WorldWideScience

Sample records for strongly driven raman

  1. Raman scattering with strongly coupled vibron-polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strashko, Artem; Keeling, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    Strong coupling between cavity photons and molecular vibrations can lead to the formation of vibron-polaritons. In a recent experiment with PVAc molecules in a metal-metal microcavity [Shalabney et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 54, 7971 (2015), 10.1002/anie.201502979], such a coupling was observed to enhance the Raman scattering probability by several orders of magnitude. Inspired by this, we theoretically analyze the effect of strong photon-vibron coupling on the Raman scattering amplitude of organic molecules. This problem has recently been addressed by del Pino, Feist, and Garcia-Vidal [J. Phys. Chem. C 119, 29132 (2015), 10.1021/acs.jpcc.5b11654] using exact numerics for a small number of molecules. In this paper we derive compact analytic results for any number of molecules, also including the ultrastrong-coupling regime. Our calculations predict a division of the Raman signal into upper and lower polariton modes, with some enhancement to the lower polariton Raman amplitude due to the mode softening under strong coupling.

  2. Strong overtones and combination bands in ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efremov, E.V.; Ariese, F.; Mank, A.J.G.; Gooijer, C.

    2006-01-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy is carried out using a continuous wave frequency-doubled argon ion laser operated at 229, 244, and 257 nm in order to characterize the overtones and combination bands for several classes of organic compounds in liquid solutions. Contrary to what is generally

  3. Cooperative fluorescence from a strongly driven dilute cloud of atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Wubs, Martijn; Lodahl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    We investigate cooperative fluorescence in a dilute cloud of strongly driven two-level emitters. Starting from the Heisenberg equations of motion, we compute the first-order scattering corrections to the saturation of the excited-state population and to the resonance-fluorescence spectrum, which...... both require going beyond the state-of-the-art linear-optics approach to describe collective phenomena. A dipole blockade is observed due to long-range dipole-dipole coupling that vanishes at stronger driving fields. Furthermore, we compute the inelastic component of the light scattered by a cloud...

  4. Fulleride Superconductors are Phonon-Driven and Strongly Correlated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosatti, Erio; Capone, Massimo; Castellani, Claudio; Fabrizio, Michele

    2010-03-01

    Superconductivity in trivalent alkali fullerides is believed to be phonon-driven and s-wave, similar in that to ordinary BCS systems. There is nonetheless in these materials a metal-Mott insulator transition upon lattice expansion, indicating exceedingly strong electron-electron correlations. Using Dynamical Mean Field Theory we solved a 3-band Hubbard model, including both electron-electron and (simplified) electron-phonon interactions, which yields a phase diagram [1] in striking agreement with the experimental one for the recently discovered expanded fulleride Cs3C60 as a function of pressure.[2] A dome-shaped superconducting order parameter, a pseudogap phase, and the subsequent Mott transition upon expansion thus assimilate the phonon driven fulleride superconductors to cuprates and to 2D organics, despite their obvious differences. Some experimental predictions are made, including a kinetic energy gain and a Drude weight increase in the superconducting state relative to the normal state, contrary to BCS, but similar to cuprates. [1] M. Capone, et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 81,943 (2009); [2] Y. Takabayashi et al., Science 323, 1585 (2009).

  5. Quantum dynamics of a strongly driven Josephson Junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosner, Jennifer; Kubala, Bjoern; Ankerhold, Joachim [Institute for Complex Quantum Systems, University of Ulm (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    A Josephson Junction embedded in a dissipative circuit can be driven to exhibit non-linear oscillations. Classically the non-linear oscillator shows under sufficient strong driving and weak damping dynamical bifurcations and a bistable region similar to the conventional Duffing-oscillator. These features depend sensitively on initial conditions and parameters. The sensitivity of this circuit, called Josephson Bifurcation Amplifier, can be used to amplify an incoming signal, to form a sensing device or even for measuring a quantum system. The quantum dynamics can be described by a dissipative Lindblad master equation. Signatures of the classical bifurcation phenomena appear in the Wigner representation, used to characterize and visualize the resulting behaviour. In order to compare this quantum dynamics to that of the conventional Duffing-oscillator, the complete cosine-nonlinearity of the Josephson Junction is kept for the quantum description while going into a rotating frame.

  6. Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [CASS and CMTFO, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Lesur, M. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    A theory to describe basic characterization of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance is presented. The role of trapped ion granulations, clusters of trapped ions correlated by precession resonance, is the focus. Microscopically, the presence of trapped ion granulations leads to a sharp (logarithmic) divergence of two point phase space density correlation at small scales. Macroscopically, trapped ion granulations excite potential fluctuations that do not satisfy dispersion relation and so broaden frequency spectrum. The line width from emission due only to trapped ion granulations is calculated. The result shows that the line width depends on ion free energy and electron dissipation, which implies that non-adiabatic electrons are essential to recover non-trivial dynamics of trapped ion granulations. Relevant testable predictions are summarized.

  7. Extraordinary Photoluminescence and Strong Temperature/Angle-Dependent Raman Responses in Few-Layer Phosphorene

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Jiong; Xu, Renjing; Wang, Fan; Li, Weifeng; Ghufran, Muhammad; Zhang, Yong-wei; Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Gang; Qin, Qinghua; Lu, Yuerui

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorene is a new family member of two-dimensional materials. We observed strong and highly layer-dependent photoluminescence in few-layer phosphorene (2 to 5 layers). The results confirmed the theoretical prediction that few-layer phosphorene has a direct and layer-sensitive band gap. We also demonstrated that few-layer phosphorene is more sensitive to temperature modulation than graphene and MoS2 in Raman scattering. The anisotropic Raman response in few-layer phosphorene has enabled us ...

  8. Extraordinary photoluminescence and strong temperature/angle-dependent Raman responses in few-layer phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Jiong; Xu, Renjing; Wang, Fan; Li, Weifeng; Ghufran, Muhammad; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Gang; Qin, Qinghua; Lu, Yuerui

    2014-09-23

    Phosphorene is a new family member of two-dimensional materials. We observed strong and highly layer-dependent photoluminescence in few-layer phosphorene (two to five layers). The results confirmed the theoretical prediction that few-layer phosphorene has a direct and layer-sensitive band gap. We also demonstrated that few-layer phosphorene is more sensitive to temperature modulation than graphene and MoS2 in Raman scattering. The anisotropic Raman response in few-layer phosphorene has enabled us to use an optical method to quickly determine the crystalline orientation without tunneling electron microscopy or scanning tunneling microscopy. Our results provide much needed experimental information about the band structures and exciton nature in few-layer phosphorene.

  9. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Harvey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  10. Rhythmic cluster generation in strongly driven colloidal dispersions

    OpenAIRE

    Wensink, H. H.; Löwen, H.

    2006-01-01

    We study the response of a nematic colloidal dispersion of rods to a driven probe particle which is dragged with high speed through the dispersion perpendicular to the nematic director. In front of the dragged particle, clusters of rods are generated which rhythmically grow and dissolve by rotational motion. We find evidence for a mesoscopic cluster-cluster correlation length, {\\em independent} of the imposed drag speed. Our results are based on non-equilibrium Brownian dynamics computer simu...

  11. Driven transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P.; Prasad, G.; Sen, A.; Kaw, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    The linear dispersion properties of transverse shear waves in a strongly coupled dusty plasma are experimentally studied in a DC discharge device by exciting them in a controlled manner with a variable frequency external source. The dusty plasma is maintained in the strongly coupled fluid regime with (1 c ) where Γ is the Coulomb coupling parameter and Γ c is the crystallization limit. A dispersion relation for the transverse waves is experimentally obtained over a frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 2 Hz and found to show good agreement with viscoelastic theoretical results

  12. Strongly driven ion acoustic waves in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldis, H.A.; Labaune, C.; Renard, N.

    1994-01-01

    This paper present an experimental study of ion acoustic waves with wavenumbers corresponding to stimulated Brillouin scattering. Time resolved Thomson scattering in frequency and wavenumber space, has permitted to observe the dispersion relation of the waves as a function of the laser intensity. Apart from observing ion acoustic waves associated with a strong second component is observed at laser intensities above 10 13 Wcm -2

  13. Nonperturbative stochastic dynamics driven by strongly correlated colored noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jun; Li, Rui; You, J. Q.; Yu, Ting

    2015-02-01

    We propose a quantum model consisting of two remote qubits interacting with two correlated colored noises and establish an exact stochastic Schrödinger equation for this open quantum system. It is shown that the quantum dynamics of the qubit system is profoundly modulated by the mutual correlation between baths and the bath memory capability through dissipation and fluctuation. We report a physical effect on generating inner correlation and entanglement of two distant qubits arising from the strong bath-bath correlation.

  14. Frequency Comb Driven Raman Transitions in the THz Range: High Precision Isotope Shift Measurements in Ca+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    to picoseconds in the previous experiments. For the broad spectrum, the additional effect of group delay dispersion (GDD) has to be taken into account, since the Raman process relies on the coherent interaction of all frequency components of the spectrum, with GDD influencing the relative phase which leads...... and frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) are used, and the two frequency comb systems used for the experiments are thoroughly characterized, a Coherent Mira Ti:sapph oscillator and a MenloSystems fiber based frequency comb system. The potential of frequency comb driven Raman transitions is shown...... isotope shifts are extracted. To complement these measurements, the isotopes shifts of the 729 nm S-D transition for the same series of isotopes are also determined with a relative accuracy of 5e-12, using a different technique. To the best of my knowledge, these measurements represent the most accurate...

  15. Response of the Strongly Driven Jaynes-Cummings Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Lev S.; Ginossar, Eran; Girvin, S. M.

    2010-09-01

    We analyze the Jaynes-Cummings model of quantum optics, in the strong-dispersive regime. In the bad-cavity limit and on time scales short compared to the atomic coherence time, the dynamics are those of a nonlinear oscillator. A steady-state nonperturbative semiclassical analysis exhibits a finite region of bistability delimited by a pair of critical points, unlike the usual dispersive bistability from a Kerr nonlinearity. This analysis explains our quantum trajectory simulations that show qualitative agreement with recent experiments from the field of circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  16. In situ Raman scattering study on a controllable plasmon-driven surface catalysis reaction on Ag nanoparticle arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Z G; Xiao, X H; Zhang, Y P; Ren, F; Wu, W; Zhang, S F; Zhou, J; Jiang, C Z; Mei, F

    2012-01-01

    Control of the plasmon-driven chemical reaction for the transformation of 4-nitrobenzenethiol to p,p′-dimercaptoazobenzene by Ag nanoparticle arrays was studied. The Ag nanoparticle arrays were fabricated by means of nanosphere lithography. By changing the PS particle size, the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) peaks of the Ag nanoparticle arrays can be tailored from 460 to 560 nm. The controlled reaction process was monitored by in situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The reaction can be dramatically influenced by varying the duration of laser exposure, Ag nanoparticle size, laser power and laser excitation wavelength. The maximum reaction speed was achieved when the LSPR wavelength of the Ag nanoparticle arrays matched the laser excitation wavelength. The experimental results reveal that the strong LSPR can effectively drive the transfer of the ‘hot’ electrons that decay from the plasmon to the reactants. The experimental results were confirmed by theoretical calculations. (paper)

  17. Kondo memory in driven strongly correlated quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2013-08-23

    We investigate the real-time current response of strongly correlated quantum dot systems under sinusoidal driving voltages. By means of an accurate hierarchical equations of motion approach, we demonstrate the presence of prominent memory effects induced by the Kondo resonance on the real-time current response. These memory effects appear as distinctive hysteresis line shapes and self-crossing features in the dynamic current-voltage characteristics, with concomitant excitation of odd-number overtones. They emerge as a cooperative effect of quantum coherence-due to inductive behavior-and electron correlations-due to the Kondo resonance. We also show the suppression of memory effects and the transition to classical behavior as a function of temperature. All these phenomena can be observed in experiments and may lead to novel quantum memory applications.

  18. Topological Frequency Conversion in Strongly Driven Quantum Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivar Martin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available When a physical system is subjected to a strong external multifrequency drive, its dynamics can be conveniently represented in the multidimensional Floquet lattice. The number of Floquet lattice dimensions equals the number of irrationally-related drive frequencies, and the evolution occurs in response to a built-in effective “electric” field, whose components are proportional to the corresponding drive frequencies. The mapping allows us to engineer and study temporal analogs of many real-space phenomena. Here, we focus on the specific example of a two-level system under a two-frequency drive that induces topologically nontrivial band structure in the 2D Floquet space. The observable consequence of such a construction is the quantized pumping of energy between the sources with frequencies ω_{1} and ω_{2}. When the system is initialized into a Floquet band with the Chern number C, the pumping occurs at a rate P_{12}=-P_{21}=(C/2πℏω_{1}ω_{2}, an exact counterpart of the transverse current in a conventional topological insulator.

  19. raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    also had the devoted and loyal assistance of Asutosh Dey, known to everyone in the Association as Ashu Babu. Raman soon ...... Even after reaching the hotel, the stream of photographers and news- paper reporters continued to show us their ...... My affection, loyalty and respect for him were something extraordinary and I ...

  20. Feature driven classification of Raman spectra for real-time spectral brain tumour diagnosis using sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stables, Ryan; Clemens, Graeme; Butler, Holly J; Ashton, Katherine M; Brodbelt, Andrew; Dawson, Timothy P; Fullwood, Leanne M; Jenkinson, Michael D; Baker, Matthew J

    2016-12-19

    Spectroscopic diagnostics have been shown to be an effective tool for the analysis and discrimination of disease states from human tissue. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopic probes are of particular interest as they allow for in vivo spectroscopic diagnostics, for tasks such as the identification of tumour margins during surgery. In this study, we investigate a feature-driven approach to the classification of metastatic brain cancer, glioblastoma (GB) and non-cancer from tissue samples, and we provide a real-time feedback method for endoscopic diagnostics using sound. To do this, we first evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of three classifiers (SVM, KNN and LDA), when trained with both sub-band spectral features and principal components taken directly from Raman spectra. We demonstrate that the feature extraction approach provides an increase in classification accuracy of 26.25% for SVM and 25% for KNN. We then discuss the molecular assignment of the most salient sub-bands in the dataset. The most salient sub-band features are mapped to parameters of a frequency modulation (FM) synthesizer in order to generate audio clips from each tissue sample. Based on the properties of the sub-band features, the synthesizer was able to maintain similar sound timbres within the disease classes and provide different timbres between disease classes. This was reinforced via listening tests, in which participants were able to discriminate between classes with mean classification accuracy of 71.1%. Providing intuitive feedback via sound frees the surgeons' visual attention to remain on the patient, allowing for greater control over diagnostic and surgical tools during surgery, and thus promoting clinical translation of spectroscopic diagnostics.

  1. In-situ plasmon-driven chemical reactions revealed by high vacuum tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengtao; Zhang, Zhenglong; Zheng, Hairong; Xu, Hongxing

    2012-01-01

    With strong surface plasmons excited at the metallic tip, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) has both high spectroscopic sensitivity and high spatial resolution, and is becoming an essential tool for chemical analysis. It is a great challenge to combine TERS with a high vacuum system due to the poor optical collection efficiency. We used our innovatively designed home-built high vacuum TERS (HV-TERS) to investigate the plasmon-driven in-situ chemical reaction of 4-nitrobenzenethiol dimerizing to dimercaptoazobenzene. The chemical reactions can be controlled by the plasmon intensity, which in turn can be controlled by the incident laser intensity, tunneling current and bias voltage. The temperature of such a chemical reaction can also be obtained by the clearly observed Stokes and Anti-Stokes HV-TERS peaks. Our findings offer a new way to design a highly efficient HV-TERS system and its applications to chemical catalysis and synthesis of molecules, and significantly extend the studies of chemical reactions.

  2. Intervalence-resonant Raman spectroscopy of strongly coupled mixed-valence cluster dimers of ruthenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Reginaldo C; Brown, Mac G; Londergan, Casey H; Salsman, J Catherine; Kubiak, Clifford P; Shreve, Andrew P

    2005-10-13

    Resonance Raman spectroelectrochemistry (RR-SEC) at -20 degrees C has been performed on the pyrazine-bridged dimer of mu-oxo-centered trinuclear ruthenium-acetate "clusters"--[(dmap)(CO)(mu-OAc)6(mu3-O)Ru3(mu-L(b))Ru3(mu3-O)(mu-OAc)6(CO)(dmap)]n (where dmap = 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine and L(b) = pyrazine-h4 and pyrazine-d4)-in three oxidation states: n = 0, -1, and -2. In the one-electron reduced, "mixed-valent" state (overall -1 charge and a single odd electron; formal oxidation states [II, II, III]-[III, III, II] on the metal centers), the Raman excitation at 800 nm is resonant with a cluster-to-cluster intervalence charge-transfer (IVCT) band. Under these conditions, scattering enhancement is observed for all four totally symmetric vibrational modes of the bridging pyrazine ligand (nu8a, nu9a, nu1, and nu6a) in the investigated spectral range (100-2000 cm(-1)), and there is no evidence of activity in non-totally symmetric vibrations. Resonantly enhanced Raman peaks related to peripheral pyridyl (dmap) ligand modes and low-frequency features arising from the trigonal Ru3O cluster core and the cluster[Ru]-[N]ligand vibrations were also observed in the spectra of the intermediate-valence (n = -1) cluster dimer. The vibrational assignments and interpretations proposed in this work were reinforced by observation of characteristic isotopic frequency shifts accompanying deuteration of the bridging pyrazine. The results reveal that the fully symmetric (A(g)) vibrational motions of the organic bridge are coupled to the nominally metal cluster-to-metal cluster fast intramolecular electron transfer (ET) and provide validation of the near-delocalized description according to a predicted three-site/three-state (e.g., metal-bridge-metal) vibronic coupling model, in which the important role of the bridging ligand in mediating electronic communication and delocalization between charge centers is explicitly considered. Further compelling evidence supporting an extended five

  3. Single-particle model of a strongly driven, dense, nanoscale quantum ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, C. S.; Rangan, C.

    2018-01-01

    We study the effects of interatomic interactions on the quantum dynamics of a dense, nanoscale, atomic ensemble driven by a strong electromagnetic field. We use a self-consistent, mean-field technique based on the pseudospectral time-domain method and a full, three-directional basis to solve the coupled Maxwell-Liouville equations. We find that interatomic interactions generate a decoherence in the state of an ensemble on a much faster time scale than the excited-state lifetime of individual atoms. We present a single-particle model of the driven, dense ensemble by incorporating interactions into a dephasing rate. This single-particle model reproduces the essential physics of the full simulation and is an efficient way of rapidly estimating the collective dynamics of a dense ensemble.

  4. Attosecond counter-rotating-wave effect in xenon driven by strong fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, M.; Pabst, Stefan; Kwon, Ojoon; Kim, Dong Eon

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the subfemtosecond dynamics of a highly excited xenon atom coherently driven by a strong control field at which the Rabi frequency of the system is comparable to the frequency of a driving laser. The widely used rotating-wave approximation breaks down at such fields, resulting in features such as the counter-rotating-wave (CRW) effect. We present a time-resolved observation of the CRW effect in the highly excited 4 d-1n p xenon using attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Time-dependent many-body theory confirms the observation and explains the various features of the absorption spectrum seen in experiment.

  5. Laser-driven platform for generation and characterization of strong quasi-static magnetic fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santos, J.J.; Bailly-Grandvaux, M.; Giuffrida, Lorenzo; Forestier-Colleoni, P.; Fujioka, H.; Zhang, Z.; Korneev, P.; Bouillaud, R.; Dorard, S.; Batani, D.; Chevrot, M.; Cross, J. E.; Crowston, R.; Dubois, J.L.; Gazave, J.; Gregori, G.; d'Humieres, E.; Hulin, S.; Ishihara, K.; Kojima, S.; Loyez, E.; Marqués, J.-R.; Morace, A.; Nicolaï, P.; Peyrusse, O.; Poyé, A.; Raffestin, D.; Ribolzi, J.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Serres, F.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Vacar, P.; Woolsey, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, Aug (2015), s. 1-10, č. článku 083051. ISSN 1367-2630 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : strong magnetic field * laser-driven coil targets * laser-plasma interaction Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.570, year: 2015

  6. Multiphoton-resonance-induced fluorescence of a strongly driven two-level system under frequency modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yiying; Lü, Zhiguo; Luo, JunYan; Zheng, Hang

    2018-03-01

    We study the fluorescence spectrum of a strongly driven two-level system (TLS) with modulated transition frequency, which is a bichromatically driven TLS and has multiple resonance frequencies. We are aiming to provide a reliable description of the fluorescence in a regime that is difficult to tackle with perturbation theory and the rotating-wave approximation (RWA), and illustrate the spectral features of the fluorescence under off- and multiphoton-resonance conditions. To go beyond the RWA, we use a semianalytical counter-rotating-hybridized rotating-wave method that combines a unitary transformation and Floquet theory to calculate the two-mode Floquet states and quasienergies for the bichromatically driven TLS. We then solve the master equation accounting for the spontaneous decay in the bases of the two-mode Floquet states, and derive a physically transparent fluorescence spectrum. In comparison with the numerically exact spectrum from the generalized Floquet-Liouville approach, the present spectrum is found to be applicable in a wide range of the parameters where the RWA and the secular approximation may break down. We find that the counter-rotating (CR) terms of the transverse field omitted in the RWA have non-negligible contributions to the spectrum under certain conditions. Particularly, at the multiphoton resonance the width of which is comparable with the Bloch-Siegert shift, the RWA and non-RWA spectra markedly differ from each other because of the CR-induced shift. We also analyze the symmetry of the spectrum in terms of the transition matrix elements between the two-mode Floquet states. We show that the strict symmetry of the spectrum cannot be expected without the RWA but the almost symmetric spectrum can be obtained at the single-photon resonance that takes the Bloch-Siegert shift into account if the driving is moderately strong and at the multiphoton resonance with a sufficiently weak transverse field.

