WorldWideScience

Sample records for strongyloides stercoralis infections

  1. Human infection with Strongyloides stercoralis and other related Strongyloides species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutman, Thomas B

    2017-03-01

    The majority of the 30-100 million people infected with Strongyloides stercoralis, a soil transmitted intestinal nematode, have subclinical (or asymptomatic) infections. These infections are commonly chronic and longstanding because of the autoinfective process associated with its unique life cycle. A change in immune status can increase parasite numbers, leading to hyperinfection syndrome, dissemination, and death if unrecognized. Corticosteroid use and HTLV-1 infection are most commonly associated with the hyperinfection syndrome. Strongyloides adult parasites reside in the small intestine and induce immune responses both local and systemic that remain poorly characterized. Definitive diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection is based on stool examinations for larvae, but newer diagnostics - including new immunoassays and molecular tests - will assume primacy in the next few years. Although good treatment options exist for infection and control of this infection might be possible, S. stercoralis remains largely neglected.

  2. Strongyloides stercoralis infection in a Finnish kennel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillard, Kati J; Saari, Seppo Am; Anttila, Marjukka

    2007-12-12

    Intestinal threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis is a parasite of dog, cat and primates that occurs worldwide being most prevalent in tropical and subtropical countries. The adult parasitic worm is about 2 mm long and slender. It possesses both parasitic and free-living lifecycles. The parasitic worms are females. Strongyloides stercoralis infects the host via percutaneous, peroral or transmammary transmission in addition to autoinfection. Clinical disease varies from inapparent to severe enteritis and pneumonia. The diagnosis is based on demonstration of larvae in fresh faeces, which is best made by Baermann technique. Strongyloides stercoralis infection was diagnosed in autopsy in a 10-week-old puppy born and raised in a Finnish kennel. Prior to its sudden death, the puppy had suffered from gastrointestinal disturbance for three weeks. Subsequent sampling of the dogs in the kennel revealed that three adult dogs in the kennel were also infected. The present case shows that S. stercoralis can complete its life cycle and cause disease in dogs also in Northern Europe. Infection can be maintained also in a temperate climate and may become a chronic problem in a kennel environment. Infection may be underdiagnosed as Baermann technique is not routinely performed in small animal practice.

  3. Strongyloides stercoralis infection in a Finnish kennel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saari Seppo AM

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis is a parasite of dog, cat and primates that occurs worldwide being most prevalent in tropical and subtropical countries. The adult parasitic worm is about 2 mm long and slender. It possesses both parasitic and free-living lifecycles. The parasitic worms are females. Strongyloides stercoralis infects the host via percutaneous, peroral or transmammary transmission in addition to autoinfection. Clinical disease varies from inapparent to severe enteritis and pneumonia. The diagnosis is based on demonstration of larvae in fresh faeces, which is best made by Baermann technique. Case presentation Strongyloides stercoralis infection was diagnosed in autopsy in a 10-week-old puppy born and raised in a Finnish kennel. Prior to its sudden death, the puppy had suffered from gastrointestinal disturbance for three weeks. Subsequent sampling of the dogs in the kennel revealed that three adult dogs in the kennel were also infected. Conclusion The present case shows that S. stercoralis can complete its life cycle and cause disease in dogs also in Northern Europe. Infection can be maintained also in a temperate climate and may become a chronic problem in a kennel environment. Infection may be underdiagnosed as Baermann technique is not routinely performed in small animal practice.

  4. Strongyloides stercoralis Infection in Alcoholic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia C. A. Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The course of Strongyloides stercoralis infection is usually asymptomatic with a low discharge of rhabditoid larva in feces. However, the deleterious effects of alcohol consumption seem to enhance the susceptibility to infection, as shown by a fivefold higher strongyloidiasis frequency in alcoholics than in nonalcoholics. Moreover, the association between S. stercoralis infection and alcoholism presents a risk for hyperinfection and severe strongyloidiasis. There are several possible mechanisms for the disruption of the host-parasite equilibrium in ethanol-addicted patients with chronic strongyloidiasis. One explanation is that chronic ethanol intake stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis to produce excessive levels of endogenous cortisol, which in turn can lead to a deficiency in type 2 T helper cells (Th2 protective response, and also to mimic the parasite hormone ecdysone, which promotes the transformation of rhabditiform larvae to filariform larvae, leading to autoinfection. Therefore, when untreated, alcoholic patients are continuously infected by this autoinfection mechanism. Thus, the early diagnosis of strongyloidiasis and treatment can prevent serious forms of hyperinfection in ethanol abusers.

  5. Strongyloides stercoralis Infection in Alcoholic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Flavia T. F.; Souza, Joelma N.; Silva, Mônica L. S.; Inês, Elizabete J.; Soares, Neci M.

    2016-01-01

    The course of Strongyloides stercoralis infection is usually asymptomatic with a low discharge of rhabditoid larva in feces. However, the deleterious effects of alcohol consumption seem to enhance the susceptibility to infection, as shown by a fivefold higher strongyloidiasis frequency in alcoholics than in nonalcoholics. Moreover, the association between S. stercoralis infection and alcoholism presents a risk for hyperinfection and severe strongyloidiasis. There are several possible mechanisms for the disruption of the host-parasite equilibrium in ethanol-addicted patients with chronic strongyloidiasis. One explanation is that chronic ethanol intake stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to produce excessive levels of endogenous cortisol, which in turn can lead to a deficiency in type 2 T helper cells (Th2) protective response, and also to mimic the parasite hormone ecdysone, which promotes the transformation of rhabditiform larvae to filariform larvae, leading to autoinfection. Therefore, when untreated, alcoholic patients are continuously infected by this autoinfection mechanism. Thus, the early diagnosis of strongyloidiasis and treatment can prevent serious forms of hyperinfection in ethanol abusers. PMID:28105424

  6. Incidence of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in Ungogo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out between October, 2005 and August, 2006 to determine the occurrence and distribution of Strongyloides stercoralis in Dala, Fagge, Nassarawa and Ungoggo Local Government Areas of Kano State. A total of 280 stool samples from primary schools pupils in the area were examined for the ...

  7. Ivermectin versus albendazole or thiabendazole for Strongyloides stercoralis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Echevarria, Juan; White, A Clinton; Terashima, Angelica; Samalvides, Frine; Pérez-Molina, José A; Plana, Maria N

    2016-01-01

    Background Strongyloidiasis is a gut infection with Strongyloides stercoralis which is common world wide. Chronic infection usually causes a skin rash, vomiting, diarrhoea or constipation, and respiratory problems, and it can be fatal in people with immune deficiency. It may be treated with ivermectin or albendazole or thiabendazole. Objectives To assess the effects of ivermectin versus benzimidazoles (albendazole and thiabendazole) for treating chronic strongyloides infection. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register (24 August 2015); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (January 1966 to August 2015); EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2015); LILACS (August 2015); and reference lists of articles. We also searched the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) using 'strongyloid*' as a search term, reference lists, and conference abstracts. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials of ivermectin versus albendazole or thiabendazole for treating chronic strongyloides infection. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias in the included trials. We used risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and fixed- or random-effects models. We pooled adverse event data if the trials were sufficiently similar in their adverse event definitions. Main results We included seven trials, enrolling 1147 participants, conducted between 1994 and 2011 in different locations (Africa, Southeast Asia, America and Europe). In trials comparing ivermectin with albendazole, parasitological cure was higher with ivermectin (RR 1.79, 95% CI 1.55 to 2.08; 478 participants, four trials, moderate quality evidence). There were no statistically significant differences in adverse events (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.09; 518 participants, four trials, low quality evidence). In trials comparing ivermectin with thiabendazole

  8. Strongyloides stercoralis disseminated infection and schistosomiasis in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Martins Brandão

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome is classically associated with impaired host response and implies in an overburden of larvae in its usual cycle. It has been recognized as a severe and potentially fatal condition in immunocompromised individuals, especially those using oral corticosteroids. Infection with Schistosoma mansoni not only increases the susceptibility to HIV infection, but also promotes progression to disease. The association of the most severe forms of strongyloidiasis and AIDS is scarcely described, even more when S. mansoni is also associated. The authors describe a case of a 34-year-old previously healthy male, admitted to the emergency department with a history of hematemesis associated with dyspnea, hemoptysis, and fever. He referred homosexual relations for 6 years. Physical examination showed an ill-looking patient, and was remarkable for tachycardia, tachypnea, diaphoresis, and pulse oximetry of 70% in room air. Lungs examination revealed the presence of rales in the left base. Chest radiography showed a diffuse and bilateral reticulo-nodular pattern. HIV serology was positive. Empirical antimicrobial therapy and corticosteroids were initiated. On the third day of hospitalization, petechiae appeared over the periumbilical area, but no further investigation was undertaken because the patient died soon after. The autopsy findings were compatible with S. stercoralis disseminated infection, a hepatic intestinal chronic form of schistosomiasis, and septic shock as the primary cause of death. The authors call attention to this infrequent association.

  9. Strongyloides stercoralis infection and re-infection in a cohort of children in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khieu, Virak; Hattendorf, Jan; Schär, Fabian; Marti, Hanspeter; Char, Meng Chuor; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Information on Strongyloides stercoralis re-infection after ivermectin treatment is scarce in S. stercoralis endemic countries. In semi-rural Cambodia, we determined S. stercoralis infection and re-infection rates among schoolchildren, two years after ivermectin treatment (2×100 μg/kg PO, 24 h apart). The study was conducted among 484 children from four primary schools in semi-rural villages in Kandal province from 2009 to 2011, using Koga agar plate culture and the Baermann method on two stool samples per child. Complete data were available for 302 participants. We observed infections in 24.2% and 22.5% of the children at baseline and at follow-up, respectively. At baseline, 73 children were treated for S. stercoralis infection. At follow-up, one-third of those treated for S. stercoralis infection had been reinfected, while 19.6% of the 229 healthy children (at baseline) had been newly infected with S. stercoralis. Possession of shoes and defecation in toilet were negatively associated with S. stercoralis infection at follow-up. Infection and re-infection rates of S. stercoralis among schoolchildren are considerably high. However, 68.5% of infected children remained free of infection for at least two years. A large-scale cohort study is required to understand age-specific infection and re-infection dynamics in endemic countries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Disseminated infection with Strongyloides stercoralis in a diabetic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 58-year-old male diabetic who was operated for carcinoma larynx 4 years back was admitted with exertional dyspnoea and bilateral leg swelling for the past 2 years. Over the last 2 months, there was a progressive worsening of symptoms. Echocardiography done 2 years back showed pericardial effusion. Echo done during the current admission also showed pericardial effusion with preserved left ventricular function; cytological examination of the pericardial fluid showed larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. He was treated with antinematodal drugs. A follow-up echo done at discharge showed no pericardial effusion and the patient was completely asymptomatic. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Strongyloides pericardial effusion in a diabetic patient.

  11. Hyperinfection with Strongyloides stercoralis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Cabello, Raúl; Villagroy Gómez, Javier; Hernández González, Mercedes; Romero Feregrino, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is caused by Strongyloides stercoralis, which commonly produces gastrointestinal problems. If immune systems are compromised, the nematode larvae may spread and produce Strongyloides hyperinfection. Diagnosis of strongyloidiasis is based on the observation of larvae in coproparasitological studies. We present a case of a 49-year-oldman, VIH, who developed Strongyloides hyperinfection, diagnosed postmortem. Our patient reached the dissemination stage, which resulted in severe damage to the stomach and intestine, perforation of the intestinal wall, as well as sepsis due to the dissemination of bacteria. The diagnosis is difficult because of the low larvae excretion in stools. It is usually performed by the microscopic examination of fresh and fixed enriched stool samples. Serology was reported to be useful for screening and follow-up after treatment. This case reaffirms that HIV immunosuppression favours the dissemination of S stercoralis larvae. Thus, a search for intestinal parasites should be considered in similar cases. PMID:23203176

  12. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T.; Nozaki, F.; Tanaka, K.; Ebihara, H.; Shimayama, T.; Katsuki, T.

    1981-07-15

    Sequential changes of gastrointestinal radiology are described in a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection. Duodenal dilatation, reflux of barium into the biliary and pancreatic duct, and mucosal thickening of the small intestine were the striking features before treatment. Although treatment with thiabendazole led to rapid and complete clearance of rhabditiform larvae, some abnormal radiologic changes in the small intestine persisted for approximately 4 months before the mucosal pattern reverted to normal.

  13. Prevalence of Blastocystis hominis and Strongyloides stercoralis infection in Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Tetsuo; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Kinjo, Nagisa; Hokama, Akira; Kinjo, Fukunori; Yamane, Nobuhisa; Fujita, Jiro

    2007-11-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the prevalence of Blastocystis hominis and Strongyloides stercoralis infection in Ryukyu University Hospital, Okinawa, Japan, between January 2004 and November 2006. Stool samples collected from 3,292 patients were examined by the direct smear method, formalin-ether sedimentation method, and agar plate culture method. The prevalence rate of B. hominis and S. stercoralis infection was 1.0 and 3.4%, respectively. The prevalence rate of B. hominis infection in patients aged >80 years old was significantly higher than that in patients hominis infection compared with those without (P hominis and S. stercoralis infection and an association between B. hominis and S. stercoralis infection in Okinawa, Japan.

  14. Distribution of human Oesophagostomum bifurcum, hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis infections in northern Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yelifari, L.; Bloch, P.; Magnussen, P.

    2005-01-01

    with a global positioning system (GPS). The prevalence of Oesophagostomum, hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis infections in a study population of 20 250 people was determined by microscopic examination of larvae in stool cultures. The overall prevalence was 10.2, 50.6 and 11.6% for the three nematodes...

  15. Serological and molecular detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection among an Orang Asli community in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Arine Fadzlun; Hadip, Faizah; Ngui, Romano; Lim, Yvonne A L; Mahmud, Rohela

    2013-08-01

    Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection particularly in asymptomatic individuals is often hampered due to the lack of standard diagnostic tools. In this study, the use of serological and molecular approaches were investigated for the detection of S. stercoralis infection among an Orang Asli (indigenous) community following a preliminary detection by microscopic examination of faecal samples. Out of 54 individuals studied, 17/54 (31.5%) were detected to be positive for S. stercoralis infection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), compared to 0/54 (0%) by faecal examination. Further confirmation performed by a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using DNA extracted from faecal samples of these 17 individuals yielded 3/17 (17.6%) positives for S. stercoralis DNA amplification. No amplification was seen with the other 37 faecal samples, which were negative by microscopy and ELISA. As the high ELISA positive results were suspected to be false-positives, ELISA is not recommended for use as a detection tool but may be beneficial for evaluating the effectiveness of anti-Strongyloides drugs. The present finding indicated that PCR should be considered as an alternative diagnostic tool for the detection of S. stercoralis infection.

  16. Ivermectin Treatment and Sanitation Effectively Reduce Strongyloides stercoralis Infection Risk in Rural Communities in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armelle Forrer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis is the only soil-transmitted helminth with the ability to replicate within its host, leading to long-lasting and potentially fatal infections. It is ubiquitous and its worldwide prevalence has recently been estimated to be at least half that of hookworm. Information on the epidemiology of S. stercoralis remains scarce and modalities for its large-scale control are yet to be determined.A community-based two-year cohort study was conducted among the general population in a rural province in North Cambodia. At each survey, participants infected with S. stercoralis were treated with a single oral dose of ivermectin (200μg/kg BW. Diagnosis was performed using a combination of the Baermann method and Koga agar plate culture on two stool samples. The cohort included participants from eight villages who were either positive or negative for S. stercoralis at baseline. Mixed logistic regression models were employed to assess risk factors for S. stercoralis infection at baseline and re-infection at follow-up. A total of 3,096 participants were examined at baseline, revealing a S. stercoralis prevalence of 33.1%. Of these participants, 1,269 were followed-up over two years. Re-infection and infection rates among positive and negative participants at baseline were 14.4% and 9.6% at the first and 11.0% and 11.5% at the second follow-up, respectively. At follow-up, all age groups were at similar risk of acquiring an infection, while infection risk significantly decreased with increasing village sanitation coverage.Chemotherapy-based control of S. stercoralis is feasible and highly beneficial, particularly in combination with improved sanitation. The impact of community-based ivermectin treatment on S. stercoralis was high, with over 85% of villagers remaining negative one year after treatment. The integration of S. stercoralis into existing STH control programs should be considered without further delay.

  17. Ivermectin Treatment and Sanitation Effectively Reduce Strongyloides stercoralis Infection Risk in Rural Communities in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrer, Armelle; Khieu, Virak; Schindler, Christian; Schär, Fabian; Marti, Hanspeter; Char, Meng Chuor; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is the only soil-transmitted helminth with the ability to replicate within its host, leading to long-lasting and potentially fatal infections. It is ubiquitous and its worldwide prevalence has recently been estimated to be at least half that of hookworm. Information on the epidemiology of S. stercoralis remains scarce and modalities for its large-scale control are yet to be determined. A community-based two-year cohort study was conducted among the general population in a rural province in North Cambodia. At each survey, participants infected with S. stercoralis were treated with a single oral dose of ivermectin (200μg/kg BW). Diagnosis was performed using a combination of the Baermann method and Koga agar plate culture on two stool samples. The cohort included participants from eight villages who were either positive or negative for S. stercoralis at baseline. Mixed logistic regression models were employed to assess risk factors for S. stercoralis infection at baseline and re-infection at follow-up. A total of 3,096 participants were examined at baseline, revealing a S. stercoralis prevalence of 33.1%. Of these participants, 1,269 were followed-up over two years. Re-infection and infection rates among positive and negative participants at baseline were 14.4% and 9.6% at the first and 11.0% and 11.5% at the second follow-up, respectively. At follow-up, all age groups were at similar risk of acquiring an infection, while infection risk significantly decreased with increasing village sanitation coverage. Chemotherapy-based control of S. stercoralis is feasible and highly beneficial, particularly in combination with improved sanitation. The impact of community-based ivermectin treatment on S. stercoralis was high, with over 85% of villagers remaining negative one year after treatment. The integration of S. stercoralis into existing STH control programs should be considered without further delay.

  18. Strongyloides stercoralis seroprevalence in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diep, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Thai, Pham Quang; Trang, Nghiem Nguyen Minh; Jäger, Julia; Fox, Annette; Horby, Peter; Phuong, Hoang Vu Mai; Anh, Dang Duc; Mai, LE Thi Quynh; VAN Doorn, H Rogier; Nadjm, Behzad

    2017-11-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by the roundworm Strongyloides stercoralis affecting 30-100 million people worldwide. Many Southeast-Asian countries report a high prevalence of S. stercoralis infection, but there are little data from Vietnam. Here, we evaluated the seroprevalence of S. stercoralis related to geography, sex and age in Vietnam through serological testing of anonymized sera. Sera (n = 1710, 1340 adults and 270 children) from an anonymized age-stratified serum bank from four regions in Vietnam between 2012 and 2013 were tested using a commercial Strongyloides ratti immunoglobulin G ELISA. Seroreactivity was found in 29·1% (390/1340) of adults and 5·5% (15/270) of children. Male adults were more frequently seroreactive than females (33·3% vs. 24·9%, P = 0·001). The rural central highlands had the highest seroprevalence (42·4% of adults). Seroreactivity in the other regions was 29·9% (Hue) and 26·0% and 18·2% in the large urban centres of Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, respectively. We conclude that seroprevalence of S. stercoralis was high in the Vietnamese adult population, especially in rural areas.

  19. Systemic Cytokine Profiles in Strongyloides stercoralis Infection and Alterations following Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukti; Jagannathan, Jeeva; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Shen, Kui; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth organism that infects ∼50 to 100 million people worldwide. Despite its widespread prevalence, very little is known about the immune response that characterizes human S. stercoralis infection. To study the systemic cytokine profile characteristic of Strongyloides infection, we measured the circulating levels of a large panel of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in asymptomatic, infected individuals (n = 32) and compared them to those in uninfected, controls (n = 24). Infected individuals exhibited significantly lower circulating levels of proinflammatory cytokines (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and interleukin-1β [IL-1β]) and significantly higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-10, IL-13, IL-27, IL-37, and transforming growth factor β [TGF-β]). Moreover, treatment of Strongyloides infection resulted in a significant reversal of the cytokine profile, with increased levels of proinflammatory (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-22, IL-23, and IL-1β) and decreased levels of anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-5, IL-9, IL-10, IL-13, IL-27, IL-37, and TGF-β) cytokines following treatment. Thus, S. stercoralis infection is characterized by alterations in the levels of systemic cytokines, reflecting major alterations in the underlying immune response to this chronic helminth infection. PMID:26597982

  20. Peripheral blood CD4+/CD25+ regulatory T cells in alcoholic patients with Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Steveen Rios; Covre, Luciana Polaco; Stringari, Lorenzzo Lyrio; da Penha Zago-Gomes, Maria; Gomes, Daniel Cláudio Oliveira; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima

    2017-03-01

    An increased number of regulatory T (Treg) cells has been reported in patients with HTLV-1 and Strongyloides stercoralis co-infection, suggesting the contribution of these cells to worm survival. As Strongyloides infections have been found to be highly prevalent in chronic alcoholics, we investigated the effect of abusive ethanol ingestion on the induction of Treg cells in alcoholic patients with Strongyloides infection. Treg cells were assessed by flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 12 healthy non-alcoholic (control) and 14 alcoholic patients (alcoholic) without Strongyloides infection and five non-alcoholics (controlSs) and five chronic alcoholics (alcoholSs) with Strongyloides infection. The results showed significantly higher frequencies of Treg cells in the alcoholic, controlSs and alcoholSs group patients than in the control group patients. However, the frequencies of Treg cells did not differ between the alcoholSs and controlSs groups. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that ethanol consumption induced an increase in the number of circulating Treg cells in chronic alcoholics in this study but was unable to potentiate the induction of these cells in alcoholics with Strongyloides infection.

  1. Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm co-infection: spatial distribution and determinants in Preah Vihear Province, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrer, Armelle; Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Vounatsou, Penelope; Chammartin, Frédérique; Marti, Hanspeter; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2018-01-12

    Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm are two soil-transmitted helminths (STH) that are highly prevalent in Cambodia. Strongyloides stercoralis causes long-lasting infections and significant morbidity but is largely neglected, while hookworm causes the highest public health burden among STH. The two parasites have the same infection route, i.e. skin penetration. The extent of co-distribution, which could result in potential high co-morbidities, is unknown in highly endemic settings like Cambodia. The aim of this study was to predict the spatial distribution of S. stercoralis-hookworm co-infection risk and to investigate determinants of co-infection in Preah Vihear Province, North Cambodia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2010 in 60 villages of Preah Vihear Province. Diagnosis was performed on two stool samples, using combined Baermann technique and Koga agar culture plate for S. stercoralis and Kato-Katz technique for hookworm. Bayesian multinomial geostatistical models were used to assess demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioural determinants of S. stercoralis-hookworm co-infection and to predict co-infection risk at non-surveyed locations. Of the 2576 participants included in the study, 48.6% and 49.0% were infected with S. stercoralis and hookworm, respectively; 43.8% of the cases were co-infections. Females, preschool aged children, adults aged 19-49 years, and participants who reported regularly defecating in toilets, systematically boiling drinking water and having been treated with anthelmintic drugs had lower odds of co-infection. While S. stercoralis infection risk did not appear to be spatially structured, hookworm mono-infection and co-infection exhibited spatial correlation at about 20 km. Co-infection risk was positively associated with longer walking distances to a health centre and exhibited a small clustering tendency. The association was only partly explained by climatic variables, suggesting a role for underlying factors, such as

  2. Strongyloides stercoralis infection in an HIV positive patient--a case report from RIMS, Imphal, Manipur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukhrambam, Pratita Devi; Rebachandra, H; Singh, Ng Brajachand; Singh, Th Nabakumar

    2010-09-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis, a nematode parasite in human with free living and autoinfective cycles, is often an asymptomatic infection of the upper small intestine. If the host becomes immunocompromised, autoinfection may increase the intestinal worm burden and lead to disseminated strongyloidiasis. We report a case of a 33 year old male HIV positive patient admitted on 2/6/08 in male medical ward, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, Manipur with complaints of loose stools, pain abdomen, nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, loss of appetite and loss of weight for past one month with fever off and on. Stool examination reveals larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. The patient was successfully treated with Ivermectin 200 microgm/kg daily for 2 days.

  3. Triple infection with HIV-1, HTLV-1 and Strongyloides stercoralis, rendering CD4+ T-cell counts a misleading entity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Saskia; Rossatanga, Elie G.; Jurriaans, Suzanne; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a Gabonese HIV-patient who presented with haemoptysis, weight loss, fulminant diarrhoea and subsequent ileus and elevated CD4+ T-cell counts. He was diagnosed with Strongyloides stercoralis and human T-lymphotrophic virus type-1 infection. After treatment of the strongyloides

  4. Screening, prevention, and treatment for hyperinfection syndrome and disseminated infections caused by Strongyloides stercoralis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Rojelio; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review This review discusses the latest approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with strongyloidiasis, with an emphasis on infection in the immunocompromised host and the risk for disseminated strongyloidiasis. Recent findings The differences in acute, chronic, accelerated autoinfection, and disseminated disease in Strongyloides stercoralis infection are explored with particular emphasis on early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. The goals of treatment are investigated for the different infection states. Predisposing risks for dissemination are delineated, and the roles played for newer diagnostics in the identification of at-risk individuals are detailed. Summary The use of newer diagnostic tests and broader screening of immunocompromised patients from Strongyloides-endemic areas is of paramount importance, particularly if prevention of life-threatening dissemination is the goal. PMID:22691685

  5. Microarray-based analysis of differential gene expression between infective and noninfective larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Ramanathan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Differences between noninfective first-stage (L1 and infective third-stage (L3i larvae of parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis at the molecular level are relatively uncharacterized. DNA microarrays were developed and utilized for this purpose.Oligonucleotide hybridization probes for the array were designed to bind 3,571 putative mRNA transcripts predicted by analysis of 11,335 expressed sequence tags (ESTs obtained as part of the Nematode EST project. RNA obtained from S. stercoralis L3i and L1 was co-hybridized to each array after labeling the individual samples with different fluorescent tags. Bioinformatic predictions of gene function were developed using a novel cDNA Annotation System software. We identified 935 differentially expressed genes (469 L3i-biased; 466 L1-biased having two-fold expression differences or greater and microarray signals with a p value<0.01. Based on a functional analysis, L1 larvae have a larger number of genes putatively involved in transcription (p = 0.004, and L3i larvae have biased expression of putative heat shock proteins (such as hsp-90. Genes with products known to be immunoreactive in S. stercoralis-infected humans (such as SsIR and NIE had L3i biased expression. Abundantly expressed L3i contigs of interest included S. stercoralis orthologs of cytochrome oxidase ucr 2.1 and hsp-90, which may be potential chemotherapeutic targets. The S. stercoralis ortholog of fatty acid and retinol binding protein-1, successfully used in a vaccine against Ancylostoma ceylanicum, was identified among the 25 most highly expressed L3i genes. The sperm-containing glycoprotein domain, utilized in a vaccine against the nematode Cooperia punctata, was exclusively found in L3i biased genes and may be a valuable S. stercoralis target of interest.A new DNA microarray tool for the examination of S. stercoralis biology has been developed and provides new and valuable insights regarding differences between infective and

  6. Serological and molecular tests for the diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonfrate, Dora; Paradies, Paola; Iarussi, Fabrizio; Formenti, Fabio; Perandin, Francesca; Otranto, Domenico; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2017-07-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis can cause severe infection both in humans and dogs. Coproparasitological examination has low sensitivity for the diagnosis of this parasite; hence, different diagnostic techniques have been implemented. However, serology and molecular methods have been assessed almost exclusively in humans. In this study, two serologic assays and a real-time PCR (RT-PCR), routinely used for the diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in humans, have been tested for the diagnosis in dogs. Five dogs living in the same kennel in Bari, southern Italy, were diagnosed with S. stercoralis infection by detection of larvae in fecal samples processed by the Baermann method. Serum, fecal, and tissue (lungs, scraping of intestinal tract) samples from the same dogs were tested with two serologic assays (commercial ELISA, in-house IFAT) and with an in-house RT-PCR, routinely used for diagnosis in humans. IFAT was positive in all serum samples, ELISA in 3/7 (42.8%) samples. RT-PCR was positive in all pre-treatment fecal samples, in all fecal debris, and in intestinal scraping (three samples from the same deceased dog). The results suggest that IFAT and RT-PCR techniques routinely used for S. stercoralis diagnosis in humans could be useful for the diagnosis of the infection in dogs.

  7. HIGH PREVALENCE OF Strongyloides stercoralis INFECTION AMONG THE ELDERLY IN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Margarida Naves

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Little is known about the frequency of intestinal parasites in the elderly due to a lack of attention given to the occurrence of these infections among older adults. This study compares the frequency of Strongyloides stercoralis and other enteroparasites between elderly living in nursing homes (n = 100 and those noninstitutionalized (n = 100 from Uberlândia, state of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, associated with data of epidemiological and socio-demographic conditions. Through coproparasitological examination of both groups, enteroparasites were detected in 15 of 200 individuals examined (7.5%; CI: 5.1- 9.9. S. stercoralis was the most frequent parasite 10/200 (5%; CI: 4.2-5.8, being significantly higher in males and in individuals with autonomy for daily living activities. There were no statistical differences in the prevalence of parasites between the two groups compared. In conclusion, S. stercoralis infection was highly prevalent in elderly patients and it does not depend on whether the individual was institutionalized or not.

  8. Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with Strongyloides stercoralis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Sveta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP is a small blood vessel vasculitis, which usually manifests during childhood. The exact cause of the disease is unknown. Case report. We reported a 14-year-old girl who had been admitted to our clinic due to the appearance of red macules on her extremities and face, vomiting, and pain in the abdomen and joints. The patient was initially diagnosed with Henoch- Schönlein purpura. At the end of the fourth week of illness, larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis were detected in stool samples. The patient was therefore treated with mebendazole, after which all symptoms permanently withdrew. About a month later laboratory examinations were repeated demonstrating increasing signs of renal damage. Kidney biopsy was performed, showing mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis with crescents and IgA and C3 positive staining in the mesangium. Upon reviewing the clinical presentation, biochemically demonstrated progressive renal damage and biopsy results, the patient was diagnosed with HSP nephritis. Conclusion. The time course of the disease and present knowledge concerning the pathogenic mechanisms of HSP suggest that Strongyloides stercoralis infection could have caused HSP in the presented patient, which was complicated by nephritis.

  9. Incidental identification of Strongyloides stercoralis infection by broad-range 28S rDNA gene sequencing in a patient with a hematolymphoid malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konnick, Eric Q; Chow, Siu-Kei; Reder, Nicholas P; Sengupta, Dhruba J; Hoogestraat, Daniel R; Pottinger, Paul S; Abbott, April N; Monsaas, Peter W; Kurosawa, Kyoko; Stephens, Karen; Salipante, Stephen J; Yeung, Cecilia C S

    2016-12-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an important human parasite, especially in rural areas and developing countries. Infected immunosuppressed patients are at risk for hyperinfection, with severe clinical consequences. Here we describe the incidental detection and diagnosis of an unexpected S. stercoralis infection by methods designed to detect fungal 28S ribosomal DNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Strongyloides stercoralis infection increases the likelihood to detect Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in peripheral blood in Chagas disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Fernando; Sulleiro, Elena; Piron, Maria; Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Sauleda, Silvia; Molina-Morant, Daniel; Moure, Zaira; Molina, Israel

    2017-11-01

    In a previous study performed by our group, Strongyloides stercoralis infection in patients with Chagas disease was associated with higher proportion of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA detection in peripheral blood. The aim of the study was to confirm this association in a larger cohort of patients. Cross-sectional study of all patients with Chagas disease diagnosed from 2005 to 2015 during blood donation at the Catalan Blood Bank. Demographic data and T. cruzi RT-PCR were collected. S. stercoralis infection diagnosis was based on a serological test. Two hundred and two blood donors were included. T. cruzi RT-PCR was positive in 72 (35.6%) patients, and S. stercoralis serology was positive in 22 (10.9%) patients. Patients with positive S. stercoralis serology had higher proportion of positive T. cruzi RT-PCR than those with negative serology (54.5% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.050), and the difference increased when taking a serological index cut-off of 2.5, which increases the specificity of the test to detect a confirmed strongyloidiasis (60% vs. 33%, P = 0.017). Patients with Chagas disease with positive S. stercoralis serology had higher proportion of positive T. cruzi RT-PCR in peripheral blood than those with negative serology, which reflects the potential immunomodulatory effects of S. stercoralis in T. cruzi co-infected patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Strongyloides stercoralis: Global Distribution and Risk Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Schär

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The soil-transmitted threadworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, is one of the most neglected among the so-called neglected tropical diseases (NTDs. We reviewed studies of the last 20 years on S. stercoralis's global prevalence in general populations and risk groups. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A literature search was performed in PubMed for articles published between January 1989 and October 2011. Articles presenting information on infection prevalence were included. A Bayesian meta-analysis was carried out to obtain country-specific prevalence estimates and to compare disease odds ratios in different risk groups taking into account the sensitivities of the diagnostic methods applied. A total of 354 studies from 78 countries were included for the prevalence calculations, 194 (62.4% were community-based studies, 121 (34.2% were hospital-based studies and 39 (11.0% were studies on refugees and immigrants. World maps with country data are provided. In numerous African, Asian and South-American resource-poor countries, information on S. stercoralis is lacking. The meta-analysis showed an association between HIV-infection/alcoholism and S. stercoralis infection (OR: 2.17 BCI: 1.18-4.01; OR: 6.69; BCI: 1.47-33.8, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show high infection prevalence rates in the general population in selected countries and geographical regions. S. stercoralis infection is prominent in several risk groups. Adequate information on the prevalence is still lacking from many countries. However, current information underscore that S. stercoralis must not be neglected. Further assessments in socio-economic and ecological settings are needed and integration into global helminth control is warranted.

  12. Strongyloides stercoralis: Global Distribution and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Fabian; Trostdorf, Ulf; Giardina, Federica; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Marti, Hanspeter; Vounatsou, Penelope; Odermatt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background The soil-transmitted threadworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, is one of the most neglected among the so-called neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). We reviewed studies of the last 20 years on S. stercoralis's global prevalence in general populations and risk groups. Methods/Principal Findings A literature search was performed in PubMed for articles published between January 1989 and October 2011. Articles presenting information on infection prevalence were included. A Bayesian meta-analysis was carried out to obtain country-specific prevalence estimates and to compare disease odds ratios in different risk groups taking into account the sensitivities of the diagnostic methods applied. A total of 354 studies from 78 countries were included for the prevalence calculations, 194 (62.4%) were community-based studies, 121 (34.2%) were hospital-based studies and 39 (11.0%) were studies on refugees and immigrants. World maps with country data are provided. In numerous African, Asian and South-American resource-poor countries, information on S. stercoralis is lacking. The meta-analysis showed an association between HIV-infection/alcoholism and S. stercoralis infection (OR: 2.17 BCI: 1.18–4.01; OR: 6.69; BCI: 1.47–33.8), respectively. Conclusions Our findings show high infection prevalence rates in the general population in selected countries and geographical regions. S. stercoralis infection is prominent in several risk groups. Adequate information on the prevalence is still lacking from many countries. However, current information underscore that S. stercoralis must not be neglected. Further assessments in socio-economic and ecological settings are needed and integration into global helminth control is warranted. PMID:23875033

  13. Strongyloides stercoralis-infected dogs as a model for human disseminated strongyloidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikens, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The route of migration of Strongyloides stercoralis third-stage infective larvae was explored in primary and autogenous infections in the dog. Larvae was radiolabeled by one of two means: (1) by culture of the free-living L3 stage in a nutrient medium, deficient in methionine, supplemented with ({sup 75}Se)Selenomethionine, and (2) by feeding of ({sup 75}Se)Selenomethionine-labeled bacteria to microbiverous L1 and L2 stages. Third-stage labeled larvae were then injected into 10-day-old pups either subcutaneously, to study primary migration, or into the distal ileum, to study autogenous migration. At intervals after infection pups were killed and whole body compressed organ autoradiography done on individual tissues to determine organ-specific larval transit sites. Autoradiographic recoveries were analyzed in the context of a series of mathematical models designed to test migratory route hypotheses. Postulated routes of migration for primary infections included (1) the Null Hypothesis or Scramble Route in which larvae migrate to the intestines by any available route, (2) the Classical Pulmonary Route in which larvae migrate sequentially from skin, to blood, to lungs, to the trachea, esophagus and intestines, and (3) the Head Migration Route in which larvae move from caudal to cranial sites within the skin and muscle before entering the intestines. Postulated routes for autoinfective migration reiterated 1 and 2 above. Least squares comparisons, of calculated models to observed autoradiographic distributions, led us to conclude that there was no reason to reject the simplest assumption that larvae move by any available route to the definitive site in both forms of migration. Sampling through tracheostomy sites in 14 pups for larval migrants confirmed this conclusion.

  14. Case Report: Strongyloides stercoralis coinfection in a Nigerian with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient, Methods and Results: A human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected Nigerian trader with candidiasis and trichomoniasis, while being screened for antiretroviral therapy, was found to also have S. stercoralis infection. She was treated with oral mebendazole. We report the first documented case of Strongyloides ...

  15. Atividade predatória dos fungos nematófagos Duddingtonia flagrans, Monacrosporium thaumasium e Artrobotrys robusta sobre larvas infectantes de Strongyloides stercoralis Predatory activity of the nematophagous fungi Duddingtonia flagrans, Monacrosporium thaumasium and Arthrobotrys robusta on Strongyloides stercoralis infective larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Ribeiro Braga

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Strongyloides stercoralis é um nematoide que infecta grande parte da população mundial. MÉTODOS: O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar a capacidade predatória dos fungos nematófagos Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001, Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34 e Arthrobotrys robusta (I-31 sobre larvas infectantes (L3 de Strongyloides stercoralis em condições laboratoriais no meio ágar-água 2%. RESULTADOS: Ao final do experimento, os percentuais de redução de L3 de Strongyloides stercoralis observados foram de: 83,7% (AC001; 75,5% (NF34 e 73,2% (I-31. CONCLUSÕES: Os fungos nematófagos foram capazes de capturar e destruir in vitro as L3, podendo ser utilizados como controladores biológicos de Strongyloides stercoralis.INTRODUCTION: Strongyloides stercoralis is a nematode that infects much of the population worldwide. METHODS: This study aimed to compare the ability of predatory nematophagous fungi Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001, Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34 and Arthrobotrys robusta (I-31 on infective larvae (L3 of Strongyloides stercoralis in laboratory conditions on 2% water-agar. RESULTS: At the end of the experiment, the percentage reductions in Strongyloides stercoralis L3 were 83.7% (AC001, 75.5% (NF34 and 73.2% (I-31. CONCLUSIONS: The nematophagous fungi were able to capture and destroy the L3 in vitro and may be used as biological controls of Strongyloides stercoralis.

  16. Donor-Derived Strongyloides stercoralis Infection in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients in the United States, 2009–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanyie, F. A.; Gray, E. B.; Delli Carpini, K. W.; Yanofsky, A.; McAuliffe, I.; Rana, M.; Chin-Hong, P. V.; Barone, C. N.; Davis, J. L.; Montgomery, S. P.; Huprikar, S.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Strongyloides stercoralis is typically asymptomatic in immunocompetent hosts, despite chronic infection. In contrast, immunocompromised hosts such as solid organ transplant recipients are at risk for hyperinfection syndrome and/or disseminated disease, frequently resulting in fatal outcomes. Infection in these recipients may result from reactivation of latent infection or infection through transmission from an infected donor. We describe the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's experience with seven clusters of donor-derived infection from 2009 to 2013. Six of the seven (86%) donors were born in Latin America; donor screening was not performed prior to organ transplantation in any of these investigations. Eleven of the 20 (55%) organ recipients were symptomatic, two of whom died from complications of strongyloidiasis. We also describe the New York Organ Donor Network (NYODN) experience with targeted donor screening from 2010 to 2013. Of the 233 consented potential donors tested, 10 tested positive for Strongyloides antibody; and 18 organs were transplanted. The majority (86%) of the donors were born in Central or South America. Fourteen recipients received prophylaxis after transplantation; no recipients developed strongyloidiasis. The NYODN experience provides evidence that when targeted donor screening is performed prior to transplantation, donor-derived infection can be averted in recipients. PMID:25703251

  17. Coinfection by Strongyloides stercoralis in blood donors infected with human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 in São Paulo city, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro P Chieffi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of coinfection with Strongyloides stercoralis and human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTML-1 was determined in 91 blood donors examined at the blood bank of a large hospital in São Paulo city, Brazil. As control group 61 individuals, not infected by HTLV-1, were submitted to the same techniques for the diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection. In HTLV-1 infected patients the frequency of S. stercoralis infection was 12.1%; on the other hand, the control group showed a frequency significantly lower of S. stercoralis infection (1.6%, suggesting that HTLV-1 patients shoud be considered as a high risk group for strongyloidiasis in São Paulo city.

  18. Strongyloides stercoralis genotypes in humans in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Fabian; Guo, Li; Streit, Adrian; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Marti, Hanspeter; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Little is known about the genetic variability of the soil-transmitted nematode, Strongyloides stercoralis, in humans. We sequenced portions of the small subunit rDNA (SSU), including the hyper variable regions (HVR) I and IV from S. stercoralis larvae derived from individuals living in a rural setting in Cambodia. We identified three polymorphic positions, including a previously reported one within the HVR I. HVR IV was invariable. Six different SSU alleles existed in our sample. Although different genotypes of S. stercoralis were found in the same individuals, no heterozygous larvae were found. This indicates that there is no or very little interbreeding between the different genotypes. Further studies are needed to examine if this is because sexual reproduction, which is facultative, is rare in our study area's S. stercoralis population or because what is considered to be S. stercoralis today is actually a complex of closely related species or subspecies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. incidence of strongyloides stercoralis infectionn in ungogo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. This study was carried out between October, 2005 and August, 2006 to determine the occurrence and distribution of Strongyloides stercoralis in Dala, Fagge, Nassarawa and Ungoggo Local. Government Areas of Kano State. A total of 280 stool samples from primary schools pupils in the area were examined ...

  20. Development of a Sensitive and Specific Antigen-Detection System for Strongyloides Stercoralis and Hookworm Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    endemic to certain areas in the southeastern United States. Adult females reproduce parthenogenetically and live buried in the mucosa of the duodenum...enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA) proposed for diagnosis Strongyloides and hookworm infections currently used in rickettsia diagnosis utilizes...serial dilutions of rickettsial antigen spotted on nitrocellulose. Test kits (DS and reagents) for R. typhi, R. rickettsii , R. conorii, R

  1. Use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and dipstick assay for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, H. Rogier; Koelewijn, Rob; Hofwegen, Henk; Gilis, Henk; Wetsteyn, Jose C. F. M.; Wismans, Pieter J.; Sarfati, Claudine; Vervoort, Tony; van Gool, Tom

    2007-01-01

    A homemade enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (Academic Medical Center ELISA [AMC-ELISA]) and a dipstick assay for the detection of anti-Strongyloides stercoralis antibodies in serum were developed and evaluated together with two commercially available ELISAs (IVD-ELISA [IVD Research, Inc.

  2. Hiperinfecção por Strongyloides stercoralis: relato de caso autopsiado Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection: autopsy case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moema Gonçalves Pinheiro Veloso

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Infecção assintomática por Strongyloides stercoralis pode resultar em doença potencialmente fatal em pacientes imunodeprimidos. Os autores relatam caso de hiperinfecção por Strongyloides stercoralis descoberto à autópsia, enfatizando aspectos clinicopatológicos, em homem de 55 anos, em tratamento para mieloma múltiplo. Apresentava, havia um dia, cefaléia intensa, dor abdominal e oligúria desenvolvendo insuficiência respiratória aguda e choque séptico. Devido à dificuldade no diagnóstico, o tratamento empírico antes do início da terapia imunossupressora pode ser a melhor estratégia para prevenir a hiperinfecção pelo verme.Asymptomatic infection due to Strongyloides stercoralis may result in potentially fatal disease in immunodepressed patients. A case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection discovered at autopsy in a 55-year-old man who had been undergoing treatment for multiple myeloma is reported, emphasizing the clinical and pathological findings. One day earlier, he presented severe headache, abdominal pain and oliguria, from which he developed acute respiratory failure and septic shock. Because of difficulty in reaching this diagnosis, empirical treatment before starting immunosuppressive therapy may be the best strategy for preventing hyperinfection by this worm.

  3. Hiper-infecção por Strongyloides Stercoralis: relato de caso Strongyloides Stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Chassot Benincasa

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O Strongyloides stercoralis é um agente comum de infecção do trato gastrintestinal. Em pacientes imunodeprimidos este nematódeo pode causar hiper-infecção, com manifestações pulmonares e sepse por germes gram-negativos. O objetivo deste relato foi apresentar um caso com evolução letal e ressaltar a importância do diagnóstico e do tratamento precoce. RELATO DO CASO: Paciente do sexo masculino, 60 anos, com diagnóstico de tumor de timo, submetido a tratamento cirúrgico, radioterapia e quimioterapia. Foi consultado na emergência relatando queixa de diarréia e dispnéia, sendo admitido na UTI após apresentar quadro de insuficiência respiratória aguda hipoxêmica e choque refratário, evoluindo para óbito. No aspirado traqueal, foi identificado larvas de Strongyloides stercoralis. CONCLUSÕES: A estrongiloidíase, apesar de tratar-se de infecção parasitária freqüentemente leve, em pacientes imunodeprimidos pode apresentar-se de forma grave e disseminada. Deve-se suspeitar deste agente em pacientes que vivem em áreas endêmicas, sendo o diagnóstico estabelecido através da pesquisa da larva do Strongyloides stercoralis na secreção traqueal e nas fezes.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Strongyloides Stercoralis is a common cause of gastrointestinal infection. This nematode can produce an overwhelming hyperinfection syndrome, especially in the immunocompromised patient. Typically, patients present with pulmonary symptoms, but subsequently they can acquire Gram-negative sepsis. The objective of this report is to describe a lethal case and call attention to the importance of early diagnosis and treatment. CASE REPORT: Male patient, 60 year-old with diagnosis of timoma, treated with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the past. He presented to the emergency room complaining of diarrhea and dyspnea, and then transferred to the ICU after development of hypoxemic acute respiratory failure and refractory

  4. Regulatory T cell expansion in HTLV-1 and strongyloidiasis co-infection is associated with reduced IL-5 responses to Strongyloides stercoralis antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Montes

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Human strongyloidiasis varies from a chronic but limited infection in normal hosts to hyperinfection in patients treated with corticosteroids or with HTLV-1 co-infection. Regulatory T cells dampen immune responses to infections. How human strongyloidiasis is controlled and how HTLV-1 infection affects this control are not clear. We hypothesize that HTLV-1 leads to dissemination of Strongyloides stercoralis infection by augmenting regulatory T cell numbers, which in turn down regulate the immune response to the parasite.To measure peripheral blood T regulatory cells and Strongyloides stercoralis larval antigen-specific cytokine responses in strongyloidiasis patients with or without HTLV-1 co-infection.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated from newly diagnosed strongyloidiasis patients with or without HTLV-1 co-infection. Regulatory T cells were characterized by flow cytometry using intracellular staining for CD4, CD25 and FoxP3. PBMCs were also cultured with and without Strongyloides larval antigens. Supernatants were analyzed for IL-5 production.Patients with HTLV-1 and Strongyloides co-infection had higher parasite burdens. Eosinophil counts were decreased in the HTLV-1 and Strongyloides co-infected subjects compared to strongyloidiasis-only patients (70.0 vs. 502.5 cells/mm(3, p = 0.09, Mann-Whitney test. The proportion of regulatory T cells was increased in HTLV-1 positive subjects co-infected with strongyloidiasis compared to patients with only strongyloidiasis or asymptomatic HTLV-1 carriers (median = 17.9% vs. 4.3% vs. 5.9 p<0.05, One-way ANOVA. Strongyloides antigen-specific IL-5 responses were reduced in strongyloidiasis/HTLV-1 co-infected patients (5.0 vs. 187.5 pg/ml, p = 0.03, Mann-Whitney test. Reduced IL-5 responses and eosinophil counts were inversely correlated to the number of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells.Regulatory T cell counts are increased in patients with HTLV-1 and Strongyloides stercoralis co-infection and

  5. Strongyloides spp. infections of veterinary importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamsborg, Stig M.; Ketzis, Jennifer; Horii, Yoichiro

    2017-01-01

    in young animals. Dogs are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis while cats are infected with different species according to geographical location (Strongyloides felis, Strongyloides tumefaciens, Strongyloides planiceps and perhaps S. stercoralis). In contrast to the other species, lactogenic...... of Strongyloides species in relation to different hosts. More research is urgently needed on the potential zoonotic capacity of Strongyloides from dogs and cats based on molecular typing, information on risk factors and mapping of transmission routes....... transmission is not a primary means of infection in dogs, and S. stercoralis is the only species considered zoonotic. Strongyloides papillosus in calves has been linked to heavy fatalities under conditions of high stocking density. Strongyloides westeri and Strongyloides ransomi of horses and pigs...

  6. Epidemiology of Strongyloides stercoralis on Mekong islands in southern Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonghachack, Youthanavanh; Sayasone, Somphou; Bouakhasith, Dalouny; Taisayavong, Keoka; Akkavong, Kongsap; Odermatt, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a neglected helminth infection potentially that can lead to systemic infection in immunocompromised individuals. In Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR, Laos), information on S. stercoralis infection is scarce. We assessed S. stercoralis infection and associated risk factors and symptoms on the Mekong islands in Southern Laos. Baermann and Kato-Katz techniques were performed on two stool samples from each individual to detect S. stercoralis larvae and concomitant helminth infections. Among 729 individuals, 41.0% were infected with S. stercoralis. Men were at higher risk than women (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.45-2.67). Urticaria and body itching was associated with S. stercoralis infection (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.42-4.05). Infection with Opisthorchis viverrini (72.2%), Schistosoma mekongi (12.8%), and hookworm (56.1%) were very common. Few infections with Trichuris trichiura (3.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (0.3%) and Taenia spp. (0.3%) were detected. The majority of helminth infections were of light intensity, with prevalences of 80.4%, 92.9%, 64.5%, 100% and 100%, for O. viverrini, hookworm, S. mekongi, T. trichiura and A. lumbricoides, respectively. Nevertheless, heavy infection intensities were observed for O. viverrini (1.0%), S. mekongi (14.0%) and hookworm (2.9%). S. stercoralis is highly endemic on the islands of Khong district, Champasack province, Southern Laos. The national helminth control programme should take action to control this helminth infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and Other Intestinal Parasite Infections in School Children in a Rural Area of Angola: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alegría, María Luisa Aznar Ruiz; Colmenares, Karen; Espasa, Mateu; Amor, Arancha; Lopez, Isabel; Nindia, Arlette; Kanjala, Joaquina; Guilherme, Domingas; Sulleiro, Elena; Barriga, Begoña; Gil, Eva; Salvador, Fernando; Bocanegra, Cristina; López, Teresa; Moreno, Milagros; Molina, Israel

    2017-10-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is widely distributed in the tropics and subtropics. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of S. stercoralis and other intestinal parasites and identify the risk factors for infection with S. stercoralis in a rural area of Angola. A cross-sectional study was conducted in school-age children (SAC) in Cubal, Angola. A questionnaire collecting clinical and epidemiological variables was used, and two stool samples were collected. A concentration technique (Ritchie) and a technique for detection of larvae migration (Baermann) were performed. Of 230 SAC, 56.1% were female and the mean age was 9.3 years (SD 2.45). Severe malnutrition, according to body mass index (BMI)-for-age, was observed in 20.4% of the SAC, and anemia was found in 59.6%. Strongyloides stercoralis was observed in 28 of the 230 (12.8%) SAC. Eggs of other helminths were observed in 51 (22.2%) students: Hymenolepis spp. in 27 students (11.7%), hookworm in 14 (6.1%), Schistosoma haematobium in four (1.7%), Enterobius vermicularis in four (1.7%), Ascaris lumbricoides in three (1.3%), Taenia spp. in two (0.9%), and Fasciola hepatica in one (0.4%). Protozoa were observed in 17 (7.4%) students. Detection of S. stercoralis was higher using the Baermann technique versus using formol-ether (11.3 vs. 3%). Overall prevalence of S. stercoralis in the school population of 16 studied schools in the municipal area of Cubal was greater than 10%. This fact must be considered when designing deworming mass campaigns. The use of specific tests in larvae detection is needed to avoid overlooking this parasite.

  8. Microbial Translocation Associated with an Acute-Phase Response and Elevations in MMP-1, HO-1, and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Strongyloides stercoralis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamanickam, Anuradha; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukthi; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2017-01-01

    Microbial translocation, characterized by elevated levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and related markers, is a common occurrence in HIV and some parasitic infections. This is usually associated with extensive inflammation and immune activation. To examine the occurrence of microbial translocation and the associated inflammatory response in asymptomatic Strongyloides stercoralis infection, we measured the plasma levels of LPS and other microbial translocation markers, acute-phase proteins, inflammatory markers, and proinflammatory cytokines in individuals with (infected [INF]) or without (uninfected [UN]) S. stercoralis infections. Finally, we also measured the levels of all of these markers in INF individuals following treatment of S. stercoralis infection. We show that INF individuals exhibit significantly higher plasma levels of microbial translocation markers (LPS, soluble CD14 [sCD14], intestinal fatty acid-binding protein [iFABP], and endotoxin core IgG antibody [EndoCAb]), acute-phase proteins (α-2 macroglobulin [α-2M], C-reactive protein [CRP], haptoglobin, and serum amyloid protein A [SAA]), inflammatory markers (matrix metalloproteinase 1 [MMP-1] and heme oxygenase 1 [HO-1]), and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [MCP-1], and IL-1β) than do UN individuals. INF individuals exhibit significantly decreased levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 4 (TIMP-4). Following treatment of S. stercoralis infection, the elevated levels of microbial translocation markers, acute-phase proteins, and inflammatory markers were all diminished. Our data thus show that S. stercoralis infection is characterized by microbial translocation and accompanying increases in levels of acute-phase proteins and markers of inflammation and provide data to suggest that microbial translocation is a feature of asymptomatic S. stercoralis infection and is associated with an inflammatory response. Copyright © 2016 American

  9. Late onset of Strongyloides stercoralis meningitis in a retired Belgian miner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pypen, Y; Oris, E; Meeuwissen, J; Vander Laenen, M; Van Gompel, F; Coppens, G

    2015-12-01

    We report a rare case of Strongyloides stercoralis meningitis in an immunocompromised patient treated for a lung carcinoma. Despite his Belgian origin, he was infected with S. stercoralis due to his former work as a miner. Although mostly prevalent in (sub)tropical areas, there are temperate regions where this nematode can occur.

  10. Modulation of CD4+and CD8+T Cell Function and Cytokine Responses in Strongyloides stercoralis Infection by Interleukin-27 (IL-27) and IL-37.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukthi; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2017-11-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis infection is associated with diminished antigen-specific Th1- and Th17-associated responses and enhanced Th2-associated responses. Interleukin-27 (IL-27) and IL-37 are two known anti-inflammatory cytokines that are highly expressed in S. stercoralis infection. We therefore wanted to examine the role of IL-27 and IL-37 in regulating CD4 + and CD8 + T cell responses in S. stercoralis infection. To this end, we examined the frequency of Th1/Tc1, Th2/Tc2, Th9/Tc9, Th17/Tc17, and Th22/Tc22 cells in 15 S. stercoralis -infected individuals and 10 uninfected individuals stimulated with parasite antigen following IL-27 or IL-37 neutralization. We also examined the production of prototypical type 1, type 2, type 9, type 17, and type 22 cytokines in the whole-blood supernatants. Our data reveal that IL-27 or IL-37 neutralization resulted in significantly enhanced frequencies of Th1/Tc1, Th2/Tc2, Th17/Tc17, Th9, and Th22 cells with parasite antigen stimulation. There was no induction of any T cell response in uninfected individuals following parasite antigen stimulation and IL-27 or IL-37 neutralization. Moreover, we also observed increased production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-5, IL-9, IL-17, and IL-22 and decreased production of IL-10 following IL-27 and IL-37 neutralization and parasite antigen stimulation in whole-blood cultures. Thus, we demonstrate that IL-27 and IL-37 limit the induction of particular T cell subsets along with cytokine responses in S. stercoralis infections, which suggest the importance of IL-27 and IL-37 in immune modulation in a chronic helminth infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Strongyloides stercoralis-hyperinfectie bij een harttransplantatiepatiënt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalfs, A.S.; Van Hattem, S.; Schuttelaar, M.L.A.

    2013-01-01

    A heart transplantation patient with asymptomatic reticular petechiae and purpura on thighs and buttocks is described. Gastrointestinal manifestations preceded the skin manifestations. The symptoms were caused by a Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection, transmitted to the patient via the donor

  12. Real-time PCR for Strongyloides stercoralis-associated meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadir, Eyal; Grossman, Tamar; Ciobotaro, Pnina; Attali, Malka; Barkan, Daniel; Bardenstein, Rita; Zimhony, Oren

    2016-03-01

    Four immunocompromised patients, immigrants from Ethiopia, presented with diverse clinical manifestations of meningitis associated with Strongyloides stercoralis dissemination as determined by identification of intestinal larvae. The cerebrospinal fluid of 3 patients was tested by a validated (for stool) real-time PCR for S. stercoralis and was found positive, establishing this association. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The relationship between treatment for Strongyloides stercoralis infection and type 2 diabetes mellitus in an Australian Aboriginal population: A three-year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Russell; Giacomin, Paul; Olma, Lennart; Esterman, Adrian; McDermott, Robyn

    2017-12-01

    To determine the effect of treatment for Strongyloides stercoralis infection on type 2 diabetes mellitus in an Australian Aboriginal population. A three-year cohort study of 259 Aboriginal adults living in northern Australia. Subjects were tested for S. stercoralis infection, diabetic status and HbA1c at recruitment. 92 subjects were ELISA positive for S. stercoralis and 91 were treated with two doses of ivermectin 0.2mg/kg. Serological cure was assessed after 6months and those who remained positive were retreated. All subjects then underwent the same testing at 3years follow up. Follow up was successful in 80% of subjects. Eight new cases of T2DM were recorded, 7 in the treatment group and 1 in the non-treatment group (Unadjusted RR 7.71, CI 0.98-60.48, p=0.052. Adjusted RR 5.45, CI 075-35.92, p=0.093). In addition, worsening glycemic control (T2DM or newly diagnosed glucose intolerance) was recorded in 13 cases (10 treatment group, 3 non treatment. Adjusted RR 3.74, CI 1.06-13.20, p=0.04). There was a significant improvement in glycemic control in the patients with pre-existing T2DM when treated for S. stercoralis compared to the non-treatment group (Diff. -1.03, p=0.009). This study demonstrated a differential effect of treatment for S. stercoralis on glucose metabolism in patients with and without T2DM. It showed a significant effect on the development of T2DM and glucose intolerance in those without T2DM, while improving glycemic control in subjects with pre-existing T2DM. Although numbers in this study are small, it suggests that larger studies may be of interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiolabeling of infective third-stage larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis by feeding ( sup 75 Se)selenomethionine-labeled Escherichia coli to first- and second-stage larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aikens, L.M.; Schad, G.A. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (USA))

    1989-10-01

    A technique is described for radiolabeling Strongyloides stercoralis larvae with ({sup 75}Se)selenomethionine. Cultures of an auxotrophic methionine-dependent stain of Escherichia coli were grown in a medium containing Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 5% nutrient broth, amino acids, and ({sup 75}Se)selenomethionine. When the {sup 75}Se-labeled bacterial populations were in the stationary phase of growth, cultures were harvested and the bacteria dispersed on agar plates to serve as food for S. stercoralis larvae. Use of nondividing bacteria is important for successful labeling because the isotope is not diluted by cell division and death of larvae attributable to overgrowth by bacteria is prevented. First-stage S. stercoralis larvae were recovered from feces of infected dogs and reared in humid air at 30 C on agar plates seeded with bacteria. After 7 days, infective third-stage larvae were harvested. The mean specific activity of 6 different batches of larvae ranged from 75 to 330 counts per min/larva with 91.8 +/- 9.5% of the population labeled sufficiently to produce an autoradiographic focus during a practicable, 6-wk period of exposure. Labeled infective larvae penetrated the skin of 10-day-old puppies and migrated to the small intestine, where the developed to adulthood.

