teach their…

  4. Social Media Selves: College Students' Curation of Self and Others through Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, David Michael

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study used cyber-ethnography and grounded theory to explore the ways in which 35 undergraduate students crafted and refined self-presentations on the social network site Facebook. Findings included the identification of two unique forms of self-presentation that students enacted: a "curated self" and a "commodified…

  5. The Media Omnivores: Understanding College-Bound Students and Communicating with Them Effectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Because high school students are constantly bombarded with information, they have adapted to quickly screen only the information they want. E-mail is perhaps the most underused online method of delivering personalized, customized information to prospective students. While the Internet will not replace paper and ink, it will be a combination of…

  6. Summer Bridge Program 2.0: Using Social Media to Develop Students' Campus Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottell, Derek L.; Martinez-Aleman, Ana M.; Rowan-Kenyon, Heather T.

    2014-01-01

    We know that social-networking sites, especially Facebook, offer all students the means to accumulate social capital through connection strategies. Developing social and academic connections through Facebook is particularly important for first-generation college students (FGCS), who may find participating in traditional engagement activities and…

  7. Pharmacy students' use of social media sites and perception toward Facebook use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi M. Alkhateeb

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: There has been a huge growth in the number and the use of SNS. Students, if they choose to, can take advantage of this revolutionary communication tool to advance professionally. However, the majority of students still choose to use Facebook for social purposes rather than professional or educational purposes.

  8. Teaching Java programming to media students with a liberal arts background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    knew what the problem was: Lack of motivation. The students considered here consist of students to whom programming is not a primary interest and many are prejudicial against programming. We were mistaken, it was not a motivation problem. We designed a questionnaire to find the students’ attitude...

  9. Social Media and Anatomy Education: Using Twitter to Enhance the Student Learning Experience in Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Catherine M.; Kirkpatrick, Emma; Smith, Claire F.; Border, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Neuroanatomy is a difficult subject in medical education, with students often feeling worried and anxious before they have even started, potentially decreasing their engagement with the subject. At the University of Southampton, we incorporated the use of Twitter as a way of supporting students' learning on a neuroanatomy module to evaluate how it…

  10. Social Media Use in the Career Development of Graduate Students: The Mediating Role of Internship Effectiveness and the Moderating Role of Zhongyong

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Changqing; Gu, Jibao; Wu, Wei; Zhai, Xuesong; Song, Jun

    2017-01-01

    This paper proves that social media use can contribute in important ways to employability outcomes. Specifically, results from a survey of 196 recent graduate students in China indicate that social media use is positively related to employability skills. Internship effectiveness serve as a mediating mechanism through which social media use affects…

  11. The Relationship between Media Use and Body Mass Index among Secondary Students in Kuching South City, Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Whye Lian; Chang, Ching Thon; Rosalia, Saimon; Charles, Lai Dekun; Yii, Sze Lin; Tiong, Pik Hoong; Yeap, Kim Pey

    2011-07-01

    Overweight and obesity rates among adolescents have increased substantially over the years. This study aimed to determine the body mass index (BMI) of students and parents and the relationship among media use, BMI, socio-demographic profiles, and snacking behaviour during television watching of secondary school students in Kuching South City. In accordance with the two-stage sampling method, a total of 316 adolescents aged 13-17 years from 7 secondary schools participated. Data were collected using questionnaire and anthropometric measurement. Independent t test, one-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U test, and chi-square test were performed. The mean BMI was 20.56 kg/m(2) (SD 4.33) for boys and 20.15 kg/m(2) (SD 3.91) for girls. No significant difference in terms of z score for BMI-for-age or socio-demographic factors was found. The mean duration of time devoted to media use was 4.69 hours (SD 2.93) on weekdays and 5.69 hours (SD 2.87) on weekends. Boys were found to spend more hours on media use than did the girls (t = 4.293, P < 0.01). Respondents were reported to consume more cereal compared with soft drinks and junk foods. Respondents whose fathers worked in the private sector devoted the fewest hours to media use, whereas those with self-employed fathers devoted the most time to media use. Respondents with mothers who were employed spent more time on media use than did respondents whose mothers were housewives (F = 4.067, P < 0.01). No significant difference was found between BMI and media time or snacking habits. This finding indicated that media time has no effect on body weight, because respondents were found to have normal weight and to consume less unhealthy food.

  12. Eating disorders and body image concerns as influenced by family and media among university students in Sharjah, UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Hadia; Hasan, Hayder A; Najm, Lina; Zaurub, Sara; Jami, Faridah; Javadi, Fahimeh; Deeb, Lina Adeeb; Iskandarani, Amani

    2018-01-01

    Eating disorders (ED) can be influenced by psychological and socio-cultural factors. The aim of this study was to explore the association between parental and media influences and body image concerns as factors in the onset of ED. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 662 students (407 women and 255 men) attending one of three universities in United Arab Emirates (UAE). The study employed an online self-administered questionnaire with validated scales: Eating Attitudes Test-26 (EAT-26), Body Shape Questionnaire (BSQ), Media Influences Scale, and Family Influences Scale (FIS). About 33% of the sample had EAT- 26 scores >=20 and 45% showed mild to marked concerns about their body shape. Women students were significantly more concerned about their shape, and more influenced by media than men. There were significant differences in the means of all scores, except for media influence, among the four BMI groups. The EAT-26 score showed strongest correlation with BSQ (r=0.48), followed by FIS, Media and BMI (r=0.419, r=0.276 and r=0.18 respectively). The BSQ was the best predictor of ED and was inversely associated with the EAT-26 score (B=-1.51, OR=0.219, 95% CI: 0.152-0.316, pmedia and families exert on the development of ED among young adults. These findings provide baseline data for future longitudinal studies to investigate factors influencing ED.

  13. SOCIAL NETWORKING AND ITS IMPACT ON STUDENT PERFORMANCE: MEDIA COLLAGE IN THI-QAR AS A CASE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Wisam Abduladheem Kamil*

    2017-01-01

    There may be no doubt that Social networking has gained wider acceptability and usefulness and is also becoming possibly the most important communication tools amongst college students particularly at the higher stage of instructional pursuit. Whilst, to up-date in the Arab countries used social media only protest and indignation of services. There are many studies has focused on the benefits of the social networking tools in educational institutions. Unfortunately, most of these studies cond...

  14. LIVING IN NETWORK: AN ANALYSIS OF THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA BY UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Alves Lima

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The work sought to analyze and discuss, from a predominantly quantitative approach, the repercussion caused by the use of social media in the life of students of a University located in the city of Araraquara (SP. After the bibliographic review on the subject, a field research was carried out with students who use social media such as Facebook, Twiter and Instagram, trying to identify the perceptions of users about benefits and damages due to the use. The study counted on the participation of 140 students of the Psychology course, 92 participants of the Biology course and 51 participants of the course of Computer Engineering. The students answered a questionnaire on the subject. The study found that most (95.76% of the participants use social networks often and say that this does not lead to significant changes or implications in their lives. They present as benefits the use in order to reduce the physical distance, improving their interaction and communication, ease in the exchange and obtaining of information, mainly in the acquisition of knowledge, education and entertainment. As for the damages caused, they indicate excessive exposure of personal issues in daily life, dependence on the use of the Internet in carrying out its activities and alienation from concrete situations.

  15. College Students' Responses to Emotional Anti-Alcohol Abuse Media Messages: Should We Scare or Amuse Them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moon J

    2018-05-01

    This study examined college students' responses to emotional anti-alcohol abuse media messages (i.e., fear vs. humor appeal) aimed at discouraging heavy/binge drinking. An experiment was conducted with 94 college students. As expected, college students generally expressed higher levels of interest in anti-alcohol abuse media messages when watching fear appeal than those watching humor appeal. However, college binge drinkers who watched the fear appeal reported lower levels of readiness to change their drinking behavior than those who watched the humor appeal. This pattern was the opposite among college nonbinge drinkers, in that college nonbinge drinkers were more likely to say they would change their drinking behaviors when exposed to fear appeal than those who were exposed to humor appeal or those who did not watch any media messages. Conventional fear appeal to scare college binge drinkers seems ineffective and even counterproductive while humor appeal, if well designed, could offer alternative ways to communicate with college binge drinkers.

  16. Constructing Media Artifacts in a Social Constructivist Environment to Enhance Students' Environmental Awareness and Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Engin; Roehrig, Gillian

    2015-02-01

    Current science education reforms and policy documents highlight the importance of environmental awareness and perceived need for activism. As "environmental problems are socially constructed in terms of their conceptualized effects on individuals, groups, other living things and systems research based on constructivist principles provides not only a coherent framework in which to theorize about learning, but also a context for understanding socially constructed issues" (Palmer and Suggate in Res Pap Educ 19(2), 2004, p. 208). This research study investigated the impacts of the learning processes structured based on the theories of constructionism and social constructivism on students' environmental awareness and perceived need for activism. Students constructed multimedia artifacts expressing their knowledge, attitudes, awareness, and activism about environmental issues through a constructionist design process. In addition, a social networking site was designed and used to promote social interaction among students. Twenty-two high school environmental science students participated in this study. A convergent mixed methods design was implemented to allow for the triangulation of methods by directly comparing and contrasting quantitative results with qualitative findings for corroboration and validation purposes. Using a mixed method approach, quantitative findings are supported with qualitative data (student video projects, writing prompts, blog entries, video projects of the students, observational field notes, and reflective journals) including spontaneous responses in both synchronous and asynchronous conversations on the social network to provide a better understanding of the change in students' environmental awareness and perceived need for activism. The findings of the study indicated that students' environmental awareness and perceived need for activism were improved at different scales (personal, community, global) throughout the constructionist and social

  17. Social media, cyber-aggression and student mental health on a university campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishna, Faye; Regehr, Cheryl; Lacombe-Duncan, Ashley; Daciuk, Joanne; Fearing, Gwendolyn; Van Wert, Melissa

    2018-02-15

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) offer immense benefits for university students including enhancing engagement and connections with others and promoting self-directed and interactive learning. Perceived anonymity and the absence of social cues, however, may contribute to risk of interpersonal aggression. While extensive research examines bullying in child and adolescent educational settings, this study addresses a gap regarding post-secondary environments. An internet-based survey was provided to 5004 university students to examine the nature, extent and consequences of cyber-aggression. The survey received a response from 1350 students, a response rate of 28.5%. To enable further exploration, nine focus groups and eight individual interviews were conducted. This exploratory study found one quarter of respondents had a private video or photo shared without their permission and 28% were sent angry, vulgar, threatening or intimating messages. Perpetrators were most likely to be a friend (50%), another student (20%) or an intimate partner (18%). Focus group data revealed risks of ICTs and the need for resources and support to address students' wellbeing in the context of cyber-aggression. Cyber-aggression is experienced by a significant minority of university students, impacting their sense of wellbeing and mental health.

  18. An Examination of the Association of Social Media Use with the Satisfaction with Daily Routines and Healthy Lifestyle Habits for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Melanie Austin-McCain

    2017-01-01

    Background: Social media use has become an integral daily occupation of college and graduate students. In the United States, 90% of adults aged 18 to 29 years use social media (Pew Internet, 2015). Positive and negative data has been found which examined associations between social media use and other daily occupations (activities) that impact emotional and physical health. The purpose of this study is to examine the association of social media use with the satisfaction of daily r...

  19. DEVELOPING GUIDED DISCOVERY LEARNING MATERIALS USING MATHEMATICS MOBILE LEARNING APPLICATION AS AN ALTERNATIVE MEDIA FOR THE STUDENTS CALCULUS II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunismi .

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The development research aims to develop guided-discovery learning materials of Calculus II by implementing Mathematics Mobile Learning (MML. The products to develop are MML media of Calculus II using guided discovery model for students and a guide book for lecturers. The study employed used 4-D development model consisting of define, design, develop, and disseminate. The draft of the learning materials was validated by experts and tried-out to a group of students. The data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by using a descriptive technique and t-test. The findings of the research were appropriate to be used ad teaching media for the students. The students responded positively that the MML media of Calculus II using the guided-discovery model was interestingly structured, easily operated through handphones (all JAVA, android, and blackberry-based handphones to be used as their learning guide anytime. The result of the field testing showed that the guided-discovery learning materials of Calculus II using the Mathematics Mobile Learning (MML application was effective to adopt in learning Calculus II. Keywords: learning materials, guided-discovery, mathematics mobile learning (MML, calculus II PENGEMBANGAN BAHAN AJAR MODEL GUIDED DISCOVERY DENGAN APLIKASI MATHEMATICS MOBILE LEARNING SEBAGAI ALTERNATIF MEDIA PEMBELAJARAN MAHASISWA MATAKULIAH KALKULUS II Abstrak: Penelitian pengembangan ini bertujuan untuk mengembangkan bahan ajar matakuliah Kalkulus II model guided discovery dengan aplikasi Mathematics Mobile Learning (MML. Produk yang dikembangkan berupa media MML Kalkulus II dengan model guided discovery untuk mahasiswa dan buku panduan dosen. Model pengembangan menggunakan 4-D yang meliputi tahap define, design, develop, dan dissemination. Draf bahan ajar divalidasi oleh pakar dan diujicobakan kepada sejumlah mahasiswa. Data dianalisis secara kualitatif dan kuantitatif dengan teknik deskriptif dan uji t. Temuan penelitian

  20. Student Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Edward

    This report discusses student violence within the framework of causes, issues, and false and true solutions. The author decries the abdication of responsibilities by both college administrators, who have permitted students to "do their thing," and leftwing students, who crusade thoughtlessly against educational institutions. Some true solutions…

  1. STUDENT PLACEMENT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    students express lack of interest in the field they are placed, it ... be highly motivated to learn than students placed in a department ... the following research questions. Research Questions. •. Did the criteria used by Mekelle. University for placement of students into different departments affect the academic performance of ...

  2. Understanding the Role of Social Media on a Student's College Choice Process and the Implications on a University's Enrollment and Marketing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Kimberly C.