  7. Lasing by driven atoms-cavity system in collective strong coupling regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S A

    2017-09-12

    The interaction of laser cooled atoms with resonant light is determined by the natural linewidth of the excited state. An optical cavity is another optically resonant system where the loss from the cavity determines the resonant optical response of the system. The near resonant combination of an optical Fabry-Pérot cavity with laser cooled and trapped atoms couples two distinct optical resonators via light and has great potential for precision measurements and the creation of versatile quantum optics systems. Here we show how driven magneto-optically trapped atoms in collective strong coupling regime with the cavity leads to lasing at a frequency red detuned from the atomic transition. Lasing is demonstrated experimentally by the observation of a lasing threshold accompanied by polarization and spatial mode purity, and line-narrowing in the outcoupled light. Spontaneous emission into the cavity mode by the driven atoms stimulates lasing action, which is capable of operating as a continuous wave laser in steady state, without a seed laser. The system is modeled theoretically, and qualitative agreement with experimentally observed lasing is seen. Our result opens up a range of new measurement possibilities with this system.

  8. Maximum initial growth-rate of strong-shock-driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Bhowmich, Aklant K.; Dell, Zachary R.; Pandian, Arun; Stanic, Milos; Stellingwerf, Robert F.; Swisher, Nora C.

    2017-11-01

    We focus on classical problem of dependence on the initial conditions of the initial growth-rate of strong shocks driven Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) by developing a novel empirical model and by employing rigorous theories and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations to describe the simulations data with statistical confidence in a broad parameter regime. For given values of the shock strength, fluids' density ratio, and wavelength of the initial perturbation of the fluid interface, we find the maximum value of RMI initial growth-rate, the corresponding amplitude scale of the initial perturbation, and the maximum fraction of interfacial energy. This amplitude scale is independent of the shock strength and density ratio, and is characteristic quantity of RMI dynamics. We discover the exponential decay of the ratio of the initial and linear growth-rates of RMI with the initial perturbation amplitude that excellently agrees with available data. National Science Foundation, USA.

  9. Variational Approaches to the Evolution and Control of Strongly Driven Quantum Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmayer, C. Clay

    Ongoing experimental advances, especially the advent of high intensity pulsed lasers, have produced the need for theoretical methods for modelling the behavior of quantum systems under the influence of strong driving fields. Despite decades of effort developing approaches adapted to strong driving, no single method enjoys the position of preeminence held by lowest order perturbation theory in the weak field regime. Three methods well suited to the time evolution of strongly driven systems are discussed and illustrated through numerical calculation. The impulse representation in which the time dependent Schrodinger equation is solved by switching to a shifted momentum space representation is described and applied to the problem of a hydrogen atom driven by a Stark kick for which the approach yields an exact solution. Using this result convenient exact closed form expressions for exctitation probabilities from the ground state are derived. Secondly, the time dependent variational method (TDVM) for obtaining approximate solutions to the Schrodinger equation by stationarizing an appropriately defined variational functional is discussed. A simple form of the equations of motion for time dependent variational parameters is derived and applied to the calculation of the radial wavefunction following the beta decay of tritium. Accurate values for time dependent observables are obtained by approximating the wavefunction as a superposition of the ground states of the Z = 1 and Z = 2 hydrogenic atoms. Finally, the control of quantum dynamics is considered and two methods are presented for deriving external fields for the purpose of driving a quantum system into a desired behavior. With the inverse control method a procedure is described for producing exact tracking of a time dependent observable. The method is applied to a two-level atom and is shown to lead to non-unique values of the driving field which exhibit undesirable numerical anomalies. The more robust method of

  10. Autler-Townes effect in a strongly driven electromagnetically induced transparency resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lijun; Zhang Lianshui; Li Xiaoli; Han Li; Fu Guangsheng; Manson, Neil B.; Suter, Dieter; Wei Changjiang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study the nonlinear behavior of an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonance subject to a coherent driving field. The EIT is associated with a Λ three-level system where two hyperfine levels within an electronic ground state are coupled to a common excited state level by a coupling field and a probe field. In addition there is an radio-frequency (rf) field driving a hyperfine transition within the ground state. The paper contrasts two different situations. In one case the rf-driven transition shares a common level with the probed transition and in the second case it shares a common level with the coupled transition. In both cases the EIT resonance is split into a doublet and the characteristics of the EIT doublet are determined by the strength and frequency of the rf-driving field. The doublet splitting originates from the rf-field induced dynamic Stark effect and has close analogy with the Autler-Townes effect observed in three-level pump-probe spectroscopy study. The situation changes when the rf field is strong and the two cases are very different. One is analogous to two Λ three-level systems with EIT resonance associated with each. The other corresponds to a doubly driven three-level system with rf-field-induced electromagnetically induced absorption resonance. The two situations are modeled using numerical solutions of the relevant equation of motion of density matrix. In addition a physical account of their behaviors is given in terms of a dressed state picture

  11. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow in partially saturated fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.W.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have performed modeling studies on the simultaneous transport of heat, liquid water, vapor, and air in partially saturated fractured porous media, with particular emphasis on strongly heat-driven flow. The presence of fractures makes the transport problem very complex, both in terms of flow geometry and physics. The numerical simulator used for their flow calculations takes into account most of the physical effects which are important in multi-phase fluid and heat flow. It has provisions to handle the extreme non-linearities which arise in phase transitions, component disappearances, and capillary discontinuities at fracture faces. They model a region around an infinite linear string of nuclear waste canisters, taking into account both the discrete fractures and the porous matrix. From an analysis of the results obtained with explicit fractures, they develop equivalent continuum models which can reproduce the temperature, saturation, and pressure variation, and gas and liquid flow rates of the discrete fracture-porous matrix calculations. The equivalent continuum approach makes use of a generalized relative permeability concept to take into account the fracture effects. This results in a substantial simplification of the flow problem which makes larger scale modeling of complicated unsaturated fractured porous systems feasible. Potential applications for regional scale simulations and limitations of the continuum approach are discussed. 27 references, 13 figures, 2 tables

  12. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow in partially saturated fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.W.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1984-10-01

    We have performed modeling studies on the simultaneous transport of heat, liquid water, vapor, and air in partially saturated fractured porous media, with particular emphasis on strongly heat-driven flow. The presence of fractures makes the transport problem very complex, both in terms of flow geometry and physics. The numerical simulator used for our flow calculations takes into account most of the physical effects which are important in multi-phase fluid and heat flow. It has provisions to handle the extreme non-linearities which arise in phase transitions, component disappearances, and capillary discontinuities at fracture faces. We model a region around an infinite linear string of nuclear waste canisters, taking into account both the discrete fractures and the porous matrix. From an analysis of the results obtained with explicit fractures, we develop equivalent continuum models which can reproduce the temperature, saturation, and pressure variation, and gas and liquid flow rates of the discrete fracture-porous matrix calculations. The equivalent continuum approach makes use of a generalized relative permeability concept to take into account for fracture effects. This results in a substantial simplification of the flow problem which makes larger scale modeling of complicated unsaturated fractured porous systems feasible. Potential applications for regional scale simulations and limitations of the continuum approach are discussed. 27 references, 13 figures, 2 tables

  13. Strong Stellar-driven Outflows Shape the Evolution of Galaxies at Cosmic Dawn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontanot, Fabio; De Lucia, Gabriella; Hirschmann, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    We study galaxy mass assembly and cosmic star formation rate (SFR) at high redshift (z ≳ 4), by comparing data from multiwavelength surveys with predictions from the GAlaxy Evolution and Assembly (gaea) model. gaea implements a stellar feedback scheme partially based on cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, which features strong stellar-driven outflows and mass-dependent timescales for the re-accretion of ejected gas. In previous work, we have shown that this scheme is able to correctly reproduce the evolution of the galaxy stellar mass function (GSMF) up to z ∼ 3. We contrast model predictions with both rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) and optical luminosity functions (LFs), which are mostly sensitive to the SFR and stellar mass, respectively. We show that gaea is able to reproduce the shape and redshift evolution of both sets of LFs. We study the impact of dust on the predicted LFs, and we find that the required level of dust attenuation is in qualitative agreement with recent estimates based on the UV continuum slope. The consistency between data and model predictions holds for the redshift evolution of the physical quantities well beyond the redshift range considered for the calibration of the original model. In particular, we show that gaea is able to recover the evolution of the GSMF up to z ∼ 7 and the cosmic SFR density up to z ∼ 10.

  14. Comparison of strongly heat-driven flow codes for unsaturated media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Updegraff, C.D.

    1989-08-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is developing a performance assessment methodology for the analysis of long-term disposal of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) in unsaturated welded tuff. As part of this effort, SNL evaluated existing strongly heat-driven flow computer codes for simulating ground-water flow in unsaturated media. The three codes tested, NORIA, PETROS, and TOUGH, were compared against a suite of problems for which analytical and numerical solutions or experimental results exist. The problems were selected to test the abilities of the codes to simulate situations ranging from simple, uncoupled processes, such as two-phase flow or heat transfer, to fully coupled processes, such as vaporization caused by high temperatures. In general, all three codes were found to be difficult to use because of (1) built-in time stepping criteria, (2) the treatment of boundary conditions, and (3) handling of evaporation/condensation problems. A drawback of the study was that adequate problems related to expected repository conditions were not available in the literature. Nevertheless, the results of this study suggest the need for thorough investigations of the impact of heat on the flow field in the vicinity of an unsaturated HLW repository. Recommendations are to develop a new flow code combining the best features of these three codes and eliminating the worst ones. 19 refs., 49 figs

  15. Hydrophobicity-driven self-assembly of protein and silver nanoparticles for protein detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Mehmet; Balz, Ben N; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2013-05-21

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a promising analytical technique for the detection and characterization of biological molecules and structures. The role of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces in the self-assembly of protein-metallic nanoparticle structures for label-free protein detection is demonstrated. Aggregation is driven by both the hydrophobicity of the surface as well as the charge of the proteins. The best conditions for obtaining a reproducible SERS signal that allows for sensitive, label-free protein detection are provided by the use of hydrophobic surfaces and 16 × 10(11) NPs per mL. A detection limit of approximately 0.5 μg mL(-1) is achieved regardless of the proteins' charge properties and size. The developed method is simple and can be used for reproducible and sensitive detection and characterization of a wide variety of biological molecules and various structures with different sizes and charge status.

  16. Voltage-Driven Conformational Switching with Distinct Raman Signature in a Single-Molecule Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hai; Palma, Carlos-Andres; Gong, Yuxiang; Hasch, Peter; Elbing, Mark; Mayor, Marcel; Reichert, Joachim; Barth, Johannes V

    2018-04-11

    Precisely controlling well-defined, stable single-molecule junctions represents a pillar of single-molecule electronics. Early attempts to establish computing with molecular switching arrays were partly challenged by limitations in the direct chemical characterization of metal-molecule-metal junctions. While cryogenic scanning probe studies have advanced the mechanistic understanding of current- and voltage-induced conformational switching, metal-molecule-metal conformations are still largely inferred from indirect evidence. Hence, the development of robust, chemically sensitive techniques is instrumental for advancement in the field. Here we probe the conformation of a two-state molecular switch with vibrational spectroscopy, while simultaneously operating it by means of the applied voltage. Our study emphasizes measurements of single-molecule Raman spectra in a room-temperature stable single-molecule switch presenting a signal modulation of nearly 2 orders of magnitude.

  17. Nonlocal response functions for predicting shear flow of strongly inhomogeneous fluids. I. Sinusoidally driven shear and sinusoidally driven inhomogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavatskiy, Kirill S; Dalton, Benjamin A; Daivis, Peter J; Todd, B D

    2015-06-01

    We present theoretical expressions for the density, strain rate, and shear pressure profiles in strongly inhomogeneous fluids undergoing steady shear flow with periodic boundary conditions. The expressions that we obtain take the form of truncated functional expansions. In these functional expansions, the independent variables are the spatially sinusoidal longitudinal and transverse forces that we apply in nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations. The longitudinal force produces strong density inhomogeneity, and the transverse force produces sinusoidal shear. The functional expansions define new material properties, the response functions, which characterize the system's nonlocal response to the longitudinal force and the transverse force. We find that the sinusoidal longitudinal force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of density inhomogeneity, also modulates the strain rate and shear pressure profiles. Likewise, we find that the sinusoidal transverse force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of sinusoidal shear flow, can also modify the density. These cross couplings between density inhomogeneity and shear flow are also characterized by nonlocal response functions. We conduct nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations to calculate all of the response functions needed to describe the response of the system for weak shear flow in the presence of strong density inhomogeneity up to the third order in the functional expansion. The response functions are then substituted directly into the truncated functional expansions and used to predict the density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles. The results are compared to the directly evaluated profiles from molecular-dynamics simulations, and we find that the predicted profiles from the truncated functional expansions are in excellent agreement with the directly computed density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles.

  18. Nonlocal response functions for predicting shear flow of strongly inhomogeneous fluids. I. Sinusoidally driven shear and sinusoidally driven inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavatskiy, Kirill S.; Dalton, Benjamin A.; Daivis, Peter J.; Todd, B. D.

    2015-06-01

    We present theoretical expressions for the density, strain rate, and shear pressure profiles in strongly inhomogeneous fluids undergoing steady shear flow with periodic boundary conditions. The expressions that we obtain take the form of truncated functional expansions. In these functional expansions, the independent variables are the spatially sinusoidal longitudinal and transverse forces that we apply in nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations. The longitudinal force produces strong density inhomogeneity, and the transverse force produces sinusoidal shear. The functional expansions define new material properties, the response functions, which characterize the system's nonlocal response to the longitudinal force and the transverse force. We find that the sinusoidal longitudinal force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of density inhomogeneity, also modulates the strain rate and shear pressure profiles. Likewise, we find that the sinusoidal transverse force, which is mainly responsible for the generation of sinusoidal shear flow, can also modify the density. These cross couplings between density inhomogeneity and shear flow are also characterized by nonlocal response functions. We conduct nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations to calculate all of the response functions needed to describe the response of the system for weak shear flow in the presence of strong density inhomogeneity up to the third order in the functional expansion. The response functions are then substituted directly into the truncated functional expansions and used to predict the density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles. The results are compared to the directly evaluated profiles from molecular-dynamics simulations, and we find that the predicted profiles from the truncated functional expansions are in excellent agreement with the directly computed density, velocity, and shear pressure profiles.

  19. Isochoric heating and strong blast wave formation driven by fast electrons in solid-density targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, J. J.; Vauzour, B.; Touati, M.; Gremillet, L.; Feugeas, J.-L.; Ceccotti, T.; Bouillaud, R.; Deneuville, F.; Floquet, V.; Fourment, C.; Hadj-Bachir, M.; Hulin, S.; Morace, A.; Nicolaï, Ph; d'Oliveira, P.; Reau, F.; Samaké, A.; Tcherbakoff, O.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Veltcheva, M.; Batani, D.

    2017-10-01

    We experimentally investigate the fast (metallic foils and subsequent high-pressure hydrodynamics induced by energetic electrons driven by high-intensity, high-contrast laser pulses. The early-time temperature profile inside the target is measured from the streaked optical pyrometry of the target rear side. This is further characterized from benchmarked simulations of the laser-target interaction and the fast electron transport. Despite a modest laser energy (laser-based platform dedicated to high-energy-density physics studies.

  20. Proton dynamics in the strong chelate hydrogen bond of crystalline picolinic acid N-oxide. A new computational approach and infrared, raman and INS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stare, Jernej; Panek, Jarosław; Eckert, Juergen; Grdadolnik, Joze; Mavri, Janez; Hadzi, Dusan

    2008-02-21

    Infrared, Raman and INS spectra of picolinic acid N-oxide (PANO) were recorded and examined for the location of the hydronic modes, particularly O-H stretching and COH bending. PANO is representative of strong chelate hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) with its short O...O distance (2.425 A). H-bonding is possibly well-characterized by diffraction, NMR and NQR data and calculated potential energy functions. The analysis of the spectra is assisted by DFT frequency calculations both in the gas phase and in the solid state. The Car-Parrinello quantum mechanical solid-state method is also used for the proton dynamics simulation; it shows the hydron to be located about 99% of time in the energy minimum near the carboxylic oxygen; jumps to the N-O acceptor are rare. The infrared spectrum excels by an extended absorption (Zundel's continuum) interrupted by numerous Evans transmissions. The model proton potential functions on which the theories of continuum formation are based do not correspond to the experimental and computed characteristics of the hydrogen bond in PANO, therefore a novel approach has been developed; it is based on crystal dynamics driven hydronium potential fluctuation. The envelope of one hundred 0 --> 1 OH stretching transitions generated by molecular dynamics simulation exhibits a maximum at 1400 cm-1 and a minor hump at approximately 1600 cm-1. These positions square well with ones predicted for the COH bending and OH stretching frequencies derived from various one- and two-dimensional model potentials. The coincidences with experimental features have to be considered with caution because the CPMD transition envelope is based solely on the OH stretching coordinate while the observed infrared bands correspond to heavily mixed modes as was previously shown by the normal coordinate analysis of the IR spectrum of argon matrix isolated PANO, the present CPMD frequency calculation and the empirical analysis of spectra. The experimental infrared spectra show some

  1. Phonon driven proton transfer in crystals with short strong hydrogen bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontaine-Vive, F.; Johnson, M.R.; Kearley, G.J.; Cowan, J.A.; Howard, J.A.K.; Parker, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    Recent work on understanding why protons migrate with increasing temperature in short, strong hydrogen bonds is extended here to three more organic, crystalline systems. Inelastic neutron scattering and density functional theory based simulations are used to investigate structure, vibrations, and

  2. Strong spin-phonon coupling in infrared and Raman spectra of SrMnO.sub.3./sub..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamba, Stanislav; Goian, Veronica; Skoromets, Volodymyr; Hejtmánek, Jiří; Bovtun, Viktor; Kempa, Martin; Borodavka, Fedir; Vaněk, Přemysl; Belik, A.A.; Lee, J.H.; Pacherová, Oliva; Rabe, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 6 (2014), "064308-1"-"064308-9" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13048; GA ČR GAP204/12/1163; GA MŠk LD12026; GA ČR GP14-14122P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : multiferroics * spin-phonon coupling * infrared and Raman spectra Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  3. Experimental triple-slit interference in a strongly driven V-type artificial atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Adetunmise C.; Santana, Ted S.; Koutroumanis, Antonios; Ma, Yong; Park, Suk-In; Song, Jindong; Gerardot, Brian D.

    2017-08-01

    Rabi oscillations of a two-level atom appear as a quantum interference effect between the amplitudes associated with atomic superpositions, in analogy with the classic double-slit experiment which manifests a sinusoidal interference pattern. By extension, through direct detection of time-resolved resonance fluorescence from a quantum-dot neutral exciton driven in the Rabi regime, we experimentally demonstrate triple-slit-type quantum interference via quantum erasure in a V-type three-level artificial atom. This result is of fundamental interest in the experimental studies of the properties of V-type three-level systems and may pave the way for further insight into their coherence properties as well as applications for quantum information schemes. It also suggests quantum dots as candidates for multipath-interference experiments for probing foundational concepts in quantum physics.

  4. Intermittency for stochastic partial differential equations driven by strongly inhomogeneous space-time white noises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the main topic is to investigate the intermittent property of the one-dimensional stochastic heat equation driven by an inhomogeneous Brownian sheet, which is a noise deduced from the study of the catalytic super-Brownian motion. Under some proper conditions on the catalytic measure of the inhomogeneous Brownian sheet, we show that the solution is weakly full intermittent based on the estimates of moments of the solution. In particular, it is proved that the second moment of the solution grows at the exponential rate. The novelty is that the catalytic measure relative to the inhomogeneous noise is not required to be absolutely continuous with respect to the Lebesgue measure on R.

  5. Reflective Amplification without Population Inversion from a Strongly Driven Superconducting Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, P. Y.; Kockum, A. F.; Ian, H.; Chen, J. C.; Nori, F.; Hoi, I.-C.