  15. Regulation of Life Cycle Checkpoints and Developmental Activation of Infective Larvae in Strongyloides stercoralis by Dafachronic Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennatallah M Y Albarqi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The complex life cycle of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis leads to either developmental arrest of infectious third-stage larvae (iL3 or growth to reproductive adults. In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, analogous determination between dauer arrest and reproductive growth is governed by dafachronic acids (DAs, a class of steroid hormones that are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12. Biosynthesis of DAs requires the cytochrome P450 (CYP DAF-9. We tested the hypothesis that DAs also regulate S. stercoralis development via DAF-12 signaling at three points. First, we found that 1 μM Δ7-DA stimulated 100% of post-parasitic first-stage larvae (L1s to develop to free-living adults instead of iL3 at 37°C, while 69.4±12.0% (SD of post-parasitic L1s developed to iL3 in controls. Second, we found that 1 μM Δ7-DA prevented post-free-living iL3 arrest and stimulated 85.2±16.9% of larvae to develop to free-living rhabditiform third- and fourth-stages, compared to 0% in the control. This induction required 24-48 hours of Δ7-DA exposure. Third, we found that the CYP inhibitor ketoconazole prevented iL3 feeding in host-like conditions, with only 5.6±2.9% of iL3 feeding in 40 μM ketoconazole, compared to 98.8±0.4% in the positive control. This inhibition was partially rescued by Δ7-DA, with 71.2±16.4% of iL3 feeding in 400 nM Δ7-DA and 35 μM ketoconazole, providing the first evidence of endogenous DA production in S. stercoralis. We then characterized the 26 CYP-encoding genes in S. stercoralis and identified a homolog with sequence and developmental regulation similar to DAF-9. Overall, these data demonstrate that DAF-12 signaling regulates S. stercoralis development, showing that in the post-parasitic generation, loss of DAF-12 signaling favors iL3 arrest, while increased DAF-12 signaling favors reproductive development; that in the post-free-living generation, absence of DAF-12 signaling is crucial for

  16. Regulation of Life Cycle Checkpoints and Developmental Activation of Infective Larvae in Strongyloides stercoralis by Dafachronic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Adeiye A.; Nolan, Thomas J.; Wang, Zhu; Kliewer, Steven A.; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Lok, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The complex life cycle of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis leads to either developmental arrest of infectious third-stage larvae (iL3) or growth to reproductive adults. In the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, analogous determination between dauer arrest and reproductive growth is governed by dafachronic acids (DAs), a class of steroid hormones that are ligands for the nuclear hormone receptor DAF-12. Biosynthesis of DAs requires the cytochrome P450 (CYP) DAF-9. We tested the hypothesis that DAs also regulate S. stercoralis development via DAF-12 signaling at three points. First, we found that 1 μM Δ7-DA stimulated 100% of post-parasitic first-stage larvae (L1s) to develop to free-living adults instead of iL3 at 37°C, while 69.4±12.0% (SD) of post-parasitic L1s developed to iL3 in controls. Second, we found that 1 μM Δ7-DA prevented post-free-living iL3 arrest and stimulated 85.2±16.9% of larvae to develop to free-living rhabditiform third- and fourth-stages, compared to 0% in the control. This induction required 24–48 hours of Δ7-DA exposure. Third, we found that the CYP inhibitor ketoconazole prevented iL3 feeding in host-like conditions, with only 5.6±2.9% of iL3 feeding in 40 μM ketoconazole, compared to 98.8±0.4% in the positive control. This inhibition was partially rescued by Δ7-DA, with 71.2±16.4% of iL3 feeding in 400 nM Δ7-DA and 35 μM ketoconazole, providing the first evidence of endogenous DA production in S. stercoralis. We then characterized the 26 CYP-encoding genes in S. stercoralis and identified a homolog with sequence and developmental regulation similar to DAF-9. Overall, these data demonstrate that DAF-12 signaling regulates S. stercoralis development, showing that in the post-parasitic generation, loss of DAF-12 signaling favors iL3 arrest, while increased DAF-12 signaling favors reproductive development; that in the post-free-living generation, absence of DAF-12 signaling is crucial for iL3 arrest

  17. Strongyloides spp. infections of veterinary importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamsborg, Stig M; Ketzis, Jennifer; Horii, Yoichiro; Matthews, Jacqueline B

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews the occurrence and impact of threadworms, Strongyloides spp., in companion animals and large livestock, the potential zoonotic implications and future research. Strongyloides spp. infect a range of domestic animal species worldwide and clinical disease is most often encountered in young animals. Dogs are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis while cats are infected with different species according to geographical location (Strongyloides felis, Strongyloides tumefaciens, Strongyloides planiceps and perhaps S. stercoralis). In contrast to the other species, lactogenic transmission is not a primary means of infection in dogs, and S. stercoralis is the only species considered zoonotic. Strongyloides papillosus in calves has been linked to heavy fatalities under conditions of high stocking density. Strongyloides westeri and Strongyloides ransomi of horses and pigs, respectively, cause only sporadic clinical disease. In conclusion, these infections are generally of low relative importance in livestock and equines, most likely due to extensive use of macrocyclic lactone anthelmintics and/or improved hygiene. Future prevalence studies need to include molecular typing of Strongyloides species in relation to different hosts. More research is urgently needed on the potential zoonotic capacity of Strongyloides from dogs and cats based on molecular typing, information on risk factors and mapping of transmission routes.

  18. Massive haemoptysis associated with pulmonary Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfestation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collet, F.; Favory, R.; Augusto, D.; Moukassa, D.; Dutoit, E.; Mathieu, D.

    2005-11-01

    Pulmonary infestation with Strongyloides stercoralis is an exceptionally rare cause of haemoptysis, the diagnosis being difficult and often delayed. We report the case of a retired coal miner suffering from pneumoconiosis who presented with acute respiratory insufficiency and massive haemoptysis, with a fatal outcome, associated with pulmonary stongyloidosis. The only identified source of infestation with Strongyloides stercoralis was his period in the coal mine and the only risk factors for the hyper-infestation were a short course of systemic corticosteroid therapy and the presence of a peritoneal-auricular valve. This observation illustrates the importance of a systematic search for anguillosis in ex coal miners prior to any immunosuppressant treatment in order to avoid the serious and frequently fatal form of hyperinfestation with Strongyloides stercoralis.

  19. Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis in an urban US AIDS cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabha, Linda; Krishnan, Sonya; Ramanathan, Roshan; Mejia, Rojelio; Roby, Gregg; Sheikh, Virginia; Mcauliffe, Isabel; Nutman, Thomas; Sereti, Irini

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We examined the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss) infection in a cohort of AIDS patients from a US urban centre. We monitored our cohort for possible cases of dissemination or immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation. Methods One hundred and three HIV-infected participants were prospectively sampled from a cohort observational study of ART-naive HIV-1-infected patients with CD4 ⩽100 T cells/μl. Clinical symptoms, corticosteroid therapy, eosinophilia, CD4 count, and plasma HIV-RNA were reviewed. Sera were tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CrAg-ELISA) to crude Ss extract or to an Ss-specific recombinant protein (NIE) and by luciferase immunoprecipitation system assay (LIPS) for Ss-specific antibodies. Results Twenty-five per cent of study participants were Strongyloides seropositive by CrAg-ELISA and 62% had emigrated from Strongyloides-endemic areas. The remaining 38% of the seropositives were US born and tested negative by NIE and LIPS. CrAg-ELISA-positive participants had a median CD4 count of 22 T cells/μl and a median HIV-RNA of 4.87 log10 copies/ml. They presented with diarrhea (27%), abdominal pain (23%), and skin manifestations (35%) that did not differ from seronegative patients. Peripheral blood eosinophilia was common among seropositive patients (prevalence of 62% compared to 29% in seronegatives, P = 0.004). Seropositive patients were treated with ivermectin. There were no cases of hyperinfection syndrome. Discussion Strongyloidiasis may be prevalent in AIDS patients in the USA who emigrated from Ss-endemic countries, but serology can be inconclusive, suggesting that empiric ivermectin therapy is a reasonable approach in AIDS patients originating from Strongyloides endemic areas. PMID:23265425

  20. A retrospective study comparing agar plate culture, indirect immunofluorescence and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonfrate, Dora; Perandin, Francesca; Formenti, Fabio; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2017-05-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a parasite that can cause death in immunocompromised people. A proper diagnosis is hence essential. The real-time polymerase-chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a novel, promising diagnostic method, that detects the DNA of the parasite in stool samples. In this retrospective study, we compared the sensitivity of agar plate coproculture (APC), an in-house immunofluorescence test (IFAT) and an in-house RT-PCR for the diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection. The study sample was composed by 223 samples. Samples resulting positive to APC, IFAT and RT-PCR were 20, 140 and 25, respectively. When sensitivity was calculated against a composite reference standard, serology confirmed the best performance (sensitivity 95%), followed by RT-PCR (57%) and APC (45%). In conclusion, in a non-endemic setting, serology is the best screening method, while the combination of APC and RT-PCR does not seem a reasonable approach to increase sensitivity. Both methods can have a role as confirmatory tests for selected cases.

  1. Seroprevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis in a South Australian Vietnam veteran cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanian, Hany; MacFarlane, Alexander C; Rowland, Karen E; Einsiedel, Lloyd J; Neuhaus, Susan J

    2015-08-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a parasitic roundworm causing chronic infection that is endemic in Southeast Asia. Vietnam veterans are considered to be at high risk of Strongyloides infection. The prevalence of persistent infection in this group is unknown. This study aimed to establish the seropositivity rate of Strongyloides antibodies in South Australian Vietnam veterans and to identify the most reported symptoms within the seropositive group. This cross-sectional study recruited 309 veterans who had served in Vietnamese territory between 1962 and 1975 and were currently resident in South Australia. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire examining demographics, deployment, somatic symptoms and depression. Venous blood was collected for Strongyloides serology and eosinophil count. Participants who demonstrated positive Strongyloides serology underwent faecal microscopy for parasites. A total of 309 participants were recruited and 256 completed the questionnaire. Strongyloides seropositivity was demonstrated in 29 of 249 participants (11.6%). No participant had Strongyloides larvae detected by faecal microscopy. On multivariate analysis, only dermatological symptoms were associated with positive serology (OR 4.84, 95%CI 1.31-17.92, p-value 0.01). This study found a high seroprevalence (11.6%) of Strongyloides antibodies within the Vietnam veteran community in South Australia. Seropositivity was associated with increased likelihood of dermatological symptoms. Post-deployment screening and eradication therapy for Strongyloides should be offered to ADF staff after service in Strongyloides-endemic areas. This should include those veterans who left the service many years ago. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  2. Real-time PCR for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in human stool samples from Côte d'Ivoire: diagnostic accuracy, inter-laboratory comparison and patterns of hookworm co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Sören L; Piraisoody, Nivetha; Kramme, Stefanie; Marti, Hanspeter; Silué, Kigbafori D; Panning, Marcus; Nickel, Beatrice; Kern, Winfried V; Herrmann, Mathias; Hatz, Christoph F; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Utzinger, Jürg; von Müller, Lutz

    2015-10-01

    Human infections with the helminth species Strongyloides stercoralis encompass a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from asymptomatic carriage to life-threatening disease. The diagnosis of S. stercoralis is cumbersome and the sensitivity of conventional stool microscopy is low. New molecular tools have been developed to increase sensitivity. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of real-time PCR with microscopy for the detection of S. stercoralis and hookworm in human stool samples, and investigated the inter-laboratory agreement of S. stercoralis-specific real-time PCR in two European laboratories. Stool specimens from 256 randomly selected individuals in rural Côte d'Ivoire were examined using three microscopic techniques (i.e. Kato-Katz, Koga agar plate (KAP) and Baermann (BM)). Additionally, ethanol-fixed stool aliquots were subjected to molecular diagnosis. The prevalence of S. stercoralis and hookworm infection was 21.9% and 52.0%, respectively, whilst co-infections were detected in 35 (13.7%) participants. The diagnostic agreement between real-time PCR and microscopy was excellent when both KAP and BM tested positive for S. stercoralis, but was considerably lower when only one microscopic technique was positive. The sensitivity of KAP, BM and real-time PCR for detection of S. stercoralis as compared to a combination of all diagnostic techniques was 21.4%, 37.5% and 76.8%, respectively. The inter-laboratory agreement of S. stercoralis-specific PCR was substantial (κ=0.63, p<0.001). We conclude that a combination of real-time PCR and stool microscopy shows high accuracy for S. stercoralis diagnosis. Besides high sensitivity, PCR may also enhance specificity by reducing microscopic misdiagnosis of morphologically similar helminth larvae (i.e. hookworm and S. stercoralis) in settings where both helminth species co-exist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Strongyloides stercoralis infestation in HIV seropositive patients in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A contemporary surge in diarrhoeal illnesses due to parasitic infestations is believed to be a synergy between endemicity and HIV seropositivity. Aim: To determine the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infestation among HIV seropositive patients at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital.

  4. Corticosteroid-induced asthma: a manifestation of limited hyperinfection syndrome due to Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, P; Gil, C; Estrellas, B; Middleton, J R

    1995-09-01

    Inadequate therapeutic response to parenteral corticosteroids in patients with acute bronchial asthma is infrequent. We report four patients whose bronchial asthma symptoms worsened after treatment with parenteral corticosteroids. All had larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis in the stool. The new attack or the exacerbation of asthma appeared to be precipitated by systemic corticosteroid administration. The paradoxic therapeutic response of asthma to glucocorticoides was the major pulmonary manifestation of Strongyloides superinfection; there was no evidence of other organ involvement. Individuals with new onset of bronchial asthma or worsening of asthmatic episodes concurrent with the use of systemic corticosteroids should have thorough investigation for possible superinfection due to Strongyloides stercoralis. This is particularly important for patients who have resided in areas where intestinal helminthic infections are endemic. Discontinuance of steroid therapy or reduction in dosage of parenteral steroids appears necessary. Treatment with thiabendazole appears to be effective in patients with limited hyperinfection syndrome.

  5. Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuretic Hormone Secretion (SIADH in Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepshikha Nag Chowdhury

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis (S. stercoralis is a soil transmitted intestinal roundworm that has a unique ability to multiply within the human host and reinfect the human carrier by a process of autoinfection. By this property, S. stercoralis can persist as an occult infection for many decades. In situations of immunosuppression or other permissive gastrointestinal conditions, there occurs a massive increase in parasite multiplication. The parasites penetrate through the intestinal mucosa and are carried in circulation and can cause multisystem involvement. We report a case of a 76-year-old Columbian male who presented with intractable vomiting and hyponatremia who was then diagnosed to have syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (SIADH. The patient′s symptoms improved after treatment with two doses of ivermectin and his serum sodium levels returned to normal. S. stercoralis infection should be suspected in patients from endemic regions who present with gastrointestinal symptoms and unexplained hyponatremia.

  6. Fatalt forløbende Strongyloides stercoralis-infektion hos patient uden forudgående kendt immunsuppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M; Andersen, O; Friis-Møller, A

    2000-01-01

    A case of fatal infection with Strongyloides stercoralis in a previously healthy young African with no known immunosuppression is reported. The patient suffered severe gastrointestinal bleeding and despite intensive treatment died of multiorgan failure. Postmortem, signs of ulcerating T-cell lymp......A case of fatal infection with Strongyloides stercoralis in a previously healthy young African with no known immunosuppression is reported. The patient suffered severe gastrointestinal bleeding and despite intensive treatment died of multiorgan failure. Postmortem, signs of ulcerating T......-cell lymphoma were found in a jejunal specimen, and the patient was found to be infected with HTLV-1. Gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to infection with Strongyloides stercoralis is discussed as well as possible relations between the severity of infection, lymphoma and HTLV-1....

  7. Strongyloides stercoralis is associated with significant morbidity in rural Cambodia, including stunting in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrer, Armelle; Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Hattendorf, Jan; Marti, Hanspeter; Neumayr, Andreas; Char, Meng Chuor; Hatz, Christoph; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted nematode that can replicate within its host, leading to long-lasting and potentially fatal infections. It is ubiquitous and highly prevalent in Cambodia. The extent of morbidity associated with S. stercoralis infection is difficult to assess due to the broad spectrum of symptoms and, thus, remains uncertain. Clinical signs were compared among S. stercoralis infected vs. non-infected participants in a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2012 in eight villages of Northern Cambodia, and before and after treatment with a single oral dose of ivermectin (200μg/kg BW) among participants harboring S. stercoralis. Growth retardation among schoolchildren and adolescents was assessed using height-for-age and thinness using body mass index-for-age. S. stercoralis prevalence was 31.1% among 2,744 participants. Urticaria (55% vs. 47%, OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.6) and itching (52% vs. 48%, OR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0-1.4) were more frequently reported by infected participants. Gastrointestinal, dermatological, and respiratory symptoms were less prevalent in 103 mono-infected participants after treatment. Urticaria (66% vs. 11%, OR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01-0.1) and abdominal pain (81 vs. 27%, OR: 0.07, 95% CI: 0.02-0.2) mostly resolved by treatment. S. stercoralis infection was associated with stunting, with 2.5-fold higher odds in case of heavy infection. The morbidity associated with S. stercoralis confirmed the importance of gastrointestinal and dermatological symptoms unrelated to parasite load, and long-term chronic effects when associated with malnutrition. The combination of high prevalence and morbidity calls for the integration of S. stercoralis into ongoing STH control measures in Cambodia.

  8. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and bronchial asthma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yildiz Levent

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted intestinal nematode that has been estimated to infect at least 60 million people, especially in tropical and subtropical regions. Strongyloides infection has been described in immunosupressed patients with lymphoma, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus etc. Our case who has rheumatoid arthritis (RA and bronchial asthma was treated with low dose steroids and methotrexate. Methods A 68 year old woman has bronchial asthma for 55 years and also diagnosed RA 7 years ago. She received immunusupressive agents including methotrexate and steroids. On admission at hospital, she was on deflazacort 5 mg/day and methotrexate 15 mg/week. On her physical examination, she was afebrile, had rhonchi and mild epigastric tenderness. She had joint deformities at metacarpophalengeal joints and phalanges but no active arthritis finding. Results Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed and it showed hemorrhagic focus at bulbus. Gastric biopsy obtained and showed evidence of S.Stercoralis infection. Stool and sputum parasitological examinations were also all positive for S.stercoralis larvae. Chest radiography result had no pathologic finding. Albendazole 400 mg/day was started for 23 days. After the ivermectin was retrieved, patient was treated with oral ivermectin 200 μg once a day for 3 days. On her outpatient control at 15th day, stool and sputum samples were all negative for parasites. Conclusion S.stercoralis may cause mortal diseases in patients. Immunosupression frequently causes disseminated infections. Many infected patients are completely asymptomatic. Although it is important to detect latent S. stercoralis infections before administering chemotherapy or before the onset of immunosuppression in patients at risk, a specific and sensitive diagnostic test is lacking. In immunosupressed patients, to detect S.stercoralis might help to have the patient survived and constitute the exact therapy.

  9. Prevalence and risk factors of Strongyloides stercoralis in Takeo Province, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Marti, Hanspeter; Bless, Philipp J; Char, Meng Chuor; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-05-12

    The threadworm Strongyloides stercoralis, the most neglected helminth, affects an estimated 30-100 million people worldwide. Information on S. stercoralis infection is scarce in tropical and sub-tropical resource poor countries, including Cambodia. We determined S. stercoralis infection prevalence and risk factors for infection in the general population in Southern Cambodia. A cross-sectional study was carried out between January and April 2011 among 2,861 participants living in 60 villages of Takeo province, using Koga-agar plate culture, the Baermann technique and the Kato-Katz technique on a single stool sample. Eight intestinal helminth species were diagnosed. Hookworm (31.4%) and S. stercoralis (21.0%) occurred most frequently. Prevalence of S. stercoralis infection increased with age. In all age groups a higher prevalence was found among males than among females (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4 - 2.0; P < 0.001). Participants who had a latrine at home were significantly less frequently infected with S. stercoralis than those who did not (OR: 0.7; 95% CI: 0.4 - 0.8; P = 0.003). Muscle pain (OR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.0 - 1.6; P = 0.028) and urticaria (OR: 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1 - 1.8; P = 0.001) were significantly associated with S. stercoralis infection. S. stercoralis is highly prevalent among the general Cambodian population and should no longer be neglected. Access to adequate diagnosis and treatment is urgently needed.

  10. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complicating Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is endemic in tropic and subtropic areas, but is currently seldom encountered in developed area like Taiwan. We present an elder man with acute respiratory distress syndrome complicating Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection. There was no significant clue initially for diagnosing this patient as having S. stercoralis hyperinfection. Neither peripheral eosinophilia nor significant hemoptysis was noted. Bronchoscopy played a critical role to define the unexpected cause of his progressive pulmonary infiltrates. The correct diagnosis was soon made by recognition of the worm in bronchioloalveolar lavage cytology, and specific treatment was initiated promptly. For a septic patient with progressive pulmonary infiltrates, bronchoscopic studies including cytology may be necessary for defining the cause. Hyperinfection strongyloidiasis should be considered as a cause of acute respiratory distress syndrome in immunocompromised patient, especially with the presence of chronic gastrointestinal symptoms.

  11. First molecular identification and genetic diversity of Strongyloides stercoralis and Strongyloides fuelleborni in human communities having contact with long-tailed macaques in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sanpool, Oranuch; Rodpai, Rutchanee; Tourtip, Somjintana; Yahom, Sujitra; Kullawat, Jitsuda; Radomyos, Prayong; Thammasiri, Chalida; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2017-07-01

    The parasitic nematodes, Strongyloides stercoralis and Strongyloides fuelleborni, can infect humans and non-human primates. We amplified and sequenced a portion of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rRNA) and of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of Strongyloides from humans in the study area in Thailand, where people have frequent contact with long-tailed macaques. Fresh stool samples were obtained from 213 people and were examined using the agar plate culture method. The overall prevalence of Strongyloides infection was 8.92% (19/213). From a total of 19 worms (one per infected person), 18 adult males had 18S rRNA sequences identical with that of S. stercoralis and one adult female had a sequence almost identical with that of S. fuelleborni. A median-joining network of cox1 sequences revealed nine new haplotypes from S. stercoralis, and an overall haplotype diversity (Hd) of 0.9309. The single haplotype of S. fuelleborni was also new and contributed to an overall haplotype diversity for that species of 0.9842. This is the first molecular identification of S. stercoralis and S. fuelleborni in a human community having contact with long-tailed macaques in Thailand. It is also the first report of S. fuelleborni infecting a human in Thailand.

  12. Strongyloides stercoralis diagnostic polypeptides for human strongyloidiasis and their proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodpai, Rutchanee; Intapan, Pewpan M; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sanpool, Oranuch; Janwan, Penchom; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Insawang, Tonkla; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2016-10-01

    Human strongyloidiasis is a deleterious gastrointestinal disease mainly caused by Strongyloides stercoralis infection. Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminthiasis that is distributed around the globe. Although definitive diagnosis is carried out through the detection of parasite objects in human stool samples, the development of reliable immunological assays is an important alternative approach for supportive diagnosis. We characterized the two sensitive and specific bands of S. stercoralis filariform larvae that reacted with human strongyloidiasis sera based on immunoblot analysis. Serum samples obtained from strongyloidiasis patients showed a sensitivity of 90 and 80 % at the approximate molecular mass of 26 and 29-kDa polypeptide bands, respectively. The reactive specificity of the 26-kDa band was 76.5 % while for the 29-kDa band was 92.2 %. Proteomic analysis identified the 26-kDa band protein was 14-3-3 protein zeta, while the 29-kDa band protein was ADP/ATP translocase 4. The results provided a basic framework for further studies regarding the potential of the S. stercoralis recombinant antigen to become a leading to diagnostic tool.

  13. Diagnosis, Treatment and Risk Factors of Strongyloides stercoralis in Schoolchildren in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Marti, Hanspeter; Sayasone, Somphou; Duong, Socheat; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, an estimated 30 to 100 million people are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis, a soil-transmitted helminth. Information on the parasite is scarce in most settings. In semi-rural Cambodia, we determined infection rates and risk factors; compared two diagnostic methods (Koga agar plate [KAP] culture and Baermann technique) for detecting S. stercoralis infections, using a multiple stool examination approach; and assessed efficacy of ivermectin treatment. Methods/Principal Findings We performed a cross-sectional study in 458 children from four primary schools in semi-rural villages in Kandal province, using three diagnostic procedures (Kato-Katz, KAP culture and Baermann technique) on three stool samples. Infected children were treated with ivermectin (100 µg/kg/day for two days) and re-examined three weeks after treatment. Hookworm, S. stercoralis, Trichuris trichiura, and small trematode eggs were most prevalent, with 24.4% of children being infected with S. stercoralis. The sensitivity of KAP culture and Baermann technique was 88.4% and 75.0%, respectively and their negative predictive values were 96.4% and 92.5%, respectively. The cumulative prevalence of S. stercoralis increased from 18.6% to 24.4%, after analyzing three stool samples, which was close to the modeled ‘true’ prevalence of 24.8%. Children who reported defecating in latrines were significantly less infected with S. stercoralis than those who did not use latrines (p<0.001). Itchy skin and diarrhea were significantly associated with S. stercoralis infection. The cure rate of ivermectin was 98.3%. Conclusions/Significance S. stercoralis infection is highly prevalent among semi-rural Cambodian schoolchildren. The sensitivity of KAP culture is higher than that of the Baermann technique. In the absence of a “gold standard”, analysis of multiple stool samples by different diagnostic methods is required to achieve a satisfactory level of sensitivity. Almost three-quarters of

  14. Diagnosis, treatment and risk factors of Strongyloides stercoralis in schoolchildren in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Marti, Hanspeter; Sayasone, Somphou; Duong, Socheat; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, an estimated 30 to 100 million people are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis, a soil-transmitted helminth. Information on the parasite is scarce in most settings. In semi-rural Cambodia, we determined infection rates and risk factors; compared two diagnostic methods (Koga agar plate [KAP] culture and Baermann technique) for detecting S. stercoralis infections, using a multiple stool examination approach; and assessed efficacy of ivermectin treatment. We performed a cross-sectional study in 458 children from four primary schools in semi-rural villages in Kandal province, using three diagnostic procedures (Kato-Katz, KAP culture and Baermann technique) on three stool samples. Infected children were treated with ivermectin (100 µg/kg/day for two days) and re-examined three weeks after treatment. Hookworm, S. stercoralis, Trichuris trichiura, and small trematode eggs were most prevalent, with 24.4% of children being infected with S. stercoralis. The sensitivity of KAP culture and Baermann technique was 88.4% and 75.0%, respectively and their negative predictive values were 96.4% and 92.5%, respectively. The cumulative prevalence of S. stercoralis increased from 18.6% to 24.4%, after analyzing three stool samples, which was close to the modeled 'true' prevalence of 24.8%. Children who reported defecating in latrines were significantly less infected with S. stercoralis than those who did not use latrines (p<0.001). Itchy skin and diarrhea were significantly associated with S. stercoralis infection. The cure rate of ivermectin was 98.3%. S. stercoralis infection is highly prevalent among semi-rural Cambodian schoolchildren. The sensitivity of KAP culture is higher than that of the Baermann technique. In the absence of a "gold standard", analysis of multiple stool samples by different diagnostic methods is required to achieve a satisfactory level of sensitivity. Almost three-quarters of the infections could have been avoided by proper sanitation

  15. Diagnosis, treatment and risk factors of Strongyloides stercoralis in schoolchildren in Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virak Khieu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Worldwide, an estimated 30 to 100 million people are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis, a soil-transmitted helminth. Information on the parasite is scarce in most settings. In semi-rural Cambodia, we determined infection rates and risk factors; compared two diagnostic methods (Koga agar plate [KAP] culture and Baermann technique for detecting S. stercoralis infections, using a multiple stool examination approach; and assessed efficacy of ivermectin treatment. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a cross-sectional study in 458 children from four primary schools in semi-rural villages in Kandal province, using three diagnostic procedures (Kato-Katz, KAP culture and Baermann technique on three stool samples. Infected children were treated with ivermectin (100 µg/kg/day for two days and re-examined three weeks after treatment. Hookworm, S. stercoralis, Trichuris trichiura, and small trematode eggs were most prevalent, with 24.4% of children being infected with S. stercoralis. The sensitivity of KAP culture and Baermann technique was 88.4% and 75.0%, respectively and their negative predictive values were 96.4% and 92.5%, respectively. The cumulative prevalence of S. stercoralis increased from 18.6% to 24.4%, after analyzing three stool samples, which was close to the modeled 'true' prevalence of 24.8%. Children who reported defecating in latrines were significantly less infected with S. stercoralis than those who did not use latrines (p<0.001. Itchy skin and diarrhea were significantly associated with S. stercoralis infection. The cure rate of ivermectin was 98.3%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: S. stercoralis infection is highly prevalent among semi-rural Cambodian schoolchildren. The sensitivity of KAP culture is higher than that of the Baermann technique. In the absence of a "gold standard", analysis of multiple stool samples by different diagnostic methods is required to achieve a satisfactory level of sensitivity. Almost three

  16. Donor-derived Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome after simultaneous kidney/pancreas transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Galiano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Most cases of strongyloidiasis associated with solid organ transplantation have been due to the reactivation of a latent infection in the recipient as a result of the immunosuppressive therapy; however, donor-derived infections are becoming increasingly frequent. The case of a patient who nearly died of a Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection after receiving simultaneous kidney/pancreas transplants is described herein. No specific parasitological tests were performed pre-transplantation, despite the fact that both the recipient and the donor originated from endemic areas. Serological analysis of the donor's serum performed retrospectively revealed the origin of the infection, which if it had been done beforehand would have prevented the serious complications. Current practice guidelines need to be updated to incorporate immunological and molecular techniques for the rapid screening of Strongyloides prior to transplantation, and empirical treatment with ivermectin should be applied systematically when there is the slightest risk of infection in the donor or recipient.

  17. Diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis by morphological characteristics combine with molecular biological methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Fu; Xu, Lian; Luo, Shi-Qi; Xie, Hui; Chen, Wei; Wu, Zhong-Dao; Sun, Xi

    2017-04-01

    Strongyloidiasis is one of the neglected tropical diseases caused by infection with the nematode Strongyloides genus and distributed worldwide. Strongyloidiasis can be fatal in immunosuppressed patients induced hyperinfection or disseminated strongyloidiasis. Unfortunately, until now, due to the unspecific clinical symptom in infected individuals and the low sensitivity diagnosis of strongyloidiasis, many patients were misdiagnosed every year. Furthermore, the larvae of the Strongyloides stercoralis (S. stercoralis) is similar to other nematodes such as hookworm, Trichostrongylus increased the difficulty of diagnosis. In this case, the patient is a 63-year-old male person, who had a nearly 30 years medical history of asthma and emphysema, and 4-5-year medical history of diabetes. The sputum examination found some parasite larvae, then we identify the larvae using clinical observation and morphological characteristics combine with examined cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COX1) and 18S rRNA genes by PCR, sequence analysis and finally classified by phylogenetic analysis, the larvae were diagnosed as S. stercoralis. Our results showed that diagnosis with strongyloidiasis by morphological characteristics combine with molecular biological methods can improve the sensitive of diagnosis and provide a final diagnosis for the disease in the clinics.

  18. E. coli Meningitis Presenting in a Patient with Disseminated Strongyloides stercoralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana B. Gomez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spontaneous Escherichia coli meningitis is an infrequent condition in adults and is associated with some predisposing factors, including severe Strongyloides stercoralis (SS infections. Case Presentation. A 43-year-old Hispanic man, with history of travelling to the jungle regions of Peru and Brazil two decades ago, and who received prednisone due to Bell’s palsy for three weeks before admission, presented to the Emergency Department with diarrhea, fever, and hematochezia. A week after admission he developed drowsiness, meningeal signs, abdominal distension, and constipation. A cerebrospinal fluid culture showed extended spectrum β-lactamase producing E. coli. A colonoscopy was performed and showed pancolitis. Three days after the procedure the patient became unstable and developed peritoneal signs. He underwent a laparotomy, which ended up in a total colectomy and partial proctectomy due to toxic megacolon. Three days later the patient died in the intensive care unit due to septic shock. Autopsy was performed and microscopic examination revealed the presence of multiple Strongyloides larvae throughout the body. Conclusion. Strongyloides stercoralis infection should be excluded in adults with spontaneous E. coli meningitis, especially, if gastrointestinal symptoms and history of travelling to an endemic area are present. Even with a proper diagnosis and management, disseminated strongyloidiasis has a poor prognosis.

  19. Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and other intestinal parasitic infections among mentally retarded residents in central institution of southern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Azar Shokri; Khojasteh Sharifi Sarasiabi; Saeed Hosseini Teshnizi; Hamid Mahmoodi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among mentally retarded residents of rehabilitation center of Bandar Abbas, Hormozgan province, southern Iran. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in central rehabilitation institute of Hormozgan province in summer 2010. Fecal samples of all 133 residents (72 males, 61 females) aged 3-52, were collected in triplicate. Specimens were examined by direct smear, formalin-ether concentration techniques and st...

  20. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Is Associated with Strongyloides stercoralis Treatment Failure in Australian Aboriginals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Hays

    Full Text Available To explore the efficacy of ivermectin in the treatment of serologically diagnosed cases of Strongyloides stercoralis (S. stercoralis infection in an Aboriginal community and to describe factors that may influence the outcome of treatment.Longitudinal study of a group of 92 individuals with serologically diagnosed S. stercoralis treated with ivermectin and followed up over a period of approximately 6 months. Main outcomes were serological titers pre and post treatment, diabetic status, and duration of follow up.Treatment success was achieved in 62% to 79% of cases dependent on the methods employed for the diagnosis of infection and assessment of treatment outcome. Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM was found to be significantly associated with treatment failure in this group for two of the three methods employed.Ivermectin has been confirmed as an effective treatment for S stercoralis infection in this setting. T2DM appears to be an independent risk factor for treatment failure in this population, and plausible mechanisms to explain this observation are presented.

  1. Strongyloides infection in rodents: immune response and immune regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breloer, Minka; Abraham, David

    2017-03-01

    The human pathogenic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis infects approximately 30-100 million people worldwide. Analysis of the adaptive immune response to S. stercoralis beyond descriptive studies is challenging, as no murine model for the complete infection cycle is available. However, the combined employment of different models each capable of modelling some features of S. stercoralis life cycle and pathology has advanced our understanding of the immunological mechanisms involved in host defence. Here we review: (i) studies using S. stercoralis third stage larvae implanted in diffusion chambers in the subcutaneous tissue of mice that allow analysis of the immune response to the human pathogenic Strongyloides species; (ii) studies using Strongyloides ratti and Strongyloides venezuelensis that infect mice and rats to extend the analysis to the parasites intestinal life stage and (iii) studies using S. stercoralis infected gerbils to analyse the hyperinfection syndrome, a severe complication of human strongyloidiasis that is not induced by rodent specific Strongyloides spp. We provide an overview of the information accumulated so far showing that Strongyloides spp. elicits a classical Th2 response that culminates in different, site specific, effector functions leading to either entrapment and killing of larvae in the tissues or expulsion of parasitic adults from the intestine.

  2. Tratamiento de Strongyloides stercoralis con ivermectina y tiabendazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Huapaya

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir la experiencia del uso de ivermectina y tiabendazole en pacientes atendidos en el Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Daniel A. Carrión"- UNMSM. Material y Métodos: Durante los años 2001 y 2002, se administró ivermectina 0,2 mg/kg en dosis única a 22 pacientes (Grupo 1 o tiabendazole 25 mg/kg por 3 días a 20 pacientes (Grupo 2 con diagnóstico de Strongyloides stercoralis en heces. Se efectuó controles entre 20 y 40 días después de administrado el tratamiento. Resultados: El promedio de edades fue 21,8 años (DE 22,6 para el grupo 1 y de 33,5 años (DE 14,2 para el grupo 2. Hubo 12 varones (54,5% en el grupo 1 y 7 (35% en el grupo 2. Ivermectina fue 100% eficaz, mientras que tiabendazole lo fue en 95%; sólo un caso requirió un segundo ciclo debido a la alta carga parasitaria inicial; el siguiente control fue negativo. Los síntomas más frecuentes fueron diarreas (71,4%, dolor cólico (61,9% y dolor epigástrico (47,6%. Todos los pacientes manifestaron mejoría clínica luego del tratamiento. Sólo 2 casos (10% del grupo 2 manifestaron leve sensación nauseosa durante el primer día del tratamiento, que remitió por completo al segundo día. Conclusiones: Ambos medicamentos ratifican su eficacia y seguridad para ser utilizados en el tratamiento de Strongyloides stercoralis; es necesario disponer de ellos en el petitorio nacional.

  3. Different but overlapping populations of Strongyloides stercoralis in dogs and humans—Dogs as a possible source for zoonotic strongyloidiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemm, Felix M.; Schär, Fabian; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter; Lok, James B.

    2017-01-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a much-neglected soil born helminthiasis caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Human derived S. stercoralis can be maintained in dogs in the laboratory and this parasite has been reported to also occur in dogs in the wild. Some authors have considered strongyloidiasis a zoonotic disease while others have argued that the two hosts carry host specialized populations of S. stercoralis and that dogs play a minor role, if any, as a reservoir for zoonotic S. stercoralis infections of humans. We isolated S. stercoralis from humans and their dogs in rural villages in northern Cambodia, a region with a high incidence of strongyloidiasis, and compared the worms derived from these two host species using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence polymorphisms. We found that in dogs there exist two populations of S. stercoralis, which are clearly separated from each other genetically based on the nuclear 18S rDNA, the mitochondrial cox1 locus and whole genome sequence. One population, to which the majority of the worms belong, appears to be restricted to dogs. The other population is indistinguishable from the population of S. stercoralis isolated from humans. Consistent with earlier studies, we found multiple sequence variants of the hypervariable region I of the 18 S rDNA in S. stercoralis from humans. However, comparison of mitochondrial sequences and whole genome analysis suggest that these different 18S variants do not represent multiple genetically isolated subpopulations among the worms isolated from humans. We also investigated the mode of reproduction of the free-living generations of laboratory and wild isolates of S. stercoralis. Contrary to earlier literature on S. stercoralis but similar to other species of Strongyloides, we found clear evidence of sexual reproduction. Overall, our results show that dogs carry two populations, possibly different species of Strongyloides. One population appears to be dog specific but the other one is

  4. Different but overlapping populations of Strongyloides stercoralis in dogs and humans-Dogs as a possible source for zoonotic strongyloidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleta, Tegegn G; Zhou, Siyu; Bemm, Felix M; Schär, Fabian; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter; Lok, James B; Streit, Adrian

    2017-08-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a much-neglected soil born helminthiasis caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Human derived S. stercoralis can be maintained in dogs in the laboratory and this parasite has been reported to also occur in dogs in the wild. Some authors have considered strongyloidiasis a zoonotic disease while others have argued that the two hosts carry host specialized populations of S. stercoralis and that dogs play a minor role, if any, as a reservoir for zoonotic S. stercoralis infections of humans. We isolated S. stercoralis from humans and their dogs in rural villages in northern Cambodia, a region with a high incidence of strongyloidiasis, and compared the worms derived from these two host species using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequence polymorphisms. We found that in dogs there exist two populations of S. stercoralis, which are clearly separated from each other genetically based on the nuclear 18S rDNA, the mitochondrial cox1 locus and whole genome sequence. One population, to which the majority of the worms belong, appears to be restricted to dogs. The other population is indistinguishable from the population of S. stercoralis isolated from humans. Consistent with earlier studies, we found multiple sequence variants of the hypervariable region I of the 18 S rDNA in S. stercoralis from humans. However, comparison of mitochondrial sequences and whole genome analysis suggest that these different 18S variants do not represent multiple genetically isolated subpopulations among the worms isolated from humans. We also investigated the mode of reproduction of the free-living generations of laboratory and wild isolates of S. stercoralis. Contrary to earlier literature on S. stercoralis but similar to other species of Strongyloides, we found clear evidence of sexual reproduction. Overall, our results show that dogs carry two populations, possibly different species of Strongyloides. One population appears to be dog specific but the other one is

  5. An improved DNA isolation technique for PCR detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, S A; Alba Soto, C D; Cazorla, S I; Tayeldin, M L; Cuello, S; Lasala, M B; Tekiel, V S; González Cappa, S M

    2013-05-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a nematode that causes severe infections in immunocompromised patients. The low parasitic burden of chronically infected patients makes diagnosis difficult to achieve by conventional methods. Here, an in-house (IH) method for the isolation of parasite DNA from stools and a PCR assay for the molecular diagnosis of S. stercoralis were optimized. DNA yield and purity improved with the IH method which included a step of incubation of stool samples with a glycine-SDS buffer and mechanical disruption prior to DNA extraction. For the PCR assay, the addition of bovine serum albumin was required to neutralize inhibitors present in stool. The analytical sensitivity of the PCR using DNA as template, isolated with the IH method, was superior to the commercial one. This study demonstrates that a combined method that adds the step of glycine-SDS buffer incubation plus mechanical disruption prior to DNA isolation with the commercial kit increased PCR sensitivity to levels of the IH method. Finally, our assay was tested on 17 clinical samples. With the IH method for DNA isolation, a S. stercoralis specific band was detected by PCR in the first stool sample in all patients (17/17), while with the commercial kit, our S. stercoralis-specific band was only observed in 7 samples. The superior efficiency of the IH and combined methods over the commercial kit was demonstrated when applied to clinical samples with low parasitic burden. These results show that the DNA extraction procedure is a key to increase sensitivity of the S. stercoralis PCR assay in stool samples. The method developed here could help to improve the molecular diagnosis of S. stercoralis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High prevalence and spatial distribution of Strongyloides stercoralis in rural Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khieu, Virak; Schär, Fabian; Forrer, Armelle; Hattendorf, Jan; Marti, Hanspeter; Duong, Socheat; Vounatsou, Penelope; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The threadworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, endemic in tropical and temperate climates, is a neglected tropical disease. Its diagnosis requires specific methods, and accurate information on its geographic distribution and global burden are lacking. We predicted prevalence, using Bayesian geostatistical modeling, and determined risk factors in northern Cambodia. From February to June 2010, we performed a cross-sectional study among 2,396 participants from 60 villages in Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Two stool specimens per participant were examined using Koga agar plate culture and the Baermann method for detecting S. stercoralis infection. Environmental data was linked to parasitological and questionnaire data by location. Bayesian mixed logistic models were used to explore the spatial correlation of S. stercoralis infection risk. Bayesian Kriging was employed to predict risk at non-surveyed locations. Of the 2,396 participants, 44.7% were infected with S. stercoralis. Of 1,071 strongyloidiasis cases, 339 (31.6%) were among schoolchildren and 425 (39.7%) were found in individuals under 16 years. The incidence of S. stercoralis infection statistically increased with age. Infection among male participants was significantly higher than among females (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4-2.0; PCambodia is very high and school-aged children and adults over 45 years were the most at risk for infection. Lack of access to adequate treatment for chronic uncomplicated strongyloidiasis is an urgent issue in Cambodia. We would expect to see similar prevalence rates elsewhere in Southeast Asia and other tropical resource poor countries.

  7. Comparative evaluation of Strongyloides ratti and S. stercoralis larval antigen for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in an endemic area of opisthorchiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamudomkarn, Chatanun; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Sithithaworn, Jiraporn; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sripa, Banchob; Itoh, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    The use of Strongyloides ratti as heterologous antigen for serodiagnosis of strongyloidiasis is preferable to Strongyloides from humans due to the ease and safety of antigen preparation. In Southeast Asia where Opisthorchis viverrini coexists with Strongyloides stercoralis, there has been no report in using S. ratti for serodiagnosis of S. stercoralis. In this study, performance of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on S. ratti was compared with that based on S. stercoralis for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in areas where O. viverrini is co-endemic in Thailand. Of the 107 individuals, 50 (46.7 %) were positive for S. stercoralis by agar culture method and by ELISA; 82 (76.6 %) and 81 (75.7 %) were seropositive using S. ratti and S. stercoralis antigens, respectively. The levels of parasite-specific IgG to S. ratti and S. stercoralis antigen were significantly proportionally correlated (P < 0.001). Mixed infections with O. viverrini have little effect on diagnosis of strongyloidiasis. Of 42 subjects who were infected with other parasites, there were no cross-reaction with Angiostrongylus cantonensis, Taenia spp., hookworms, Paragonimus spp., Clonorchis sinensis, Ascaris lumbricoides except for Fasciola spp. (1 of 5), and Opisthorchis viverrini (5 of 20). In spite of cross-reactivities, the results suggest that the S. ratti antigen provides an useful option for diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in an endemic area of opisthorchiasis with high sensitivity comparable to the S. stercoralis antigen and provide a basis for effective control strategies for strongyloidiasis.

  8. Strongyloides Hyperinfection Syndrome Combined with Cytomegalovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatehi Elnour Elzein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mortality in Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome (SHS is alarmingly high. This is particularly common in bone marrow, renal, and other solid organ transplant (SOT patients, where figures may reach up to 50–85%. Immunosuppressives, principally corticosteroids, are the primary triggering factor. In general, the clinical features of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection are nonspecific; therefore, a high index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy. Although recurrent Gram-negative sepsis and meningitis have been previously reported, the combination of both cytomegalovirus (CMV and strongyloidiasis had rarely been associated. We here describe a patient who survived SHS with recurrent Escherichia coli (E. coli urosepsis and CMV infection.

  9. High prevalence and spatial distribution of Strongyloides stercoralis in rural Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virak Khieu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The threadworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, endemic in tropical and temperate climates, is a neglected tropical disease. Its diagnosis requires specific methods, and accurate information on its geographic distribution and global burden are lacking. We predicted prevalence, using Bayesian geostatistical modeling, and determined risk factors in northern Cambodia. METHODS: From February to June 2010, we performed a cross-sectional study among 2,396 participants from 60 villages in Preah Vihear Province, northern Cambodia. Two stool specimens per participant were examined using Koga agar plate culture and the Baermann method for detecting S. stercoralis infection. Environmental data was linked to parasitological and questionnaire data by location. Bayesian mixed logistic models were used to explore the spatial correlation of S. stercoralis infection risk. Bayesian Kriging was employed to predict risk at non-surveyed locations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Of the 2,396 participants, 44.7% were infected with S. stercoralis. Of 1,071 strongyloidiasis cases, 339 (31.6% were among schoolchildren and 425 (39.7% were found in individuals under 16 years. The incidence of S. stercoralis infection statistically increased with age. Infection among male participants was significantly higher than among females (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.4-2.0; P<0.001. Participants who defecated in latrines were infected significantly less than those who did not (OR: 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4-0.8; P=0.001. Strongyloidiasis cases would be reduced by 39% if all participants defecated in latrines. Incidence of S. stercoralis infections did not show a strong tendency toward spatial clustering in this province. The risk of infection significantly decreased with increasing rainfall and soil organic carbon content, and increased in areas with rice fields. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Prevalence of S. stercoralis in rural Cambodia is very high and school-aged children and adults over 45 years were the

  10. Estimating occurrence of Strongyloides stercoralis in the Caribbean island countries: Implications for monitoring and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketzis, Jennifer K; Conan, Anne

    2017-07-01

    Few data are available for the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis in the Caribbean region. This frequently under diagnosed soil-transmitted helminth (STH) can result in long-term low intensity chronic infections that are asymptomatic or can cause varied intestinal disturbances. With autoinfections, infections lasting over 60 years can occur and hyperinfections lead to high morbidity and mortality. Historical literature was searched to determine the prevalence of S. stercoralis in the Caribbean island countries with some additional countries and islands included for comparative data. A previously published model was used to calculate prevalence taking in to account the sensitivity of the diagnostic methods used. Data for 17 islands/Caribbean countries were found and sufficient data were located to calculate prevalence for 14 locations. Prevalence ranges from <1% to 20.3% and while it has decreased in many islands it has not decreased at the same rate as other STHs in the last 40 years within the Caribbean region. S. stercoralis continues to be an important STH within the Caribbean. Potential reasons for the current prevalence include: long lasting infections, populations not targeted with mass drug administration (MDA) programs being infected, low efficacy of commonly used drugs in MDA programs, and under-diagnosis resulting in infections not being treated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of Three Immunoassays for Detection of Antibodies to Strongyloides stercoralis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Neil W.; Klein, Diane M.; Dornink, Sarina M.; Jespersen, Deborah J.; Kubofcik, Joseph; Nutman, Thomas B.; Merrigan, Stephen D.; Couturier, Marc Roger

    2014-01-01

    Due to the limited sensitivities of stool-based microscopy and/or culture techniques for Strongyloides stercoralis, the detection of antibodies to this intestinal nematode is relied upon as a surrogate for determining exposure status or making a diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection. Here, we evaluated three immunoassays, including the recently released InBios Strongy Detect IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (InBios International, Inc., Seattle, WA), the SciMedx Strongyloides serology microwell ELISA (SciMedx Corporation, Denville, NJ), and the luciferase immunoprecipitation system (LIPS) assay performed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), for their detection of IgG antibodies to S. stercoralis. A total of 101 retrospective serum samples, previously submitted for routine S. stercoralis antibody detection using the SciMedx assay, were also evaluated by the InBios and LIPS assays. The qualitative results from each assay were compared using a Venn diagram analysis, to the consensus result among the three assays, and each ELISA was also evaluated using the LIPS assay as the reference standard. By Venn diagram analysis, 65% (66/101) of the samples demonstrated perfect agreement by all three assays. Also, the numbers of samples considered positive or negative by a single method were similar. Compared to the consensus result, the overall percent agreement of the InBios, SciMedx, and LIPS assays were comparable at 87.1%, 84.2%, and 89.1%, respectively. Finally, the two ELISAs performed analogously but demonstrated only moderate agreement (kappa coefficient for the two assays, 0.53) with the LIPS assay. Collectively, while the two commercially available ELISAs perform equivalently, neither should be used independently of clinical evaluation to diagnose strongyloidiasis. PMID:24648484

  12. Spatial distribution of soil-transmitted helminths, including Strongyloides stercoralis, among children in Zanzibar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Knopp

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A programme periodically distributing anthelminthic drugs to school-aged children for the control of soiltransmitted helminthiasis was launched in Zanzibar in the early 1990s. We investigated the spatial distribution of soiltransmitted helminth infections, including Strongyloides stercoralis, in 336 children from six districts in Unguja, Zanzibar, in 2007. One stool sample per child was examined with the Kato-Katz, Koga agar plate and Baermann methods. The point prevalence of the different helminth infections was compared to the geological characteristics of the study sites. The observed prevalences for Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm and S. stercoralis were 35.5%, 12.2%, 11.9% and 2.2%, respectively, with considerable spatial heterogeneity. Whilst T. trichiura and hookworm infections were found in all six districts, no A. lumbricoides infections were recorded in the urban setting and only a low prevalence (2.2% was observed in the South district. S. stercoralis infections were found in four districts with the highest prevalence (4.0% in the West district. The prevalence of infection with any soil-transmitted helminth was highest in the North A district (69.6% and lowest in the urban setting (22.4%. A. lumbricoides, hookworm and, with the exception of the North B district, S. stercoralis infections were observed to be more prevalent in the settings north of Zanzibar Town, which are characterized by alluvial clayey soils, moist forest regions and a higher precipitation. After a decade of large-scale administration of anthelminthic drugs, the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections across Unguja is still considerable. Hence, additional measures, such as improving access to adequate sanitation and clean water and continued health education, are warranted to successfully control soil-transmitted helminthiasis in Zanzibar.

  13. Improved Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in Modified Agar Plate Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocaterra, Leonor A; Ferrara, Giuseppe; Peñaranda, Rosaura; Rojas, Elsy; Pérez-Chacón, Gladymar; Hernán, Aurora; Certad, Gabriela; Goldstein, Carlos; Núñez, Luz

    2017-04-01

    AbstractA modification of Koga agar plate culture was performed, consisting of a 2 × 2-cm cellophane paper centered on the agar plate to prevent bacterial contamination of the agar and daily dish examinations (days 2-5). Between January 2000 and July 2005, we examined 1,708 infection-suspected patients, of which 147 (8.6%) harbored S. stercoralis. Single modified agar plate cultures exhibited superior sensitivity (93.2%), compared with different three-sample screening methods (sensitivity-Baermann: 76.6%, formalin-ethyl acetate: 22%, and direct smear: 15.3%). Agar plate cultures stand out as helpful alternatives for improved detection and therapy monitoring in poor countries and endemic areas. Combined with Baermann methods, they provide increased probability for S. stercoralis detection.

  14. Evaluation of real-time PCR for Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm as diagnostic tool in asymptomatic schoolchildren in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Fabian; Odermatt, Peter; Khieu, Virak; Panning, Marcus; Duong, Socheat; Muth, Sinuon; Marti, Hanspeter; Kramme, Stefanie

    2013-05-01

    Diagnosis of soil-transmitted helminths such as Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworms (Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus) is challenging due to irregular larval and egg output in infected individuals and insensitive conventional diagnostic procedures. Sensitive novel real-time PCR assays have been developed. Our study aimed to evaluate the real-time PCR assays as a diagnostic tool for detection of Strongyloides spp. and hookworms in a random stool sample of 218 asymptomatic schoolchildren in Cambodia. Overall prevalence of 17.4% (38/218) and 34.9% (76/218) were determined by real-time PCR for S. stercoralis and hookworms, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of S. stercoralis specific real-time PCR as compared to the combination of Baermann/Koga Agar as gold standard were 88.9% and 92.7%, respectively. For hookworm specific real-time PCR a sensitivity of 78.9% and specificity of 78.9% were calculated. Co-infections were detectable by PCR in 12.8% (28/218) of individuals. S. stercoralis real-time PCR applied in asymptomatic cases showed a lower sensitivity compared to studies undertaken with symptomatic patients with the same molecular tool, yet it proved to be a valid supplement in the diagnosis of STH infection in Cambodia. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Dissemination of Strongyloides stercoralis in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus after initiation of albendazole: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Catherine J

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Strongyloides stercoralis infection affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. As immigration rates and international travel increase, so does the number of cases of strongyloidiasis in the United States. Although described both in immigrant and in immunosuppressed populations, hyperinfection and dissemination of S. stercoralis following the initiation of antiparasitic medication is a previously unreported phenomenon. Case presentation Here we describe the case of a 38-year-old immunocompromised woman with systemic lupus erythematosus, who developed disseminated disease following treatment with albendazole (400 mg every 12 hours. Notably the patient was receiving oral prednisone (10 mg once daily, azathioprine (50 mg twice daily, and hydroxychloroquine (400 mg daily at the time of hospitalization. The patient was subsequently treated successfully with ivermectin (200 mcg/kg daily. Conclusion The reader should be aware that dissemination of S. stercoralis can occur even after the initiation of antiparasitic medication.

  16. Diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis: Detection of parasite-derived DNA in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodh, Nilanjan; Caro, Reynaldo; Sofer, Shterna; Scott, Alan; Krolewiecki, Alejandro; Shiff, Clive

    2016-11-01

    Detecting infections of Strongyloides stercoralis is arduous and has low sensitivity. Clinically this is a major problem because chronic infections may disseminate in the host and lead to a life threatening condition. Epidemiologically, S. stercoralis is often missed in surveys as it is difficult to identify by standard stool examination procedures. We present, for the first time, evidence that the infection can be detected in filtered urine samples collected and processed in the field and subsequently assayed for the presence of parasite DNA. Urine specimens (∼40mL) were collected from 125 test and control individuals living in rural and peri-urban regions of Northern Argentina. From the same individuals, fresh stool specimens were processed using three different copropological methods. Urine specimens were filtered in the field through a 12.5cm Whatman No. 3 filter. The filters were dried and packed individually in sealable plastic bags with desiccant and shipped to a laboratory where DNA was recovered from the filter and PCR-amplified with primers specific to a dispersed repetitive sequence. Prevalence of S. stercoralis infection by stool culture and direct examination was 35/125 (28%), In contrast, PCR-based detection of parasite-specific trans-renal DNA in urine indicated that 56/125 (44.8%) carried the parasite. Of the patients that tested positive for urine-based parasite DNA, approximately half also tested positive in their stool specimens. There were 6.4% of cases where parasite larvae were seen in the stool but no DNA was amplified from the urine. As proof of principle, DNA amplification from urine residue reveals significantly more cases of S. stercoralis infection than the current standard stool examination techniques. Additional work is required to establish the relative utility, sensitivity and specificity of urine-based analysis compared to parasitological and nucleic acid detection from stool for clinical and epidemiological detection for S

  17. Donor-derived Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome after simultaneous kidney/pancreas transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiano, A; Trelis, M; Moya-Herráiz, Á; Sánchez-Plumed, J; Merino, J F

    2016-10-01

    Most cases of strongyloidiasis associated with solid organ transplantation have been due to the reactivation of a latent infection in the recipient as a result of the immunosuppressive therapy; however, donor-derived infections are becoming increasingly frequent. The case of a patient who nearly died of a Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection after receiving simultaneous kidney/pancreas transplants is described herein. No specific parasitological tests were performed pre-transplantation, despite the fact that both the recipient and the donor originated from endemic areas. Serological analysis of the donor's serum performed retrospectively revealed the origin of the infection, which if it had been done beforehand would have prevented the serious complications. Current practice guidelines need to be updated to incorporate immunological and molecular techniques for the rapid screening of Strongyloides prior to transplantation, and empirical treatment with ivermectin should be applied systematically when there is the slightest risk of infection in the donor or recipient. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. A public health response against Strongyloides stercoralis: time to look at soil-transmitted helminthiasis in full.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krolewiecki, Alejandro J; Lammie, Patrick; Jacobson, Julie; Gabrielli, Albis-Francesco; Levecke, Bruno; Socias, Eugenia; Arias, Luis M; Sosa, Nicanor; Abraham, David; Cimino, Ruben; Echazú, Adriana; Crudo, Favio; Vercruysse, Jozef; Albonico, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis infections have a worldwide distribution with a global burden in terms of prevalence and morbidity that is largely ignored. A public health response against soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections should broaden the strategy to include S. stercoralis and overcome the epidemiological, diagnostic, and therapeutic challenges that this parasite poses in comparison to Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and hookworms. The relatively poor sensitivity of single stool evaluations, which is further lowered when quantitative techniques aimed at detecting eggs are used, also complicates morbidity evaluations and adequate drug efficacy measurements, since S. stercoralis is eliminated in stools in a larval stage. Specific stool techniques for the detection of larvae of S. stercoralis, like Baermann's and Koga's agar plate, despite superiority over direct techniques are still suboptimal. New serologies using recombinant antigens and molecular-based techniques offer new hopes in those areas. The use of ivermectin rather than benzimidazoles for its treatment and the need to have curative regimens rather than lowering the parasite burden are also unique for S. stercoralis in comparison to the other STH due to its life cycle, which allows reproduction and amplification of the worm burden within the human host. The potential impact on STH of the benzimidazoles/ivermectin combinations, already used for control/elimination of lymphatic filariasis, should be further evaluated in public health settings. While waiting for more effective single-dose drug regimens and new sensitive diagnostics, the evidence and the tools already available warrant the planning of a common platform for STH and S. stercoralis control.