    2017-01-01

    With decreasing state funds, a sluggish economy, and increased competition, universities are finding new ways to recruit prospective students to their institutions (Campbell, 2013; Sandlin & Pena, 2014). One way to create relationships and recruit prospective students to a university is through the use of social media platforms (Han, 2014;…

  3. The Effect of Blended Learning and Social Media-Supported Learning on the Students' Attitude and Self-Directed Learning Skills in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgunduz, Devrim; Akinoglu, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of blended learning and social media supported learning on the students' attitude and self-directed learning skills in Science Education. This research took place with the 7th grade 74 students attending to a primary school in Kadikoy, Istanbul and carried out "Our Body Systems"…

  4. Use of social media and college student organizations to increase support for organ donation and advocacy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Anthony M; Peltier, James W; Dahl, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    This report focuses on the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics organ procurement organization's efforts to increase deceased organ and tissue donation by using social media and personalized messages targeting members of university student organizations, their families, and their friends. A grant from the US Department of Health and Human Services funded a 2-year study to (1) identify barriers/opportunities for increasing awareness, attitudes, and behaviors related to organ and tissue donation; (2) implement an intervention using social media and personalized message to increase knowledge, support, and donor registrations; (3) measure impact on awareness and attitudinal and behavioral changes within the organization; and (4) assess behavioral measures across a host of social media analytics and organ donor registrations. The results show increases in knowledge about and support for organ donation, including a 20% increase in donor registration. As a result, funding was secured to continue the project for an additional 2 years.

  5. Analfanauts and Fourth Screen: Lack of Infodiets and Media and Information Literacy in Latin American University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. ROMERO RODRÍGUEZ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices have become an integral part of our lives. Through these terminals, users can not only communicate with their peers, but receive and produce vast amounts of information usually through social networks, making us in many ways in mass media. However, the question arises are we ready for it? In this research the problem of analfanauts understood as those individuals who dominate the digital skills necessary to interact with ICT is addressed, but lack sufficient media and information skills to avoid misinformation and structural infoxication present in the networks. In order to analyze these behaviors one quantitative and qualitative a sample of 1,603 university students in Colombia, Venezuela and Peru, consumption, use of social networks and making viral of pseudo-information in the communication system study will be conducted. The results present a forward-profile technical skills, relegating the analytical content consumption exposed digital media, which turns into an exponential growth of prosumer infoxication.

  6. Student employment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, Marita; Gerth, Maria; Weiss, Felix

    2018-01-01

    , according to social origins, in student employment from first-year students through graduating students. We show that inequality in job quality exists and is partly attributable to the need for students from lower social origins to work to finance their studies. We hypothesise that initial inequalities......In this article, we examine social origin differences in employment patterns across different stages of higher education and compare these differences between vocational and academic fields of study. Using data from a large-scale German student survey, we study the development of inequality...

  7. The Impact of Media Literacy Intervention on the Students\\' Attitudes about Self-Medication of Slimming Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Solhi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Self-medication of slimming supplements has increased. Media advertising is involved in this field. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of media literacy educational intervention in the students' attitudes about self-medication of slimming supplements among the female dormitories in University of Medical Sciences in Iran. Methods: In this quasi-experimental study of controlled type, 98 students were selected by multistage cluster sampling method and randomly divided into two groups of 49 tests and 49 control. The data collecting instruments were the researcher-made questionnaire about media literacy and attitude on self-medication of slimming pills, BICI questionnaire of body image, and SEI Cooper Smith's questionnaire of self-esteem. Based on the results obtained from the questionnaires early completion, an appropriate educational intervention was designed and carried out. One and three months after the intervention, data was gathered and analyzed in (16 SPSS software using descriptive and analytical tests. Results: Before the intervention, the mean scores of attitude, body image, self-esteem, and dimensions of media literacy in both groups were moderate, and there was no significant difference between them. Also, positive correlations were observed in the experiment group between attitude and knowledge (r = 0.99, p = 0.001, critical thinking (r = 0.61, p = 0.001 and analysis (r=0.37, p=0.009. One and three months after the intervention, the mean scores of  body image, self-esteem, and dimensions of media literacy were  observed significant in  both groups (p <0.05. Conclusion: Media literacy education was effective in promoting the attitude about slimming supplements. Paper Type: Research Article.

  8. Supporting Transparency between Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Christian

    The paper presents the results of a case study that explores the potentials of weblogs and social bookmarking to support transparency in a university course. In the course, groups of students used weblogs and social bookmarking in their work. The objective of the case was to empower students...... by providing them with tools that would be visible to the other students in the course, thus, making students’ ideas, thoughts and questions visible to the other students in the course. The paper concludes that use of digital media for transparency can support empowerment of students and inspiration among...... students in a course, but that the challenge is to create a balance between personal tools and tools for collaborative group work that are also suitable for transparency between students....

  9. Student-Centered Teaching Meets New Media: Concept and Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Holzinger

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available There exists empirical evidence proving that students who are given the freedom to explore areas based on their personal interests, and who are accompanied in their learning by a supportive, understanding facilitator, not only achieve superior academic results but also develop socially and grow personally. However, pure Student-Centered Teaching is more demanding in terms of communication, organization, as well as the provision of learning material. Thus, the basic idea underlying our paradigm is to combine Student-Centered Teaching with eLearning in order to exploit the advantages of the two approaches. We refer to this combined style as Student-Centered eLearning (SCeL. Strongly simplified, the computer takes over the task of providing information, while presence phases can be used for giving the content more meaning by means of transparent, open, respectful and empathic interactions within the group. Our case study indicates that Student-Centered eLearning has the potential of reducing the increased demands of Student-Centered Teaching in the long run, while fully retaining all its benefits, such as deeper learning processes, personal growth, social skills, and a higher degree of flexibility. Furthermore, the maturity for life-long learning is cultivated. In this paper we introduce our concept and derive first hypotheses on the conditions under which our paradigm appears most effective. While potential continuations of our studies are manifold, we intend to employ SCeL in the course of the new curriculum of the medical faculty of GrazUniversity where a Virtual Medical Campus (http://vmc.uni-graz.at is currently being developed.

  10. Theological Media Literacy Education and Hermeneutic Analysis of Soviet Audiovisual Anti-Religious Media Texts in Students' Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This article realized the Russian way of theological media education literacy and hermeneutic analysis of specific examples of Soviet anti-religious audiovisual media texts: a study of the process of interpretation of these media texts, cultural and historical factors influencing the views of the media agency/authors. The hermeneutic analysis…

  11. Self-Regulated Learning and Social Media--A "Natural Alliance"? Evidence on Students' Self-Regulation of Learning, Social Media Use, and Student-Teacher Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzat, U.; Vrieling, E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Research on the educational consequences of social media has led to divergent findings that are difficult to integrate and studies often examine specific courses. It remains unclear what types of social media use in classroom prevail on a broader scale and how teachers, if at all, can affect outcomes. We contribute to answering these questions by…

  12. Student-to-Student Diplomacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bislev, Ane Katrine

    2017-01-01

    Chinese international students have become an increasingly visible presence around the globe, and interest in these students has consequently increased among universities, researchers, and policy-makers, who often see international students as a source of increased soft power. This article...... questions the idea of Chinese international students as a soft-power tool. This is done through a critical discussion of the concept of soft power and the rather limited research on educational diplomacy, demonstrating that the analytical vagueness of the concept of soft power leads to an oversimplified...... understanding of the linkage between international students and soft power. In order to provide a more nuanced understanding of this linkage, the article examines the actual overseas experience of Chinese international students and argues that the linkage between international students and soft power is highly...

  13. The One Another Project: A Quantitative Study of North American Christian College and Seminary Students' Perception of Social Media's Effect on Their Blblical Interpersonal Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardue, Micheal S.

    2012-01-01

    Statistics show that social media is being used by a large majority of college students. This technological advent brings with it questions about how social media is affecting the relationships of those who use it. This is especially true for the Church and Christian institutions that put a high value on relationships. This study asked 3,645…

  14. Using the mixed media according to internet-based on the instructional multimedia for developing students' learning achievements in biology course on foundational cell issue of secondary students at the 10th grade level in Rangsit University demonstration school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangloan, Pichet; Chayaburakul, Kanokporn; Santiboon, Toansakul

    2018-01-01

    The aims of this research study were 1) to develop students' learning achievements in biology course on foundational cell issue, 2) to examine students' satisfactions of their learning activities through the mixed media according to internet-based multi-instruction in biology on foundational cell issue at the 10th grade level were used in the first semester in the academic year 2014, which a sample size of 17 students in Rangsit University Demonstration School with cluster random sampling was selected. Students' learning administrations were instructed with the 3-instructional lesson plans according to the 5-Step Ladder Learning Management Plan (LLMP) namely; the maintaining lesson plan on the equilibrium of cell issue, a lesson plan for learning how to communicate between cell and cell division. Students' learning achievements were assessed with the 30-item Assessment of Learning Biology Test (ALBT), students' perceptions of their satisfactions were satisfied with the 20-item Questionnaire on Students Satisfaction (QSS), and students' learning activities were assessed with the Mixed Media Internet-Based Instruction (MMIBI) on foundational cell issue was designed. The results of this research study have found that: statistically significant of students' post-learning achievements were higher than their pre-learning outcomes and indicated that the differences were significant at the .05 level. Students' performances of their satisfaction to their perceptions toward biology class with the mixed media according to internet-based multi instruction in biology on foundational cell issue were the highest level and evidence of average mean score as 4.59.

  15. A Tale of Two Doctoral Students: Social Media Tools and Hybridised Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Liz; Folley, Sue

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of two doctoral students who embraced Web 2.0 tools in their digital scholarship practices. The paper gives an insider perspective of the challenges and potential of working with online tools, such as blogs, and participating in online communities, such as Twitter's #phdchat. We explore by drawing on our…

  16. Remaking Poems: Combining Translation and Digital Media to Interest High School Students in Poetry Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Amy Beth

    2017-01-01

    In American high schools, the practice of poetry analysis as a study of language art has declined. Outworn methods have contributed to the trend away from close interactions with the text, to the unfortunate end that millennial high school students neither understand nor enjoy poetry. Digital technology coupled with principles of translation…

  17. Rethinking E-Learning Media: What Happens When Student "Like" Meets Professor "Me"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Today digital-device-outfitted Millennials comprise the majority of university students. Concern over these digital natives' tendency to perform lower than expected as a group in college after completing a commendable high school experience, has some eyeing character traits as a possible culprit. Conversely, university faculties are comprised…

  18. RESLanjut: The learning media for improve students understanding in embedded systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrianto, Susanti, Meilia Nur Indah; Karina, Djunaidi

    2017-08-01

    The use of network in embedded system can be done with many kinds of network, with the use of mobile phones, bluetooths, modems, ethernet cards, wireless technology and so on. Using network in embedded system could help people to do remote controlling. On previous research, researchers found that many students have the ability to comprehend the basic concept of embedded system. They could also make embedded system tools but without network integration. And for that, a development is needed for the embedded system module. The embedded system practicum module design needs a prototype method in order to achieve the desired goal. The prototype method is often used in the real world. Or even, a prototype method is a part of products that consist of logic expression or external physical interface. The embedded system practicum module is meant to increase student comprehension of embedded system course, and also to encourage students to innovate on technology based tools. It is also meant to help teachers to teach the embedded system concept on the course. The student comprehension is hoped to increase with the use of practicum course.

  19. The Student Affairs Profession: A Selective Bibliography. Revised Edition. ACPA Media Publication No. 46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belson, Beverly; Stamatakos, Louis C.

    This bibliography contains a resource guide for persons working with students in postsecondary institutions. Selections related to historical perspectives and philosophical foundations are from materials written over more than 40 years. Entries primarily concerned with programmatic planning, organization, and administration have come predominantly…

  20. Making Progress: The Use of Multiple Progress Reports to Enhance Advertising Students' Media Plan Term Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritz, Gary H.; Lozada, Hector R.; Long, Mary M.

    2007-01-01

    Since the AACSB mandates that students demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills, it is imperative that business professors do what is necessary to improve such skills. The authors investigate whether the use of using multiple progress reports in an Advertising class project improves the final product. The data results show that…

  1. Gamifying the Media Classroom: Instructor Perspectives and the Multidimensional Impact of Gamification on Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaborn, Katie; Fels, Deborah I.; Bajko, Rob; Hodson, Jaigris

    2017-01-01

    Gamification, or the use of game elements in non-game contexts, has become a popular and increasingly accepted method of engaging learners in educational settings. However, there have been few comparisons of different kinds of courses and students, particularly in terms of discipline and content. Additionally, little work has reported on course…

  2. International Student Carbon Footprint Challenge--Social Media as a Content and Language Integrated Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauville, Géraldine; Lantz-Andersson, Annika; Säljö, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Environmental education (EE) is now clearly specified in educational standards in many parts of the world, and at the same time the view of language learning is moving towards a content and language integrated learning (CLIL) strategy, to make English lessons more relevant and attractive for students (Eurydice, 2006). In this respect,…

  3. Enhancing Learning with the Social Media: Student Teachers' Perceptions on Twitter in a Debate Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, Gemma; Marín, Victoria I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents research focused on the educational experience of students using the microblogging platform Twitter for debate activities in three groups in different teacher education programmes at the University of the Balearic Islands, Spain. The implementation of this technology-based task in a face-to-face class was introduced as an…

  4. Global Prevalence of Sleep Deprivation in Students and Heavy Media Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meilan; Tillman, Daniel A.; An, Song A.

    2017-01-01

    The latest two international educational assessments found global prevalence of sleep deprivation in students, consistent with what has been reported in sleep research. However, despite the fundamental role of adequate sleep in cognitive and social functioning, this important issue has been largely overlooked by educational researchers. Drawing…

  5. The Role of Internet Addiction and Social Media Membership on University Students' Psychological Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Eylem; Sali, Jale Balaban

    2014-01-01

    How Internet addiction affects happiness of university students in terms of their cognitive and emotional resources was not adequately investigated. One of the inner resources of life satisfaction and happiness is defined as psychological capital (PsyCap), under the paradigm of positive psychology. PsyCap consists of four main sub-factors: hope,…

  6. MoREK: The learning media to improve students understanding about electrical circuit in informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrianto; Nur Indah Susanti, Meilia; Arianto, Rakhmat

    2018-03-01

    The needs for labor in the world is already increasing especially in Indonesia. According to the World Bank, Indonesia is a country that ranks 9th in the world’s largest economic growth. To meet that needs, Indonesia needs 55 million workers who are experts in the field of electricity. Therefore, it takes a lot of human resources and has been equipped with knowledge and expertise in the field of electricity. To be able to meet these needs, it takes a better method of learning to increase knowledge and expertise in the field of electricity since college, especially in the field of informatics. Prototype of Electrical Module (The MoREK) requires a Prototype method for the Practicum Module to be created as desired. This method is often used in the real world or it could be said Prototype method is part of the product that expresses the logic and physical external interface that is displayed. For data retrieval is used Pre-experimental method where students will be given pre-test and post-test. The Design of Electrical Module has a purpose to improve the students understanding of Electric Circuit Engineering Courses with the creation of The MoREK so that students are more competent to the course and can meet the needs of manpower or Human Resources (SDM) in the field of electricity. By using The Morek, the score of student learning outcomes increased by 7.8% and informatics students who conduct research in the field of electricity increased to 21%.