    2018-02-01

    Amplification of optical or microwave fields is often achieved by strongly driving a medium to induce population inversion such that a weak probe can be amplified through stimulated emission. Here we strongly couple a superconducting qubit, an artificial atom, to the field in a semi-infinite waveguide. When driving the qubit strongly on resonance such that a Mollow triplet appears, we observe a 7% amplitude gain for a weak probe at frequencies in between the triplet. This amplification is not due to population inversion, neither in the bare qubit basis nor in the dressed-state basis, but instead results from a four-photon process that converts energy from the strong drive to the weak probe. We find excellent agreement between the experimental results and numerical simulations without any free fitting parameters. Since our device consists of a single two-level artificial atom, the simplest possible quantum system, it can be viewed as the most fundamental version of a four-wave-mixing parametric amplifier.

  6. New Raman method for aqueous solutions: xi-function dispersion evidence for strong F(-)-water H-bonds in aqueous CsF and KF solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walrafen, George E

    2005-08-15

    The Raman xi-function dispersion method recently elucidated for the strong H-bond breaker, ClO4-, in water [G. E. Walrafen, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094510 (2005)] is extended to the strongly H-bond forming ion, F-. Measuring the xi function is analogous to measuring DeltaG from the thermodynamic activity of the water, aH2O, as the stoichiometric mol fraction of the water in the solution decreases due to addition of an electrolyte or nonelectrolyte. xi is the derivative of the OH-stretching part of the Gibbs free energy with respect to the water mol fraction; xiomega identical with-RT[ partial differential ln(Iomega/IREF) partial differentialX2](T,P). I is the Raman intensity at omega (omega=Raman shift in cm-1); IREF, that at an arbitrary reference omega; and, X2 is the water mol fraction (X1=CsF or KF mol fraction). ln(Iomega/IREF) was found to be linear in X2 for the complete range of OH-stretching omega's, with correlation coefficients as large as 0.999 96. Linearity of ln(Iomega/IREF) versus X2 is an experimental fact for all omega's throughout the spontaneous Raman OH-stretching contour; this fact cannot be negated by relative contributions of ultrafast/fast, homogeneous/inhomogeneous processes which may underlie this linearity. Linearity in ln(Iomega/IREF) versus 1T, or in ln(Iomega/IREF) versus P, was also observed for the Raman H-bond energy DeltaE and pair volume DeltaV dispersions, respectively. A low-frequency maximum (MAX) and a high-frequency minimum (MIN) were observed in the xi function dispersion curve. Deltaxi=xiMIN-xiMAX values of -7000+/-800-cal/mol H2O for CsF, and the experimentally equal Deltaxi=-6400+/-1000-cal/mol H2O for KF, were obtained. These Deltaxi's are opposite in sign but have nearly the same absolute magnitude as the Deltaxi value for NaClO4 in water; Deltaxi=+8050+/-100-cal/mol H2O. A positive Deltaxi corresponds to a water-water H-bond breaker; a negative Deltaxi to a H-bond former; specifically, a F--water H-bond former, in the

  7. The Influence of Strong Electron and Hole Doping on the Raman Intensity of Chemical Vapor-Deposition Graphene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Reina-Cecco, A.; Farhat, H.; Kong, J.; Kavan, Ladislav; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 10 (2010), s. 6055-6063 ISSN 1936-0851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400911; GA AV ČR IAA400400804; GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA MŠk ME09060; GA MŠk LC510; GA ČR GC203/07/J067; GA ČR GAP204/10/1677 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : graphene * Raman spectroscopy * spectroelectrochemistry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 9.855, year: 2010

  8. Semiconductor-driven "turn-off" surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy: application in selective determination of chromium(vi) in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Wang, Yue; Tanabe, Ichiro; Han, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Bing; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor materials have been successfully used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates, providing SERS technology with a high flexibility for application in a diverse range of fields. Here, we employ a dye-sensitized semiconductor system combined with semiconductor-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to detect metal ions, using an approach based on the "turn-off" SERS strategy that takes advantage of the intrinsic capacity of the semiconductor to catalyze the degradation of a Raman probe. Alizarin red S (ARS)-sensitized colloidal TiO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) were selected as an example to show how semiconductor-enhanced Raman spectroscopy enables the determination of Cr(vi) in water. Firstly, we explored the SERS mechanism of ARS-TiO 2 complexes and found that the strong electronic coupling between ARS and colloidal TiO 2 NPs gives rise to the formation of a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) transition, providing a new electronic transition pathway for the Raman process. Secondly, colloidal TiO 2 nanoparticles were used as active sites to induce the self-degradation of the Raman probe adsorbed on their surfaces in the presence of Cr(vi). Our data demonstrate the potential of ARS-TiO 2 complexes as a SERS-active sensing platform for Cr(vi) in an aqueous solution. Remarkably, the method proposed in this contribution is relatively simple, without requiring complex pretreatment and complicated instruments, but provides high sensitivity and excellent selectivity in a high-throughput fashion. Finally, the ARS-TiO 2 complexes are successfully applied to the detection of Cr(vi) in environmental samples. Thus, the present work provides a facile method for the detection of Cr(vi) in aqueous solutions and a viable application for semiconductor-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based on the chemical enhancement they contribute.

  9. Transitional dispersive scenarios driven by mesoscale flows on complex terrain under strong dry convective conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Palau

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available By experimentation and modelling, this paper analyses the atmospheric dispersion of the SO2 emissions from a power plant on complex terrain under strong convective conditions, describing the main dispersion features as an ensemble of "stationary dispersive scenarios" and reformulating some "classical" dispersive concepts to deal with the systematically monitored summer dispersive scenarios in inland Spain. The results and discussions presented arise from a statistically representative study of the physical processes associated with the multimodal distribution of pollutants aloft and around a 343-m-tall chimney under strong dry convective conditions in the Iberian Peninsula. This paper analyses the importance of the identification and physical implications of transitional periods for air quality applications. The indetermination of a transversal plume to the preferred transport direction during these transitional periods implies a small (or null physical significance of the classical definition of horizontal standard deviation of the concentration distribution.

  10. Sequential nonadiabatic excitation of large molecules and ions driven by strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markevitch, Alexei N.; Levis, Robert J.; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Smith, Stanley M.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard; Ivanov, Misha Yu.

    2004-01-01

    Electronic processes leading to dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules in strong laser fields are investigated experimentally, theoretically, and numerically. Using time-of-flight ion mass spectroscopy, we study the dependence of fragmentation on laser intensity for a series of related molecules and report regular trends in this dependence on the size, symmetry, and electronic structure of a molecule. Based on these data, we develop a model of dissociative ionization of polyatomic molecules in intense laser fields. The model is built on three elements: (i) nonadiabatic population transfer from the ground electronic state to the excited-state manifold via a doorway (charge-transfer) transition; (ii) exponential enhancement of this transition by collective dynamic polarization of all electrons, and (iii) sequential energy deposition in both neutral molecules and resulting molecular ions. The sequential nonadiabatic excitation is accelerated by a counterintuitive increase of a large molecule's polarizability following its ionization. The generic theory of sequential nonadiabatic excitation forms a basis for quantitative description of various nonlinear processes in polyatomic molecules and ions in strong laser fields

  11. Deep circulation driven by strong vertical mixing in the Timor Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Yannis; Pous, Stephane; Sprintall, Janet; Atmadipoera, Agus; Madec, Gurvan; Molcard, Robert

    2017-02-01

    The importance of deep mixing in driving the deep part of the overturning circulation has been a long debated question at the global scale. Our observations provide an illustration of this process at the Timor Basin scale of ˜1000 km. Long-term averaged moored velocity data at the Timor western sill suggest that a deep circulation is present in the Timor Basin. An inflow transport of ˜0.15 Sv is observed between 1600 m and the bottom at 1890 m. Since the basin is closed on its eastern side below 1250 m depth, a return flow must be generated above 1600 m with a ˜0.15 Sv outflow. The vertical turbulent diffusivity is inferred from a heat and transport balance at the basin scale and from Thorpe scale analysis. Basin averaged vertical diffusivity is as large as 1 × 10-3 m2 s-1. Observations are compared with regional low-resolution numerical simulations, and the deep observed circulation is only recovered when a strong vertical diffusivity resulting from the parameterization of internal tidal mixing is considered. Furthermore, the deep vertical mixing appears to be strongly dependent on the choice of the internal tide mixing parameterization and also on the prescribed value of the mixing efficiency.

  12. Classical Spin Liquid Instability Driven By Off-Diagonal Exchange in Strong Spin-Orbit Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; Perkins, Natalia B.

    2017-04-01

    We show that the off-diagonal exchange anisotropy drives Mott insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling to a classical spin liquid regime, characterized by an infinite number of ground states and Ising variables living on closed or open strings. Depending on the sign of the anisotropy, quantum fluctuations either fail to lift the degeneracy down to very low temperatures, or select noncoplanar magnetic states with unconventional spin correlations. The results apply to all 2D and 3D tricoordinated materials with bond-directional anisotropy and provide a consistent interpretation of the suppression of the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism signal reported recently for β -Li2IrO3 under pressure.

  13. Resonance fluorescence spectrum of two atoms, coherently driven by a strong resonant laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ficek, Z.; Tanas, R.; Kielich, S.

    1981-01-01

    In Lehmberg's approach, we consider the resonance fluorescence spectrum of two radiatively interacting atoms. In the strong field limit we have obtained analytical solutions for the spectrum of the symmetric and antisymmetric modes without decoupling approximation. Our solutions are valid for all values of the distance r 12 separating the atoms. The spectrum of the symmetric modes contains additional sidebands in 2Ω (Ω is the Rabi frequency) with amplitude dependent on (a/Ω) 2 , where a is a parameter dependent on r 12 . The antisymmetric part of the spectrum has no additional sidebands in 2Ω. For small distances r 12 (a = 1) our results for the symmetric modes are identical with those of Agarwal et al. apart from the so-called scaling factor. For large distance r 12 (a = 0) the spectra of the symmetric and antisymmetric modes are identical with the well-known one-atom spectrum. (orig.)

  14. Kinetics-Driven Superconducting Gap in Underdoped Cuprate Superconductors Within the Strong-Coupling Limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Yildirim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A generic theory of the quasiparticle superconducting gap in underdoped cuprates is derived in the strong-coupling limit, and found to describe the experimental “second gap” in absolute scale. In drastic contrast to the standard pairing gap associated with Bogoliubov quasiparticle excitations, the quasiparticle gap is shown to originate from anomalous kinetic (scattering processes, with a size unrelated to the pairing strength. Consequently, the k dependence of the gap deviates significantly from the pure d_{x^{2}-y^{2}} wave of the order parameter. Our study reveals a new paradigm for the nature of the superconducting gap, and is expected to reconcile numerous apparent contradictions among existing experiments and point toward a more coherent understanding of high-temperature superconductivity.

  15. Relaxation process of coherent transients in the presence of an adjacent strongly driven transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xiaomin; Yang Lijun; Li Xiaoli; Zhang Lianshui; Han Li; Guo Qinglin; Fu Guangsheng

    2007-01-01

    Coherent transient occurs when a two-level transition is subjected to pulsed laser excitation. The relaxation process of coherent transient depends on both the longitudinal and transverse relaxation parameters of the two-level transition, which is related to the population and coherence decay rates. In this paper we study relaxation process of a new type coherent transients observed by applying a pulsed laser excitation to a two-level transition in the presence of a second strong continuous-wave (cw) coherent field coupling one of the two levels to a third level, that is, in a three-level double-resonance configuration. The relaxation process of coherent transients is studied as a function of relaxation parameters of both the two-level transition excited by the pulsed laser field and the transition coupled by the cw laser field. It is shown that by involving a third level with coherent field the relaxation process of coherent transients of a two-level transition can be modified. Our study illustrates a new way of controlling relaxation process of coherent transients in a two-level transition by a second coherent laser and this has important implication for quantum information storage and quantum computing

  16. Suppression of parasitic noise by strong Langmuir wave damping in quasitransient regimes of backward Raman amplification of intense laser pulses in plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, Vladimir; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2009-11-01

    Currently built powerful soft x-ray sources may be able to access intensities needed for backward Raman amplification (BRA) of x-ray pulses in plasmas. However, high plasma densities, needed to provide enough coupling between the pump and seed x-ray pulsed, cause strong damping of the Langmuir wave that mediates energy transfer from the pump to the seed pulse. Such damping could reduce the coupling, thus making efficient BRA impossible. This work shows that efficient BRA can survive despite the Langmuir wave damping significantly exceeding the linear BRA growth rate. Moreover, the strong Langmuir wave damping can suppress deleterious instabilities of BRA seeded by the thermal noise. This shows that it may be feasible to observe x-ray BRA for the first time soon.

  17. High resolution geodynamo simulations with strongly-driven convection and low viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Nathanael; Fournier, Alexandre; Jault, Dominique; Aubert, Julien

    2015-04-01

    Numerical simulations have been successful at explaining the magnetic field of the Earth for 20 years. However, the regime in which these simulations operate is in many respect very far from what is expected in the Earth's core. By reviewing previous work, we find that it appears difficult to have both low viscosity (low magnetic Prandtl number) and strong magnetic fields in numerical models (large ratio of magnetic over kinetic energy, a.k.a inverse squared Alfvén number). In order to understand better the dynamics and turbulence of the core, we have run a series of 3 simulations, with increasingly demanding parameters. The last simulation is at the limit of what nowadays codes can do on current super computers, with a resolution of 2688 grid points in longitude, 1344 in latitude, and 1024 radial levels. We will show various features of these numerical simulations, including what appears as trends when pushing the parameters toward the one of the Earth. The dynamics is very rich. From short time scales to large time scales, we observe at large scales: Inertial Waves, Torsional Alfvén Waves, columnar convective overturn dynamics and long-term thermal winds. In addition, the dynamics inside and outside the tangent cylinder seem to follow different routes. We find that the ohmic dissipation largely dominates the viscous one and that the magnetic energy dominates the kinetic energy. The magnetic field seems to play an ambiguous role. Despite the large magnetic field, which has an important impact on the flow, we find that the force balance for the mean flow is a thermal wind balance, and that the scale of convective cells is still dominated by viscous effects.

  18. Predictive Modeling for Strongly Correlated f-electron Systems: A first-principles and database driven machine learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Khair, Adnan; Abdullah, Mueen; Harper, Heike; Eriksson, Olle; Wills, John; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander

    Data driven computational tools are being developed for theoretical understanding of electronic properties in f-electron based materials, e.g., Lanthanides and Actnides compounds. Here we show our preliminary work on Ce compounds. Due to a complex interplay among the hybridization of f-electrons to non-interacting conduction band, spin-orbit coupling, and strong coulomb repulsion of f-electrons, no model or first-principles based theory can fully explain all the structural and functional phases of f-electron systems. Motivated by the large need in predictive modeling of actinide compounds, we adopted a data-driven approach. We found negative correlation between the hybridization and atomic volume. Mutual information between these two features were also investigated. In order to extend our search space with more features and predictability of new compounds, we are currently developing electronic structure database. Our f-electron database will be potentially aided by machine learning (ML) algorithm to extract complex electronic, magnetic and structural properties in f-electron system, and thus, will open up new pathways for predictive capabilities and design principles of complex materials. NSEC, IMS at LANL.

  19. Strong Erosion-Driven Nongravitational Effects in Orbital Motions of the Kreutz Sungrazing System’s Dwarf Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Kracht, Rainer

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the relationships among the angular orbital elements—the longitude of the ascending node Ω, the inclination i, and the argument of perihelion ω—of the Kreutz system’s faint, dwarf sungrazers observed only with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/STEREO coronagraphs; their published orbits were derived using a parabolic, purely gravitational approximation. In a plot of i against Ω the bright Kreutz sungrazers (such as C/1843 D1, C/1882 R1, C/1963 R1, etc.) fit a curve of fixed apsidal orientation, whereas the dwarf members are distributed along a curve that makes with the apsidal curve an angle of 15°. The dwarf sungrazers’ perihelion longitude is statistically invariable, but their perihelion latitude increases systematically with Ω. We find that this trend can be explained by a strong erosion-driven nongravitational acceleration normal to the orbit plane, confirmed for several test dwarf Kreutz sungrazers by orbital solutions with nongravitational terms incorporated directly in the equations of motion on a condition of fixed apsidal orientation. Proceeding in three steps, we first apply Marsden et al.'s standard formalism, solving for the normal acceleration only, and eventually relax additional constraints on the nongravitational law and the acceleration’s radial and transverse components. The resulting nongravitational accelerations on the dwarf sungrazers exceed the maximum for cataloged comets in nearly parabolic orbits by up to three orders of magnitude, topping in exceptional cases the Sun’s gravitational acceleration! A mass-loss model suggests that the dwarf sungrazers’ nuclei fragment copiously and their dimensions diminish rapidly near the Sun, implying the objects’ imminent demise shortly before they reach perihelion.

  20. Propagation of a strong x-ray pulse: Pulse compression, stimulated Raman scattering, amplified spontaneous emission, lasing without inversion, and four-wave mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Liu Jicai; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-01-01

    We study the compression of strong x-ray pulses from x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) propagating through the resonant medium of atomic argon. The simulations are based on the three-level model with the frequency of the incident x-ray pulse tuned in the 2p 3/2 -4s resonance. The pulse propagation is accompanied by the self-seeded stimulated resonant Raman scattering (SRRS). The SRRS starts from two channels of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), 4s-2p 3/2 and 3s-2p 3/2 , which form the extensive ringing pattern and widen the power spectrum. The produced seed field triggers the Stokes ASE channel 3s-2p 3/2 . The population inversion is quenched for longer propagation distances where the ASE is followed by the lasing without inversion (LWI), which amplifies the Stokes component. Both ASE and LWI reshape the input pulse: The compressed front part of the pulse (up to 100 as) is followed by the long tail of the ringing and beating between the pump and Stokes frequencies. The pump pulse also generates weaker Stokes and anti-Stokes fields caused by four-wave mixing. These four spectral bands have fine structures caused by the dynamical Stark effect. A slowdown of the XFEL pulse up to 78% of the speed of light in vacuum is found because of a large nonlinear refractive index.

  1. Spectral and far-field broadening due to stimulated rotational Raman scattering driven by the Nike krypton fluoride laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, James; Lehmberg, Robert; Obenschain, Stephen; Kehne, David; Wolford, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    Stimulated rotational Raman scattering (SRRS) in the ultraviolet region (λ=248  nm) has been observed at the Nike laser over extended propagation paths in air during high power operation. Although this phenomenon is not significant for standard operating configurations at Nike, broadening of the laser spectrum and far-field focal profiles has been observed once the intensity-path length product exceeds a threshold of approximately 1  TW/cm. This paper presents experimental results and a new theoretical evaluation of these effects. The observations suggest that significantly broader spectra can be achieved with modest degradation of the final focal distribution. These results point to a possible path for enhanced laser-target coupling with the reduction of laser-plasma instabilities due to broad laser bandwidth produced by the SRRS.

  2. A self-consistent trapping model of driven electron plasma waves and limits on stimulated Raman scatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, Harvey A.; Russell, David A.

    2001-01-01

    A Vlasov equation based model is used to determine various regimes of electron plasma wave response to a source appropriate to stimulated scatter in a laser hot spot. It incorporates trapped particle effects such as the standard nonlinear frequency shift, extended beyond the weak regime, and a reduction of damping a la Zakharov and Karpman [V. E. Zakharov and V. I. Karpman, JETP 16, 351 (1963)]. The results are consistent with those of Holloway and Dorning [J. P. Holloway and J. J. Dorning, Phys. Rev. A 44, 3856 (1991)] for small amplitude Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes. This leads to the prediction that as long as kλ D ≥0.53 for a background Maxwellian distribution function, e.g., a 5 keV plasma with n e /n c ≤0.075, anomalously large backward stimulated Raman scatter can be excluded. A similar analysis leads to density limits on stimulated Brillouin scatter

  3. Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and electrochemically driven melting to discriminate Yersinia pestis from Y. pseudotuberculosis based on single nucleotide polymorphisms within unpurified polymerase chain reaction amplicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Evanthia; Goodchild, Sarah A; Cleary, David W; Weller, Simon A; Gale, Nittaya; Stubberfield, Michael R; Brown, Tom; Bartlett, Philip N

    2015-02-03

    The development of sensors for the detection of pathogen-specific DNA, including relevant species/strain level discrimination, is critical in molecular diagnostics with major impacts in areas such as bioterrorism and food safety. Herein, we use electrochemically driven denaturation assays monitored by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to target single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that distinguish DNA amplicons generated from Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, from the closely related species Y. pseudotuberculosis. Two assays targeting SNPs within the groEL and metH genes of these two species have been successfully designed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to produce Texas Red labeled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) amplicons of 262 and 251 bases for the groEL and metH targets, respectively. These amplicons were used in an unpurified form to hybridize to immobilized probes then subjected to electrochemically driven melting. In all cases electrochemically driven melting was able to discriminate between fully homologous DNA and that containing SNPs. The metH assay was particularly challenging due to the presence of only a single base mismatch in the middle of the 251 base long PCR amplicon. However, manipulation of assay conditions (conducting the electrochemical experiments at 10 °C) resulted in greater discrimination between the complementary and mismatched DNA. Replicate data were collected and analyzed for each duplex on different days, using different batches of PCR product and different sphere segment void (SSV) substrates. Despite the variability introduced by these differences, the assays are shown to be reliable and robust providing a new platform for strain discrimination using unpurified PCR samples.