  19. Diffuse alveolar haemorrhage and severe hypoxemia from Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sameed, Yaser Abu; Beejay, Nigel; Al Maashari, Rehab

    2015-10-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome is a rare, yet highly fatal disorder. It occurs most commonly in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of a 36-year-old Ethiopian female who presented with abdominal pain and hypotension. Shortly thereafter, she developed acute respiratory failure and progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome and septic shock. She was found to have diffuse alveolar hemorrhage due to disseminated strongyloidiasis. We discuss the clinical condition of Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome presenting with severe hypoxemia and complicated by severe diffuse alveolar hemorrhage leading to death. Similar cases in the literature are also describe. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome: a case series and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geri, Guillaume; Rabbat, Antoine; Mayaux, Julien; Zafrani, Lara; Chalumeau-Lemoine, Ludivine; Guidet, Bertrand; Azoulay, Elie; Pène, Frédéric

    2015-12-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis may lead to overwhelming infestation [Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome (SHS)]. We aimed at describing a case series of patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU) with SHS and report a literature review of such cases. Retrospective multicenter study of 11 patients admitted to the ICU of tertiary hospitals with SHS between 2000 and 2013. Literature review with Pubmed retrieved 122 cases. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify predictive factors of ICU mortality and shock occurrence. 133 patients [median age 53 (39, 64), 72.2 % males] were included. Underlying immunosuppression was present in 127 patients, mostly long-term corticosteroid treatment in 111 (83.5 %) patients. Fever (80.8 %), respiratory (88.6 %), and gastrointestinal (71.2 %) symptoms were common clinical manifestations. Shock occurred in 75 (57.3 %) patients and mechanical ventilation was required in 89 (67.9 %) patients. Hypereosinophilia and a concomitant bacterial infection were observed in 34 (34.3 %) and 51 (38.4 %) patients, respectively. The in-ICU mortality rate was 60.3 %. Predictive factors of ICU mortality were shock occurrence [Odds ratio (OR) 18.1, 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 3.03-107.6, p < 0.01] and mechanical ventilation (OR 28.1, 95 % CI 3.6-217, p < 0.01). Hypereosinophilia (OR 0.21, 95 % CI 0.06-0.7, p = 0.01) and a concomitant bacterial infection (OR 4.68, 95 % CI 1.3-16.8, p = 0.02) were independent predictors of shock occurrence. SHS remains associated with a poor outcome, especially when associated with shock and mechanical ventilation. Deterioration to shock is often related to concomitant bacterial infection. The poor outcome of established SHS pleads for a large application of antiparasitic primary prophylaxis in at-risk patients.

  1. Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection Syndrome Presenting as Severe, Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding, Leading to a Diagnosis of Cushing Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Brittany; Chi, Nai-Wen; Hansen, Lawrence A.; Lee, Roland R.; U, Hoi-Sang; Savides, Thomas J.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old male immigrant from Ethiopia presented for consultation after 3 years of hematochezia/melena requiring > 25 units of blood transfusions. Physical examination revealed severe proximal muscle wasting and weakness, central obesity, proptosis, and abdominal striae, accompanied by eosinophilia, elevated hemoglobin A1c, elevated 24-hour urinary cortisol, lack of suppression of 8 am cortisol levels by 1 mg dexamethasone, and inappropriately elevated random adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level. Histopathological examination of gastrointestinal biopsies showed large numbers of Strongyloides stercoralis, indicating Strongyloides hyperinfection. Treatment with 2 days of ivermectin led to resolution of gastrointestinal bleeding. This syndrome was due to chronic immunosuppression from a pituitary ACTH (corticotroph) microadenoma, of which resection led to gradual normalization of urine cortisol, improved glycemic control, resolution of eosinophilia, and no recurrence of infection. PMID:26195463

  2. Strongyloides stercoralis and other Enteroparasites in Children at Uberlândia City, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues Machado Eleuza

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the rate of infection by Strongyloides stercoralis and other enteroparasites a survey was conducted in the city of Uberlândia, State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. A total of 900 stool samples from 300 children aging from four months to seven years, randomly selected in ten nursery schools from September 1994 to December 1995, were examined, both by the Baermann-Moraes and Lutz methods. Thirty nine children (13% were found to be infected by S. stercoralis, 64.1% were boys and 35.9% were girls. Taking all the enteroparasites as a whole the results of the survey pointed out that 265 (88.4% of the 300 children were infected by the following: Giardia lamblia, 78.3%; Ascaris lumbricoides, 15.3%; S. stercoralis, 13%; Hymenolepis nana, 6.7%; hookworms, 6%; Enterobius vermicularis, 4%; Hymenole-pis diminuta, 4% and Trichuris trichiura, 0.7%. From 265 infected children 64.5% were mono-infected, 27.2% were infected by two parasites and 8.3% had a poly-specific parasite burden. It was concluded that strongyloidiasis is hyperendemic in this area

  3. High prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis among school children in rural Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinz, Dominik; N'Guessan, Nicaise A; Utzinger, Jürg; N'Goran, Eliézer K

    2010-04-01

    Two cross-sectional surveys were carried out in rural Côte d'Ivoire, the first in 5 primary schools in the Lake Taabo area, and the second in the primary school of Azaguié-Institute de Recherche sur les Fruits et Agrumes. Overall, 251 school children were screened for Strongyloides stercoralis by using either the Baermann method, or the Koga agar plate method, or both techniques. The prevalence of S. stercoralis at the unit of the school ranged between 4.0 and 48%. Because S. stercoralis is a neglected nematode, yet an important parasite from a public health perspective, surveys should consider the use of appropriate diagnostic methods to further our understanding of the epidemiology of strongyloidiasis and to better target control interventions.

  4. Genome-Wide Analyses of Individual Strongyloides stercoralis (Nematoda: Rhabditoidea Provide Insights into Population Structure and Reproductive Life Cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisei Kikuchi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The helminth Strongyloides stercoralis, which is transmitted through soil, infects 30-100 million people worldwide. S. stercoralis reproduces sexually outside the host as well as asexually within the host, which causes a life-long infection. To understand the population structure and transmission patterns of this parasite, we re-sequenced the genomes of 33 individual S. stercoralis nematodes collected in Myanmar (prevalent region and Japan (non-prevalent region. We utilised a method combining whole genome amplification and next-generation sequencing techniques to detect 298,202 variant positions (0.6% of the genome compared with the reference genome. Phylogenetic analyses of SNP data revealed an unambiguous geographical separation and sub-populations that correlated with the host geographical origin, particularly for the Myanmar samples. The relatively higher heterozygosity in the genomes of the Japanese samples can possibly be explained by the independent evolution of two haplotypes of diploid genomes through asexual reproduction during the auto-infection cycle, suggesting that analysing heterozygosity is useful and necessary to infer infection history and geographical prevalence.

  5. The roundworm Strongyloides stercoralis in children, dogs, and soil inside and outside a segregated settlement in Eastern Slovakia: frequent but hardly detectable parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štrkolcová, G; Goldová, M; Bocková, E; Mojžišová, J

    2017-03-01

    A comparative study was carried out to evaluate the Strongyloides stercoralis infections in children and dogs inside and outside the segregated settlement in Medzev, Eastern Slovakia, and a survey of the soil within the settlement was included. Applying the Koga agar plate (KAP) culture method and microscopy examination of stool samples collected from 60 Roma and 21 nonRoma children, no larvae of S. stercoralis were detected but eggs of three nematodes (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Enterobius vermicularis) and cysts of two protozoan endoparasites (Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp.) were often found. However, immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA) for the evidence of IgG antibodies against S. stercoralis showed 33.3% seroprevalence in Roma children and 23.8% prevalence in children from the majority population, attending the same school. Eosinophilia was regularly present in children with exclusive infection of S. stercoralis (eight cases) as well as in individuals suffering from mixed infections of S. stercoralis and some of the above listed parasites (16 cases); high eosinophil counts sometimes, but not always, occurred in parasitized children lacking S. stercoralis antibodies. A comparison of S. stercoralis in dogs from the settlement (40 dogs) and from a distant dog shelter (20 dogs) did not reveal remarkable differences: the direct microscopy of faecal samples revealed rhabditiform larvae in 13.3% of the dogs from the settlement (4/30) and in 10.0% of the dogs from the shelter (2/20). Out of blood samples collected from the second dog group, 55% of the dogs contained antibodies against S. stercoralis. In the soil collected from 14 various locations within the settlement, S. stercoralis larvae were observed in two samples (14.3%); however, 13 samples (92.9%) were positive for human or dog endoparasites of the genera Ancylostoma, Ascaris, Toxocara, Toxascaris, Trichuris, and Hymenolepis.

  6. Increase in Reports of Strongyloides Infection - Los Angeles County, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, Curtis; She, Rosemary

    2015-08-28

    During the 1990s, reports of infection with the nematode (roundworm) Strongyloides stercoralis submitted to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH) ranged from 40 to 50 per year, but by 2000, reports had decreased to five per year; in 2006, Strongyloides infection was removed from the LACDPH reportable disease list. Currently, it is only reported at the discretion of Los Angeles County clinicians and laboratories as an unusual disease occurrence. LACDPH currently only monitors case counts and does not investigate reported Strongyloides cases. During 2013-2014, an increase in Strongyloides cases occurred, with 43 cases reported.

  7. Strongyloides stercoralis, the hidden worm. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 70 cases diagnosed in the North Metropolitan Area of Barcelona, Spain, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, Lluís; Roure, Sílvia; Fernández-Rivas, Gema; Basile, Luca; Martínez-Cuevas, Octavio; Ballesteros, Ángel-Luis; Ramos, Xavier; Sabrià, Miquel

    2013-08-01

    The nematode Strongyloides stercoralis has a very particular autoinfection life-cycle which leads to chronic infections remaining undetected for decades. However, hyperinfection can occur in patients receiving immunotherapy resulting in high mortality rates. The main objective of this study was to assess the results of a 10-year multicenter surveillance program performed in an area with dense immigration in Barcelona, Spain. From January 2003 to December 2012, all individuals with Strongyloides stercoralis infection attending the four centers with diagnostic capability in the North Metropolitan area of Barcelona were recorded. The annual detection rate was 0.2 new diagnosed cases x10 000 inhabitants/year and 1 case x10 000 immigrants/year. Many patients were immigrants (63; 90.0%), asymptomatic (45; 64.3%) and with a high eosinophil count (63; 90.0%). Immunosuppression was present in 11 (15.7%) patients, among whom two (2.8%) cases of disseminated hyperinfection were recorded. Ivermectin was prescribed in 45 (76.3%) and albendazole in 14 (23.7%). Following treatment seven patients (11.9%) receiving albendazole presented relapse, that is, albendazole failed to clear the parasite in 50% of these drug-treated patients (p Strongyloides stercoralis diagnosed could be considered as imported by immigrants, most being asymptomatic and with eosinophilia. The infection is probably largely underestimated and population-based studies are needed to determine its true prevalence. Meanwhile, diagnosis must be based on active investigation of the helminth (serology and feces culture), especially in immunocompromised patients. The implementation of pre-immunosuppression protocols with the aim of identifying Strongyloides stercoralis is encouraged with empirical treatment with ivermectin being recommended in sites without diagnostic facilities.

  8. Eosinophilic acute appendicitis caused by Strongyloides stercoralis and Enterobius vermicularis in an HIV-positive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Dennis Baroni; Friedrisch, Bruno Kras; Fontanive Junior, Vilmar; da Rocha, Vívian Wünderlich

    2012-03-27

    A 29 year old female HIV-positive patient presented in emergency with acute right lower quadrant abdominal pain, fever, tenderness and positive Blumberg sign. Laboratorial tests revealed eosinophilia, anaemia and leukocytosis. She underwent exploratory laparotomy followed by appendectomy. The pathological analysis of the appendix revealed acute appendicitis, accentuated eosinophilia and infestation by Strongyloides stercoralis and Enterobius vermicularis. She did well after surgery and adequate treatment. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of eosinophilic acute appendicitis caused by these two parasitic worms reported in the medical literature.

  9. Evaluation of techniques for the diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive and HIV negative individuals in the city of Itajaí, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucelene Marchi Blatt

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and intestinal parasites are common in Brazil. Previous studies have shown that infection with Strongyloides stercoralis is frequently associated with HIV infection. Strongyloidiasis is difficult to diagnosis and stool examination with conventional techniques fails to detect the helminth larvae. We made a prospective study, to test the efficacy of the agar plate technique to detect S. stercoralis in 211 HIV-positive patients and 213 HIV-negative patients in the city of Itajaí, Brazil, between September 2001 and June 2002. The feces samples of these patients were processed and analyzed according to the following methods: Lutz, formalin ethyl acetate, Baermann, Harada-Mori and agar plate culture. HIV-positive patients were more frequently infected by S. stercoralis (odds ratio= 5,.687. Among the methods used on fecal specimens, the larvae of S. stercoralis were most efficiently detected by the agar plate (69.7% method, followed by the Baermann and the formalin ethyl acetate methods (48.5% (P=0.01, Lutz (42.4% (P=0.01, and Harada-Mori culture (24% (P=0.001. Therefore agar plate culture is the most efficient method for the detection of S. stercoralis larvae and this technique should be the test of choice, especially in immunocompromised patients.

  10. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in stool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Yasmin; Jeoffreys, Neisha; Watts, Matthew R; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Lee, Rogan

    2013-06-01

    The use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in stool has recently been described. We compared five DNA extraction methods by using normal human stool spiked with Strongyloides ratti and tested by using a real-time PCR. The PowerSoil kit was found to be the best technique in terms of sensitivity and ease of use. The PCR detected DNA extracted from one spiked S. ratti larva diluted 10⁻². The PowerSoil kit was then used to extract DNA from 160 human survey samples. All culture positive specimens with a high and moderate larval load were identified by real-time PCR, but only 15% of specimens with low larval load were positive. Specificity was greater than 99%. The combination of the PowerSoil kit and real-time PCR reliably detected high to moderate larval numbers of S. stercoralis in stools but was less sensitive when the larval load was low.

  11. Epidemiology of Strongyloides stercoralis in northern Italy: results of a multicentre case-control study, February 2013 to July 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonfrate, Dora; Baldissera, Mara; Abrescia, Fabrizio; Bassetti, Matteo; Caramaschi, Giacomo; Giobbia, Mario; Mascarello, Marta; Rodari, Paola; Scattolo, Novella; Napoletano, Giuseppina; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2016-08-04

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth widely diffused in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Autochthonous cases have been also diagnosed sporadically in areas of temperate climate. We aimed at defining the epidemiology of strongyloidiasis in immigrants and Italians living in three northern Italian Regions. Screening for S. stercoralis infection was done with serology, confirmation tests were a second serological method or stool agar culture. A case-control approach was adopted and patients with a peripheral eosinophil count ≥ 500/mcL were classified as cases. Of 2,701 individuals enrolled here 1,351 were cases and 1,350 controls; 86% were Italians, 48% women. Italians testing positive were in 8% (97/1,137) cases and 1% (13/1,178) controls (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 8.2; 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5-14.8), while positive immigrants were in 17% (36/214) cases and in 2% (3/172) controls (aOR 9.6; 95% CI: 2.9-32.4). Factors associated with a higher risk of infection for all study participants were eosinophilia (p < 0.001) and immigration (p = 0.001). Overall, strongyloidiasis was nine-times more frequent in individuals with eosinophilia than in those with normal eosinophil count. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2016.

  12. Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and Other Intestinal Parasites among Institutionalized Mentally Disabled Individuals in Rasht, Northern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin SAEIDINIA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We aimed to determine the status of strongyloidiasis in mentally disabled population in the institutional places in Rasht City, the capital of Guilan Province, northern Iran.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 8 institutions for mentally retarded population in Rasht in 2013. Before collecting the samples, a questionnaire was filled out for each participant by an expert person. A single  stool sample was obtained from each of the 173 subjects and examined using direct wet mount, formalin-ether concentration technique and agar plate culture method. Results: A total of 173 mentally disabled individuals aged 2-57 (25.69±11.56 yr old were studied. Stool examination showed that 51 (29.5% cases were infected with at least one parasite. Of 173 studied cases only 10 (5.8% individuals were infected with pathogenic parasites, of which 2 (1.2% cases were infected with Strongyloides stercoralis and 8 (4.6% with Giardia lamblia. On the other hand, 42 (24.3% of the studied population were infected with non-pathogenic intestinal protozoa such as Blastocystis hominis (n=29, 16.8%, Entamoeba coli (n=16, 9.2% and Endolimax nana (n=4, 2.3%. Mixed protozoal infections were observed in 8 (4.6% individuals.Conclusion: The prevalence rate of S. stercoralis in mentally disabled individuals in Rasht was somewhat higher than those of normal population of the province. The same picture was seen when the prevalence of G. lamblia and non-pathogenic protozoa in normal and mentally disabled populations were compared.

  13. Strongyloides ratti and S. venezuelensis - rodent models of Strongyloides infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Mark; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2017-03-01

    Strongyloides spp. are common parasites of vertebrates and two species, S. ratti and S. venezuelensis, parasitize rats; there are no known species that naturally infect mice. Strongyloides ratti and S. venezuelensis overlap in their geographical range and in these regions co-infections appear to be common. These species have been widely used as tractable laboratory systems in rats as well as mice. The core biology of these two species is similar, but there are clear differences in aspects of their within-host biology as well as in their free-living generation. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that S. ratti and S. venezuelensis are the result of two independent evolutionary transitions to parasitism of rats, which therefore presents an ideal opportunity to begin to investigate the basis of host specificity in Strongyloides spp.

  14. Strongyloides stercoralis y VIH: un caso de infección diseminada en una zona no endémica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D. Rivero

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis affects people who live in the tropics, but it also extends to temperate regions where its low incidence rate may lead to misdiagnose it. Inside the host this nematode may remain silent for many years, nevertheless, in patients infected with HIV its reactivation leads to a disseminated infection in ectopic sites. This report presents the case of a 34 years-old man infected with HIV who lived in a highland area in the province of Córdoba, Argentina. He was admitted to the hospital because of a complicated Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, receiving trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and prednisone treatment. A few days after admission his conditions deteriorated badly, a sputum examination revealed filariform larvae of S. stercoralis, he was then given oral ivermectin medication (200 µg/kg/d. Malabsorption and ileus were installed and he died from multiorganic failure. The evolution of HIV infection to AIDS, a steroids treatment and therapy failure despite oral ivermectin triggered larvae proliferation and lead to disseminated hyperinfection until he died. This report presents not only the first case of disseminated strongyloidiasis detected in our Hospital but also an indigenous infection acquired in a non-endemic area. An awareness of an increased predisposition to this infection, especially in immunocompromised patients with malabsorption and ileus is of paramount importance, since failure to initiate appropriate therapy can lead to catastrophic outcomes, as illustrated in this case report.Strongyloides stercoralis es un geohelminto que afecta a los pobladores que residen tanto en regiones tropicales como templadas. Dentro de sus huéspedes inmunocompetentes puede permanecer inadvertido durante años; no obstante, en pacientes infectados por el VIH su reactivación puede conducir a una diseminación de larvas hacia sitios ectópicos. Este informe muestra el caso de un paciente masculino VIH positivo oriundo de una zona

  15. Hiperinfestação por Strongyloides Stercoralis - doi:10.5020/18061230.2006.p118

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Maria Cavalcante Maia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A estrongiloidíase é uma helmintíase predominantemente intestinal causada pelo Strongyloides stercoralis, sendo o homem seu hospedeiro definitivo, além da principal fonte de infecção. Este trabalho objetivou relatar um caso de identificação laboratorial de larva de Strongyloides stercolaris no líquido ascítico de um paciente do sexo masculino, 49 anos, agricultor, etilista há mais de 30 anos, encaminhado ao Hospital Universitário Walter Cantídio, por estar evoluindo com episódios de icterícia associada a aumento do volume abdominal diagnosticado como ascite, vômito, diarréia pastosa e diminuição do volume urinário. No internamento, foi iniciada medicação profilática para Peritonite Bacteriana Espontânea (PBE, bem como reposição de vitaminas, hidratação venosa e diuréticos, sem sucesso terapêutico. A partir de achados no líquido ascítico de presença de larvas de Strongyloides stercolaris em atividade, o quadro foi interpretado como estrongiloidíase disseminada em paciente imunocomprometido por hepatopatia avançada e alcoólica. O paciente evoluiu com quadro de choque caracterizado por hipotensão e hipotermia, tendo chegado a fazer uso de drogas vasoativas de forma não responsiva. O quadro evoluiu para óbito. Os autores chamam a atenção para a importância do diagnóstico e tratamento precoce da estrongiloidíase, principalmente em pacientes imunodeprimidos.

  16. Comparison of Nested Polymerase Chain Reaction and Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction with Parasitological Methods for Detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in Human Fecal Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifdini, Meysam; Mirhendi, Hossein; Ashrafi, Keyhan; Hosseini, Mostafa; Mohebali, Mehdi; Khodadadi, Hossein; Kia, Eshrat Beigom

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR methods for detection of Strongyloides stercoralis in fecal samples compared with parasitological methods. A total of 466 stool samples were examined by conventional parasitological methods (formalin ether concentration [FEC] and agar plate culture [APC]). DNA was extracted using an in-house method, and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and 18S ribosomal genes were amplified by nested PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Among 466 samples, 12.7% and 18.2% were found infected with S. stercoralis by FEC and APC, respectively. DNA of S. stercoralis was detected in 18.9% and 25.1% of samples by real-time PCR and nested PCR, respectively. Considering parasitological methods as the diagnostic gold standard, the sensitivity and specificity of nested PCR were 100% and 91.6%, respectively, and that of real-time PCR were 84.7% and 95.8%, respectively. However, considering sequence analyzes of the selected nested PCR products, the specificity of nested PCR is increased. In general, molecular methods were superior to parasitological methods. They were more sensitive and more reliable in detection of S. stercoralis in comparison with parasitological methods. Between the two molecular methods, the sensitivity of nested PCR was higher than real-time PCR. PMID:26350449

  17. Soil-Transmitted Helminths in Children in a Remote Aboriginal Community in the Northern Territory: Hookworm is Rare but Strongyloides stercoralis and Trichuris trichiura Persist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah C. Holt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: soil-transmitted helminths are a problem worldwide, largely affecting disadvantaged populations. The little data available indicates high rates of infection in some remote Aboriginal communities in Australia. Studies of helminths were carried out in the same remote community in the Northern Territory in 1994–1996 and 2010–2011; (2 Methods: fecal samples were collected from children aged <10 years and examined for helminths by direct smear microscopy. In the 2010–2011 study, some fecal samples were also analyzed by agar plate culture and PCR for Strongyloides stercoralis DNA. Serological analysis of fingerprick dried blood spots using a S. stercoralis NIE antigen was also conducted; (3 Results and Conclusions: a reduction in fecal samples positive for S. stercoralis, hookworm and Trichuris trichiura was seen between the studies in 1994–1996 and 2010–2011, likely reflecting public health measures undertaken in the region to reduce intestinal helminths. Comparison of methods to detect S. stercoralis showed that PCR of fecal samples and serological testing of dried blood spots was at least as sensitive as direct smear microscopy and agar plate culture. These methods have advantages for use in remote field studies.

  18. Hyperinfection by Strongyloides stercoralis probably associated with Rituximab in a patient with mantle cell lymphoma and hyper eosinophilia Hiperinfección por Strongyloides stercoralis probablemente asociada con Rituximab en una paciente con linfoma e hipereosinofilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Nino Incani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The first report to our knowledge, of hyperinfection by Strongyloides stercoralis (HS and hypereosinophilia, associated to immune suppression by Rituximab (the only drug received for the last one year and 10 months, in a patient with mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL, is presented. The patient has a 3-year history of MCL, and developed two accesses of HS during 2008, including meningitis, pneumonia and presence of larvae of S. stercoralis in the lungs. We had a unique chance to look at cytotoxicity of filariform larvae in the expectoration after Ivermectin treatment, showing immobilization and death of larvae, associated with eosinophils attached to the cuticle of the parasite.Se presenta el primer reporte, hasta donde tengamos información, de hiperinfección por Strongyloides stercoralis (HS e hipereosinofilia asociados a inmunosupresión por Rituximab (el único medicamento recibido durante 1 año y 10 meses, en un paciente con linfoma de células del manto (LCM. La paciente tuvo una historia de 3 años con LCM, y desarrolló 2 accesos de HS durante el 2008, incluyendo meningitis, neumonía y presencia de larvas de S. stercoralis en los pulmones. Se tuvo la oportunidad única de observar la citotoxicidad contra las larvas filariformes en la expectoración, luego del tratamiento con Ivermectina, mostrando la inmovilización y muerte de las larvas, asociada a la presencia de eosinófilos adheridos a la cutícula del parásito.

  19. First molecular identification and report of genetic diversity of Strongyloides stercoralis, a current major soil-transmitted helminth in humans from Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laymanivong, Sakhone; Hangvanthong, Bouasy; Insisiengmay, Bounnaloth; Vanisaveth, Viengxay; Laxachack, Pinnakhone; Jongthawin, Jurairat; Sanpool, Oranuch; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Sadaow, Lakkhana; Phosuk, Issarapong; Rodpai, Rutchanee; Maleewong, Wanchai; Intapan, Pewpan M

    2016-08-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a major soil-transmitted helminth (STH) disease that affects people worldwide. We present updated data on prevalence in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR) in 2015, arising from a community cross-sectional helminthiasis survey. Fecal samples were collected from 327 individuals across three provinces in Lao PDR (Luang Prabang in the north, Khammouane in the center, and Champasack in the south). Agar plate culture and Kato-Katz methods were used to examine duplicate stool samples from each participant to detect Strongyloides stercoralis and co-infecting helminths. Overall prevalences of S. strercoralis human hookworm, Taenia spp., Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Enterobius vermicularis were 41.0, 28.1, 4.9, 4.0, 1.5, and 0.9 %, respectively. The prevalence of miscellaneous trematodiases (including opisthorchiasis) was 37.9 % and of Schistosoma mekongi infection was 0.3 %. Strongyloidiasis is a current major STH disease in Lao PDR. We also report the molecular-phylogenetic identification of S. stercoralis adult males collected from 40 representative human strongyliodiasis fecal samples. DNA was extracted, amplified, and sequenced from a portion of the mitochondrial cox1 gene and the nuclear 18S ribosomal DNA. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that all specimens sequenced belonged to S. stercoralis (Bavay, 1876) Stiles and Hassall, 1902. The cox1 sequences exhibited great diversity (24 haplotypes) in Lao PDR. This is the first molecular identification and report of genetic diversity of S. stercoralis in humans from Lao PDR. An effective parasite control program is needed to reduce the serious health impacts.

  20. Albendazole and ivermectin for the control of soil-transmitted helminths in an area with high prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm in northwestern Argentina: A community-based pragmatic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Echazú

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recommendations for soil-transmitted helminth (STH control give a key role to deworming of school and pre-school age children with albendazole or mebendazole; which might be insufficient to achieve adequate control, particularly against Strongyloides stercoralis. The impact of preventive chemotherapy (PC against STH morbidity is still incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a community-based program with albendazole and ivermectin in a high transmission setting for S. stercoralis and hookworm.Community-based pragmatic trial conducted in Tartagal, Argentina; from 2012 to 2015. Six communities (5070 people were enrolled for community-based PC with albendazole and ivermectin. Two communities (2721 people were re-treated for second and third rounds. STH prevalence, anemia and malnutrition were explored through consecutive surveys. Anthropometric assessment of children, stool analysis, complete blood count and NIE-ELISA serology for S. stercoralis were performed.STH infection was associated with anemia and stunting in the baseline survey that included all communities and showed a STH prevalence of 47.6% (almost exclusively hookworm and S. stercoralis. Among communities with multiple interventions, STH prevalence decreased from 62% to 23% (p<0.001 after the first PC; anemia also diminished from 52% to 12% (p<0.001. After two interventions S. stercoralis seroprevalence declined, from 51% to 14% (p<0.001 and stunting prevalence decreased, from 19% to 12% (p = 0.009.Hookworm' infections are associated with anemia in the general population and nutritional impairment in children. S. stercoralis is also associated with anemia. Community-based deworming with albendazole and ivermectin is effective for the reduction of STH prevalence and morbidity in communities with high prevalence of hookworm and S. stercoralis.

  1. Albendazole and ivermectin for the control of soil-transmitted helminths in an area with high prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm in northwestern Argentina: A community-based pragmatic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Marisa; Vargas, Paola A.; Cajal, Silvana P.; Cimino, Ruben O.; Heredia, Viviana; Caropresi, Silvia; Paredes, Gladys; Arias, Luis M.; Abril, Marcelo; Gold, Silvia; Lammie, Patrick; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Recommendations for soil-transmitted helminth (STH) control give a key role to deworming of school and pre-school age children with albendazole or mebendazole; which might be insufficient to achieve adequate control, particularly against Strongyloides stercoralis. The impact of preventive chemotherapy (PC) against STH morbidity is still incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a community-based program with albendazole and ivermectin in a high transmission setting for S. stercoralis and hookworm. Methodology Community-based pragmatic trial conducted in Tartagal, Argentina; from 2012 to 2015. Six communities (5070 people) were enrolled for community-based PC with albendazole and ivermectin. Two communities (2721 people) were re-treated for second and third rounds. STH prevalence, anemia and malnutrition were explored through consecutive surveys. Anthropometric assessment of children, stool analysis, complete blood count and NIE-ELISA serology for S. stercoralis were performed. Principal findings STH infection was associated with anemia and stunting in the baseline survey that included all communities and showed a STH prevalence of 47.6% (almost exclusively hookworm and S. stercoralis). Among communities with multiple interventions, STH prevalence decreased from 62% to 23% (p<0.001) after the first PC; anemia also diminished from 52% to 12% (p<0.001). After two interventions S. stercoralis seroprevalence declined, from 51% to 14% (p<0.001) and stunting prevalence decreased, from 19% to 12% (p = 0.009). Conclusions Hookworm’ infections are associated with anemia in the general population and nutritional impairment in children. S. stercoralis is also associated with anemia. Community-based deworming with albendazole and ivermectin is effective for the reduction of STH prevalence and morbidity in communities with high prevalence of hookworm and S. stercoralis. PMID:28991899

  2. Therapy of the experimental infection by Strongyloides venezuelensis in rats with injectable ivermectin or levamizole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Campos

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available For the therapy of human strongyloidiasis, are necessary effective drugs to eliminate both larvae and adult worm parasitism, which may also be used by parenteral route, to obviate the particular conditions presented by many patients. A study based on the experimental infection by Strongyloides venezuelensis in rats was done, administering injectable ivermectin or levamizole. Both drugs were shown to be active, when used in single doses of 0.2 to 0.5 mg/kg of ivermectin, or 26 mg/kg for levamizole. Ivermectin was slightly more effective as far as larval stage of the infection is concerned, and the same happened for levamisole for the adult worm stage. Promising perspectives are visualized to improve the therapy of patients with serious disseminated infection by Strongyloides stercoralis.

  3. Infección por Strongyloides stercoralis con eosinofilia masiva y hepatitis colestásica

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pinal Fernández, I; Molina Romero, I; Sulleiro Igual, E; Segura García, A

    2011-01-01

    ...% de los casos cursan con eosinofilia. La infección aguda se produce por un primer contacto con el parásito. Inicialmente se observan lesiones dérmicas en el punto de entrada del S. stercoralis , posteriormente se produce la sintomatología pulmonar y a las pocas semanas aparece la clínica digestiva. A su vez la infección crónica en caso de ser ...

  4. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Strongyloides stercoralis, Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Blastocystis spp. isolates in school children in Cubal, Western Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacal, Elena; Saugar, José M; de Lucio, Aida; Hernández-de-Mingo, Marta; Robinson, Elena; Köster, Pamela C; Aznar-Ruiz-de-Alegría, María L; Espasa, Mateu; Ninda, Arlette; Gandasegui, Javier; Sulleiro, Elena; Moreno, Milagros; Salvador, Fernando; Molina, Israel; Rodríguez, Esperanza; Carmena, David

    2018-01-29

    Human infections by the gastrointestinal helminth Strongyloides stercoralis and the enteric protozoans Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Blastocystis spp. are not formally included in the list of 20 neglected tropical diseases prioritised by the World Health Organization. Although largely underdiagnosed and considered of lower public health relevance, these infections have been increasingly demonstrated to cause significant morbidity and even mortality globally, particularly among children living in resource-poor settings. In this cross-sectional survey the prevalence, frequency and molecular diversity of S. stercoralis, G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Blastocystis spp. were investigated in a school children population in the province of Benguela (Angola). A total of 351 stool samples were collected during January to June 2015. The presence of S. stercoralis and G. duodenalis was confirmed by qPCR methods. Giardia duodenalis assemblages and sub-assemblages were determined by multilocus sequence-based genotyping of the glutamate dehydrogenase and β-giardin genes of the parasite. Detection and identification of Cryptosporidium and Blastocystis species and subtypes was carried out by amplification and sequencing of a partial fragment of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene of both protozoan. Analyses of risk factors potentially associated with the transmission of these pathogens were also conducted. Prevalences of S. stercoralis, G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Blastocystis spp. were estimated at 21.4% (95% CI: 17.1-25.7%), 37.9% (95% CI: 32.8-43.0%), 2.9% (95% CI: 1.1-4.5%) and 25.6% (95% CI: 21.18-30.2%), respectively. Overall, 64.1% (225/351) of the children were infected by at least one of the pathogens investigated. Sequence analyses of the 28 G. duodenalis isolates that were successfully genotyped allowed the identification of sub-assemblages AI (14.3%), AII (14.3%), BIII (7.1%) and BIV (25.0%). Discordant typing results AII

  5. A loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for Strongyloides stercoralis in stool that uses a visual detection method with SYTO-82 fluorescent dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Matthew R; James, Gregory; Sultana, Yasmin; Ginn, Andrew N; Outhred, Alexander C; Kong, Fanrong; Verweij, Jaco J; Iredell, Jonathan R; Chen, Sharon C-A; Lee, Rogan

    2014-02-01

    An assay to detect Strongyloides stercoralis in stool specimens was developed using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method. Primers were based on the 28S ribosomal subunit gene. The reaction conditions were optimized and SYTO-82 fluorescent dye was used to allow real-time and visual detection of the product. The product identity was confirmed with restriction enzyme digestion, cloning, and sequence analysis. The assay was specific when tested against DNA from bacteria, fungi and parasites, and 30 normal stool samples. Analytical sensitivity was to LAMP method. On the basis of these findings, the assay warrants further clinical validation.

  6. Parasitological and molecular diagnosis in experimental Strongyloides venezuelensis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Fabiana Martins; Sitta, Renata Barnabé; Malta, Fernanda Mello; Gottardi, Maiara; Corral, Marcelo Andreetta; Gryschek, Ronaldo César Borges; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Strongyloides venezuelensis is a parasitic nematode of rats which is frequently used as a model to study human and animal strongyloidiasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between parasitological and molecular diagnosis in Strongyloides venezuelensis infection. PCR assays were used to detect S. venezuelensis DNA in fecal samples obtained from experimentally infected Rattus norvegicus. The results showed a higher sensitivity of the PCR assay in detecting the infection compared to parasitological methods.

  7. The detergent fraction is effective in the detection of IgG anti-Strongyloides stercoralis in serum samples from immunocompromised individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Herculano; de Carvalho, Célio José Victal; Levenhagen, Marcelo Arantes; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2014-12-01

    Human strongyloidiasis is an intestinal helminthiasis that can be fatal particularly in cases of immunosuppression. The aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the detergent fraction (D), purified from total saline extract (SE) of Strongyloides venezuelensis, in the detection of anti-Strongyloides stercoralis IgG antibodies in serum samples from individuals coming from endemic areas for strongyloidiasis and presenting immunocompromised conditions: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV(+)), diabetes mellitus type 2, cancer, tuberculosis and alcoholism. Serum samples from 93 individuals were analyzed by ELISA, as follows: Group 1: 30 immunocompromised individuals with strongyloidiasis; Group 2: 33 immunocompromised individuals without strongyloidiasis and Group 3: 30 healthy individuals. The total saline extract (SE) and detergent fraction (D) showed a sensitivity of 73.33 and 83.33%, and specificity of 82.15 and 86.36%, respectively. The detergent fraction was effective to detect anti-S. stercoralis IgG antibodies in immunocompromised individuals with strongyloidiasis and may be applied as an important tool in the immunodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis related to immunosuppression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) Assay for Strongyloides stercoralis in Stool That Uses a Visual Detection Method with SYTO-82 Fluorescent Dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Matthew R.; James, Gregory; Sultana, Yasmin; Ginn, Andrew N.; Outhred, Alexander C.; Kong, Fanrong; Verweij, Jaco J.; Iredell, Jonathan R.; Chen, Sharon C-A.; Lee, Rogan

    2014-01-01

    An assay to detect Strongyloides stercoralis in stool specimens was developed using the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method. Primers were based on the 28S ribosomal subunit gene. The reaction conditions were optimized and SYTO-82 fluorescent dye was used to allow real-time and visual detection of the product. The product identity was confirmed with restriction enzyme digestion, cloning, and sequence analysis. The assay was specific when tested against DNA from bacteria, fungi and parasites, and 30 normal stool samples. Analytical sensitivity was to < 10 copies of target sequence in a plasmid and up to a 10-2 dilution of DNA extracted from a Strongyloides ratti larva spiked into stool. Sensitivity was increased when further dilutions were made in water, indicative of reduced reaction inhibition. Twenty-seven of 28 stool samples microscopy and polymerase chain reaction positive for S. stercoralis were positive with the LAMP method. On the basis of these findings, the assay warrants further clinical validation. PMID:24323513

  9. Transcripts analysis of infective larvae of an intestinal nematode, Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ayako; Nagayasu, Eiji; Nishimaki, Anna; Sawaguchi, Akira; Yanagawa, Sayaka; Maruyama, Haruhiko

    2011-01-01

    Free-living infective larvae of Strongyloides nematodes fulfill a number of requirements for the successful infection. They need to endure a long wait in harsh environmental conditions, like temperature, salinity, and pH, which might change drastically from time to time. Infective larvae also have to deal with pathogens and potentially hazardous free-living microbes in the environment. In addition, infective larvae must recognize the adequate host properly, and start skin penetration as quickly as possible. All these tasks are essentially important for the survival of Strongyloides nematodes, however, our knowledge is extremely limited in any one of these aspects. In order to understand how Strongyloides infective larvae meet these requirements, we examined transcripts of infective larvae by randomly sequencing cDNA clones constructed from S. venezuelensis infective larvae. After assembling successfully sequenced clones, we obtained 162 unique singletons and contigs, of which 84 had been significantly annotated. Annotated genes included those for respiratory enzymes, heat-shock proteins, neuromuscular proteins, proteases, and immunodominant antigens. Genes for lipase, small heat-shock protein, globin-like protein and cytochrome c oxidase were most abundantly transcribed, though genes of unknown functions were also abundantly transcribed. There were no hits found against NCBI or NEMABASE4 for 37 (22.3%) EST out of the total 162 EST. Although most of the transcripts were not infective larva-specific, the expression of respiration related proteins was most actively transcribed in the infective larva stage. The expression of astacin-like metalloprotease, small heat-shock protein, S. stercoralis L3Nie antigen homologue, and one unannotated and 2 novel genes was highly specific for the infective larva stage. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Parasitological and transcriptomic comparison of Strongyloides ratti infections in natural and in suboptimal permissive hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleta, Tegegn G; Rödelsperger, Christian; Streit, Adrian

    2017-09-01

    The nematode genus Strongyloides consists of fairly species-specific small intestinal parasites of various vertebrates, among them the human pathogen S. stercoralis. Between the parthenogenetic parasitic generations these worms can also form single facultative sexual free-living generations. In addition to their primary hosts, several species can also live more or less well in other permissive hosts, which are sometimes not very closely related with the normal host. For example, S. stercoralis can also infect dogs and non-human primates. Here we compare the infection and reproductive success over time and the gene expression profiles as determined by quantitative sequencing of S. ratti parasitizing in its natural host rat and in the permissive host gerbil. We show that in gerbils fewer infective larvae successfully establish in the host, but those that do accomplish this survive and reproduce for longer and produced a higher proportion of males during the first two month of infection. Globally, the gene expression profiles in the two hosts are very similar. Among the relatively few differentially expressed genes, astacin-like and acetylcholinesterase genes are prominently represented. In the future it will be interesting to see if these changes in the suboptimal host are indeed ecologically sensible responses to the different host. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Immunoblotting using Strongyloides venezuelensis larvae, parthenogenetic females or eggs extracts for the diagnosis of experimentally infected immunosuppressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart de Carvalho, Edson Fernando; Neto de Sousa, José Eduardo; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia Ribeiro; da Cunha-Junior, Jair Pereira; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2015-10-01

    The nematode Strongyloides stercoralis is responsible for strongyloidiasis in humans. Diagnosis of infection occurs through detection of larvae in feces, but low elimination of larvae often hampers the detection of disease, particularly in cases of patient immunosuppression. Immunodiagnostic tests have been developed; however obtaining S. stercoralis larvae for the production of homologous antigen extract is technically difficult. Thus, the use different developmental forms of Strongyloides venezuelensis has become an alternative method for the production of antigen extracts. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunoblotting using alkaline extracts from S. venezuelensis L3 larvae, parthenogenetic females or eggs to test detection of experimental strongyloidiasis associated with immunosuppression. Immunocompetent and immunosuppressed male rats were experimentally infected, and serum sample from all animals were obtained at 0, 5, 8 13, and 21 days post infection (d.p.i.). Immunoblotting was evaluated for use in detection of anti-S. venezuelensis IgG in both experimental rat groups. The larval extract immunoblotting profile had the most immunoreactive fractions in the immunosuppressed group beginning at 5 d.p.i., while the immunocompetent group reactivity began on 8 d.p.i. Immunoreactive protein fractions of 17 kDa present in larval alkaline extract presented as possible markers of infection in immunosuppressed rats. It is concluded that all extracts using immunoblotting have diagnostic potential in experimental strongyloidiasis, particularly larval extract in immunosuppressed individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dexamethasone Effects in the Strongyloides venezuelensis Infection in A Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Eleuza R.; Carlos, Daniela; Sorgi, Carlos A.; Ramos, Simone G.; Souza, Daniela I.; Soares, Edson G.; Costa-Cruz, Julia M.; Ueta, Marlene T.; Aronoff, David M.; Faccioli, Lúcia H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of glucocorticoids on the immune response to Strongyloides venezuelensis in mice. Balb/c mice were infected with S. venezuelensis and treated with Dexamethasone (Dexa) or vehicle. Dexa treatment increased circulating blood neutrophil numbers and inhibited eosinophil and mononuclear cell accumulation in the blood, bronchoalveolar, and peritoneal fluid compared with control animals. Moreover, Dexa decreased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-3 (IL-3), IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and IL-12 production in the lungs and circulating immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1), IgG2a, and IgE antibody levels while increasing the overall parasite burden in the feces and intestine. Dexa treatment enhanced the fertility of female nematodes relative to untreated and infected mice. In summary, the alterations in the immune response induced by Dexa resulted in a blunted, aberrant immune response associated with increased parasite burden. This phenomenon is similar to that observed in S. stercoralis-infected humans who are taking immunosuppressive or antiinflammatory drugs, including corticosteroids. PMID:21633034

  13. Diagnosis of the strongyloid nematode Strongyloides venezuelensis in experimentally infected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, P D; Malta, F M; Meisel, D M C L; Corral, M A; Pinho, J R; Costa-Cruz, J M; Chieffi, P P; Gryschek, R C B; Paula, F M

    2016-07-01

    Strongyloides venezuelensis is an intestinal nematode of rats, frequently used as a model for studying human and animal strongyloidiasis. In the present study, we evaluated parasitological, serological and molecular methods for the diagnosis of experimental S. venezuelensis in rats, Rattus norvegicus. Blood and faecal samples were collected and analysed up to 60 days post infection (pi) with adult worm recovery occurring from 5 to 45 days pi. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), serum levels of IgG antibodies increased up to 28 days pi, thereafter decreasing by day 60 pi. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays detected S. venezuelensis DNA in faecal samples of rats from 5 to 21 days pi. The present study therefore represents the first step towards improving the diagnosis of experimental strongyloidiasis.

  14. Studies on prevalence of Strongyloides infection in Holambra and Maceió, Brazil, by the agar plate faecal culture method Estudos sobre a prevalência da infecção por Strongyloides em Holambra e em Maceió, Brasil, pelo método de cultura de fezes em placa de ágar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Kobayashi

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in three areas of Brazil was surveyed by a recently developed faecal culture method (an agar plate culture. The Strongyloides infection was confirmed in 11.3% of 432 subjects examined. The diagnostic efficacy of the agar plate culture was as high as 93.9% compared to only 28.5% and 26.5% by the Harada-Mori filter paper culture and faecal concentration methods, when faecal samples were examined simultaneously by these three methods. Among the 49 positive samples, about 60% were confirmed to be positive only by the agar plate culture. These results indicate that the agar plate culture is a sensitive new tool for the correct diagnosis of chronic Strongyloides infection.Foi feito levantamento sobre a prevalência da infecção por Strongyloides stercoralis em três áreas do Brasil, através do desenvolvimento de método de cultura de fezes (cultura em placa de ágar. A infecção por Strongyloides foi confirmada em 11,3% de 432 pacientes examinados. A eficácia do diagnóstico pela cultura em placa de ágar foi de 93,9% comparado com apenas 28,5% e 26,5% pelo método de Harada-Mori de cultura em papel de filtro e método de concentração de fezes, quando amostras de fezes foram examinadas simultaneamente por estes três métodos. Entre as 49 amostras positivas, aproximadamente 60% foram confirmadas como positivas somente pela cultura em placa de ágar. Estes resultados indicam que a cultura em placa de ágar é um novo método sensível para o diagnóstico correto da infecção crônica pelo Strongyloides.

  15. INFECCIÓN POR STRONGYLOIDES STERCORALIS: METANÁLISIS SOBRE EVALUACIÓN DE MÉTODOS DIAGNÓSTICOS CONVENCIONALES (1980-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Campo Polanco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamentos: Las investigaciones sobre los métodos diagnósticos de estrongiloidiasis presentan divergencias en su validez y son incompletas al no reportar datos sobre seguridad, eficiencia y desempeño diagnóstico. El objetivo del trabajo fue evaluar la validez, desempeño, eficiencia y seguridad diagnósticas de cuatro métodos parasitológicos convencionales para la detección de la infección por Strongyloides stercoralis. Métodos: Revisión sistemática con metanálisis, búsqueda exhaustiva y reproducible de literatura en seis bases de datos para el período 1980-2013. Se evaluó la calidad de los artículos y se realizó metanálisis con el modelo de efectos aleatorios, calculando sensibilidad, especificidad, cocientes de probabilidad, valores predictivos, proporción de resultados falsos, exactitud, razón de odds, índice J de Youden y curva ROC, usando Meta-DiSc(es y Epidat 3.1. Resultados: Se incluyeron 11 estudios con 9.025 individuos. La sensibilidad del método de Baermann fue del 72%, cociente de probabilidad positivo (CP+ 228 y cociente de probabilidad negativo (CP- 0,32. El en placa de ágar (CPA presentó una sensibilidad de 89%, CP+ 341 y CP- 0,11. En el examen directo en heces la sensibilidad fue del 21%; el CP+ 67 y el CP- 0,67. La sensibilidad de la concentración formol-éter fue del 48%, el CP+ 110 y el CP- 0,59. Áreas bajo la curva ROC de 0,999 en Baermann y CPA; 0,977 en el examen directo en heces y 0,829 en concentración formol-éter; la especificidad fue de 100% en todas las pruebas. Conclusiones: Los cuatro métodos parasitológicos convencionales evaluados en este estudio para la detección de S. stercoralis pueden ser útiles, sin embargo, resulta más idóneo implementar el en placa de ágar y el método de Baermann.

  16. Current progress toward vaccine and passive immunization approaches for Strongyloides spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenhagen, Marcelo Arantes; Conte, Hélio; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2016-12-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a helminth parasite that can infect millions of people worldwide, particularly in tropical, subtropical and temperate regions with poor sanitation. Several aspects of epidemiology, biology and host-parasite interactions of S. stercoralis have been studied, and substantial knowledge has been acquired; however, very few studies on immunotherapeutic control strategies to prevent infection and disease in humans have been conducted. Therefore, this article reviews the current progress and targets toward vaccine and passive immunization approaches for Strongyloides spp. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Heterologous antigen extract in ELISA for the detection of human IgE anti-Strongyloides stercoralis Extrato antigênico heterólogo em ELISA para a detecção de IgE humana anti-Strongyloides stercoralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Maria Costa-Cruz

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides ratti larval extract was used for the standardization of ELISA to detect genus-specific IgE in human strongyloidiasis. Forty serum samples from monoinfected patients shedding S. stercoralis larvae (Group I, 40 from patients with other intestinal parasites (Group II, and 40 from copronegative healthy subjects (Group III were analyzed. Genus-specific IgE levels (ELISA Index: EI were significantly higher in the group I (EI = 1.43 than groups II (EI = 0.70 and III (EI = 0.71, showing positivity rates of 55%, 2.5% and 0%, respectively. Similarly, sera from copropositive patients had significantly higher levels of total IgE (866 IU/mL as compared to those from group II (302 IU/mL and III (143 IU/mL. A significant positive correlation was found between levels of Strongyloides specific-IgE and total IgE in sera from patients with strongyloidiasis. In conclusion, S. ratti heterologous extract showed to be a useful tool for detecting genus-specific IgE by ELISA, contributing for a better characterization of the immune response profile in human strongyloidiasis.Extrato contendo larvas de Strongyloides ratti foi usado na padronização de um ELISA para detecção de IgE gênero-específica na estrongiloidíase humana. Foram analisadas 40 amostras de soro de pacientes monoinfectados que estavam eliminando larvas de S. stercoralis nas fezes (Grupo I, 40 de pacientes com outros parasitos intestinais (Grupo II, e 40 indivíduos copronegativos (Grupo III. Níveis de IgE gênero-específica (índice ELISA: EI foram significativamente maiores no Grupo I (EI = 1,43 do que no II (EI = 0,70 e III (EI = 0,71, mostrando positividade de 55%, 2,5% e 0%, respectivamente. Similarmente, soros dos pacientes copropositivos (Grupo I apresentaram níveis significativamente maiores de IgE total (866 IU/mL quando comparados com os soros dos Grupo II (302 IU/mL e III (143 IU/mL. Uma significativa correlação positiva foi encontrada entre os níveis de IgE espec

  18. The Strongyloides (Nematoda) of sheep and the predominant Strongyloides of cattle form at least two different, genetically isolated populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Alexander G; Mayer, Werner E; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Streit, Adrian

    2008-10-20

    Strongyloides sp. (Nematoda) are very wide spread small intestinal parasites of vertebrates that can form a facultative free-living generation. Most authors considered all Strongyloides of farm ruminants to belong to the same species, namely Strongyloides papillosus (Wedl, 1856). Here we show that, at least in southern Germany, the predominant Strongyloides found in cattle and the Strongyloides found in sheep belong to separate, genetically isolated populations. While we did find mixed infections in cattle, one form clearly dominated. This variety, in turn, was never found in sheep, indicating that the two forms have different host preferences. We also present molecular tools for distinguishing the two varieties, and an analysis of their phylogenetic relationship with the human parasite Strongyloides stercoralis and the major laboratory model species Strongyloides ratti. Based on our findings we propose that Strongyloides from sheep and the predominant Strongyloides from cattle should be considered separate species as it had already been proposed by [Brumpt, E., 1921. Recherches sur le determinisme des sexes et de l'evolution des Anguillules parasites (Strongyloides). Comptes rendu hebdomadaires des séances et mémoires de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 85, 149-152], but was largely ignored by later authors. For nomenclature, we follow [Brumpt, E., 1921. Recherches sur le determinisme des sexes et de l'evolution des Anguillules parasites (Strongyloides). Comptes rendu hebdomadaires des séances et mémoires de la Société de Biologie et de ses filiales 85, 149-152] and use the name S. papillosus for the Strongyloides of sheep and the name Strongyloides vituli for the predominant Strongyloides of cattle.

  19. Immunological responses elicited by different infection regimes with Strongyloides ratti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Paterson

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Nematode infections are a ubiquitous feature of vertebrate life. In nature, such nematode infections are acquired by continued exposure to infective stages over a prolonged period of time. By contrast, experimental laboratory infections are typically induced by the administration of a single (and often large dose of infective stages. Previous work has shown that the size of an infection dose can have significant effects on anti-nematode immune responses. Here we investigated the effect of different infection regimes of Strongyloides ratti, comparing single and repeated dose infections, on the host immune response that was elicited. We considered and compared infections of the same size, but administered in different ways. We considered infection size in two ways: the maximum dose of worms administered and the cumulative worm exposure time. We found that both infection regimes resulted in Th2-type immune response, characterised by IL4 and IL13 produced by S. ratti stimulated mesenteric lymph node cells, anti-S. ratti IgG(1 and intestinal rat mast cell protease II (RMCPII production. We observed some small quantitative immunological differences between different infection regimes, in which the concentration of IL4, IL13, anti-S. ratti IgG(1 and IgG(2a and RMCPII were affected. However, these differences were quantitatively relatively modest compared with the temporal dynamics of the anti-S. ratti immune response as a whole.

  20. [Destruction of Strongyloides venezuelensis infective larvae by fungi Duddingtonia flagrans, Arthrobotrys robusta and Monacrosporium sinense].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; Araujo, Juliana Milani; Silva, André Ricardo e; Araújo, Jackson Victor de; Carvalho, Rogério Oliva; Tavela, Alexandre de Oliveira; Silva, Manoel Eduardo da; Fernandes, Fernanda Mara; Melo, Alan Lane de

    2011-01-01

    Strongyloides venezuelensis has been used as a model for studying human strongyloidosis. This study aimed to compare the ability of predatory nematophagous fungi Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001), Arthrobotrys robusta (I-31) and Monacrosporium sinense (SF53) and on infective larvae (L3) of Strongyloides venezuelensis in laboratory conditions on 2% water-agar medium. At the end of the experiment, the percentage reductions of Strongyloides venezuelensi L3 were: 93% (AC001), 77.2% (I-31) and 65.2% (SF53). The nematophagous fungi were able to capture and destroy the L3 in vitro and can be used as biological controllers of Strongyloides venezuelensi.

  1. Importance of a Rapid and Accurate Diagnosis inStrongyloides Stercoralisand Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 Co-infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Olga; Berini, Carolina A; Waldbaum, Carlos; Avagnina, Alejandra; Juarez, María; Repetto, Silvia; Sorda, Juan; Biglione, Mirna

    2017-01-01

    Strongyloides (S.) stercoralis and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1 (HTLV-1) share some endemic regions such as Japan, Jamaica, and South America and are mostly diagnosed elsewhere in immigrants from endemic areas. This co-infection has not been documented in Argentina although both pathogens are endemic in the Northwest. We present a case of S. stercoralis and HTLV-1 co-infection with an initial presentation due to gastrointestinal symptoms which presented neither eosinophilia nor the presence of larvae in stool samples in a non-endemic area for these infections. A young Peruvian woman living in Buenos Aires attended several emergency rooms and finally ended up admitted in a gastroenterology ward due to incoercible vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, fever, and weight loss. Gastrointestinal symptoms started 3 months before she returned to Argentina from a trip to Peru. She presented malnutrition and abdominal distension parameters. HIV-1 and other immunodeficiencies were discarded. The serial coproparasitological test was negative. Computed tomography showed diffuse thickening of duodenal and jejunal walls. At the beginning, vasculitis was suspected and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. The patient worsened rapidly. Skin, new enteral biopsies, and a new set of coproparasitological samples revealed S. stercoralis . Then, HTLV-1 was suspected and infection was confirmed. Ivermectin and albendazole were administrated, until the stool sample remained negative for 2 weeks. Larvae were not observed in fresh stool, Ritchie method, and agar culture 1 week post-treatment. Although she required initial support with parenteral nutrition due to oral intolerance she slowly progressed favorably. It has been highly recommended to include a rapid and sensitive PCR strategy in the algorithm to confirm Strongyloides infection, which has demonstrated to improve early diagnosis in patients at-risk of disseminated strongyloidiasis.

  2. Central Nervous System Strongyloidiasis and Cryptococcosis in an HIV-Infected Patient Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome with central nervous system involvement, in a patient with late human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection starting antiretroviral therapy, in whom Strongyloides stercoralis larvae and Cryptococcus neoformans were isolated antemortem from cerebrospinal fluid. Our patient was not from an endemic region for the parasite, so strongyloidiasis was not originally suspected. For this reason, we conclude that Strongyloides stercoralis infection should be suspected in HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in order to avoid potential fatal outcomes.

  3. Fatal outcome of a hyperinfection syndrome despite successful eradication of Strongyloides with subcutaneous ivermectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, H P; Galle, J; Chiodini, P L; Rupp, J; Birke, R; Vollmer, E; Zabel, P; Lange, C

    2005-10-01

    We report the case of a 77-year-old man who developed a Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome following immunosuppressive therapy more than 60 years after he moved away from an area endemic for Strongyloides stercoralis. Successful eradication of the nematode was achieved with an off label subcutaneous formulation of ivermectin. However, the patient subsequently died from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Despite a high wormload in the stool and sputum of the patient and delayed infection control measures in the hospital, testing of the medical staff revealed a very low risk of Strongyloides transmission among healthcare workers.

  4. Effect of Bifidobacterium animalis on mice infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Sequeira, Teresa Cristina Goulart; David, Érica Boarato; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Guimarães, Semíramis; Masseno, Ana Paula Batista; Katagiri, Satie; Sequeira, Julio Lopes

    2014-01-01

    The administration of viable Bifidobacterium animalis was tested to induce resistance against Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in mice. Effects on parasite burden, worm length, egg output, and intestinal mucosal histology were evaluated. The oral administration of B. animalis, strain 04450B, starting 14 days before the inoculation of nematode larvae significantly decreased the worm burden and egg output. In probiotic treated animals, the percent reduction of adult worms in the intestine was of 33% and the reduction of egg production was of 21%, compared with those of the control group. The duodenum villous height and villous/crypt ratio were significantly higher in probiotic-treated mice, indicating that this group could be experiencing less intestinal damage. The present findings revealed that the administration of B. animalis for the amelioration of host response to nematode infections is biologically plausible and could have some potential for impacting public health. Meanwhile, further study is needed to delineate the nature and identity of the factor(s) involved in these beneficial effects.