  7. Turned on, tuned in, but not dropped out: Enhancing the student experience with popular social media platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Daniel; Wild, Charles

    2016-01-01

    A paper which contends that social media platforms should be embraced by Universities, as\\ud opposed to being regarded with fear or suspicion, as they offer an invaluable resource to not\\ud only enhance educational communications, but also to embed into day-to-day practice the\\ud reality that students are active co-producers of content, rather than passive information\\ud consumers which the majority of University-based Managed Learning Environments\\ud (MLEs) have, to date, been seen to promot...

  8. An Examination of the Association of Social Media Use with the Satisfaction with Daily Routines and Healthy Lifestyle Habits for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Austin-McCain

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social media use has become an integral daily occupation of college and graduate students. In the United States, 90% of adults aged 18 to 29 years use social media (Pew Internet, 2015. Positive and negative data has been found which examined associations between social media use and other daily occupations (activities that impact emotional and physical health. The purpose of this study is to examine the association of social media use with the satisfaction of daily routines and healthy lifestyle habits for undergraduate and graduate students. Method: Undergraduate and graduate students responded to survey questions regarding their social media use, healthy lifestyle habits, and satisfaction with daily routines. Results: Findings revealed that social media use is substantially related to certain healthy lifestyle habits, such as relaxation, leisure, and social participation activities, as well as satisfaction with daily routine. No significant association was found between other healthy habits, such as fitness and healthy eating. Discussion: Undergraduate and graduate students are part of society’s population at risk for poor health (CDC, 2016. Social media use as part of students’ daily routines may not be harmful and can inform interdisciplinary practitioners and educators with essential information and strategies to promote overall health and well-being.

  9. IMPACT OF INFORMATION SERVICES USING MEDIA FILM TO STUDENT MOTIVATION LEARNING AT SMA NEGERI 1 RAMAN UTARA, LAMPUNG TIMUR

    OpenAIRE

    Septazema Suciana; Nurul Atieka

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: One of the factors that can influence student learning is the motivation to learn. Students' motivation can be built with an understanding to students about the importance of learning how to learn effectively, and how to overcome learning problems. Departing from this, the research problem is formulated as follows: Is there any influence of information services on the students motivation ?. The aim of research to determine the effect of information services on the students motivatio...

  10. Students developing resources for students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Michael; Evans, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    The development of new technologies has provided medical education with the ability to enhance the student learning experience and meet the needs of changing curricula. Students quickly adapt to using multimedia learning resources, but these need to be well designed, learner-centred and interactive for students to become significantly engaged. One way to ensure that students become committed users and that resources become distinct elements of the learning cycle is to involve students in resource design and production. Such an approach enables resources to accommodate student needs and preferences, but also provides opportunities for them to develop their own teaching and training skills. The aim of the medical student research project was to design and produce an electronic resource that was focused on a particular anatomical region. The views of other medical students were used to decide what features were suitable for inclusion and the resulting package contained basic principles and clinical relevance, and used a variety of approaches such as images of cadaveric material, living anatomy movies and quizzes. The completed package was assessed using a survey matrix and found to compare well with commercially available products. Given the ever-diversifying arena of multimedia instruction and the ability of students to be fully conversant with technology, this project demonstrates that students are ideal participants and creators of multimedia resources. It is hoped that such an approach will help to further develop the skill base of students, but will also provide an avenue of developing packages that are student user friendly, and that are focused towards particular curricula requirements. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  11. New Media and Models for Engaging Under-Represented Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Laurel M.; Finkelstein, Noah D.

    2008-10-01

    We describe the University of Colorado Partnerships for Informal Science Education in the Community (PISEC) program in which university students participate in classroom and after school science activities with local precollege children. Across several different formal and informal educational environments, we use new technological tools, such as stop action motion (SAM) movies [1] to engage children so that they may develop an understanding of science through play and "show and tell". This approach provides a complementary avenue for reaching children who are otherwise underrepresented in science and under-supported in more formal educational settings. We present the model of university community partnership and demonstrate its utility in a case study involving an African American third grade student learning about velocity and acceleration.

  12. Undocumented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on the plight of undocumented immigrant students in the United States. Fights have been waged in various state legislatures over the past few years concerning whether undocumented immigrant students should be able to benefit from in-state tuition rates at public colleges and universities. But a story in The Wall Street Journal…

  13. Student Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conduit, Jodie; Karpen, Ingo; Farrelly, Francis

    2017-01-01

    system (the university), the narrow service system (the course), and the individual dyadic level of engagement (the student-lecturer interaction). These findings could be further considered and empirically tested in other engagement contexts (e.g. employee engagement, customer engagement).......Universities are seeking to actively and strategically manage student engagement through providing opportunities for students to interact and engage with the institution on a range of levels and in different ways. However, this increasingly complex and multi-layered nature of student engagement...... within a tertiary education environment is not well understood. Through qualitative focus groups and a series of interviews with undergraduate and postgraduate students, this study explores and articulates the cognitive, emotional, behavioural and social dimensions of engagement that depict the nature...

  14. Middle School Students' Use of Epistemological Resources while Reasoning about Science Performance Tasks and Media Reports of Socioscientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Brandy L. E.

    The goal of science education is to prepare students to make decisions about the complicated socioscientific issues that are an inescapable part of modern life, from personal medical decisions to evaluating a political candidate's environmental platform. We cannot expect adults to maintain a deep conceptual understanding of the current state of every branch of science that might prove relevant to their lives, so we must prepare them to rely on other knowledge to make these decisions. Epistemological beliefs about scientific knowledge--what it is, its purpose, how it is constructed--are one type of knowledge that could be brought to bear when evaluating scientific claims. Complicating this situation is the fact that most adults will get most of their information about these socioscientific issues from the news media. Journalists do not have the same goals or norms as scientists, and this media lens can distort scientific issues. This dissertation addresses the question of whether we can assess epistemological change in a way that gives us meaningful information about how people will apply their epistemological understanding of science when they make decisions in the real world. First, I designed a written assessment made up of performance tasks to assess middle school students' implicit epistemological beliefs, and looked at whether we can use such an assessment to see epistemological change over two years. I then gave the same students news articles about whether there is a link between vaccines and autism and looked at their reasoning about this issue and how the journalistic features of two different articles impacted their reasoning. Finally, I examined the external validity of the epistemology assessment by looking at whether it predicted anything about students' responses to the news articles. While I was able to find evidence of differences between eighth graders' and sixth graders' use of epistemological resources within the performance tasks, I found that

  15. Parental mediation of adolescent media use and demographic factors as predictors of Kenyan high school students' exposure to sexual content in television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngula, Kyalo wa; Mberia, Hellen K; Miller, Ann Neville

    2016-01-01

    Research in Western nations suggests that parents' involvement in their children's media use can make a difference in how adolescents select, process and respond to sexual television messages. Little or no published research has investigated this issue in sub-Saharan Africa, even though adolescents and young adults remain among the groups at highest risk for HIV transmission. This study investigated the relationship between Kenyan adolescents' level of exposure to sexual television content and their parents' mediation of their television use. A cluster sample of 427 Nairobi public high school students was surveyed regarding parental mediation of their media use and their intake of sexual television content. Co-viewing with opposite sex friends was associated with higher intake of sexual TV content. This relationship was stronger among boarding school students than among day school students. Parental mediation and co-viewing variables predicted three times as much variance among boarding than among day school students.

  16. Web-Based Media Literacy to Prevent Tobacco Use among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps-Tschang, Jane S.; Miller, Elizabeth; Rice, Kristen; Primack, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Facilitator-led smoking media literacy (SML) programs have improved media literacy and reduced intention to smoke. However, these programs face limitations including high costs and barriers to standardization. We examined the efficacy of a Web-based media literacy program in improving smoking media literacy skills among adolescents. Sixty-six 9th…

  17. Access Denied: Ending the Exclusion of Disabled Students from Media Production Courses in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubbage, Jayne

    2017-01-01

    As the acceptance of media literacy increases among educators, media producers and consumers, one group is often missing from the dialogue--persons with disabilities. This absence is witnessed in the marginalized media depictions of the disabled. To gain entry into the media professions, some form of higher education is required. Using muted group…

  18. Social Media Use and Online Political Participation Among College Students During the US Election 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei “Chris” Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 4,556 US college students were surveyed immediately after Election 2012 to investigate what social media–related psychological and behavioral factors predicted their online political participation. Structural equation modeling and hierarchical multiple regression results showed that online social capital, political self-efficacy, and Facebook group participation were positive predictors of online political participation, while social trust did not directly influence online political participation. General political use of Facebook and Twitter was a positive predictor of online political participation; however, extensive Facebook and Twitter use was a negative predictor. Implications for research and political practice are discussed.

  19. Use of social media is associated with short sleep duration in a dose-response manner in students aged 11 to 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampasa-Kanyinga, Hugues; Hamilton, Hayley A; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2018-04-01

    This study examined the association between social media and sleep duration among Canadian students aged 11-20. Data from 5242 students were obtained from the 2015 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey, a province-wide, school-based survey that has been conducted every two years since 1977. We measured the respondents' sleep duration against the recommended ranges of 9-11 h per night at 11-13 years of age, 8-10 h at 14-17 and 7-9 h per night for those aged 18 years or more. Overall, 36.4% of students met or exceeded the recommended sleep duration and 63.6% slept less than recommended, with 73.4% of students reporting that they used social media for at least one hour per day. After adjusting for various covariates, the use of social media was associated with greater odds of short sleep duration in a dose-response manner (p for linear trend fashion among Canadian students aged 11-20. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THEMATIC – INTEGRATED E-PORTFOLIO MEDIA WEB BLOG BASED TO INCREASE THE SCIENTIFIC LITERACY OF ELEMENTARY TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM’S STUDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wijayanti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to improve the scientific literacy of Elementary Teacher Education Program’s students using a valid thematic-integrated e-portfolio media web blog based. Applied research and development methods for elementary school’s course planning by applying thematic-integrated e-portfolio media web blog based. The result of media and evaluation experts recommend that e-portfolio which has been developed gets 98.75% of eligibility percentage which means that it is very decent to be used in the lecturing.  Thematic-Integrated e-portfolio media web blog based effectively improves the scientific literacy of students to reach multidimensional level, in which students are able to take advantage of various concepts and demonstrate the ability to connect these concepts to daily life.  Students understand how science, society and technology are interrelated and influence each other. Students also demonstrate an understanding of the nature of science through his answer.

  1. Student-Led Conferences: Students Taking Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauss, Sherri A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the many challenges that face middle grade students, parents, and teachers is the student's lack of ownership of their academic achievements. Student-led conferences are a unique way to engage the student and the parent in the academic progress. Parents and teachers discuss the student's attitude toward the work, the student's work ethic in…

  2. Personality, emotion-related variables, and media pressure predict eating disorders via disordered eating in Lebanese university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ruiz, Maria Jose; El-Jor, Claire; Abi Kharma, Joelle; Bassil, Maya; Zeeni, Nadine

    2017-04-18

    Disordered eating behaviors are on the rise among youth. The present study investigates psychosocial and weight-related variables as predictors of eating disorders (ED) through disordered eating (DE) dimensions (namely restrained, external, and emotional eating) in Lebanese university students. The sample consisted of 244 undergraduates (143 female) aged from 18 to 31 years (M = 20.06; SD = 1.67). Using path analysis, two statistical models were built separately with restrained and emotional eating as dependent variables, and all possible direct and indirect pathways were tested for mediating effects. The variables tested for were media influence, perfectionism, trait emotional intelligence, and the Big Five dimensions. In the first model, media pressure, self-control, and extraversion predicted eating disorders via emotional eating. In the second model, media pressure and perfectionism predicted eating disorders via restrained eating. Findings from this study provide an understanding of the dynamics between DE, ED, and key personality, emotion-related, and social factors in youth. Lastly, implications and recommendations for future studies are advanced.

  3. Exploring the Divides among Students, Educators, and Practitioners in the Use of Digital Media as a Pedagogical Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Katherine; Ney, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies pervade the higher education landscape as a way to build student engagement and enhance student learning and teaching. In practice, however, the ways in which these tools are implemented in marketing education appear to be ad hoc, rather than using a systematic approach to build engagement and provide students with the skill…

  4. Differences between Perceived Usefulness of Social Media and Institutional Channels by Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Leandro Sumida; Silva, Camila Mariane Costa

    2016-01-01

    Social media technologies were introduced among the modern society and are part of its routine in many ways--knowledge acquisition and sharing, interpersonal relationships, media diffusion--sometimes complementing and even substituting tools that were specifically designed for similar activities. This research compares social media sites and…

  5. Solar Heliospheric and INterplanetary Environment (SHINE) Students - Student Representatives' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahud, D. M.; Niembro, T.