  4. Identification of Operating Parameters Most Strongly Influencing the Jetting Performance in a Piezoelectric Actuator-Driven Dispenser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Woo Sohn

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This work identifies crucial operating parameters which most significantly influence the jetting performances of piezostack-driven non-contact dispensers. This is achieved through experimental investigation and statistical analysis. After introducing the configuration and operating principle of the piezoelectric jetting dispenser, an experimental setup is constructed in order to test the jetting performance, such as the dispensed amount. After selecting four significant operating parameters for the light-emitting diode (LED-packaging process, two levels for each parameter are considered. Subsequently, the weight of a single dispensed dot is measured 100 times, and the average weight and standard deviation are calculated for each experimental set. The results are then statistically analyzed using a commercial software package. Finally, the crucial operating parameters which provide a low average weight and a minimum variation in the weight of a single dispensed dot are identified.

  5. Direct Visualization of Laser-Driven Electron Multiple Scattering and Tunneling Distance in Strong-Field Ionization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, S.; Hickstein, D.D.; Ranitovic, P.; Tong, X.-M.; Huismans, Y.; Arpin, P.; Zhou, X.; Keister, K.E.; Hogle, C.W.; Zhang, B.; Ding, C.; Johnsson, P.; Toshima, N.; Vrakking, M.J.J.; Murnane, M.M.; Kapteyn, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Using a simple model of strong-field ionization of atoms that generalizes the well-known 3-step model from 1D to 3D, we show that the experimental photoelectron angular distributions resulting from laser ionization of xenon and argon display prominent structures that correspond to electrons that

  6. Thermal degradation of polyaniline films prepared in solutions of strong and weak acids and in water – FTIR and Raman spectroscopic studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šeděnková, Ivana; Trchová, Miroslava; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 12 (2008), s. 2147-2157 ISSN 0141-3910 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0419; GA ČR GA203/08/0686 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : polyaniline * infrared spectroscopy * Raman spectroscopy * conducting polymer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 2.320, year: 2008

  7. Laser imprint reduction for the critical-density foam buffered target driven by a relatively strong foot pulse at early stage of laser implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J. W., E-mail: li-jiwei@iapcm.ac.cn; He, X. T. [Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P. O. Box 8009, Beijing 100094 (China); Kang, W. [Key Lab of High Energy Density Physics Simulation, Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Li, J. H.; Zheng, W. D. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P. O. Box 8009, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2015-12-15

    In order to reduce the effect of laser imprint in direct-drive ignition scheme a low-density foam buffered target has been proposed. This target is driven by a laser pulse with a low-intensity foot at the early stage of implosion, which heats the foam and elongates the thermal conduction zone between the laser absorption region and ablation front, increasing the thermal smoothing effect. In this paper, a relatively strong foot pulse is adopted to irradiate the critical-density foam buffered target. The stronger foot, near 1 × 10{sup 14 }W/cm{sup 2}, is able to drive a radiative shock in the low-density foam, which helps smooth the shock and further reduce the effect of laser imprint. The radiative shock also forms a double ablation front structure between the two ablation fronts to further stabilize the hydrodynamics, achieving the similar results to a target with a high-Z dopant in the ablator. 2D analysis shows that for the critical-density foam buffered target irradiated by the strong foot pulse, the laser imprint can be reduced due to the radiative shock in the foam and an increased thermal smoothing effect. It seems viable for the critical-density foam buffered target to be driven by a relatively strong foot pulse with the goal of reducing the laser imprint and achieving better implosion symmetry in the direct-drive laser fusion.

  8. Laser imprint reduction for the critical-density foam buffered target driven by a relatively strong foot pulse at early stage of laser implosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J. W.; He, X. T.; Kang, W.; Li, J. H.; Zheng, W. D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to reduce the effect of laser imprint in direct-drive ignition scheme a low-density foam buffered target has been proposed. This target is driven by a laser pulse with a low-intensity foot at the early stage of implosion, which heats the foam and elongates the thermal conduction zone between the laser absorption region and ablation front, increasing the thermal smoothing effect. In this paper, a relatively strong foot pulse is adopted to irradiate the critical-density foam buffered target. The stronger foot, near 1 × 10 14  W/cm 2 , is able to drive a radiative shock in the low-density foam, which helps smooth the shock and further reduce the effect of laser imprint. The radiative shock also forms a double ablation front structure between the two ablation fronts to further stabilize the hydrodynamics, achieving the similar results to a target with a high-Z dopant in the ablator. 2D analysis shows that for the critical-density foam buffered target irradiated by the strong foot pulse, the laser imprint can be reduced due to the radiative shock in the foam and an increased thermal smoothing effect. It seems viable for the critical-density foam buffered target to be driven by a relatively strong foot pulse with the goal of reducing the laser imprint and achieving better implosion symmetry in the direct-drive laser fusion

  9. More light on the 2ν{sub 5} Raman overtone of SF{sub 6}: Can a weak anisotropic spectrum be due to a strong transition anisotropy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremer, D.; Rachet, F.; Chrysos, M., E-mail: michel.chrysos@univ-angers.fr [LUNAM Université, Université d’Angers, CNRS UMR 6200, Laboratoire MOLTECH-Anjou, 2 Bd Lavoisier, 49045 Angers (France)

    2014-01-21

    Long known as a fully polarized band with a near vanishing depolarization ratio [η{sub s} = 0.05, W. Holzer and R. Ouillon, Chem. Phys. Lett. 24, 589 (1974)], the 2ν{sub 5} Raman overtone of SF{sub 6} has so far been considered as of having a prohibitively weak anisotropic spectrum [D. P. Shelton and L. Ulivi, J. Chem. Phys. 89, 149 (1988)]. Here, we report the first anisotropic spectrum of this overtone, at room temperature and for 13 gas densities ranging between 2 and 27 amagat. This spectrum is 10 times broader and 50 times weaker than the isotropic counterpart of the overtone [D. Kremer, F. Rachet, and M. Chrysos, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 174308 (2013)] and its profile much more sensitive to pressure effects than the profile of the isotropic spectrum. From our measurements an accurate value for the anisotropy matrix-element |〈000020|Δα|000000〉| was derived and this value was found to be comparable to that of the mean-polarizability ((000020), α{sup ¯} (000000)). Among other conclusions our study offers compelling evidence that, in Raman spectroscopy, highly polarized bands or tiny depolarization ratios are not necessarily incompatible with large polarizability anisotropy transition matrix-elements. Our findings and the way to analyze them suggest that new strategies should be developed on the basis of the complementarity inherent in independent incoherent Raman experiments that run with two different incident-beam polarizations, and on concerted efforts to ab initio calculate accurate data for first and second polarizability derivatives. Values for these derivatives are still rarities in the literature of SF{sub 6}.

  10. Semiconductor-driven “turn-off” surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy: application in selective determination of chromium(vi) in water† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed Benesi–Hildebrand plot, IR spectra, Raman assignments, and experiment optimization. See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc02618g Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Wang, Yue; Tanabe, Ichiro; Han, Xiaoxia

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor materials have been successfully used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates, providing SERS technology with a high flexibility for application in a diverse range of fields. Here, we employ a dye-sensitized semiconductor system combined with semiconductor-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to detect metal ions, using an approach based on the “turn-off” SERS strategy that takes advantage of the intrinsic capacity of the semiconductor to catalyze the degradation of a Raman probe. Alizarin red S (ARS)-sensitized colloidal TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) were selected as an example to show how semiconductor-enhanced Raman spectroscopy enables the determination of Cr(vi) in water. Firstly, we explored the SERS mechanism of ARS–TiO2 complexes and found that the strong electronic coupling between ARS and colloidal TiO2 NPs gives rise to the formation of a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) transition, providing a new electronic transition pathway for the Raman process. Secondly, colloidal TiO2 nanoparticles were used as active sites to induce the self-degradation of the Raman probe adsorbed on their surfaces in the presence of Cr(vi). Our data demonstrate the potential of ARS–TiO2 complexes as a SERS-active sensing platform for Cr(vi) in an aqueous solution. Remarkably, the method proposed in this contribution is relatively simple, without requiring complex pretreatment and complicated instruments, but provides high sensitivity and excellent selectivity in a high-throughput fashion. Finally, the ARS–TiO2 complexes are successfully applied to the detection of Cr(vi) in environmental samples. Thus, the present work provides a facile method for the detection of Cr(vi) in aqueous solutions and a viable application for semiconductor-enhanced Raman spectroscopy based on the chemical enhancement they contribute. PMID:28694937

  11. Climate- and successional-related changes in functional composition of European forests are strongly driven by tree mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Benito, Paloma; Ratcliffe, Sophia; Zavala, Miguel A; Martínez-Vilalta, Jordi; Vilà-Cabrera, Albert; Lloret, Francisco; Madrigal-González, Jaime; Wirth, Christian; Greenwood, Sarah; Kändler, Gerald; Lehtonen, Aleksi; Kattge, Jens; Dahlgren, Jonas; Jump, Alistair S

    2017-10-01

    Intense droughts combined with increased temperatures are one of the major threats to forest persistence in the 21st century. Despite the direct impact of climate change on forest growth and shifts in species abundance, the effect of altered demography on changes in the composition of functional traits is not well known. We sought to (1) quantify the recent changes in functional composition of European forests; (2) identify the relative importance of climate change, mean climate and forest development for changes in functional composition; and (3) analyse the roles of tree mortality and growth underlying any functional changes in different forest types. We quantified changes in functional composition from the 1980s to the 2000s across Europe by two dimensions of functional trait variation: the first dimension was mainly related to changes in leaf mass per area and wood density (partially related to the trait differences between angiosperms and gymnosperms), and the second dimension was related to changes in maximum tree height. Our results indicate that climate change and mean climatic effects strongly interacted with forest development and it was not possible to completely disentangle their effects. Where recent climate change was not too extreme, the patterns of functional change generally followed the expected patterns under secondary succession (e.g. towards late-successional short-statured hardwoods in Mediterranean forests and taller gymnosperms in boreal forests) and latitudinal gradients (e.g. larger proportion of gymnosperm-like strategies at low water availability in forests formerly dominated by broad-leaved deciduous species). Recent climate change generally favoured the dominance of angiosperm-like related traits under increased temperature and intense droughts. Our results show functional composition changes over relatively short time scales in European forests. These changes are largely determined by tree mortality, which should be further

  12. Competition between Free-Floating Plants Is Strongly Driven by Previously Experienced Phosphorus Concentrations in the Water Column.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin T H M Peeters

    Full Text Available Nutrients can determine the outcome of the competition between different floating plant species. The response of floating plants to current phosphorus levels may be affected by previously experienced phosphorus concentrations because some species have the ability to store excess phosphorus for later use. This might have an impact on their competition. Here, we investigate the effect of previous and actual phosphorus concentrations on the growth rate of free-floating plant species (Azolla filiculoides, Lemna minor/gibba and Ricciocarpus natansand the effect of phosphorus history on the competition between L. minor/gibba and A. filiculoides and between L. minor/gibba and R. natans. As expected, plant growth was lower when previously kept at low instead of high phosphorus concentrations. Growth of L. minor/gibba and A. filiculoides with a phosphorus rich history was comparable for low and high actual phosphorus concentrations, however, internal phosphorus concentrations were significantly lower with low actual phosphorus concentration. This indicates that both species perform luxury phosphorus uptake. Furthermore, internal P concentration in Azolla and Lemna increased within two weeks after a period of P deficit without a strong increase in growth. A. filiculoides in a mixture with L. minor/gibba grew faster than its monoculture. Morphological differences may explain why A. filiculoides outcompeted L. minor/gibba and these differences may be induced by phosphorus concentrations in the past. Growth of L. minor/gibba was only reduced by the presence of A. filiculoides with a high phosphorus history. Growth of L. minor/gibba and R. natans in mixtures was positively affected only when they had a high phosphorus history themselves and their competitor a low phosphorus history. These observations clearly indicate that phosphorus history of competing plants is important for understanding the outcome of the competition. Therefore, actual and previously

  13. Competition Between Radial Loss and EMIC Wave Scattering of MeV Electrons During Strong CME-shock Driven Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M. K.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, Z.; Malaspina, D.; Millan, R. M.; Patel, M.; Qin, M.; Shen, X.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The two strongest storms of Solar Cycle 24, 17 March and 22 June 2015, provide a contrast between magnetospheric response to CME-shocks at equinox and solstice. The 17 March CME-shock initiated storm produced a stronger ring current response with Dst = - 223 nT, while the 22 June CME-shock initiated storm reached a minimum Dst = - 204 nT. The Van Allen Probes ECT instrument measured a dropout in flux for both events which can be characterized by magnetopause loss at higher L values prior to strong recovery1. However, rapid loss is seen at L 3 for the June storm at high energies with maximum drop in the 5.2 MeV channel of the REPT instrument coincident with the observation of EMIC waves in the H+ band by the EMFISIS wave instrument. The rapid time scale of loss can be determined from the 65 minute delay in passage of the Probe A relative to the Probe B spacecraft. The distinct behavior of lower energy electrons at higher L values has been modeled with MHD-test particle simulations, while the rapid loss of higher energy electrons is examined in terms of the minimum resonant energy criterion for EMIC wave scattering, and compared with the timescale for loss due to EMIC wave scattering which has been modeled for other storm events.2 1Baker, D. N., et al. (2016), Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 121, 6647-6660, doi:10.1002/2016JA022502. 2Li, Z., et al. (2014), Investigation of EMIC wave scattering as the cause for the BARREL 17 January 2013 relativistic electron precipitation event: A quantitative comparison of simulation with observations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 8722-8729, doi:10.1002/2014GL062273.

  14. Novel nano-sized MR contrast agent mediates strong tumor contrast enhancement in an oncogene-driven breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Olof Eriksson

    Full Text Available The current study was carried out to test the potential of a new nanomaterial (Spago Pix as a macromolecular magnetic MR contrast agent for tumor detection and to verify the presence of nanomaterial in tumor tissue. Spago Pix, synthesized by Spago Nanomedical AB, is a nanomaterial with a globular shape, an average hydrodynamic diameter of 5 nm, and a relaxivity (r1 of approximately 30 (mM Mn-1 s-1 (60 MHz. The material consists of an organophosphosilane hydrogel with strongly chelated manganese (II ions and a covalently attached PEG surface layer. In vivo MRI of the MMTV-PyMT breast cancer model was performed on a 3 T clinical scanner. Tissues were thereafter analyzed for manganese and silicon content using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES. The presence of nanomaterial in tumor and muscle tissue was assessed using an anti-PEG monoclonal antibody. MR imaging of tumor-bearing mice (n = 7 showed a contrast enhancement factor of 1.8 (tumor versus muscle at 30 minutes post-administration. Contrast was retained and further increased 2-4 hours after administration. ICP-AES and immunohistochemistry confirmed selective accumulation of nanomaterial in tumor tissue. A blood pharmacokinetics analysis showed that the concentration of Spago Pix gradually decreased over the first hour, which was in good agreement with the time frame in which the accumulation in tumor occurred. In summary, we demonstrate that Spago Pix selectively enhances MR tumor contrast in a clinically relevant animal model. Based on the generally higher vascular leakiness in malignant compared to benign tissue lesions, Spago Pix has the potential to significantly improve cancer diagnosis and characterization by MRI.

  15. Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman spectroscopy has gained increased use and importance in recent years for accurate and precise detection of physical and chemical properties of food materials, due to the greater specificity and sensitivity of Raman techniques over other analytical techniques. This book chapter presents Raman s...

  16. Pseudogap in cuprates driven by D-wave flux-phase order proximity effects: a theoretical analysis from Raman and ARPES experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Andrés; Bejas, Matías

    2014-12-03

    One of the puzzling characteristics of the pseudogap phase of high-Tc cuprates is the nodal-antinodal dichotomy. While the nodal quasiparticles have a Fermi liquid behaviour, the antinodal ones show non-Fermi liquid features and an associated pseudogap. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and electronic Raman scattering are two valuable tools which have shown universal features which are rather material-independent, and presumably intrinsic to the pseudogap phase. The doping and temperature dependence of the Fermi arcs and the pseudogap observed by photoemission near the antinode correlates with the non-Fermi liquid behaviour observed by Raman for the B(1g) mode. In contrast, and similar to the nodal quasiparticles detected by photoemission, the Raman B(2g) mode shows Fermi liquid features. We show that these two experiments can be analysed, in the context of the t-J model, by self-energy effects in the proximity to a D-wave flux-phase order instability. This approach supports a crossover origin for the pseudogap, and a scenario of two competing phases. The B(2g) mode shows, in an underdoped case, a depletion at intermediate energy which has attracted renewed interest. We study this depletion and discuss its origin and relation with the pseudogap.

  17. Raman facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raman scattering is a powerful light scattering technique used to diagnose the internal structure of molecules and crystals. In a light scattering experiment, light...

  18. Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Donald L.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature on Raman spectroscopy from late 1981 to late 1983. Topic areas include: instrumentation and sampling; liquids and solutions; gases and matrix isolation; biological molecules; polymers; high-temperature and high-pressure studies; Raman microscopy; thin films and surfaces; resonance-enhanced and surface-enhanced spectroscopy; and…

  19. Raman Chandrasekar

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Raman Chandrasekar. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 430-439 General Article. How Children Learn to Use Language - An Overview of R. Narasimhan's Ideas on Child Language Acquisition.

  20. CV Raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    style, philosophy and motivations. We thus have here an authoritative biography of the most .... What motivated Raman to do the extraordinary things he did against all odds? What was the secret of his success? ... to Professor S. Chandrasekhar for permission to quote some of his statements. I am very indebted to Prof.

  1. Raman spectroscopy of white wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Coralie; Bruneel, Jean-Luc; Guyon, François; Médina, Bernard; Jourdes, Michael; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Guillaume, François

    2015-08-15

    The feasibility of exploiting Raman scattering to analyze white wines has been investigated using 3 different wavelengths of the incoming laser radiation in the near-UV (325 nm), visible (532 nm) and near infrared (785 nm). To help in the interpretation of the Raman spectra, the absorption properties in the UV-visible range of two wine samples as well as their laser induced fluorescence have also been investigated. Thanks to the strong intensity enhancement of the Raman scattered light due to electronic resonance with 325 nm laser excitation, hydroxycinnamic acids may be detected and analyzed selectively. Fructose and glucose may also be easily detected below ca. 1000 cm(-1). This feasibility study demonstrates the potential of the Raman spectroscopic technique for the analysis of white wines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Survey of Strong Normal-Internal k : ℓ Resonances in Quasi-Periodically Driven Oscillators for ℓ = 1,2,3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broer, H. W.; van Dijk, R.; Vitolo, R.

    Recently, semi-global results have been reported by Wagener6 for the k : ℓ resonance where ℓ = 1, 2. In this work we add the ℓ = 3 strong resonance case and give an overview for ℓ = 1,2,3. For an introduction to the topic, as well as results on the non-resonant and weakly-resonant cases, see Refs. 1,2,6.

  3. The internal propagation of fusion flame with the strong shock of a laser driven plasma block for advanced nuclear fuel ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malekynia, B.; Razavipour, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    An accelerated skin layer may be used to ignite solid state fuels. Detailed analyses were clarified by solving the hydrodynamic equations for nonlinear force driven plasma block ignition. In this paper, the complementary mechanisms are included for the advanced fuel ignition: external factors such as lasers, compression, shock waves, and sparks. The other category is created within the plasma fusion as reheating of an alpha particle, the Bremsstrahlung absorption, expansion, conduction, and shock waves generated by explosions. With the new condition for the control of shock waves, the spherical deuterium-tritium fuel density should be increased to 75 times that of the solid state. The threshold ignition energy flux density for advanced fuel ignition may be obtained using temperature equations, including the ones for the density profile obtained through the continuity equation and the expansion velocity for the r ≠ 0 layers. These thresholds are significantly reduced in comparison with the ignition thresholds at x = 0 for solid advanced fuels. The quantum correction for the collision frequency is applied in the case of the delay in ion heating. Under the shock wave condition, the spherical proton-boron and proton-lithium fuel densities should be increased to densities 120 and 180 times that of the solid state. These plasma compressions are achieved through a longer duration laser pulse or X-ray. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  4. FT-Raman study of dehydrogenation polymer (DHP) lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Noritsugu Terashima

    2003-01-01

    Compared to conventional Raman spectroscopy where samples are excited using visible light lasers, 1064 nm-excited FT-Raman technique has the single most important advantage that the sample-fluorescence is significantly suppressed for samples that are strongly fluorescent. DHPs are difficult to analyze in conventional Raman because small amounts of chromophores present...