  5. Strongyloides colitis is a lethal mimic of ulcerative colitis: the key morphologic differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Zhenhong; Kundu, Uma R; Abadeer, Rania A; Wanger, Audrey

    2009-04-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis colitis is a severe, but easily curable, form of strongyloidiasis that carries a high mortality rate if untreated. Autoinfection characteristic of Strongyloides stercoralis frequently makes the infection a life-long disease unless it is effectively treated. Our experience with 4 cases of Strongyloides colitis prompted us to assess the clinical outcome of the disease by literature review. In this case series, the misdiagnosis and resultant mortality rates of Strongyloides colitis are 52% and 39.1%, respectively. A low index of suspicion and morphologic resemblance to ulcerative colitis were the main sources of diagnostic error. Ulcerative colitis alone accounted for 38.5% of the erroneous diagnoses. Features of Strongyloides colitis that contrast with those of ulcerative colitis include (1) skip pattern of the inflammation, (2) distal attenuation of the disease, (3) eosinophil-rich infiltrates, (4) relative intact crypt architecture, and (5) frequent involvement of submucosa. We also found that history of steroid therapy, chronic colitis refractory to conventional immune-modifying management, and endoscopic finding of distal attenuation of the colitis are helpful clues. It is also our experience that if Strongyloides colitis is included in the differential diagnosis, the correct diagnosis can usually be made. Current therapy with ivermectin or albendazole is very effective at a cure rate greater than 98%. We believe that the misdiagnosis and mortality rates of this curable, but often, unnecessarily deadly, infectious disease are alarming and warrant efforts to increase the awareness of the disease.

  6. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II but not MHC class I molecules are required for efficient control of Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rosângela M; Silva, Neide M; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia R; Cardoso, Cristina R; Alves, Ronaldo; Gonçalves, Flávia A; Beletti, Marcelo E; Ueta, Marlene T; Silva, João S; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

    2009-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode capable of chronic, persistent infection and hyperinfection of the host; this can lead to dissemination, mainly in immunosuppressive states, in which the infection can become severe and result in the death of the host. In this study, we investigated the immune response against Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I or class II deficient mice. We found that MHC II−/− animals were more susceptible to S. venezuelensis infection as a result of the presence of an elevated number of eggs in the faeces and a delay in the elimination of adult worms compared with wild-type (WT) and MHC I−/− mice. Histopathological analysis revealed that MHC II−/− mice had a mild inflammatory infiltration in the small intestine with a reduction in tissue eosinophilia. These mice also presented a significantly lower frequency of eosinophils and mononuclear cells in the blood, together with reduced T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines in small intestine homogenates and sera compared with WT and MHC I−/− animals. Additionally, levels of parasite-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA, IgE, total IgG and IgG1 were also significantly reduced in the sera of MHC II−/− infected mice, while a non-significant increase in the level of IgG2a was found in comparison to WT or MHC I−/− infected mice. Together, these data demonstrate that expression of MHC class II but not class I molecules is required to induce a predominantly Th2 response and to achieve efficient control of S. venezuelensis infection in mice. PMID:19191916

  7. Trichuris sp. and Strongyloides sp. infections in a free-ranging baboon colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J; Upadhayay, R; Sudimack, D; Nair, S; Leland, M; Williams, J T; Anderson, T J C

    2012-02-01

    We conducted cross-sectional surveys of parasites infecting a large free-living colony of baboons at the Southwest National Primate Research Center in San Antonio in October 2003 and April 2004, immediately before, and 6 mo after, treatment with ivermectin. Trichuris sp. was the predominant species present, infecting 79 and 69% of individual animals in the 2 surveys, with fecal egg counts (FEC) of up to 60,200 eggs per g (epg) (mean = 1,235 in October 2003 and 1,256 in April 2004). Prevalence remained fairly stable across age groups, and intensity was highest in animals 15 yr old, in contrast to patterns observed in humans, where school-age children show the heaviest infections. Strongyloides sp. was also identified, but the species identity remains uncertain. Small subunit ribosomal DNA sequences differed from published sequences of Strongyloides fuelleborni at multiple sites, but resided in a monophyletic group with other Strongyloides species with 92% bootstrap support. This may reflect a recent acquisition from a local host, or that the published sequence of S. fuelleborni is incorrect. Widespread infections with 2 nematode genera in a free-ranging baboon colony that are an important source of morbidity in human populations provide a useful model system for work on the epidemiology, control, pathology, and genetics of these parasites in a host species that is physiologically, immunologically, and genetically similar to humans.

  8. Cyclooxygenase-derived mediators regulate the immunological control of Strongyloides venezuelensis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Eleuza R; Carlos, Daniela; Lourenço, Elaine V; Souza, Glória E P; Sorgi, Carlos A; Silva, Erika V; Ueta, Marlene T; Ramos, Simone G; Aronoff, David M; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to define the immunoregulatory role of prostaglandins in a mouse model of Strongyloides venezuelensis infection. Strongyloides venezuelensis induced an increase of eosinophils and mononuclear cells in the blood, peritoneal cavity fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Treatment with the dual cyclooxygenase (COX-1/-2) inhibitors indomethacin and ibuprofen, and the COX-2-selective inhibitor celecoxib partially blocked these cellular responses and was associated with enhanced numbers of infective larvae in the lung and adult worms in the duodenum. However, the drugs did not interfere with worm fertility. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors also inhibited the production of the T-helper type 2 (Th2) mediators IL-5, IgG1, and IgE, while indomethacin alone also inhibited IL-4, IL-10, and IgG2a. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors tended to enhance the Th1 mediators IL-12 and IFN-gamma. This shift away from Th2 immunity in cyclooxygenase inhibitor-treated mice correlated with reduced prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production in infected duodenal tissue. As PGE(2) is a well-characterized driver of Th2 immunity, we speculate that reduced production of this lipid might be involved in the shift toward a Th1 phenotype, favoring parasitism by S. venezuelensis. These findings provide new evidence that cyclooxygenase-derived lipids play a role in regulating host defenses against Strongyloides, and support the exploration of eicosanoid signaling for identifying novel preventive and therapeutic modalities against these infections.

  9. IgG and IgE collaboratively accelerate expulsion of Strongyloides venezuelensis in a primary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Makoto; Sasaki, Yuki; Yasuda, Koubun; Takai, Toshiyuki; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Yoshimoto, Tomohiro; Nakanishi, Kenji

    2013-07-01

    The host deploys a subset of immune responses to expel helminths, which differs depending on the nature of the helminth. Strongyloides venezuelensis, a counterpart of the human pathogen S. stercoralis, naturally infects rodents and has been used as an experimental model. Here we show that induction of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgE is a prerequisite for rapid expulsion of S. venezuelensis during a primary infection. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase-deficient (AID(-/-)) mice, which lack the ability to switch IgM to other isotypes, normally developed T-helper 2 (Th2) cells and intestinal mastocytosis after infection with S. venezuelensis. Although AID(-/-) mice expelled Nippostrongylus brasiliensis normally, they required a much longer period to expel S. venezuelensis than wild-type (WT) mice. Adoptive transfers of immune sera from S. venezuelensis-infected but not N. brasiliensis-infected mice restored the ability of AID(-/-) mice to promptly expel S. venezuelensis. Immune serum-derived IgG and IgE induced worm expulsion via Fc γ receptor III (FcγRIII) and Fc ε receptor I (FcεRI), respectively, and a mixture of IgG and IgE showed collaborative effects. Whereas FcγRIII(-/-) mice or FcεRIα(-/-) mice normally could expel S. venezuelensis, FcγRIII(-/-) mice, when their IgE was neutralized by anti-IgE, or FcεRIα(-/-) mice, when their IgG binding to FcγRIII was blocked by anti-FcγRIII, showed a markedly reduced ability to expel S. venezuelensis. These data reveal that IgG and IgE play redundant roles but act in concert to accelerate S. venezuelensis expulsion. Mast cell-deficient mice, even those equipped with immune serum-derived IgG or IgE, failed to expel S. venezuelensis promptly, suggesting that mast cells are cellular targets of IgG and IgE.

  10. Strongyloides infections of humans and great apes in Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic and in degraded forest fragments in Bulindi, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Kalousova, Barbora; McLennan, Matthew R; Modry, David; Profousova-Psenkova, Ilona; Shutt-Phillips, Kathryn A; Todd, Angelique; Huffman, Michael A; Petrzelkova, Klara J

    2016-10-01

    DNA sequence analysis was carried out on Strongyloides spp. larvae obtained from fecal samples of local humans, a wild western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and a central chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes troglodytes) inhabiting Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas (DSPA), Central African Republic, and eastern chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) living in degraded forest fragments on farmland in Bulindi, Uganda. From humans, both Strongyloides fuelleborni and Strongyloides stercoralis were recorded, though the former was predominant. Only S. fuelleborni was present in the great apes in both areas. Phylogenetic analysis of partial mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (Cox1) and comparison of 18S rDNA hyper variable region IV (HVR-IV) sequences implied that in DSPA S. fuelleborni populations in humans differ from those in the nonhuman great apes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome in an immunocompetent host resulting in bandemia and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Aung; Chapman, Courtney; Almira-Suarez, Isabel; Mehta, Nupur

    2017-03-22

    Strongyloides stercoralis infection is usually asymptomatic but can result in a hyperinfection syndrome, most commonly triggered by acquired or iatrogenic immunosuppression. Here, we present a case of a man aged 60 years originally from a strongyloides endemic area with a medical history of alcohol abuse who presents with strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome (SHS) complicated by partial small bowel obstruction, pulmonary haemorrhage, large bandemia without eosinophilia and cardiac arrest resulting in death. This case is notable for the presence of bandemia and absence of eosinophilia, lack of historical risk factors for hyperinfection, specifically corticosteroid immunosuppressants, and dramatic decline in clinical status which ultimately resulted in the patient's death. Clinicians should suspect SHS in immunocompetent patients who are from an endemic area and who have persistent gastrointestinal and/or pulmonary manifestations in the absence of a clear cause. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Molecular Detection of Strongyloides ratti in Faecal Samples from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A PCR method targeting the small subunit of the rRNA gene was performed in this study for the detection of DNA from Strongyloides ratti (an animal model of S. stercoralis) in faecal samples of wild Brown rats, Rattus norvegicus. Results: Strongyloides ratti was detected in 34.2 % of collected rats by different ...

  13. Morphological and molecular characterization of Strongyloides ophidiae (Nematoda, Strongyloididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, K R; Carlos, B C; Paduan, K S; Kadri, S M; Barrella, T H; Amarante, M R V; Ribolla, P E M; da Silva, R J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to report morphological data from parasitic female, rhabditoid and filarioid larvae, free-living female worms and eggs of Strongyloides ophidiae (Nematoda, Strongyloididae). In addition, a molecular DNA analysis was carried out using a pool of eight S. ophidiae parasitic females. Samples were obtained from the small intestine of Oxyrhopus guibei (Serpentes, Colubridae) collected in the municipality of Lençóis Paulista, State of São Paulo, Brazil. DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) resulted in a 350 bp band for samples containing S. ophidiae and Strongyloides venezuelensis DNA. Strongyloides ophidiae nucleotide sequence analysis showed 98% similarity with Strongyloides procyonis and 97% with Strongyloides cebus, Strongyloides stercoralis, Strongyloides fuelleborni and Strongyloides sp. from snakes.

  14. Prevalence of patent Strongyloides westeri infections in Thoroughbred foals in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, E T; Tolliver, S C

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence of patent Strongyloides westeri infections was determined by examination for eggs in fecal samples collected from 513 Thoroughbred (TB) foals between February 25 and June 3, 2014. The study was conducted with 244 colts and 269 fillies from 11 well-managed farms in Central Kentucky. Foals ranged from 17 to 117 days of age and had never been dewormed. The mean prevalence of patent S. westeri infection was 30% (156/513 foals). This prevalence was substantially greater than historical reports from the same sampling area during the late 1990s and early 2000s. It is hypothesized that this change is attributable to diminished use of ivermectin in foals due to concerns about macrocyclic lactone resistance in Parascaris equorum.

  15. The effect of infection history on the fitness of the gastrointestinal nematode Strongyloides ratti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleay, C; Wilkes, C P; Paterson, S; Viney, M E

    2009-04-01

    Hosts in nature will often acquire infections by different helminth species over their lifetime. This presents the potential for new infections to be affected (particularly via the host immune response) by a host's history of previous con- or hetero-specific infection. Here we have used an experimental rat model to investigate the consequences of a history of primary infection with either Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Strongyloides venezuelensis or S. ratti on the fitness of, and immunological response to, secondary infections of S. ratti. We found that a history of con-specific, but not hetero-specific, infection reduced the survivorship of S. ratti; the fecundity of S. ratti was not affected by a history of either con- or hetero-specific infections. We also found that a history of con-specific infection promoted Th2-type responses, as shown by increased concentrations of total IgE, S. ratti-specific IgG1, rat mast cell protease II (RMCPII), IL4 (but decreased concentrations of IFNgamma) produced by mesenteric lymph node cells in response to S. ratti antigen. Additionally, S. ratti-specific IgG1 was positively related to the intensity of both primary and secondary infections of S. ratti. Hetero-specific primary infections were only observed to affect the concentration of total IgE and RMCPII. The overall conclusion of these experiments is that the major immunological effect acting against an infection is induced by the infection itself and that there is little effect of prior infections of the host.

  16. Persistent infection with Strongyloides venezuelensis in the Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Byeong-Kirl; Whang, In-Soo; Islam, M. Khyrul; Kim, Byeong-Soo

    2002-01-01

    To examine the fate of Strongyloides venezuelensis, Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguicalatus) were orally infected with 1,000 L3 larvae per animal. Altogether, 50 gerbils divided into 5 groups of 10 each were monitored for a period of 570 days to document the kinetics of faecal egg output, adults worm population, morphological development, fecundity, and hematological changes including peripheral blood eosinophilia. This study chronicled a life long parasitism of S. venezuelensis in the gerbil host, and showed that S. venezuelensis infection was quite stable throughout the course of infection and the worms maintained their normal development as evidenced by their body dimension. A progressive loss of body condition of the infected gerbils was observed as the level of infection advanced. However, no detectable pathological changes were observed in the gastrointestinal tract. The present findings indicate that an immunocompetent host, such as the Mongolian gerbil, can serve as a life long carrier model of S. venezuelensis if the worms are not expelled within 570 days after infection. PMID:12509102

  17. Evaluation of gastrointestinal transit after infection with different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos-Ramos, L; Gama, L A; Mati, V L T; Corá, L A; Fujiwara, R T; Americo, M F

    2016-04-01

    The aim was to correlate the gastrointestinal transit profile in rats, evaluated by a biomagnetic technique, in response to infection with different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis. Eggs per gram, intestinal number of worms and fecundity, and also gastric emptying time, cecum arrival time, small intestinal transit time and stool weight were determined. Assessments occurred at 0 (control), 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days post infection (dpi) with three infective loads (400, 2000, and 10,000 L). Gastric emptying was faster (p=0.0001) and the intestinal transit was significantly slower (p=0.001) during the infection time course. Also, linear mixed-effects models showed significantly changes in small intestinal transit after three parasite load over time. Cecum arrival was not influenced by infection time course or parasite load. As indirect effect, stool weight decreased accompanied a strong oviposition peak at 9 dpi in 400 L and 2000 L. In several motor function instances, neuromuscular dysfunction persists after mucosal inflammation has decreased. Our approach could be very helpful to evaluate gastrointestinal motor abnormalities in vivo after parasite infection. Despite parasitological data progressively decreased after 15 dpi, small intestinal transit worse over time and according to burden. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of in vitro culture methods on morphological development and infectivity of Strongyloides venezuelensis filariform larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. Khyrul; Matsuda, Kiku; Kim, Jin-Ho

    1999-01-01

    The effects of in vitro culture methods on morphological development and infectivity of Strongyloides venezuelensis filariform larvae (L3) to rats were investigated. A significantly higher body length was observed in L3 from filter paper culture (597.3 ± 32.2 µm) than those in fecal (509.9 ± 35.0 µm) and nutrient broth culture (503.3 ± 31.0 µm) (P<0.05). Larval infectivity was assessed by exposing rats to 1,000 L3 from each culture and worms were recovered from the lungs and small intestines. Recovery rate of these worms did not show any significant difference. A significantly greater body length of adults was recorded in those corresponding to the L3 harvested from filter paper (2,777.5 ± 204.4 µm) and nutrient broth culture (2,732.5 ± 169.8 µm) than those corresponding to the L3 obtained from fecal culture (2,600.5 ± 172.4 µm) (P<0.05). Although worm fecundity and EPG counts differed among culture methods but worm burdens and course of infection did not. These findings suggest that the methods of cultures have a significant effect on the morphological development of the larvae to the L3 stage, but do not influence the infectivity to rats. PMID:10188378

  19. PARASITIC INFECTIONS OF DRY SEASON FARMERS IN SOME ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ancylostoma duodenale 91.9%. Ascaris lumbricoides 84.7%, Trichuris trichiura 74.2%, Strongyloides stercoralis 50.3%, Giardia lamblia 13.3%, Entamoeba coli 28.4%, Chilomastix mesnili 15.4%, Endolimax nana 17.3%, Isospora belli 6.3% and Lodoamoeba butshkii 11.5%. More males than females were infected.

  20. Status of intestinal parasites infection in schoolchildren at Yauri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Status of intestinal parasites infection in schoolchildren at Yauri Emirate of Kebbi state, northwestern Nigeria. ... Strongyloides stercoralis (1.22%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.31%), Schistosoma mansoni (1.22%), Fasciola gigantica (0.92%), Taenia saginata (0.31%), Entamoeba coli (1.53%), Balantidium coli (2.14%).

  1. Status of intestinal parasites infection in schoolchildren at Yauri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Others encountered included Trichuris trichura (0.92%), Strongyloides stercoralis (1.22%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.31%), Schistosoma mansoni (1.22%), Fasciola gigantica (0.92%), Taenia saginata (0.31%), Entamoeba coli (1.53%), Balantidium coli (2.14%). Only two cases of mixed infections were observed. By this ...

  2. Strongyloides venezuelensis infection susceptibility of seven inbred strains of mice Susceptibilidade de sete linhagens isogênicas de camundongos à infecções por Strongyloides venezuelensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F.T. Amarante

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available A trial was carried out to investigate the susceptibility of seven strains of mice to Strongyloides venezuelensis primary and secondary experimental infections, in order to provide the basis for genetic studies about resistance. Twelve six-week-old male inbred mice of the A/J, BALB/c, CBA/J, C3H/Hepos, C57BL/6, DBA/2 and NIH strains were infected s.c. with 2000 infective larvae. The mean worm counts (± SD in the small intestine six days after infection were, in increasing order: 28 (± 19 in NIH; 647 (± 228 in BALB/c; 709 (± 425 in DBA/2; 731 (± 151 in C3H/Hepos, 801 (± 174 in CBA/J; 1024 (± 267 in C57BL/6 and 1313 (± 483 in A/J. C57BL/6 mice showed the highest fecal egg counts and NIH, the lowest. No eggs in fecal exams or nematodes in small intestines were recovered from animals reinfected 14 days after primary infection. NIH strain was highly resistant to primary infection by S. venezuelensis. The most susceptible of the other six strains appeared to be the C57BL/6 strain which presented a high nematode counting in intestine and the highest egg output.Foi investigada a susceptibilidade de sete linhagens isogênicas de camundongos à infecção experimental, primária e secundária, por Strongyloides venezuelensis a fim de servir de base para estudos genéticos sobre a resistência. Foram utilizados 12 camundongos machos, com seis semanas de idade, das seguintes linhagens isogênicas: A/J, BALB/c, CBA/J, C3H/Hepos, C57BL/6, DBA/2 e NIH. Os animais foram inoculados, via sub-cutânea, com 2000 larvas infectantes. As contagens médias (± desvio padrão de parasitas no intestino delgado dos camundongos seis dias após a infecção, em ordem crescente, foram: 28 (± 19 na linhagem NIH; 647 (± 228 na BALB/c; 709 (± 425 na DBA/2; 731 (± 151 na C3H/Hepos, 801 (± 174 na CBA/J; 1024 (± 267 na C57BL/6 e 1313 (± 483 na A/J. Os camundongos C57BL/6 apresentaram as mais elevadas contagens de ovos de S. venezuelensis por grama de fezes (OPG e os

  3. Intestinal mass in a one year old child: An unusual presentation of Strongyloides stercolaris infection. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Aragon, MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal strongyloidiasis is a common disease in the world. In children, the worldwide prevalence rates ranged from 0.6% to 5.3% [1]. In Colombia studies report a prevalence of 1.3% in children, although it may be higher [2]. The most frequent symptoms are abdominal pain, diarrhea and weight loss. However, on rare occasions the infection can cause duodenal obstruction, pyloric hypertrophy and colonic mass. This article reports the first case of a toddler who presented with a mass in the cecum as a manifestation of Strongyloides stercolaris infection, which required surgical resection as it was initially believed to be a Burkitt lymphoma.

  4. Efficient control of Leishmania and Strongyloides despite partial suppression of nematode-induced Th2 response in co-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbaum, J; Ritter, U; Zimara, N; Brewig, N; Eschbach, M-L; Breloer, M

    2011-04-01

    Endemic regions for the pathogenic nematode Strongyloides and parasitic protist Leishmania overlap and therefore co-infections with both parasites frequently occur. As the Th2 and Th1 immune responses necessary to efficiently control Strongyloides and Leishmania infections are known to counterregulate each other, we analysed the outcome of co-infection in the murine system. Here, we show that Leishmania major-specific Th1 responses partially suppressed the nematode-induced Th2 response in co-infected mice. Despite this modulation, successful expulsion of gut dwelling Strongyloides was not suppressed in mice with pre-existing or subsequent Leishmania infection. A pre-existing Strongyloides infection, in contrast, did not interfere with efficient type-1 responses but even increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Also, control of L. major infections was not affected by pre-existing nematode infection. Taken together, we provide evidence that simultaneous presence of helminth and protist parasites did not interfere with efficient host defence in our co-infection model. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Strongyloides spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Mark E; Lok, James B

    2007-01-01

    Strongyloides is a genus of parasitic nematodes, which, unusually, has a free-living adult generation. Here we introduce the biology of this genus, especially the fascinating, but complex, life-cycle together with an overview of the taxonomy, morphology, genetics and genomics of this genus. PMID:18050491

  6. Loss of surface coat by Strongyloides ratti infective larvae during skin penetration: evidence using larvae radiolabelled with /sup 67/gallium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grove, D.I.; Northern, C.; Warwick, A.; Lovegrove, F.T.

    1984-10-01

    The optimal conditions for labelling infective larvae of Strongyloides ratti with /sup 67/Ga citrate were determined. Radiolabelled larvae were injected s.c. into normal and previously infected rats. The distribution of radioactivity in these animals was compared with that in rats infected subcutaneously with a similar dose of free /sup 67/Ga by using a gamma camera linked to a computer system. Whereas free /sup 67/Ga was distributed throughout the body and excreted via the hepatobiliary system, the bulk of radioactivity in rats injected with radiolabelled larvae remained at the injection sites. Direct microscopical examination of these sites, however, revealed only minimal numbers of worms. When rats were infected percutaneously with radiolabelled larvae, it was found that most radioactivity remained at the surface, despite penetration of worms. When infective larvae were exposed to CO/sub 2/ in vitro and examined carefully by light microscopy, loss of an outer coat was observed. It was concluded that infective larvae lose an outer coat on skin penetration.

  7. The effect of the intensity of parasitic infection with Strongyloides papillosus and albendazole therapy on biochemical parameters in sheep blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Blagoje

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this report was to study the biochemical parameters in sheep blood under conditions of various intensities of parasitic infection with Strongyloides papillosus, as well as after therapy with albendazole (ABZ. Investigations were performed on sheep of the Würtemberg race (n = 30 in which were detected mild, moderate and high intensities of parasitic infection with S. papillosus. The control group (n = 10 was composed of sheep negative to parasitic infections. The degree and type of changes were monitored by determining the concentrations of glucose, total proteins, albumin, A/G ratio, AST, urea, total bilirubin, calcium, phosphorus, total LDH activity and isoenzymatic LDH1-5 distributions. On the basis of the obtained results, we determined, through isoenzymatic LDH distribution, that during parasitic infection with S. papillosus, there is ongoing damage to the liver, heart muscle and lung, while after therapy with ABZ, the liver suffers the most damage. The concentration of glucose, total proteins and albumin fell linearly with the rise in the intensity of parasitic infection (p0.05 and phosphorus (p<0.05 also fall linearly with the rise of the intesity of the parasitic infection. The trend in the concentration fall of these macroelements, continues also after treatment with albendazole (p<0.001. Having in mind our previous studies in the field of oxidative stress and phenomena lying behind these changes, we strongly recommend that in antiparasitic treatment protocols, beside antihelminthics, compounds with antioxidative properties should also be used.

  8. Comparison of parasitological, immunological and molecular methods for evaluation of fecal samples of immunosuppressed rats experimentally infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Leilane A; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia R; Paula, Fabiana M; Silva, Neide M; Silva, Cláudio V; Costa-Cruz, Julia M; Freitas, Michelle A R

    2015-12-01

    Definitive diagnosis of strongyloidiasis in humans is typically achieved by detection of larvae in fecal samples. However, limitations on sensitivity of parasitological methods emphasize the need for more robust diagnostic methods. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic value of three methods: eggs per gram of feces (EPG), coproantigen detection by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and DNA detection by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The assays were performed at 0 and 5, 8, 13, 21 and 39 days post-infection (dpi) using fecal samples from experimentally infected immunocompetent and immunosuppressed rats. In immunocompetent rats, eggs were detected in feces on days 5, 8 and 13 dpi; coproantigen detection and PCR amplification were successful at all post-infection time points (5, 8, 13, 21 and 39 dpi). In immunosuppressed rats, eggs were detected at 5, 8, 13 and 21; coproantigen detection and PCR amplification were successful at all post-infection time points. In conclusion, these results suggest that coproantigen detection and PCR may be more sensitive alternatives to traditional methods such as EPG for diagnosis of Strongyloides venezuelensis infection.

  9. Strongyloides Colitis as a Harmful Mimicker of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Poveda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoinfection caused by Strongyloides stercoralis frequently becomes a life-long disease unless it is effectively treated. There is overlapping histomorphology between Strongyloides colitis and inflammatory bowel disease; a low index of suspicion can lead to misdiagnosis and fatal consequences. We present a case of Strongyloides colitis mimicking the clinical and pathologic features of inflammatory bowel disease. A 64-year-old female presented to the emergency department with a four-day history of abdominal pain, diarrhea, and hematochezia. Colonoscopy revealed diffuse inflammation suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease, which led to initiation of 5-aminosalicylic acid and intravenous methylprednisolone. Biopsies of the colon revealed increased lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate of the lamina propria with eosinophilic microabscesses and presence of larvae, consistent with Strongyloides stercoralis. Immunosuppressive medication was halted. The patient ultimately died a few days later. This case emphasizes the importance of identifying the overlapping clinical and pathologic features of Strongyloides colitis and inflammatory bowel disease. A high index of suspicion and recognition of particular histological findings, including eosinophilic microabscesses, aid in the correct diagnosis. Definitive diagnosis is crucial as each disease carries distinct therapeutic implications and outcome.

  10. Genetic characterization of Strongyloides spp. from captive, semi-captive and wild Bornean orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus) in Central and East Kalimantan, Borneo, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labes, E M; Nurcahyo, W; Wijayanti, N; Deplazes, P; Mathis, A

    2011-09-01

    Orangutans (Pongo spp.), Asia's only great apes, are threatened in their survival due to habitat loss, hunting and infections. Nematodes of the genus Strongyloides may represent a severe cause of death in wild and captive individuals. In order to better understand which Strongyloides species/subspecies infect orangutans under different conditions, larvae were isolated from fecal material collected in Indonesia from 9 captive, 2 semi-captive and 9 wild individuals, 18 captive groups of Bornean orangutans and from 1 human working with wild orangutans. Genotyping was done at the genomic rDNA locus (part of the 18S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer 1, ITS1) by sequencing amplicons. Thirty isolates, including the one from the human, could be identified as S. fuelleborni fuelleborni with 18S rRNA gene identities of 98·5-100%, with a corresponding published sequence. The ITS1 sequences could be determined for 17 of these isolates revealing a huge variability and 2 main clusters without obvious pattern with regard to attributes of the hosts. The ITS1 amplicons of 2 isolates were cloned and sequenced, revealing considerable variability indicative of mixed infections. One isolate from a captive individual was identified as S. stercoralis (18S rRNA) and showed 99% identity (ITS1) with S. stercoralis sequences from geographically distinct locations and host species. The findings are significant with regard to the zoonotic nature of these parasites and might contribute to the conservation of remaining orangutan populations.

  11. Faecal egg counts from field experiment reveal density dependence in helminth fecundity: Strongyloides robustus infecting grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Claudia; Wauters, L A; Cauchie, S; Martinoli, A; Matthysen, E; Saino, N; Ferrari, N

    2014-09-01

    Investigation of endo-macroparasite infections in living animals relies mostly on indirect methods aimed to detect parasite eggs in hosts' faeces. However, faecal flotation does not provide quantitative information on parasite loads, whereas faecal egg count (FEC) techniques may not give reliable estimates of parasite intensity, since egg production may be affected by density-dependent effects on helminth fecundity. We addressed this issue using Eastern grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) and their gastrointestinal nematode Strongyloides robustus to assess the performance of coprological techniques and to investigate factors affecting parasite fecundity. We compared results of gut examination, flotation and McMaster FECs in 65 culled grey squirrels. Sensitivity and specificity of flotation were 81.2% (Confidence Interval, CI 54.3-95.9%) and 85.7% (CI 72.7-94.1%), respectively, resulting in low positive predictive values when infection prevalence is low. Individual parasite fecundity (no. of eggs/adult female worm) was negatively affected by S. robustus intensity, leading to a non-linear relationship between parasite load and eggs/gram of faeces (EPG). As a consequence, whereas flotation may be a valid method to perform the first screening of infection status, FECs are not a reliable method to estimate S. robustus intensity, since diverse values of EPG may correspond to the same number of parasites. Neither the amount of analysed faeces nor the season had any effect on EPG, indicating that the observed reduction in helminth fecundity is likely caused exclusively by density-dependent processes such as competition among worms or host immune response.

  12. Effect of different stages of Schistosoma mansoni infection on the parasite burden and immune response to Strongyloides venezuelensis in co-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rezende, Michelle Carvalho; Araújo, Emília Souza; Moreira, João Marcelo Peixoto; Rodrigues, Vanessa Fernandes; Rodrigues, Jailza Lima; Pereira, Cíntia A de Jesus; Negrão-Corrêa, Deborah

    2015-12-01

    Multiple schistosome and soil-transmitted nematode infections are frequently reported in human populations living in tropical areas of developing countries. In addition to exposure factors, the host immune response plays an important role in helminth control and morbidity in hosts with multiple infections; however, these aspects are difficult to evaluate in human populations. In the current study, female Swiss mice were simultaneously co-infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis and Schistosoma mansoni or infected with St. venezuelensis at 2, 4, or 14 weeks after Sc. mansoni infection. The simultaneously infected mice showed a similar parasite burden for St. venezuelensis compared with mono-infected mice. In contrast, there was a significant reduction of St. venezuelensis burden (primarily during the migration of the larvae) in mice that were previously infected with Sc. mansoni at the acute or chronic phase. Independent of the stage of Sc. mansoni infection, the St. venezuelensis co-infection was capable of inducing IL-4 production in the small intestine, increasing the IgE concentration in the serum and increasing eosinophilia in the lungs and intestine. This result suggests that the nematode infection stimulates local type 2 immune responses independently of the schistosomiasis stage. Moreover, previous Sc. mansoni infection stimulated early granulocyte infiltration in the lungs and trematode-specific IgM and IgG1 production that recognized antigens from St. venezuelensis infective larvae; these immune responses would act in the early control of St. venezuelensis larvae. Our data suggest that the effect of multiple helminth infections on host susceptibility and morbidity largely depends on the species of parasite and the immune response.

  13. The free-living generation of the nematode Strongyloides papillosus undergoes sexual reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Alexander G; Mayer, Werner E; Streit, Adrian

    2007-07-01

    The nematode genus Strongyloides consists of parasites that live as parthenogenetic females in the small intestines of their hosts. They can also form a facultative free-living generation with males and females. Recently, research on Strongyloides cellular and molecular biology has concentrated on Strongyloides ratti and Strongyloides stercoralis. We propose that the related nematode Strongyloides papillosus, a common parasite of ruminants, is well suited for comparative and evolutionary studies and we show that it is phylogentically basal to S. ratti and S. stercoralis. Based on cytological observations several reports have proposed that Strongyloides males do not contribute genetically to the next generation, leaving open the question of why males still exist. In contrast, the only study employing molecular markers showed that S. ratti males do pass on genetic material. Here, we demonstrate that in S. papillosus males also contribute molecular genetic markers to the next generation. This is interesting for two reasons. First, it shows that S. papillosus is amenable to genetic analysis and second, it indicates that sexual reproduction is more common in Strongyloides than previously assumed.

  14. Intestinal parasite infections in symptomatic children attending hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Catrin E; Nget, Phot; Saroeun, Mao; Kuong, Suy; Chanthou, Seng; Kumar, Varun; Bousfield, Rachel; Nader, Johanna; Bailey, J Wendi; Beeching, Nicholas J; Day, Nicholas P; Parry, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Infections with helminths and other intestinal parasites are an important but neglected problem in children in developing countries. Accurate surveys of intestinal parasites in children inform empirical treatment regimens and can assess the impact of school based drug treatment programmes. There is limited information on this topic in Cambodia. In a prospective study of intestinal parasites in symptomatic children attending Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia, April-June 2012, samples were examined by microscopy of a direct and concentrated fecal sample. Two culture methods for hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were employed when sufficient sample was received. Demographic, clinical and epidemiological data were collected. We studied 970 samples from 865 children. The median (inter-quartile range) age of the children was 5.4 (1.9-9.2) years, 54% were male. The proportion of children with abdominal pain was 66.8%, diarrhea 34.9%, anemia 12.7% and malnutrition 7.4%. 458 parasitic infections were detected in 340 (39.3%) children. The most common parasites using all methods of detection were hookworm (14.3%), Strongyloides stercoralis (11.6%) and Giardia lamblia (11.2%). Giardia lamblia was most common in children aged 1-5 years, hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were more common with increasing age. Hookworm, Strongloides stercoralis and Giardia lamblia were more common in children living outside of Siem Reap town. In a multivariate logistic regression increasing age was associated with all three infections, defecating in the forest for hookworm infection, the presence of cattle for S. stercoralis and not using soap for handwashing for G. lamblia. This study confirms the importance of intestinal parasitic infections in symptomatic Cambodian children and the need for adequate facilities for laboratory diagnosis together with education to improve personal hygiene and sanitation.

  15. Intestinal parasite infections in symptomatic children attending hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catrin E Moore

    Full Text Available Infections with helminths and other intestinal parasites are an important but neglected problem in children in developing countries. Accurate surveys of intestinal parasites in children inform empirical treatment regimens and can assess the impact of school based drug treatment programmes. There is limited information on this topic in Cambodia.In a prospective study of intestinal parasites in symptomatic children attending Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia, April-June 2012, samples were examined by microscopy of a direct and concentrated fecal sample. Two culture methods for hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were employed when sufficient sample was received. Demographic, clinical and epidemiological data were collected.We studied 970 samples from 865 children. The median (inter-quartile range age of the children was 5.4 (1.9-9.2 years, 54% were male. The proportion of children with abdominal pain was 66.8%, diarrhea 34.9%, anemia 12.7% and malnutrition 7.4%. 458 parasitic infections were detected in 340 (39.3% children. The most common parasites using all methods of detection were hookworm (14.3%, Strongyloides stercoralis (11.6% and Giardia lamblia (11.2%. Giardia lamblia was most common in children aged 1-5 years, hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis were more common with increasing age. Hookworm, Strongloides stercoralis and Giardia lamblia were more common in children living outside of Siem Reap town. In a multivariate logistic regression increasing age was associated with all three infections, defecating in the forest for hookworm infection, the presence of cattle for S. stercoralis and not using soap for handwashing for G. lamblia.This study confirms the importance of intestinal parasitic infections in symptomatic Cambodian children and the need for adequate facilities for laboratory diagnosis together with education to improve personal hygiene and sanitation.

  16. Application of real-time PCR for the detection of Strongyloides spp. in clinical samples in a reference center in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugar, José M; Merino, Francisco J; Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Ortega, Sheila; Gárate, Teresa; Rodríguez, Esperanza

    2015-02-01

    Strongyloidiasis is one of the major intestinal helminthic infections in humans with a worldwide distribution, affecting especially tropical and subtropical regions. This disease can occur without any symptoms or as a potentially fatal hyperinfection or disseminated infection. Definitive diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection relies mainly on demonstration of larvae in stool, but at present there is no gold standard for this diagnosis. Our main objective was to evaluate a real-time PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene of Strongyloides spp. and to compare it with routine parasitological methods. DNA from Strongyloides venezuelensis was used to optimize PCR protocols obtaining an analytical sensitivity of 0.1 pg of parasite DNA per sample. Sensitivity and specificity of real-time PCR on fecal samples from 231 patients screened for suspected strongyloidiasis attending two hospitals in Madrid were 93.8% and 86.5%, respectively. No significant differences were found when comparing Ct-values of positive PCR between parasitological positive and negative samples. This study showed that real-time PCR is an effective tool for diagnosing strongyloidiasis and could be applied in association with parasitological methods in epidemiological studies in endemic areas. It would be also important to assess its performance in immunocompromised populations who are at risk of fatal disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hyper-variable regions in 18S rDNA of Strongyloides spp. as markers for species-specific diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Hayashida, Shotaro; Ikeda, Yatsukaho; Sato, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Four hyper-variable regions (HVR-I to -IV) found in 18S ribosomal DNA sequences were compared among 34 isolates of 15 species of the genus Strongyloides to evaluate their diagnostic value. HVR-I to -III were short, and plural species exhibit the same nucleotide arrangement. Meanwhile, HVR-IV had 23 to 39 nucleotides, showing species-specific arrangements, except Strongyloides ransomi and Strongyloides venezuelensis, which had the same nucleotide sequence in HVR-IV but were readily distinguished by the difference in HVR-I and -III. Isolates of Strongyloides stercoralis from humans of USA, Japan, and Philippines, chimpanzees, and dogs had an identical sequence in this region. Meanwhile, intraspecific polymorphism in HVR-IV nucleotide arrangement was observed among isolates of Strongyloides fuelleborni and Strongyloides callosciureus, presumably reflecting process of geographical dispersal and adaptation to the hosts.

  18. Identification and characterization of the threadworm, Strongyloides procyonis, from feral raccoons (Procyon lotor) in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Kazuo; Osanai, Arihiro; Kamiya, Haruo; Furuoka, Hidefumi

    2006-02-01

    Strongyloides procyonis Little, 1966 was detected about 45 years ago in raccoons (Procyon lotor) of southern Louisiana, U.S.A., and was demonstrated experimentally to cause creeping eruption and a short-lived intestinal infection in a healthy human volunteer. After its description and demonstration of its pathogenicity in humans, S. procyonis has not been found in raccoons in North America despite repeated surveys. During a survey on feral raccoons in Japan, S. procyonis parasitic females were identified in 66 (28.3%) of 233 raccoons collected between May 2004 and January 2005. The number of parasitic females recovered from individual raccoons was 1-197 (geomean, 3.2). Both the morphological features and the nucleotide sequences of the small and large subunit ribosomal RNA genes (SSU/LSU rDNA) of S. procyonis closely resembled those of zoonotic Strongyloides stercoralis. The sequences of internal transcribed spacer (ITS)1 and 28S rDNA could differentiate clearly these 2 species. Awareness of S. procyonis in raccoons in North America and other places worldwide where raccoons are introduced and naturalized is important to assess the epidemiological significance of this potentially zoonotic helminth species.

  19. Molecular identification of the causative agent of human strongyloidiasis acquired in Tanzania: dispersal and diversity of Strongyloides spp. and their hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideo; Sato, Hiroshi; Fujita, Shiho; Nguema, Pierre Philippe Mbehang; Nobusue, Kenichi; Miyagi, Kei; Kooriyama, Takanori; Takenoshita, Yuji; Noda, Shohei; Sato, Akiko; Morimoto, Azusa; Ikeda, Yatsukaho; Nishida, Toshisada

    2010-09-01

    In order to identify the causative agent of imported strongyloidiasis found in a Japanese mammalogist, who participated in a field survey in Tanzania, the hyper-variable region IV (HVR-IV) of 18S ribosomal DNA and partial mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1) were analyzed and compared with Strongyloides fuelleborni collected from apes and monkeys of Africa and Japan, and S. stercoralis from humans, apes and dogs. The HVR-IV and cox1 of the patient's worms were identical to or only slightly differed from those of worms parasitic in Tanzanian chimpanzees and yellow baboons, demonstrating that the patient acquired the infection during her field survey in Tanzania. Phylogenetic analysis with the maximum-likelihood method largely divided isolates of S. fuelleborni into three groups, which corresponded to geographical localities but not to host species. Meanwhile, isolates of S. stercoralis were grouped by the phylogenetic analysis into dog-parasitic and primate-parasitic clades, and not to geographical regions. It is surmised that subspeciation has occurred in S. fuelleborni during the dispersal of primates in Africa and Asia, while worldwide dispersal of S. stercoralis seems to have occurred more recently by migration and the activities of modern humans.

  20. The genomic basis of parasitism in the Strongyloides clade of nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Vicky L; Tsai, Isheng J; Coghlan, Avril; Reid, Adam J; Holroyd, Nancy; Foth, Bernardo J; Tracey, Alan; Cotton, James A; Stanley, Eleanor J; Beasley, Helen; Bennett, Hayley M; Brooks, Karen; Harsha, Bhavana; Kajitani, Rei; Kulkarni, Arpita; Harbecke, Dorothee; Nagayasu, Eiji; Nichol, Sarah; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Quail, Michael A; Randle, Nadine; Xia, Dong; Brattig, Norbert W; Soblik, Hanns; Ribeiro, Diogo M; Sanchez-Flores, Alejandro; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Itoh, Takehiko; Denver, Dee R; Grant, Warwick; Stoltzfus, Jonathan D; Lok, James B; Murayama, Haruhiko; Wastling, Jonathan; Streit, Adrian; Kikuchi, Taisei; Viney, Mark; Berriman, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Soil-transmitted nematodes, including the Strongyloides genus, cause one of the most prevalent neglected tropical diseases. Here we compare the genomes of four Strongyloides species, including the human pathogen Strongyloides stercoralis, and their close relatives that are facultatively parasitic (Parastrongyloides trichosuri) and free-living (Rhabditophanes sp. KR3021). A significant paralogous expansion of key gene families--families encoding astacin-like and SCP/TAPS proteins--is associated with the evolution of parasitism in this clade. Exploiting the unique Strongyloides life cycle, we compare the transcriptomes of the parasitic and free-living stages and find that these same gene families are upregulated in the parasitic stages, underscoring their role in nematode parasitism.

  1. Increased susceptibility to Strongyloides venezuelensis infection is related to the parasite load and absence of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rosângela Maria; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia Ribeiro; Silva, Neide Maria; Massa, Virgínia; Alves, Ronaldo; Ueta, Marlene Tiduko; Silva, João Santana; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2013-11-01

    In human and murine models strongyloidiasis induce a Th2 type response. In the current study we investigated the role of different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis in the immune response raised against the parasite and the participation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule in the disease outcome in face of the different parasite burden. The C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and MHC II(-/-) mice were individually inoculated by subcutaneous injection with 500 or 3000 S. venezuelensis L3. The MHC II(-/-) mice infected with 3000L3 were more susceptible to S. venezuelensis infection when compared with WT groups, in which the parasite was completely eliminated. The production of Th2 cytokines and specific IgG1 or IgE antibodies against parasite were significantly lowered in MHC II(-/-) infected mice with different larvae inoculums. The infection of MHC II(-/-) mice with S. venezuelensis induced slight inflammatory alterations in the small intestine, and these lesions were lower when compared with WT mice, irrespective of the parasite load utilized to infect animals. Finally, we concluded that MHC class II molecules are essential in the immune response against S. venezuelensis mainly when infection occurs with high parasite inoculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The prevalence and diversity of intestinal parasitic infections in humans and domestic animals in a rural Cambodian village

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schär, Fabian; Inpankaew, Tawin; Traub, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    ., Giardia spp. and Blastocystis spp. Major gastrointestinal parasitic infections found in humans included hookworms (63.3%), Entamoeba spp. (27.1%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (24.3%). In dogs, hookworm (80.8%), Spirometra spp. (21.3%) and Strongyloides spp. (14.9%) were most commonly detected and in pigs...... Isospora suis (75.0%), Oesophagostomum spp. (73.7%) and Entamoeba spp. (31.6%) were found. Eleven parasite species were detected in dogs (eight helminths and three protozoa), seven of which have zoonotic potential, including hookworm, Strongyloides spp., Trichuris spp., Toxocara canis, Echinostoma spp......., Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. Five of the parasite species detected in pigs also have zoonotic potential, including Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp., Capillaria spp., Balantidium coli and Entamoeba spp. Further molecular epidemiological studies will aid characterisation of parasite species...

  3. Specific IgG and immune complex responses to parthenogenetic females and eggs of nematode Strongyloides venezuelensis for the diagnosis of immunosuppression in infected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A L R; de Araújo, K C L; Carvalho, E F G; Ueta, M T; Costa-Cruz, J M

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, antigens from parthenogenetic females and eggs of Strongyloides venezuelensis, or anti-parthenogenetic-female and anti-egg antigens were used to detect specific IgG and immune complex responses, respectively. Serum samples from experimentally infected immunocompetent and immunosuppressed rats were analysed on days 5, 8, 13 and 21 post-infection (dpi). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed using alkaline parasite extract for specific IgG detection, and anti-parthenogenetic-female or anti-egg antigens for immune complex detection. The data were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by a Bonferroni test. When parthenogenetic female or egg extracts were used as antigens, specific IgGs were not detected in either immunocompetent or immunosuppressed rats. When anti-parthenogenetic-female or anti-S. venezuelensis-eggs were used, immune complexes were detected for the duration of the infection in immunosuppressed animals and were only detected between 5 and 13 dpi in immunocompetent animals. The duration of infection was not significantly different between the immunocompetent and immunosuppressed groups when anti-parthenogenetic-female or anti-S. venezuelensis-eggs were used. Parthenogenetic female extracts yielded significant differences between antibody and immune complex responses in immunocompetent rats from 5 to 13 dpi, but only on day 5 dpi in immunosuppressed rats. Exposure to S. venezuelensis egg extract yielded significant differences in both antibody and immune complex detection between immunocompetent and immunosuppressed rats for the duration of the infection. In conclusion, ELISA using alternative antigens may be a successful strategy for identifying immune complexes in serum samples and diagnosing active strongyloidiasis, particularly under conditions of immunosuppression.

  4. Prevalence of Helminthic Infections among Wild Animals in Yankari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Faecal culture and larval recovery revealed that Strongyloides canis and Ancylostoma caninum larvae were common among the carnivores. For the primates, Stronyloides stercoralis and Ancylostoma duodenale were encountered while, Haemonchus contortus, Stronyloides pappilosus, Trichostrongylus colubrioformis and ...

  5. seasonal variation of intestinal parasitic infections among hiv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    CONCLUSION: Cryptosporidium species and Strongyloides stercoralis were the only parasitic agents that were associated with rainy season. Keywords: Season, Intestinal Parasites, HIV. INTRODUCTION. Despite the worldwide efforts at controlling the menace of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. (AIDS), the number ...

  6. Strong-LAMP: A LAMP Assay for Strongyloides spp. Detection in Stool and Urine Samples. Towards the Diagnosis of Human Strongyloidiasis Starting from a Rodent Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandasegui, Javier; Bajo Santos, Cristina; López-Abán, Julio; Saugar, José María; Rodríguez, Esperanza; Vicente, Belén; Muro, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Strongyloides stercoralis, the chief causative agent of human strongyloidiasis, is a nematode globally distributed but mainly endemic in tropical and subtropical regions. Chronic infection is often clinically asymptomatic but it can result in severe hyperinfection syndrome or disseminated strongyloidiasis in immunocompromised patients. There is a great diversity of techniques used in diagnosing the disease, but definitive diagnosis is accomplished by parasitological examination of stool samples for morphological identification of parasite. Until now, no molecular method has been tested in urine samples as an alternative to stool samples for diagnosing strongyloidiasis. This study aimed to evaluate the use of a new molecular LAMP assay in a well-established Wistar rat experimental infection model using both stool and, for the first time, urine samples. The LAMP assay was also clinically evaluated in patients´ stool samples. Methodology/Principal Findings Stool and urine samples were obtained daily during a 28-day period from rats infected subcutaneously with different infective third-stage larvae doses of S. venezuelensis. The dynamics of parasite infection was determined by daily counting the number of eggs per gram of feces from day 1 to 28 post-infection. A set of primers for LAMP assay based on a DNA partial sequence in the 18S rRNA gene from S. venezuelensis was designed. The set up LAMP assay (namely, Strong-LAMP) allowed the sensitive detection of S. venezuelensis DNA in both stool and urine samples obtained from each infection group of rats and was also effective in S. stercoralis DNA amplification in patients´ stool samples with previously confirmed strongyloidiasis by parasitological and real-time PCR tests. Conclusions/Significance Our Strong-LAMP assay is an useful molecular tool in research of a strongyloidiasis experimental infection model in both stool and urine samples. After further validation, the Strong-LAMP could also be potentially

  7. Strongyloides hyperinfection following hematopoietic stem cell transplant in a patient with HTLV-1-associated T-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpern, Jonathan D; Arbefeville, Sophie S; Vercellotti, Gregory; Ferrieri, Patricia; Green, Jaime S

    2017-02-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis has the potential to cause accelerated autoinfection in immunocompromised hosts. Screening tests for strongyloidiasis may be falsely negative in the setting of immunosuppression. We report a case of Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome in a patient with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-associated T-cell leukemia early after hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The diagnosis was made by stool ova and parasite examination, despite a negative screening enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Because of anticipated prolonged neutropenia, an extended course of treatment was utilized. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Intestinal parasitic infections among inhabitants of Karaj City, Tehran province, Iran in 2006-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Vahid; Esmailnia, Kasra; Karim, Gholamreza; Nasir, Mehdi; Akhavan, Omid

    2009-09-01

    Karaj is an area with large influx of refugee people in Iran. To increase knowledge about parasitic infections, we carried out this research during 2006-2008. We recorded the stool examination results and some of their personal characteristics. A total of 13,915 human stools were examined, and 649 (4.7%) were positive for intestinal parasites. Among them, 13 (0.09%) had worm and 636 (4.6%) had protozoan infections. Maximum infections belonged to Giardia intestinalis, and 534 (3.8%) samples had this infection. Other parasitic infections included Entamoeba coli (0.39%), Entamoeba histolytica (0.021%), Blastocystis hominis (0.08%), Trichomonas hominis (0.1%), Iodamoeba butschlii (0.06%), Chilomastix mesnili (0.007%), Endolimax nana (0.05%), Enterobius spp. eggs (0.028%), Taenia proglottids (0.028%), and Strongyloides stercoralis larvae (0.03%). The maximum numbers of referred people to laboratories were in July and the maximum percentage of infections was in August. There is a point that all 5 Strongyloides stercoralis infections were pertained to 2008. With attention to the rate of parasitic infections (4.7%), it seems that we should take additional educational information to wide spectrum of people living in this city.

  9. Geophagy as risk behaviour for gastrointestinal nematode infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascaris lumbricoides and hookworm were associated with geophagy while Trichuris trichiura and Strongyloides stercoralis had no association. Prevalence of A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura and S. stercoralis differed significantly (p<0.05) between geophagous and non-geophagous women. The soil types consumed had eggs ...

  10. A Comparative Analysis of Intestinal Parasitic Infections between HIV+/AIDS Patients and Non-HIV Infected Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EB Kia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to verify the occurrence of intestinal parasitic infections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS patients in Iran in comparison with non-HIV individuals. Methods: A total of HIV+/AIDS patients (Group I and 1220 clinically healthy individuals (Group II were submitted to coproparasitological examination from 2003 to 2005. Results: The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites in group I and group II was 11.4% and 11.6%, respectively, without significant difference between two groups. The prevalence of infection for each helminth and pathogenic protozoan, in every group, was as follows: Group I: Blastocystis hominis (6.1%; Giardia lamblia (4.2%; Cryptosporidium spp. (0.9%; Isospora belli (0.26%; Strongyloides stercoralis (0.26%; Hymenolepis nana (0.13%; and Rhabditis axei (0.13%. Group II: Blastocystis hominis (6.5%; Giardia lamblia (4.1%; Strongyloides stercoralis (0.33%; Hymenolepis nana (0.16%; and Trichostrongylus sp. (0.16%. Although the prevalence of infection for extracellular parasites was not statistically different between two groups, however, the infection rates for enteric coccidians including Cryptosporidium spp. and I. belli were significantly higher in patients at AIDS stage than Group II. Conclusion: The results emphasize the needs for especial consideration of enteropathogenic intracellular coccidians in immunocompromised patients.

  11. Strongyloides infections of humans and great apes in Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic and in degraded forest fragments in Bulindi, Uganda

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasegawa, H.; Kalousová, B.; McLennan, M. R.; Modrý, David; Profousová-Pšenková, I.; Shutt-Phillips, K. A.; Todd, A.; Huffman, M. A.; Petrželková, Klára Judita

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 5 (2016), s. 367-370 ISSN 1383-5769 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : chimpanzee * Gorilla * Human * Strongyloides * transmission * HVR-IV * cox1 Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.744, year: 2016

  12. Strongyloides infections of humans and great apes in Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas, Central African Republic and in degraded forest fragments in Bulindi, Uganda

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasegawa, H.; Kalousová, B.; McLennan, M. R.; Modrý, D.; Profousová-Pšenková, I.; Shutt-Phillips, K. A.; Todd, A.; Huffman, M. A.; Petrželková, Klára Judita

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 5 (2016), s. 367-370 ISSN 1383-5769 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-05180S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Chimpanzee * Cox1 * Gorilla * Human * HVR-IV * Strongyloides * Transmission Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.744, year: 2016

  13. Application of a Multiplex Quantitative PCR to Assess Prevalence and Intensity Of Intestinal Parasite Infections in a Controlled Clinical Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llewellyn, Stacey; Inpankaew, Tawin; Nery, Susana Vaz

    2016-01-01

    multiplex real-time PCR reactions the first targeting: Necator americanus, Ancylostoma spp., Ascaris spp., and Trichuris trichiura; and the second Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia. duodenalis, and Strongyloides stercoralis. Samples were also subject to sodium nitrate flotation...

  14. Intestinal parasitic infections and anaemia among pregnant women in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Michael, Audrey; Kirarock, Wendy S; Pomat, William S; van den Biggelaar, Anita H J

    2013-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections and associations with risk factors among pregnant women in their second or third trimester in Goroka, Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea. Among the 201 pregnant women enrolled in this study, 163 (81%) were infected with one or more intestinal parasites. Infections with protozoan parasites (65%) were more prevalent than infections with nematodes (31%); protozoan infections included Entamoeba histolytica (43%), Giardia lamblia (39%) and Pentatrichomonas hominis (14%), and nematode infections included hookworm (18%), Ascaris lumbricoides (14%), Strongyloides stercoralis (3%) and Trichuris trichiura (2%). Factors associated with higher risk of intestinal parasitic infections in pregnancy included being a primigravida for protozoan-only infections and education limited to primary school for nematode infections. Altitude-adjusted haemoglobin levels were assessed at the beginning of labour for 110 women, with 69 (63%) found to be anaemic (haemoglobin pregnancy and anaemia.

  15. Chemotherapy and immunity in opportunistic parasitic infections in AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumla, A; Croft, S L

    1992-01-01

    Parasitic diseases are endemic in parts of the tropics, but there is no convincing evidence that their prevalence or incidence is increasing due to the HIV epidemic. Available scientific data on parasitic infections in patients with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) suggests a predominance of Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium spp. For reasons which are unclear, parasitic infections such as Plasmodium falciparum, Strongyloides stercoralis and Entamoeba histolytica, where cell-mediated immune responses are also thought to be significant, do not appear to be opportunists of importance. It is being increasingly recognized that chemotherapy for parasitic diseases has a host-dependent component, although scientific data on this subject remain scanty. The management of opportunistic parasitic infections in patients infected with HIV is dogged by failures and relapses, aptly illustrating the notion of the relationship between chemotherapy and the immune response. This review discusses the immunity and chemotherapy of opportunistic parasite infections in patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

  16. Validation of DESS as a DNA Preservation Method for the Detection of Strongyloides spp. in Canine Feces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meruyert Beknazarova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis is a gastrointestinal parasitic nematode with a life cycle that includes free-living and parasitic forms. For both clinical (diagnostic and environmental evaluation, it is important that we can detect Strongyloides spp. in both human and non-human fecal samples. Real-time PCR is the most feasible method for detecting the parasite in both clinical and environmental samples that have been preserved. However, one of the biggest challenges with PCR detection is DNA degradation during the postage time from rural and remote areas to the laboratory. This study included a laboratory assessment and field validation of DESS (dimethyl sulfoxide, disodium EDTA, and saturated NaCl preservation of Strongyloides spp. DNA in fecal samples. The laboratory study investigated the capacity of 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios to preserve Strongyloides ratti in spike canine feces. It was found that both ratios of DESS significantly prevented DNA degradation compared to the untreated sample. This method was then validated by applying it to the field-collected canine feces and detecting Strongyloides DNA using PCR. A total of 37 canine feces samples were collected and preserved in the 1:3 ratio (sample: DESS and of these, 17 were positive for Strongyloides spp. The study shows that both 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios were able to preserve the Strongyloides spp. DNA in canine feces samples stored at room temperature for up to 56 days. This DESS preservation method presents the most applicable and feasible method for the Strongyloides DNA preservation in field-collected feces.

  17. Validation of DESS as a DNA Preservation Method for the Detection of Strongyloides spp. in Canine Feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beknazarova, Meruyert; Millsteed, Shelby; Robertson, Gemma; Whiley, Harriet; Ross, Kirstin

    2017-06-09

    Strongyloides stercoralis is a gastrointestinal parasitic nematode with a life cycle that includes free-living and parasitic forms. For both clinical (diagnostic) and environmental evaluation, it is important that we can detect Strongyloides spp. in both human and non-human fecal samples. Real-time PCR is the most feasible method for detecting the parasite in both clinical and environmental samples that have been preserved. However, one of the biggest challenges with PCR detection is DNA degradation during the postage time from rural and remote areas to the laboratory. This study included a laboratory assessment and field validation of DESS (dimethyl sulfoxide, disodium EDTA, and saturated NaCl) preservation of Strongyloides spp. DNA in fecal samples. The laboratory study investigated the capacity of 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios to preserve Strongyloides ratti in spike canine feces. It was found that both ratios of DESS significantly prevented DNA degradation compared to the untreated sample. This method was then validated by applying it to the field-collected canine feces and detecting Strongyloides DNA using PCR. A total of 37 canine feces samples were collected and preserved in the 1:3 ratio (sample: DESS) and of these, 17 were positive for Strongyloides spp. The study shows that both 1:1 and 1:3 sample to DESS ratios were able to preserve the Strongyloides spp. DNA in canine feces samples stored at room temperature for up to 56 days. This DESS preservation method presents the most applicable and feasible method for the Strongyloides DNA preservation in field-collected feces.