    2014-12-01

    The SHINE workshop is an annual meeting of solar and heliospheric scientists which, in addition to aiming to improve understanding of solar disturbances and their propagation to, and effect, on the Earth (shinecon.org), is dedicated to actively supporting students. This dedication is substantiated in part through the National Science Foundation (NSF) providing funding for student attendance to the workshop, which enables student participation. Another example of SHINE's commitment to its student members is the incorporation of a Student Day prior to the workshop since 2003, entirely organized and run by two student representatives. While there are variations in format from year to year, Student Day consists of tutorials and research talks exclusively by student volunteers to an audience of only students. The day is intended to provide a low-stress environment for students to learn about the various topics addressed during the workshop, to ask questions freely, and to engage in scientific discussion with other students which hopefully is a catalyst for collaboration. As a result of positive experiences, over the past decade student attendance and participation in the workshop have increased. At the SHINE 2014 workshop, nearly a third of attendees were students. SHINE student visibility has increased over the years, with student posters being advertised at breakfast, inclusion of a student day summary by the student representatives during a plenary session, and continued support from the steering committee. Students are also promoting a broader impact of SHINE sciences via increased social media presence. From a student representative's perspective, SHINE has built and fostered a healthy student community and encourages students to engage in shaping the future of the field.

  6. Associations between Electronic Media Use and Involvement in Violence, Alcohol and Drug Use among United States High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denniston, Maxine

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We identified associations between time spent watching television and time spent playing video or computer games or using computers and involvement in interpersonal violence, alcohol and drug use in a nationally representative sample of United States high school students.Methods: We analyzed data from the 2007 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Exposure variables were time spent watching television and time spent playing computer or video games or using computers (hereafter denoted as “computer/video game use” on an average school day; outcome variables included multiple measures assessing involvement in violence and alcohol or drug use. Chi-square tests were used to identify statistically significant associations between each exposure variable and each of the outcome variables. We used logistic regression to obtain crude odds ratios for outcome variables with a significant chi-square p-value and to obtain adjusted odds ratios controlling for sex, race, and grade in school.Results: Overall, 35.4% (95% CI=33.1%-37.7% of students reported frequent television (TV use and 24.9% (95% CI=22.9%-27.0% reported frequent computer/video game use. A number of risk behaviors, including involvement in physical fights and initiation of alcohol use before age 13, were significantly associated with frequent TV use or frequent computer/video game use, even after controlling for sex, race/ethnicity and grade.Conclusion: Findings highlight the need for additional research to better understand the mechanisms by which electronic media exposure and health-risk behaviors are associated and for the development of strategies that seek to understand how the content and context (e.g., watching with peers, having computer in common area of media use influence risk behaviors among youth. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(3:310-315.

  7. Consumer Behavior and Social Media Marketing: A Research on University Student

    OpenAIRE

    NARCI, Muhammed Talha

    2017-01-01

    Social media sites are the most time spent areas in recent years with the services what they provide and the number of users is rapidly increasing. Thanks to a large number of social media users, companies turn to this field, and through this, firms can reach more people by carrying out promotion and marketing activities. On the other hand, social media sites enable consumers to gather information about their needs and they can directly communicate with companies about the products and servic...

  8. Using Entertainment Media to Inform Student Affairs Teaching and Practice Related to Sex and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy L.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents several strategies for teaching about sex and gender using entertainment media and explores critical issues related to content development, the delivery process, and evaluation methods.

  9. SUBTITLE FOR THE DEAF (SDH MEDIA AS AN NEW MODEL TO TEACH ENGLISH VOCABULARY FOR THE DEAF OR HARD OF HEARING STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilik Untari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available English is a compulsory subject for the students in Indonesia including students of SMPLB. The SMPLB students are found to have difficulties in reaching the standard grade to pass the National evaluation (UN. This might happen since they have limitation in vocabulary mastery due to their hearing impairment. This study is to recognize the characteristic of DH students, implement SDH to teach English vocabulary for DH students and find out its strengths. It is a Classroom Action Research, involving 6 students of SLB-B YRTRW Surakarta. It is recognized that physically, the students have severely to profoundly pre-lingual deafness. They cannot hear conversational speech, but they may still hear loud sound. Vision is their primary modality for communication. Their individual speech is not easy to understand. Psychological characteristics are seen from their spoken language development, communication ability, academic achievement, social adaptation, and intelligence. To solve their limitation in acquiring vocabulary through hearing, SDH is offered. SDH is a media that can be used to introduce a concept of word by visualizing the concept audio-visually as well as literally. The visual context on the subtitled video made the students easy to comprehend the vocabulary. Thus, it helps the students understand the story structure of the video. It encouraged other language activity to take place in the class. Thus, after the implementation of SDH, the students demonstrated increased vocabulary mastery. In the interview, it was revealed that the students have valuable classroom activity with SDH. They showed their attractiveness toward the class.

  10. EFFORTS TO IMPROVE THE ABILITY TO USE MEASURING INSTRUMENT STUDENT LEARNING THROUGH MEDIA MACROMEDIA FLASH IN CLASS X MECHANICAL MACHINING SMK 1 SEDAYU ACADEMIC YEAR 2012/2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puput Hananto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the effect of instructional media makromedia flash in improving the students practical skill on subjects Measure Measuring Precision Mechanics class X Mechanical Engineering SMK 1 Sedayu Academic Year 2012/2013. This study included in Classroom Action Research (CAR. This study was conducted in two cycles, in 1 cycle has 3 times with the research subjects are class X students of SMK 1 Sedayu TPm totaling 32 students. The data were obtained from observations during learning activities by using observation sheets, tests, documents and photographs. Results obtained were analyzed with descriptive statistical analysis. The results showed that the ability of the students to practice using instructional media on subjects macromedia flash Measuring with Precision Mechanical Measuring Instrument has increased as follows: the initial capabilities obtained an average value of 65.9 after treatment in the first cycle the average value becomes 76.1. While the values obtained in the second cycle to 84.8 average. Based on the study results, the authors suggest that teachers improve the application of instructional media in learning macromedia flash so the ability to practice and student achievement will increase.

  11. The integration and evaluation of a social-media facilitated journal club to enhance the student learning experience of evidence-based practice: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Caleb; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Gholizadeh, Leila; Ferguson, Leila E; Hickman, Louise D

    2017-01-01

    Nurses are required to interpret and apply knowledge so communities will receive care based on best available evidence, as opposed to care that is simply based on tradition or authority. Fostering nursing students' critical appraisal skills will assist in their capacity to engage with, interpret and use best evidence. Journal clubs are frequently used approach to engage learners with research and develop critical appraisal skills. Given new flipped and blended approaches to teaching and learning there is need to rejuvenate how research is utilised and integrated within journal clubs to maximise engagement and translation of evidence. This paper provides a case study of a single site Australian university experience of transitioning a traditional physical journal club, to a social media-facilitated club within a postgraduate health subject to stimulate and facilitate engagement with the chosen manuscripts. This case study is based on our own experiences, supported by literature and includes qualitative comments obtained via student feedback surveys during November 2015. Case study. Social media-facilitated journal clubs offer an efficient way to continue developing critical appraisal skills in nursing students. The integration of a social media-facilitated journal clubs increased student attention, engagement with presented activities and overall student satisfaction within this evidence-based practice subject. Future rigorously-designed, large-scale studies are required to evaluate the impact of online journal clubs on the uptake of evidence-based practice, including those resulting in improved patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. eABLE: Embedding Social Media in Academic Curriculum as a Learning and Assessment Strategy to Enhance Students Learning and E-Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megele, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the redesign of an MSc module to enhance students' engagement and learning through embedding social media technologies into the academic curriculum as a learning and assessment strategy, and in a complementary manner that facilitated and enhanced the achievement of the module's learning outcomes. This paper describes the…

  13. The Role of the Islamic Education in Dealing with Psychological Effects of Social Media Networks among Students at Mu'tah University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Marayeah, Abdullah Sulaiman; Albtoosh, Zeyad Abdalateef; Al-Nawasrah, Maha Ayed

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the role of the Islamic Education in dealing with the psychological effects of social media networks among students at Mu'tah University in Jordan. In order to obtain the required data, a questionnaire consists of 31 questions was used in this study. The questionnaire can be divided into three sections. The sample of…

  14. Understanding Business Interests in International Large-Scale Student Assessments: A Media Analysis of "The Economist," "Financial Times," and "Wall Street Journal"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner-Khamsi, Gita; Appleton, Margaret; Vellani, Shezleen

    2018-01-01

    The media analysis is situated in the larger body of studies that explore the varied reasons why different policy actors advocate for international large-scale student assessments (ILSAs) and adds to the research on the fast advance of the global education industry. The analysis of "The Economist," "Financial Times," and…

  15. Social Media Contribution to the Promotion of Digital Citizenship among Female Students at Imam Mohammed bin Saud Islamic University in Riyadh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Wafa Owaydhah; Alturki, Khaled Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the degree of social media contribution to reinforcing digital citizenship meaning from the viewpoint of female students at Imam Mohammed bin Saud Islamic University in Riyadh. The study was an attempt to answer the following two questions in order to achieve the objectives of the study: To which extent does SnapChat…

  16. Determination of Media and Television Literacy Levels of Sport Consumers Filtered out of the Students of the School of Physical Education and Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed to determine the literacy levels of media and television and the level of addiction of sport consumers filtered out of the students of the School of Physical Education and Sports and to investigate the relationship between these two levels. Sport consumers studying in Mugla University, School of Physical Education and Sports…

  17. Cyberbullying and Social Media: Information and Interventions for School Nurses Working with Victims, Students, and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Elizabeth; Vessey, Judith A.; Pfeifer, Lauren

    2018-01-01

    Social media has become an increasingly prevalent fixture in youths' lives, with over 90% of teenagers reporting daily usage. These online sites and applications have provided many positive opportunities for youths to connect and share ideas with others; however, social media has also become a major platform for cyberbullying. Victims often…

  18. Differences between Perceived Usefulness of Social Media and Institutional Channels by Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida Garcia, Leandro; Costa Silva, Camila Mariane

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to compare the preference of social media sites and institutional communication channels of a higher education institution by confronting elements that form perceived usefulness and user satisfaction with the system. Social media technologies are a part of the routine of the modern society in many diverse ways,…

  19. The Predictive Level of Social Media Addiction for Life Satisfaction: A Study on University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Cengiz

    2017-01-01

    Social media addiction is considered as a sort of Internet addiction. Individuals who spend too much time on social media have a desire to be notified of anything immediately, which can cause virtual tolerance, virtual communication and virtual problems. Behaviours that force the person into these actions can be explained as social media…

  20. Leadership Lessons: Helping Students Develop Essential Leadership and Communication Competencies through Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remund, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors often use social media as an extra platform for sharing information and therefore extend the classroom beyond classroom walls. However, when more thoughtfully integrated in pedagogy and tied to specific desired learning outcomes, social media may help accomplish more: strong engagement and self-reported comprehension, aided by the…

  1. School Library Media Specialists Inform Technology Preparation of Library Science Students: An Evidence-Based Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Donna L.; Miller, Andrea L.

    2009-01-01

    What is the relative importance of current and emerging technologies in school library media programs? In order to answer this question, in Fall 2007 the authors administered a survey to 1,053 school library media specialists (SLMSs) throughout the state of Pennsylvania. As a part of the MSLS degree with Library Science K-12 certification, Clarion…

  2. Implications of Social Media on African-American College Students' Communication Regarding Sex Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosrovani, Massomeh; Desai, Mayur S.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of mobile phone technologies and the emergence of new social media websites created a new platform for social interactions. This new phenomenon has positive features that allow individuals to interact socially and to conduct business. The use of social media also allows its users to share or exchange valuable knowledge and information,…

  3. Improve Student Understanding Ability Through Gamification in Instructional Media Based Explicit Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdausi, N.; Prabawa, H. W.; Sutarno, H.

    2017-02-01

    In an effort to maximize a student’s academic growth, one of the tools available to educators is the explicit instruction. Explicit instruction is marked by a series of support or scaffold, where the students will be guided through the learning process with a clear statement of purpose and a reason for learning new skills, a clear explanation and demonstration of learning targets, supported and practiced with independent feedback until mastery has been achieved. The technology development trend of todays, requires an adjustment in the development of learning object that supports the achievement of explicit instruction targets. This is where the gamification position is. In the role as a pedagogical strategy, the use of gamification preformance study class is still relatively new. Gamification not only use the game elements and game design techniques in non-game contexts, but also to empower and engage learners with the ability of motivation on learning approach and maintains a relaxed atmosphere. With using Reseach and Development methods, this paper presents the integration of technology (which in this case using the concept of gamification) in explicit instruction settings and the impact on the improvement of students’ understanding.

  4. Student perception as moderator for student wellbeing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Petegem, Karen; Aelterman, Antonia; Rosseel, Yves; Creemers, Bert

    Student motivation as well as student perception of interpersonal teacher behaviour are linked to the sense of wellbeing at student level. However, while most of the variance in the measurement of student wellbeing was situated at student level, eleven percent of variance was found at classroom

  5. Cyberbullying and Social Media: Information and Interventions for School Nurses Working With Victims, Students, and Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Elizabeth; Vessey, Judith A; Pfeifer, Lauren

    2018-02-01

    Social media has become an increasingly prevalent fixture in youths' lives, with over 90% of teenagers reporting daily usage. These online sites and applications have provided many positive opportunities for youths to connect and share ideas with others; however, social media has also become a major platform for cyberbullying. Victims often experience negative health outcomes directly related to cyberbullying. For this reason, it is critical that third parties, such as school nurses, are well versed in social media and the warning signs of those being victimized by cyberbullying. Therefore, this integrative review examines school nurses' knowledge of cyberbullying and social media and identifies the implications for school nursing practice regarding prevention and intervention processes.

  6. Assessing the Association Between E-Cigarette Use and Exposure to Social Media in College Students: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawdey, Michael D; Hancock, Linda; Messner, Marcus; Prom-Wormley, Elizabeth C

    2017-12-06

    Social media platforms provide an indirect medium for encouraging e-cigarette use between individuals and also serve as a direct marketing tool from e-cigarette brands to potential users. E-cigarette users share information via social media that often contains product details or health-related claims. Determine whether e-cigarette use is associated with exposure to e-cigarettes on social media in college students. Data from a sample of 258 college students was obtained via a clicker-response questionnaire (90% response rate). Demographic, lifetime and current e-cigarette/cigarette use, and e-cigarette exposure via social media (peer posts or advertisements) were examined. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between lifetime and current e-cigarette use and viewing peer posts or advertisements on social media while adjusting for cigarette use and self-posting about e-cigarettes. Overall, 46% of participants reported lifetime e-cigarette use, 16% current e-cigarette use, and 7% were current dual users of e-cigarettes and cigarettes. There were positive and significant associations between lifetime e-cigarette use and viewing peer posts (aOR = 3.11; 95% CI = 1.25-7.76) as well as advertisements (aOR = 3.01; 95% CI = 1.19-7.65) on e-cigarettes via social media after adjusting for cigarette use. Current e-cigarette use was only significantly associated with viewing peer posts via social media (aOR = 7.58; 95% CI = 1.66-34.6) after adjusting for cigarette use. Conclusions/Importance: Almost half of college students view peer posts and advertisements on e-cigarettes via social media. This exposure is associated with individual e-cigarette use. Continued efforts to examine online e-cigarette content are needed to help future interventions decrease e-cigarette use.