  5. Transgenic Bt cotton driven by the green tissue-specific promoter shows strong toxicity to lepidopteran pests and lower Bt toxin accumulation in seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Zhu, Yi; Sun, Lin; Li, Lebin; Jin, Shuangxia; Zhang, Xianlong

    2016-02-01

    A promoter of the PNZIP (Pharbitis nil leucine zipper) gene (1.459 kb) was cloned from Pharbitis nil and fused to the GUS (β-glucuronidase) and Bacillus thuringiensis endotoxin (Cry9C) genes. Several transgenic PNZIP::GUS and PNZIP::Cry9C cotton lines were developed by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Strong GUS staining was detected in the green tissues of the transgenic PNZIP::GUS cotton plants. In contrast, GUS staining in the reproductive structures such as petals, anther, and immature seeds of PNZIP::GUS cotton was very faint. Two transgenic PNZIP::Cry9C lines and one transgenic cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S::Cry9C line were selected for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and insect bioassays. Expression of the Cry9C protein in the 35S::Cry9C line maintained a high level in most tissues ranging from 24.6 to 45.5 μg g(-1) fresh weight. In green tissues such as the leaves, boll rinds, and bracts of the PNZIP::Cry9C line, the Cry9C protein accumulated up to 50.2, 39.7, and 48.3 μg g(-1) fresh weight respectively. In contrast, seeds of the PNZIP::Cry9C line (PZ1.3) accumulated only 0.26 μg g(-1) fresh weight of the Cry9C protein, which was 100 times lower than that recorded for the seeds of the CaMV 35S::Cry9C line. The insect bioassay showed that the transgenic PNZIP::Cry9C cotton plant exhibited strong resistance to both the cotton bollworm and the pink bollworm. The PNZIP promoter could effectively drive Bt toxin expression in green tissues of cotton and lower accumulated levels of the Bt protein in seeds. These features should allay public concerns about the safety of transgenic foods. We propose the future utility of PNZIP as an economical, environmentally friendly promoter in cotton biotechnology.

  6. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow processes at a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Two complementary numerical models for analyzing high-level nuclear waste emplacement at Yucca Mountain have been developed. A vertical cross-sectional (X-Z) model permits a realistic representation of hydrogeologic features, such as alternating tilting layers of welded and non-welded tuffs. fault zones, and surface topography. An alternative radially symmetric (R-Z) model is more limited in its ability to describe the hydrogeology of the site, but is better suited to model heat transfer in the host rock. Our models include a comprehensive description of multiphase fluid and heat flow processes, including strong enhancements of vapor diffusion from pore-level phase change effects. The neighborhood of the repository is found to partially dry out from the waste heat. A condensation halo of large liquid saturation forms around the drying zone, from which liquid flows downward at large rates. System response to infiltration from the surface and to ventilation of mined openings is evaluated. The impact of the various flow processes on the waste isolation capabilities of the site is discussed

  7. Modeling of strongly heat-driven flow processes at a potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.; Tsang, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Two complementary numerical models for analyzing high-level nuclear waste emplacement at Yucca Mountain have been developed. A vertical cross-sectional (X-Z) model permits a realistic representation of hydrogeologic features, such as alternating tilting layers of welded and non-welded tuffs, fault zones, and surface topography. An alternative radially symmetric (R-Z) model is more limited in its ability to describe the hydrogeology of the site, but is better suited to model heat transfer in the host rock. Our models include a comprehensive description of multiphase fluid and heat flow processes, including strong enhancements of vapor diffusion from pore-level phase change effects. The neighborhood of the repository is found to partially dry out from the waste heat. A condensation halo of large liquid saturation forms around the drying zone, from which liquid flows downward at large rates. System response to infiltration from the surface and to ventilation of mined openings is evaluated. The impact of the various flow processes on the waste isolation capabilities of the site is discussed

  8. Raman scattering for food quality and safety assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Growing interests in both academia and industry have driven a rapid advance in Raman spectroscopy and spectral imaging technologies during the last decade. Novel Raman measurement techniques are constantly emerging to create new detection possibilities that cannot be achieved by existing methods. Im...

  9. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  10. Semiconductor-driven ?turn-off? surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy: application in selective determination of chromium(vi) in water? ?Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed Benesi?Hildebrand plot, IR spectra, Raman assignments, and experiment optimization. See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc02618g Click here for additional data file.

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Wei; Wang, Yue; Tanabe, Ichiro; Han, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Bing; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor materials have been successfully used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-active substrates, providing SERS technology with a high flexibility for application in a diverse range of fields. Here, we employ a dye-sensitized semiconductor system combined with semiconductor-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to detect metal ions, using an approach based on the ?turn-off? SERS strategy that takes advantage of the intrinsic capacity of the semiconductor to catalyze the degradation of...

  11. Raman scattering of Cisplatin near silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Duplanty, Michael; Torres, Marjorie; Moazzezi, Mojtaba; Rostovtsev, Yuri V.

    2018-03-01

    The Raman scattering of Cisplatin (the first generation of anticancer drugs) has been studied. In the presence of silver nanoparticles, strong modifications of Raman spectra have been observed. The Raman frequencies have been shifted and the line profiles are broadened. We develop a theoretical model to explain the observed features of the Raman scattering. The model takes into account self-consistently the interaction of molecules with surface plasmonic waves excited in the silver nanoparticles, and it provides a qualitative agreement with the observed Raman spectra. We have demonstrated that the using silver nanoparticles can increase sensitivity of the technique, and potentially it has a broader range of applications to both spectroscopy and microscopy.

  12. Detection of biologically active diterpenoic acids by Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Talian, Ivan; Orinak, Andrej; Efremov, Evtim V.

    2010-01-01

    is not suitable for their unambiguous identification, especially not in solution. We attempted to increase the sensitivity by applying UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) techniques. The UV-Raman spectra of the three compounds in ethanol/water 50 : 50 showed only very......Three poorly detectable, biologically active diterpenoic acids, kaurenoic, abietic, and gibberellic acid, were studied by using different modes of Raman spectroscopy. Because of their structural similarities, in the absence of strongly polarizable groups, conventional Raman spectroscopy...

  13. A quarter century of stimulated Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1987-01-01

    To round out a quarter century of SRS the timing of this writing (1986) requires a look ahead of only one year into the future. The proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Raman Spectroscopy present a picture of current activity. Further progress will be made in time-resolved spectroscopy with subpicosecond resolution, in the study of hyper-Raman and other higher order effects with CARS, in extension of resonant Raman excitation in the UV region of spectrum, and in the development of Raman laser sources. During past few years extensive theoretical investigations have been made for four-wave light mixing in the case of one or more very strong light beams. The perturbation approach for those fields ceases to be valid. If only one light field is strong, the usual approach is to make a transformation to a rotating coordinate system so that the strong Hamiltonian for this light field becomes time-independent. Very recently these techniques have been extended to the case of two or more strong fields. CARS-type experiments with strong beams are likely to receive more attention. Extrapolation of the current activities instills confidence in the vitality of stimulated Raman scattering for the foreseeable future

  14. Inter-daily variability of a strong thermally-driven wind system over the Atacama Desert of South America: synoptic forcing and short-term predictability using the GFS global model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques-Coper, Martín; Falvey, Mark; Muñoz, Ricardo C.

    2015-07-01

    Crucial aspects of a strong thermally-driven wind system in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile during the extended austral winter season (May-September) are studied using 2 years of measurement data from the Sierra Gorda 80-m meteorological mast (SGO, 22° 56' 24″ S; 69° 7' 58″ W, 2,069 m above sea level (a.s.l.)). Daily cycles of atmospheric variables reveal a diurnal (nocturnal) regime, with northwesterly (easterly) flow and maximum mean wind speed of 8 m/s (13 m/s) on average. These distinct regimes are caused by pronounced topographic conditions and the diurnal cycle of the local radiative balance. Wind speed extreme events of each regime are negatively correlated at the inter-daily time scale: High diurnal wind speed values are usually observed together with low nocturnal wind speed values and vice versa. The associated synoptic conditions indicate that upper-level troughs at the coastline of southwestern South America reinforce the diurnal northwesterly wind, whereas mean undisturbed upper-level conditions favor the development of the nocturnal easterly flow. We analyze the skill of the numerical weather model Global Forecast System (GFS) in predicting wind speed at SGO. Although forecasted wind speeds at 800 hPa do show the diurnal and nocturnal phases, observations at 80 m are strongly underestimated by the model. This causes a pronounced daily cycle of root-mean-squared error (RMSE) and bias in the forecasts. After applying a simple Model Output Statistics (MOS) post-processing, we achieve a good representation of the wind speed intra-daily and inter-daily variability, a first step toward reducing the uncertainties related to potential wind energy projects in the region.

  15. Coherent Raman spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Eesley, G L

    1981-01-01

    Coherent Raman Spectroscopy provides a unified and general account of the fundamental aspects of nonlinear Raman spectroscopy, also known as coherent Raman spectroscopy. The theoretical basis from which coherent Raman spectroscopy developed is described, along with its applications, utility, and implementation as well as advantages and disadvantages. Experimental data which typifies each technique is presented. This book is comprised of four chapters and opens with an overview of nonlinear optics and coherent Raman spectroscopy, followed by a discussion on nonlinear transfer function of matter

  16. [Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy analysis of thiabendazole pesticide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lei; Wu, Rui-mei; Liu, Mu-hua; Wang, Xiao-bin; Yan, Lin-yuan

    2015-02-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique was used to analyze the Raman peaks of thiabendazole pesticides in the present paper. Surface enhanced substrates of silver nanoparticle were made based on microwave technology. Raman signals of thiabendazole were collected by laser Micro-Raman spectrometer with 514. 5 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths, respectively. The Raman peaks at different excitation wavelengths were analyzed and compared. The Raman peaks 782 and 1 012 at 785 nm excitation wavelength were stronger, which were C--H out-of-plane vibrations. While 1284, 1450 and 1592 cm(-1) at 514.5 nm excitation wavelength were stronger, which were vng and C==N stretching. The study results showed that the intensity of Raman peak and Raman shift at different excitation wavelengths were different And strong Raman signals were observed at 782, 1012, 1284, 1450 and 1592 cm(-1) at 514.5 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths. These characteristic vibrational modes are characteristic Raman peaks of carbendazim pesticide. The results can provide basis for the rapid screening of pesticide residue in agricultural products and food based on Raman spectrum.

  17. CD8 and CD4 epitope predictions in RV144: no strong evidence of a T-cell driven sieve effect in HIV-1 breakthrough sequences from trial participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommaraju, Kalpana; Kijak, Gustavo; Carlson, Jonathan M; Larsen, Brendan B; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Geraghty, Dan E; Deng, Wenjie; Maust, Brandon S; Edlefsen, Paul T; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Ratto-Kim, Silvia; deSouza, Mark S; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttihum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; O'Connell, Robert J; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Mullins, James I; Kim, Jerome H; Rolland, Morgane

    2014-01-01

    The modest protection afforded by the RV144 vaccine offers an opportunity to evaluate its mechanisms of protection. Differences between HIV-1 breakthrough viruses from vaccine and placebo recipients can be attributed to the RV144 vaccine as this was a randomized and double-blinded trial. CD8 and CD4 T cell epitope repertoires were predicted in HIV-1 proteomes from 110 RV144 participants. Predicted Gag epitope repertoires were smaller in vaccine than in placebo recipients (p = 0.019). After comparing participant-derived epitopes to corresponding epitopes in the RV144 vaccine, the proportion of epitopes that could be matched differed depending on the protein conservation (only 36% of epitopes in Env vs 84-91% in Gag/Pol/Nef for CD8 predicted epitopes) or on vaccine insert subtype (55% against CRF01_AE vs 7% against subtype B). To compare predicted epitopes to the vaccine, we analyzed predicted binding affinity and evolutionary distance measurements. Comparisons between the vaccine and placebo arm did not reveal robust evidence for a T cell driven sieve effect, although some differences were noted in Env-V2 (0.022≤p-value≤0.231). The paucity of CD8 T cell responses identified following RV144 vaccination, with no evidence for V2 specificity, considered together both with the association of decreased infection risk in RV 144 participants with V-specific antibody responses and a V2 sieve effect, lead us to hypothesize that this sieve effect was not T cell specific. Overall, our results did not reveal a strong differential impact of vaccine-induced T cell responses among breakthrough infections in RV144 participants.

  18. Confocal Raman Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Toporski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy is a relatively new technique that allows chemical imaging without specific sample preparation. By integrating a sensitive Raman spectrometer within a state-of-the-art microscope, Raman microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 200nm laterally and 500nm vertically can be achieved using visible light excitation. Recent developments in detector and computer technology as well as optimized instrument design have reduced integration times of Raman spectra by orders of magnitude, so that complete images consisting of tens of thousands of Raman spectra can be acquired in seconds or minutes rather than hours, which used to be standard just one decade ago. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the rapidly developing field of Confocal Raman Microscopy and its applications.

  19. Low-frequency Raman scattering in alkali tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    (ω). In many studies the Raman coupling coefficient was de- termined by considering only the depolarized reduced. Raman intensity. Detailed analysis of the depolarization ratio for several oxides and chlorides in a wide tempera- ture range showed strong frequency dependence (Papa- theodorou and Yannopoulas 2002).

  20. Raman-Kerr frequency combs in microresonators with normal dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherenkov, A V; Kondratiev, N M; Lobanov, V E; Shitikov, A E; Skryabin, D V; Gorodetsky, M L

    2017-12-11

    We generalize the coupled mode formalism to study the generation of frequency combs in microresonators with simultaneous Raman and Kerr nonlinearities and investigate an impact of the former on the formation of frequency combs and dynamics of platicons in the regime of the normal group velocity dispersion. We demonstrate that the Raman effect initiates generation of sidebands, which cascade further in four-wave mixing and reshape into the Raman-Kerr frequency combs. We reveal that the Raman scattering induces a strong instability of the platicon pulses associated with the Kerr effect and normal dispersion. This instability results in branching of platicons and complex spatiotemporal dynamics.

  1. Raman spectroscopic characterization of multiwall carbon nanotubes and of composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bokobza

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work Raman spectroscopy was used for extensive characterization of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNTs and of MWCNTs/rubber composites. We have measured the Raman spectra of bundled and dispersed multiwall carbon nanotubes. All the Raman bands of the carbon nanotubes are seen to shift to higher wavenumbers upon debundling on account of less intertube interactions. Effects of laser irradiation were also investigated. Strong effects are observed by changing the wavelength of the laser excitation. On the other hand, at a given excitation wavelength, changes on the Raman bands are observed by changing the laser power density due to sample heating during the measurement procedure.

  2. Possibility of 1-nm level localization of a single molecule with gap-mode surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Han Kyu; Kim, Zee Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) enhancement mechanism of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been well established through 30 years of extensive investigation: molecules adsorbed on resonantly driven silver or gold nanoparticles (NPs) experience strongly enhanced field and thus show enhanced Raman scattering. Even stronger SERS enhancement is possible with a gap structure in which two or more NPs form assemblies with gap sizes of 1 nm or less. We have theoretically shown that the measurement of SERS angular distribution can reveal the position of a single molecule near the gap with 1-nm accuracy, even though the spatial extent of the enhanced field is ~10 nm. Real implementation of such experiment requires extremely well-defined (preferably a single crystal) dimeric junctions. Nevertheless, the experiment will provide spatial as well as frequency domain information on single-molecule dynamics at metallic surfaces

  3. Visualizing cell state transition using Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ichimura

    Full Text Available System level understanding of the cell requires detailed description of the cell state, which is often characterized by the expression levels of proteins. However, understanding the cell state requires comprehensive information of the cell, which is usually obtained from a large number of cells and their disruption. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy, which can report changes in the cell state without introducing any label, as a non-invasive method with single cell capability. Significant differences in Raman spectra were observed at the levels of both the cytosol and nucleus in different cell-lines from mouse, indicating that Raman spectra reflect differences in the cell state. Difference in cell state was observed before and after the induction of differentiation in neuroblastoma and adipocytes, showing that Raman spectra can detect subtle changes in the cell state. Cell state transitions during embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation were visualized when Raman spectroscopy was coupled with principal component analysis (PCA, which showed gradual transition in the cell states during differentiation. Detailed analysis showed that the diversity between cells are large in undifferentiated ESC and in mesenchymal stem cells compared with terminally differentiated cells, implying that the cell state in stem cells stochastically fluctuates during the self-renewal process. The present study strongly indicates that Raman spectral morphology, in combination with PCA, can be used to establish cells' fingerprints, which can be useful for distinguishing and identifying different cellular states.

  4. V V Raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. V V Raman. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 13 Issue 6 June 2008 pp 596-605 Reflections. The Scientific Enterprise - Science: Some Definitions and Views · V V Raman · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 13 Issue 8 August ...

  5. Raman crystallography of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bo; Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chase, Elaine; Chadalavada, Durga M; Golden, Barbara L; Carey, Paul R; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2009-10-01

    Raman crystallography is the application of Raman spectroscopy to single crystals. This technique has been applied to a variety of protein molecules where it has provided unique information about biopolymer folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here, we describe the application of Raman crystallography to functional RNA molecules. RNA represents unique opportunities and challenges for Raman crystallography. One issue that confounds studies of RNA is its tendency to adopt multiple non-functional folds. Raman crystallography has the advantage that it isolates a single state of the RNA within the crystal and can evaluate its fold, metal ion binding properties (ligand identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), proton binding properties (identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), and catalytic potential. In particular, base-specific stretches can be identified and then associated with the binding of metal ions and protons. Because measurements are carried out in the hanging drop at ambient, rather than cryo, conditions and because RNA crystals tend to be approximately 70% solvent, RNA dynamics and conformational changes become experimentally accessible. This review focuses on experimental setup and procedures, acquisition and interpretation of Raman data, and determination of physicochemical properties of the RNA. Raman crystallographic and solution biochemical experiments on the HDV RNA enzyme are summarized and found to be in excellent agreement. Remarkably, characterization of the crystalline state has proven to help rather than hinder functional characterization of functional RNA, most likely because the tendency of RNA to fold heterogeneously is limited in a crystalline environment. Future applications of Raman crystallography to RNA are briefly discussed.

  6. Karthik Raman Nagasuma Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karthik Raman1 Nagasuma Chandra2. Department of Biochemistry, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057, Switzerland; Bioinformatics Centre, Raman building, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Current Issue : Vol. 23, Issue 2. Current Issue

  7. Raman fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book serves as a comprehensive, up-to-date reference about this cutting-edge laser technology and its many new and interesting developments. Various aspects and trends of Raman fiber lasers are described in detail by experts in their fields. Raman fiber lasers have progressed quickly in the past decade, and have emerged as a versatile laser technology for generating high power light sources covering a spectral range from visible to mid-infrared. The technology is already being applied in the fields of telecommunication, astronomy, cold atom physics, laser spectroscopy, environmental sensing, and laser medicine. This book covers various topics relating to Raman fiber laser research, including power scaling, cladding and diode pumping, cascade Raman shifting, single frequency operation and power amplification, mid-infrared laser generation, specialty optical fibers, and random distributed feedback Raman fiber lasers. The book will appeal to scientists, students, and technicians seeking to understand the re...

  8. Confocal Raman microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Hollricher, Olaf

    2018-01-01

    This second edition provides a cutting-edge overview of physical, technical and scientific aspects related to the widely used analytical method of confocal Raman microscopy. The book includes expanded background information and adds insights into how confocal Raman microscopy, especially 3D Raman imaging, can be integrated with other methods to produce a variety of correlative microscopy combinations. The benefits are then demonstrated and supported by numerous examples from the fields of materials science, 2D materials, the life sciences, pharmaceutical research and development, as well as the geosciences.

  9. Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman of Biological Material

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guicheteau, Jason A; Gonser, Kristina; Christesen, Steven Dale

    2004-01-01

    .... Vibrational spectroscopic methods such as Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) provide rapid detailed fingerprint information about the molecular composition of biomaterial in a non-destructive manner...

  10. Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic investigation on Lamiaceae plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösch, P.; Popp, J.; Kiefer, W.

    1999-05-01

    The essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgaris are studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The containing monoterpenes can be identified by their Raman spectra. Further the essential oils are investigated in their natural environment, the so-called oil cells of these Lamiaceae plants, with surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). This method has the advantage to enhance Raman signals and furthermore the SERS effect leads to fluorescence quenching.

  11. Prospects of Mid Infrared Silicon Raman Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Bahram

    2006-03-01

    Mid wave infrared (MWIR) lasers in the wavelength range of 2-5μm form an important tool for free space communications, bio-chemical detection and certain medical applications. Most organic chemicals and biological agents have unique signatures in the MWIR and can be detected using these lasers. The strong water absorption peak at 2.9μm renders such a laser attractive for surgery and dentistry. Solid state lasers comprising OPO-based nonlinear frequency converters and Raman lasers have been the popular choice for these applications. However, the low damage threshold, poor thermal conductivity and high cost limit the commercial availability of these sources. The recent demonstration of the first silicon Raman laser in 2004 combined with excellent transmission of silicon in the mid-IR suggests that silicon should be considered as a MWIR Raman crystal. In the near IR, where current silicon Raman lasers operate, free carriers that are generated by two photon absorption (TPA) create severe losses. TPA vanishes in the MWIR regime (λ > 2.25μm), hence eliminating the main problem with silicon Raman lasers. This combined with (i) the unsurpassed quality of commercial silicon crystals, (ii) the low cost and wide availability of the material, (iii) extremely high optical damage threshold of 1-4 GW/cm2 (depending on the crystal resistivity), and (iv) excellent thermal conductivity renders silicon a very attractive Raman crystal. Moreover, integrated waveguide and resonator technologies can lead to device miniaturization. This talk discusses the MWIR silicon laser and its applications.