  18. Fatal Strongyloides Hyperinfection Syndrome in an Immunocompromised Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochineni, Vaishnavi; Lal, Darshan; Hasnayen, Shahed; Restrepo, Erfidia

    2015-09-08

    Currently, it is normal to screen for Strongyloides as part of the workup in pre-transplant patients who have eosinophilia. Given the high mortality rates in Strongyloides hyperinfection, this article illustrates the need to screen all patients with eosinophilia who will be started on immunosuppression. We present here an interesting case of a 76-year-old man with membranous glomerulopathy who developed a severe Strongyloides hyperinfection that required an ICU stay and ultimately led to his death a few weeks after initiation of cyclophosphamide and steroids. We recommend that a detailed workup to detect or rule out this parasitic infection be conducted prior to the initiation of immunosuppression in any patient with eosinophilia.

  19. HIV and parasitic co-infections in tuberculosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Range, N.; Magnussen, Pascal; Mugomela, A.

    2007-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in Mwanza, Tanzania, to determine the burden of HIV and parasitic co-infections among patients who were confirmed or suspected cases of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). Of the 655 patients investigated, 532 (81.2%) had been confirmed as PTB cases, by microscopy...... and Strongyloides stercoralis infections were less common, each recorded at a prevalence of HIV-positive than the PTB- patients (43.6% v. 62.6%; PHIV-positive had a significantly lower prevalence (12.1% v. 25%; P... intensity (49 v. 123 eggs/g; P=0.003) of hookworm infection than the HIV-negative. The PTB patients in the study area were, however, still frequently co-infected with HIV and with parasitic infections that may increase morbidity and accelerate the progression of HIV disease. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jun...

  20. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of 2-aminoalkanol and 1,2-alkanediamine derivatives against Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda-Ceballos, Ana L; López-Abán, Julio; Del Olmo, Esther; Escarcena, Ricardo; Bustos, Luis A; Rojas-Caraballo, Jose; Vicente, Belén; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; San Feliciano, Arturo; Muro, Antonio

    2016-06-28

    Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic disease widely present in tropical and subtropical areas. Strongyloides stercoralis represents the main species that infects human beings. Ivermectin is the current drug of choice; however, issues related with treatment failure in patients with diabetes or infected with T-lymphotropic virus-1 make the identification of new molecules for alternative treatment a priority. In the present study, the activity of sphingosine-related aminoalcohol and diamine were evaluated against Strongyloides venezuelensis third-stage larva (L3) cultures and experimental infections in mice. The efficacy of each compound against L3 was assessed using both XTT (2,3-bis-(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) assay and microscopic observation with concentrations ranging from 1 to 350 μM. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using J774.2 macrophage cell line and XTT assay. Lethal concentration 50 (LC50), selectivity index (SI) and structure-activity relationships were established. The activity compounds 4 (2-(ethylamino) hexadecan-1-ol), 6 (2-(butylamino) hexadecan-1-ol), 17 (tert-butyl N-(1-aminododecan-2-yl) carbamate) and 18 (tert-butyl N-(1-aminohexadecan-2-yl) carbamate) were further assessed against experimental S. venezuelensis infections in CD1 mice measuring reductions in the numbers of parthenogenetic females and egg passed in faeces. Mice were infected with 3,000 L3 and treated with 20 mg/kg/day for five days. In the screening study of 15 aminoalcohols [lauryl (n = 9); palmityl (n = 13); stearyl (n = 15) and alcohol derivatives], the presence of a palmitol chain was associated with the highest efficacy against L3 (LC50 31.9-39.1 μM). Alkylation of the 2-amino group with medium size fragments as ethyl or n-butyl showed the best larvicidal activity. The dialkylation did not improve efficacy. Aminoalcohols 4 and 6 showed the highest SI (1.5 and 1.6, respectively). With respect to diamine derivative compounds, a chain

  1. First report of Strongyloides sp. (Nematoda, Strongyloididae) in Lutreolina crassicaudata (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardia, D F F; Camossi, L G; Fornazari, F; Babboni, S D; Teixeira, C R; Bresciani, K D S

    2016-01-01

    The present study reports the first case of the presence of the intestinal nematode Strongyloides sp. in fecal examinations of a male Lutreolina crassicaudata, considered a synanthropic marsupial species with zoonotic potential. The Willis technique was used for the diagnosis. Presence of typical eggs of Strongyloides species in feces was detected. A fecal culture was performed to obtain larval stages, free-living adults and infective third stage larvae (L3) of this nematode after seven days, which was morphologically identified as Strongyloididae. This is the first report of infection by Strongyloides sp. in a tick-tailed opossum from Brazil.

  2. SURVEY OF HOUSE RAT INTESTINAL PARASITES FROM SURABAYA DISTRICT, EAST JAVA, INDONESIA THAT CAN CAUSE OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HUMANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, R H

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of house rat zoonotic intestinal parasites from Surabaya District, East Java, Indonesia that have the potential to cause opportunistic infection in humans. House rat fecal samples were collected from an area of Surabaya District with a dense rat population during May 2015. Intestinal parasites were detected microscopically using direct smear of feces stained with Lugol's iodine and modified Ziehl-Neelsen stains. The fecal samples were also cultured for Strongyloides stercoralis. Ninety-eight house rat fecal samples were examined. The potential opportunistic infection parasite densities found in those samples were Strongyloides stercoralis in 53%, Hymenolepis nana in 42%, Cryptosporidium spp in 33%, and Blastocystis spp in 6%. This is the first report of this kind in Surabaya District. Measures need to be taken to control the house rat population in the study area to reduce the risk of the public health problem. Keywords: zoonotic intestinal parasites, opportunistic infection, house rat, densely populated area, Indonesia

  3. The biology of Strongyloides spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viney, Mark E; Lok, James B

    2015-07-16

    Strongyloides is a genus of parasitic nematodes that, unusually, has a free-living adult generation. Here we introduce the biology of this genus, especially the fascinating but complex life-cycle, together with an overview of the taxonomy, morphology, genetics, and genomics of this genus.

  4. HIPERINFECCIÓN POR STRONGYLOIDES EN ANCIANO CON EPOC Strongyloides hyperinfection in elderly patient with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Análida Elizabeth Pinilla-Roa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un caso de un hombre de 81 años natural de zona rural, agricultor, recolector de café 50 años atrás y jardinero por 22 años en Bogotá. Consultó por dolor abdominal de 10 días de evolución, localizado hacia mesogastrio y epigastrio. Además, disnea, tos productiva. Antecedentes: enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica, cor pulmonale, fumador de 25 paquetes /año, había recibido prednisona oral y beclometasona inhalada en diversas ocasiones incluso en la última hospitalización. En el examen físico presentó signos de desnutrición, taquicardia, taquipnea; estertores en base del hemitórax derecho; abdomen: blando, depresible con dolor a la palpación profunda en epigastrio e hipocondrio derecho. Ingresó con síndrome de respuesta inflamatoria sistémica por taquicardia, taquipnea, leucocitosis 37.600 y eosinofilia 52-60%, Ig E: 180 UI/ ml. Se evidenciaron larvas rabditiformes de Strongyloides stercoralis en esputo y materia fecal. La radiografía de tórax mostró derrame pleural derecho, la ecografía hepática fue normal, la endoscopia de vías digestivas altas evidenció gastritis y duodenitis. Se inició tratamiento con ivermectina 200 mg/ Kg/dosis, con seguimiento clínico y de laboratorio con evolución clínica satisfactoria.The case is presented of an 81-years old man from a rural area who had been a farmer, a coffee harvester 50 years beforehand and a gardener in Bogotá for 22 years. He consulted because of abdominal pain having 10 days’ evolution, localized towards the mesogastrium and epigastrium. He was also suffering from dyspnoea and productive cough. Background: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, smoking 25 packets/year, he had received oral prednisone and inhaled beclomethasone on occasions, including during his last hospitalization. Physical examination revealed signs of undernourishment, tachycardia, tachypnoea; stertors at the base of the right hemithorax; abdomen: soft, depressible with pain on

  5. A microarray analysis of gene expression in the free-living stages of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkes Clare P

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nematode Strongyloides ratti has two adult phases in its lifecycle: one obligate, female and parasitic and one facultative, dioecious and free-living. The molecular control of the development of this free-living generation remains to be elucidated. Results We have constructed an S. ratti cDNA microarray and used it to interrogate changes in gene expression during the free-living phase of the S. ratti life-cycle. We have found very extensive differences in gene expression between first-stage larvae (L1 passed in faeces and infective L3s preparing to infect hosts. In L1 stages there was comparatively greater expression of genes involved in growth. We have also compared gene expression in L2 stages destined to develop directly into infective L3s with those destined to develop indirectly into free-living adults. This revealed relatively small differences in gene expression. We find little evidence for the conservation of transcription profiles between S. ratti and S. stercoralis or C. elegans. Conclusion This is the first multi-gene study of gene expression in S. ratti. This has shown that robust data can be generated, with consistent measures of expression within computationally determined clusters and contigs. We find inconsistencies between EST representation data and microarray hybridization data in the identification of genes with stage-specific expression and highly expressed genes. Many of the genes whose expression is significantly different between L1 and iL3s stages are unknown beyond alignments to predicted genes. This highlights the forthcoming challenge in actually determining the role of these genes in the life of S. ratti.

  6. Karyotype and reproduction mode of the rodent parasite Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Akina; Tanaka, Teruhisa; Takaishi, Maho; Fujii, Yumiko; Palomares-Rius, Juan E; Hasegawa, Koichi; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Kikuchi, Taisei

    2014-11-01

    SUMMARY Strongyloides venezuelensis is a parasitic nematode that infects rodents. Although Strongyloides species described to date are known to exhibit parthenogenetic reproduction in the parasitic stage of their life cycle and sexual reproduction in the free-living stage, we did not observe any free-living males in S. venezuelensis in our strain, suggesting that the nematode is likely to depend on parthenogenetic reproduction. We confirmed by cytological analysis that S. venezuelensis produces eggs by parthenogenesis during the parasitic stage of its life cycle. Phylogenetic analysis using nearly the full length of 18S and D3 region of 28S ribosomal RNA gene suggested that S. venezuelensis is distantly related to another rodent parasite, namely Strongyloides ratti, but more closely related to a ruminant parasite, Strongyloides papillosus. Karyotype analysis revealed S. venezuelensis reproduces with mitotic parthenogenesis, and has the same number of chromosomes as S. papillosus (2n = 4), but differs from S. ratti (2n = 6) in this regard. These results, taken together, suggest that S. venezuelensis evolved its parasitism for rodents independently from S. ratti and, therefore, is likely to have a different reproductive strategy.

  7. Intestinal parasitic infections and eosinophilia in an human immunedeficiency virus positive population in Honduras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina G Kaminsky

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of intestinal parasites, their regional distribution and their relations to eosinophilia were studied in 133 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive individuals from Honduras. After signing an informed consent, participants answered a socio-demographic and risk factor questionnaire, a complete physical examination, medical history, and a series of laboratory tests. All participants were HIV positive but not acquired immunodeficiency syndrome positive. Of them, 67% were co-infected with pathogen and non pathogen parasites. Overall occurrence of nematodes was: 44.3% for Trichuris trichiura, 24% for Ascaris lumbricoides, 12% for Hookworm and 7.5% for Strongyloides stercoralis. No cases of Giardia lamblia, acute amebiasis or cryptosporidiasis were diagnosed. Mean eosinophil percents for participants were consistently and significantly higher in infected than in non infected individuals: 22% for Hookworm vs 7.2% (p < 0.001, 11% for Trichuris compared to 5.2% (p < 0.001, 13.2% compared to 7.5% for S. stercoralis (p < 0.05, and 12% compared to 6% for Ascaris cases (p < 0.05. Helminths and non pathogenic protozoa, as single or mixed infections, occurred among the participants. There was a strong correlation between eosinophilia and helminthiasis infections; however, none was identified between CD4 levels and eosinophilia. Because parasitic infections aggravate malnutrition and promote a disbalanced Th2 response in a potentially immuno-compromised host, their effect on HIV disease progression needs further study, mainly in countries were HIV and parasitic infections are highly prevalent.

  8. Determining intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) in inmates from Kajang Prison, Selangor, Malaysia for improved prison management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angal, Lorainne; Mahmud, Rohela; Samin, Sajideh; Yap, Nan-Jiun; Ngui, Romano; Amir, Amirah; Ithoi, Init; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Lim, Yvonne A L

    2015-10-29

    The prison management in Malaysia is proactively seeking to improve the health status of the prison inmates. Intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) are widely distributed throughout the world and are still gaining great concern due to their significant morbidity and mortality among infected humans. In Malaysia, there is a paucity of information on IPIs among prison inmates. In order to further enhance the current health strategies employed, the present study aims to establish firm data on the prevalence and diversity of IPIs among HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected individuals in a prison, an area in which informed knowledge is still very limited. Samples were subjected to microscopy examination and serological test (only for Strongyloides). Speciation for parasites on microscopy-positive samples and seropositive samples for Strongyloides were further determined via polymerase chain reaction. SPSS was used for statistical analysis. A total of 294 stool and blood samples each were successfully collected, involving 131 HIV positive and 163 HIV negative adult male inmates whose age ranged from 21 to 69-years-old. Overall prevalence showed 26.5% was positive for various IPIs. The IPIs detected included Blastocystis sp., Strongyloides stercoralis, Entamoeba spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., and Trichuris trichiura. Comparatively, the rate of IPIs was slightly higher among the HIV positive inmates (27.5%) than HIV negative inmates (25.8%). Interestingly, seropositivity for S. stercoralis was more predominant in HIV negative inmates (10.4%) compared to HIV-infected inmates (6.9%), however these findings were not statistically significant. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed the presence of Blastocystis, Strongyloides, Entamoeba histolytica and E. dispar. These data will enable the health care providers and prison management staff to understand the trend and epidemiological situations in HIV/parasitic co-infections in a prison. This information will further

  9. The prevalence and diversity of intestinal parasitic infections in humans and domestic animals in a rural Cambodian village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Fabian; Inpankaew, Tawin; Traub, Rebecca J; Khieu, Virak; Dalsgaard, Anders; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Chhoun, Chamnan; Sok, Daream; Marti, Hanspeter; Muth, Sinuon; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-08-01

    In Cambodia, intestinal parasitic infections are prevalent in humans and particularly in children. Yet, information on potentially zoonotic parasites in animal reservoir hosts is lacking. In May 2012, faecal samples from 218 humans, 94 dogs and 76 pigs were collected from 67 households in Dong village, Preah Vihear province, Cambodia. Faecal samples were examined microscopically using sodium nitrate and zinc sulphate flotation methods, the Baermann method, Koga Agar plate culture, formalin-ether concentration technique and Kato Katz technique. PCR was used to confirm hookworm, Ascaris spp., Giardia spp. and Blastocystis spp. Major gastrointestinal parasitic infections found in humans included hookworms (63.3%), Entamoeba spp. (27.1%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (24.3%). In dogs, hookworm (80.8%), Spirometra spp. (21.3%) and Strongyloides spp. (14.9%) were most commonly detected and in pigs Isospora suis (75.0%), Oesophagostomum spp. (73.7%) and Entamoeba spp. (31.6%) were found. Eleven parasite species were detected in dogs (eight helminths and three protozoa), seven of which have zoonotic potential, including hookworm, Strongyloides spp., Trichuris spp., Toxocara canis, Echinostoma spp., Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. Five of the parasite species detected in pigs also have zoonotic potential, including Ascaris spp., Trichuris spp., Capillaria spp., Balantidium coli and Entamoeba spp. Further molecular epidemiological studies will aid characterisation of parasite species and genotypes and allow further insight into the potential for zoonotic cross transmission of parasites in this community. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Distribution and risk factors for Plasmodium and helminth co-infections: a cross-sectional survey among children in Bagamoyo district, coastal region of Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahya Salim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium and soil transmitted helminth infections (STH are a major public health problem, particularly among children. There are conflicting findings on potential association between these two parasites. This study investigated the Plasmodium and helminth co-infections among children aged 2 months to 9 years living in Bagamoyo district, coastal region of Tanzania.A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1033 children. Stool, urine and blood samples were examined using a broad set of quality controlled diagnostic methods for common STH (Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, Enterobius vermicularis, Trichuris trichura, schistosoma species and Wuchereria bancrofti. Blood slides and malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs were utilized for Plasmodium diagnosis.Out of 992 children analyzed, the prevalence of Plasmodium infection was 13% (130/992, helminth 28.5% (283/992; 5% (50/992 had co-infection with Plasmodium and helminth. The prevalence rate of Plasmodium, specific STH and co-infections increased significantly with age (p < 0.001, with older children mostly affected except for S. stercoralis monoinfection and co-infections. Spatial variations of co-infection prevalence were observed between and within villages. There was a trend for STH infections to be associated with Plasmodium infection [OR adjusted for age group 1.4, 95% CI (1.0-2.1], which was more marked for S. stercoralis (OR = 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.3. Age and not schooling were risk factors for Plasmodium and STH co-infection.The findings suggest that STH and Plasmodium infections tend to occur in the same children, with increasing prevalence of co-infection with age. This calls for an integrated approach such as using mass chemotherapy with dual effect (e.g., ivermectin coupled with improved housing, sanitation and hygiene for the control of both parasitic infections.

  11. Parasitic lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Vannan Kandi

    2009-05-01

    Global climate change and population explosion leading to changes in natural ecosystem and travel across the continents have resulted in an increase in the transmission of parasites to human beings. This review focuses on recent advancements in parasitic lung infections. Invasive parasitic diseases including lung infections are increasingly being reported in patients with immunodeficiency syndromes. A recombinant kinesin-related antigen of Leishmania donovani has been validated with ELISA using urine samples for the diagnosis of visceral leishmaniasis. Pyruvate kinase deficiency has been shown to provide protection against Plasmodium falciparum infection. Intravenous artesunate is an alternative drug for the treatment of severe malaria. The best way to protect from malaria is the use of long-lasting insecticide-treated bednets. Biennial treatment with praziquantel has been found to be cost-effective treatment for control of infection with Schistosoma haematobium. Pulmonary paragonimiasis can be diagnosed by fine needle aspiration biopsy of pulmonary nodules. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection can mimic accelerated idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Migratory nodular shadows with halos are important chest computed tomographic findings in human toxocariasis. Patients with immunodeficiency syndromes (HIV infection, organ transplantation and immunosuppressive drugs, including corticosteroids) should be evaluated for early detection of parasitic lung infections.

  12. Intestinal parasitic infections in Thai HIV-infected patients with different immunity status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwanitkit Viroj

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the major health problems among HIV seropositive patients is superimposed infection due to the defect of immunity. Furthermore, intestinal parasite infection, which is also one of the basic health problems in tropical region, is common in these patients. In this study, a cross sectional study to document the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in Thai HIV-infected patients with different immune status was performed. Methods A study of stool samples from 60 Thai HIV-infected patients with different immune status was performed at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thailand. Each patient was examined for CD4 count and screened for diarrheal symptoms. Results The prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among the HIV-infected patients in this study was 50 %. Non- opportunistic intestinal parasite infections such as hookworms, Opisthorchis viverrini and Ascaris lumbricoides were commonly found in HIV-infected people regardless of immune status with or without diarrheal symptoms. Opportunistic intestinal parasites such as Cryptosporidium, Isospora belli, Microsporidia and Strongyloides stercoralis infection were significantly more frequent in the low immunity group with diarrhea. Conclusion Therefore, opportunistic intestinal parasite infection should be suspected in any HIV infected patient with advanced disease presenting with diarrhea. The importance of tropical epidemic non-opportunistic intestinal parasite infections among HIV-infected patients should not be neglected.

  13. First report of Strongyloides sp. (Nematoda, Strongyloididae) in Leopardus tigrinus (Carnivora: Felidae) in the municipality of Botucatu, State of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Karina R; Faciulli, Paula; Paparotto, Telma; Takahira, Regina K; Lopes, Raimundo S; da Silva, Reinaldo J

    2009-12-01

    The present study reports the first case of infection by Strongyloides sp. in Leopardus tigrinus in the municipality of Botucatu, State of São Paulo, Brazil. Feces of the infected L. tigrinus specimen were cultivated in sterilized equine feces and a cat (Felis catus domesticus) was experimentally infected with three thousand infective L3 subcutaneous route, in order to identify the Strongyloides species involved in the parasitism. Parthenogenetic females recovered from the experimental animals were analyzed but comparison between the biometric data found and the data in the literature did not enable identification of the species. This is the first report on the occurrence of Strongyloides sp. in L. tigrinus.

  14. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in five farms in Holambra, São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, J; Hasegawa, H; Forli, A A; Nishimura, N F; Yamanaka, A; Shimabukuro, T; Sato, Y

    1995-01-01

    A parasitological survey was carried out on 222 inhabitants of five farms in Holambra, located 30 km north of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, on October 1992. Approximately 70% of the inhabitants were found to be infected with at least one species of intestinal parasite. The positive rates of 6 helminths and 7 protozoan species detected are as follows: 5.4% Ascaris lumbricoides; 8.6% Trichuris trichiura; 19.8% Necator americanus; 10.4% Strongyloides stercoralis; 1.4% Enterobius vermicularis; 0.9% Hymenolepis nana; 3.2% Entamoeba histolytica; 2.7% E. hartmanni; 9.9% E. coli; 14.0% Endolimax nana; 2.3% Iodamoeba butschlii; 10.4% Giardia lamblia; 37.8% Blastocystis hominis. The positive rates of helminth infection were generaly higher in the younger-group under 16 years-old than those in the elder group aged 16 or more, whereas the infection rates of protozoan species were higher in the elder group. The infection rate of Strongyloides was found to be 10.4% by a newly developed sensitive method (an agarplate culture methods).

  15. IMPORTANT NEMATODE INFECTIONS IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Oemijati

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available At least 13 species of intestinal nematodes and 4 species of blood and tissue nematodes have been reported infecting man in Indonesia. Five species of intestinal nematodes are very common and highly prevalent, especially in the rural areas and slums of the big cities. Those species are Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura and Oxyuris vermicularis, while Strongyloides stercoralis is disappearing. The prevalence of the soil transmitted helminths differs from place to place, depending on many factors such as the type of soil, human behaviour etc. Three species of lymph dwelling filarial worms are known to be endemic, the urban Wuchereria bancrofti is low endemic in Jakarta and a few other cities along the north coast of Java, with Culex incriminated as vector, high endemicity is found in Irian Jaya, where Anopheline mosquitoes act as vectors. Brugia malayi is widely distributed and is still highly endemic in many areas. The zoonotic type is mainly endemic in swampy areas, and has many species of Mansonia mosquitoes as vectors. B.timori so far has been found only in the south eastern part of the archipelago and has Anopheles barbirostris as vector. Human infections with animal parasites have been diagnosed properly only when adult stages were found either in autopsies or removed tissues. Cases of infections with A. caninum, A.braziliense, A.ceylanicum, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, T.axei and Oesophagostomum apiostomum have been desribed from autopsies, while infections with Gnathostoma spiningerum have been reported from removed tissues. Infections with the larval stages such as VLM, eosinophylic meningitis, occult filanasis and other could only be suspected, since the diagnosis was extremely difficult and based on the finding and identification of the parasite. Many cases of creeping eruption which might be caused by the larval stages of A.caninum and A.braziliense and Strongyloides stercoralis

  16. Novel real-time PCR for the universal detection of Strongyloides species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramme, Stefanie; Nissen, Nicole; Soblik, Hanns; Erttmann, Klaus; Tannich, Egbert; Fleischer, Bernhard; Panning, Marcus; Brattig, Norbert

    2011-04-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a neglected disease that is prevalent mainly in tropical and subtropical regions. It is caused by intestinal nematodes of the genus Strongyloides. Due to the rise in worldwide travel, infections are increasingly encountered in non-endemic regions. Diagnosis is hampered by insensitive and laborious detection methods. A universal Strongyloides species real-time PCR was developed with an internal competitive control system. The 95% limit of detection as determined by probit analysis was one larva per PCR equivalent to 100 larvae per 200 mg stool. The assay proved to be 100% specific as assessed using a panel of parasites and bacteria and thus might be useful in the diagnostic setting as well as for Strongyloides research.

  17. Strongyloides spp Distribution on Orangutans in Tanjung Putting National Park, Care Center in Pangkalanbun, and Sebangau National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisnu Nurcahyo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides spp is a parasitic nematode in livestock, primate and human which is  considered asa danger zoonotic disease. Therefore, study about parasite distribution is very important in order to find outgenetic diversity among orangutan in quarantine, zoo and nature, as an effort to explore infection patternand life cycle of Strongyloides spp on orangutan. Amount of 326 orangutan feces were taken from threedifferent habitat of orangutan in Central Borneo, Tanjung Puting National Park, Orangutan Care Centerand Sebangau National Park. Samples which were collected from Tanjung Puting, Care Center and Sebangauwere 75, 80 and 171 respectively. Those samples were transported to the Parasitology laboratory in Facultyof Veterinary Medicine, Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta for examination and detection.  Prevalence ofstrongyloides in Tanjung Putting, Sebangau and Orangutan Care Center were 24%, 14,6% and 13,3%respectively. Among positive samples of Strongyloides, 62,5% were from male orangutans, while 37,5% werefrom female orangutans. Strongyloides in pre adult and baby orangutan were 91,6% and 4,2% respectively.Meanwhile, Strongyloides in adult orangutan were very rare. Orangutan habitat in Sebangau National Parkis an ideal habitat for orangutan, supported by the watery condition of peat land, so that Strongyloides re-infection become difficult. Some factors may have important role in Strongyloidoses, such as behavior,physical condition, nutrition, age, body weight, sex, immunity and social status of orangutan.

  18. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection in five farms in Holambra, São Paulo, Brazil Prevalência de enteroparasitoses em cinco fazendas de Holambra-SP, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Kobayashi

    1995-02-01

    Full Text Available A parasitological survey was carried out on 222 inhabitants of five farms in Holambra, located 30 km north of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, on October 1992. Approximately 70% of the inhabitants were found to be infected with at least one species of intestinal parasite. The positive rates of 6 helminths and 7 protozoan species detected are as follows: 5.4% Ascaris lumbricoides; 8.6% Trichuris trichiura; 19.8% Necator americanus; 10.4% Strongyloides stercoralis; 14% Enterobius vermicularis; 0.9% Hymenolepis nana; 3.2% Entamoeba histolytica; 2.7% E. hartmanni; 9.9% E. coli; 14.0% Endolimax nana; 2.3% Iodamoeba butschlii; 10.4% Giardia lamblia; 37.8% Blastocystis hominis. The positive rates of helminth infection were generaly higher in the younger-group under 16 years-old than those in the elder group aged 16 or more, whereas the infection rates of protozoan species were higher in the elder group. The infection rate of Strongyloides was found to be 10.4% by a newly developed sensitive method (an agarplate culture methods.Uma pesquisa coproparasitológica foi realizada em 222 habitantes de cinco fazendas de Holambra, localizada a 30 km ao norte de Campinas, SP, Brasil, em outubro de 1992. Aproximadamente 70% dos habitantes apresentaram pelo menos um tipo de parasitose intestinal. O índice de positividade das 6 espécies de helmintos e de 7 protozoários na população foi o seguinte: Ascaris lumbricoides (5,4%; Trichuris trichiura (8,6%; Necator americanus (19,8%; Strongyloides stercoralis (10,4%; Enterobius vermiculares (1,4%; Hymenolepis nana (0,9%; Entamoeba histolytica (3,2%; E. hartmanni (2,7%; E. coli (9,9%; Endolimax nana (14,0%; Iodamoeba butschlii (2,3%; Giardia lamblia (10,4%; Blastocystis hominis (37,4%. O índice de positividade para infecção por helmitos foi aparentemente maior na população mais jovem (menores de 16 anos do que no grupo de população com idades acima de 16 anos, ao contrário do índice de infecção pelos protozo

  19. The Impact of Nutrition, Helminth Infection, and Lifestyle on Elementary School Student’s Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Febianti Buntoro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a lot of helminth infections and malnutrition cases in Indonesia. Some of the effects of helminth infection are anemia, diarrhea, malnutrition, intestinal obstruction, growth and developmental disorder, and also cognitive impairment. This study aimed to explore the impact of nutrition, helminth infection, and lifestyle on elementary school students’ achievement. An observational analytical study with the cross-sectional design was used. The study was participated by 65 elementary school students grade 3, 4, and 5. The study was conducted in Pasir Panjang Elementary School, Kupang, Nusa Tenggara Timur, Indonesia. The data was analyzed using chi-square. There were 7 students (10.77% having helminth infections:4 students (57.1% had Ascarislumbricoides infection, 2 students (28.6% had Enterobius vermicularis infection, and 1 student (14.3% had Strongyloides stercoralis infection. There were no differences found on students’ achievement between students with normal and low nutritional state (p = 0.917; p > 0.05 and between different lifestyle habit  (p = 0.768;  p > 0.05. However, a significant difference in students’ achievement was found between students with and without helminth infection (p = 0.036; p < 0.05. Helminth infection had a significant impact on elementary school students’ achievement, but no significant impact found for differences in nutritional state and lifestyle habit.

  20. Parasitological and serological studies on Amoebiasis and other intestinal parasitic infections in Recife and its suburban area, northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsu Okazaki

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available Parasitological examinations were carried out during April to August, 1987, with 187 out-patients of the IMIP hospital, located in the center of Recife City, and 464 inhabitants of several villages around Cabo City, 50 Km southeast of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Approximately 71% of the IMIP patients and 92% of the Cabo inhabitants were infected with at least one species of intestinal parasite. There was minimum difference in the prevalence rate of Trichuris trichiura between two areas, whereas the prevalence rates of Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworms, Strongyloides stercoralis, Schistosoma mansoni and Entamoeba histolytica were higher in the inhabitants of the Cabo City area. Only Giardia lamblia was more prevalent in the out-patients of IMIP hospital. Test tube cultivation revealed that the prevalence rate of Necator americanus in both areas was much higher than that of Ancylostoma duodenale , and also that the prevalence rate of S. stercoralis of the IMIP patients and Cabo inhabitants were 4.5% and 9.6%, respectively. Six hundred and fifteen sera were serologically examined for amoebiasis by the gel diffusion precipitation test (GDP and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using the antigen prepared from axenically cultured trophozoite of E. histolytica (strain HM-ITMSS. No positive reaction was observed in all of the sera as examined by GDP, while 32 out of 615 sera were positive on ELISA.

  1. Enterobiasis and strongyloidiasis and associated co-infections and morbidity markers in infants, preschool- and school-aged children from rural coastal Tanzania: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Nahya; Schindler, Tobias; Abdul, Ummi; Rothen, Julian; Genton, Blaise; Lweno, Omar; Mohammed, Alisa S; Masimba, John; Kwaba, Denis; Abdulla, Salim; Tanner, Marcel; Daubenberger, Claudia; Knopp, Stefanie

    2014-12-09

    There is a paucity of data pertaining to the epidemiology and public health impact of Enterobius vermicularis and Strongyloides stercoralis infections. We aimed to determine the extent of enterobiasis, strongyloidiasis, and other helminth infections and their association with asymptomatic Plasmodium parasitaemia, anaemia, nutritional status, and blood cell counts in infants, preschool-aged (PSAC), and school-aged children (SAC) from rural coastal Tanzania. A total of 1,033 children were included in a cross-sectional study implemented in the Bagamoyo district in 2011/2012. Faecal samples were examined for intestinal helminth infections using a broad set of quality controlled methods. Finger-prick blood samples were subjected to filariasis and Plasmodium parasitaemia testing and full blood cell count examination. Weight, length/height, and/or mid-upper arm circumference were measured and the nutritional status determined in accordance with age. E. vermicularis infections were found in 4.2% of infants, 16.7%, of PSAC, and 26.3% of SAC. S. stercoralis infections were detected in 5.8%, 7.5%, and 7.1% of infants, PSAC, and SAC, respectively. Multivariable regression analyses revealed higher odds of enterobiasis in children of all age-groups with a reported anthelminthic treatment history over the past six months (odds ratio (OR): 2.15; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22 - 3.79) and in SAC with a higher temperature (OR: 2.21; CI: 1.13 - 4.33). Strongyloidiasis was associated with eosinophilia (OR: 2.04; CI: 1.20-3.48) and with Trichuris trichiura infections (OR: 4.13; CI: 1.04-16.52) in children of all age-groups, and with asymptomatic Plasmodium parasitaemia (OR: 13.03; CI: 1.34 - 127.23) in infants. None of the investigated helminthiases impacted significantly on the nutritional status and anaemia, but moderate asymptomatic Plasmodium parasitaemia was a strong predictor for anaemia in children aged older than two years (OR: 2.69; 95% CI: 1.23 - 5.86). E. vermicularis

  2. Distribution and risk factors for Plasmodium and helminth co-infections: a cross-sectional survey among children in Bagamoyo district, coastal region of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Nahya; Knopp, Stefanie; Lweno, Omar; Abdul, Ummi; Mohamed, Ali; Schindler, Tobias; Rothen, Julian; Masimba, John; Kwaba, Denis; Mohammed, Alisa S; Althaus, Fabrice; Abdulla, Salim; Tanner, Marcel; Daubenberger, Claudia; Genton, Blaise

    2015-04-01

    Plasmodium and soil transmitted helminth infections (STH) are a major public health problem, particularly among children. There are conflicting findings on potential association between these two parasites. This study investigated the Plasmodium and helminth co-infections among children aged 2 months to 9 years living in Bagamoyo district, coastal region of Tanzania. A community-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 1033 children. Stool, urine and blood samples were examined using a broad set of quality controlled diagnostic methods for common STH (Ascaris lumbricoides, hookworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, Enterobius vermicularis, Trichuris trichura), schistosoma species and Wuchereria bancrofti. Blood slides and malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs) were utilized for Plasmodium diagnosis. Out of 992 children analyzed, the prevalence of Plasmodium infection was 13% (130/992), helminth 28.5% (283/992); 5% (50/992) had co-infection with Plasmodium and helminth. The prevalence rate of Plasmodium, specific STH and co-infections increased significantly with age (p Plasmodium infection [OR adjusted for age group 1.4, 95% CI (1.0-2.1)], which was more marked for S. stercoralis (OR = 2.2, 95% CI (1.1-4.3). Age and not schooling were risk factors for Plasmodium and STH co-infection. The findings suggest that STH and Plasmodium infections tend to occur in the same children, with increasing prevalence of co-infection with age. This calls for an integrated approach such as using mass chemotherapy with dual effect (e.g., ivermectin) coupled with improved housing, sanitation and hygiene for the control of both parasitic infections.

  3. Strongyloidiasis in the immunocompetent: an overlooked infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Tachamo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is a parasitic infestation caused by Strongyloides stercoralis. Most cases are asymptomatic; however, symptomatic patients may present with a wide range of non-specific cutaneous, pulmonary, or gastrointestinal symptoms posing a diagnostic dilemma and delay in diagnosis. We report a case of a 58-year-old female who presented with months of generalized pruritus and abdominal discomfort along with persistent eosinophilia due to strongyloidiasis, which completely resolved with treatment.

  4. Coincident helminth infection modulates systemic inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parakkal Jovvian George

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are known to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB. However, the role of helminth infections in modulating responses associated with inflammation and immune activation (reflecting disease activity and/or severity in TB is not known.We measured markers of inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary TB individuals (ATB with co-incidental Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss infection. These included systemic levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors and immune activation markers. As a control, we measured the systemic levels of the same molecules in TB-uninfected individuals (NTB with or without Ss infection.Our data confirm that ATB is associated with elevated levels of the various measured molecules when compared to those seen in NTB. Our data also reveal that co-incident Ss infection in ATB individuals is associated with significantly decreased circulating levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the systemic immune activation markers, sCD14 and sCD163. These changes are specific to ATB since they are absent in NTB individuals with Ss infection.Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the markers associated with TB disease activity and severity and indicate that co-incidental helminth infections might dampen the severity of TB disease.

  5. Prevalence of intestinal helminthic infections and malnutrition among schoolchildren of the Zegie Peninsula, northwestern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Merem; Nibret, Endalkachew; Munshea, Abaineh

    A cross-sectional study involving 408 schoolchildren was performed from November 2013 to February 2014 to assess the prevalence of intestinal helminthic infections and malnutrition among schoolchildren of the Zegie Peninsula, northwestern Ethiopia. A structured questionnaire was used to gather data on the demographic and risk factors associated with intestinal helminthic infections. Stool samples were collected and examined for helminth eggs using the formalin-ether concentration technique. In addition, anthropometric measurements were performed to assess the nutritional status of the schoolchildren. The overall prevalence of intestinal helminthic infections in the study area was 69.1%. Single, double, triple, and quadruple infections were 42.2%, 18.4%, 5.9%, and 0.7%, respectively. The prevalence of hookworm, Schistosoma mansoni, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Hymenolepis nana, and Strongyloides stercoralis infections were 43.4%, 29.9%, 12.7%, 10%, 4.6%, and 0.7%, respectively. The prevalence of malnutrition in terms of stunting, being underweight, and wasting were 15.3%, 18%, and 27.6%, respectively. However, no significant association was found between intestinal helminthic infections and stunting, being underweight and wasting (p>0.05). It can be concluded that intestinal helminthic infections, specifically infections due to hookworm and S. mansoni, are important health problems among schoolchildren of the Zegie Peninsula. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A 6 year Geohelminth infection profile of children at high altitude in Western Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VS Binu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geohelminth infections are a major problem of children from the developing countries. Children with these infections suffer from developmental impairments and other serious illnesses. This study aimed to measure the prevalence of geohelminth infection, infection intensity as well as the change in the intensity in children from Western Nepal over years. Methods This 6-year hospital based prospective study at the Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara included children ( Results The overall prevalence in hospital - attending children was 9.2% with 7.6% in preschool (0 – 5 y and 11.0% in school-age (6 – 15 y children, and in community 17.7% with 14.8% in pre-school and 20.5% in school-age children. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Ancylostoma deodenale and Strongyloides stercoralis were the common geohelminths with a gradual decrease in worm load over the years. School-age children were found to be significantly more prone to geohelminth infection as compared to preschool children, but no statistical difference was detected by gender, district as well as season. Conclusion This heavy infection of geohelminths in children should be corrected by appropriate medication and maintaining strict personal hygiene. Health education, clean water, good sewage management and a congenial environment should be ensured to minimise infection.

  7. Hookworm infection is associated with decreased CD4+ T cell counts in HIV-infected adult Ugandans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozena M Morawski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Most studies evaluating epidemiologic relationships between helminths and HIV have been conducted in the pre-ART era, and evidence of the impact of helminth infections on HIV disease progression remains conflicting. Less is known about helminth infection and clinical outcomes in HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART. We sampled HIV-infected adults for eight gastrointestinal parasites and correlated parasitic infection with demographic predictors, and clinical and immunologic outcomes. Contrasting with previous studies, we measured parasitic infection with a quantitative, highly sensitive and specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. This cohort study enrolled HIV-infected Ugandans from August-September 2013 in Mbale, Uganda and collected stool and blood samples at enrollment. Real-time PCR quantified stool: Ascaris lumbricoides, Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus, Strongyloides stercoralis, Trichuris trichiura, Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia intestinalis infection. Generalized linear models assessed relationships between parasitic infection and clinical or demographic data. 35% of participants (71/202 tested positive for ≥1 helminth, mainly N. americanus (55/199, 28%, and 4.5% (9/202 were infected with ≥2 stool parasites. Participants with hookworm infection had lower average CD4+ cell counts (-94 cells/mcL, 95%CI: -141, -48 cells/mcL; p<0.001 after adjustment for sex, CD4+ nadir at clinic entry, and time on ART. The high prevalence of parasitic infection and correlation with decreased CD4+ concentrations highlight the need to re-examine the effects of invasive helminth co-infection in rural, HIV-infected populations in the era of widely available ART. Elucidating the relationship between hookworm infection and immune recovery could provide opportunities for health optimization, e.g. integrated deworming, in these vulnerable populations.

  8. Flare-up of ulcerative colitis after systemic corticosteroids: A strong case for Strongyloides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Horin, Shomron; Barshack, Iris; Chowers, Yehuda; Mouallem, Meir

    2008-01-01

    Super-imposed infection with intestinal organisms can mimic a flare-up of underlying disease in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We report a case of patient with long standing ulcerative colitis (UC), who presented with abdominal pain, diarrhea and low-grade fever after receiving systemic corticosteroids for an unrelated disorder. Despite a negative stool examination, a peripheral eosinophilia reappeared upon tapering down of a corticosteroid dose. Subsequently, duodenal biopsies showed evidence for Strongyloides, presumably acquired 20 years ago when the patient was residing in Brazil. The patient fully recovered following anti-helmintic therapy. This case underscores the importance of considering Strongyloides in the work-up of flaring-up IBD patients, even if a history of residing or traveling to endemic areas is in the distant past. PMID:18666337

  9. Use of larval, parasitic female and egg antigens from Strongyloides venezuelensis to detect parasite-specific IgG and immune complexes in immunodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A L R; Nunes, D S; Gonçalves-Pires, M R F; Ueta, M T; Costa-Cruz, J M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to use larval, parasitic female and egg antigens from Strongyloides venezuelensis to detect parasite-specific IgG and immune complexes in human serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In total, 95 serum samples were analysed, consisting of 30 patients harbouring S. stercoralis larvae, 30 healthy subjects and 35 patients with other parasites. Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic efficiency were calculated. A significant statistical difference was found in the detection of immune complexes and antibodies in patients harbouring S. stercoralis larvae from larval and eggs antigens, with higher positivity using larval antigen. The larval antigen showed the highest values for sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic efficiency in ELISA from detection of immune complexes. For the first time we used IgG anti-larvae, IgG anti-parasitic females or IgG anti-eggs for immune complex detection. We concluded that the association of antibody and immune complex detection could be used in the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.

  10. Protozoan enteric infection in AIDS related diarrhea in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waywa, D; Kongkriengdaj, S; Chaidatch, S; Tiengrim, S; Kowadisaiburana, B; Chaikachonpat, S; Suwanagool, S; Chaiprasert, A; Curry, A; Bailey, W; Suputtamongkol, Y; Beeching, N J

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of enteric protozoa and other pathogens in AIDS patients with diarrhea in Bangkok, Thailand. Of 288 consecutive patients screened in the 10 month period between November 1999-August 2000 inclusive, 55 (19.2%) had Cryptosporidium spp, 13 (4.5%) had Isospora oocyst, 11 (3.8%) had Giardia lamblia, 3 (0.9%) had Entamoeba histolytica, and 1 (0.3%) had Iodamoeba butschlii infection. The prevalence of microsporidia was 11% in this study. Of 251 patients for whom stool culture for bacteria was performed, enteric bacterial pathogens isolated were Campylobacter spp in 18 (7.1%), Salmonella spp in 11 (4.3%), and Shigella spp in 1 (0.5%). Other pathogens found in these patients were Clostridium difficile in 16/102 (15.6%). Mycobacterium spp in 18/287 (6.2%), and Strongyloides stercoralis in 23/288 (8.0%). Overall, parasitic and bacterial pathogens were identified in 140 (48.6%) patients. These pathogens were identified by the routine simple wet smear technique in 32, formalin-ether concentration method in 46, culture for S. stercoralis in 5, and culture for bacteria in 30. Additional test, using modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining, identified cryptosporidial oocyst, isospora oocyst, and Mycobacterium spp in 72. The microsporidia, initially identified by modified trichrome blue staining, all were then determined to be Enterocytozoon bieneusi by thin sectioning electron microscopy. Protozoan and bacterial pathogens were confirmed to be important etiologic agents in diarrhea in AIDS in Thailand. They were all associated with increased mortality. Routine stool examination by simple wet smear detected only one-fourth of these pathogens. Therefore all diagnostic techniques for these organisms should be made more widely available in Thailand.

  11. Control of parasitic infections among school children in the peri-urban area of Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Coeli Cunha Dórea

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Tide prevalence of intestinal parasitosis ivas investigated in a primaiy school located in Rubiâo Júnior, a peri-urban district of Botucatu, São Paulo slate, Brazil, in order to assess the effect of treatment and practical measures of prophylaxis in the control of parasitic infections among 7-to- 18-year-old school children of a low socio-economic status. The first series of parasitological examinations included 219 school children, ef which 123 (56.1 % were found to be infected with one or more parasite species. Eighty- four children canying pathogenic parasites were submitted to various anti-parasitic treatment schedules. We re-evaluated 15 (89 % students after 4 to 6 months post- chemotherapy. The results indicate that the combination of treatment with prophylactic measures has been successful in the control of parasitic infections, since reinfection rates were generally low ( 73-1 % in children infected with most parasite species. The reasons for the apparent failure in the control of infections caused by Hymenolepis nana and Strongyloides stercoralis are discussed.Prôcedeu-se o estudo da prevalência de enteroparasitoses entre escolares de 7 a 18 anos, de condições sõcio-econômicas baixas e residentes no distritoperi-urbano de Rubião Júnior, município de Botucatu, São Paulo, com o objetivo de analisar o papel de medidas profiláticas e terapêuticas no controle das parasitoses diagnosticadas. Dos 219 alunos estudados na primeira avaliação parasitolõgica, 123 (56.1% mostraram-se positivos para unia ou mais parasitoses. O tratamento foi aplicado para 84 escolares, por serem estes portadores de parasitos patogênicos. A segunda avaliação parasitolõgica foi realizada 4 a 6 meses após o tratamento em 75 (89% escolares. Os resultados indicam que o uso combinado do tratamento e medidas profiláticas foi capaz de limitar a ocorrência de novas infecções para níveis 73-1% foram encontradas para a maioria das parasitoses, exceto

  12. Prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections among schoolchi ldren in Bang Khla District, Chachoengsao Province, Central Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisit Suntaravitun

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among primary schoolchildren in rural areas from Bang Khla District, Chachoengsao Province, Central Thailand. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out between January and March 2017 among 203 schoolchildren in four rural schools using purposive sampling. All stool samples were examined using simple direct smear method and formalin ethyl acetate concentration technique. Results: The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections was 14.8% (30/203. Seven intestinal parasite species (two helminths and five protozoa were identified in the stool samples. The most common intestinal protozoa in schoolchildren was Giardia intestinalis (n = 11, 5.4% followed by Blastocystis hominis (n = 9, 4.4%, Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (n = 5, 2.5%, Entamoeba coli (n = 2, 1.0% and Endolimax nana (n = 1, 0.5%. Hookworm (n = 1, 0.5% and Strongyloides stercoralis (n = 1, 0.5% were the most frequent helminths. No significant statistical differences in the prevalence rates of infections were observed by gender, age and school location (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Intestinal parasitic infection is a significant public health problem among schoolchildren in rural areas of Thailand. Therefore, health education and environmental sanitation improvement are recommended as preventive control measures.

  13. Distribution of intestinal parasitic infections amongst aborigine children at Post Sungai Rual, Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartini, Y; Geishamimi, G; Mariam, A Z; Mohamed-Kamel, A G; Hidayatul, F O; Ismarul, Y I

    2013-12-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are important public health problems among underprivileged communities. This study was carried out to evaluate the infection rate of intestinal parasites among aborigine children at Pos Sungai Rual, Kelantan, Malaysia. A total of 111 faecal samples from aborigine children aged 4-12 years were screened for intestinal parasites by direct smear technique. Harada-Mori culture was also performed to identify hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis larvae. The results showed that 87.4% of the children examined were positive for one or more parasites. Intestinal parasites were significantly lower in boys (78.7%) as compared to girls (93.8%). The infection occurred in very young children aged 4-6 years (80.0%) and the percentage of parasite-positive cases appeared to be significantly higher (92.9%) among the children aged 7-9 years. Trichuris trichiura was the most common parasite found in aborigine children (65.8%). Low socioeconomic status, poor environmental sanitation and poor personal hygiene are possible contributing factors that increase the rate of intestinal parasitic infections among the children. Thus, the parasitic diseases will continue to threaten the people's health especially among communities from rural areas if no appropriate actions are taken to diminish the transmission of the parasites.

  14. Control of parasitic infections among school children in the peri-urban area of Botucatu, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Coeli Cunha Dórea

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Tide prevalence of intestinal parasitosis ivas investigated in a primaiy school located in Rubiâo Júnior, a peri-urban district of Botucatu, São Paulo slate, Brazil, in order to assess the effect of treatment and practical measures of prophylaxis in the control of parasitic infections among 7-to- 18-year-old school children of a low socio-economic status. The first series of parasitological examinations included 219 school children, ef which 123 (56.1 % were found to be infected with one or more parasite species. Eighty- four children canying pathogenic parasites were submitted to various anti-parasitic treatment schedules. We re-evaluated 15 (89 % students after 4 to 6 months post- chemotherapy. The results indicate that the combination of treatment with prophylactic measures has been successful in the control of parasitic infections, since reinfection rates were generally low ( 73-1 % in children infected with most parasite species. The reasons for the apparent failure in the control of infections caused by Hymenolepis nana and Strongyloides stercoralis are discussed.

  15. High prevalence of persistent parasitic infections in foreign-born, HIV-infected persons in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha S Hochberg

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Foreign-born, HIV-infected persons are at risk for sub-clinical parasitic infections acquired in their countries of origin. The long-term consequences of co-infections can be severe, yet few data exist on parasitic infection prevalence in this population.This cross-sectional study evaluated 128 foreign-born persons at one HIV clinic. We performed stool studies and serologic testing for strongyloidiasis, schistosomiasis, filarial infection, and Chagas disease based on the patient's country of birth. Eosinophilia and symptoms were examined as predictors of helminthic infection. Of the 128 participants, 86 (67% were male, and the median age was 40 years; 70 were Mexican/Latin American, 40 African, and 18 from other countries or regions. Strongyloides stercoralis antibodies were detected in 33/128 (26% individuals. Of the 52 persons from schistosomiasis-endemic countries, 15 (29% had antibodies to schistosome antigens; 7 (47% had antibodies to S. haematobium, 5 (33% to S. mansoni, and 3 (20% to both species. Stool ova and parasite studies detected helminths in 5/85 (6% persons. None of the patients tested had evidence of Chagas disease (n = 77 or filarial infection (n = 52. Eosinophilia >400 cells/mm(3 was associated with a positive schistosome antibody test (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.1-19.0. The only symptom significantly associated with strongyloidiasis was weight loss (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.4-7.2.Given the high prevalence of certain helminths and the potential lack of suggestive symptoms and signs, selected screening for strongyloidiasis and schistosomiasis or use of empiric antiparasitic therapy may be appropriate among foreign-born, HIV-infected patients. Identifying and treating helminth infections could prevent long-term complications.

  16. Comparative study of cultivation of feces in vermiculite or charcoal to obtain larvae of Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Steveen Rios; Maia, Caroline Ohnesorge; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Moreira, Narcisa Imaculada Brant

    2014-01-01

    We compared feces culturing in charcoal or vermiculite to obtain Strongyloides venezuelensis larvae. Feces (5 g) from infected rats was mixed with vermiculite (10 g) or coal (10 g) in plastic cups and incubated at 28°C for 48 h. Larvae were recovered using Baermann-Moraes method. Significantly higher number of positive larval cultures were recovered from vermiculite than from charcoal (15/17 and 4/17, respectively; p < 0.001; 990.6 ± 307.5 and 215 ± 78.1 larvae, p = 0.027). Vermiculite yields more larvae and provides cleaner pellets, improving larvae identification and facilitating their use for other purposes.

  17. Identification of Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Infant and Adult Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Keith G.; Lin, Kuei-Chin; Newman, Joseph; Schauer, David; MacKey, John; Lackner, Andrew A.; Carville, Angela

    2001-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) was recognized as a common opportunistic pathogen of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) with AIDS. Retrospective analysis revealed that 27 of 96 (28.1%) animals with AIDS had features of EPEC infection, and EPEC was the most frequent pathogen of the gastrointestinal tract identified morphologically. In 7.3% of animals dying with AIDS, EPEC represented the sole opportunistic agent of the gastrointestinal tract at death. In 20.8% of cases, it was seen in combination with one or more gastrointestinal pathogens, including Cryptosporidium parvum, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Mycobacterium avium, Entamoeba histolytica, Balantidium coli, Strongyloides stercoralis, cytomegalovirus, and adenovirus. Clinically, infection was associated with persistent diarrhea and wasting and was more frequent in animals that died at under 1 year of age (P < 0.001, Fisher exact test). The organism was associated with the characteristic attaching and effacing lesion in colonic tissue sections and produced a focal adherence pattern on a HEp-2 assay but was negative for Shiga toxin production as assessed by PCR and a HeLa cell cytotoxicity assay. A 2.6-kb fragment encompassing the intimin gene was amplified and sequenced and revealed 99.2% identity to sequences obtained from human isolates (GenBank AF116899) corresponding to the epsilon intimin subtype. Further investigations with rhesus macaques may offer opportunities to study the impact of EPEC on AIDS pathogenesis and gastrointestinal dysfunction. PMID:11230413

  18. Migratory route of Strongyloides venezuelensis in Lewis rats: comparison of histological analyses and PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Nelson Mendes; Chiuso-Minicucci, Fernanda; Machado, Gabriel Capella; Zorzella-Pezavento, Sofia Fernanda Gonçalves; França, Thaís Graziela Donegá; Ishikawa, Larissa Lumi Watanabe; Amarante, Alessandro F T; Sartori, Alexandrina; Amarante, Mônica R V

    2011-02-01

    Strongyloides venezuelensis is a parasitic nematode that has been used as a model to study human and animal strongyloidiasis. In this study, we compared the sensitivity between traditional methodologies and PCR assay to characterize the dynamics of S. venezuelensis infection and its migration route in Lewis rats subcutaneously infected with 4000 L3. The dynamics of the infection was determined by counting the number of eggs and by detecting parasite deoxyribonucleic acid in faeces samples. Both techniques similarly detected the infection at day 6 after larvae inoculation. However, PCR performed with the genus primer showed higher sensitivity during the recovery phase. Histological analysis and PCR assay were then used to follow parasite tissue migration. S. venezuelensis migration route included the muscular fibers below the skin, the pulmonary alveoli and the small intestine vilosities. The sensitivity of these two techniques to detect parasite's presence in these tissues was statistically similar. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Primeiro relato de Strongyloides sp. (Nematoda, Strongyloididae em Leopardus tigrinus (Carnivora: Felidae do município de Botucatu, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil First report of Strongyloides sp. (Nematoda, Strongyloididae in Leopardus tigrinus (Carnivora: Felidae in the municipality of Botucatu, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina R. dos Santos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo reporta o primeiro caso de infecção por Strongyloides sp. em Leopardus tigrinus no município de Botucatu, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Fezes do exemplar parasitado de L. tigrinus foram cultivadas em fezes eqüinas esterilizadas e foi realizada infecção experimental em gato (Felis catus domesticus com três mil larvas L3 infectantes por via subcutânea, para a identificação da espécie de Strongyloides envolvida no parasitismo. As fêmeas partenogenéticas obtidas do animal experimental foram analisadas porém a comparação dos dados biométricos encontrados com os dados da literatura não permitiu a identificação da espécie. Este é o primeiro relato sobre a ocorrência de Strongyloides sp. Em L. tigrinusThe present study reports the first case of infection by Strongyloides sp. in Leopardus tigrinus in the municipality of Botucatu, State of São Paulo, Brazil. Feces of the infected L. tigrinus specimen were cultivated in sterilized equine feces and a cat (Felis catus domesticus was experimentally infected with three thousand infective L3 subcutaneous route, in order to identify the Strongyloides species involved in the parasitism. Parthenogenetic females recovered from the experimental animals were analyzed but comparison between the biometric data found and the data in the literature did not enable identification of the species. This is the first report on the occurrence of Strongyloides sp. in L. tigrinus.

  20. Gastrointestinal helminths of arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) from different bioclimatological regions in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapel, C. M O; Nansen, P.

    1996-01-01

    Nine species of gastrointestinal helminths were recovered from 254 arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) from 8 different localities in Greenland. Prevalences of infection with the helminth species differed from area to area: Toxascaris leonina (3968%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0-14%), Mesocestoides...

  1. Intestinal parasitosis among Kara and Kwego semipastoralist tribes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Nine intestinal parasites were identified: Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia lamblia, Iodamoeba buetschlii, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Hookworms, Strongyloides stercoralis and Schistosoma mansoni. The difference in the rates of intestinal parasitic infection between Kara and ...

  2. pastoralist tribes in lower Omo Valley, Southwestern Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACIPH_Admin

    Results: Nine intestinal parasites were identified: Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia lamblia,. Iodamoeba buetschlii, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Hookworms, Strongyloides stercoralis and. Schistosoma mansoni. The difference in the rates of intestinal parasitic infection between Kara and ...

  3. Infection with Soil-Transmitted Helminths Is Associated with Increased Insulin Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilianto E Wiria

    Full Text Available Given that helminth infections have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in animal studies, which may be explained by beneficial effects on energy balance or by a shift in the immune system to an anti-inflammatory profile, we investigated whether soil-transmitted helminth (STH-infected subjects are more insulin sensitive than STH-uninfected subjects.We performed a cross-sectional study on Flores island, Indonesia, an area with high prevalence of STH infections.From 646 adults, stool samples were screened for Trichuris trichiura by microscopy and for Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, and Strongyloides stercoralis by qPCR. No other helminth was found. We collected data on body mass index (BMI, kg/m2, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, fasting blood glucose (FBG, mmol/L, insulin (pmol/L, high sensitive C-reactive protein (ng/ml and Immunoglobulin E (IU/ml. The homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMAIR was calculated and regression models were used to assess the association between STH infection status and insulin resistance.424 (66% participants had at least one STH infection. STH infected participants had lower BMI (23.2 vs 22.5 kg/m2, p value = 0.03 and lower HOMAIR (0.97 vs 0.81, p value = 0.05. In an age-, sex- and BMI-adjusted model a significant association was seen between the number of infections and HOMAIR: for every additional infection with STH species, the HOMAIR decreased by 0.10 (p for linear trend 0.01. This effect was mainly accounted for by a decrease in insulin of 4.9 pmol/L for every infection (p for trend = 0.07.STH infections are associated with a modest improvement of insulin sensitivity, which is not accounted for by STH effects on BMI alone.

  4. Infection with Soil-Transmitted Helminths Is Associated with Increased Insulin Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiria, Aprilianto E; Hamid, Firdaus; Wammes, Linda J; Prasetyani, Margaretta A; Dekkers, Olaf M; May, Linda; Kaisar, Maria M M; Verweij, Jaco J; Guigas, Bruno; Partono, Felix; Sartono, Erliyani; Supali, Taniawati; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Smit, Johannes W A

    2015-01-01

    Given that helminth infections have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in animal studies, which may be explained by beneficial effects on energy balance or by a shift in the immune system to an anti-inflammatory profile, we investigated whether soil-transmitted helminth (STH)-infected subjects are more insulin sensitive than STH-uninfected subjects. We performed a cross-sectional study on Flores island, Indonesia, an area with high prevalence of STH infections. From 646 adults, stool samples were screened for Trichuris trichiura by microscopy and for Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, and Strongyloides stercoralis by qPCR. No other helminth was found. We collected data on body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), fasting blood glucose (FBG, mmol/L), insulin (pmol/L), high sensitive C-reactive protein (ng/ml) and Immunoglobulin E (IU/ml). The homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMAIR) was calculated and regression models were used to assess the association between STH infection status and insulin resistance. 424 (66%) participants had at least one STH infection. STH infected participants had lower BMI (23.2 vs 22.5 kg/m2, p value = 0.03) and lower HOMAIR (0.97 vs 0.81, p value = 0.05). In an age-, sex- and BMI-adjusted model a significant association was seen between the number of infections and HOMAIR: for every additional infection with STH species, the HOMAIR decreased by 0.10 (p for linear trend 0.01). This effect was mainly accounted for by a decrease in insulin of 4.9 pmol/L for every infection (p for trend = 0.07). STH infections are associated with a modest improvement of insulin sensitivity, which is not accounted for by STH effects on BMI alone.