  7. NETWORK MEDIA RESOURCES AS THE INSTRUMENT OF RECRUITING OF FOREIGN STUDENTS IN THE RUSSIAN HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Гульнара Амангельдиновна Краснова

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Information technologies become more and more important instrument of recruiting of foreign students. In article the online recruiting methods used by foreign and Russian higher education institutions now and recent trends in the field of education export are considered. Results of the research “Education Value” conducted in 2015 by HSBC bank are given. Are discussed a role of the websites for students, parents, the recruiting agencies in information search and social networks as one of the main channels of recruiting of students. Social aspects of Wikipedia as important information resource and instrument of recruiting of foreign students are discussed.

  8. Associations between social media displays and event-specific alcohol consumption by college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Megan A; Kacvinsky, Lauren; Pumper, Megan; Wachowski, Leah; Whitehill, Jennifer M

    2013-12-01

    The Mifflin Street Block Party is a yearly Wisconsin event known for high levels of alcohol consumption and previous negative outcomes. This study investigated displayed Mifflin references on Facebook and their association with alcohol consumption at the block party. Participants included first-year college students who were enrolled in a longitudinal study involving Facebook profile assessments and interviews. We identified a subset of participants who were interviewed within 28 days following the Mifflin St Block Party. Participants were categorized as "Mifflin Displayers" or "Non-displayers" based on Facebook profile content. Interviews included the timeline follow-back method to assess alcohol use in the past 28 days. Analysis included logistic and linear regression. Among the 66 participants included in this study, 45 (68.2%) were female and 38 (50%) were Mifflin Displayers on Facebook. Among the Mifflin Displayer participants, 18 (27.2%) displayed prior to Mifflin, 11 displayed the day of Mifflin (16.7%) and 19 (28.8%) displayed after. Some participants displayed in more than 1 time frame. A total of 40 (60.6%) reported alcohol use on the day of the Mifflin Street Block Party. The mean number of drinks reported on the day of Mifflin was 8.8 (SD = 6.1), with a range of 1 to 35. Displayed references to Mifflin on Facebook were positively associated with reporting alcohol use at Mifflin (OR = 20.9, 95% CI 5.6-78.8). Displaying Facebook references to Mifflin was associated with alcohol consumption on the day of the event. Future prevention efforts could consider creating Facebook advertisements with safety messages triggered by Mifflin displays.

  9. A Comprehensive Multi-Media Program to Prevent Smoking among Black Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Joy S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Implemented program to decrease incidence of new smokers among black adolescents. Program combined school-based curriculum with comprehensive media intervention. There were two experimental conditions: one group participated in school-based intervention and was prompted to participate in multimedia intervention; other group had access to…

  10. Evidence of the Value of the Smoking Media Literacy Framework for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Melinda C.; Zwarun, Lara; Sherblom, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Susceptibility to future smoking, positive beliefs about smoking, and perceptions of antismoking norms are all factors that are associated with future smoking. In previous research, smoking media literacy (SML) has been associated with these variables, even when controlling for other known risk factors for smoking. However, these…

  11. Social Media Use to Enhance Internal Communication: Course Design for Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Amy M.; Hinesly, Mary D.

    2014-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly using social media to improve their internal communication. When successfully implemented, such initiatives can have a dramatic impact on internal efficiency, team collaboration, innovation, organizational alignment, and cultural transformation. This article describes a course offered by the Ross School of Business,…

  12. Simple Tips for Helping Students Become Safer, Smarter Social Media Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosto, Denise E.; Abbas, June

    2016-01-01

    In thinking about teens and online risks, school librarians need to know researchers generally agree that, despite the popular image of pedophiles and criminals lurking online waiting to harm innocent young people, in reality social media use is only about as risky as most everyday social interactions in the offline world (Agosto and Abbas 2013).…

  13. Leadership Training in an Industry Context: Preparing Student Leaders for a Chaotic News Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, Keith; Krueger, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    This application brief explains the creation and execution of a leadership training program within the context of journalism education. The news media has experienced profound changes in an era of digital disruption. Massive job loss, financial distress, and ownership consolidation have resulted in a chaotic industry. Promising young journalists…

  14. Endorphins and Media Messages: Addicting Students to Mediated Violence and Emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathercoal, Paul

    This paper discusses current developments in neuroscience and cognitive psychology that have significance for education and learning, and considers the effects of violent and emotion-laden media messages. Topics include: (1) the developing brain, including the roles of genetics, experience, metaphorical imagination, and culture; (2) the links…

  15. Online Content Creation: Looking at Students' Social Media Practices through a Connected Learning Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cheryl; Czerniewicz, Laura; Noakes, Travis

    2016-01-01

    As the boundaries between technology and social media have decreased, the potential for creative production or participatory practices have increased. However, the affordances of online content creation (OCC) are still taken up by a minority of internet users despite the opportunities offered for engagement and creativity. While previous studies…

  16. Pedagogical Applications of Social Media in Business Education: Student and Faculty Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2015-01-01

    There has been wide academic and research interest in the application of social media modalities, as pedagogical tools, in higher education. Recent research indicates that business-related topics are a major focus of study on this emerging educational issue. Yet a systematic review of outcome studies regarding instructional Web 2.0 adaptations in…

  17. A Peer-Led, Social Media-Delivered, Safer Sex Intervention for Chinese College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wai Han; Wong, Carlos King Ho; Wong, William Chi Wai

    2017-08-09

    The peer-led, social media-delivered intervention is an emerging method in sexual health promotion. However, no research has yet investigated its effectiveness as compared with other online channels or in an Asian population. The objective of this study is to compare a peer-led, social media-delivered, safer sex intervention with a sexual health website. Both conditions target Chinese college students in Hong Kong. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with a peer-led, safer sex Facebook group as the intervention and an existing online sexual health website as the control. The intervention materials were developed with peer input and followed the information-motivation-behavioral skills model; the intervention was moderated by peer educators. The participants filled out the online questionnaires before and after the 6-week intervention period. Outcome evaluations included safer sex attitudes, behavioral skills, and behaviors, while process evaluation focused on online experience, online-visiting frequency, and online engagement. The effect of online-visiting frequency and online engagement on outcome variables was investigated. Of 196 eligible participants-100 in the control group and 96 in the intervention group-who joined the study, 2 (1.0%) control participants joined the Facebook group and 24 of the remaining 194 participants (12.4%) were lost to follow-up. For the process evaluation, participants in the intervention group reported more satisfying online experiences (Psocial media-delivered, safer sex intervention was found to be feasible and effective in improving attitudes toward condom use and behavioral skills, but was not significantly more effective than a website. Future research may focus on the long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this popular method, as well as the potential cultural differences of using social media between different countries. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry (ChiCTR): ChiCTR-IOR-16009495; http

  18. 3D Virtual Worlds as Art Media and Exhibition Arenas: Students' Responses and Challenges in Contemporary Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lilly

    2013-01-01

    3D virtual worlds (3D VWs) are considered one of the emerging learning spaces of the 21st century; however, few empirical studies have investigated educational applications and student learning aspects in art education. This study focused on students' responses to and challenges with 3D VWs in both aspects. The findings show that most participants…

  19. Factors Associated With Nursing Students' Resilience: Communication Skills Course, Use of Social Media and Satisfaction With Clinical Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigalit, Warshawski; Sivia, Barnoy; Michal, Itzhaki

    The purpose of this study was to explore the (a) associations between students' personal and group resilience to their utilization of social networking platforms and formally taught communication skills, (b) students' personal and clinical characteristics that are related to personal and group resilience and the perceived helpfulness of communication course, and (c) factors that contribute to students' satisfaction with their clinical placement. Data were collected from 149 second year nursing students learning in a major university in the country of Israel with the use of a self-administered structured questionnaire. Students' satisfaction from their clinical placement was measured using 1 open-ended question, analyzed through qualitative methods. Results demonstrated positive correlations between students' use of social networking to their personal and group resilience (Pmedia use, religion, and clinical placement characteristics were related to resilience and to the perceived helpfulness of the communication course (P<.01). Students' satisfaction with their clinical placement was based primarily on the clinical instructors' personal and professional skills. In conclusion, social networking can and should be used as a learning tool to promote resilience among nursing students. Faculty and nurse managers should be aware of the central role of the clinical instructor and initiate collaborative and supporting initiatives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Instructional Media in the Learning of English Grammar on the Achievement of Teacher Training Students at Namakkal District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulselvi, Evangelin

    2011-01-01

    The present study is aimed at finding the effect of Instructional software program in the learning of grammar on the achievement of teacher training students of Namakkal District. Parallel group experimental method was adopted in this study. A sample of 80 students studying in the teacher training college were selected on the basis of their…

  1. Developing Students' Professional Digital Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Thomas; Antonczak, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the myth of the "Digital Native" and the ubiquity of Facebook use, we have found that students' digital identities are predominantly social with their online activity beyond Facebook limited to being social media consumers rather than producers. Within a global economy students need to learn new digital literacy skills to…

  2. Learning process in fashion design students: link with industry and social media

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, António Manuel Dinis Ribeiro; Moschatou, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    Portugal is today an important player in the European fashion industry. The Portuguese footwear industry, “low-tech”, mature and traditional, dominated by SMEs, is also a success case in the Portuguese economy. With own brands, own collections and own products, the quality, innovation and international image of the Portuguese clothes, accessories and shoes is increasing year by year in the most sophisticated markets worldwide. The new information economy and social media presen...

  3. Learning process in fashion design students: link with industry and social media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, A. D.; Moschatou, A.

    2017-10-01

    Portugal is today an important player in the European fashion industry. The Portuguese footwear industry, “low-tech”, mature and traditional, dominated by SMEs, is also a success case in the Portuguese economy. With own brands, own collections and own products, the quality, innovation and international image of the Portuguese clothes, accessories and shoes is increasing year by year in the most sophisticated markets worldwide. The new information economy and social media presents a new set of opportunities and threats to established companies, new challenges and new markets, and demanding to all the companies to rethink their strategy and to prepare new business plans. Portuguese companies in the fashion industry are starting to perceive that the brand’s transition to social media means a transformation of the customer relationship, wherein social media and the community members is an ally of the brand and not an “audience”. Also the universities are preparing new professionals to the fashion industry and the learning process has to be managed according these new challenges. And the University of Minho has the Bachelor in Fashion Design and Marketing, an excellent course to prepare new skills to these fashion companies: textile, clothing and footwear industries.

  4. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Monday 8 August 09:15 - 10:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (3/4) 10:15 - 12:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (1-2/4) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 9 August 09:15 - 10:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (4/4) 10:15 - 11:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. GREY The GRID 12:00 Discussion Session 14:15 - 17:00 Student Sessions Wednesday 10 August 09:15 - 10:00 J-J. GOMEZ-CADENAS Neutrino Physics (4/4) 10:15 - 12:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (1-2/5) 12:00 Discussion Session 14:15 - 17:00 Student Sessions Thursday 11 August 09:15 - 11:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (3-4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 G. KALMUS The ILC Story 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 12 August 09:15 - 10:00 J. LESGOURGUES Introduction to Cosmology (5/5) 10:15 - 11:00 G. VENEZIANO String theory: has Einstein's dream come true? 11:00  Discussion...

  5. To Twitter to Woo: Harnessing the power of social media (SoMe) in nurse education to enhance the student's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Wendy; McLoughlin, Moira; Warne, Tony

    2015-11-01

    This paper explores some of the difficulties, challenges and rewards for student nurses and nurse academics when harnessing social media (SoMe) as part of the overall learning experience. The paper draws upon data in the form of student voices, captured through an online planned Twitter chat. This data analysis provides the basis of a case study on the student experience in practice placements. A planned 1 h Twitter chat took place in June 2013, specifically aimed at student nurses. What transpired was an illuminating debate, eliciting responses from around the globe about learning in practice, mentors, and student support that lasted over 3 h. More importantly, the Twitter chat also included qualified nurses and mentors, listening and responding in real time, offering thoughts and solutions to how support and mentoring could be improved. This was in contrast to how students, locally, currently use a paper based questionnaire to give feedback in isolation. The authenticity of this feedback is often compromised by university link lecturers' who often provide a more sanitised version of this feedback to clinical placement. This paper explores whether it is possible to facilitate a realignment and capture the zeitgeist in order to provide the opportunity for enhancing learning in practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Efforts to Increase Artistic Sensitivity of Unesa’s Art Education Students by Painting with Watercolor and Wax Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winarno Winarno

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Artistic abilities of students who had been enrolled in Arts Educations Department of UNESA, in general, were a lack in realizing artistic aspect. It created the problems in learning and teaching of art. The purpose of this research was to increase the students’ sensitivity in creating their work. One way to solve this problem was by doing the work as much as possible, but the results were not fully obtained. So far, there were no standardized guidelines to help the improvement of the work quality in term artistic achievement level. While it became a problem in learning, there was an effort to find a simple and effective way by mixed media watercolor paint and wax. The method in this research was the design of class action research, where the research was conducted in the learning process of each cycle. Every cycle consists of planning, implementation, observation, and reflection. The result of this research shows an increasing of artistic quality regarding practical grades of art. However, there are other alternatives must be sought to increase students’ ability to create, view, appreciate something that is artistic. 