  12. Raman spectrum of asphaltene

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Wael A.

    2012-11-05

    Asphaltenes extracted from seven different crude oils representing different geological formations from around the globe were analyzed using the Raman spectroscopic technique. Each spectrum is fitted with four main peaks using the Gaussian function. On the basis of D1 and G bands of the Raman spectrum, asphaltene indicated an ordered structure with the presence of boundary defected edges. The average aromatic sheet size of the asphaltene molecules is estimated within the range of 1.52-1.88 nm, which represents approximately seven to eight aromatic fused rings. This estimation is based on the integrated intensity of D1 and G bands, as proposed by Tunistra and Koenig. The results here are in perfect agreement with so many other used techniques and indicate the potential applicability of Raman measurements to determine the average aromatic ring size and its boundary. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy - Recent Advancement of Raman Spectroscopy. Ujjal Kumar Sur. General Article Volume 15 Issue 2 February 2010 pp 154-164 ...

  14. Cyclic Organic Peroxides Characterization by Mass Spectrometry and Raman Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    included d -ace- tone (99% isotope), acetone, cyclopentanone, hexamethylene tetraamine, benzoyl peroxide (98% w/w), and formaldehyde (CH O, 37% wt...absorption of the N-H stretching at 3336 cm in FTIR absorption and 3346 cm in Raman scattering [40], [41]. Urea has a strong carbonyl absorption in the range...demonstrate the presence of a carbonyl group. The corresponding Raman signal was observed about 1650–1770 cm . Characterization of the nitrogen-carbon bond

  15. Development of Raman spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, A.I.

    2008-05-01

    In this work, the Raman spectrophotometer HG.2S Jobin Yvon rebuilt and developed, the Raman setup provided as a gift for Neelian University from Amsterdam University. The main parts, which were replaced, include monochromator, an air-cooled photomultiplier tube RCA IP 28, log amplifier, hand scanning lab VIEW card for computer interfacing. The components assembled and the whole device was tested successfully. The developed setup was checked using some standard solutions, which showed perfect consistency with literature in the references and published papers. Solutions included hexane, cyclohexane, carbon tetrachloride, benzene and sodium sulfate.(Author)

  16. In situ raman spectroelectrochemistry of electron transfer between glassy carbon and a chemisorbed nitroazobenzene monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Takashi; McCreery, Richard L

    2002-09-11

    In situ Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor 4-nitroazobenzene (NAB) in an electrochemical cell, both as a free molecule and as a chemisorbed monolayer on a glassy carbon (GC) electrode surface. Reduction of free NAB exhibited two well-defined voltammetric couples in acetonitrile, and the accompanying spectral changes supported a mechanism involving two successive 1-e(-) transfers. Raman spectra of NAB chemisorbed to GC via diazonium ion reduction were obtained in acetonitrile with a high-sensitivity, line-focused CCD spectrometer. The chemisorbed NAB spectra were quite different from the free NAB spectra, and were sufficiently strong to monitor as a function of applied potential. In the potential range of +400 to -800 mV vs Ag/Ag(+), the intensity of the Raman bands associated with the phenyl-NO(2) moiety varied, implying an electronic interaction between the pi system of the graphitic substrate and the chemisorbed NAB molecules. Negative of -800 mV, a 1-e(-) voltammetric reduction peak was observed, which was reversible on the positive voltage scan. This peak was accompanied by significant spectral changes, particularly the loss of the N=N and NO(2) stretches. The spectra are consistent with formation of a quinoid structure containing a C=C double bond between the NAB and the graphitic surface. The electron transfer and spectral changes occurred over a wider potential range than expected for a conventional Nernstian equilibrium, but did not appear to be broadened by slow electron-transfer kinetics. The results imply a significant perturbation of electron transfer between the GC and the monolayer, caused by strong electronic coupling between the graphitic pi system and the NAB orbitals. Rather than a discrete electron transfer to a free molecule, the electron transfer to chemisorbed NAB is more gradual, and is presumably driven by the electric field at the electrode/solution interface.

  17. Lidar - Wind, Raman, and Other Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Rocadenbosch Burillo, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Lidar stands for Llght Detection and Ranging. Laser radars or lidars, which are optically the closest counterparts of conventional rnicrowave radars, take advantage of the relatively strong interaction of laser light with atmospheric constituents. They offer superior spatial and temporal resolution and are effective remote sensing instruments. Wind, Raman, and other lidar sensing instruments encompass a wide range of systems-unprecedented long-range wind, aerosol, and molecular chemical...

  18. Confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puppels, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a technique that provides detailed structural information about molecules studied. In the field of molecular biophysics it has been extensively used for characterization of nucleic acids and proteins and for investigation of interactions between these molecules. It was felt that this technique would have great potential if it could be applied for in situ study of these molecules and their interactions, at the level of single living cell or a chromosome. To make this possible a highly sensitive confocal Raman microspectrometer (CRM) was developed. The instrument is described in detail in this thesis. It incorporates a number of recent technological developments. First, it employs a liquid nitrogen cooled CCD-camera. This type of detector, first used in astronomy, is the ultimate detector for Raman spectroscopy because it combines high quantum efficiency light detection with photon-noise limited operation. Second, an important factor in obtaining a high signal throughput of the spectrometer was the development of a new type of Raman notch filter. In the third place, the confocal detection principle was applied in the CRM. This limits the effective measuring volume to 3 . (author). 279 refs., 48 figs., 11 tabs

  19. Parimala, Prof. Raman

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parimala, Prof. Raman Ph.D. (Mumbai), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 21 November 1948. Specialization: Algebra Address: Professor, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Emory University, 400 Dowman Drive W 401, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA Contact: Office: 001-404 727 7577. Residence: 001-404 444 8870

  20. Raman, Prof. Rajiva

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman, Prof. Rajiva Ph.D. (Banaras), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 9 December 1948. Specialization: Human Molecular Genetics & Cytogenetics, Gene Expression & Chromatin Organization in Development and Sex Determination Address: Professor Emeritus, Department of Zoology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 ...

  1. Raman Imaging Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Raman imaging has long been used to probe the chemical nature of a sample, providing information on molecular orientation, symmetry and structure with sub-micron spatial resolution. Recent technical developments have pushed the limits of micro-Raman microscopy, enabling the acquisition of Raman spectra with unprecedented speed, and opening a pathway to fast chemical imaging for many applications from material science and semiconductors to pharmaceutical drug development and cell biology, and even art and forensic science. The promise of tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy (TERS) and near-field techniques is pushing the envelope even further by breaking the limit of diffraction and enabling nano-Raman microscopy.

  2. Huge spin-driven polarizations at room temperature in bulk BiFeO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hee; Fishman, Randy

    2015-03-01

    Although BiFeO3 is one of the most investigated multiferroics, its magnetoelectricity and spin-driven polarizations are barely understood on an atomistic level. By combining a first-principles approach with a spin-cycloid model, we report hidden but huge spin-driven polarizations at room temperature in bulk BiFeO3. One of the polarizations reaches ~ 0.03 C/m2, which is larger than any other spin-driven polarization in a bulk material by one order of magnitude. By comparing our results with intrinsic measurements such as neutron scattering, Raman spectroscopy, IR directional dichroism, and high magnetic-field measurements, we disentangle all the hidden spin-driven polarizations due to exchange-striction, spin-current, and single-ion-anisotropy. We find that the broken inversion symmetries of the R3c structure of BiFeO3 induce the strong response of the magnetic couplings to an electric field and are responsible for the associated huge spin-driven polarizations. This research is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division and by the Scientific User Facilities Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy.

  3. Raman spectroscopy an intensity approach

    CERN Document Server

    Guozhen, Wu

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the highlights of our work on the bond polarizability approach to the intensity analysis. The topics covered include surface enhanced Raman scattering, Raman excited virtual states and Raman optical activity (ROA). The first chapter briefly introduces the Raman effect in a succinct but clear way. Chapter 2 deals with the normal mode analysis. This is a basic tool for our work. Chapter 3 introduces our proposed algorithm for the Raman intensity analysis. Chapter 4 heavily introduces the physical picture of Raman virtual states. Chapter 5 offers details so that the readers can have a comprehensive idea of Raman virtual states. Chapter 6 demonstrates how this bond polarizability algorithm is extended to ROA intensity analysis. Chapters 7 and 8 offer details on ROA, showing many findings on ROA mechanism that were not known or neglected before. Chapter 9 introduces our proposed classical treatment on ROA which, as combined with the results from the bond polarizability analysis, leads to a com...

  4. Double-wall carbon nanotubes doped with different Br2 doping levels: a resonance Raman study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Gustavo M; Hou, Taige; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu; Akuzawa, Noboru; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the effects of different Br2 doping levels on the radial breathing modes of "double-wall carbon nanotube (DWNT) buckypaper". The resonance Raman profile of the Br2 bands are shown for different DWNT configurations with different Br2 doping levels. Near the maximum intensity of the resonance Raman profile, mainly the Br2 molecules adsorbed on the DWNT surface contribute strongly to the observed omega(Br-Br) Raman signal.

  5. Polarized Raman spectroscopy of chemically vapour deposited diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Weiser, P.S.

    1994-01-01

    Polarized micro-Raman spectra of chemically vapour deposited diamond films are presented. It is shown that important parameters often extracted from the Raman spectra such as the ratio of the diamond to non-diamond component of the films and the estimation of the level of residual stress depend on the orientation of the diamond crystallites with respect to the polarization of the incident laser beam. The dependence originates from the fact that the Raman scattering from the non-diamond components in the films is almost completely depolarized whilst the scattering from the diamond components is strongly polarized. The results demonstrate the importance of taking polarization into account when attempting to use Raman spectroscopy in even a semi-quantitative fashion for the assessment of the purity, perfection and stress in CVD diamond films. 8 refs., 1 tab. 2 figs

  6. Raman Plus X: Biomedical Applications of Multimodal Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandan K. Das

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is a label-free method of obtaining detailed chemical information about samples. Its compatibility with living tissue makes it an attractive choice for biomedical analysis, yet its translation from a research tool to a clinical tool has been slow, hampered by fundamental Raman scattering issues such as long integration times and limited penetration depth. In this review we detail the how combining Raman spectroscopy with other techniques yields multimodal instruments that can help to surmount the translational barriers faced by Raman alone. We review Raman combined with several optical and non-optical methods, including fluorescence, elastic scattering, OCT, phase imaging, and mass spectrometry. In each section we highlight the power of each combination along with a brief history and presentation of representative results. Finally, we conclude with a perspective detailing both benefits and challenges for multimodal Raman measurements, and give thoughts on future directions in the field.

  7. RAMAN SCATTERING BY MOLECULAR HYDROGEN AND NITROGEN IN EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oklopčić, Antonija [California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Hirata, Christopher M. [Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Heng, Kevin, E-mail: oklopcic@astro.caltech.edu [Center for Space and Habitability, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012, Bern (Switzerland)

    2016-11-20

    An important source of opacity in exoplanet atmospheres at short visible and near-UV wavelengths is Rayleigh scattering of light on molecules. It is accompanied by a related, albeit weaker process—Raman scattering. We analyze the signatures of Raman scattering imprinted in the reflected light and the geometric albedo of exoplanets, which could provide information about atmospheric properties. Raman scattering affects the geometric albedo spectra of planets in the following ways. First, it causes filling-in of strong absorption lines in the incident radiation, thus producing sharp peaks in the albedo. Second, it shifts the wavelengths of spectral features in the reflected light causing the so-called Raman ghost lines. Raman scattering can also cause a broadband reduction of the albedo due to wavelength shifting of a stellar spectrum with red spectral index. Observing the Raman peaks in the albedo could be used to measure the column density of gas, thus providing constraints on the presence of clouds in the atmosphere. Observing the Raman ghost lines could be used to spectroscopically identify the main scatterer in the atmosphere, even molecules like H{sub 2} or N{sub 2}, which do not have prominent spectral signatures in the optical wavelength range. If detected, ghost lines could also provide information about the temperature of the atmosphere. In this paper, we investigate the effects of Raman scattering in hydrogen- and nitrogen-dominated atmospheres. We analyze the feasibility of detecting the signatures of Raman scattering with the existing and future observational facilities, and of using these signatures as probes of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  8. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  9. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-21

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into "coffee" rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials.

  10. Reducing noise in a Raman quantum memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustard, Philip J; England, Duncan G; Heshami, Khabat; Kupchak, Connor; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2016-11-01

    Optical quantum memories are an important component of future optical and hybrid quantum technologies. Raman schemes are strong candidates for use with ultrashort optical pulses due to their broad bandwidth; however, the elimination of deleterious four-wave mixing noise from Raman memories is critical for practical applications. Here, we demonstrate a quantum memory using the rotational states of hydrogen molecules at room temperature. Polarization selection rules prohibit four-wave mixing, allowing the storage and retrieval of attenuated coherent states with a mean photon number 0.9 and a pulse duration 175 fs. The 1/e memory lifetime is 85.5 ps, demonstrating a time-bandwidth product of ≈480 in a memory that is well suited for use with broadband heralded down-conversion and fiber-based photon sources.

  11. Raman Identification of Polymorphs in Pentacene Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Girlando

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We use Raman spectroscopy to characterize thin films of pentacene grown on Si/SiO x by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition (SuMBD. We find that films up to a thickness of about 781 Å (∼ 52 monolayers all belong to the so-called thin-film (TF phase. The appearance with strong intensity of some lattice phonons suggests that the films are characterized by good intra-layer order. A comparison of the Raman spectra in the lattice and CH bending spectral regions of the TF polymorph with the corresponding ones of the high-temperature (HT and low-temperature (LT bulk pentacene polymorphs provides a quick and nondestructive method to identify the different phases.

  12. A relationship between Raman and infrared spectra: the case of push pull molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Zoppo, M.; Tommasini, M.; Castiglioni, C.; Zerbi, G.

    1998-04-01

    Vibrational spectra of push-pull polyenes show a peculiar feature namely, in infrared and Raman spectra strong, coincident bands appear, arising from vibrations localised on the polyene bridge. A simple model, based on the introduction of an effective internal field due to the charge transfer between end groups allows the infrared and Raman intensities of these bands to be related.

  13. Influence of stimulated Raman scattering on the conversion efficiency in four wave mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, R.; Moore, M.A.; Garrett, W.R.; Payne, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    Secondary nonlinear optical effects following parametric four wave mixing in sodium vapor are investigated. The generated ultraviolet radiation induces stimulated Raman scattering and other four wave mixing process. Population transfer due to Raman transitions strongly influences the phase matching conditions for the primary mixing process. Pulse shortening and a reduction in conversion efficiency are observed. 8 refs., 3 figs

  14. Molecular selectivity of graphene-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengxi; Ling, Xi; Liang, Liangbo; Song, Yi; Fang, Wenjing; Zhang, Jin; Kong, Jing; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2015-05-13

    Graphene-enhanced Raman scattering (GERS) is a recently discovered Raman enhancement phenomenon that uses graphene as the substrate for Raman enhancement and can produce clean and reproducible Raman signals of molecules with increased signal intensity. Compared to conventional Raman enhancement techniques, such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS), in which the Raman enhancement is essentially due to the electromagnetic mechanism, GERS mainly relies on a chemical mechanism and therefore shows unique molecular selectivity. In this paper, we report graphene-enhanced Raman scattering of a variety of different molecules with different molecular properties. We report a strong molecular selectivity for the GERS effect with enhancement factors varying by as much as 2 orders of magnitude for different molecules. Selection rules are discussed with reference to two main features of the molecule, namely its molecular energy levels and molecular structures. In particular, the enhancement factor involving molecular energy levels requires the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies to be within a suitable range with respect to graphene's Fermi level, and this enhancement effect can be explained by the time-dependent perturbation theory of Raman scattering. The enhancement factor involving the choice of molecular structures indicates that molecular symmetry and substituents similar to that of the graphene structure are found to be favorable for GERS enhancement. The effectiveness of these factors can be explained by group theory and the charge-transfer interaction between molecules and graphene. Both factors, involving the molecular energy levels and structural symmetry of the molecules, suggest that a remarkable GERS enhancement requires strong molecule-graphene coupling and thus effective charge transfer between the molecules and graphene. These conclusions are further

  15. Recent progress in distributed optical fiber Raman photon sensors at China Jiliang University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zaixuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Yi; Gong, Huaping; Yu, Xiangdong; Liu, Honglin; Jin, Yongxing; Kang, Juan; Li, Chenxia; Zhang, Wensheng; Zhang, Wenping; Niu, Xiaohui; Sun, Zhongzhou; Zhao, Chunliu; Dong, Xinyong; Jin, Shangzhong

    2012-06-01

    A brief review of recent progress in researches, productions and applications of full distributed fiber Raman photon sensors at China Jiliang University (CJLU) is presented. In order to improve the measurement distance, the accuracy, the space resolution, the ability of multi-parameter measurements, and the intelligence of full distributed fiber sensor systems, a new generation fiber sensor technology based on the optical fiber nonlinear scattering fusion principle is proposed. A series of new generation full distributed fiber sensors are investigated and designed, which consist of new generation ultra-long distance full distributed fiber Raman and Rayleigh scattering photon sensors integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier, auto-correction full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors based on Raman correlation dual sources, full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors based on a pulse coding source, full distributed fiber Raman photon temperature sensors using a fiber Raman wavelength shifter, a new type of Brillouin optical time domain analyzers (BOTDAs) integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier for replacing a fiber Brillouin amplifier, full distributed fiber Raman and Brillouin photon sensors integrated with a fiber Raman amplifier, and full distributed fiber Brillouin photon sensors integrated with a fiber Brillouin frequency shifter. The Internet of things is believed as one of candidates of the next technological revolution, which has driven hundreds of millions of class markets. Sensor networks are important components of the Internet of things. The full distributed optical fiber sensor network (Rayleigh, Raman, and Brillouin scattering) is a 3S (smart materials, smart structure, and smart skill) system, which is easy to construct smart fiber sensor networks. The distributed optical fiber sensor can be embedded in the power grids, railways, bridges, tunnels, roads, constructions, water supply systems, dams, oil and gas pipelines and other

  16. Comparison of UV and visible Raman spectroscopy of bulk metal molybdate and metal vanadate catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hanjing; Wachs, Israel E; Briand, Laura E

    2005-12-15

    The visible (532 and 442 nm) and UV (325 nm) Raman spectra of bulk mixed metal oxides (metal molybdates and metal vanadates) were compared on the same spectrometer, for the first time, to allow examination of how varying the excitation energy from visible to UV affects the resulting Raman spectra. The quality of the Raman spectra was found to be a strong function of the absorption properties of the bulk mixed oxide. For bulk mixed metal oxides that absorb weakly in the visible and UV regions, both the visible and UV Raman spectra were of high quality and exhibit identical vibrational bands, but with slightly different relative intensities. For bulk mixed metal oxides that absorb strongly in the UV and visible regions and/or strongly in the UV and weakly in the visible regions, the visible Raman spectra are much richer in structural information and of higher resolution than the corresponding UV Raman spectra. This is a consequence of the strong UV absorption that significantly reduces the sampling volume and number of scatterers giving rise to the Raman signal. The shallower escape depth of UV Raman, however, was not sufficient to detect vibrations from the surface metal oxide species that are present on the outermost surface layer of these crystalline mixed metal oxide phases as previously suggested. It was also demonstrated that there is no sample damage by the more energetic UV excitation when very low laser powers and fast detectors are employed, thus avoiding the need of complicated fluidized bed sample arrangements sometimes used for UV Raman investigations. The current comparative Raman investigation carefully documents, for the first time, the advantages and disadvantages of applying different excitation energies in collecting Raman spectra of bulk mixed metal oxide materials.

  17. Faraday effect on stimulated Raman scattering in the linear region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. J.; Li, B.; Xiang, J.; Cao, L. H.; Zheng, C. Y.; Hao, L.

    2018-04-01

    The paper presents the effect of Faraday rotation on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). When light propagates along the magnetic field upon plasma, Faraday rotation occurs. The rotation angle can be expressed as {{d}}θ /{{d}}{s}=2.93× {10}-4B\\tfrac{{n}e/{n}c}{\\sqrt{1-{n}e/{n}c}} {cm}}-1 approximately, where θ is the rotation angle and s is distance, n e is the electron density, n c is the critical density and B is magnetic field in unit of Gauss. Both the incident light and Raman light have Faraday effects. The angle between the polarization directions of incident light and Raman light changes with position. The driven force of electron plasma wave also reduces, and then SRS scattering level is reduced. Faraday rotation effect can increase the laser intensity threshold of Raman scattering, even if the magnetic field strength is small. The circularly polarized light incident case is also compared with that of the linearly polarized light incident. The Raman scattering level of linearly polarized light is much smaller than that of circularly polarized light in the magnetized plasma. The difference between linearly and circularly polarized lights is also discussed.