  5. Effect of Poor Access to Water and Sanitation As Risk Factors for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection: Selectiveness by the Infective Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echazú, Adriana; Bonanno, Daniela; Juarez, Marisa; Cajal, Silvana P.; Heredia, Viviana; Caropresi, Silvia; Cimino, Ruben O.; Caro, Nicolas; Vargas, Paola A.; Paredes, Gladys; Krolewiecki, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are a public health problem in resource-limited settings worldwide. Chronic STH infection impairs optimum learning and productivity, contributing to the perpetuation of the poverty-disease cycle. Regular massive drug administration (MDA) is the cardinal recommendation for its control; along with water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) interventions. The impact of joint WASH interventions on STH infections has been reported; studies on the independent effect of WASH components are needed to contribute with the improvement of current recommendations for the control of STH. The aim of this study is to assess the association of lacking access to water and sanitation with STH infections, taking into account the differences in route of infection among species and the availability of adequate water and sanitation at home. Methods and Findings Cross-sectional study, conducted in Salta province, Argentina. During a deworming program that enrolled 6957 individuals; 771 were randomly selected for stool/serum sampling for parasitological and serological diagnosis of STH. Bivariate stratified analysis was performed to explore significant correlations between risk factors and STH infections grouped by mechanism of entry as skin-penetrators (hookworms and Strongyloides stercoralis) vs. orally-ingested (Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura). After controlling for potential confounders, unimproved sanitation was significantly associated with increased odds of infection of skin-penetrators (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.9; 95% CI: 2.6–5.9). Unimproved drinking water was significantly associated with increased odds of infection of orally-ingested (aOR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3–3.7). Conclusions Lack of safe water and proper sanitation pose a risk of STH infections that is distinct according to the route of entry to the human host used by each of the STH species. Interventions aimed to improve water and sanitation access should

  6. Effect of Poor Access to Water and Sanitation As Risk Factors for Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection: Selectiveness by the Infective Route.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Echazú

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil-transmitted helminth (STH infections are a public health problem in resource-limited settings worldwide. Chronic STH infection impairs optimum learning and productivity, contributing to the perpetuation of the poverty-disease cycle. Regular massive drug administration (MDA is the cardinal recommendation for its control; along with water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH interventions. The impact of joint WASH interventions on STH infections has been reported; studies on the independent effect of WASH components are needed to contribute with the improvement of current recommendations for the control of STH. The aim of this study is to assess the association of lacking access to water and sanitation with STH infections, taking into account the differences in route of infection among species and the availability of adequate water and sanitation at home.Cross-sectional study, conducted in Salta province, Argentina. During a deworming program that enrolled 6957 individuals; 771 were randomly selected for stool/serum sampling for parasitological and serological diagnosis of STH. Bivariate stratified analysis was performed to explore significant correlations between risk factors and STH infections grouped by mechanism of entry as skin-penetrators (hookworms and Strongyloides stercoralis vs. orally-ingested (Ascaris lumbricoides and Trichuris trichiura. After controlling for potential confounders, unimproved sanitation was significantly associated with increased odds of infection of skin-penetrators (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.9; 95% CI: 2.6-5.9. Unimproved drinking water was significantly associated with increased odds of infection of orally-ingested (aOR = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.3-3.7.Lack of safe water and proper sanitation pose a risk of STH infections that is distinct according to the route of entry to the human host used by each of the STH species. Interventions aimed to improve water and sanitation access should be highlighted in the recommendations

  7. Failure of pyrantel in treatment of human hookworm infections (Ancylostoma duodenale) in the Kimberley region of north west Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoldson, J A; Behnke, J M; Pallant, L J; Macnish, M G; Gilbert, F; Giles, S; Spargo, R J; Thompson, R C

    1997-12-01

    A survey of 108 individuals from a coastal Aboriginal community in north Western Australia revealed that two species of gastrointestinal protozoan parasites (Giardia duodenalis--39.8%, Entamoeba coli--40.7%) and five gastrointestinal helminths (Hymenolepis nana--54.6%, Hookworm [Ancylostoma duodenale]--30.6%, Enterobius vermicularis--6.5%, Trichuris trichiura--2.8%, Strongyloides stercoralis 1.9%) were present. A total of 29 individuals infected with hookworm were offered treatment with either pyrantel pamoate at a single dose rate of 10 mg/kg body weight or albendazole (single 400 mg dose). Seven days after treatment stool samples were examined. Pyrantel had no significant effect against hookworm. In contrast, albendazole cleared hookworm infections completely and reduced the prevalence of Giardia. The former result suggests that locally A. duodenale is resistant to pyrantel and despite its relatively low cost and wide availability, should not be considered a drug of choice at this dose rate in the treatment of hookworm infections (A. duodenale) in endemic regions.

  8. Intestinal parasite infections in immigrant children in the city of Rome, related risk factors and possible impact on nutritional status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manganelli Laura

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic diseases can represent a social and economic problem among disadvantaged people - even in developed countries. Due to the limited data available concerning Europe, the aims of the present study were to evaluate the presence of parasites in immigrant children and the risk factors favouring the spread of parasites. Subsequently, the possible correlation between nutritional status and parasitic infections was also investigated. Findings A convenience sample of two hundred and forty seven immigrant children (aged 0–15 attending the Poliambulatorio della Medicina Solidale in Rome was examined. Data were collected using structured questionnaires, and parasitological and anthropometric tests were applied. Chi-squared test and binary logistic multiple-regression models were used for statistical analysis. Thirty-seven children (15% tested positive to parasites of the following species: Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba coli, Giardia duodenalis, Enterobius vermicularis, Ascaris lumbricoides and Strongyloides stercoralis. A monospecific infection was detected in 30 (81% out of 37 parasitized children, while the others (19% presented a polyparasitism. The major risk factors were housing, i.e. living in shacks, and cohabitation with other families (p Conclusions This study shows that parasite infection in children is still quite common, even in a developed country and that children’s growth and parasitism may be related. Extensive improvements in the living, social and economic conditions of immigrants are urgently needed in order to overcome these problems.

  9. Ancylostoma duodenale is responsible for hookworm infections among pregnant women in the rural plains of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navitsky, R C; Dreyfuss, M L; Shrestha, J; Khatry, S K; Stoltzfus, R J; Albonico, M

    1998-06-01

    Fecal specimens from 292 pregnant women (ages 15-40 yr) and 129 infants (ages 10-20 wk) were examined for helminth eggs by the Kato-Katz method and cultured for helminth larvae identification using a modified Harada Mori method. These specimens were collected from June 1995 through July 1996 in Sarlahi District in the southern rural plains of Nepal. Among pregnant women, the prevalence of helminth infection by the Kato-Katz method was 78.8%, 56.2%, and 7.9% for hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Trichuris trichiura, respectively. Using the modified Harada-Mori method, 66.1% and 2.0% of women's fecal cultures were positive for hookworm and Strongyloides stercoralis, respectively. All of the cultured hookworm larvae were identified as Ancylostoma duodenale. Among infants, 1 specimen was positive for hookworm and 1 for A. lumbricoides using the Kato-Katz method. The modified Harada Mori method detected no larvae in specimens from infants. There was 81.8% agreement between the 2 methods for the detection of hookworm infection. Ancylostoma duodenale is endemic in this study population and highly prevalent in pregnant women.

  10. Apoptotic mechanisms are involved in the death of Strongyloides venezuelensis after triggering of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, A L; López-Abán, J; Gajate, C; Mollinedo, F; De Melo, A L; Muro, A

    2012-12-01

    Despite progress in understanding the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the pathogenesis of helminth infections, the role in strongyloidosis is unknown. Firstly, we studied the production of NO in mice infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis as well as in macrophage cultures stimulated with parasite antigens. Somatic larvae 3 (L3) and excretory-secretory female antigens stimulate specific NO production measured by Griess reaction and expression of inducible NO synthase by RT-PCR and quantitative PCR. Moreover, mice infected with S. venezuelensis produce NO in migration stages. Secondly, we analysed the effect of NO production on L3 and females of S. venezuelensis using NO donors such as diethylenetriamine and 3,3-bis(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene. Parasites died after NO donor treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, apoptotic mechanisms are involved in the death of S. venezuelensis larvae. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Enteric parasitic infections in HIV/AIDS patients before and after the highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Paschoalette Rodrigues Bachur

    Full Text Available Enteroparasites are related to gastrointestinal alterations among patients with HIV/AIDS, some causing severe manifestations in the period before the institution of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. The prevalence of enteroparasitoses in patients with HIV/AIDS seen at two hospitals in Ceará , Brazil, was compared in the pre-HAART (Group 1; n = 482 and HAART (Group 2; n = 100 eras. Fecal parasitologic examinations (FPE were performed using the direct, Lutz, Baermann-Moraes and modified Ziehl-Neelsen methods. The following parasites were detected in Groups 1 and 2, respectively: Strongyloides stercoralis - 30.1% and 11% (p<0.0001, Ascaris lumbricoides - 15.6% and 2% (p<0.0001, hookworms - 13.7% and 2% (p<0.0001, Trichuris trichiura - 13.1% and 1% (p<0.0001, Hymenolepis nana - 0 and 1% (p = 0.1718, Giardia duodenalis - 7.9% and 1% (p = 0.0076, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar - 3.3% and 1% (p = 0.3301, Isospora belli - 4.8% and 1% (p = 0.0993, Cryptosporidium sp. - 8.1% and 0 (p = 0.0007, and non-pathogenic protozoans as well. There was a significant reduction in the prevalence of enteroparasites between the eras (63.9% to 24%; p<0.0001. In the HAART era, the following observations were made: greater frequency of enteroparasites in patients without antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.0575, as in those with AIDS (p = 0.08, and diarrhea (36% of the patients; lack of association with positive FPE (p = 0.626; and non-detection of Cryptosporidium sp. Strongyloides stercoralis showed an elevated prevalence in the two eras and was more frequent in men (32.41% than women (19.04% of Group 1 (p = 0.018, a finding suggesting the transmission of the helminth through sodomy. The advent of the HAART modified the profile of opportunistic infections, including parasites, probably due to the reconstitution of cellular immunity and the direct action of HAART on the parasites.

  12. The role of B-cells in immunity against adult Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Malky, Mohamed A; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Al-Harthi, Saeed A; El-Beshbishi, Samar N; Ohta, Nobu

    2013-05-24

    Strongyloides venezuelensis has been used as a tool and model for strongyloidiasis research. Elimination of S. venezuelensis adult worms from mice has been particularly associated with proliferation and activation of intestinal mast cells and eosinophils. To date, the role of B-cells in the protective mechanism against adult Strongyloides infection in experimental animals has not been reported in the literature. Therefore, the present study was carried to investigate the role of B-lymphocytes in immunity against adult S. venezuelensis infection using mice with a targeted deletion of the JH locus. JHD knockout mice with its wild-type Balb/c mice were infected by intra-duodenal implantation of adult S. venezuelensis. Fecal egg count, intestinal worm recovery, mucosal mast cells and eosinophils were counted. At day 11 post infection, parasites in wild-type mice stopped egg laying, while in JHD knockout mice parasites continued to excrete eggs until the end of the observation period, day 107. The higher number of parasite eggs expelled in the feces of JHD knockout infected mice was a consequence of higher worm burdens, which established in the small intestine of these animals. On the other hand worm fecundity was comparable in both groups of mice. Both B-cell-deficient mice and wild-type mice, showed an influx of mucosal mast cells and eosinophils. The absolute numbers in JHD knockout mice were lower than those seen in wild-type mice at day 11, but not to a level of significance. JHD knockout mice could not recover from infection despite the recruitment of both types of cells. Our findings highlight a role of B cells in mucosal immunity against invasion of adult S. venezuelensis and in its expulsion. Therefore, we conclude that B-cells together with mucosal mast cells and eosinophils, contribute to immunity against adult S. venezuelensis by mechanism(s) to be investigated.

  13. Structural and functional characterization of a novel scFv anti-HSP60 of Strongyloides sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenhagen, Marcelo Arantes; de Almeida Araújo Santos, Fabiana; Fujimura, Patrícia Tiemi; Carneiro, Ana Paula; Caneiro, Ana Paula; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo

    2015-05-21

    Phage display is a powerful technology that selects specific proteins or peptides to a target. We have used Phage Display to select scFv (single-chain variable fragment) clones from a combinatorial library against total proteins of Strongyloides venezuelensis. After scFv characterization, further analysis demonstrated that this recombinant fragment of antibody was able to bind to an S. venezuelensis antigenic fraction of ~65 kDa, present in the body periphery and digestive system of infective larvae (L3), as demonstrated by immunofluorescence. Mass spectrometry results followed by bioinformatics analysis showed that this antigenic fraction was a heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) of Strongyloides sp. The selected scFv was applied in serodiagnosis by immune complexes detection in serum samples from individuals with strongyloidiasis using a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), showing sensitivity of 97.5% (86.84-99.94), specificity of 98.81 (93.54-99.97), positive likelihood ratio of 81.60 and an area under the curve of 0.9993 (0.9973-1.000). Our study provided a novel monoclonal scFv antibody fragment which specifically bound to HSP60 of Strongyloides sp. and was applied in the development of an innovative serodiagnosis method for the human strongyloidiasis.

  14. Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among HIV seropositive patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaitey Yaw

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections are aggravating the incidence and progression of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection into Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS more especially in the developing countries. This study was conducted to assess the common gastrointestinal and urinary infections among HIV/AIDS patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH in Ghana between April and December 2008. Findings This work reports on gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among 500 HIV seropositive and 300 HIV seronegative patients. There was a 35% (175/500 prevalence of intestinal parasites among HIV seropositive patients compared to 4.3% (13/300 in HIV seronegative patients. Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium accounted for 19% (95/500 and 14% (70/500 respectively, while Schistosoma mansoni, Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm together accounted for 2% (10/500 of intestinal parasitic infections among the HIV seropositive patients. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05 in urinary parasitic infection between HIV seropositive 1% (2/500 and seronegative patients 0.7% (2/300. Most, 60 (86% out of 70, of the urinary tract infection among the HIV seropositive patients was due to bacteria with E. coli being the most predominant isolate, 28 (47% out of 60. There was no significant difference in infections based on age and gender. Conclusion G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium were the most common gastrointestinal parasites detected while bacteria accounted for majority of the urinary tract infections among the HIV seropositive patients at the hospital.

  15. Strongyloides cebus (Nematoda: Strongyloididae) in Lagothrix cana (Primates: Atelidae) from the Brazilian Amazon: aspects of clinical presentation, anatomopathology, treatment, and parasitic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mati, Vitor Luís Tenório; Ferreira Junior, Francisco Carlos; Pinto, Hudson Alves; de Melo, Alan Lane

    2013-12-01

    Abstract :  Seven cases of parasitism by Strongyloides cebus were identified in Lagothrix cana from Brazil. Aspects of the clinical presentation, treatment, pathology, and parasitic biology of these infections are described. Moderate to severe disease was observed, requiring hospitalization of 3 primates, and diarrhea was the most common clinical sign described. One L. cana individual died, for which ulcerative enteritis was the major finding upon histopathological analysis. The use of ivermectin in these atelids was safe and effective against the parasite. Parallel attempts to experimentally infect gerbils with the parasite failed. Lagothrix cana is presented as a new host for S. cebus. The evidence that Strongyloides infections are common in nonhuman primates under free-living conditions, and even more prevalent in captive animals, likely represents a neglected problem.

  16. Intestinal parasitic infections among expatriate workers in various occupations in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmunim Izzeldin Abdelrahman Dafalla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intestinal parasitic infections are prevalent throughout many countries. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasite carriers among 21,347 expatriate workers, including food handlers and housemaids attending the public health center laboratory in Sharjah, UAE. Stool sample collection was performed throughout the period between January and December 2013. All samples were examined microscopically. Demographic data were also obtained and analyzed. Intestinal parasites were found in 3.3% (708/21,347 of the studied samples (single and multiple infections. Among positive samples, six hundred and eighty-three samples (96.5% were positive for a single parasite: Giardia lamblia (257; 36.3% and Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (220; 31.1%, respectively, whereas mono-infections with helminths accounted for 206 (29.1% of the samples. Infection rates with single worms were: Ascaris lumbricoides (84; 11.9%, Hookworm (34; 4.8%, Trichuris trichiura (33; 4.7%, Taenia spp. (27; 3.81%, Strongyloides stercoralis (13; 1.8%, Hymenolepis nana (13; 1.8%, and Enterobius vermicularis (2; 0.28%, respectively. Infections were significantly associated with gender (x2 = 14.18; p = 0.002 with males as the most commonly infected with both groups of intestinal parasites (protozoa and helminths. A strong statistical association was noted correlating the parasite occurrence with certain nationalities (x2= 49.5, p <0.001. Furthermore, the study has also found a strong statistical correlation between parasite occurrence and occupation (x2= 15.60; p = 0.029. Multiple infections were not common (3.5% of the positive samples, although one individual (0.14% had four helminth species, concurrently. These findings emphasized that food handlers with different pathogenic parasitic organisms may pose a significant health risk to the public.

  17. Hymenolepis nana Impact Among Children in the Highlands of Cusco, Peru: An Emerging Neglected Parasite Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Miguel M; Morales, Maria Luisa; Lopez, Martha; Reynolds, Spencer T; Vilchez, Elizabeth C; Lescano, Andres G; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Garcia, Hector Hugo; White, Clinton A

    2016-11-02

    Hymenolepis nana is the most common cestode infection in the world. However, limited information is available regarding its impact on affected populations. We studied the epidemiology and symptoms associated with hymenolepiasis among children 3-16 years old in 16 rural communities of the highlands of the Cusco region in Peru. Information on demographics, socioeconomic status, symptoms as reported by parents, and parasitological testing was obtained from the database of an ongoing Fasciola hepatica epidemiologic study. A total of 1,230 children were included in the study. Forty-five percent were infected with at least one pathogenic intestinal parasite. Giardia spp. (22.9%) was the most common, followed by Hymenolepis (17.4%), Fasciola (14.1%), Ascaris lumbricoides (6.1%), and Strongyloides stercoralis (2%). The prevalence of Hymenolepis infection varied by community, by other parasitic infections, and by socioeconomic status. However, only years of education of the mother, use of well water, and age less than 10 years were associated with Hymenolepis infection in the multivariate analysis. Hymenolepis nana infection was associated with diarrhea, jaundice, headaches, fever, and fatigue. Children with > 500 eggs/g of stool were more likely to have symptoms of weight loss, jaundice, diarrhea, and fever. Hymenolepis nana infection and age were the only factors retained in the multivariate analysis modeling diarrhea. Hymenolepiasis is a common gastrointestinal helminth in the Cusco region and is associated with significant morbidity in children in rural communities. The impact caused by the emergence of Hymenolepis as a prevalent intestinal parasite deserves closer scrutiny. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. Metalloproteases of infective Ancylostoma hookworm larvae and their possible functions in tissue invasion and ecdysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotez, P; Haggerty, J; Hawdon, J; Milstone, L; Gamble, H R; Schad, G; Richards, F

    1990-01-01

    To infect their hosts, hookworm larvae must exsheath and migrate through connective tissue. A modified in vitro skin chamber was used to show that the human hookworm Ancylostoma duodenale and the zoonotic canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum penetrate epidermis, basement membrane, and dermis in similar ways. These similarities in tissue invasion properties reflect the observed biochemical similarities in parasite protease composition. The larvae of both species contain protease activity that is inhibited by o-phenanthroline; this identifies the proteases as metalloproteases. The enzyme activities exhibit an alkaline pH optimum between pH 9 and 10. During modified sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in which a protein substrate (either casein or gelatin) was used, the protease activities resolved into a major band at an Mr of 68,000 and a minor band at an Mr of 38,000. Proteases were released by living A. caninum larvae in vitro and degraded purified and radiolabeled casein to smaller peptides. Motile hookworm larvae were also incubated with purified and radiolabeled connective tissue macromolecules in vitro. Both Ancylostoma species degraded human fibronectin to a 60,000-Mr polypeptide intermediate, but could not degrade solubilized bovine elastin or human laminin. In contrast, the obligate skin-penetrating nematode Strongyloides stercoralis degraded all three substrates. This biochemical difference may explain some observed differences in invasiveness. Images PMID:2254016

  19. Serological cross-reactivity between Strongyloides venezuelensis and Syphacia muris in Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, José Eduardo N; de Carvalho, Edson Fernando G; Levenhagen, Marcelo A; de Faria, Lucas S; Gonçalves-Pires, Maria do R F; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

    2016-04-01

    One of the problems frequently faced in laboratory facilities is the possibility of the natural parasitic infection of lab animals, which can interfere with biomedical research results. The present study aimed to evaluate cross-reactivity among serum samples from Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus) naturally infected with Syphacia muris and experimentally infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis. Forty rats were divided into four groups of ten animals each. Parasite load was evaluated by quantifying the adult worms from both helminthes species recovered from the intestines and the S. venezuelensis eggs eliminated in feces. Serological cross-reactivity by parasite-specific IgG detection was tested via enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and immunoblotting. The results demonstrated that the quantity of S. venezuelensis eliminated eggs and parthenogenetic females decreased significantly in cases of co-infection with S. muris. ELISA revealed 100% cross-reactivity of serum samples from both species against the opposing antigen. IgG cross-reactivity was confirmed by IFAT using tissue sections of S. venezuelensis larvae and adult S. muris. Immunoblotting showed that IgG antibodies from the sera of animals infected with S. muris recognized eight antigenic bands from S. venezuelensis saline extract and that IgG antibodies from the sera of animals infected with S. venezuelensis recognized seven bands from S. muris saline extract. These results demonstrate the serological cross-reactivity between S. muris and S. venezuelensis in infected rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intestinal parasitic infections in HIV-infected patients, Lao People's Democratic Republic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phimpha Paboriboune

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV infection is an emerging problem in Laos. We conducted the first prospective study on intestinal parasites, including opportunistic protozoa, in newly diagnosed HIV infected patients, with or without diarrhea. The aims were to describe the spectrum of infections, to determine their prevalence and to assess their associations with diarrhea, CD4 cell count, place of residence and living conditions. METHODOLOGY: One to three stool samples over consecutive days were obtained from 137 patients. The Kato thick smear method, formalin-ethyl concentration and specific stains for coccidia and microsporidia diagnosis were performed on 260 stool samples. Baseline characteristics regarding relevant demographics, place of residence and living conditions, clinical features including diarrhea, were collected using a standardized questionnaire. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The 137 patients were young (median age: 36 years and severely immunocompromised (83.9% at WHO stage 3 or 4, median CD4 cell count: 41/mm3. Diarrhea was present in 43.0% of patients. Parasite infection was found in 78.8% of patients, infection with at least two species in 49.6%. Prevalence rates of protozoan and helminth infections were similar (54.7% and 58.4% respectively. Blastocystis sp. was the most frequent protozoa (26.3%. Cryptosporidium sp., Cytoisospora belli and microsporidia, found at low prevalence rates (6.6%, 4.4%, 2.9%, respectively, were described for the first time in Laos. Cryptosporidium sp. was associated with persistent diarrhea. Strongyloides stercoralis was the most prevalent helminth following Opisthorchis viverrini (20.4% and 47.5% respectively. The most immunocompromised patients, as assessed by a CD4 count ≤ 50 cells/mm3, were more likely to be infected with intestinal parasites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HIV infection was mainly diagnosed at an advanced stage of immunosuppression in Lao patients. Intestinal parasite infections were highly prevalent

  1. Comparative study of cultivation of feces in vermiculite or charcoal to obtain larvae of Strongyloides venezuelensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steveen Rios Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction We compared feces culturing in charcoal or vermiculite to obtain Strongyloides venezuelensis larvae. Methods Feces (5g from infected rats was mixed with vermiculite (10g or coal (10g in plastic cups and incubated at 28°C for 48h. Larvae were recovered using Baermann-Moraes method. Results Significantly higher number of positive larval cultures were recovered from vermiculite than from charcoal (15/17 and 4/17, respectively; p < 0.001; 990.6 ± 307.5 and 215 ± 78.1 larvae, p = 0.027. Conclusions Vermiculite yields more larvae and provides cleaner pellets, improving larvae identification and facilitating their use for other purposes.

  2. Determining Soil-transmitted Helminth Infection Status and Physical Fitness of School-aged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Peiling; Fürst, Thomas; Müller, Ivan; Kriemler, Susi; Utzinger, Jürg; Steinmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are common. Indeed, more than 1 billion people are affected, mainly in the developing world where poverty prevails and hygiene behavior, water supply, and sanitation are often deficient1,2. Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and the two hookworm species, Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus, are the most prevalent STHs3. The estimated global burden due to hookworm disease, ascariasis, and trichuriasis is 22.1, 10.5, and 6.4 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), respectively4. Furthermore, an estimated 30-100 million people are infected with Strongyloides stercoralis, the most neglected STH species of global significance which arguably also causes a considerable public health impact5,6. Multiple-species infections (i.e., different STHs harbored in a single individual) are common, and infections have been linked to lowered productivity and thus economic outlook of developing countries1,3. For the diagnosis of common STHs, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends the Kato-Katz technique7,8, which is a relatively straightforward method for determining the prevalence and intensity of such infections. It facilitates the detection of parasite eggs that infected subjects pass in their feces. With regard to the diagnosis of S.stercoralis, there is currently no simple and accurate tool available. The Baermann technique is the most widely employed method for its diagnosis. The principle behind the Baermann technique is that active S.stercoralis larvae migrate out of an illuminated fresh fecal sample as the larvae are phototactic9. It requires less sophisticated laboratory materials and is less time consuming than culture and immunological methods5. Morbidities associated with STH infections range from acute but common symptoms, such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and pruritus, to chronic symptoms, such as anemia, under- and malnutrition, and cognitive impairment10. Since the symptoms are generally

  3. Economic Analysis of the Impact of Overseas and Domestic Treatment and Screening Options for Intestinal Helminth Infection among US-Bound Refugees from Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Maskery

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many U.S.-bound refugees travel from countries where intestinal parasites (hookworm, Trichuris trichuria, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis are endemic. These infections are rare in the United States and may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed, leading to potentially serious consequences. This evaluation examined the costs and benefits of combinations of overseas presumptive treatment of parasitic diseases vs. domestic screening/treating vs. no program.An economic decision tree model terminating in Markov processes was developed to estimate the cost and health impacts of four interventions on an annual cohort of 27,700 U.S.-bound Asian refugees: 1 "No Program," 2 U.S. "Domestic Screening and Treatment," 3 "Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin" presumptive treatment, and 4 "Overseas Albendazole and Domestic Screening for Strongyloides". Markov transition state models were used to estimate long-term effects of parasitic infections. Health outcome measures (four parasites included outpatient cases, hospitalizations, deaths, life years, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs.The "No Program" option is the least expensive ($165,923 per cohort and least effective option (145 outpatient cases, 4.0 hospitalizations, and 0.67 deaths discounted over a 60-year period for a one-year cohort. The "Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin" option ($418,824 is less expensive than "Domestic Screening and Treatment" ($3,832,572 or "Overseas Albendazole and Domestic Screening for Strongyloides" ($2,182,483. According to the model outcomes, the most effective treatment option is "Overseas Albendazole and Ivermectin," which reduces outpatient cases, deaths and hospitalization by around 80% at an estimated net cost of $458,718 per death averted, or $2,219/$24,036 per QALY/life year gained relative to "No Program".Overseas presumptive treatment for U.S.-bound refugees is a cost-effective intervention that is less expensive and at least as effective as

  4. Strongyloides ratti: implication of mast cell-mediated expulsion through FcεRI-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe K.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to examine whether FcεRI-dependent degranulation of intestinal mast cells is required for expulsion of intestinal nematode Strongyloides ratti, CD45 exon6-deficient (CD45-/- mice were inoculated with S. ratti. In CD45-/- mice, egg excretion in feces persisted for more than 30 days following S. ratti larvae inoculation, whereas in wild-type (CD45+/+ mice, the eggs completely disappeared by day 20 post-infection. The number of intestinal mucosal mast cells, which are known effector cells for the expulsion of S. ratti, was 75% lower in CD45-/- mice compared with that in CD45+/+ mice. Adoptive transfer of wild-type T cells from CD45+/+ mice into CD45-/- mice reduced the duration of S. ratti infection to comparable levels observed in CD45+/+ mice, with concomitant increases in intestinal mucosal mast cells. These results showed that CD45 is not involved in the effector function of intestinal mucosal mast cells against S. ratti infection. Since FcεRI-dependent degranulation of mast cells is completely impaired in these CD45 knockout mice, we conclude that FcεRIdependent degranulation is not required in the protective function of intestinal mucosal mast cells against primary infection of S. ratti.

  5. Transcriptomic analysis of four developmental stages of Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayasu, Eiji; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Itoh, Takehiko; Yoshida, Ayako; Chakraborty, Gunimala; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Maruyama, Haruhiko

    2013-02-01

    Strongyloides venezuelensis is one of some 50 species of genus Strongyloides, obligate gastrointestinal parasites of vertebrates, responsible for strongyloidiasis in humans and other domestic/companion animals. Although S. venezuelensis has been widely used as a model species for studying human/animal strongyloidiasis, the sequence information for this species has been quite limited. To create a more comprehensive catalogue of expressed genes for identification of genes potentially involved in animal parasitism, we conducted a de novo sequencing analysis of the transcriptomes from four developmental stages of S. venezuelensis, using a Roche 454 GS FLX Titanium pyrosequencing platform. A total of 14,573 contigs were produced after de novo assemblies of over 2 million sequencing reads and formed a dataset "Vene454". BLAST homology search of Vene454 against proteome and transcriptome data from other animal-parasitic and non-animal-parasitic nematode species revealed several interesting genes, which may be potentially related to animal parasitism, including nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase and ferrochelatase. The Vene454 dataset analysis also enabled us to identify transcripts that are specifically enriched in each developmental stage. This work represents the first large-scale transcriptome analysis of S. venezuelensis and the first study to examine the transcriptome of the lung L3 developmental stage of any Strongyloides species. The results not only will serve as valuable resources for future functional genomics analyses to understand the molecular aspects of animal parasitism, but also will provide essential information for ongoing whole genome sequencing efforts in this species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A protocol for chemical mutagenesis in Strongyloides ratti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Chang, Zisong; Dieterich, Christoph; Streit, Adrian

    2015-11-01

    Genetic analysis using experimentally induced mutations has been a most valuable tool in the analysis of various organisms. However, genetic analysis of endoparasitic organisms tends to be difficult because of the limited accessibility of the sexually reproducing adults, which are normally located within the host. Nematodes of the genera Strogyloides and Parastrongyloides represent an exception to this because they can form facultative free-living sexually reproducing generations in between parasitic generations. Here we present a protocol for the chemical mutagenesis of Strongyloides ratti. Further we evaluate the feasibility of identifying the induced mutations by whole genome re-sequencing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Strongyloides papillosus: changes in transcript levels of lysozyme and aspartic protease 2 in percutaneously migrated larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biewener, Valerie; Welz, Claudia; Khumpool, Grisada; Küttler, Ulla; Schnieder, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    The infection of the host is the crucial event in the life-cycle of parasites. To understand the molecular mechanisms of this important step, different methods are used in present studies. For analysis of changes in transcript levels the most sensitive method is the quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). For an accurate analysis the evaluation of a set of adequate reference genes is necessary. The present study aimed to analyse the transcriptional levels of two genes of interest, the putative aspartic protease Spa-asp-2 and the putative lysozyme Spa-lys, in infective, free-living larvae of Strongyloides papillosus at different ages and from long-term and short-term infections and percutaneously migrated ("parasitic") larvae. Percutaneously migrated larvae were collected using the PERL chamber system and ovine skin in vitro. Reference genes identified as most suitable for transcriptional analysis according to geNorm analysis were genes for the eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 alpha (Spa-eft-2), actin variation 2 (Spa-act-v2) and beta tubulin (Spa-tbb-1). Transcriptional analysis of the genes in percutaneously migrated larvae showed an upregulation of Spa-asp-2, while Spa-lys was downregulated. Data from the presented study provide a first glance into the changes of transcript levels of S. papillosus induced by percutaneous migration. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Dexamethasone reduces bronchial wall remodeling during pulmonary migration of Strongyloides venezuelensis larvae in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefé-Silva, Cristiane; Beneli, Cristina T; Celes, Mara R; Machado, Eleuza R; Ueta, Marlene T; Sorgi, Carlos A; Floriano, Elaine M; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Ramos, Simone G

    2012-09-01

    Strongyloidiasis is an intestinal parasitosis with an obligatory pulmonary cycle. A Th2-type immune response is induced and amplifies the cellular response through the secretion of inflammatory mediators. Although this response has been described as being similar to asthma, airway remodeling during pulmonary migration of larvae has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to identify the occurrence of airway remodeling during Strongyloides venezuelensis (S. v.) infection and to determine the ability of dexamethasone treatment to interfere with the mechanisms involved in this process. Rats were inoculated with 9,000 S. v. larvae, treated with dexamethasone (2 mg/kg) and killed at 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21 days. Morphological and morphometric analyzes with routine stains and immunohistochemistry were conducted, and some inflammatory mediators were evaluated using ELISA. Goblet cell hyperplasia and increased bronchiolar thickness, characterized by edema, neovascularization, inflammatory infiltrate, collagen deposition and enlargement of the smooth muscle cell layer were observed. VEGF, IL1-β and IL-4 levels were elevated throughout the course of the infection. The morphological findings and the immunomodulatory response to the infection were drastically reduced in dexamethasone-treated rats. The pulmonary migration of S. venezuelensis larvae produced a transitory, but significant amount of airway remodeling with a slight residual bronchiolar fibrosis. The exact mechanisms involved in this process require further study.

  9. Strongyloidiasis--the most neglected of the neglected tropical diseases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, A.; L., van Lieshout; Marti, H.

    2009-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminths of the genus Strongyloides (S. fuelleborni and the more prevalent S. stercoralis) are currently believed to infect an estimated 30-100 million people worldwide. The health consequences of S. stercoralis infections range from asymptomatic light infections to chronic...... in our knowledge and future research needs related to this infection. As Strongyloides infections have the potential to develop into severe disease in certain population subgroups, untreated infections could cause serious problems in the community. Therefore, we need to carefully investigate...

  10. Intestinal Parasitic Infections and Environmental Water Contamination in a Rural Village of Northern Lao PDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Alexis; Jollivet, Chloé; Morand, Serge; Thongmalayvong, Boupha; Somphavong, Silaphet; Siew, Chern-Chiang; Ting, Pei-Jun; Suputtamongkol, Saipin; Saensombath, Viengsaene; Sanguankiat, Surapol; Tan, Boon-Huan; Paboriboune, Phimpha; Akkhavong, Kongsap; Chaisiri, Kittipong

    2017-10-01

    A field survey studying intestinal parasites in humans and microbial pathogen contamination at environment was performed in a Laotian rural village to identify potential risks for disease outbreaks. A parasitological investigation was conducted in Ban Lak Sip village, Luang Prabang, Lao PDR involving fecal samples from 305 inhabitants as well as water samples taken from 3 sites of the local stream. Water analysis indicated the presence of several enteric pathogens, i.e., Aeromonas spp., Vibrio spp., E. coli H7, E. coli O157: H7, verocytotoxin-producing E. coli (VTEC), Shigella spp., and enteric adenovirus. The level of microbial pathogens contamination was associated with human activity, with greater levels of contamination found at the downstream site compared to the site at the village and upstream, respectively. Regarding intestinal parasites, the prevalence of helminth and protozoan infections were 68.9% and 27.2%, respectively. Eight helminth taxa were identified in fecal samples, i.e., 2 tapeworm species (Taenia sp. and Hymenolepis diminuta), 1 trematode (Opisthorchis sp.), and 5 nematodes (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis, trichostrongylids, and hookworms). Six species of intestinal protists were identified, i.e., Blastocystis hominis, Cyclospora spp., Endolimax nana, Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, Entamoeba coli, and Giardia lamblia. Questionnaires and interviews were also conducted to determine risk factors of infection. These analyses together with a prevailing infection level suggested that most of villagers were exposed to parasites in a similar degree due to limited socio-economic differences and sharing of similar practices. Limited access to effective public health facilities is also a significant contributing factor.

  11. Malnutrition and intestinal parasitic infections in school children of Gondar, North West Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worku, Netsanet; Erko, Berhanu; Torben, Workineh; Belay, Mulugeta; Kasssu, Afework; Fetene, Teshome; Huruy, Kahsay

    2009-01-01

    In developing countries, malnutrition is a considerable health problem with prevalence ranges of 4-46%, with 1-10% severely malnourished. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of malnutrition and intestinal parasitoses and identify risk factors of malnutrition in schoolchildren. A cross-sectional study was carried out on 322 schoolchildren, of age 6 to 14 years, attending private and government primary schools, in Gonder town, North West Ethiopia. The study was conducted from December 2006 to February 2007. Nutritional status of these children was determined using anthropometric parameters (weight-for-age, height-for-age and weight-for-height). Epi Info 2000 software was used to evaluate anthropometric results of each individual and formol-ether concentration technique was employed to identify parasites. The prevalence of underweight, stunting, wasting and intestinal parasitoses was 34.8%, 27%, 50% and 55.6%, respectively. Parasites encountered during the study were Ascaris lumbricoides (17.8%), Trichuiris trichiura (3.4%), hookworm (4.3%), Giardia lamblia (9%), Entamoeba histolytica (2.1%), Schistosoma mansoni (2.4%), Hymenolepis nana (4.7%) and Enterobius vermicularis (0.31%), respectively, in single infections. Only two cases of Strongyloides stercoralis was found in multiple infections and none in single infections. The prevalence of multiple parasitoses was 10.9%. Maternal literacy status, sex and age of the child were significantly associated with malnutrition (p malnutrition (stunting) was decreasing, indicators of acute type of malnutrition were increasing at a higher rate in the area. Implementation of maternal education and school feeding programs, avoidance of students from getting in contact with waste and river water were recommended to avoid malnutrition and intestinal parasitoses in children of the study area.

  12. A four-antigen mixture for rapid assessment of Onchocerca volvulus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbelo, Peter D; Leahy, Hannah P; Iadarola, Michael J; Nutman, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    Onchocerciasis, an infection caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, is a major public health concern. Given the debilitating symptoms associated with onchocerciasis and concerns about recrudescence in areas of previous onchocerciasis control, more efficient tools are needed for diagnosis and monitoring of control measures. We investigated whether luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) may be used as a more rapid, specific, and standardized diagnostic assay for Onchocerca volvulus infection. Four recombinantly produced Onchocerca volvulus antigens (Ov-FAR-1, Ov-API-1, Ov-MSA-1 and Ov-CPI-1) were tested by LIPS on a large cohort of blinded sera comprised of both uninfected controls and patients with a proven parasitic infection including Onchocerca volvulus (Ov), Wuchereria bancrofti (Wb), Loa loa (Ll), Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss), and with other potentially cross-reactive infections. In addition to testing all four Ov antigens separately, a mixture that tested all four antigens simultaneously was evaluated in the standard 2-hour incubation format as well as in a 15-minute rapid LIPS format. Antibody responses to the four different Ov antigens allowed for unequivocal differentiation between Ov-infected and uninfected control sera with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Analysis of the antibody titers to each of these four antigens in individual Ov-infected sera revealed that they were markedly different and did not correlate (r(S) = -0.11 to 0.58; P = 0.001 to 0.89) to each other. Compared to Ov-infected sera, patients infected with Wb, Ll, Ss, and other conditions had markedly lower geometric mean antibody titers to each of the Ov 4 antigens (P<0.0002 for each antigen). The simplified method of using a mixture of the 4 Ov antigens simultaneously in the standard format or a quick 15-minute format (QLIPS) showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity in distinguishing the Ov-infected sera from the uninfected control sera. Finally, the QLIPS

  13. A four-antigen mixture for rapid assessment of Onchocerca volvulus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D Burbelo

    Full Text Available Onchocerciasis, an infection caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus, is a major public health concern. Given the debilitating symptoms associated with onchocerciasis and concerns about recrudescence in areas of previous onchocerciasis control, more efficient tools are needed for diagnosis and monitoring of control measures. We investigated whether luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS may be used as a more rapid, specific, and standardized diagnostic assay for Onchocerca volvulus infection.Four recombinantly produced Onchocerca volvulus antigens (Ov-FAR-1, Ov-API-1, Ov-MSA-1 and Ov-CPI-1 were tested by LIPS on a large cohort of blinded sera comprised of both uninfected controls and patients with a proven parasitic infection including Onchocerca volvulus (Ov, Wuchereria bancrofti (Wb, Loa loa (Ll, Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss, and with other potentially cross-reactive infections. In addition to testing all four Ov antigens separately, a mixture that tested all four antigens simultaneously was evaluated in the standard 2-hour incubation format as well as in a 15-minute rapid LIPS format.Antibody responses to the four different Ov antigens allowed for unequivocal differentiation between Ov-infected and uninfected control sera with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Analysis of the antibody titers to each of these four antigens in individual Ov-infected sera revealed that they were markedly different and did not correlate (r(S = -0.11 to 0.58; P = 0.001 to 0.89 to each other. Compared to Ov-infected sera, patients infected with Wb, Ll, Ss, and other conditions had markedly lower geometric mean antibody titers to each of the Ov 4 antigens (P<0.0002 for each antigen. The simplified method of using a mixture of the 4 Ov antigens simultaneously in the standard format or a quick 15-minute format (QLIPS showed 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity in distinguishing the Ov-infected sera from the uninfected control sera. Finally

  14. Experimental evolution of parasite life-history traits in Strongyloides ratti (Nematoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Steve; Barber, Rebecca

    2007-06-22

    Evolutionary ecology predicts that parasite life-history traits, including a parasite's survivorship and fecundity within a host, will evolve in response to selection and that their evolution will be constrained by trade-offs between traits. Here, we test these predictions using a nematode parasite of rats, Strongyloides ratti, as a model. We performed a selection experiment by passage of parasite progeny from either early in an infection ('fast' lines) or late in an infection ('slow' lines). We found that parasite fecundity responded to selection but that parasite survivorship did not. We found a trade-off mediated via conspecific density-dependent constraints; namely, that fast lines exhibit higher density-independent fecundity than slow lines, but fast lines suffered greater reduction in fecundity in the presence of density-dependent constraints than slow lines. We also found that slow lines both stimulate a higher level of IgG1, which is a marker for a Th2-type immune response, and show less of a reduction in fecundity in response to IgG1 levels than for fast lines. Our results confirm the general prediction that parasite life-history traits can evolve in response to selection and indicate that such evolutionary responses may have significant implications for the epidemiology of infectious disease.

  15. Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria spp. and other endoparasite infections in kennel dogs in central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauda Federica

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence and risk factors of Leishmania infantum, Dirofilaria spp. and other potentially zoonotic or canine-specific endoparasite infections were assessed in 639 kennel dogs from central Italy. To this end, individual blood and fecal samples were examined using parasitological, immunological and molecular techniques. The presence of compatible clinical pictures, as well as age and gender were considered as putative risks factors. To evaluate risk factors, multivariable analysis with logistic regression and univariable analysis with a Chi square test and a Fischer’s exact test were performed. Overall, 52.6% of dogs (95% CI 48.6-56.5 were found positive, while 39.6% of dogs (95% CI 35.8-43.5 were infected by potentially zoonotic species. Leishmania infantum and Dirofilaria repens showed prevalences of 2.5% (95% CI 1.5-4.1 and 2.8% (95% CI 1.7-4.5, respectively. The prevalence of cardiorespiratory parasites was 7.8% (95% CI 5.9-10.3 and included the species Angiostrongylus vasorum, Eucoleus aerophilus, Eucoleus boehmi and D. immitis; the latter showed a prevalence of 0.2% (95% CI 0.001-1. Intestinal parasites were significantly prevalent (38.8%, 95% CI 35-42.7 and they consisted mainly of species of major zoonotic concern, including ancylostomatids, Toxocara canis, Giardia duodenalis, Dipylidium caninum, Taeniidae, Strongyloides stercoralis and Cryptosporidium parvum. Endoparasites were significantly prevalent in clinically suspected dogs. Leishmania infantum and cardiorespiratory nematodes were prevalent in older dogs, while intestinal parasites were prevalent in younger dogs. Results show high dog and public health risks in kennels in central Italy, and suggest the need for more effective control measures.

  16. The role of IL-33/ST2, IL-4, and eosinophils on the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by Strongyloides venezuelensis in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Emilia Souza; de Jesus Pereira, Cintia Aparecida; de Moura Pereira, Ana Terezinha; Moreira, João Marcelo Peixoto; de Rezende, Michelle Carvalho; Rodrigues, Jailza Lima; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Negrão-Corrêa, Deborah

    2016-08-01

    Strongyloidiasis is a neglected chronic nematode infection, in which the control of autoinfection rate and severity of disease is dependent on type 2 immune responses. Strongyloides also causes Th2 responses in the lung of infected animals and changes in airway function, including airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Mechanisms of AHR during Strongyloides venezuelensis infection are not entirely known, and we investigate here the role of IL-4, eosinophils, and IL-33/ST2. AHR was evaluated in infected mice by determining changes in lung function after increasing doses of methacholine. Balb/C, but no C57Bl/6, mice developed AHR, tissue eosinophilia, and increased local IL-4 and IL-5 production. Functional changes peaked at day 4 and 7, after the larva had left the lungs. AHR was clearly dependent on IL-4 but not on eosinophils, as evaluated by experiments in IL-4 and Gata-1-deficient mice. Experiments in ST2-deficient mice showed that this pathway was not needed for induction of AHR but was necessary for the maintenance of AHR and for Th2 responses in the lung. These studies clearly show a crucial role for IL-4 in the induction of AHR following S. venezuelensis infection and for IL-33/ST2 in maintaining AHR and lung Th2 responses.

  17. Prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection and associated risk factors among village health volunteers in rural communities of southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuchard Punsawad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intestinal parasitic infections remain prevalent and constitute a public health problem in certain rural areas of Thailand. Village health volunteers (VHVs, who are members of a Thai healthcare alliance, function as key providers of health prevention measures, disease control, and health education and share national health promotion campaigns with community members. This study is aimed at evaluating the prevalence, intensity, and risk factors for intestinal parasitic infection in VHVs in order to design community awareness and health education campaigns for the target population. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between January to April 2016 among village health volunteers (VHVs from four sub-districts of Nopphitam District, Nakhon Si Thammarat Province, southern Thailand. Subjects for the study were selected using a simple random sampling method. Socio-demographic variables and risk factors were collected by a structured questionnaire. Stool specimens were collected and processed using direct wet mount and formol-ether concentration techniques to determine the presence of parasites and modified Kato-Katz thick smear to determine the intensity of infection. Results A total of 324 VHVs were enrolled. The overall prevalence of intestinal helminths was 9.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.3–13.0. The prevalence of hookworm, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Trichuris trichiura were 8.0% (95% CI: 5.3–11.5, 0.9% (95% CI: 0.2–2.7, and 0.3% (95% CI: 0–1.7, respectively. Mean intensity of hookworm infection was 1732 eggs per gram of stool. The prevalence was lower for protozoan infection than for helminth infection. Blastocystis hominis accounted for the highest percentage of intestinal protozoan infections 4.0% (95% CI: 2.2–6.8, followed by Giardia intestinalis 0.6% (95% CI: 0–2.2. No statistically significant difference was observed in the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection among sub-districts (p

  18. Viability of Strongyloides venezuelensis eggs and larvae in vermiculite containing the fungus Duddingtonia flagrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laryssa Pinheiro Costa; Ferraz, Carolina Magri; Aguiar, Anderson Rocha; Araújo, Jackson Victor; Ribeiro, Steveen Rios; Rossi, Débora Goldner; Mendes, Luanderson Queiroz; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Moreira, Narcisa Imaculada Brant; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro

    2017-07-01

    Strongyloidiasis is the most clinically important disease among the infections caused by geohelminths, seeing that this parasite can cause autoinfection. The use of nematophagous fungi like Duddingtonia flagrans, that have predation action on eggs and infecciososas forms of helminths, emerges as an alternative method for environmental control. For this reason, analyzing the viability of larvae and eggs of Strongyloides venezuelensis and the action of Duddingtonia flagrans AC001 in vermiculite, as well as the action of the nematophagous fungi in different growth stages, is important to elaborate and define the best culture conditions that favor the activity of the fungus. Two different growth conditions were applied: both eggs and AC001 fungi were added at the same time to the vermiculite (assay A) and the addition of eggs after the growth of the AC001 fungi in the vermiculite (assay B). To recover the L3 larvae, the Baermann-Moraes method was applied, followed by the counting of L3 dead and alive. At last, it was observed that the vermiculite enriched with organic material is an adequate culture medium not only for the growth of the S. venezuelensis but also for the growth of the D. flagrans fungus, being therefore, a satisfactory culture medium for tests of viability and predatory action of this fungus. It was also observed that the activity of the AC001 fungus is greater when it is growing concomitantly with the eggs, in other words, when it is in the adaptation phase.

  19. The alkylphospholipid edelfosine shows activity against Strongyloides venezuelensis and induces apoptosis-like cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda-Ceballos, Ana L; Rojas-Caraballo, Jose; López-Abán, Julio; Ruano, Ana Lucía; Yepes, Edward; Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino; Muro, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Strongyloidiasis is widely distributed in the tropical and subtropical areas. Ivermectin is the drug of choice for the treatment. However, the concerns about relying treatment on a single drug make identification of new molecules a priority. Alkylphospholipid analogues, including edelfosine, are a group of synthetic compounds that have shown activity against some parasites. The objective was to assess the in vitro and in vivo activity of edelfosine, miltefosine, perifosine against Strongyloides venezuelensis. Moreover, apoptosis-like mechanism in larvae after treatment was studied. Edelfosine displayed the highest activity and the best selectivity index (LD50=49.6 ± 5.4μM, SI=1.1) compared to miltefosine or perifosine. Third stage larvae after culture with edelfosine were not able to develop an infection in mice. Treatment of mice with edelfosine showed reduction of 47% in parasitic females allocated in the gut. Moreover, DNA fragmentation was observed by TUNEL staining in larvae treated with edelfosine. These results suggest that edelfosine could be an effective drug against strongyloidiasis, probably through induction of apoptosis-like cell death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Partial cross-resistance between Strongyloides venezuelensis and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M. Khyrul; Kim, Jin-Ho; Lee, John-Wha; Hur, Jin

    1999-01-01

    Rats were immunized through an initial infection with 1,000 filariform larvae (L3) of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and after complete expulsion of worms they were challenged with 1,000 L3 of Strongyloides venezuelensis to investigate whether cross-resistance developed against a heterologous parasite. Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-immunized rats developed a partial cross-resistance against S. venezuelensis migrating larvae (MSL3) in the lungs and adult worms in the small intestine. The population of MSL3 in the lungs were significantly lower (P<0.05) in immunized rats (22.0 ± 7.4) compared with controls (105.0 ± 27.6). The populations of adult worms, egg output and fecundity were initially decreased but from day 14 post-challenge they did not show any significant difference between immunized and control rats. However, the length of worm in immunized rat was revealed as retardation. Peripheral blood eosinophilia was significantly decreased (P<0.05) on day 7 post-challenge and then gradually increased, which peaked on day 42 post-challenge when most of the worms were expelled. These results suggest that peripheral blood eosinophilia is strongly involved in the worm establishment and expulsion mechanisms. PMID:10388268

  1. THE CURRENT SITUATION OF PARASITIC INFECTIONS IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Oemijati

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections are highly prevalent in Indonesia, especially in rural areas, suburbs and slums of big cities. Twenty two species of protozoa and 32 species of helminths have been reported infecting man in Indonesia. Among the 16 species of intestinal protozoa, nine are constantly found in stool surveys, but only Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia are real pathogens. Among the blood and tissue protozoa, the most important are the malaria parasites. The most frequently encountered and widely distributed species are Plasmodium falciparum, and P. vivax. P. malariae is at present more difficult to find, while P. ovale has been reported only from Flores, Timor and Irian Jaya. The non human parasites so far has not been diagnosed in human. Among the 80 species of Anopheline mosquitoes in Indonesia, 16 have been reconfirmed as vectors. Among the other tissue protozoa, Trichomonas vaginalis is frequenUy found in the Gynaecological clinic, while Toxolasma gondii is found only in special studies. Among the 13 species of intestinal nematodes, five are highly prevalent namely : Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura and Oxyuris vermicularis, while Strongyloides stercoralis is getting more difficult to find. Filariasis is widely distributed and is still highly endemic in certain areas. Both urban and rural Wuchereria bancrofti are prevalent, but B. malayi is causing more public health problems in rural areas. Both the human and the zoonotic type are prevalent. B. timori so far has been described only from the south eastern part of Indonesia. The filarial worms have different vectors and are therefore different in epidemiology and distribution. Non human filarial worms have not been reported infecting man in Indonesia. Among the 12 species of Trematodes, only Schistosoma japonicum is endemic in Central Sulawesi, and recently an endemic area oiFasciolopsis buski was discovered in a restricted area in

  2. Prevalence and clinical relevance of helminth co-infections among tuberculosis patients in urban Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Mhimbira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infections can negatively affect the immunologic host control, which may increase the risk of progression from latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection to tuberculosis (TB disease and alter the clinical presentation of TB. We assessed the prevalence and determined the clinical relevance of helminth co-infection among TB patients and household contact controls in urban Tanzania.Between November 2013 and October 2015, we enrolled adult (≥18 years sputum smear-positive TB patients and household contact controls without TB during an ongoing TB cohort study in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We used Baermann, FLOTAC, Kato-Katz, point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen, and urine filtration to diagnose helminth infections. Multivariable logistic regression models with and without random effects for households were used to assess for associations between helminth infection and TB.A total of 597 TB patients and 375 household contact controls were included. The median age was 33 years and 60.2% (585/972 were men. The prevalence of any helminth infection among TB patients was 31.8% (190/597 and 25.9% (97/375 among controls. Strongyloides stercoralis was the predominant helminth species (16.6%, 161, followed by hookworm (9.0%, 87 and Schistosoma mansoni (5.7%, 55. An infection with any helminth was not associated with TB (adjusted odds ratio (aOR 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.88-1.80, p = 0.22, but S. mansoni infection was (aOR 2.15, 95% CI: 1.03-4.45, p = 0.040. Moreover, S. mansoni infection was associated with lower sputum bacterial load (aOR 2.63, 95% CI: 1.38-5.26, p = 0.004 and tended to have fewer lung cavitations (aOR 0.41, 95% CI: 0.12-1.16, p = 0.088.S. mansoni infection was an independent risk factor for active TB and altered the clinical presentation in TB patients. These findings suggest a role for schistosomiasis in modulating the pathogenesis of human TB. Treatment of helminths should be considered in clinical management of

  3. Control of Strongyloides westeri by nematophagous fungi after passage through the gastrointestinal tract of donkeys Controle de Strongyloides westeri por fungos nematófagos após trânsito gastrintestinal em jumentas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Milani Araujo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides westeri is the most prevalent nematode among equines aged up to four months and causes gastrointestinal disorders. The objective of this study was to observe the control of infective S. westeri larvae (L3 by the nematophagous fungi Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001 and Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34 after passage through the gastrointestinal tract of female donkeys. Twelve dewormed female donkeys that were kept in stables were used. Two treatment groups each comprising four animals received orally 100 g of pellets made of sodium alginate matrix containing a mycelial mass of either D. flagrans (AC001 or M. thaumasium (NF34. The control group consisted of four animals that received pellets without fungus. Feces samples were then collected from the animal groups at different times (after 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours. These feces were placed in Petri dishes containing 2% water-agar medium and 1000 L3 of S. westeri. AC001 and NF34 isolates showed the ability to destroy the L3, after gastrointestinal transit, thus demonstrating their viability and predatory activity.O Strongyloides westeri é o nematóide de maior prevalência entre equídeos com idade até quatro meses, causando distúrbios gastrintestinais. O objetivo do presente trabalho foi observar o controle de larvas infectantes (L3 de Strongyloides westeri pelos fungos nematófagos Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001 e Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34 após trânsito gastrintestinal em jumentas. Foram utilizadas 12 jumentas, estabuladas e previamente vermifugadas. A seguir, dois grupos tratados, contendo cada um 4 animais receberam por via oral 100 g de péletes em matriz de alginato de sódio, contendo massa miceliana dos fungos D. flagrans (AC001 ou M. thaumasium (NF34. O grupo controle foi constituído de 4 animais que receberam péletes sem fungo. A seguir, amostras de fezes dos grupos de animais foram coletadas em distintos intervalos de horas (12, 24, 48 e 72. Essas fezes foram vertidas em

  4. Prevalence of endoparasitic infection in children and its relation with cholera prevention efforts in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles T. Faulkner

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether increased knowledge and use of public health measures promoted for cholera prevention is reflected in lower prevalence of parasitic infection in households in a community in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, that is close to the border with the United States of America. METHODS: Between 1994 and 1997, fecal samples from 438 children were collected through convenience sampling and then examined for helminth eggs/larvae and protozoan cysts as biologic indicators of household compliance with recommended cholera prevention measures. The suggested measures were to wash hands before meals and after defecation, to drink purified water, to wash fruits and vegetables, and to eat well-cooked food. In addition, information on the knowledge of and the use of cholera preventive measures was collected by interviews with adult informants in 252 households (186 of those households also provided a fecal sample for analysis. RESULTS: Parasitic infections occurred in 131 of the 438 children (30%, who resided in 79 of the 186 households (42% that provided fecal samples. Giardia lamblia accounted for 12.5% of all infections. Infections with Hymenolepis nana, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, Ancylostoma/Necator, Strongyloides stercoralis, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba hartmanni, Entamoeba histolytica, Endolimax nana, and Iodamoeba bütschlii were also noted. Infected children were older and more often had an infected sibling. Households with three or more children were also more likely to have an infected child. The primary caregivers in the households where at least one child had a parasitic infection were distinguished by their inability to list at least three cholera prevention measures from memory. CONCLUSIONS: The 42% household prevalence of parasitic infection was relatively high and indicates that some residents of this community may not have fully embraced the public health education efforts

  5. Strongyloides seroprevalence before and after an ivermectin mass drug administration in a remote Australian Aboriginal community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese M Kearns

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides seroprevalence is hyper-endemic in many Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, ranging from 35-60%. We report the impact on Strongyloides seroprevalence after two oral ivermectin mass drug administrations (MDAs delivered 12 months apart in a remote Australian Aboriginal community.Utilizing a before and after study design, we measured Strongyloides seroprevalence through population census with sequential MDAs at baseline and month 12. Surveys at months 6 and 18 determined changes in serostatus. Serodiagnosis was undertaken by ELISA that used sonicated Strongyloides ratti antigen to detect anti-Strongyloides IgG. Non-pregnant participants weighing ≥15 kg were administered a single 200 μg/kg ivermectin dose, repeated after 10-42 days if Strongyloides and/or scabies was diagnosed; others followed a standard alternative algorithm. A questionnaire on clinical symptoms was administered to identify adverse events from treatment and self-reported symptoms associated with serostatus.We surveyed 1013 participants at the baseline population census and 1060 (n = 700 from baseline cohort and 360 new entrants at month 12. Strongyloides seroprevalence fell from 21% (175/818 at baseline to 5% at month 6. For participants from the baseline cohort this reduction was sustained at month 12 (34/618, 6%, falling to 2% at month 18 after the second MDA. For new entrants to the cohort at month 12, seroprevalence reduced from 25% (75/297 to 7% at month 18. Strongyloides positive seroconversions for the baseline cohort six months after each MDA were 2.5% (4/157 at month 6 and 1% at month 18, whilst failure to serorevert remained unchanged at 18%. At 12 months, eosinophilia was identified in 59% of baseline seropositive participants and 89% of seropositive new entrants, compared with 47%baseline seronegative participants and 51% seronegative new entrants. Seropositivity was not correlated with haemoglobin or any self-reported clinical

  6. Strongyloides seroprevalence before and after an ivermectin mass drug administration in a remote Australian Aboriginal community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Therese M; Currie, Bart J; Cheng, Allen C; McCarthy, James; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Holt, Deborah C; Page, Wendy; Shield, Jennifer; Gundjirryirr, Roslyn; Mulholland, Eddie; Ward, Linda; Andrews, Ross M

    2017-05-01

    Strongyloides seroprevalence is hyper-endemic in many Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, ranging from 35-60%. We report the impact on Strongyloides seroprevalence after two oral ivermectin mass drug administrations (MDAs) delivered 12 months apart in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Utilizing a before and after study design, we measured Strongyloides seroprevalence through population census with sequential MDAs at baseline and month 12. Surveys at months 6 and 18 determined changes in serostatus. Serodiagnosis was undertaken by ELISA that used sonicated Strongyloides ratti antigen to detect anti-Strongyloides IgG. Non-pregnant participants weighing ≥15 kg were administered a single 200 μg/kg ivermectin dose, repeated after 10-42 days if Strongyloides and/or scabies was diagnosed; others followed a standard alternative algorithm. A questionnaire on clinical symptoms was administered to identify adverse events from treatment and self-reported symptoms associated with serostatus. We surveyed 1013 participants at the baseline population census and 1060 (n = 700 from baseline cohort and 360 new entrants) at month 12. Strongyloides seroprevalence fell from 21% (175/818) at baseline to 5% at month 6. For participants from the baseline cohort this reduction was sustained at month 12 (34/618, 6%), falling to 2% at month 18 after the second MDA. For new entrants to the cohort at month 12, seroprevalence reduced from 25% (75/297) to 7% at month 18. Strongyloides positive seroconversions for the baseline cohort six months after each MDA were 2.5% (4/157) at month 6 and 1% at month 18, whilst failure to serorevert remained unchanged at 18%. At 12 months, eosinophilia was identified in 59% of baseline seropositive participants and 89% of seropositive new entrants, compared with 47%baseline seronegative participants and 51% seronegative new entrants. Seropositivity was not correlated with haemoglobin or any self-reported clinical symptoms

  7. Duplications and Positive Selection Drive the Evolution of Parasitism-Associated Gene Families in the Nematode Strongyloides papillosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Praveen; Jaleta, Tegegn G; Streit, Adrian; Rödelsperger, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Gene duplication is a major mechanism playing a role in the evolution of phenotypic complexity and in the generation of novel traits. By comparing parasitic and nonparasitic nematodes, a recent study found that the evolution of parasitism in Strongyloididae is associated with a large expansion in the Astacin and CAP gene families.To gain novel insights into the developmental processes in the sheep parasite Strongyloides papillosus, we sequenced transcriptomes of different developmental stages and sexes. Overall, we found that the majority of genes are developmentally regulated and have one-to-one orthologs in the diverged S. ratti genome. Together with the finding of similar expression profiles between S. papillosus and S. ratti, these results indicate a strong evolutionary constraint acting against change at sequence and expression levels. However, the comparison between parasitic and free-living females demonstrates a quite divergent pattern that is mostly due to the previously mentioned expansion in the Astacin and CAP gene families. More detailed phylogenetic analysis of both gene families shows that most members date back to single expansion events early in the Strongyloides lineage and have undergone subfunctionalization resulting in clusters that are highly expressed either in infective larvae or in parasitic females. Finally, we found increased evidence for positive selection in both gene families relative to the genome-wide expectation.In summary, our study reveals first insights into the developmental transcriptomes of S. papillosus and provides a detailed analysis of sequence and expression evolution in parasitism-associated gene families. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  8. Tratamento de ratos, experimentalmente infectados pelo Strongyloides venezuelensis, através da ivermectina administrada por via oral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Amato Neto

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Em modelo experimental, baseado na infecção de ratos pelo Strongyloides venezuelensis, foi avaliada a atividade terapêutica de duas preparações de ivermectina, para usos veterinário e humano. Houve interesse em verificar a efetividade em relação a vermes adultos e formas larvárias. A administração dos fármacos ocorreu sempre por via oral e a posologia correspondeu à dose única de 0,2mg/kg. Considerados os vermes adultos e as formas larvárias, o produto para emprego veterinário propiciou eliminações expressas pelas porcentagens de 98,0% e 84,2%; quanto à outra preparação, as taxas situaram-se em 59,3% e 73,0%, respectivamente. O estudo revelou, então, utilidade do anti-helmíntico quando usada a via oral e, também, mostrou significativa ação sobre as formas larvárias, certamente valiosa quando vigente a modalidade disseminada da estrongiloidíase.Strongyloides venezuelensis experimental infection in rats was treated by two different oral preparations of ivermectin, 0.2mg/kg. One was a human formula used by WHO in the treatment of onchocerciasis; the other was a veterinary preparation. Adult worms and larvae were evaluated. The human formulation cleared both forms in 59.3% (adult worms and 73.0% (larvae, whereas the veterinary one cleared 98.0% and 84.2%, respectively. The antilarval action is very useful when treating systemic strongyloidiasis

  9. Germline organization in Strongyloides nematodes reveals alternative differentiation and regulation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Arpita; Lightfoot, James W; Streit, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Nematodes of the genus Strongyloides are important parasites of vertebrates including man. Currently, little is known about their germline organization or reproductive biology and how this influences their parasitic life strategies. Here, we analyze the structure of the germline in several Strongyloides and closely related species and uncover striking differences in the development, germline organization, and fluid dynamics compared to the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. With a focus on Strongyloides ratti, we reveal that the proliferation of germ cells is restricted to early and mid-larval development, thus limiting the number of progeny. In order to understand key germline events (specifically germ cell progression and the transcriptional status of the germline), we monitored conserved histone modifications, in particular H3Pser10 and H3K4me3. The evolutionary significance of these events is subsequently highlighted through comparisons with six other nematode species, revealing underlying complexities and variations in the development of the germline among nematodes.