  7. IMPACT OF INFORMATION SERVICES USING MEDIA FILM TO STUDENT MOTIVATION LEARNING AT SMA NEGERI 1 RAMAN UTARA, LAMPUNG TIMUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septazema Suciana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: One of the factors that can influence student learning is the motivation to learn. Students' motivation can be built with an understanding to students about the importance of learning how to learn effectively, and how to overcome learning problems. Departing from this, the research problem is formulated as follows: Is there any influence of information services on the students motivation ?. The aim of research to determine the effect of information services on the students motivation. The study design was one group pretest-posttest design. Subjects numbered 20 students. To determine the study subjects used the technique Proportionate Stratified Random Sampling.Hasil hypothesis test showed the value of t = 8.75> 1.729. The conclusion of the study is an information service that executed can affect motivation. Therefore, it is advisable to guidance and counseling teachers use information services by using the medium of film, so that the services effectively organized and able to enhance students' motivation. Keyword: Information Services, Motivation

  8. Teacher Ethnicity, Student Ethnicity, and Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Geert

    2015-01-01

    A review of the empirical literature was conducted to establish the relation between teacher and student ethnicity, and cognitive and noncognitive student outcomes. It was hypothesized that ethnic teacher-student congruence results in more favorable outcomes for especially minority students. A total of 24 quantitative studies focusing on primary…

  9. International Students: A Vulnerable Student Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Mark; Thomas, Peter; Chui, Wing Hong

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the experiences of international students at The University of Toledo, where international students comprise approximately 10% of the student population. It highlights problems international students experience such as adapting to a new culture, English language problems, financial problems and lack of understanding from the…

  10. Student-on-Student Sexual Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Frances E.

    2011-01-01

    No school board member, administrator, or teacher wants to see a student suffering from taunts of the student's peers, but with budget cutbacks, reductions in force, and increased class size, teachers and administrators are stretched too thin to easily identify, investigate, and remedy student-on-student harassment. But school districts must…

  11. Association between exposure to media and body weight concern among female university students in five Arab countries: a preliminary cross-cultural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Al-Mannai, Mariam

    2014-03-01

    Mass media play an important role in changing body image. This study aimed to determine the role of media (magazines and television) in body weight concern among university females in five Arab countries. A total sample of 1134 female university students was selected at convenience from universities in five Arab countries: Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Oman and Syria. The females' ages ranged from 17 to 32. A pre-tested questionnaire was used to assess the exposure to mass media regarding weight concerns. For the variables on exposure to mass media, girls were divided into two groups: infrequently exposed and frequently exposed. In general, the females who were exposed to mass media had a greater risk of having dieted to lose weight and changing their ideas of a perfect body shape than those who were not exposed or infrequently exposed. The association of exposure to magazines with having dieted to lose weight was only significant among females in Bahrain (pbody weight concerns of females. The association of exposure to television with females' idea of a perfect body shape was only statistically significant in females in Egypt (pmedia on the body weight concern of female university students may lead these women to practise unhealthy weight control diets.

  12. Generation Y Students in Social Media: What Do We Know about Them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Popescul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to estimate what we know about Generation Y students’ behavior in Social Media (SM, especially in our country. The correct identification of their traits is crucial for the academic community, primarily from the perspective of understanding their real needs, as beneficiaries of teaching act, followed by a serious and consistent adaptation of our offer. In an extended literature review, we try to determine the reasons for SM use, their preferences for one medium or another, the way, place and time of SM use, and the Romanian particularities in the general personality portrait observed and explained by literature. We discuss the advantages anddisadvantages of their intensive SM use, show how the time spent in SM affect the individuals and the universities, and try to find out what their needs and expectancies are. In our opinion, the problems treated here are of interest both for professors as individuals, and for the universities’ and faculties’ management – especially in a world in which the borderline between the physical and virtual life is becoming more and more difficult to draw.

  13. Developmental Complexity in Student Conduct: An Extended Case Analysis of Student Board Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittinger, Joshua D.; Reif, Gabriel; Kimball, Ezekiel W.

    2018-01-01

    College students frequently serve on boards that hear cases of alleged student misconduct. These students contribute to decisions that can affect their peers' lives and make their colleges vulnerable to litigation and negative media coverage. It is critical that student board members carefully interpret all information presented in disciplinary…

  14. Student Club

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    They know where the work is, but where’s all the fun? CERN’s new student club provides a much-needed social outlet for all young people coming to CERN for any length of time. Some of the participants on the trip to Chamonix enjoy the breath-taking scenery.For many young people, their time at CERN can be filled not only with exciting opportunities but also anxious uncertainty. Whether your stay is for just a few months or a few years, it can be quite daunting to arrive at a new place and try to find your way around – and let’s face it, CERN is not an easy place to find your way around! Much of their time here is spent on doing analysis or technical work on the experiments or the LHC; but even at the end of the day or on weekends there are few social outlets at CERN geared just towards young people. Fortunately, some young people have decided to come together and make their time here not just productive, but fun! Doctoral student, Omer Khalid, Marie Curie fell...

  15. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 6 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. CERUTTI (CERN) Presentation of the Summer Student Programme D. Heagerty (CERN) Computer rules O. ULLALAND (CERN) Workshops presentation 10:15 - 11:00 D. SCHLATTER (CERN) Introduction to CERN 11:15 Film on CERN Thursday 7 July 09:15 - 11:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (1-2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session 14:00 - 14:45 M. Lindroos (CERN) ISOLDE Facility 15:00 M. Lindroos (CERN) ISOLDE Visit Friday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) How an experiment is designed (1/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physi...

  16. Facebook usage by students in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseling, N.F.; de la Poza, Elena; Dormènech, Jozep; Lloret, Jaime; Vincent Vela, M. Cinta; Zuriaga Agustí, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In this paper I measure first year student Facebook usage as part of a broader PhD study into the influence of social media usage on the success of students in higher education. A total of 906 students were asked to complete 3 surveys on Facebook usage with their peers, for two consecutive years

  17. Institutional Liability for Student Activities and Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Douglas R.

    1990-01-01

    Examines higher education institutional liability in the following areas: (1) in tort, based on negligence, for physical harm to students; (2) in tort, for defamation flowing from student media; and (3) in contract, arising out of student organizations' business relationships with third parties. (222 references) (MLF)

  18. Student Power in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sociology, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, USA. ... publication, the book Student Politics in Africa: Representation and Activism, published .... reference to two moments in the country's student political history: the 1973 student.

  19. Eating habits of students

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Silvestra; Zupančič, Andreja

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with eating habits of students. Its purpose was to ascertaineating habits of students living outside their primary home and are under different forms of stress. Methods: the pattern is represented by students living in student homer where they can cook and prepare their own meals. In the research, 81 students living in the students home on Cesta v Mestni log in Ljubljana. The inquiry was composed from 34 questions. The data were processed with Microsoft Excel. Body mass inde...

  20. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 16 August 09:15 - 10:00 Student sessions (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 Student sessions (2/6 11:15 - 12:00 Student sessions (3/6) Tuesday 17 August 09:15 - 10:00 Student sessions (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 Student sessions (5/6) 11:15 - 12:00 Student sessions (6/6

  1. UNDERSTANDING UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS PRACTICUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    student misbehavior as the most stressful experience of student teacher practicum experience. ... adequate support, rethinking assessment mechanism, provision of adequate fund, strengthening ..... provide regular formative feedback, have.

  2. Supporting Deaf Students--and All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuknis, Christina; Santini, Joseph; Appanah, Thangi

    2017-01-01

    Two faculty members and a Ph.D. student at Gallaudet University, the world's only university for the deaf, explain the concept of Deaf-Gain, which reframes the idea of hearing loss into one of gaining deafness and recognizes the contributions that deaf people make to society. This narrative assumes that deaf students and all students bring…

  3. The Development of Media Activities by Undergraduate Students in Order to Promote Agricultural Tourism Community Enterprise According to the Principles of Social Service Learning and Community-Based Leaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamwipat, Kuntida; Princhankol, Pornpapatsorn; Yampinij, Sakesun; Meejaleurn, Sopon

    2018-01-01

    This research was aimed to develop media activities by undergraduate students to promote agricultural tourism community enterprise according to the principles of social service learning and community-based learning, 2) to evaluate the quality of such media activities, 3) to measure the income of the community after the development of media…

  4. Longitudinal investigation into implicit stigma of epilepsy among Japanese medical students before and after mass media coverage of car accidents associated with people with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamori, Chizuko; Hara, Keiko; Ohta, Katsuya; Akaza, Miho; Sumi, Yuki

    2017-08-01

    Public attitudes and stigma toward epilepsy may limit patient motivation for treatment and participation in social activities. Stigma research requiring individuals to report personal beliefs is useful but is subject to social desirability bias. Self-reporting methods often do not capture implicit attitudes; therefore, in this study, implicit stigma was measured using the implicit association test (IAT), which is a word sorting task to minimize this bias. Recently, in Japan, several serious car accidents caused by people with epilepsy (PWE) resulted in pedestrian fatalities. Traffic accidents involving PWE have been reported extensively and repeatedly in the media since 2011. The present study aimed to examine differences in implicit stigma toward epilepsy among medical students in 2010, 2013, and 2016. We recruited 41 medical students in 2010, 44 medical students in 2013 and 42 medical students in 2016. We investigated the strength of conceptual associations between the words "Epilepsy" or "Hypertension", and "Safety" or "Danger" in the IAT. The association between the words "Epilepsy" and "Danger" was stronger in 2013 compared with that in 2010; however, the association was weaker in 2016 compared with that in 2013. There was no significant difference between 2010 and 2016. The change in IAT results between 2010 and 2013 might be due to the traffic accident involving PWE in Japan. However, the result in 2016 might indicate that the implicit attitudes toward epilepsy were improved to the same level as those in 2010. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Different digital paths to the keg? How exposure to peers' alcohol-related social media content influences drinking among male and female first-year college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Sarah C; LaBrie, Joseph W; Froidevaux, Nicole M; Witkovic, Yong D

    2016-06-01

    Despite speculation that peers' alcohol-related content on social media sites (SMS) may influence the alcohol use behaviors of SMS frequenting college students, this relationship has not been investigated longitudinally. The current prospective study assesses the relationship between exposure to peers' alcohol-related SMS content and later-drinking among first-year college students. Among 408 first-year students, total exposure to peers' alcohol-related content on Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat during the initial 6 weeks of college predicted alcohol consumption 6 months later. The rather robust relationship persisted even after students' and close friends drinking were accounted for, indicating that alcohol references on SMS do not simply reflect alcohol use behaviors that would otherwise be observed in the absence of SMS and be predictive of later alcohol use. Findings also illuminate important gender differences in the degree to which peers' alcohol-related SMS content influenced later drinking behavior as well as psychological mediators of this relationship. Among females, enhancement drinking motives and beliefs about the role of alcohol in the college experience fully mediated the relationship between SMS alcohol exposure and later drinking. Males, however, evidenced a much stronger predictive relationship between SMS alcohol exposure and second semester drinking, with this relationship only partially explained by perceptions of drinking norms, enhancement drinking motives, and beliefs about the role of alcohol in the college experience. Implications of these findings for college drinking prevention efforts and directions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Effects of a mixed media education intervention program on increasing knowledge, attitude, and compliance with standard precautions among nursing students: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Peng; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Wu, Tat Leong; Hall, Brian J

    2017-04-01

    Standard precautions (SPs) are considered fundamental protective measures to manage health care-associated infections and to reduce occupational health hazards. This study intended to assess the effectiveness of a mixed media education intervention to enhance nursing students' knowledge, attitude, and compliance with SPs. A randomized controlled trial with 84 nursing students was conducted in a teaching hospital in Hubei, China. The intervention group (n = 42) attended 3 biweekly mixed media education sessions, consisting of lectures, videos, role-play, and feedback with 15-20 minutes of individual online supervision and feedback sessions following each class. The control group learned the same material through self-directed readings. Pre- and posttest assessments of knowledge, attitudes, and compliance were assessed with the Knowledge with Standard Precautions Questionnaire, Attitude with Standard Precautions Scale, and the Compliance with Standard Precautions Scale, respectively. The Standard Bacterial Colony Index was used to assess handwashing effectiveness. At 6-week follow-up, performance on the Knowledge with Standard Precautions Questionnaire, Attitude with Standard Precautions Scale, and Compliance with Standard Precautions Scale were significantly improved in the intervention group compared with the control group (P media education intervention is effective in improving knowledge, attitude, and compliance with SPs. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. WELLS The Higgs Saga at LEP 10:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (1/4) 11:15 - 12:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 2 August 09:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (2-3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (2/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 3 August 09:15 - 10:00 G. COWAN Introduction to Statistics (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 E. KIRITSIS Beyond the Standard Model (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 K. JAKOBS Physics at Hadronic Colliders (1/4) 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 4 August 09:15 - 11:00 K. JAKOBS Physics at Hadronic Colliders (2-3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 A. WEINSTEIN Gravitation Waves 12:00 Discussion Session 16:30 - 18:00 Poster Session Friday 5 August 09:15 - 11:00 A. Höcker CP Violation (1-2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 K. JA...

  8. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 18 July 09:15 - 11:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (1-2/6) 11:15 - 12:00 N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE Astroparticle Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 12:00 N. PALANQUE-DELABROUILLE Astroparticle Physics (2-3/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 20 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 F. RADEMAKERS ROOT 11:15 - 12:00 L. ROSSI Super-conducting magnet technology for particle accelerators and detectors 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 21 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. ROSS Fundamental concepts in Particle Physics (5/6) 10:15 - 12:00 C. DE LA TAILLE Introduction to Electronics (1-2/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 C. DE LA TAILLE Introduction to Electronics (3/3) 10:15 -...

  9. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 25 July 09:15 - 11:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (2-3/8) 11:15 - 12:00 J. STACHEL Quark Gluon Plasma Physics (1/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (4/8) 10:15 - 12:00 J. STACHEL Quark Gluon Plasma Physics (2-3/3) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 27 July 09:15 - 11:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (5-6/8) 11:15 - 12:00 J-P. DELAHAYE The CLIC Concept and Technology for an e+e-Collider at the Energy Frontier 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 28 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 P. SPHICAS Data Acquisition Systems (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw data to Physics Results (1/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH The Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 P. SPHICAS Data Acquisition Systems (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. JACOBSEN Fr...