  18. Multi-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy based on modified multi-energy constrained iterative deconvolution algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wenlong; Cai, Zhijian; Zhou, Hongwu; Wu, Jianhong

    2013-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy is fast and nondestructive, and it is widely used in chemistry, biomedicine, food safety and other areas. However, Raman spectroscopy is often hampered by strong fluorescence background, especially in food additives detection and biomedicine researching. In this paper, one efficient technique was the multi-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (MERDS) which incorporated a series of small wavelength-shift wavelengths as excitation sources. A modified multi-energy constrained iterative deconvolution (MMECID) algorithm was proposed to reconstruct the Raman Spectroscopy. Computer simulation and experiments both demonstrated that the Raman spectrum can be well reconstructed from large fluorescence background. The more excitation sources used, the better signal to noise ratio got. However, many excitation sources were equipped on the Raman spectrometer, which increased the complexity of the experimental system. Thus, a trade-off should be made between the number of excitation frequencies and experimental complexity.

  19. Enhancement of Raman scattering in dielectric nanostructures with electric and magnetic Mie resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizyuk, Kristina; Hasan, Mehedi; Krasnok, Alex; Alú, Andrea; Petrov, Mihail

    2018-02-01

    Resonantly enhanced Raman scattering in dielectric nanostructures has been recently proven to be an efficient tool for nanothermometry and for the experimental determination of their mode composition. In this paper we develop a rigorous analytical theory based on the Green's function approach to calculate the Raman emission from crystalline high-index dielectric nanoparticles. As an example, we consider silicon nanoparticles which have a strong Raman response due to active optical phonon modes. We relate enhancement of Raman signal emission to the Purcell effect due to the excitation of Mie modes inside the nanoparticles. We also employ our numerical approach to calculate inelastic Raman emission in more sophisticated geometries, which do not allow a straightforward analytical form of the Green's function. The Raman response from a silicon nanodisk has been analyzed with the proposed method, and the contribution of various Mie modes has been revealed.

  20. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    In Raman spectroscopy, inelastic scattering of photons from an atom or molecule in chemical entities is utilized to analyze the composition of solids, liquids and gases. However, the low cross-section limits its applications. The introduction of sur- face-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in 1974 has attracted a lot of attention ...

  1. Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Shapiro, Alexander; Berg, Rolf W.

    Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt......Poster "Diffusion measurements by Raman spectroscopy", See poster at http://www.kemi.dtu.dk/~ajo/rolf/petroday2004.ppt...

  2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    near-ultraviolet range of electromagnetic spectra. The shift in energy in Raman effect gives information about the ... Raman spectroscopy is commonly used in chemistry, since vibrational information is very specific for the ... in polarizability is compatible with preservation of the center of symmetry. Thus, in a centrosymmetric ...

  3. Industrial applications of Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, J. G.; Walder, F.; Petty, C.; Kemeny, G.

    1993-03-01

    In the last two decades, Raman spectroscopy has matured as an important method for the study of molecules and complex molecular systems. This is evident from the number of fine texts and the many review articles which have been published describing theory and applications of Raman spectroscopy over a very broad range of subjects (1-10). Raman spectroscopy is the essential partner to infrared spectroscopy for a complete vibrational analysis of a molecule in structure determinations. From the understanding developed on small molecules, theory was extended to interpret the spectra of larger systems such as polymers, biological molecules, and ordered condensed phases. The contribution of Raman spectroscopy to these areas has been significant. It was the development of commercial lasers in the 1960s which spurred the renewed interest in the Raman technique. But applications were still limited for highly fluorescing or intensely colored systems. In 1986, a breakthrough paper by Hirschfeld and Chase (11) described the use of near-infrared laser excitation and a commercial interferometer-based FT-IR spectrometer to record FT-Raman spectra. Significant advantages included the inherent multiplex, throughput and data processing features of the FT interferometers and the use of a ND:YAG laser (1.064 μm) which dramatically decreased problems with sample fluorescence and decomposition. A deluge of papers describing applications of FT-Raman spectroscopy can be found in the Journal of Raman Spectroscopy, Spectrochimica Acta (special issues 40A ad 47A), and Applied Spectroscopy since then.

  4. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    to perform real-time measurements with little or no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is now considered an invaluable analytical tool, finding application in several fields including medicine, defense and process control. When combined with fiber optics technology, Raman spectroscopy allows......The design and development of an all-in-fiber probe for Raman spectroscopy are presented in this Thesis. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique able to probe a sample based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Due to its high specificity and reliability and to the possibility...... for the realization of flexible and minimally-invasive devices, able to reach remote or hardly accessible samples, and to perform in-situ analyses in hazardous environments. The work behind this Thesis focuses on the proof-of-principle demonstration of a truly in-fiber Raman probe, where all parts are realized...

  5. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of cervix cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubina, S.; Sathe, Priyanka; Dora, Tapas Kumar; Chopra, Supriya; Maheshwari, Amita; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Cervix-cancer is the third most common female cancer worldwide. It is the leading cancer among Indian females with more than million new diagnosed cases and 50% mortality, annually. The high mortality rates can be attributed to late diagnosis. Efficacy of Raman spectroscopy in classification of normal and pathological conditions in cervix cancers on diverse populations has already been demonstrated. Our earlier ex vivo studies have shown the feasibility of classifying normal and cancer cervix tissues as well as responders/non-responders to Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). The present study was carried out to explore feasibility of in vivo Raman spectroscopic methods in classifying normal and cancerous conditions in Indian population. A total of 182 normal and 132 tumor in vivo Raman spectra, from 63 subjects, were recorded using a fiberoptic probe coupled HE-785 spectrometer, under clinical supervision. Spectra were acquired for 5 s and averaged over 3 times at 80 mW laser power. Spectra of normal conditions suggest strong collagenous features and abundance of non-collagenous proteins and DNA in case of tumors. Preprocessed spectra were subjected to Principal Component-Linear Discrimination Analysis (PCLDA) followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Classification efficiency of ~96.7% and 100% for normal and cancerous conditions respectively, were observed. Findings of the study corroborates earlier studies and suggest applicability of Raman spectroscopic methods in combination with appropriate multivariate tool for objective, noninvasive and rapid diagnosis of cervical cancers in Indian population. In view of encouraging results, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  6. Modeling Stimulated Raman Scattering in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Plasmas for National Ignition Facility Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, A. V.; Shaw, J. G.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.

    2017-10-01

    In the plasmas of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the coupling of laser power to the target plasma is strongly influenced by the laser-plasma interaction (LPI) processes driven by multiple crossing laser beams. For the plasma parameters relevant to the conditions of the experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the threshold of the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is usually well exceeded because of the large scale length of the plasma density, making the study of SRS vital for the NIF ICF program. The SRS evolution starts as a convective or absolute instability, and the nonlinear saturation is determined by the ion-acoustic perturbations and kinetic effects. The LPI processes of cross-beam energy transfer and two-plasmon decay also drive the ion-acoustic modes and their interplay with SRS is analyzed. This work was supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. Energy diffusion in strongly driven quantum chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elyutin, P. V.

    2006-01-01

    The energy evolution of a quantum chaotic system under a perturbation that harmonically depends on time is studied in the case of a large perturbation in which the transition rate calculated from the Fermi golden rule exceeds the frequency of the perturbation. It is shown that the energy evolution retains its diffusive character, with a diffusion coefficient that is asymptotically proportional to the magnitude of the perturbation and to the square root of the density of states. The results are supported by numerical calculation. Energy absorption by the system and quantum-classical correlations are discussed

  8. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  9. [Micro-Raman and fluorescence spectra of several agrochemicals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yi-lin; Zhang, Peng-xiang; Qian, Xiao-fan

    2004-05-01

    Raman and fluorescence spectra from several agrochemicals were measured, which are sold for the use in vegetables, fruits and grains. Characteristic vibration Raman peaks from some of the agrochemicals were recorded, hence the spectra can be used for their identification. Other marketed agrochemicals demonstrated strong fluorescence under 514.5 nm excitation. It was found that the fluorescence spectra of the agrochemicals are very different. According to these results one can detect the trace amount of agrochemicals left on the surface of fruits, vegetables and grains in situ and conveniently.

  10. Raman spectra of lithium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Bi, Dongxue; Voinov, Y. P.; Vodchits, A. I.; Gorshunov, B. P.; Yurasov, N. I.; Yurasova, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The paper is devoted to the results of investigating the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra in the lithium compounds crystals in a wide spectral range by the fibre-optic spectroscopy method. We also present the stimulated Raman scattering spectra in the lithium hydroxide and lithium deuteride crystals obtained with the use of powerful laser source. The symmetry properties of the lithium hydroxide, lithium hydroxide monohydrate and lithium deuteride crystals optical modes were analyzed by means of the irreducible representations of the point symmetry groups. We have established the selection rules in the Raman and infrared absorption spectra of LiOH, LiOH·H2O and LiD crystals.

  11. Noticeable red emission and Raman active modes in nanoscale gadolinium oxyfluoride (Gd4O3F6) systems with Eu3+ inclusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarika, Samiran; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2017-01-01

    Eu 3+ doped gadolinium oxyfluoride (Gd 4 O 3 F 6 , GOF) nanoscale systems have been synthesized following a modified Pechini method. While exhibiting a tetragonal crystal structure, the GOF nanosystem gave an average crystallite size (d) of ∝21-26 nm. The Lotgering factor (L F ), which is a measure of orientation of crystallites along the preferred direction was found to vary between 0.22 and 0.48. In the photoluminescence spectra, ∝595 and ∝613 nm peaks were identified as magnetically driven ( 5 D 0 → 7 F 1 ) and electrically driven ( 5 D 0 → 7 F 2 ) transitions with latter (red emission) being strongly manifested with Eu 3+ doping concentration and intrinsic defects. Moreover, several Raman active modes have been probed in the Raman spectra with low frequency peaks (<300 cm -1 ) and moderate frequency peaks (∝481 and 567 cm -1 ) assigned to observable vibration of heavy atom Gd-Gd pairs and Gd-O groups, respectively. Apart from manifestation of phononic features, inclusion of Eu 3+ in the host lattice would bring new insight on improving the red emission response prior to concentration quenching. (orig.)

  12. Narrow-linewidth passband filter for ultraviolet rotational Raman imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, N D; Lempert, W R; Miles, R B

    1997-04-15

    We present a narrow-passband spectral filter capable of frequency-resolved imaging of rotational Raman light scattering with strong spectral rejection of out-of-band Raman, Rayleigh, and Mie scattering. The filter is based on mercury-vapor absorption, and subsequent resonant fluorescence and has a passband of less than 1 cm(-1). It is paired with an injection-seeded, cavity-locked, frequency-tripled Ti:sapphire laser that produces >30 mJ/pulse of single-mode, tunable light in the vicinity of 253.7 nm. The laser and filter are combined to spectrally resolve scattering from individual rotational Raman lines of nitrogen and oxygen.

  13. Triplet State Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, N. H.; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1978-01-01

    Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied......Makes the first report on the resonance Raman spectrum of a molecule in its triplet state generated by pulse radiolysis. A solution of 0.01 mol dm-3 of p-terphenyl in benzene was studied...

  14. Heating by the Raman instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estabrook, K.G.; Kruer, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    Computer simulations are presented of the reflection and heating due to stimulated Raman backscatter of intense laser light in large regions of underdense plasma. The heated electron distribution is found to be approximately a Maxwellian of temperature (m/sub e//2)v/sub p/ 2 , where v/sub p/ is the phase velocity of the electron plasma wave. A simple model of the reflection is presented. Raman may cause a pre-heat problem with large laser fusion reactor targets

  15. Multi-wavelength Raman scattering of nanostructured Al-doped zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, V.; Ghidelli, M.; Gondoni, P. [Dipartimento di Energia and NEMAS, Center for Nanoengineered Materials and Surfaces, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Casari, C. S.; Li Bassi, A. [Dipartimento di Energia and NEMAS, Center for Nanoengineered Materials and Surfaces, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Center for Nano Science and Technology PoliMI, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    In this work we present a detailed Raman scattering investigation of zinc oxide and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) films characterized by a variety of nanoscale structures and morphologies and synthesized by pulsed laser deposition under different oxygen pressure conditions. The comparison of Raman spectra for pure ZnO and AZO films with similar morphology at the nano/mesoscale allows to investigate the relation between Raman features (peak or band positions, width, relative intensity) and material properties such as local structural order, stoichiometry, and doping. Moreover Raman measurements with three different excitation lines (532, 457, and 325 nm) point out a strong correlation between vibrational and electronic properties. This observation confirms the relevance of a multi-wavelength Raman investigation to obtain a complete structural characterization of advanced doped oxide materials.

  16. The Ring Monstrance from the Loreto treasury in Prague: handheld Raman spectrometer for identification of gemstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehlička, Jan; Culka, Adam; Baštová, Markéta; Bašta, Petr; Kuntoš, Jaroslav

    2016-12-13

    A miniature lightweight portable Raman spectrometer and a palm-sized device allow for fast and unambiguous detection of common gemstones mounted in complex jewels. Here, complex religious artefacts and the Ring Monstrance from the Loreto treasury (Prague, Czech Republic; eighteenth century) were investigated. These discriminations are based on the very good correspondence of the wavenumbers of the strongest Raman bands of the minerals. Very short laser illumination times and efficient collection of scattered light were sufficient to obtain strong diagnostic Raman signals. The following minerals were documented: quartz and its varieties, beryl varieties (emerald), corundum varieties (sapphire), garnets (almandine, grossular), diamond as well as aragonite in pearls. Miniature Raman spectrometers can be recommended for common gemmological work as well as for mineralogical investigations of jewels and cultural heritage objects whenever the antiquities cannot be transported to a laboratory.This article is part of the themed issue 'Raman spectroscopy in art and archaeology'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. UV Excited Photoacoustic Raman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, J. Chance [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chambers, David H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Steele, Paul T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Haugen, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heller, Don [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-11-15

    To summarize, our efforts and findings are as follows: we analyzed the theoretical system performance using known PARS theory coupled with an acoustic detector model to estimate the expected signal-­to-noise ratio (SNR). The system model comprised a mathematical model of the Raman process leading to a prediction of the temperature change in the active region; a thermoacoustic gas prediction of the radiated pressure field (amplitude and pulse shape); and the receiver response for an acoustic microphone, including a simple model of the receiver circuitry (filters, integrators, etc.). Based on the PARS experimental parameters in Appendix B, the model predicted a PARS signal with pressure peak of 7 Pa and duration slightly longer than 2 ms at a distance of 7 mm from the focal spot when acoustic dissipation is not included. An analytical model of a PARS signal with acoustic dissipation was constructed but the numerical calculation is limited to gains of <1% of the experimental value. For these lower gains, the model predicts spreading of the signal.

  18. Enhanced Raman Monitor Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenskow, Dwayne

    1996-01-01

    Monitoring of gaseous contaminants stems from the need to ensure a healthy and safe environment. NASA/Ames needs sensors that are able to monitor common atmospheric gas concentrations as well as trace amounts of contaminant gases. To provide an accurate assessment of air quality, a monitoring system would need to be continuous and on-line with full spectrum capabilities, allowing simultaneous detection of all gas components in a sample, including both combustible and non-combustible gases. The system demands a high degree of sensitivity to detect low gas concentrations in the low-ppm and sub-ppm regions. For clean and healthy air ('good' category), criteria established by the EPA requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 4 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO) in an 8 hour period, 60 ppb of ozone(O3) in a one hour period and 30 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in a 24 hour period. One step below this is the National Ambient Air Quality Standard ('moderate' category) which requires that contaminant concentrations not exceed 9 ppm of carbon monoxide (CO), 120 ppb of ozone (O3) and 140 ppb of sulfur dioxide (SO2) for their respective time periods. Ideally a monitor should be able to detect the concentrations specified in the 'good' category. To benchmark current abilities of Raman technology in gas phase analysis, laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the RASCAL II anesthetic gas monitor.

  19. Explorations of soil microbial processes driven by dissolved organic carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straathof, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    <strong>Explorations> <strong>of soil microbial processes driven by dissolved organic carbonstrong> Angela L. Straathof June 17, 2015, Wageningen UR ISBN 978-94-6257-327-7 <strong>Abstract> Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is a complex, heterogeneous mixture of C compounds which, as

  20. Evaluation of Turmeric Powder Adulterated with Metanil Yellow Using FT-Raman and FT-IR Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Schmidt, Walter; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon; Chan, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Turmeric powder (Curcuma longa L.) is valued both for its medicinal properties and for its popular culinary use, such as being a component in curry powder. Due to its high demand in international trade, turmeric powder has been subject to economically driven, hazardous chemical adulteration. This study utilized Fourier Transform-Raman (FT-Raman) and Fourier Transform-Infra Red (FT-IR) spectroscopy as separate but complementary methods for detecting metanil yellow adulteration of turmeric powd...

  1. Physical chemistry of Nanogap-Enhanced Raman Scattering (NERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Yung Doug; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2017-08-01

    Plasmonically coupled electromagnetic field localization has generated a variety of new concepts and applications, and this has been one of the hottest topics in nanoscience, materials science, chemistry, physics and engineering and increasingly more important over the last decade. In particular, plasmonically coupled nanostructures with ultra-small gap ( 1-nm or smaller) gap have been of special interest due to their ultra-strong optical properties that can be useful for a variety of signal enhancements such surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and nanoantenna. These promising nanostructures with extraordinarily strong optical signal, however, have rendered a limited success in widespread use and commercialization largely due to the lack of designing principles, high-yield synthetic strategies with nm-level structural controllability and reproducibility and lack of systematic single-molecule and single-particle level studies. All these are extremely important challenges because even small changes ( 1 nm) of the coupled nanogap structures can significant affect plasmon mode and signal intensity and therefore structural and signal reproducibility and controllability can be in question. The plasmonic nanogap-enhanced Raman scattering (NERS) is defined as the plasmonic nanogap-based Raman signal enhancement within plasmonic nanogap particles with 1 nm gap and a Raman dye positioned inside the gap.

  2. Testing strong interaction theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses possible tests of the current theories of the strong interaction, in particular, quantum chromodynamics. High energy e + e - interactions should provide an excellent means of studying the strong force. (W.D.L.)

  3. Doping of C70 fullerene peapods with lithium vapor: Raman spectroscopic and Raman spectroelectrochemical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbáč, Martin; Vales, Vaclav; Kavan, Ladislav; Dunsch, Lothar

    2014-12-01

    Raman spectroscopy and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry were applied to study the lithium vapor doping of C70@SWCNTs (peapods). A strong degree of doping was proved by the vanishing of the single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT’s) radial breathing mode (RBM) and by the attenuation of the tangential (TG) band intensity. In contrast to potassium vapor doping, the strong downshift of the frequency of the TG band has not been observed for Li-doping. The Li vapor treated peapods remained partly doped even if they were exposed to humid air. This has been reflected by a reduced intensity of the nanotube and the fullerene modes and by the change of the shape of the RBM band as compared to that of the undoped sample. The modes of the intratubular fullerene were almost unresolved after the contact of the Li-doped sample with water. A lithium insertion into the interior of a peapod and its strong interaction with the intratubular fullerene is suggested to be responsible for the air-insensitive residual doping. This residual doping was studied by spectroelectrochemical measurements. The TG band of the Li doped peapods is partly upshifted during the anodic doping, which points to the different state of C70@SWCNTs and C60@SWCNTs studied previously.

  4. Dual-modal cancer detection based on optical pH sensing and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soogeun; Lee, Seung Ho; Min, Sun Young; Byun, Kyung Min; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2017-10-01

    A dual-modal approach using Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing was investigated to discriminate between normal and cancerous tissues. Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated the potential for in vivo cancer detection. However, Raman spectroscopy has suffered from strong fluorescence background of biological samples and subtle spectral differences between normal and disease tissues. To overcome those issues, pH sensing is adopted to Raman spectroscopy as a dual-modal approach. Based on the fact that the pH level in cancerous tissues is lower than that in normal tissues due to insufficient vasculature formation, the dual-modal approach combining the chemical information of Raman spectrum and the metabolic information of pH level can improve the specificity of cancer diagnosis. From human breast tissue samples, Raman spectra and pH levels are measured using fiber-optic-based Raman and pH probes, respectively. The pH sensing is based on the dependence of pH level on optical transmission spectrum. Multivariate statistical analysis is performed to evaluate the classification capability of the dual-modal method. The analytical results show that the dual-modal method based on Raman spectroscopy and optical pH sensing can improve the performance of cancer classification.