  10. Strongyloides ferreirai sp.n. (Nematoda, Rhabdiasoidea parasito do roedor Kerodon rupestris (Wied. no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. de Oliveira Rodrigues

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available É descrita uma nova espécie de nematóide do gênero Strongyloides Grassi, 1879, Strongyloides ferreirai sp.n. parasita do instestino delgado de Kerodon rupestris (Wied. proveniente de Floriano Peixoto, Estado do Piauí. Esta é a primeira referência deste gênero parasitando roedor caviideo no Brasil.Strongyloides ferreirai n.sp. is described and compared to the closely related species S. ratti, S. venezuelensis and S. myopotami, parasites of rodents in Brazil. The description is based on parasitic females, recovered from the small intestine of Kerodon rupestris (Wied. (Caviidae captured in Floriano Peixoto, Piauí State, Brazil.

  11. Relationship between carotid intima media thickness and helminth infections on Flores Island, Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilianto Eddy Wiria

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between helminth infections and atherosclerosis. BACKGROUND: Chronic helminth infection, which can lead to poor nutritional status and anti-inflammatory response, might protect against the development of atherosclerosis. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed in Flores, Indonesia, an area highly endemic for soil-transmitted helminths (STH. Stool samples from 675 participants aged 18-80 years were collected and screened for Trichuris trichiura by microscopy and for Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, and Strongyloides stercoralis by qPCR. We collected data on body mass index (BMI, waist to hip ratio (WHR, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose (FBG, lipid, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, total immunoglobulin-E (TIgE and Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide stimulated cytokines (tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-10. In a subset of 301 elderly adults (≥40 years of age carotid intima media thickness (cIMT was measured. RESULTS: Participants with any STH infection had lower BMI (kg/m2 (mean difference -0.66, 95%CI [-1.26, -0.06], WHR (-0.01, [-0.02, -0.00], total cholesterol (mmol/L (-0.22, [-0.43, -0.01] and LDL-cholesterol (mmol/L (-0.20, [-0.39, -0.00] than uninfected participants. After additional adjustment for BMI the association between helminth infection and total cholesterol (mean difference -0.17, 95%CI [-0.37, 0.03] as well as LDL-cholesterol (-0.15, [-0.33, 0.04] was less pronounced. BMI, WHR, and total cholesterol were negatively associated with number species of helminth co-infections. Participants with high TIgE, an indicator of exposure to helminths, had lower FBG, TC, and HDL. The association between TIgE and TC and HDL remained significant after adjustment with BMI. No clear association was found between STH infection or TIgE and mean cIMT. CONCLUSIONS: This cross-sectional study presents evidence that helminth infections were negatively

  12. Application of a Multiplex Quantitative PCR to Assess Prevalence and Intensity Of Intestinal Parasite Infections in a Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Llewellyn

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate quantitative assessment of infection with soil transmitted helminths and protozoa is key to the interpretation of epidemiologic studies of these parasites, as well as for monitoring large scale treatment efficacy and effectiveness studies. As morbidity and transmission of helminth infections are directly related to both the prevalence and intensity of infection, there is particular need for improved techniques for assessment of infection intensity for both purposes. The current study aimed to evaluate two multiplex PCR assays to determine prevalence and intensity of intestinal parasite infections, and compare them to standard microscopy.Faecal samples were collected from a total of 680 people, originating from rural communities in Timor-Leste (467 samples and Cambodia (213 samples. DNA was extracted from stool samples and subject to two multiplex real-time PCR reactions the first targeting: Necator americanus, Ancylostoma spp., Ascaris spp., and Trichuris trichiura; and the second Entamoeba histolytica, Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia. duodenalis, and Strongyloides stercoralis. Samples were also subject to sodium nitrate flotation for identification and quantification of STH eggs, and zinc sulphate centrifugal flotation for detection of protozoan parasites. Higher parasite prevalence was detected by multiplex PCR (hookworms 2.9 times higher, Ascaris 1.2, Giardia 1.6, along with superior polyparasitism detection with this effect magnified as the number of parasites present increased (one: 40.2% vs. 38.1%, two: 30.9% vs. 12.9%, three: 7.6% vs. 0.4%, four: 0.4% vs. 0%. Although, all STH positive samples were low intensity infections by microscopy as defined by WHO guidelines the DNA-load detected by multiplex PCR suggested higher intensity infections.Multiplex PCR, in addition to superior sensitivity, enabled more accurate determination of infection intensity for Ascaris, hookworms and Giardia compared to microscopy, especially in samples

  13. Molecular appraisal of intestinal parasitic infection in transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pooja; Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan

    2016-08-01

    Diarrhoea is the main clinical manifestation caused by intestinal parasitic infections in patients, with special reference to transplant recipients who require careful consideration to reduce morbidity and mortality. Further, molecular characterization of some important parasites is necessary to delineate the different modes of transmission to consider appropriate management strategies. We undertook this study to investigate the intestinal parasitic infections in transplant recipients with or without diarrhoea, and the genotypes of the isolated parasites were also determined. Stool samples from 38 transplant recipients comprising 29 post-renal, two liver and seven bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients presenting with diarrhoea and 50 transplant recipients (42 post-renal transplant, eight BMT) without diarrhoea were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites by light microscopy using wet mount, modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining for intestinal coccidia and modified trichrome staining for microsporidia. Genotypes of Cryptosporidium species were determined by multilocus genotyping using small subunit ribosomal (SSUrRNA), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) as the target genes. Assemblage study for Giardia lamblia was performed using triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) as the target gene. Samples were also screened for bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. The parasites that were detected included Cryptosporidium species (21%, 8/38), Cystoisospora (Isospora) belli (8%, 3), Cyclospora cayetanensis (5%, 2), G. lamblia (11%, 4), Hymenolepis nana (11%, 4), Strongyloides stercoralis (3%, 1) and Blastocystis hominis (3%, 1). Multilocus genotyping of Cryptosporidium species at SSUrRNA, COWP and DHFR loci could detect four isolates of C. hominis; two of C. parvum, one of mixed genotype and one could not be genotyped. All the C. hominis isolates were detected in adult post-renal transplant (PRT) recipients, whereas the C. parvum

  14. Molecular appraisal of intestinal parasitic infection in transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Yadav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Diarrhoea is the main clinical manifestation caused by intestinal parasitic infections in patients, with special reference to transplant recipients who require careful consideration to reduce morbidity and mortality. Further, molecular characterization of some important parasites is necessary to delineate the different modes of transmission to consider appropriate management strategies. We undertook this study to investigate the intestinal parasitic infections in transplant recipients with or without diarrhoea, and the genotypes of the isolated parasites were also determined. Methods: Stool samples from 38 transplant recipients comprising 29 post-renal, two liver and seven bone marrow transplant (BMT recipients presenting with diarrhoea and 50 transplant recipients (42 post-renal transplant, eight BMT without diarrhoea were examined for the presence of intestinal parasites by light microscopy using wet mount, modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining for intestinal coccidia and modified trichrome staining for microsporidia. Genotypes of Cryptosporidium species were determined by multilocus genotyping using small subunit ribosomal (SSUrRNA, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR as the target genes. Assemblage study for Giardia lamblia was performed using triose phosphate isomerase (TPI as the target gene. Samples were also screened for bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. Results: The parasites that were detected included Cryptosporidium species (21%, 8/38, Cystoisospora (Isospora belli (8%, 3, Cyclospora cayetanensis (5%, 2, G. lamblia (11%, 4, Hymenolepis nana (11%, 4, Strongyloides stercoralis (3%, 1 and Blastocystis hominis (3%, 1. Multilocus genotyping of Cryptosporidium species at SSUrRNA, COWP and DHFR loci could detect four isolates of C. hominis; two of C. parvum, one of mixed genotype and one could not be genotyped. All the C. hominis isolates were detected in adult post

  15. Evaluation of parasitological methods for the detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Strongyloides stercoralis causes chronic intestinal infection that may lead to disseminated disease during immunosuppression. Therefore, efficient diagnostic methods are essential to detect silent and latent infections. The present study was aimed to compare the efficacy of parasitological methods for the ...

  16. The prevalence of gastro-intestinal tract parasites in the inhabitants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis Teania saginata and Enterobius vermicularis. Overall prevalence rates of 84.6% in pupils and 99.0% in adults were recorded; A, lumbricoides formed the bulk of the infections and E. vermicularis the least. Multiple infections of two-three parasite combinations were encouyragee, ...

  17. Strongyloidiasis in children five years and below | Dada-Adegbola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Strongyloidiasis is one of the major human intestinal infections caused by a minute nematode, Strongyloides stercoralis. It is a soil-transmitted nematode of worldwide distribution, which resides in the small intestines of humans and is acquired by tissue penetration by the infective stage, filariform larva, of the ...

  18. Microarray analysis of gender- and parasite-specific gene transcription in Strongyloides ratti

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, Helen; Mello, Luciane V.; Fang, Yongxiang; Wit, Ernst; Thompson, Fiona J.; Viney, Mark E.; Paterson, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms by which parasitic nematodes reproduce and have adapted to life within a host are unclear. In the present study, microarray analysis was used to explore differential transcription among the different stages and sexes of Strongyloides ratti, a parasitic nematode of brown

  19. Occurrence of strongyloidiasis among patients with HTLV-1/2 seen at the outpatient clinic of the Núcleo de Medicina Tropical, Belém, State of Pará, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Karen Cristini Yumi Ogawa; Costa, Carlos Araújo da; Ferreira, Louise de Souza Canto; Martins, Luisa Carício; Linhares, Alexandre da Costa; Ishikawa, Edna Aoba Yassui; Batista, Evander de Jesus Oliveira; Sousa, Maisa Silva de

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of Strongyloides stercoralis infestation and coinfection with HTLV-1/2 in Belém, Brazil. S. stercoralis was investigated in stool samples obtained from individuals infected with HTLV-1/2 and their uninfected relatives. The frequency of S. stercoralis was 9% (9/100), including six patients infected with HTLV-1 (14.3%), two patients infected with HTLV-2 (11.1%), and one uninfected relative. Two cases of hyperinfestation by S. stercoralis were characterized as HTLV-1. These results support the need for the routine investigation of S. stercoralis in patients with HTLV-1, in an attempt to prevent the development of severe forms of strongyloidiasis.

  20. The anthelmintic effect of plant extracts on Haemonchus contortus and Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Camila O; Chagas, Ana Carolina S; Cotinguiba, Fernando; Furlan, Maysa; Brito, Luciana G; Chaves, Francisco C M; Stephan, Marília P; Bizzo, Humberto R; Amarante, Alessandro F T

    2012-02-10

    The indiscriminate use of anthelmintics has resulted in the establishment of parasite resistance. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the in vitro antiparasitic effect of plant extracts on Haemonchus contortus in sheep and the in vivo effect on Strongyloides venezuelensis in Rattus norvegicus. The plant extracts from Piper tuberculatum, Lippia sidoides, Mentha piperita, Hura crepitans and Carapa guianensis, produced at different research institutions, were chemically analyzed and evaluated through the egg hatch test (EHT) and larval development test (LDT) in H. contortus. P. tuberculatum (150 and 250 mg kg(-1) of body weight) was evaluated for its anthelmintic action on R. norvegicus experimentally infected with S. venezuelensis. In the EHT, the LC(50) and LC(90) of the extracts were respectively as follows: 0.031 and 0.09 mg mL(-1) for P. tuberculatum, 0.04 and 0.13 mg mL(-1) for L. sidoides, 0.037 and 0.10 mg mL(-1) for M. piperita, 2.16 and 17.13 mg mL(-1) for H. crepitans and 2.03 × 10(-6) and 1.22 × 10(-12) mg mL(-1) for C. guianensis. In the LDT, the LC(50) and LC(90) were respectively: 0.02 and 0.031 mg mL(-1) for P. tuberculatum, 0.002 and 0.04 mg mL(-1) for L. sidoides, 0.018 and 0.03 mg mL(-1) for M. piperita, 0.36 and 0.91 mg mL(-1) for H. crepitans and 17.65 and 1890 mg mL(-1) for C. guianensis. The extract of P. tuberculatum showed the following substances: piperamides as (Z)-piplartine, (E)-piplartine, 8,9-dihydropiplartine, piperine, 10,11-dihydropiperine, 5,6 dihydropiperlongumine and pellitorine. The major compounds of the oils were thymol (76.6%) for L. sidoides, menthol (27.5%) for M. piperita and oleic acid (46.8%) for C. guianensis. Regarding the in vivo test, neither dose of P. tuberculatum caused any significant reduction (P>0.05) in worm burden and fecal egg counts compared with the control group. We conclude that the extracts of P. tuberculatum, L. sidoides and M. piperita have effective activity when tested in vitro, but the doses of the

  1. Identification of a bacteria-like ferrochelatase in Strongyloides venezuelensis, an animal parasitic nematode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayasu, Eiji; Ishikawa, Sohta A; Taketani, Shigeru; Chakraborty, Gunimala; Yoshida, Ayako; Inagaki, Yuji; Maruyama, Haruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Heme is an essential molecule for vast majority of organisms serving as a prosthetic group for various hemoproteins. Although most organisms synthesize heme from 5-aminolevulinic acid through a conserved heme biosynthetic pathway composed of seven consecutive enzymatic reactions, nematodes are known to be natural heme auxotrophs. The completely sequenced Caenorhabditis elegans genome, for example, lacks all seven genes for heme biosynthesis. However, genome/transcriptome sequencing of Strongyloides venezuelensis, an important model nematode species for studying human strongyloidiasis, indicated the presence of a gene for ferrochelatase (FeCH), which catalyzes the terminal step of heme biosynthesis, whereas the other six heme biosynthesis genes are apparently missing. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that nematode FeCH genes, including that of S. venezuelensis (SvFeCH) have a fundamentally different evolutionally origin from the FeCH genes of non-nematode metazoa. Although all non-nematode metazoan FeCH genes appear to be inherited vertically from an ancestral opisthokont, nematode FeCH may have been acquired from an alpha-proteobacterium, horizontally. The identified SvFeCH sequence was found to function as FeCH as expected based on both in vitro chelatase assays using recombinant SvFeCH and in vivo complementation experiments using an FeCH-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Messenger RNA expression levels during the S. venezuelensis lifecycle were examined by real-time RT-PCR. SvFeCH mRNA was expressed at all the stages examined with a marked reduction at the infective third-stage larvae. Our study demonstrates the presence of a bacteria-like FeCH gene in the S. venezuelensis genome. It appeared that S. venezuelensis and some other animal parasitic nematodes reacquired the once-lost FeCH gene. Although the underlying evolutionary pressures that necessitated this reacquisition remain to be investigated, it is interesting that the presence of FeCH genes in the

  2. Identification of a bacteria-like ferrochelatase in Strongyloides venezuelensis, an animal parasitic nematode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Nagayasu

    Full Text Available Heme is an essential molecule for vast majority of organisms serving as a prosthetic group for various hemoproteins. Although most organisms synthesize heme from 5-aminolevulinic acid through a conserved heme biosynthetic pathway composed of seven consecutive enzymatic reactions, nematodes are known to be natural heme auxotrophs. The completely sequenced Caenorhabditis elegans genome, for example, lacks all seven genes for heme biosynthesis. However, genome/transcriptome sequencing of Strongyloides venezuelensis, an important model nematode species for studying human strongyloidiasis, indicated the presence of a gene for ferrochelatase (FeCH, which catalyzes the terminal step of heme biosynthesis, whereas the other six heme biosynthesis genes are apparently missing. Phylogenetic analyses indicated that nematode FeCH genes, including that of S. venezuelensis (SvFeCH have a fundamentally different evolutionally origin from the FeCH genes of non-nematode metazoa. Although all non-nematode metazoan FeCH genes appear to be inherited vertically from an ancestral opisthokont, nematode FeCH may have been acquired from an alpha-proteobacterium, horizontally. The identified SvFeCH sequence was found to function as FeCH as expected based on both in vitro chelatase assays using recombinant SvFeCH and in vivo complementation experiments using an FeCH-deficient strain of Escherichia coli. Messenger RNA expression levels during the S. venezuelensis lifecycle were examined by real-time RT-PCR. SvFeCH mRNA was expressed at all the stages examined with a marked reduction at the infective third-stage larvae. Our study demonstrates the presence of a bacteria-like FeCH gene in the S. venezuelensis genome. It appeared that S. venezuelensis and some other animal parasitic nematodes reacquired the once-lost FeCH gene. Although the underlying evolutionary pressures that necessitated this reacquisition remain to be investigated, it is interesting that the presence of Fe

  3. Transposon-mediated Chromosomal Integration of Transgenes in the Parasitic Nematode Strongyloides ratti and Establishment of Stable Transgenic Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Thomas J.; Massey, Holman C.; Pearce, Edward J.; Lok, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic transformation is a potential tool for analyzing gene function and thereby identifying new drug and vaccine targets in parasitic nematodes, which adversely affect more than one billion people. We have previously developed a robust system for transgenesis in Strongyloides spp. using gonadal microinjection for gene transfer. In this system, transgenes are expressed in promoter-regulated fashion in the F1 but are silenced in subsequent generations, presumably because of their location in repetitive episomal arrays. To counteract this silencing, we explored transposon-mediated chromosomal integration of transgenes in S. ratti. To this end, we constructed a donor vector encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the Ss-act-2 promoter with flanking inverted tandem repeats specific for the piggyBac transposon. In three experiments, free-living Strongyloides ratti females were transformed with this donor vector and a helper plasmid encoding the piggyBac transposase. A mean of 7.9% of F1 larvae were GFP-positive. We inoculated rats with GFP-positive F1 infective larvae, and 0.5% of 6014 F2 individuals resulting from this host passage were GFP-positive. We cultured GFP-positive F2 individuals to produce GFP-positive F3 L3i for additional rounds of host and culture passage. Mean GFP expression frequencies in subsequent generations were 15.6% in the F3, 99.0% in the F4, 82.4% in the F5 and 98.7% in the F6. The resulting transgenic lines now have virtually uniform GFP expression among all progeny after at least 10 generations of passage. Chromosomal integration of the reporter transgenes was confirmed by Southern blotting and splinkerette PCR, which revealed the transgene flanked by S. ratti genomic sequences corresponding to five discrete integration sites. BLAST searches of flanking sequences against the S. ratti genome revealed integrations in five contigs. This result provides the basis for two powerful functional genomic tools in S. ratti

  4. Soil-transmitted Nematodes and Hygiene Practices in a Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %; Trichuris trichiura 5.2%, and Strongyloides stercoralis 4.8%. Infection was higher among females (72.2%) than males (70.1%) and among age groups; it was highest in those less than 10 years. Among occupations, farmers had the highest ...

  5. Prevalence of intestinal helminthes among pupils of Federal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. lumbricoidis had higher prevalence (43%) followed by A. duodenale, (8%) and Strongyloids stercoralis (5%) with Enterobius vermicularis as the least (0.5%). Infection was dependent on sex and parental occupation but decreased significantly with increase in host age and body weight. Suggestions are made for the ...

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brazilian Amazon (10), and Kenyan coast (11). Findings from other centres such as Oman emirate (12), bookworm infection was the commonest organism while findings from Santo. Brazil(13) showed Strongyloides stercoralis as the commonest organism among alcoholics. Nutritional status in concert with other external.

  7. EAMJ Aetiology Sep 09.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-09

    Sep 9, 2009 ... to local bacterial-resistance patterns. INTRODUCTION. In sub-Saharan Africa, diarrhoea is a .... specimens were also tested for Rotavirus using the. Murex Rotavirus ELISA kit (Meo-Ox Diagnostics, Inc., ..... immune suppression and Strongyloides stercoralis and. Cryptosporidium parvum infection (14, 15).

  8. Enteric parasites and HIV infection: occurrence in AIDS patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Parasitas entéricos e infecção pelo HIV: ocorrência em pacientes com SIDA/AIDS no Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Moura

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of intestinal parasites, its relation with the transmission mechanism of HIV, and the clinical state of the AIDS patients, were analyzed in 99 Group IV patients (CDC, 1986, treated at "Hospital Universitário Pedro Ernesto" (HUPE, between 1986 and 1988. The group consisted of 79 (79.8% patients whose HIV transmission mechanism took place through sexual contact and of 16 (20.2% who were infected through blood. Feces samples from each patient were examined by four distincts methods (Faust et al, Kato-Katz, Baermann-Moraes and Baxby et al.. The moste occuring parasites were: Cryptosporidium sp., Entamoeba coli and Endolimax nana (18.2%, Strongyloides stercoralis and Giardia lambia (15.2%. E. histolytica and/or E. hartmanni (13.1%, Ascaris lumbricoides (11.1% and Isospora belli (10.1%. Furthermore, 74.7% of the patients carried at least one species. Intestinal parasites were found in 78.5% of the patients who acquired the HIV through sexual intercourse and in 56,3% of those infected by blood contamination. The difference, was not statistically significant (p > 0.05. In the group under study, the increase of the occurrence of parasitc infections does not seem to depend on the acquisiton of HIV through sexual contact. It appears that in developing countries, the dependancy is more related to the classic mechanisms of parasites transmission and its endemicity.A ocorrência de parasitas intestinais, sua relação com o mecanismo de transmissão do HIV e a apresentação clínica da AIDS foram analisadas em 99 pacientes do grupo IV (CDC, 1986, atendidos no Hospital Universitário Pedro Ernesto (HUPE entre 1986 e 1988. O grupo era constituído de 79 (79,9% pacientes cujo mecanismos de transmssão do HIV se deu por via sexual e de 16 (20,2% que se infectaram por via sanguínea. Amostras de fezes de cada paciente foram examinadas por quatro métodos distintos (Faust et al., Kato-Katz, Baermann-Moraes e Baxby et al.. Os parasitos mais frq

  9. Western blotting using Strongyloides ratti antigen for the detection of IgG antibodies as confirmatory test in human strongyloidiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Pereira Silva

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to evaluate the frequency of antigenic components recognized by serum IgG antibodies in Western blotting (WB using a Strongyloides ratti larval extract for the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. In addition, the WB results were compared to the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and the indirect immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT results. Serum samples of 180 individuals were analyzed (80 with strongyloidiasis, 60 with other intestinal parasitoses, and 40 healthy individuals. S. ratti was obtained from fecal culture of experimentally infected Rattus rattus. For IFAT, S. ratti larvae were used as antigen and S. ratti larval antigenic extracts were employed in WB and ELISA. Eleven S. ratti antigenic components were predominantly recognized by IgG antibodies in sera of patients with strongyloidiasis. There was a positive concordance for the three tests in 87.5% of the cases of strongyloidiasis. The negative concordance in the three tests was 94% and 97.5%, in patients with other intestinal parasitoses and healthy individuals, respectively. In cases of positive ELISA and negative IFAT results, diagnosis could be confirmed by WB. ELISA, IFAT, and WB using S. ratti antigens showed a high rate of sensitivity and specificity. In conclusion, WB using S. ratti larval extract was able to recognize 11 immunodominant antigenic components, showing to be a useful tool to define the diagnosis in cases of equivocal serology.

  10. F-actin accumulates in the vulva of female Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, C V; Gonçalves, A L R; Cruz, L; Cruz, M C; Ueta, M T; Costa-Cruz, J M

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about the actin cytoskeleton architecture in female Strongyloides venezuelensis and thus to investigate the distribution and concentration of actin, female worms were labelled with phalloidin-rhodamine and visualized under confocal microscopy. Our results demonstrate that filamentous actin accumulates in the vulva and the concentration of F-actin at this site suggests its important role, especially during oviposition, in the life cycle of S. venezuelensis.

  11. Assessment of Helminth Infections in Goats Slaughtered in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proportions of goats infected with each parasite type were 100%, 94.4%, 88.6%,80.5%, 68.6 62.8% and 44.4% respectively for Strongyloides sp., tapeworms, Ascaris sp., Fasciola hepatica, Trichuris sp., Haemonchus contortus and Schistosoma haematobium. The proportion of animals infected with Haemonchus ...

  12. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Intestinal Parasitic Infection among Under five Children in University of Gondar Hospital, Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yetemwork Aleka

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intestinal parasitic infection is a serious health problem in developing countries mainly in children, whichleads to child mortality and morbidity. Objective: To assess the prevalence and associated risk factors of intestinal para- sitic infection among underfive children in UoG Hospital.Methodology: A cross-sectional study was conducted from May 2015 to June 2015, a total of 277 children were selected by using systematic random sampling technique. Direct wet mount and formol-ether concentration technique was used for identification of IP; also, an interview-based questioner was prepared to assess the socio-demographic status (of parents and children and associated risk factors of those under five children. Re- sult: A total of 277 children [(148 (53.4% females and 129 (46.6% males] aged 1 year to 5 years was examined for intestinal parasitic infections. The overall prevalence of this study was 25 (9.02% when examined by wet mount and48 (17.3% when examined by formol-ether concentration technique. Five (1.8 % children were infected by multiple parasites in concentra- tion technique. Both intestinal helminthes (84%, 81.1% and protozoan parasites (16%, 18.9% were detected in microscopic examination with wet mount and formol-ether concentration techniques respectively. Eight species of intestinal parasites were identified. Of those, the predominant were Ascaris lumbricoides (52%, 35.8%, Hymenolepis nana (20%, 24.5% and cyst of Giardia lamblia (12%, 9.4% when examined by wet mount and formol-ether concentration techniques respectively. The least prevalent were Strongyloides stercoralis (1.9%. There was statistically observed association for the prevalence of IP with age, hand washing habit of parents and shortening of fingernails habit of parents. Conclusion: The result of this study indicated that helminthic infection is more predominant than protozoan infection. Children who come from parents who had no hand wash- ing habit and had no

  13. Water, sanitation, hygiene, and soil-transmitted helminth infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Strunz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preventive chemotherapy represents a powerful but short-term control strategy for soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Since humans are often re-infected rapidly, long-term solutions require improvements in water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively summarize the relationship between WASH access or practices and soil-transmitted helminth (STH infection. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the associations of improved WASH on infection with STH (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworm [Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus], and Strongyloides stercoralis. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and LILACS were searched from inception to October 28, 2013 with no language restrictions. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they provided an estimate for the effect of WASH access or practices on STH infection. We assessed the quality of published studies with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE approach. A total of 94 studies met our eligibility criteria; five were randomized controlled trials, whilst most others were cross-sectional studies. We used random-effects meta-analyses and analyzed only adjusted estimates to help account for heterogeneity and potential confounding respectively. Use of treated water was associated with lower odds of STH infection (odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% CI 0.36-0.60. Piped water access was associated with lower odds of A. lumbricoides (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.39-0.41 and T. trichiura infection (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.45-0.72, but not any STH infection (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.28-3.11. Access to sanitation was associated with decreased likelihood of infection with any STH (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.57-0.76, T. trichiura (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.50-0.74, and A. lumbricoides (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44-0.88, but not with hookworm infection (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.61-1.06. Wearing shoes was associated with reduced odds

  14. Development of a rapid serological assay for the diagnosis of strongyloidiasis using a novel diffraction-based biosensor technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Pak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is a persistent human parasitic infection caused by the intestinal nematode, Strongyloides stercoralis. The parasite has a world-wide distribution, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions with poor sanitary conditions. Since individuals with strongyloidiasis are typically asymptomatic, the infection can persist for decades without detection. Problems arise when individuals with unrecognized S. stercoralis infection are immunosuppressed, which can lead to hyper-infection syndrome and disseminated disease with an associated high mortality if untreated. Therefore a rapid, sensitive and easy to use method of diagnosing Strongyloides infection may improve the clinical management of this disease.An immunological assay for diagnosing strongyloidiasis was developed on a novel diffraction-based optical bionsensor technology. The test employs a 31-kDa recombinant antigen called NIE derived from Strongyloides stercoralis L3-stage larvae. Assay performance was tested using retrospectively collected sera from patients with parasitologically confirmed strongyloidiasis and control sera from healthy individuals or those with other parasitoses including schistosomiasis, trichinosis, echinococcosis or amebiasis who were seronegative using the NIE ELISA assay. If we consider the control group as the true negative group, the assay readily differentiated S. stercoralis-infected patients from controls detecting 96.3% of the positive cases, and with no cross reactivity observed in the control group These results were in excellent agreement (κ = 0.98 with results obtained by an NIE-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. A further 44 sera from patients with suspected S. stercoralis infection were analyzed and showed 91% agreement with the NIE ELISA.In summary, this test provides high sensitivity detection of serum IgG against the NIE Strongyloides antigen. The assay is easy to perform and provides results in less than 30 minutes

  15. Seasonal variations of nematode infection in Small East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The proportions of Strongyloides spp (6%), Bunostomum spp (4%) and Cooperia spp (3%) were small in all periods and locations. It is concluded that the level of nematode infection is highest at the end of the rain season and low during the dry season. The crossbred goats kept under semi-intensive grazing system had ...

  16. Epidemiological Characteristics of Strongyloidiasis in Inhabitants of Indigenous Communities in Borneo Island, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngui, Romano; Halim, Noor Amira Abdul; Rajoo, Yamuna; Lim, Yvonne Al; Ambu, Stephen; Rajoo, Komalaveni; Chang, Tey Siew; Woon, Lu Chan; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological study on strongyloidiasis in humans is currently lacking in Malaysia. Thus, a cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infection among the inhabitants of longhouse indigenous communities in Sarawak. A single stool and blood sample were collected from each participant and subjected to microscopy, serological and molecular techniques. Five species of intestinal parasites were identified by stool microscopy. None of the stool samples were positive for S. stercoralis. However, 11% of 236 serum samples were seropositive for strongyloidiasis. Further confirmation using molecular technique on stool samples of the seropositive individuals successfully amplified 5 samples, suggesting current active infections. The prevalence was significantly higher in adult males and tended to increase with age. S. stercoralis should no longer be neglected in any intestinal parasitic survey. Combination of more than 1 diagnostic technique is necessary to increase the likelihood of estimating the 'true' prevalence of S. stercoralis.

  17. Membrane fractions from Strongyloides venezuelensis in the immunodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Marcelo Andreetta; Paula, Fabiana Martins; Gottardi, Maiara; Meisel, Dirce Mary Correia Lima; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo; Gryschek, Ronaldo César Borges

    2015-01-01

    Strongyloides venezuelensis is a parasitic nematode of rodents frequently used to obtain heterologous antigens for the immunological diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate membrane fractions from S. venezuelensis for human strongyloidiasis immunodiagnosis. Soluble and membrane fractions were obtained in phosphate saline (SS and SM) and Tris-HCl (TS and TM) from filariform larvae of S. venezuelensis. Ninety-two serum samples (n = 92) were obtained from 20 strongyloidiasis patients (Group I), 32 from patients with other parasitic diseases (Group II), and 40 from healthy individuals (Group III), and were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Soluble fractions (SS and TS) showed 90.0% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity, whereas the membrane fractions (SM and TM) showed 95.0% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity. The present results suggest the possible use of membrane fractions of S. venezuelensis as an alternative antigen for human strongyloidiasis immunodiagnosis.

  18. Strongyloides myopotami (Secernentea: Strongyloididae) from the intestine of feral nutrias (Myocastor coypus) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Seongjun; Lee, Dongmin; Park, Hansol; Oh, Mihyeon; Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Eom, Keeseon S

    2014-10-01

    Surveys on helminthic fauna of the nutria, Myocastor coypus, have seldom been performed in the Republic of Korea. In the present study, we describe Strongyloides myopotami (Secernentea: Strongyloididae) recovered from the small intestine of feral nutrias. Total 10 adult nutrias were captured in a wetland area in Gimhae-si (City), Gyeongsangnam-do (Province) in April 2013. They were transported to our laboratory, euthanized with ether, and necropsied. About 1,300 nematode specimens were recovered from 10 nutrias, and some of them were morphologically observed by light and scanning electron microscopies. They were 3.7-4.7 (4.0±0.36) mm in length, 0.03-0.04 (0.033) mm in width. The worm dimension and other morphological characters, including prominent lips of the vulva, blunted conical tail, straight type of the ovary, and 8-chambered stoma, were all consistent with S. myopotami. This nematode fauna is reported for the first time in Korea.

  19. Strongyloides venezuelensis alkaline extract for the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Eleuza Rodrigues

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to detected IgG antibodies using Strongyloides venezuelensis alkaline extract for the diagnosis of human strongyloidiasis by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Sera from 90 subjects were analyzed (30 with strongyloidiasis, 30 with other parasites and 30 healthy individuals. Results were expressed in antibody titers, which were considered as positive when titer was > 80. Sensibility and specificity of the assay were 100% and 96.7%, respectively. It can be concluded that the heterologous alkaline extract could be employed in ELISA as a diagnostic aid in human strongyloidiasis, due to its advantages as easiness of obtaining, practicability in preparing, and high indexes of sensitivity and specificity.

  20. The genome of Strongyloides spp. gives insights into protein families with a putative role in nematode parasitism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Vicky L; Tsai, Isheng J; Selkirk, Murray E; Viney, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Parasitic nematodes are important and abundant parasites adapted to live a parasitic lifestyle, with these adaptations all aimed at facilitating their survival and reproduction in their hosts. The recently sequenced genomes of four Strongyloides species, gastrointestinal parasites of humans and other animals, alongside transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of free-living and parasitic stages of their life cycles have revealed a number of protein families with a putative role in their parasitism. Many of these protein families have also been associated with parasitism in other parasitic nematode species, suggesting that these proteins may play a fundamental role in nematode parasitism more generally. Here, we review key protein families that have a putative role in Strongyloides' parasitism - acetylcholinesterases, astacins, aspartic proteases, prolyl oligopeptidases, proteinase inhibitors (trypsin inhibitors and cystatins), SCP/TAPS and transthyretin-like proteins - and the evidence for their key, yet diverse, roles in the parasitic lifestyle.

  1. Changes in the viability of Strongyloides ransomi larvae (Nematoda, Rhabditida under the influence of synthetic flavourings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Boyko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common nematodes of pigs globally is Strongyloides ransomi Schwartz and Alicata 1930. It usually causes aggravation of physiological indicators of its hosts and damage to their immune system. Also it is a good modelling object for the evaluation of the antiparasitic activity of new antihelminthic drugs. We conducted laboratory experiments to assess the effect of flavouring additives with flower odour (benzaldehyde, citral, D-limonene and β-ionone upon the viability of S. ransomi larvae. The mortality rate was calculated for 24 hours exposure at four concentrations of each substance (10, 1, 0.1 и 0.01 g/l with eight replications. The lowest LD50 values were obtained for citral (97 mg/l and benzaldehyde (142 mg/l. These substances are recommended for further evaluation of their antihelminthic effect in experiments using laboratory animals. Unlike other substances, the effect of β-ionone and D-limonene even at a concentration of 10 g/l after 24 hours caused the death of <50% of S. ransomi larvae. The study of flavouring additives with flowery odour, which are permitted to be used in food for humans and also to be used in cosmetics, is a promising field for research aimed at the development of new antiparasitic drugs.

  2. IMMUNODIAGNOSIS OF HUMAN STRONGYLOIDIASIS: USE OF SIX DIFFERENT ANTIGENIC FRACTIONS FROM Strongyloides venezuelensis PARASITIC FEMALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Andreetta CORRAL

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY The aim of this study was to evaluate six different antigenic fractions from Strongyloides venezuelensis parasitic females for the immunodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. Soluble and membrane fractions from S. venezuelensis parasitic females were prepared in phosphate-buffered saline (SSF and SMF, respectively, Tris-HCl (TSF and TMF, respectively, and an alkaline buffer (ASF and AMF, respectively. Serum samples obtained from patients with strongyloidiasis or, other parasitic diseases, and healthy individuals were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Soluble fractions SSF, TSF, and ASF showed 85.0%, 75.0%, and 80.0% sensitivity and 93.1%, 93.1%, and 87.5% specificity, respectively. Membrane fractions SMF, TMF, and AMF showed 80.0%, 75.0%, and 85.0% sensitivity, and 95.8%, 90.3%, and 91.7% specificity, respectively. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the fractions obtained from parasitic females, especially the SSF and SMF, could be used as alternative antigen sources in the serodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.

  3. IMMUNODIAGNOSIS OF HUMAN STRONGYLOIDIASIS: USE OF SIX DIFFERENT ANTIGENIC FRACTIONS FROM Strongyloides venezuelensis PARASITIC FEMALES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Marcelo Andreetta; Paula, Fabiana Martins de; Gottardi, Maiara; Meisel, Dirce Mary Correia Lima; Castilho, Vera Lucia Pagliusi; Gonçalves, Elenice Messias do Nascimento; Chieffi, Pedro Paulo; Gryschek, Ronaldo Cesar Borges

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate six different antigenic fractions from Strongyloides venezuelensis parasitic females for the immunodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis. Soluble and membrane fractions from S. venezuelensis parasitic females were prepared in phosphate-buffered saline (SSF and SMF, respectively), Tris-HCl (TSF and TMF, respectively), and an alkaline buffer (ASF and AMF, respectively). Serum samples obtained from patients with strongyloidiasis or, other parasitic diseases, and healthy individuals were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Soluble fractions SSF, TSF, and ASF showed 85.0%, 75.0%, and 80.0% sensitivity and 93.1%, 93.1%, and 87.5% specificity, respectively. Membrane fractions SMF, TMF, and AMF showed 80.0%, 75.0%, and 85.0% sensitivity, and 95.8%, 90.3%, and 91.7% specificity, respectively. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the fractions obtained from parasitic females, especially the SSF and SMF, could be used as alternative antigen sources in the serodiagnosis of human strongyloidiasis.

  4. Optimizing culture conditions for free-living stages of the nematode parasite Strongyloides ratti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulovic, Alex; Puller, Vadim; Streit, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    The rat parasitic nematode Strongyloides ratti (S. ratti) has recently emerged as a model system for various aspects of parasite biology and evolution. In addition to parasitic parthenogenetic females, this species can also form facultative free-living generations of sexually reproducing adults. These free-living worms are bacteriovorous and grow very well when cultured in the feces of their host. However, in fecal cultures the worms are rather difficult to find for observation and experimental manipulation. Therefore, it has also been attempted to raise S. ratti on Nematode Growth Media (NGM) plates with Escherichia coli OP50 as food, exactly as described for the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Whilst worms did grow on these plates, their longevity and reproductive output compared to fecal cultures were dramatically reduced. In order to improve the culture success we tested other plates occasionally used for C. elegans and, starting from the best performing one, systematically varied the plate composition, the temperature and the food in order to further optimize the conditions. Here we present a plate culturing protocol for free-living stages of S. ratti with strongly improved reproductive success and longevity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pulmonary strongyloidiasis presenting as chronic bronchitis leading to interlobular septal fibrosis and cured by treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukerjee, Chitta M; Carrick, Jane; Walker, John C; Woods, Robert L

    2003-12-01

    Two patients presented with long-standing chronic bronchitis and exertional dyspnoea of 5 and 3 months' duration, respectively, and had interlobular septal fibrosis on chest high resolution CT. In the past both had lived in areas in which Strongyloides stercoralis was known to be endemic. Serological tests confirmed the diagnosis of pulmonary strongyloidiasis, and both patients were treated with anti-helminthic medications, including albendazole and ivermectin. Following this there was complete resolution of both symptomatic and radiological manifestations of their disease. An awareness of the possibility of Strongyloides infection presenting with respiratory symptoms in patients exposed to this parasite is important in the management of such patients.

  6. Intestinal helminthes infestation in pregnancy: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Jason; Shippey, Stuart; Macri, Charles; Macedonia, Christian

    2002-11-01

    Pregnancy and parasitic infection are globally prevalent conditions that frequently coexist. Most pregnant patients with intestinal parasitic infections may be managed without antiparasitic chemotherapy. Shortly after a visit to her nation of origin, a 22-year-old native of Ethiopia presented during her first trimester with gastrointestinal complaints and worms in her stool, which were identified as Taenia. Microscopic examination of her stool also demonstrated Strongyloides stercoralis larvae, likely the residue of an infection that had occurred several years prior to her presentation. She was treated with appropriate antihelmenthic agents, and her subsequent prenatal course has been uncomplicated. The ability of Strongyloides to sustain an intestinal infection through autoinvasion and to cause serious disease (hyperinfection syndrome) among certain hosts makes it unique among intestinal helminths. In this case, the patient was treated to manage her symptoms and prevent subsequent Strongyloides hyperinfection.

  7. Prevalence of endoparasitic infection in children and its relation with cholera prevention efforts in Mexico Prevalencia de la infestación endoparasitaria en niños y su relación con los esfuerzos para la prevención del cólera en México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles T. Faulkner

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether increased knowledge and use of public health measures promoted for cholera prevention is reflected in lower prevalence of parasitic infection in households in a community in the state of Tamaulipas, Mexico, that is close to the border with the United States of America. METHODS: Between 1994 and 1997, fecal samples from 438 children were collected through convenience sampling and then examined for helminth eggs/larvae and protozoan cysts as biologic indicators of household compliance with recommended cholera prevention measures. The suggested measures were to wash hands before meals and after defecation, to drink purified water, to wash fruits and vegetables, and to eat well-cooked food. In addition, information on the knowledge of and the use of cholera preventive measures was collected by interviews with adult informants in 252 households (186 of those households also provided a fecal sample for analysis. RESULTS: Parasitic infections occurred in 131 of the 438 children (30%, who resided in 79 of the 186 households (42% that provided fecal samples. Giardia lamblia accounted for 12.5% of all infections. Infections with Hymenolepis nana, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Enterobius vermicularis, Ancylostoma/Necator, Strongyloides stercoralis, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba hartmanni, Entamoeba histolytica, Endolimax nana, and Iodamoeba bütschlii were also noted. Infected children were older and more often had an infected sibling. Households with three or more children were also more likely to have an infected child. The primary caregivers in the households where at least one child had a parasitic infection were distinguished by their inability to list at least three cholera prevention measures from memory. CONCLUSIONS: The 42% household prevalence of parasitic infection was relatively high and indicates that some residents of this community may not have fully embraced the public health education efforts

  8. Strongyloidiasis Epidemiology and Treatment Response in Patients with HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes-Penfield, Nicolas; Moore, Cody; Arduino, Roberto; Serpa, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background We sought to characterize the epidemiology of HIV and S. stercoralis coinfection in an urban HIV cohort, and to investigate the effect of S. stercoralis infection on HIV virologic control and immune recovery. Methods We reviewed the medical records of all HIV-infected patients diagnosed with strongyloidiasis who received care at Thomas Street Health Center (Houston, TX) between 2000 and 2015. For each case we included up to two matched HIV-infected patients without strongyloidiasis (controls). Matching was based on age, sex, ethnicity, baseline CD4 percentage, and HIV viral load at the time of strongyloidiasis diagnosis in the case patient. We recorded patient demographics, comorbidities, CD4 count and percentage, HIV viral load, and absolute eosinophilia count (AEC) at the time of HIV diagnosis, strongyloidiasis diagnosis, and six and twelve months after ivermectin treatment. Results We identified 15 cases of HIV and S.stercoralis coinfection; 13 had at least one available matched control. The mean age of coinfected patients was 45; all were Hispanic, 84.6% were male, and the mean CD4 nadir was 146 cells/ul. At the time of strongyloidiasis diagnosis, the mean CD4 count was 460 cells/ul, HIV RNA viral load 2.07 logs/ml, and AEC was 1,360 cells/μL. At 6 and 12 months after treatment, CD4 counts were 514 and 464 cells/μL, HIV RNA viral loads 1.78 and 2.31 log/mL, and AECs 319 and 362 cells/μL, respectively. Although CD4 counts increased 6 months after treatment, they returned to baseline levels at 12 months; neither change achieved statistical significance. The reduction in AECs after ivermectin treatment was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Matched controls without S.stercoralis had lower AECs at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months; otherwise, there were no differences between cases and controls. Conclusion Strongyloidiasis treatment in HIV-infected patients led to normalization of the AEC at 6 months in most cases, but AECs

  9. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    whether BMPs maintain their osteoinductive capability in infected human wounds. The authors are aware of only one series describing the use of BMP in an...et al. Osteogenic protein-1 induces bone formation in the presence of bacterial infection in a rat intramuscular osteoinduction model. J Orthop Trauma

  10. Pelodera (syn. Rhabditis strongyloides as a cause of dermatitis – a report of 11 dogs from Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikander Sven E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pelodera (Rhabditis strongyloides is a small saprophytic nematode that lives in decaying organic matter. On rare occasions, it can invade the mammalian skin, causing a pruritic, erythematous, alopecic and crusting dermatitis on skin sites that come into contact with the ground. Diagnosis of the disease is based on case history (a dog living outdoors on damp straw bedding with characteristic skin lesions and on the demonstration of typical larvae in skin scrapings or biopsy. Pelodera (rhabditic dermatitis cases have been reported mainly from Central European countries and the United States. Case presentation During 1975–1999, we verified 11 canine cases of Pelodera dermatitis in Finland. The cases were confirmed by identifying Pelodera larvae in scrapings. Biopsies for histopathology were obtained from three cases, and typical histopathological lesions (epidermal hyperplasia, epidermal and follicular hyperkeratosis, folliculitis and furunculosis with large numbers of nematode larvae of 25–40 μm of diameter within hair follicles were present. The Pelodera strongyloides dermatitica strain from the first verified case in Finland has been maintained in ordinary blood agar in our laboratory since 1975. Light microscopy (LM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies were employed to obtain detailed morphological information about the causative agent. The rhabditiform oesophagus at all developmental stages, the morphology of the anterior end of the nematode, copulatory bursa and spicules of the male and the tail of the female were the most important morphological features for identifying P. strongyloides. Conclusion These cases show that Pelodera dermatitis occurs in Finland, and also farther north than described earlier in the literature. This condition should be considered when a dog living outdoors has typical skin lesions situated at sites in contact with the ground as the main presenting clinical feature. The fastest and

  11. Influence of water infusion of medicinal plants on larvae of Strongyloides papillosus (Nematoda, Strongyloididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Boyko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common nematodes of ruminants is Strongyloides papillosus (Wedl, 1856. Disease caused by these parasites brings economic losses to livestock operations. Therefore it is necessary to control their numbers. The eggs and three larval stages of S. papillosus live in the environment, while the fourth, fifth and mature individuals live in host organisms. Control of these parasites is necessary at all stages of development, including the free-living stage. An experiment on changes in the number strongiloids under the influence of environmental factors was carried out using aqueous extracts of medicinal plants. In the laboratory experiment we researched the effect on the survival of invasive and noninvasive types of S. papillosus larvae of 24 hours exposure at different doses to Artemisia absinthium Linnaeus, 1753, Artemisia annua Linnaeus, 1753, Echinacea purpurea (Linnaeus, 1753 Moench, 1794, Matricaria chamomilla Linnaeus, 1753, Tanacetum vulgare Linnaeus, 1753, Salvia sclarea Linnaeus, 1753, Levisticum officinale W.D.J. Koch, 1824, Petroselinum crispum (Miller, 1768 Nyman ex A.W. Hill, 1925. The death of 50% of S. papillosus invasive larvae was registered at 464 ± 192 mg/l concentration of aqueous extract of S. sclarea inflorescences. The greatest effect up-on the non-invasive larvae was caused by aqueous extracts of inflorescences of S. sclarea, M. chamomilla and seeds of P. crispum: at concentrations of 327 ± 186, 384 ± 155 and 935 ± 218 mg/l, respectively, 50% of non-invasive larvae died. According to the results of the research, we suggest further study of the nematocidal activity of combinations, contained in the aboveground parts, of clary sage (S. sclarea, camomile (M. chamomilla and seeds of parsley (P. crispum, and also experimental usage of these species in the fodder compound for cattle, sheep, goats and pigs on experimental farms.

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-04-0032 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-04-0032 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 2e-15 32% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-15-0057 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-15-0057 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 9e-11 35% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-18-0124 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-18-0124 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 5e-19 33% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0035 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.009 23% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-0619 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-0619 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-04 27% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-2465 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-2465 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 6.3 28% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-1985 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-1985 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.001 31% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-04-0135 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-04-0135 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.16 25% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DMEL-06-0033 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DMEL-06-0033 ref|NP_937899.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90559.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937899.1 8e-04 32% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-01-0024 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-01-0024 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 2e-22 34% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-03-0034 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-03-0034 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 3e-11 30% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-04-0019 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-04-0019 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 5e-17 39% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-02-0006 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-02-0006 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 2e-07 26% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-33-0021 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-33-0021 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-16 35% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2370 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2370 ref|NP_937907.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90567.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937907.1 1e-05 30% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-26-0182 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-26-0182 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 2e-08 24% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-0535 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-0535 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 8.0 26% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-07-0041 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-04 31% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1813 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-1813 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 9e-09 28% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-10-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-10-0016 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 7e-13 29% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-02-0145 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-02-0145 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-16 28% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1383 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-1383 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 2e-15 27% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-1063 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-1063 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 6e-04 27% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-3061 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-3061 ref|NP_937896.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90556.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937896.1 0.014 25% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-1871 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-1871 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1.4 29% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-15-0126 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-15-0126 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 8e-21 37% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRI-02-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRI-02-0060 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 1e-07 28% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-19-0010 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-19-0010 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 3e-10 31% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GACU-12-0034 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GACU-12-0034 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-05 31% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-17-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-17-0041 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 2e-14 31% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-2615 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-2615 ref|NP_937903.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90563.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937903.1 0.15 25% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-13-0002 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-13-0002 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 2e-18 34% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-10-0249 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-10-0249 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 3e-13 28% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-1662 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-1662 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 3e-06 29% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-0200 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-0200 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.004 24% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-0314 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TSYR-01-0314 ref|NP_937903.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90563.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937903.1 0.094 43% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-0117 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TSYR-01-0117 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.39 27% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-VPAC-01-0414 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-VPAC-01-0414 ref|NP_937903.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90563.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937903.1 5e-04 24% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-1215 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-1215 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.004 25% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-2017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-2017 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.86 37% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-23-0051 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-23-0051 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-18 32% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-02-0068 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-02-0068 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 4e-20 26% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-0511 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-0511 ref|NP_937899.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90559.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937899.1 0.43 31% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-26-0053 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-26-0053 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 6e-27 27% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0887 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0887 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.010 29% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0851 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0851 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 4e-09 29% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0694 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0694 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.66 26% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-26-0053 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-26-0053 ref|NP_937903.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90563.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937903.1 7e-25 30% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-37-0024 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-37-0024 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-12 34% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-03-0001 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-03-0001 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 6e-04 30% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0231 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0231 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 0.001 27% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-08-0050 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-08-0050 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 5e-14 39% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-1086 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-1086 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-06 36% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1720 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-1720 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.41 25% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-18-0003 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-18-0003 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 1e-14 28% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRE-01-1135 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-1135 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 8e-08 32% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-VPAC-01-1472 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-VPAC-01-1472 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1.4 24% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0075 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0075 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.038 25% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-25-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-25-0017 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 3e-21 31% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-35-0150 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-35-0150 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 4e-15 35% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-07-0014 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-07-0014 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 2e-12 29% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-23-0059 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-23-0059 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 4e-34 31% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0292 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0292 ref|NP_937903.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90563.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937903.1 0.48 26% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-1071 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-1071 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 6e-06 25% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-1121 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-1121 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 4e-16 33% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-26-0145 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-26-0145 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-15 30% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1549 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1549 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 1.2 38% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-35-0147 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-35-0147 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 9e-17 36% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0717 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0717 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 3e-09 31% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-26-0480 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-26-0480 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 7e-13 29% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RMAC-07-0077 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RMAC-07-0077 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-14 35% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CINT-01-0047 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CINT-01-0047 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 6e-09 28% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-3943 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-3943 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.32 30% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-0314 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TSYR-01-0314 ref|NP_937899.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90559.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937899.1 0.008 31% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-07-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-07-0041 ref|NP_937903.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90563.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937903.1 1e-04 28% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1550 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-1550 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 7e-05 26% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2330 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2330 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.001 28% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0734 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0734 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 3e-10 26% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2439 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2439 ref|NP_937896.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90556.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937896.1 0.018 25% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-0623 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-0623 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.007 27% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-23-0093 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-23-0093 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-19 32% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1847 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1847 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 3e-16 32% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TSYR-01-0636 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TSYR-01-0636 ref|NP_937896.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90556.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937896.1 0.029 26% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2370 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2370 ref|NP_937903.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90563.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937903.1 0.001 32% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-1207 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-1207 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 6e-04 28% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-HSAP-05-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-HSAP-05-0025 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 5e-12 38% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-16-0066 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-16-0066 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-17 34% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-1062 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-1062 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 2e-05 26% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-1341 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-1341 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 4e-04 27% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-26-0487 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-26-0487 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 4e-19 29% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2756 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2756 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 0.080 30% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0280 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0280 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 4e-23 38% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-23-0130 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-23-0130 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-07 30% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-23-0080 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-23-0080 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 8e-16 28% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-0714 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-0714 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 0.002 26% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-37-0024 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-37-0024 ref|NP_937903.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90563.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937903.1 8e-11 33% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRE-01-0957 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0957 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 2e-04 24% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2555 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2555 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 0.041 20% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-09-0076 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-09-0076 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 5e-16 37% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-02-0066 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-02-0066 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 4e-24 30% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-25-0017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-25-0017 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 1e-22 30% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-1993 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-1993 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 4e-05 24% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-0205 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-0205 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 3e-04 26% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUR-01-1613 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUR-01-1613 ref|NP_937906.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90566.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937906.1 0.001 31% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DRER-17-0060 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DRER-17-0060 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 3e-07 28% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-37-0079 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-37-0079 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 3e-11 32% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-20-0005 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-20-0005 ref|NP_937902.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoral...is] emb|CAD90562.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 [Strongyloides stercoralis] NP_937902.1 6e-11 37% ...