  10. Summer Students

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (4/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Introduction to Nuclear Physics (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) How an experiment is designed (2/2) 12:00 Discussion Session Tuesday 12 July  09:15 - 11:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (1-2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (1/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Wednesday 13 July 09:15 - 10:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (3/5) 10:15 - 11:00 R. LANDUA (CERN) Antimatter in the Lab (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (2/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 14 July 09:15 - 10:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (3/5) 10:15 - 11:00 G. ROLANDI (CERN) Antimatter in the Lab (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 O. BrÜning (CERN) Accelerators (4/5) 12:00 Discussion Session Friday 1...

  11. Using a Studio-Based Pedagogy to Engage Students in the Design of Mobile-Based Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, James M.

    2010-01-01

    The article presents a brief overview of the Neighbourhood Game Design Project, a studio-based curriculum intervention aimed at engaging students in the design of place-based mobile games and interactive stories using geo-locative technologies (for example, GPS enabled cell phones). It describes the three curricular components that defined the…

  12. Social Success Skills: Black Male High School Students' Perspectives on Society and Their Media Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degand, Darnel

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation's purpose was to better understand how messages received through different cultural mediums influences the development of social success skills. Black male students were chosen as the focal participants for this year-long study because they are included among the groups whose social success skills development are thought to…

  13. Problematising the Notion of 'Authentic School Learning': Insights from Student Perspectives on Media/Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weninger, Csilla

    2018-01-01

    Creating authentic learning opportunities in schools has been an important mission for educators and educational researchers, where 'authentic' is generally understood to mean connecting school education to students' current and future identities, experiences and expertise. This article aims to problematise the taken-for-granted notion of…

  14. Bringing the Digital World to Students: Partnering with the University Communications Office to Provide Social Media Experiential Learning Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Courtney C.; Levenshus, Abbey B.

    2016-01-01

    The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications recognizes the importance of a curriculum that prepares students "to apply current tools and technologies appropriate for the communications professions in which they work, and to understand the digital world" (ACEJMC, n.d.). Infusing experiential learning into…

  15. StarPower: Elevating Prospective Student Interest through Expert and Celebrity Endorsements--Relevant Message, Relevant Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucciarone, Kristy

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how universities can increase the effectiveness of the search process by featuring in their advertisements expert and celebrity endorsers who attended the institution. How can universities gain the attention of prospective students using the star power of experts and celebrities? Experts and celebrities promoting a…

  16. Engaging Engineering and Information Systems Students in Advocacy for Individuals with Disabilities through a Disability Film Media Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James; Iturralde, Val; Goldstein, Allan; Joseph, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    College curricula of engineering and information systems do not afford frequent engagement with individuals with disabilities. The authors of this research study analyzed the benefits of disability films for a community film festival of largely engineering and information systems students and individuals with developmental and intellectual…

  17. School Choice Considerations and the Role of Social Media as Perceived by Computing Students: Evidence from One University in Manila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansigan, Rolando R.; Moraga, Shirley D.; Batalla, Ma. Ymelda C.; Bringula, Rex P.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study utilized a validated questionnaire that gathered data from freshmen of two different school years. Demographic profile, marketers (i.e., source of information of students about the school), influencers (i.e., significant others that persuaded them to enroll in the school), level of school choice, and level of consideration…

  18. USING SOCIAL MEDIA (BLOG IN THE CLASSROOM: Reflecting Lecturer’s Pedagogical Approach and Students (In-Service Teachers Intrinsic Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas S. ABULIBDEH

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The demand of responsibilities among teachers has evolved not only in classroom management but also to the extent of promoting communication and interpersonal skills. Social media is integrated in schools and higher learning institutions for communication and reflection of learning which enhance teachers’ performance in leadership quality and effective teaching. This study was designed in a qualitative approach mainly to explore the extent of interest and enjoyment students experienced during an intensive ICT course. Blog was used as a medium for reflection during the class where students posted their creations of videos, posters and other ICT materials. The three needs investigated were namely autonomy, competence, and relatedness support. The researcher further examined on students’ awareness of the usefulness of the ICT skill they learned and how much they can use the blog for teaching and learning. Based on the Basic Psychological Needs Theory framework (BPNT, this study has adopted the direct observation, journal entry, and interviews as a triangulation approach.

  19. Chinese Student Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braswell, James; Boone, Jerry N.

    1991-01-01

    Places life of university students in China in context of Tiananmen Square and Cultural Revolution, with implications of serving them as students in the United States. Presents basic facts of student life in China. Although the emphasis is on college life, some attention is paid to earlier student experiences as well. (Author/NB)

  20. SAAs: The Student's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Beth

    1992-01-01

    A student member of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's student alumni association discusses numerous advantages of student participation with alumni, including contacts with campus officials, friendships, valuable networking opportunities, job-hunting assistance, and a sense of loyalty; the characteristics of good student members; and factors in…

  1. Periodic Table of Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mike

    1998-01-01

    Presents an exercise in which an eighth-grade science teacher decorated the classroom with a periodic table of students. Student photographs were arranged according to similarities into vertical columns. Students were each assigned an atomic number according to their placement in the table. The table is then used to teach students about…

  2. Students Engaged in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Channing R.; Wilkins, Emily B.; Groccia, James E.

    2018-01-01

    The role of peer teaching has long been established in academia as a means to foster student engagement in the classroom, increase student learning, and as a way to reduce faculty workload. This chapter highlights the direct and powerful positive impacts of engaging students as teachers upon the student providing the instruction, those receiving…

  3. University Student Online Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-mei

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study investigating university student online plagiarism. The following questions are investigated: (a) What is the incidence of student online plagiarism? (b) What are student perceptions regarding online plagiarism? (c) Are there any differences in terms of student perceptions of online plagiarism and print plagiarism? (d)…

  4. College Student Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Deborah J.; Thompson, Jalonda

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and it is estimated that 1,088 college students die by suicide each year (National Mental Health Association and the Jed Foundation, 2002). This chapter presents the context of college student mental health within which the problem of college student suicide is situated. Because…

  5. Empowering Students to Develop Literacy and Narrative Skills in ASL and English Through Digital Media/Visual Arts in Storytelling /

    OpenAIRE

    Sharer, Valerie Anne

    2013-01-01

    Literacy development is greatly presented and reinforced at school with emphasis on language exposure and exceptional modeling from teachers. However, many deaf students do not get enough exposure to storytelling and reading aloud due to insufficient classroom time and even professional experience in storytelling in the classroom. This becomes an ongoing issue in classroom due to educational standards and lack of investment especially in storytelling. My curriculum strongly focuses on promoti...

  6. Analysis of Media Stereotypes of the Russian Image in Media Studies in the Student Audience (example: the screen versions of Jules Verne's Novel “Michael Strogoff”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the analysis students come to the conclusion that the screen adaptations of Jules Verne's novel ''Michael Strogoff'' create, though an oversimplified and adapted to western stereotypes of perception, but a positive image of Russia – as a stronghold of European values at the Asian frontiers, a country with a severe climate, boundless Siberian spacious areas, manly and patriotic warriors, a wise monarchy. At the same time, both Jules Verne's novel and its screen adaptations contain clear-cut western pragmatism – the confidence that if a man has a proper will he can rule his destiny.

  7. BOX MEDIA MODEL THROUGH THE USE OF CONTEXTUAL UNDERSTANDING TO IMPROVE STUDENT LEARNING CONCEPTS IN VOLUME BEAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede Rohaeni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This research is motivated Cilengkrang Elementary School fifth grade students in the learning of the beam volume is still experiencing difficulties. This happens because the learning process that takes place is conventional. Learning by applying a contextual model chosen researchers by reason students will know if the learning is associated with the real world of students. The method used in this research is a classroom action research methods to the design of the research procedure refers to the spiral model Kemmis and MC. Tujuanpenelitianini is to obtain an overview of the planning, implementation and improvement of students' understanding of the results of the application of the concept model of contextual learning in the classroom beam volume V Elementary School Cilengkrang. The method used in this research is a classroom action research methods to the design of the research procedure refers to the spiral model Kemmis and MC. Taggart. Based on the implementation of the actions performed by three cycles, as a whole has shown an increase from the initial data, both process and outcomes of learning. So that the application of contextual models can enhance students' understanding of class V SDN Cilengkrang Northern District of Sumedang Sumedang district of the concept of the beam volume.   Keywords: Contextual Model, Mathematics, Mathematics Learning Objectives     Abstrak. Penelitian ini dilatarbelakangi siswa kelas V SDN Cilengkrang dalam pembelajaran volume balok masih mengalami kesulitan. Ini terjadi karena proses pembelajaran yang berlangsung bersifat konvensional. Pembelajaran dengan menerapkan model kontekstual dipilih peneliti dengan alasan siswa akan paham jika pembelajaran dikaitkan dengan dunia nyata siswa. Metode penelitian yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah metode penelitian tindakan kelas dengan rancangan prosedur penelitiannya mengacu pada model spiral Kemmis dan MC. Tujuanpenelitianini yaitu untuk memperoleh

  8. The New Student Activism: Supporting Students as Agents of Social Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The "new student activism," as it is often called, is a hot topic in higher education as well as in the popular press and social media. As a college student in the late '60s and early '70s, a long-time student affairs professional, a scholar and practitioner of service-learning, and an academic teaching a course on social change, the…

  9. Normalization and normativity practices: the subjectivization of the hyperactive student within the social media - doi: 10.4025/actascilangcult.v35i4.19879

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Franceschini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Current research verifies media discourse practices which objectify and subjectify the hyperactive student. Discourse processes that constitute the subject of education are analyzed. They verify the occurrence of discursive regularities between the medical and the school discourses within social media discourse. The theoretical and methodological concepts developed by Michel Foucault are employed, with special reference to topics related to enunciation modalities, disciplinary power, normalization and normativity which make possible the analysis of the effects of truth of enunciations in the corpus of current project. The latter comprise articles published in Brazilian newspapers and magazines and other educational texts on Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. Research investigates the discursive formations that deal with the identity of the subjects and tries to understand how knowledge-power and history-memory relationships produce truth effects on hyperactive students’ identity. Likewise, it also discusses how truth effects establish meaning effects that marginalize the subjects and label them as restless, non-attentive, disquiet and others furnished by authorized subjects who intend to normatize and discipline the hyperactive student within social environments.

  10. Different digital paths to the keg? How exposure to peers’ alcohol-related social media content influences drinking among male and female first-year college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Sarah C.; LaBrie, Joseph W.; Froidevaux, Nicole M.; Witkovic, Yong D.

    2016-01-01

    Despite speculation that peers’ alcohol-related content on social media sites (SMS) may influence the alcohol use behaviors of SMS frequenting college students, this relationship has not been investigated longitudinally. The current prospective study assesses the relationship between exposure to peers’ alcohol-related SMS content and later-drinking among first-year college students. Among 408 first-year students, total exposure to peers’ alcohol-related content on Facebook, Instagram, and Snapchat during the initial 6 weeks of college predicted alcohol consumption 6 months later. The rather robust relationship persisted even after students’ and close friends drinking were accounted for, indicating that alcohol references on SMS do not simply reflect alcohol use behaviors that would otherwise be observed in the absence of SMS and be predictive of later alcohol use. Findings also illuminate important gender differences in the degree to which peers’ alcohol-related SMS content influenced later drinking behavior as well as psychological mediators of this relationship. Among females, enhancement drinking motives and beliefs about the role of alcohol in the college experience fully mediated the relationship between SMS alcohol exposure and later drinking. Males, however, evidenced a much stronger predictive relationship between SMS alcohol exposure and second semester drinking, with this relationship only partially explained by perceptions of drinking norms, enhancement drinking motives, and beliefs about the role of alcohol in the college experience. Implications of these findings for college drinking prevention efforts and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:26835604

  11. Understanding text as social practice: An exploration of the potential of systemic functional grammar to facilitate students' interpretation of media texts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Clarence-Fincham

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available It has frequently been claimed that Halliday's Systemic Functional Grammar (SFG is apowerful linguistic tool which facilitates analytical and interpretative skills and provides aflexible, yet structured set of analytical tools with which to interpret texts. With this claim asa backdrop, this article asks whether SFG is, in fact an appropriate analytical approach forunder-graduate students and whether it can facilitate their ability to analyse texts. Its contextis a second level course, Analysing Media Texts, offered at Natal University. Broadly framedby critical discourse analysis, it traces the development of a thirteen week module and,using student analyses for illustrative purposes, identifies pedagogical challenges anddifficulties that need to be confronted before any strong claims can be made. It is concludedthat, on the evidence of students' responses to texts analysed during this course, it is not yetpossible to make strong claims about the benefits of SFG. There is enough positiveevidence, however, to pursue the possibility that with innovative curriculum development andthe careful scaffolding and integration of concepts, SFG will be clearly shown to have anextremely important role to play.Daar is dikwels beweer dat Halliday se Sistemies-Funksionele Grammatika (SFG 'n kragtige linguistiese middel is wat analitiese en interpreterende vaardighede bevorder en 'n plooibare, dog gestruktureere stel analitiese gereedskap verskaf waarmee tekste gei"nterpreteer kan word. Met die bewering as agtergrond vra hierdie artikel of SFG inderdaad 'n toepas like analitiese benadering vir voorgraadse studente is en of dit hulle vermoe om tekste te ontleed, bevorder. Die konteks is 'n tweedejaarskursus, Analysing Media Texts, wat aan die Universiteit van Natal aangebied word. Breedweg omraam deur kritiese diskoersanalise, speur die artikel die ontwikkeling van 'n module van dertien weke na, met gebruik van studenteontledings ter illustrasie en identifiseer

  12. The Influence of Social Networks on High School Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shanab, Emad; Al-Tarawneh, Heyam

    2015-01-01

    Social networks are becoming an integral part of people's lives. Students are spending much time on social media and are considered the largest category that uses such application. This study tries to explore the influence of social media use, and especially Facebook, on high school students' performance. The study used the GPA of students in four…

  13. Analysis of Art House Media Texts Use during Media Studies in the Student Audience (Alain Robbe-Grillet Movies Case Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The study of media culture and virtual world requires knowledge and skills of the analysis of media texts of different levels of complexity. In this sense, the cinematic legacy of the great French writer, screenwriter and filmmaker Alain Robbe-Grillet (1922-2008) gives productive opportunities for the analysis of works of the elite media culture…

  14. Center for Media Literacy Unveils the CML Medialit Kit[TM]: A Free Educational Framework that Helps Students Challenge and Understand Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Studies, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Five key questions form the basis of the new CML MediaLit Kit, an educational framework and curriculum guide developed by the Center for Media Literacy. Adaptable to all grades, the key questions help children and young people evaluate the thousands of media messages that bombard them daily. More than two years in development and available for…

  15. The Analysis of Internet and Social Media Behaviors of the Students in the Higher School of Vocational and Technical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Balci; Sakir Tasdemir; Mustafa Altin; Ozlem Bozok

    2015-01-01

    Our globalizing world has become almost a small village and everyone can access any information at any time. Everyone lets each other know who does whatever in which place. We can learn which social events occur in which place in the world. From the perspective of education, the course notes that a lecturer use in lessons in a university in any state of America can be examined by a student studying in a city of Africa or the Far East. This dizzying communication we have m...

  16. Bullying among High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursel TÜRKMEN, Delia; Halis DOKGÖZ, Mihai; Semra AKGÖZ, Suzana; Bülent EREN, Bogdan Nicolae; Pınar VURAL, Horatiu; Oğuz POLAT, Horatiu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The main aim of this research is to investigate the prevalence of bullying behaviour, its victims and the types of bullying and places of bullying among 14-17 year-old adolescents in a sample of school children in Bursa, Turkey. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey questionnaire was conducted among class 1 and class 2 high school students for identification bullying. Results: Majority (96.7%) of the students were involved in bullying behaviours as aggressors or victims. For a male student, the likelihood of being involved in violent behaviours was detected to be nearly 8.4 times higher when compared with a female student. Conclusion: a multidisciplinary approach involving affected children, their parents, school personnel, media, non-govermental organizations, and security units is required to achieve an effective approach for the prevention of violence targeting children in schools as victims and/or perpetrators. PMID:24371478

  17. Motivating Students by Increasing Student Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsell, Becky S.; Ream, Sarah M.; Seyller, Ann M.; Zobott, Pam L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase motivation in 7th grade students. Four teacher researchers examined the change in motivational levels as a result of choice strategies. They gathered data from four different classes, 101 students in all, to track levels of motivation. They monitored their levels of observable behavioral patterns with a…

  18. Students 'Weigh' Atmospheric Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporaloni, Marina

    1998-01-01

    Describes a procedure developed by students that measures the mass concentration of particles in a polluted urban atmosphere. Uses a portable fan and filters of various materials. Compares students' data with official data. (DDR)

  19. Credentialism among Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stodt, Martha McGinty; Thielens, Wagner, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An exploratory study of students entering four elite fields found that most sought both credentials and competence. Stiff competition within chosen occupations led the majority of students to seek every advantage that graduate education could provide. (Author/MLW)

  20. International Student Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Welch, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the mental health status of international students in institutions of higher education, unique challenges these students face and their impact on mental health, and suggestions for ways to address these challenges.

  1. Teaching Culturally Diverse Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Vivian; Tulbert, Beth

    1991-01-01

    Characteristics of culturally diverse students are discussed in terms of language, culture, and socioeconomic factors. Meeting the educational needs of culturally diverse students can involve interactive teaming of professionals; parent involvement; and providing appropriate services, assessment, curriculum, and instruction. (JDD)

  2. Student Engagement with Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-McKenna, Mary; Felten, Peter; Darby, Alexa

    2018-01-01

    Student engagement in the local community comes with both risks and rewards. This chapter explains the cognitive, behavioral, and affective outcomes of student learning in the community, along with noting the importance of preparation and reflection.

  3. Students in Action Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Theresa; Mottiar, Ziene; Quinn, Bernadette; Gorman, Catherine; Griffin, Kevin; Craggs, Ruth; Quinn, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    The Students in Action Project in the School of Hospitality Management and Tourism was established in 2012 as a way of engaging students and working with stakeholders in a destination. The overall aim of the project was to immerse students in an active collaborative learning environment within the destination to identify ways in which tourism could be enhanced. In the 2014/2015 academic year the project involved over 300 students from a variety of programmes and modules working with local sta...

  4. Students, Butterflies, and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    It is not always easy for a teacher to relate to his or her students. To communicate with students, it is important for a teacher to relate the subject that he or she is trying to teach is something that the students know, or at least to something that the students care about. In this article, the author, a genetics teacher, relates how he used…

  5. Online Learning for Students from Diverse Backgrounds: Learning Disability Students, Excellent Students and Average Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri Shonfeld

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The perceived contribution of science education online course to pre-service students (N=121 from diverse backgrounds - students with learning disabilities (25 LD students, 28 excellent students and 68 average students is presented in this five years research. During the online course students were asked to choose a scientific subject; to map it and to plan teaching activities; to carry out the proposed activities with students in a classroom experience; and to reflect the process. The assumption was that adapting the online course by using information and communication technology following formative assessment will improve students' self-learning ability as well as broaden their science knowledge, their lab performance and teaching skills. Data were collected using quantitative and qualitative tools including: pre and post questionnaires and nine (three students from each group depth interviews upon completion of the course. Findings, based on students` perceived evaluation, pinpointed on the advantages of the online course for students of the three groups. LD students’ achievements were not inferior to those of their peers, excellent students and average students. Yet, it carefully reports on a slight but explicitly marginal perceived evaluation of the LD students in comparison to excellent students and average students regarding: forum participation, authentic task and water lab performance. The article discusses the affordance of the online course via additional features that can be grouped into two categories: knowledge construction and flexibility in time, interaction and knowledge. Further research is suggested to extend the current study by examine the effect of other courses and different contents and by considering various evaluation methods of online courses, such as: observation, the think aloud, text and tasks analysis, and reflection.

  6. Students' Differentiated Translation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossé, Michael J.; Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Chandler, Kayla

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how students translate between mathematical representations is of both practical and theoretical importance. This study examined students' processes in their generation of symbolic and graphic representations of given polynomial functions. The purpose was to investigate how students perform these translations. The result of the study…

  7. Learning from Student Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Kobie

    2016-01-01

    Just as adults' personal lives and data are increasingly inhabiting online spaces, so are students. While this shift brings many benefits and the possibility of learning tailored to individual students' needs, it is also brings new challenges. Students create an electronic trail of information that creates an obvious concern: How can they enjoy…

  8. Together in student success

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Student Affairs in Africa | Volume 2 (1) 2014, v–vi | 2307-6267 | DOI: 10.14426/jsaa.v2i1.45. I have had two opportunities to ... student affairs staff, as well as faculty and students, at a number of universities, including. Stellenbosch University, the .... The role of research and scholarship in the professionalisation of ...

  9. Rules of (Student) Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskist, William; Busler, Jessica N.; Kirby, Lauren A. J.

    2018-01-01

    Teachers often think of student engagement in terms of hands-on activities that get students involved in their courses. They seldom consider the larger aspects of the teaching--learning environment that often influence the extent to which students are willing to become engaged in their coursework. In this chapter, we describe five "rules of…

  10. Students Engaged in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Emad A.; Groccia, James E.

    2018-01-01

    Engaging students in learning is a basic principle of effective undergraduate education. Outcomes of engaging students include meaningful learning experiences and enhanced skills in all learning domains. This chapter reviews the influence of engaging students in different forms of active learning on cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skill…

  11. School Students' Leisure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhenko, Liudmila Fedorovna

    1990-01-01

    Reports on a survey involving 700 students and 300 parents in Volgodonsk, Russia. Itemizes types of leisure activities and hours per week of leisure time enjoyed by students and examines amount of organized leisure. Notes that television viewing consumed much of students' leisure time. Underscores parents' critical influence in determining student…

  12. Federal Student Loan Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Student Aid, US Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    For those needing a loan to attend college, think federal aid first. Federal student loans usually offer borrowers lower interest rates and have more flexible repayment terms and options than private student loans. This brief report answers the following questions about federal aid: (1) What is a federal student loan?; (2) What is a private…

  13. Mobile Student Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  14. Measures of Student Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in the 2017-2018 school year, appraisal systems in Texas, whether the state-recommended system or a locally developed system, will need to include a measure of student growth at the individual teacher level. Student growth measures how much a student progresses academically during his or her time with a particular teacher. It takes into…

  15. “The Hyperboloid of Engineer Garin”: the Novel and its Adaptation to Media Education Lessons in the Student Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Fedorov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of the media culture, the virtual world requires human knowledge and skills analysis of media texts of different levels of complexity. The article explains the technique of analysis of media texts detective-fiction genre as an example of the screen adaptations of A.N.Tolstoy (1883-1945 novel – "The Hyperboloid of Engineer Garin" (1927 in the context of media education. The author believes that the technology fits into the basic range of media education goals of higher education (especially in the training of future cultural studies, art historians, sociologists, linguists, psychologists, teachers.

  16. Becoming a smart student

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Ulla

    English abstract When teachers and students interact in everyday academic activities, some students are ascribed social roles as “smart”, which lead other students to contest these roles. Such struggles around what it means to be smart and which students come to be viewed as smart are a pertinent...... as smart and favoured by the teacher are at risk of being ostracized by peers, of encountering greater pressure for classroom performance and of suffering reduced learning opportunities. The study inspires teachers to create wiggle room for their students by becoming aware of the conventional definitions...

  17. Attitude towards technology, social media usage and grade-point average as predictors of global citizenship identification in Filipino University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Romeo B; Baring, Rito; Maria, Madelene Sta; Reysen, Stephen

    2017-06-01

    We examine the influence of a positive attitude towards technology, number of social media network memberships and grade-point average (GPA) on global citizenship identification antecedents and outcomes. Students (N = 3628) at a university in the Philippines completed a survey assessing the above constructs. The results showed that attitude towards technology, number of social network site memberships and GPA-predicted global citizenship identification, and subsequent prosocial outcomes (e.g. intergroup helping, responsibility to act for the betterment of the world), through the perception that valued others prescribe a global citizen identity (normative environment) and perceived knowledge of the world and felt interconnectedness with others (global awareness). The results highlight the associations between technology and academic performance with a global identity and associated values. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  18. School Libraries Play an Active, Transformational Role in Student Learning and Achievement. A review of: Todd, Ross J. “Student Learning Through Ohio School Libraries: A Summary of the Ohio Research Study.” Ohio Educational Library Media Association 15 Dec. 2003. Ohio Educational Library Media Association (OELMA, 2004. 15 Nov. 2006 .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayle Bogel

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This study explored links between school libraries and student learning outcomes that were defined in a multidimensional context, using data provided by the students themselves. The researchers examined learning outcomes that reached beyond the existing correlations of school library services and standardized test scores. Insight was provided into the interactions between students and school libraries that affect student learning. An overarching goal of the study was to establish ongoing dialogue to focus on evidence based practices that may lead to continuous improvement in school library services and to provide the basis for further research.Design – Web based survey.Subjects – Participants were 13,123 students in grades 3‐12 and 879 faculty at 39 schools across the state.Setting – Ohio Public school libraries.Methods – Thirty‐nine effective school libraries, staffed by credentialed school librarians, were chosen through a judgment sampling process, using criteria based on Ohio Guidelines for Effective School Library Media Programs. The guidelines are aligned to academic content standards, assessments, resources, and professional development. Two web based surveys were used to collect quantitative and qualitative data from students and faculty: 1. The Impacts on Learning Survey, composed of Likert scale responses to 48 statements and an open‐ended critical incident question for students. 2. The Perceptions of Learning Impacts Survey was a similar survey for faculty. Survey questions were based on Dervin’s theory of information seeking that advances the idea of ‘helps’ as the constructive process of bridging gaps in information use that lead to new knowledge or making sense (sense‐making in relation to a perceived information need (Todd and Kuhlthau. The term ‘helps’ includes both inputs (help that the school library provides in engaging students in learning and outputs (learning outcomes of academic

  19. Media and Cultural Consumption by Young Students in the City of São Paulo, Brazil: Evidences of Digital Divide, Possibilities of Cosmopolitanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Roberto Bekesas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the initial findings of a Brazilian project, which is part of an international research group, studying youth cultures in the age of globalization. It aims to develop a comparative study from the cultural perspective of globalization on the construction of aesthetic cosmopolitanism among young people from France, Canada, Australia, and Brazil. Our aim here specifically is to understand the cultural consumption of young students from São Paulo and their uses of different media for this matter, in hybrid forms (mainly digital. The analysis of empirical data presented is built upon 52 exploratory questionnaires and 40 interviews conducted with young students (from 18 to 24 year old living in São Paulo, Brazil. In order to understand the Brazilian context in this analysis, we performed a triangulation with secondary data from “Brazilian digital youth” by IBOPE (2012 and “Connected youth” by Telefonica Foundation/USP (2014. Based on the analysis, we reflect on two central topics: 1 evidence of a digital divide, according to their socio-economic profile and their access to information/entertainment, and 2 possibilities of cosmopolitan encounters, through the consumption of international cultural products and the search of information regarding other countries and cultures.

  20. THE LINK BETWEEN STUDENTS' SATISFACTION WITH FACULTY, OVERALL STUDENTS' SATISFACTION WITH STUDENT LIFE AND STUDENT PERFORMANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Mihanović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Customer satisfaction has long been recognized as a central concept of all business activities. Satisfaction can serve as an indicator of success of the company, both in the past and present, as well as an indicator of future performance. High quality service to students is a prerequisite of maintaining competitiveness in the market of higher education. A relationship that is created between the expectations of students and their satisfaction with the quality of service that provides educational institution plays an important role in shaping the reputation of academic institutions. Academic institutions are becoming aware of the importance of student satisfaction, because satisfaction positively influences their decision to continue their education at this institution, and the positive word of mouth that will attract prospective students. Satisfaction will affect student motivation, and therefore their performance. This paper provides insight into the marketing aspects of customer satisfaction, primarily insight into the satisfaction of students in the educational sector. The aim is to establish the influence of satisfaction various factors related to the university and higher education to the satisfaction of student life, and does student life satisfaction affect the overall happiness and student performance. The research was conducted on the student population of the University of Split, on a sample of 191 respondents. The research was conducted with the help of online survey questionnaire. The claim that student’s satisfactions with housing affect the satisfaction with the quality of student life is rejected. The results confirmed that the student’s satisfaction with university contents, university bodies and services, teaching, teaching methods and academic reputation affects the satisfaction of student life and student life satisfaction affect the student performance.