  19. How to become a parasite without sex chromosomes: a hypothesis for the evolution of Strongyloides spp. and related nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streit, Adrian

    2014-09-01

    Parasitic lifestyles evolved many times independently. Just within the phylum Nematoda animal parasitism must have arisen at least four times. Switching to a parasitic lifestyle is expected to lead to changes in various life history traits including reproductive strategies. Parasitic nematode worms of the genus Strongyloides represent an interesting example to study these processes because they are still capable of forming facultative free-living generations in between parasitic ones. The parasitic generation consists of females only, which reproduce parthenogenetically. The sex in the progeny of the parasitic worms is determined by environmental cues, which control a, presumably ancestral, XX/XO chromosomal sex determining system. In some species the X chromosome is fused with an autosome and one copy of the X-derived sequences is removed by sex-specific chromatin diminution in males. Here I propose a hypothesis for how today's Strongyloides sp. might have evolved from a sexual free-living ancestor through dauer larvae forming free-living and facultative parasitic intermediate stages.

  20. Venestatin, a Ca++-binding protein from the parasitic nematode Strongyloides venezuelensis, is involved in the larval migration process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokawa, Daigo; Hatta, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Taisei; Maeda, Hiroki; Mikami, Fusako; Alim, M Abdul; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Tsuji, Naotoshi

    2017-07-01

    The secretory EF-hand Ca++-binding proteins act as calcium signaling molecules for control of cell functions, but those proteins from parasitic helminths are poorly understood. Here, we have identified and characterized an EF-hand Ca++-binding protein from the rodent nematode, Strongyloides venezuelensis, termed 'venestatin', which is highly conserved in Strongyloides spp. Canonical two EF-hand domains and a signal peptide are present in venestatin. A gel mobility shift assay and Ruthenium red staining indicated that the recombinant venestatin possesses binding ability with Ca++ ions. Endogenous venestatin was seemingly localized in the hypodermis and gut of the worms and was found in the excretory-secretory products. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR data showed that venestatin-specific transcript was upregulated in the parasitic stages of S. venezuelensis, and the upregulation occurred promptly after larval invasion through the host's skin, but not in the case of in vitro incubation. Immunization of mice with recombinant venestatin caused a 55% reduction in larval migration to the lungs, and lung hemorrhaging was mild compared with non-immunized groups, suggesting that anti-venestatin sera may interfere with larval migration from skin to lung. Our results suggest that venestatin is secreted from the hypodermis and gut of S. venezuelensis, and has pivotal roles in larval migration. Copyright © 2017 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    from the neonatal period to school age.' In Saudi Arabia, the rate of 5.3 per cent was reported' while in Nigeria,. Okafor et a1,7 found the prevalence rate .... the multiplication of the organisms in the urine, resulting in lalse diagnosis of urinary tract infection. This over-diagnosis ofl ITI may account for the high prevalence rate ...

  2. Infection,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-16

    lost by diuresis in early convalescence (1). Severe retention of body water, especially during central nervous system infection, has now been widely...adrenocortical production of glucocorticoid and ketosteroid hormones often declines into a subnormal range. The labile pool of body nitrogen is...may not become apparent until early convalescence when postfebrile diuresis causes excessive fluid to be excreted. (3) Protein requirements ’- Despite

  3. Water, Sanitation, Hygiene, and Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunz, Eric C.; Addiss, David G.; Stocks, Meredith E.; Ogden, Stephanie; Utzinger, Jürg; Freeman, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preventive chemotherapy represents a powerful but short-term control strategy for soil-transmitted helminthiasis. Since humans are often re-infected rapidly, long-term solutions require improvements in water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH). The purpose of this study was to quantitatively summarize the relationship between WASH access or practices and soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infection. Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the associations of improved WASH on infection with STH (Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworm [Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus], and Strongyloides stercoralis). PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and LILACS were searched from inception to October 28, 2013 with no language restrictions. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they provided an estimate for the effect of WASH access or practices on STH infection. We assessed the quality of published studies with the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. A total of 94 studies met our eligibility criteria; five were randomized controlled trials, whilst most others were cross-sectional studies. We used random-effects meta-analyses and analyzed only adjusted estimates to help account for heterogeneity and potential confounding respectively. Use of treated water was associated with lower odds of STH infection (odds ratio [OR] 0.46, 95% CI 0.36–0.60). Piped water access was associated with lower odds of A. lumbricoides (OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.39–0.41) and T. trichiura infection (OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.45–0.72), but not any STH infection (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.28–3.11). Access to sanitation was associated with decreased likelihood of infection with any STH (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.57–0.76), T. trichiura (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.50–0.74), and A. lumbricoides (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44–0.88), but not with hookworm infection (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.61–1.06). Wearing shoes was associated with reduced

  4. Soil-Transmitted Helminths in Tropical Australia and Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. Gordon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil-transmitted helminths (STH infect 2 billion people worldwide including significant numbers in South-East Asia (SEA. In Australia, STH are of less concern; however, indigenous communities are endemic for STH, including Strongyloides stercoralis, as well as for serious clinical infections due to other helminths such as Toxocara spp. The zoonotic hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum is also present in Australia and SEA, and may contribute to human infections particularly among pet owners. High human immigration rates to Australia from SEA, which is highly endemic for STH Strongyloides and Toxocara, has resulted in a high prevalence of these helminthic infections in immigrant communities, particularly since such individuals are not screened for worm infections upon entry. In this review, we consider the current state of STH infections in Australia and SEA.

  5. Intestinal helminthiases in Ecuador: the relatíonship between prevalence, genetic, and socioeconomic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Cooper

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of infection with the intestinal helminths, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Ancylostoma duodenale and Strongyloides stercoralis was examinedin 632 residents of communities in Esmeraldas province of Ecuador. These communities were divided into two groups according to area of habitation which reflected different socioeconomic circumstances. Attempts were made to correlate infection status with race and ABO blood group phenotype. The racial groups included blacks, Chachi amerindians, and mixed-race mestizos. Greater prevalences of infection were seen in the area oflower socioeconomic status. No racial or blood group associations with helminth infection were seen controlling for socioeconomic status.

  6. Gastrointestinal Nematodes and Body Condition Scores of Goats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strongyle + Strongyloides, Strongyle + Trichuris, Strongyloides + Trichuris and Strongyle + Strongyloides + Trichuris. Haemonchus contortus was the predominant nematode infecting the goats followed by Trichostrongylus spp, Oesophagostomum spp and Strongyloides spp in that order. Sex and age of the animals were ...

  7. Differences in the Importance of Mast Cells, Basophils, IgE, and IgG versus That of CD4+ T Cells and ILC2 Cells in Primary and Secondary Immunity to Strongyloides venezuelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Kaori; Karasuyama, Hajime; Kabashima, Kenji; Kubo, Masato; Galli, Stephen J

    2017-05-01

    There is evidence that mast cells, basophils, and IgE can contribute to immune responses to parasites; however, the relative levels of importance of these effector elements in parasite immunity are not fully understood. Previous work in Il3-deficient and c-kit mutant KitW/W-v mice indicated that interleukin-3 and c-Kit contribute to expulsion of the intestinal nematode Strongyloides venezuelensis during primary infection. Our findings in mast cell-deficient KitW-sh/W-sh mice and two types of mast cell-deficient mice that have normal c-kit ("Hello Kitty" and MasTRECK mice) confirmed prior work in KitW/W-v mice that suggested that mast cells play an important role in S. venezuelensis egg clearance in primary infections. We also assessed a possible contribution of basophils in immune responses to S. venezuelensis By immunohistochemistry, we found that numbers of basophils and mast cells were markedly increased in the jejunal mucosa during primary infections with S. venezuelensis Studies in basophil-deficient Mcpt8DTR mice revealed a small but significant contribution of basophils to S. venezuelensis egg clearance in primary infections. Studies in mice deficient in various components of immune responses showed that CD4+ T cells and ILC2 cells, IgG, FcRγ, and, to a lesser extent, IgE and FcεRI contribute to effective immunity in primary S. venezuelensis infections. These findings support the conclusion that the hierarchy of importance of immune effector mechanisms in primary S. venezuelensis infection is as follows: CD4+ T cells/ILC2 cells, IgG, and FcRγ>mast cells>IgE and FcεRI>basophils. In contrast, in secondary S. venezuelensis infection, our evidence indicates that the presence of CD4+ T cells is of critical importance but mast cells, antibodies, and basophils have few or no nonredundant roles. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. In vitro efficacy of latex and purified papain from Carica papaya against Strongyloides venezuelensis eggs and larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Dayane; Levenhagen, Marcelo Arantes; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria; Costa, Antônio Paulino da; Rodrigues, Rosângela Maria

    2017-04-03

    Latex from Carica papaya is rich in bioactive compounds, especially papain, which may help to control parasitic diseases. This study evaluated the efficacy of latex from C. papaya and purified papain against Strongyloides venezuelensis. The Egg Hatching Test (EHT) and the Larval Motility Test (LMT) using fresh and frozen latex (250mg/mL), lyophilized latex (34mg/mL), and purified papain (2.8 mg/mL) were performed. Albendazole (0.025 mg/mL) and ivermectin (316 ppm) were used as positive controls. EHT and LMT were carried out through the incubation of each solution with S. venezuelensis eggs or larvae (± 100 specimens), and results were analyzed after 48h (EHT) or 24, 48, and 72h (LMT). EHT showed that latex preparations at higher concentrations (1:10 to 1:100) resulted in partial or complete destruction of eggs and larvae inside the eggs. The result from the 1:1,000 dilution was similar to the positive control. LMT showed effectiveness in all the tested dilutions compared to negative controls. Purified papain showed a dose-dependent response in the EHT. Purified papain (2.8 mg/ mL) showed similar results to lyophilized latex at 1:1,000 in the EHT. Latex and purified papain from C. papaya were effective against S. venezuelensis eggs and larvae in vitro, suggesting their potential use as an alternative treatment for strongyloidiasis.

  9. [Parasitic diseases in pediatric cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialek, R

    2005-11-01

    Parasitic infections are rare events in pediatric oncology. Transmission routes and diseases of most parasites do not differ significantly from those seen in otherwise healthy children. However, latent asymptomatic infections with Cryptosporidium spp., Leishmania spp., Strongyloides stercoralis and Toxoplasma gondii might exacerbate during immunosuppression. Screening in asymptomatic patients is often unsuccessful due to the low sensitivity of available assays except in toxoplasmosis. This article provides the recommendations of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases (DGPI) and the German Society for Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (GPOH) for the appropriate diagnostic procedures and antiparasitic treatment immunocompromised patients.

  10. Occurrence of strongyloidiasis in privately owned and sheltered dogs: clinical presentation and treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradies, Paola; Iarussi, Fabrizio; Sasanelli, Mariateresa; Capogna, Antonio; Lia, Riccardo Paolo; Zucca, Daniele; Greco, Beatrice; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Otranto, Domenico

    2017-07-20

    The increasing number of reports of human infections by Strongyloides stercoralis from a range of European countries over the last 20 years has spurred the interest of the scientific community towards this parasite and, in particular, towards the role that infections of canine hosts may play in the epidemiology of human disease. Data on the epidemiology of canine strongyloidiasis is currently limited, most likely because of the inherent limitations of current diagnostic methods. Faecal samples were collected directly from the rectal ampulla of 272 animals of varying age and both genders living in Apulia, southern Italy. Dogs included were either privately owned (n = 210), living in an urban area but with unrestricted outdoor access (Group 1), or shelter dogs (n = 62 out of ~400) hosted in a single shelter in the province of Bari in which a history of diarrhoea, weight loss, reduced appetite and respiratory symptoms had been reported (Group 2). Strongyloides stercoralis infection was diagnosed by coproscopy on direct faecal smear and via the Baermann method. Six of 272 dogs were positive for S. stercoralis at the Baermann examination; all but one were from the shelter (Group 2) and displayed gastrointestinal clinical signs. The only owned dog (Group 1) infected with S. stercoralis, but clinically healthy, had been adopted from a shelter 1 year prior to sampling. Five infected dogs were treated with fenbendazole (Panacur®, Intervet, Animal Health, 50 mg/kg, PO daily for 5 days), or with a combination of fenbendazole and moxidectin plus imidacloprid spot-on (Im/Mox; Advocate® spot-on, Bayer). Post-treatment clearance of infection was confirmed in three dogs by Baermann examination, whereas treatment failure was documented in two dogs by Baermann and/or post-mortem detection of adult parasites. This study describes, for the first time, the presence of S. stercoralis infection in sheltered dogs from southern Italy. Data indicate that S. stercoralis infection

  11. Usefulness of concanavalin-A non-binding fraction of Strongyloides venezuelensis larvae to detect IgG and IgA in human strongyloidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga, Henrique Tomaz; Ribeiro, Vanessa da Silva; Cunha-Júnior, Jair Pereira; Ueta, Marlene Tiduko; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2011-05-01

    Glycosylated components from Strongyloides have an important role in parasite establishment and host recognition of these substances. Considering the sugar-binding capacity of lectins, such as concanavalin-A (Con-A), IgG and IgA detection in serum samples from strongyloidiasis patients was tested using different antigenic preparations. The total saline extract (SE) of Strongyloides venezuelensis filariform larvae was fractionated in Con-A column to obtain Con-A unbound (Con-A UF) and Con-A bound (Con-A BF) fractions. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), area under the ROC curve (AUC), likelihood ratio (LR), and correlation coefficients were calculated. Con-A UF showed the highest diagnostic parameters for IgG detection (Se 95.0%, Sp 92.5%, AUC 0.99, LR 12.7) and high correlation (r = 0.700) with SE. Con-A fractions did not clearly demonstrate any usefulness for IgA detection. In conclusion, the results obtained demonstrate that Con-A UF is an important source of specific peptides efficient to detect IgG in strongyloidiasis immunodiagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Parasitological Contamination of Wastewater Irrigated and Raw ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tadesse

    Fasciola hepatica, Hymenolepis nana, Echinococcus spp, Trichuris spp, Enterobius vermicularis, Trichostrongylus spp, Toxocara.spp, Strongyloides stercoralis, Giardia lamblia,. Entamoeba spp, Iodamoeba butschlii, Blastocystis hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum. (Gharavi et al., 2002; Gupta et al., 2009; Abougrain et al.

  13. Technology Assessment and Strategy for Development of a Rapid Field Water Microbiology Test Kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    Caribbean Spirometra mansonoides (C) Wounds Orient Strongyloides Duodenum and Worldwide stercoralis (N) jejunum Diphyllobothrium Alaska, E Canada... latum (C) Small intestine Great Lakes, Europe, S America, Ned., USSR, Japan, Australia Dipylidium caninum (C) Small intestine Worldwide Hymenolepis

  14. 78 FR 69700 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... bioavailability because of its resistance to metabolic amidases. Potential Commercial Applications: Therapeutic... agent for cognitive disorders (such as schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, dyskinesia, depression...). Publications: 1. Krolewiecki AJ, et al. Improved diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis using recombinant...

  15. Baboons as potential reservoirs of zoonotic gastrointestinal parasite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    , Strongyloides stercoralis, Fasciola sp, Schistosoma mansoni, Hymenolepis nana, and Trichostrongylus sp, and cysts of protozoan parasites Entomoeba histolytica, E. coli, and Iodamoeba butschii. Conclusion: Most of the parasites identified ...

  16. Species and prevalence determination of Human Intestinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten parasites species, namely Ascaris lumbricoides, Schistosoma mansoni, Ancylostoma duodenale, Strongyloides stercoralis, Fasciola hepatica, Hymenolepis nana, Enterobius vermicularis, Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba coli, and Giardia lamblia were observed in the stool samples. The distribution of species in ...

  17. Intestinal strongyloidiasis in a psoriatic patient following immunosuppressive therapy: Seeing the unforeseen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poongodi Lakshmi Santhana Kumaraswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis , an intestinal nematode, has a complicated life cycle. Mostly asymptomatic, if symptomatic it has nonspecific, transient clinical manifestations. The two aggressive forms of the disease are: Hyperinfection syndrome (HS or disseminated syndrome (DS. Several risk factors have been associated with strongyloidiasis including immunosuppressive therapy, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, diabetes, alcoholism, tuberculosis, impaired bowel motility, surgically created intestinal blind loops, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and chronic renal failure. We describe a case of intestinal strongyloidiasis in a psoriatic patient treated with immunosuppressive therapy.

  18. Prospective study of strongyloidosis in patients with hematologic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeff-Teixeira Carlos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunocompromised individuals infected with Strongyloides stercoralis may develop severe hyperinfection or disseminated disease with high mortality. Patients with hematological malignancies are at risk because of immunodepression produced either by the disease or its treatment. A prospective study was undertaken at the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, from July 1994 to July 1995. Seventy-two (HIV negative, had 3 stool samples collected at different days and had not received recent anti-helmintic therapy. Larvae, isolated in a modified Baermann method, were found in 6 patients, with a resultant prevalence of 8.3%. No complicated strongyloidosis was documented. The positive result for S. stercoralis larvae was significantly associated (p < 0.001 with eosinophilia. Knowledge of prevalence figures and incidence of severe disease is important to adequate guidelines for empirical treatment besides the rigorous search for strongyloidosis in patients with hematological malignancies.

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    respectively. Among the pregnant women, Ascaris lumbricoides (2/380; 0.5%), Trichiuris trichiura (1/380;. 0.3%), and Strongyloides stercoralis (2/380; 0.5%) were identified in the stool samples. However, A. lumbri- coides (2.6%), Enterobius vermicularis (1.3%), T. trichiura. (1.3%), S. stercoralis (1.6%), and Hookworm (3.1%).

  20. Significant Weight Loss, Nausea, And Vomiting Due to Strongyloidiasis:A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Shafaghi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is caused by infestation with Strongyloides stercoralis, a free living tropical and semitropical soil helminth that has a larval form that penetrates intact skin.Clinical manifestations may be varied from an asymptomatic infection   in immunocompetent hosts to a diffuse and fatal form in immunocompromised hosts.We report a 56-year-old man from Dezful (south-west of Iran with a 6-month history of nausea, vomiting and significant weight loss (greater than 10%. Abdominal ltrasonography had no significant findings. Upper gastrointestinal series and abdominal CT were performed. Dilated bowel loops especially in the jejunum,with decreased mucosal folds were seen. Abiopsy specimen from the third part of duodenum showed strongyloides larvae,thus albendazole 400 mg twice a day for 3   days was initiated.He responded well to this treatment regimen.  

  1. Microbiological screenings for infection control in unaccompanied minor refugees: the German Armed Forces Medical Service's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaßen, Winfried; Wiemer, Dorothea; Frey, Claudia; Kreuzberg, Christina; Tannich, Egbert; Hinz, Rebecca; Wille, Andreas; Fritsch, Andreas; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Frickmann, Hagen

    2017-01-01

    The German Military Medical Service contributed to the medical screening of unaccompanied minor refugees (UMRs) coming to Germany in 2014 and 2015. In this study, a broad range of diagnostic procedures was applied to identify microorganisms with clinical or public health significance. Previously, those tests had only been used to screen soldiers returning from tropical deployments. This instance is the first time the approach has been studied in a humanitarian context. The offered screenings included blood cell counts, hepatitis B serology and microscopy of the stool to look for protozoa and worm eggs as well as PCR from stool samples targeting pathogenic bacteria, protozoa and helminths. If individuals refused certain assessments, their decision to do so was accepted. A total of 219 apparently healthy male UMRs coming from Afghanistan, Egypt, Somalia, Eritrea, Syria, Ghana, Guinea, Iran, Algeria, Iraq, Benin, Gambia, Libya, Morocco, Pakistan, and Palestine were assessed. All UMRs who were examined at the study department were included in the assessment. We detected decreasing frequencies of pathogens that included diarrhoea-associated bacteria [Campylobacter (C.) jejuni, enteropathogenic Escherichia (E.) coli (EPEC), enterotoxic E. coli (ETEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC)/Shigella spp.), Giardia (G.) duodenalis, helminths (comprising Schistosoma spp., Hymenolepis (H.) nana, Strongyloides (S.) stercoralis] as well as hepatitis B virus. Pathogenic microorganisms dominated the samples by far. While G. duodenalis was detected in 11.4% of the assessed UMRs, the incidence of newly identified cases in the German population was 4.5 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. We conclude that the applied in-house PCR screening systems, which have proven to be useful for screening military returnees from tropical deployments, can also be used for health assessment of immigrants from the respective sites. Apparently healthy UMRs may be enterically

  2. Geohelminth eggs in the soil and stool of pupils of some primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    0.4%), and Strongyloides sp (0.2%) were recovered from he soil. The stool samples contained eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides (9.3%) and eggs/larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis (1.5%). The prevalence in soil was not influenced by the apparent ...

  3. A hospital-based study of epidemiological and clinical data on Blastocystis hominis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laodim, Pongsakorn; Intapan, Pewpan M; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2012-12-01

    Blastocystis hominis is a foodborne protozoan found in the human feces worldwide. One hundred and ninety-nine individuals with stool samples positive for B. hominis were identified from a pool of 14,325 patient stools collected between 2003 and 2010 from Srinagarind hospital in Thailand. The medical records of patients were reviewed for demographic and clinical data. Of the 85 patients (42.7%) who had B. hominis infection with no co-infections, 42.5% experienced gastrointestinal symptoms. Abdominal pain is the most frequently observed symptom followed by diarrhea. Strongyloides stercolaris and Opisthorchis viverrini were the predominant parasitic co-infections in blastocystosis patients. The infection rates of B. hominis were high during the rainy season. Most B. hominis-infected patients (94%) had underlying diseases; malignancy and chronic diseases were equally top ranked (35.3%) which indicated that B. hominis is an opportunistic protozoan.

  4. Infeksi Cacing pada Ular Kobra (Naja sputatrix di Bali (WORM INFECTION ON SPITTING COBRA SNAKE (Naja Sputatrix IN BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Ayu Sismami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been done the survey for study about worm infection on spitting cobra snake (Naja sputatrix inBali. There were 15 fecal samples from wild spitting cobra snake in Bali. The examination was usingconcentration cediment method. The result of examination showed that from all 15 fecal samples containedthe worm egg. From the result it could be conclude that the prevalent worm infection on spitting cobrasnake in Bali is capability 100% . From this study it means that infectioned could be happen more than 1(multiple infection on 1 splitting cobra snake. The kind and prevalent of worm infected snake wereRhabdias sp (60,03%, Strongyloides sp (60,03%, Oxyuris sp (53,3%, Kalicephalus spp (20,01%, danCapilaria sp (6,67%. For enrich the information of another kind of parasitic infection should be done theresearch with variable and more collected samples.

  5. Epidemiology and chemotherapy of parasitic infections in wild omnivores in the Mahendra Choudhury Zoological Park, Chhat Bir, Punjab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Singh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the occurrence and intensity of gastrointestinal helminthic infections along with chemotherapeutic response in 13 different omnivore species belonging to Primate, Ursidae, Suidae and Viverridae at M.C Zoological Park, Chhatbir in Punjab, India. The overall occurrence of gastrointestinal parasites based on copro-parasitoscopic analysis (CPS of 317 samples for helmithic eggs was found to be 29.02 per cent. The various parasitic eggs detected were Trichuris spp, Hymenolepis diminuta, Strongyloides spp, Ascaris suum and Ascaris spp. The most common parasitic infection found in omnivores specially the primates was of Trichuris spp. (86.96%. Mixed infection of Trichuris spp. and H. diminuta was recorded in assamese monkeys with highest intensity of Trichuris spp. The EPG for Trichuris spp varied from 1800-7500. The EPG ranging from 100-750 was recorded for H. diminuta and Strongyloides spp which was followed by that of Trichuris spp. in rhesus monkeys, Ascaris suum in wild boar, Trichuris spp in capped langur, Trichuris spp in common langur, and Ascaris spp. in sloth bear. In assamese monkeys the infection was concurrent to tuberculosis. Treatment of animals with appropriate drug based on the species of parasites present was found to be 100 per cent effective as indicated by faecal egg count reduction test which reached zero level 5-30 days post treatment. There was no re-occurrence of parasitic infection till day 55 post treatment.

  6. Anthelmintic Therapy Modifies the Systemic and Mycobacterial Antigen-Stimulated Cytokine Profile in Helminth-Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, Rajamanickam; Munisankar, Saravanan; Bhootra, Yukthi; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash

    2017-04-01

    Helminth infections are known to modulate cytokine responses in latent tuberculosis (LTB). However, very few studies have examined whether this modulation is reversible upon anthelmintic therapy. We measured the systemic and mycobacterial (TB) antigen-stimulated levels of type 1, type 2, type 17, and regulatory cytokines in individuals with LTB and with or without coexistent Strongyloides stercoralis infection before and after anthelmintic therapy. Our data reveal that individuals with LTB and coexistent S. stercoralis infection have significantly lower levels of systemic and TB antigen-stimulated type 1 (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and interleukin-2 [IL-2]) and type 17 (IL-17A and/or IL-17F) cytokines and significantly higher levels of systemic but not TB antigen-stimulated type 2 (IL-4 and IL-5) and regulatory (transforming growth factor beta [TGF-β]) cytokines. Anthelmintic therapy resulted in significantly increased systemic levels of type 1 and/or type 17 cytokines and in significantly decreased systemic levels of type 2 and regulatory (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines. In addition, anthelmintic therapy resulted in significantly increased TB antigen-stimulated levels of type 1 cytokines only. Our data therefore confirm that the modulation of systemic and TB antigen-stimulated cytokine responses in S. stercoralis -LTB coinfection is reversible (for the most part) by anthelmintic treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Improved PCR-Based Detection of Soil Transmitted Helminth Infections Using a Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Assay Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotte, Nils; Papaiakovou, Marina; Grant, Jessica R.; Bierwert, Lou Ann; Llewellyn, Stacey; McCarthy, James S.; Williams, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The soil transmitted helminths are a group of parasitic worms responsible for extensive morbidity in many of the world’s most economically depressed locations. With growing emphasis on disease mapping and eradication, the availability of accurate and cost-effective diagnostic measures is of paramount importance to global control and elimination efforts. While real-time PCR-based molecular detection assays have shown great promise, to date, these assays have utilized sub-optimal targets. By performing next-generation sequencing-based repeat analyses, we have identified high copy-number, non-coding DNA sequences from a series of soil transmitted pathogens. We have used these repetitive DNA elements as targets in the development of novel, multi-parallel, PCR-based diagnostic assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Utilizing next-generation sequencing and the Galaxy-based RepeatExplorer web server, we performed repeat DNA analysis on five species of soil transmitted helminths (Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis). Employing high copy-number, non-coding repeat DNA sequences as targets, novel real-time PCR assays were designed, and assays were tested against established molecular detection methods. Each assay provided consistent detection of genomic DNA at quantities of 2 fg or less, demonstrated species-specificity, and showed an improved limit of detection over the existing, proven PCR-based assay. Conclusions/Significance The utilization of next-generation sequencing-based repeat DNA analysis methodologies for the identification of molecular diagnostic targets has the ability to improve assay species-specificity and limits of detection. By exploiting such high copy-number repeat sequences, the assays described here will facilitate soil transmitted helminth diagnostic efforts. We recommend similar analyses when designing PCR-based diagnostic tests for the detection of other

  8. Improved PCR-Based Detection of Soil Transmitted Helminth Infections Using a Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Assay Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotte, Nils; Papaiakovou, Marina; Grant, Jessica R; Bierwert, Lou Ann; Llewellyn, Stacey; McCarthy, James S; Williams, Steven A

    2016-03-01

    The soil transmitted helminths are a group of parasitic worms responsible for extensive morbidity in many of the world's most economically depressed locations. With growing emphasis on disease mapping and eradication, the availability of accurate and cost-effective diagnostic measures is of paramount importance to global control and elimination efforts. While real-time PCR-based molecular detection assays have shown great promise, to date, these assays have utilized sub-optimal targets. By performing next-generation sequencing-based repeat analyses, we have identified high copy-number, non-coding DNA sequences from a series of soil transmitted pathogens. We have used these repetitive DNA elements as targets in the development of novel, multi-parallel, PCR-based diagnostic assays. Utilizing next-generation sequencing and the Galaxy-based RepeatExplorer web server, we performed repeat DNA analysis on five species of soil transmitted helminths (Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis). Employing high copy-number, non-coding repeat DNA sequences as targets, novel real-time PCR assays were designed, and assays were tested against established molecular detection methods. Each assay provided consistent detection of genomic DNA at quantities of 2 fg or less, demonstrated species-specificity, and showed an improved limit of detection over the existing, proven PCR-based assay. The utilization of next-generation sequencing-based repeat DNA analysis methodologies for the identification of molecular diagnostic targets has the ability to improve assay species-specificity and limits of detection. By exploiting such high copy-number repeat sequences, the assays described here will facilitate soil transmitted helminth diagnostic efforts. We recommend similar analyses when designing PCR-based diagnostic tests for the detection of other eukaryotic pathogens.

  9. Improved PCR-Based Detection of Soil Transmitted Helminth Infections Using a Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Assay Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Pilotte

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The soil transmitted helminths are a group of parasitic worms responsible for extensive morbidity in many of the world's most economically depressed locations. With growing emphasis on disease mapping and eradication, the availability of accurate and cost-effective diagnostic measures is of paramount importance to global control and elimination efforts. While real-time PCR-based molecular detection assays have shown great promise, to date, these assays have utilized sub-optimal targets. By performing next-generation sequencing-based repeat analyses, we have identified high copy-number, non-coding DNA sequences from a series of soil transmitted pathogens. We have used these repetitive DNA elements as targets in the development of novel, multi-parallel, PCR-based diagnostic assays.Utilizing next-generation sequencing and the Galaxy-based RepeatExplorer web server, we performed repeat DNA analysis on five species of soil transmitted helminths (Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis. Employing high copy-number, non-coding repeat DNA sequences as targets, novel real-time PCR assays were designed, and assays were tested against established molecular detection methods. Each assay provided consistent detection of genomic DNA at quantities of 2 fg or less, demonstrated species-specificity, and showed an improved limit of detection over the existing, proven PCR-based assay.The utilization of next-generation sequencing-based repeat DNA analysis methodologies for the identification of molecular diagnostic targets has the ability to improve assay species-specificity and limits of detection. By exploiting such high copy-number repeat sequences, the assays described here will facilitate soil transmitted helminth diagnostic efforts. We recommend similar analyses when designing PCR-based diagnostic tests for the detection of other eukaryotic pathogens.

  10. Diagnóstico sorológico da estrongiloidíase humana através do método imunoenzimático

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Brasil

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho demonstra a eficácia do método imunoenzimático utilizando antígeno solúvel de larvas de Strongyloides stercoralis no diagnóstico da estrongiloidíase humana. Foram avaliados 27 pacientes com as diversas formas clínicas da parasitose, sendo demonstrados títulos significativos em 25 (92% dos casos. Em 17 controles, com ou sem outrasparasítoses intestinais, títulos significativos estavam presentes em 3 (18%. A sensibilidade do teste foi de 92% e a especificidade de 82%. São também relatados 3 casos clínicos, nos quais o diagnóstico da doença foi feito inicialmente pela determinação de anticorpos contra larvas de S. stercoralis, havendo posteriormente demonstração parasitológica em 2 dos casos. É ressaltada a importância do teste no diagnóstico da estrongiloidíase aguda e em situações onde eosinofilia não esteja associada a outras condições clínicas.The detection of antibodies to S. stercoralis antigen by using the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay was evaluated in 27 patients with strongyloidiasis diagnosed by demonstration of larvae of S. stercoralis in the stool. Significant titers of antibody were observed in 25 (92% patients. In 17 controls with or without other parasitic infections, titers were considered positive in 3 (18%. We also report three cases in which the diagnosis of strongyloidiais was initially made only by the serological test These observations suggest that documentation of antibody to S. stercoralis by the ELISA technique may contribute to the diagnosis of strongyloidiasis. In addition, the test may be of great value in acute strongyloidiasis and in the diagnosis of patients with unexplained eosinophilia.

  11. Disseminated Strongyloidiasis in an Iranian Immunocompro-mised Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges NAJAFI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth (STH widespread in various part of the world. A 78-yr-old peasant diabetic female from Mazandaran Province northern Iran, was admitted to Infection Department of the Razi Hospital in city of Qaemshahr, north of Iran complaining about abdominal skin rash, pruritus, itching, anorexia, nausea, vomiting, dysuria and cough. This patient had cutaneous migration effects of S. stercoralis larvae in her abdominal skin (larva currents and urticaria. Lung CT without contrast demonstrates bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity draws attention. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastro esophageal reflux with antral gastritis. Duodenal endoscopy showed unusual mucosa and a biopsy from it sent to the pathology laboratory. Histopathology of duodenal bulb and duodenum biopsy showed mild villous atrophy and S. stercoralis infection. The patient was treated with albendazole and clinical sings improved completely after treatment. Strongyloidiasis should be care­fully considered by clinicians who practice in endemic areas. Clinicians must keep a high level of skepticism for patients from endemic area.

  12. AIDS - associated parasitic diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the advent of human immunodeficiency virus infection, with its profound and progressive effect on the cellular immune system, a group of human opportunistic pathogens has come into prominence. Opportunistic parasitic infection can cause severe morbidity and mortality. Because many of these infections are treatable, an early and accurate diagnosis is important. This can be accomplished by a variety of methods such as direct demonstration of parasites and by serological tests to detect antigen and/or specific antibodies. However, antibody response may be poor in these patients and therefore immunodiagnostic tests have to be interpreted with caution. Cryptosporidium parvum , Isospora belli , Cyclospora cayetanensis , Microsporidia, Entamoeba histolytica and Strongyloides stercoralis are the commonly detected parasites. Detection of these parasites will help in proper management of these patients because drugs are available for most of these parasitic infections.

  13. Human strongyloidiasis: identifying knowledge gaps, with emphasis on environmental control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor MJ

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Michael J Taylor, Tara A Garrard, Francis J O'Donahoo, Kirstin E Ross Health and Environment, School of the Environment, Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia Abstract: Strongyloides is a human parasitic nematode that is poorly understood outside a clinical context. This article identifies gaps within the literature, with particular emphasis on gaps that are hindering environmental control of Strongyloides. The prevalence and distribution of Strongyloides is unclear. An estimate of 100–370 million people infected worldwide has been proposed; however, inaccuracy of diagnosis, unreliability of prevalence mapping, and the fact that strongyloidiasis remains a neglected disease suggest that the higher figure of more than 300 million cases is likely to be a more accurate estimate. The complexity of Strongyloides life cycle means that laboratory cultures cannot be maintained outside of a host. This currently limits the range of laboratory-based research, which is vital to controlling Strongyloides through environmental alteration or treatment. Successful clinical treatment with antihelminthic drugs has meant that controlling Strongyloides through environmental control, rather than clinical intervention, has been largely overlooked. These control measures may encompass alteration of the soil environment through physical means, such as desiccation or removal of nutrients, or through chemical or biological agents. Repeated antihelminthic treatment of individuals with recurrent strongyloidiasis has not been observed to result in the selection of resistant strains; however, this has not been explicitly demonstrated, and relying on such assumptions in the long-term may prove to be shortsighted. It is ultimately naive to assume that continued administration of antihelminthics will be without any negative long-term effects. In Australia, strongyloidiasis primarily affects Indigenous communities, including communities from arid central Australia. This

  14. Parasitic and Bacterial Infections of Myocastor coypus in a Metropolitan Area of Northwestern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanzani, Sergio A; Di Cerbo, Annarita; Gazzonis, Alessia L; Epis, Sara; Invernizzi, Anna; Tagliabue, Silvia; Manfredi, Maria T

    2016-01-01

    Coypus (Myocastor coypus) are widespread throughout Europe. In northern Italy, they are abundant in the flatland areas, and their high population densities can cause economic loss and ecosystem damage. We examined 153 coypus for selected parasitic and bacterial infections. We found Strongyloides myopotami (63.4% prevalence), Trichostrongylus duretteae (28.1%), Eimeria coypi (86.3%), and Eimeria seideli (6.8%), but did not find Giardia duodenalis or Cryptosporidium spp. We also isolated Staphylococcus aureus (10.1%), Escherichia coli (4.5%), and Streptococcus spp. (3.4%) from lung samples; no Salmonella spp. were isolated from fecal samples. Coypus had antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii (28.9%) and to four serovars of Leptospira interrogans (44.9%); Australis/Bratislava was the serovar most frequently detected. It is clear that coypu can be infected with pathogens of human and veterinary importance.

  15. Intestinal Parasitic Infections among Pregnant Women in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Intestinal parasitic infections, especially due to helminths, increase anemia in pregnant women. The results of this are low pregnancy weight gain and IUGR, followed by LBW, with its associated greater risks of infection and higher perinatal mortality rates. For these reasons, in the setting of no large previous studies in Venezuela about this problem, a national multicentric study was conducted. Methods. Pregnant women from nine states were studied, a prenatal evaluation with a coproparasitological study. Univariated and multivariated analyses were made to determine risk factors for intestinal parasitosis and related anemia. Results. During 19 months, 1038 pregnant women were included and evaluated. Intestinal parasitosis was evidenced in 73.9%: A lumbricoides 57.0%, T trichiura 36.0%, G lamblia 14.1%, E hystolitica 12.0%, N americanus 8.1%, E vermicularis 6.3%, S stercoralis 3.3%. Relative risk for anemia in those women with intestinal parasitosis was 2.56 ( P<.01 . Discussion. Intestinal parasitoses could be associated with conditions for development of anemia at pregnancy. These features reflect the need of routine coproparasitological study among pregnant women in rural and endemic zones for intestinal parasites. Further therapeutic and prophylactic protocols are needed. Additional research on pregnant intestinal parasitic infection impact on newborn health is also considered.

  16. Intestinal parasitic infections among pregnant women in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J; Barbella, Rosa A; Case, Cynthia; Arria, Melissa; Ravelo, Marisela; Perez, Henry; Urdaneta, Oscar; Gervasio, Gloria; Rubio, Nestor; Maldonado, Andrea; Aguilera, Ymora; Viloria, Anna; Blanco, Juan J; Colina, Magdary; Hernández, Elizabeth; Araujo, Elianet; Cabaniel, Gilberto; Benitez, Jesús; Rifakis, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections, especially due to helminths, increase anemia in pregnant women. The results of this are low pregnancy weight gain and IUGR, followed by LBW, with its associated greater risks of infection and higher perinatal mortality rates. For these reasons, in the setting of no large previous studies in Venezuela about this problem, a national multicentric study was conducted. Pregnant women from nine states were studied, a prenatal evaluation with a coproparasitological study. Univariated and multivariated analyses were made to determine risk factors for intestinal parasitosis and related anemia. During 19 months, 1038 pregnant women were included and evaluated. Intestinal parasitosis was evidenced in 73.9%: A lumbricoides 57.0%, T trichiura 36.0%, G lamblia 14.1%, E hystolitica 12.0%, N americanus 8.1%, E vermicularis 6.3%, S stercoralis 3.3%. Relative risk for anemia in those women with intestinal parasitosis was 2.56 (P Intestinal parasitoses could be associated with conditions for development of anemia at pregnancy. These features reflect the need of routine coproparasitological study among pregnant women in rural and endemic zones for intestinal parasites. Further therapeutic and prophylactic protocols are needed. Additional research on pregnant intestinal parasitic infection impact on newborn health is also considered.

  17. Intestinal parasites of children and adults in a remote Aboriginal community of the Northern Territory, Australia, 1994-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Shield

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Parasitic infections can adversely impact health, nutritional status and educational attainment. This study investigated hookworm and other intestinal parasites in an Aboriginal community in Australia from 1994 to 1996. Methods: Seven surveys for intestinal parasites were conducted by a quantitative formol-ether method on faecal samples. Serological testing was conducted for Strongyloides stercoralis and Toxocara canis IgG by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: Of the 314 participants, infections were as follows: Trichuris trichiura (86%; hookworm, predominantly Ancylostoma duodenale (36%; Entamoeba spp. (E. histolytica complex [E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moskovski], E. coli and E. hartmanni (25%; S. stercoralis (19%; Rodentolepis nana (16%; and Giardia duodenalis (10%. Serological diagnosis for 29 individuals showed that 28% were positive for S. stercoralis and 21% for T. canis. There was a decrease in the proportion positive for hookworm over the two-year period but not for the other parasite species. The presence of hookworm, T. trichiura and Entamoeba spp. was significantly greater in 5–14 year olds (n = 87 than in 0–4 year olds (n = 41, while the presence of S. stercoralis, R. nana, G. duodenalis and Entamoeba spp. in 5–14 year olds was significantly greater than 15–69 year olds (n = 91. Discussion: Faecal testing indicated a very high prevalence of intestinal parasites, especially in schoolchildren. The decrease in percentage positive for hookworm over the two years was likely due to the albendazole deworming programme, and recent evidence indicates that the prevalence of hookworm is now low. However there was no sustained decrease in percentage positive for the other parasite species.

  18. Clinical conditions associated withintestinal strongyloidiasis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Caryna Cabral

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth that produces an infection that can persist for decades. The relationships between certain clinical conditions and strongyloidiasis remains controversial. This study aims to identify the clinical conditions associated with intestinal strongyloidiasis at a reference center for infectious diseases in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. METHODS: The clinical conditions that were assessed included HIV/AIDS, HTLV infection, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obstructive respiratory diseases, viral hepatitis, tuberculosis, cancer, chronic renal disease, nutritional/metabolic disorders, psychiatric conditions, rheumatic diseases and dermatologic diseases. We compared 167 S. stercoralis-positive and 133 S. stercoralis-negative patients. RESULTS: After controlling for sex (male/female OR = 2.29; 95% (CI: (1.42 - 3.70, rheumatic diseases remained significantly associated with intestinal strongyloidiasis (OR: 4.96; 95% CI: 1.34-18.37 in a multiple logistic regression model. With respect to leukocyte counts, patients with strongyloidiasis presented with significantly higher relative eosinophil (10.32% ± 7.2 vs. 4.23% ± 2.92 and monocyte (8.49% ± 7.25 vs. 5.39% ± 4.31 counts and lower segmented neutrophil (52.85% ± 15.31 vs. 61.32% ± 11.4 and lymphocyte counts (28.11% ± 9.72 vs. 30.90% ± 9.51 than S. stercoralis-negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: Strongyloidiasis should be routinely investigated in hospitalized patients with complex conditions facilitate the treatment of patients who will undergo immunosuppressive therapy. Diagnoses should be determined through the use of appropriate parasitological methods, such as the Baermann-Moraes technique.

  19. Staphylococcal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staph is short for Staphylococcus, a type of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including Skin infections Pneumonia ...

  20. Intestinal helminthiases in Ecuador: the relatíonship between prevalence, genetic, and socioeconomic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J. Cooper

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of infection with the intestinal helminths, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Ancylostoma duodenale and Strongyloides stercoralis was examinedin 632 residents of communities in Esmeraldas province of Ecuador. These communities were divided into two groups according to area of habitation which reflected different socioeconomic circumstances. Attempts were made to correlate infection status with race and ABO blood group phenotype. The racial groups included blacks, Chachi amerindians, and mixed-race mestizos. Greater prevalences of infection were seen in the area oflower socioeconomic status. No racial or blood group associations with helminth infection were seen controlling for socioeconomic status.A prevalência de infecções com helmintos Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, Ancylostoma duodenale e Strongyloides stercoralis foi examinada em 632 pessoas em diferentes comunidades na Região de Esmeraldas no Equador. Estas comunidades foram divididas em dois grupos conforme a área na qual residem, o que reflete diferentes circunstâncias sócio- econômicas. Intentou-se correlacionar os tiposde infecção com a raça e os grupos sanguíneos ABO. Nestes grupos raciais estão incluídos negros, ameríndios Chachi, e mestiços. Notou-se a prevalência de infecções nas áreas sócio-econômicasmais baixas. Não se encontrou nenhuma relação com a infecção helmíntica e raça ou grupo sanguíneo depois de controlar-se o status sócio- econômico.

  1. Evaluation of strongyloidiasis in kennel dogs and keepers by parasitological and serological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A L R; Machado, G A; Gonçalves-Pires, M R F; Ferreira-Júnior, A; Silva, D A O; Costa-Cruz, J M

    2007-06-20

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode with worldwide distribution, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions. Due to the low sensitivity of traditional parasitological methods, the detection of serum specific antibodies may serve as an alternative test for the diagnosis. The aims of the present study were to verify the occurrence of S. stercoralis and the presence of specific IgG antibodies to the parasite in kennel dogs and keepers, using parasitological and serological assays. A total of 181 dogs were examined from 7 breeding kennels in the city of Uberlândia, southeastern region of Brazil and distributed as follows: kennel A (n=41), kennel B (n=16), kennel C (n=11), kennel D (n=63), kennel E (n=11), kennel F (n=18) and kennel G (n=21). Fecal and serum samples from 11 keepers responsible for kennel cleaning and dog control were also collected in five of the seven kennels (two from kennel A, one from kennel B, four from kennel D, two from kennel E and two from kennel G). Overall, enteroparasites were detected by parasitological assays in 66, 36.5% (95% CI: 2.5-43.4%) of the 181 dogs tested. Only one (0.6%) dog was copropositive for S. stercoralis. Among the keepers only one fecal sample, 9.1% (95% CI: 8.6-9.4%) was positive for hookworm by the Lutz method. Serological assays showed that 44 (24.3%) of the 181 dogs were seropositive for S. stercoralis in at least one of the tests in the following kennels: 21 (11.6%) in kennel A; 1 (0.6%) in kennel B; 5 (2.7%) in kennel C; 6 (3.3%) in kennel D; 1 (0.6%) in kennel E; 9 (4.9%) in kennel F and 1 (0.6%) in kennel G. Among the keepers no S. stercoralis seropositive samples were identified using IFAT but 2 (18.2%) of the keepers from kennel D and 1 (9.1%) from kennel G were seropositive by ELISA. The present study demonstrated that the occurrence of S. stercoralis infection in kennel dogs and keepers is low in the city of Uberlândia and that serological assays can contribute to the diagnosis of

  2. Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis in adults: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Samkar, A; Brouwer, M C; Pannekoek, Y; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2015-12-01

    We describe the incidence and patient characteristics of Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis. We identified S. gallolyticus meningitis in a nationwide cohort of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis, and performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all reported adult cases in the literature. Five cases were identified (0.3%) in a cohort of 1561 episodes of bacterial meningitis. In one patient, bowel disease (colon polyps) was identified as a predisposing condition for S. gallolyticus infection, whereas no patients were diagnosed with endocarditis. In a combined analysis of our patients and 37 reported in the literature, we found that the median age was 59 years. Predisposing factors were present in 21 of 42 patients (50%), and mainly consisted of immunosuppressive therapy (seven patients), cancer (four patients), and alcoholism (four patients). Colon disease was identified in 15 of 24 patients (63%) and endocarditis in five of 27 patients (18%). Co-infection with Strongyloides stercoralis was identified in 14 of 34 patients (41%), ten of whom were infected with human immunodeficiency virus or human T-lymphotropic virus. Outcomes were described for 37 patients; eight died (22%) and one (3%) had neurological sequelae. S. gallolyticus is an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis, with specific predisposing conditions. When it is identified, consultation with a cardiologist and gastroenterologist is warranted to rule out underlying endocarditis or colon disease. Stool examinations for Strongyloides stercoralis should be performed in patients who have travelled to or originate from endemic areas. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Case of Bacteremia and Meningitis Associated with Piperacillin-Tazobactam Nonsusceptible, Ceftriaxone Susceptible Escherichia coli during Strongyloides Hyperinfection in an Immunocompromised Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Dahal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Strongyloidiasis is an emerging parasitic infection with intriguing epidemiology, presentation, and clinical management. We report a case of hyperinfection syndrome complicated by E. coli bacteremia and meningitis with one of the isolates showing a unique resistance pattern recently being recognized. This report describes the aspect of invasive bacterial infections in strongyloidiasis and highlights the unique susceptibility pattern of the E. coli isolate and the extreme caution required during the antibiotic therapy.

  4. Parasitism in Children Aged Three Years and Under: Relationship between Infection and Growth in Rural Coastal Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Desiree LaBeaud

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections, which are among the most common infections worldwide, disproportionately affect children; however, little is known about the impact of parasitic disease on growth in very early childhood. Our objective was to document the prevalence of parasitic infections and examine their association with growth during the first three years of life among children in coastal Kenya.Children enrolled in a maternal-child cohort were tested for soil transmitted helminths (STHs: Ascaris, Trichuris, hookworm, Strongyloides, protozoa (malaria, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia, filaria, and Schistosoma infection every six months from birth until age three years. Anthropometrics were measured at each visit. We used generalized estimating equation (GEE models to examine the relationship between parasitic infections experienced in the first three years of life and growth outcomes (weight, length and head circumference. Of 545 children, STHs were the most common infection with 106 infections (19% by age three years. Malaria followed in period prevalence with 68 infections (12% by three years of age. Filaria and Schistosoma infection occurred in 26 (4.8% and 16 (2.9% children, respectively. Seven percent were infected with multiple parasites by three years of age. Each infection type (when all STHs were combined was documented by six months of age. Decreases in growth of weight, length and head circumference during the first 36 months of life were associated with hookworm, Ascaris, E. histolytica, malaria and Schistosoma infection. In a subset analysis of 180 children who followed up at every visit through 24 months, infection with any parasite was associated with decelerations in weight, length and head circumference growth velocity. Multiple infections were associated with greater impairment of linear growth.Our results demonstrate an under-recognized burden of parasitism in the first three years of childhood in rural Kenya. Parasitic

  5. Eryngial (trans-2-dodecenal), a bioactive compound from Eryngium foetidum: its identification, chemical isolation, characterization and comparison with ivermectin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, W M; Gallimore, W A; Mansingh, A; Reese, P B; Robinson, R D

    2014-02-01

    Methanol-water (4:1, v/v) crude extracts (50 mg mL(-1)) of 25 Jamaican medicinal plants were screened in vitro for anthelmintic activity using infective third-stage larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. The most effective extract was further chemically scrutinized to isolate and identify the source of the bioactivity, and the efficacy of this compound was compared with ivermectin. Eosin exclusion (0.1 mg mL(-1)) served as the indicator of mortality in all bioassays. A crude extract of Eryngium foetidum (Apiaceae) was significantly (Probit Analysis, Pfoetidum was significantly more effective (Probit Analysis, Pfoetidum. There was a significant difference between the 24 h LD50 values (mm) of trans-2-dodecenal (0.461) and ivermectin (2.251) but there was none between the 48 h LD50 values (mm): trans-2-dodecenal (0.411) and ivermectin (0.499) in vitro.

  6. [Geohelminths].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Pérez, Laura; Pérez-Tanoira, Ramón; Cabello-Úbeda, Alfonso; Petkova-Saiz, Elizabet; Górgolas-Hernández-Mora, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Millions of people in in rural areas and deprived tropical and subtropical regions are infected by soil-transmitted helminths: Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, hookworms (Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus), and Strongyloides stercoralis. Large migratory flows have made their worldwide distribution easier. Besides being debilitating and producing a significant mortality, they cause high morbidity, leading to physical and intellectual impairment in millions of children who live in poverty. Along with the use of benzimidazoles (albendazole and mebendazole), large-scale international campaigns for treatment and prevention have decreased the number of affected individuals. However, re-infestations and benzimidazole-resistance are frequent, so there needs to be awareness about the importance and consequences of these neglected parasites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  7. Pneumococcal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for many cases of Brain and spinal cord infection (meningitis) Lung infection (pneumonia) Infection of the bloodstream (bacteremia) Joint infection ( ... other illnesses or health conditions such as HIV infection, certain cancers (eg, leukemia, ... or kidney disease. Last Updated 11/21/2015 ...

  8. Prevalence and intensity of infection with gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep in eastern Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulišić Z.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A coprological examination of 680 grazing sheep was performed in Eastern Serbia from March 2011 to November 2012 in order to determine the presence of gastrointestinal (GI nematode parasites. Fecal samples were randomly collected and examined by using qualitative and quantitative coprological techniques. It was found that 74.56% sheep were infected. Samples that contained nematode eggs were processed for larval development and eleven nematode genera were identified: Haemonchus (46.91%, Ostertagia (25.88%, Marshallagia (21.91%, Cooperia (14.12%, Trichostrongylus (39.85%, Nematodirus (35.88%, Bunostomum (23.97%, Strongyloides (17.06% Oesophagostomum (40.73%, Chabertia (32.79% and Trichuris (10.88%. Higher prevalence of infection was observed in females (p<0.01, as well as in adults (p<0.001. Regarding the intensity of infection, in 40.63% sheep it was low, in 51.87% moderate and in 7.50% high. There was no difference in intensity of infection considering sex and age of animals. Moreover, simultaneous infection with different number of nematode genera was dependent on sheep’s age (p<0.001. These results suggest that GI nematodes are a conspicuous problem of grazing sheep in the study area. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 046002

  9. Hookworm infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hookworm disease; Ground itch; Ancylostoma duodenale infection; Necator americanus infection; Parasitic infection - hookworm ... with any of the following roundworms: Necator americanus Ancylostoma ... Ancylostoma ceylanicum Ancylostoma braziliense The first 2 ...

  10. A Comparative Study of Single Helminths and Concurrent Helminths ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The larvae isolated from those concurrently infected were mainly Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubrioformis, Oesophagostamum columbianum, Cooperia sp and Strongyloides pappilosus while those singly infected harboured mainly Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubrioformis and Strongyloides ...

  11. Frequency of parasites and Salmonella infection in captive maned-wolf, Chrysocyon brachyurus, kept in Zoos at the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilioli R.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-one captive maned wolves (Chrysocyon brachyurus, Illiger 1815 from 11 Zoos at the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were screened to investigate the presence of parasites and Salmonella infection by parasitological diagnostic methods and fecal selective culture. The most frequent ecto and endoparasites found were Ctenocephalides felis (56.2%, Rhipicephalus sanguineus (12.5%, Ancylostoma caninum (45.1%, Strongyloides sp. (29.0%, Uncinaria stenocephala (3.2%, Capillaria sp. (3.2%, Entamoeba sp. (22.9%, Sarcocystis sp. (29.0%, Cryptosporidium sp. (19.3%, Eimeria sp. (19.3%, Giardia sp. (9.6% and Isospora sp. (3.2%. Four different serotypes of Salmonella were identified in six animals (25%. Only one infected animal showed clinical signs of diarrhea. The ability to harbor Salmonella spp. as normal nonpathogenic bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract may be a physiological adaptation of this specie.

  12. IL-10- and TGFβ-mediated Th9 Responses in a Human Helminth Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamanickam Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Th9 cells are a subset of CD4+ T cells that express the protoypical cytokine, IL-9. Th9 cells are known to effect protective immunity in animal models of intestinal helminth infections. However, the role of Th9 cells in human intestinal helminth infections has never been examined.To examine the role of Th9 cells in Strongyloidis stercoralis (Ss, a common intestinal helminth infection, we compared the frequency of Th9 expressing IL-9 either singly (mono-functional or co-expressing IL-4 or IL-10 (dual-functional in Ss-infected individuals (INF to frequencies in uninfected (UN individuals.INF individuals exhibited a significant increase in the spontaneously expressed and/or antigen specific frequencies of both mono- and dual-functional Th9 cells as well as Th2 cells expressing IL-9 compared to UN. The differences in Th9 induction between INF and UN individuals was predominantly antigen-specific as the differences were no longer seen following control antigen or mitogen stimulation. In addition, the increased frequency of Th9 cells in response to parasite antigens was dependent on IL-10 and TGFx since neutralization of either of these cytokines resulted in diminished Th9 frequencies. Finally, following successful treatment of Ss infection, the frequencies of antigen-specific Th9 cells diminished in INF individuals, suggesting a role for the Th9 response in active Ss infection. Moreover, IL-9 levels in whole blood culture supernatants following Ss antigen stimulation were higher in INF compared to UN individuals.Thus, Ss infection is characterized by an IL-10- and TGFβ dependent expansion of Th9 cells, an expansion found to reversible by anti-helmintic treatment.

  13. intestinal parasites and nutritional status of nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    5/ Adekunle. Intestinal parasites and nutritional status of children. 117. Table 1: Percentage Distribution of Intestinal Parasites. Found in the Stool Specimen of the Children. No. %. Helminthes. Ascaris lumbricoides. 128. 39.0. Trichuris trichuria. 93. 28.4. Hookworm. 87. 26.5. Strongyloides stercoralis. 4. 1.2. Taenia saginata.

  14. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in vegetables sold in major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRINCE.DR SOLOMON ADEJAYAN CHAIRMAN NURTW ONDO STATE

    Carrot, 12.0% in lettuce and 10.0% in Green leafy vegetables. No parasites were detected in the 50 cucumber samples. Intestinal parasites detected included ova of Ascaris lumbricoides (51.7%), Hookworm larvae (27.6%) and larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis (20.7%). This study shows a high prevalence of intestinal ...

  15. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 15 of 15 ... Issue, Title. Vol 1, No 1 (2008), Assessment Of Ophthalmic Patients' Satisfaction In Owo, Abstract. CO Omolase, CO Fadamiro, BO Omolase, AS Aina, EO Omolade. Vol 3, No 1 (2010), Case Report: Strongyloides stercoralis coinfection in a Nigerian with HIV. Abstract. A.A Oyekunle, R.A.A Bolarinwa, O.A ...

  16. Disseminated Strongyloidiasis among HIV/AIDS Patients in Jimma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objectives:Strongyloidiasis has become a very important disease in HIV/AIDS patients. Reports pertaining to this aspect are very scarce in Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis in stool and sputum samples of HIV/AIDS patients. Patients and ...

  17. Comparison of ivermectin and thiabendazole in the treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ivermectin is the drug of choice in the treatment of onchocerciasis, and has been proven to be highly effective against Strongyloides stercoralis. This study compares ivermectin's efficacy and safety with that of thiabendazole, an established drug of choice for strongyloidiasis, in 252 confirmed cases of uncomplicated human ...

  18. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in anaemic and non-anaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, other parasites found in this study included Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura, Hymenolopse nana, Strongyloides stercoralis, Enterobius vermicularis, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lambia and Entamoeba coli, which had prevalence rates of 35%, 18.3%, 16.7%, 15%, 21.7%, 20% and 13.3% respectively ...

  19. Prevalence of Parasitic contamination of salad vegetables in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eggs of Ascaris lumbricoides, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Enterobius vermicularis, cysts of Giardia lamblia, Fasciola hepatica, Trichuris trichiura, Strongyloides stercoralis, Balantidium coli and Necator americanus were detected in 28.0%, 23.3%, 11.7%, 5.0%, 6.7%, 3.3%, 10.0%, 3.3% and 8.3% respectively. Of the ...

  20. Prevalence of Intestinal Helminthes among Children in Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strongyloides stercoralis and Enterobius vermicularis were the least prevalent helminth parasites encountered among the study population (1% each). The population in these communities depended largely on poorly built latrines and buckets for faecal disposal although some (49%) used flush toilets despite their being in ...