  5. Raman Spectroscopy for Homeland Security Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Mogilevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is an analytical technique with vast applications in the homeland security and defense arenas. The Raman effect is defined by the inelastic interaction of the incident laser with the analyte molecule’s vibrational modes, which can be exploited to detect and identify chemicals in various environments and for the detection of hazards in the field, at checkpoints, or in a forensic laboratory with no contact with the substance. A major source of error that overwhelms the Raman signal is fluorescence caused by the background and the sample matrix. Novel methods are being developed to enhance the Raman signal’s sensitivity and to reduce the effects of fluorescence by altering how the hazard material interacts with its environment and the incident laser. Basic Raman techniques applicable to homeland security applications include conventional (off-resonance Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and spatially or temporally offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS and TORS. Additional emerging Raman techniques, including remote Raman detection, Raman imaging, and Heterodyne imaging, are being developed to further enhance the Raman signal, mitigate fluorescence effects, and monitor hazards at a distance for use in homeland security and defense applications.

  6. Raman fiber distributed feedback lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Paul S; Abedin, Kazi S; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Kremp, Tristan; Porque, Jerome

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate fiber distributed feedback (DFB) lasers using Raman gain in two germanosilicate fibers. Our DFB cavities were 124 mm uniform fiber Bragg gratings with a π phase shift offset from the grating center. Our pump was at 1480 nm and the DFB lasers operated on a single longitudinal mode near 1584 nm. In a commercial Raman gain fiber, the maximum output power, linewidth, and threshold were 150 mW, 7.5 MHz, and 39 W, respectively. In a commercial highly nonlinear fiber, these figures improved to 350 mW, 4 MHz, and 4.3 W, respectively. In both lasers, more than 75% of pump power was transmitted, allowing for the possibility of substantial amplification in subsequent Raman gain fiber. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  7. Theory of Graphene Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Eric J; Yang, Yuan; Kocia, Lucas; Chen, Wei; Fang, Shiang; Borunda, Mario; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-02-23

    Raman scattering plays a key role in unraveling the quantum dynamics of graphene, perhaps the most promising material of recent times. It is crucial to correctly interpret the meaning of the spectra. It is therefore very surprising that the widely accepted understanding of Raman scattering, i.e., Kramers-Heisenberg-Dirac theory, has never been applied to graphene. Doing so here, a remarkable mechanism we term"transition sliding" is uncovered, explaining the uncommon brightness of overtones in graphene. Graphene's dispersive and fixed Raman bands, missing bands, defect density and laser frequency dependence of band intensities, widths of overtone bands, Stokes, anti-Stokes anomalies, and other known properties emerge simply and directly.

  8. Higher order mode optical fiber Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations.......We review higher order mode Raman amplifiers and discuss recent theoretical as well as experimental results including system demonstrations....

  9. Field Raman spectrograph for environmental analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrabba, M.M.

    1995-03-01

    The use of Raman Spectroscopy in the screening of soils, ground water, and surface waters for pollutants is described. A probe accessory for conducting surface enhanced Raman Spectroscopy is undergoing testing for dilute chlorinated solvents.

  10. Raman and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy in Mineral Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, J. W.

    2014-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy is particularly useful for rapid identification of minerals and gemstones. Raman spectrometers also allow PL studies for authentication of samples and geological provenance, diamond type screening and detection of HPHT treatments.

  11. Raman spectroscopy in solid state physics and material science. Theory, techniques and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucazeau, G.; Abello, L.

    1995-01-01

    After a brief survey of the basic concepts of Raman scattering, we shall underline the specificities of the Raman spectroscopy as a characterization tool of solid materials. Most of the examples presented here have been selected among results which have been obtained recently in our laboratory. The micro-Raman technique provides a convenient way for investigating heterogeneities in ceramics and thin films. As a first example we show how the electric properties of the pure an doped BaCeO 3 perovskites are strongly dominated by the different phase transitions which take place in these compounds. We show in particular the advantage of the coupling of impedance and Raman spectroscopy when studying the influence of the chemical composition of the atmospheres and of the temperature on the electric properties of the ceramic. Unexpectedly, new concepts for explaining the phase transition mechanism in this structural family are provided by this study. A second example is borrowed from the characterization of a film made of a protonic conductor-doped polymer. A second kind of structural information which can be delivered by micro-Raman spectroscopy is related to the characterization of thermo-mechanical stresses in thin films of semi-conducting compounds in the Si-Ge system. It is well known that the gap and thus the electric properties are strongly dependent on the stress state of the material. The stress field induced either by an indenter, by a controlled flexion or by laser heating has been studied by Raman spectroscopy and is presented here. The pulsed Raman spectroscopy offers the possibility to characterize samples in strongly emissive atmospheres or submitted to strong perturbations of a short duration. The in situ characterization of diamond films in a plasma-assisted CVD reactor is briefly mentioned, another example is provided by a crystal of LaF 3 in which on a nanosecond scale different fluorescence processes are time-resolved and separated from the Raman

  12. Low-loss tunable all-in-fiber filter for Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara; Scolari, Lara; Lund-Hansen, Toke

    2011-01-01

    We show a novel in-line Rayleigh-rejection filter for Raman spectroscopy, based on a solid-core Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF) filled with a high-index material. The device is low-loss and thermally tunable, and allows for a strong attenuation of the Rayleigh line at 532nm and the transmission...... of the Raman lines in a broad wavenumber range....

  13. Chiral Topological Orders in an Optical Raman Lattice (Open Source)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    system. In otherwords, the topology is not changed under the C4ˆ transformation in position and (pseudo)spin space R, e 2 , 144 4 1 4 i 4 4 z...PAPER • OPEN ACCESS Chiral topological orders in an optical Raman lattice To cite this article: Xiong-Jun Liu et al 2016 New J. Phys. 18...P Öhberg et al. - Physics of higher orbital bands in optical lattices: a review Xiaopeng Li and W Vincent Liu - Interaction-driven topological and

  14. Challenges in higher order mode Raman amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Nielsen, Kristian; Friis, Søren Michael Mørk

    2015-01-01

    A higher order Raman amplifier model that take random mode coupling into account ispresented. Mode dependent gain and signal power fluctuations at the output of the higher order modeRaman amplifier are discussed......A higher order Raman amplifier model that take random mode coupling into account ispresented. Mode dependent gain and signal power fluctuations at the output of the higher order modeRaman amplifier are discussed...

  15. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  16. Raman Lidar MERGE Value-Added Product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newsom, Rob [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Goldsmith, John [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sivaraman, Chitra [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-04-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Raman lidars (RLs) are semi-autonomous, land-based, laser remote sensing systems that provide height- and time-resolved measurements of water vapor mixing ratio, temperature, aerosol backscatter, extinction, and linear depolarization ratio from about 200 m to greater than 10 km AGL. These systems transmit at a wavelength of 355 nm with 300 mJ, ~5 ns pulses, and a pulse repetition frequency of 30 Hz. The receiver incorporates nine detection channels, including two water vapor channels at 408 nm, two nitrogen channels at 387 nm, three elastic channels, and two rotational Raman channels for temperature profiling at 354 and 353 nm. Figure 1 illustrates the layout of the ARM RL receiver system. Backscattered light from the atmosphere enters the telescope and is directed into the receiver system (i.e., aft optics). This signal is then split between a narrow-field-of-view radiometer (NFOV) path (blue) and a wide-field-of-view zenith radiometer (WFOV) path (red). The WFOV (2 mrad) path contains three channels (water vapor, nitrogen, and unpolarized elastic), and the NFOV (0.3 mrad) path contains six channels (water vapor, nitrogen, parallel and perpendicular elastic, and two rotational Raman). All nine detection channels use Electron Tubes 9954B photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The signals from each of the nine PMTs are acquired using transient data recorders from Licel GbR (Berlin, Germany). The Licel data recorders provide simultaneous measurements of both analog photomultiplier current and photon counts at height resolution of 7.5 m and a time resolution of 10 s. The analog signal provides good linearity in the strong signal regime, but poor sensitivity at low signal levels. Conversely, the photo counting signal provides good sensitivity in the weak signal regime, but is strongly nonlinear at higher signal levels. The advantage in recording both signals is that they can be

  17. Quantitative Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of carrot bioactives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, Daniel P; Sansom, Catherine E; Lill, Ross E; Eason, Jocelyn R; Gordon, Keith C; Perry, Nigel B

    2013-03-20

    Rapid quantitative near-infrared Fourier transform Raman analyses of the key phytonutrients in carrots, polyacetylenes and carotenoids, are reported here for the first time. Solvent extracts of 31 carrot lines were analyzed for these phytonutrients by conventional methods, polyacetylenes by GC-FID and carotenoids by visible spectrophotometry. Carotenoid concentrations were 0-5586 μg g(-1) dry weight (DW). Polyacetylene concentrations were 74-4846 μg g(-1) DW, highest in wild carrots. The polyacetylenes were falcarinol, 6-1237 μg g(-1) DW; falcarindiol, 42-3475 μg g(-1) DW; and falcarindiol 3-acetate, 27-649 μg g(-1) DW. Strong Raman bands for carotenoids gave good correlation to results by visible spectrophotometry. A chemometric model capable of quantitating carotenoids from Raman data was developed. A classification model for rapidly distinguishing carrots with high and low polyacetylene (limit of detection = 1400 μg g(-1)) concentrations based on Raman spectral intensity in the region of 2250 cm(-1) was produced.

  18. Raman spectroscopy on simple molecular systems at very high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiferl, D.; LeSar, R.S.; Moore, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    We present an overview of how Raman spectroscopy is done on simple molecular substances at high pressures. Raman spectroscopy is one of the most powerful tools for studying these substances. It is often the quickest means to explore changes in crystal and molecular structures, changes in bond strength, and the formation of new chemical species. Raman measurements have been made at pressures up to 200 GPa (2 Mbar). Even more astonishing is the range of temperatures (4-5200/degree/K) achieved in various static and dynamic (shock-wave) pressure experiments. One point we particularly wish to emphasize is the need for a good theoretical understanding to properly interpret and use experimental results. This is particularly true at ultra-high pressures, where strong crystal field effects can be misinterpreted as incipient insulator-metal transitions. We have tried to point out apparatus, techniques, and results that we feel are particularly noteworthy. We have also included some of the /open quotes/oral tradition/close quotes/ of high pressure Raman spectroscopy -- useful little things that rarely or never appear in print. Because this field is rapidly expanding, we discuss a number of exciting new techniques that have been informally communicated to us, especially those that seem to open new possibilities. 58 refs., 18 figs

  19. Raman diagnostics of silicon nanocrystals dissolution in aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alykova, A. F.; Zavestovskaya, I. N.; Yakunin, V. G.; Timoshenko, V. Yu

    2018-01-01

    Raman scattering in ensembles of silicon (Si) nanocrystals (NCs), which were prepared by differed methods and then stored in an aqueous medium, was studied to reveal features of the Si NC dissolution process. Arrays of crystalline Si nanowires, mesoporous Si nanoparticles and spherical Si NCs have been analyzed after exposure in water during dialysis for elimination of the dissolution products from the medium. According to the one-phonon Raman spectroscopy the Si nanowires with cross-section size of the order of 100 nm were resistant to the dissolution process both in water and physiological saline for 2 weeks at least. The storage of mesoporous Si nanoparticles in water for 1 day resulted in a strong decrease of the Raman intensity and a low energy shift of the Raman spectrum, which was explained by size reduction of Si NCs below 10 nm. Si NCs with the initial size distribution from 5 to 100 nm after exposure in water during 24 hours revealed a decrease in the contribution of small NCs that narrowed the size distribution. The obtained results can be used in order to choose appropriate type of Si NPs for biomedical applications.

  20. Raman spectrometer with microprobe capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, J. T.; Jackson, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    This report describes the results of this equipment grant funded as a part of the Department of Defense (DOD) University Research Instrumentation Program. This grant funded the purchase of a Raman spectrometer with microprobe capability having resolution of 1.0 micron. This report describes the equipment selecting decision, the configuration of the instrument selected, and some experimental results. The experimental results include Raman spectra used in characterization of laser recrystallized silicon and ion implanted regions in semi-insulating GaAs. The Raman microprobe can be used to characterize the effects of substrate temperature, beam power density and shape, beam scan speed and direction, deposition rate, substrate seeding, and polysilicon encapsulation schemes both near and away from grain boundaries. The frequency shift and the peak width of the Raman scattering from the triply degenerate zone center phonon in Si allow determination of the strain in the grains of laser recrystallized polysilicon. Reducing these strains will allow us to achieve large single grains of device quality.

  1. Inverse Raman effect: applications and detection techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, L.J. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The processes underlying the inverse Raman effect are qualitatively described by comparing it to the more familiar phenomena of conventional and stimulated Raman scattering. An experession is derived for the inverse Raman absorption coefficient, and its relationship to the stimulated Raman gain is obtained. The power requirements of the two fields are examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The assumption that the inverse Raman absorption coefficient is constant over the interaction length is examined. Advantages of the technique are discussed and a brief survey of reported studies is presented

  2. Inverse Raman effect: applications and detection techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, L.J. Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The processes underlying the inverse Raman effect are qualitatively described by comparing it to the more familiar phenomena of conventional and stimulated Raman scattering. An experession is derived for the inverse Raman absorption coefficient, and its relationship to the stimulated Raman gain is obtained. The power requirements of the two fields are examined qualitatively and quantitatively. The assumption that the inverse Raman absorption coefficient is constant over the interaction length is examined. Advantages of the technique are discussed and a brief survey of reported studies is presented.

  3. Moderately strong pump-induced ultrafast dynamics in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, H.F. [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Zhang, Yizhu, E-mail: zhangyz@sari.ac.cn [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Yan, T.-M., E-mail: yantm@sari.ac.cn [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Wang, Z.Y. [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University (China); Jiang, Y.H., E-mail: jiangyh@sari.ac.cn [Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University (China)

    2016-09-12

    Graphical abstract: Moderately strong pump pulse is applied to the transient absorption spectrum. The pump and dump processes (resonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering) finished in one single pump pulse in moderately strong regime make the observation of high-lying excited state dynamics possible. - Highlights: • The pulse intensity in transient absorption spectrum are experimentally studied. • The higher nonlinear susceptibility responses are observed. • The resonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering. • New dynamics information in strong pump field. - Abstract: The transient transmittance spectra of laser dye IR144 in methanol were investigated experimentally in the moderately strong pump-probe field. Observed emission spectra in the red edge of the incident-field bandwidth, created by resonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering (RISRS), display significant nonlinear intensity dependence as the pulse intensity increases. Dynamic perspectives of RISRS spectra can be understood well in a wavepacket picture. The excitation of high vibrational levels in the ground electronic state leading to the redshift of emissions presents high dependence of the pump-pulse intensity and ultrafast dynamical features, mapping the spatial overlap and separation of ground and excited wave functions and resolving the ultrafast vibrational relaxation in the femtosecond regime.

  4. Raman spectroscopy of bone metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Sottnik, Joseph; Morris, Michael; Keller, Evan

    2012-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy of bone has been used to characterize chemical changes occurring in diseases such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis and osteomyelitis. Metastasis of cancer into bone causes changes to bone quality that are similar to those observed in osteoporosis, such as decreased bone strength, but with an accelerated timeframe. In particular, osteolytic (bone degrading) lesions in bone metastasis have a marked effect on patient quality of life because of increased risk of fractures, pain, and hypercalcemia. We use Raman spectroscopy to examine bone from two different mouse models of osteolytic bone metastasis. Raman spectroscopy measures physicochemical information which cannot be obtained through standard biochemical and histological measurements. This study was reviewed and approved by the University of Michigan University Committee on the Care and Use of Animals. Two mouse models of prostate cancer bone metastasis, RM1 (n=3) and PC3-luc (n=4) were examined. Tibiae were injected with RM1 or PC3-luc cancer cells, while the contralateral tibiae received a placebo injection for use as controls. After 2 weeks of incubation, the mice were sacrificed and the tibiae were examined by Raman microspectroscopy (λ=785 nm). Spectroscopic markers corresponding to mineral stoichiometry, bone mineralization, and mineral crystallinity were compared in spectra from the cancerous and control tibiae. X-ray imaging of the tibia confirmed extensive osteolysis in the RM1 mice, with tumor invasion into adjoining soft tissue and moderate osteolysis in the PC3-luc mice. Raman spectroscopic markers indicate that osteolytic lesions are less mineralized than normal bone tissue, with an altered mineral stoichiometry and crystallinity.

  5. Sum-Frequency-Generation-Based Laser Sidebands for Tunable Femtosecond Raman Spectroscopy in the Ultraviolet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangdong Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS is an emerging molecular structural dynamics technique for functional materials characterization typically in the visible to near-IR range. To expand its applications we have developed a versatile FSRS setup in the ultraviolet region. We use the combination of a narrowband, ~400 nm Raman pump from a home-built second harmonic bandwidth compressor and a tunable broadband probe pulse from sum-frequency-generation-based cascaded four-wave mixing (SFG-CFWM laser sidebands in a thin BBO crystal. The ground state Raman spectrum of a laser dye Quinolon 390 in methanol that strongly absorbs at ~355 nm is systematically studied as a standard sample to provide previously unavailable spectroscopic characterization in the vibrational domain. Both the Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman spectra can be collected by selecting different orders of SFG-CFWM sidebands as the probe pulse. The stimulated Raman gain with the 402 nm Raman pump is >21 times larger than that with the 550 nm Raman pump when measured at the 1317 cm−1 peak for the aromatic ring deformation and ring-H rocking mode of the dye molecule, demonstrating that pre-resonance enhancement is effectively achieved in the unique UV-FSRS setup. This added tunability in the versatile and compact optical setup enables FSRS to better capture transient conformational snapshots of photosensitive molecules that absorb in the UV range.

  6. Monosodium glutamate in its anhydrous and monohydrate form: Differentiation by Raman spectroscopies and density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peica, N.; Lehene, C.; Leopold, N.; Schlücker, S.; Kiefer, W.

    2007-03-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG), a common flavor enhancer, is detected in aqueous solutions by Raman and surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectroscopies at the micromolar level. The presence of different species, such as protonated and unprotonated MSG, is demonstrated by concentration and pH dependent Raman and SERS experiments. In particular, the symmetric bending modes of the amino group and the stretching modes of the carboxy moiety are employed as marker bands. The protonation of the NH 2 group at acidic pH values, for example, is detected in the Raman spectra. From the measured SERS spectra, a strong chemical interaction of MSG with the colloidal particles is deduced and a geometry of MSG adsorbed on the silver surface is proposed. In order to assign the observed Raman bands, calculations employing density functional theory (DFT) were performed. The calculated geometries, harmonic vibrational wavenumbers and Raman scattering activities for both MSG forms are in good agreement with experimental data. The set of theoretical data enables a complete vibrational assignment of the experimentally detected Raman spectra and the differentiation between the anhydrous and monohydrate forms of MSG.

  7. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials...in which a topologically nontrivial quasi-flat band is fractionally filled and then subject to strong interactions. The views, opinions and/or

  8. Strong Cosmic Censorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, James

    2017-01-01

    The Hawking-Penrose theorems tell us that solutions of Einstein's equations are generally singular, in the sense of the incompleteness of causal geodesics (the paths of physical observers). These singularities might be marked by the blowup of curvature and therefore crushing tidal forces, or by the breakdown of physical determinism. Penrose has conjectured (in his `Strong Cosmic Censorship Conjecture`) that it is generically unbounded curvature that causes singularities, rather than causal breakdown. The verification that ``AVTD behavior'' (marked by the domination of time derivatives over space derivatives) is generically present in a family of solutions has proven to be a useful tool for studying model versions of Strong Cosmic Censorship in that family. I discuss some of the history of Strong Cosmic Censorship, and then discuss what is known about AVTD behavior and Strong Cosmic Censorship in families of solutions defined by varying degrees of isometry, and discuss recent results which we believe will extend this knowledge and provide new support for Strong Cosmic Censorship. I also comment on some of the recent work on ``Weak Null Singularities'', and how this relates to Strong Cosmic Censorship.

  9. Noticeable red emission and Raman active modes in nanoscale gadolinium oxyfluoride (Gd{sub 4}O{sub 3}F{sub 6}) systems with Eu{sup 3+} inclusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazarika, Samiran; Mohanta, Dambarudhar [Tezpur University, Nanoscience and Soft Matter Laboratory, Department of Physics, Tezpur, Assam (India)

    2017-05-15

    Eu{sup 3+} doped gadolinium oxyfluoride (Gd{sub 4}O{sub 3}F{sub 6}, GOF) nanoscale systems have been synthesized following a modified Pechini method. While exhibiting a tetragonal crystal structure, the GOF nanosystem gave an average crystallite size (d) of ∝21-26 nm. The Lotgering factor (L{sub F}), which is a measure of orientation of crystallites along the preferred direction was found to vary between 0.22 and 0.48. In the photoluminescence spectra, ∝595 and ∝613 nm peaks were identified as magnetically driven ({sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 1}) and electrically driven ({sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 2}) transitions with latter (red emission) being strongly manifested with Eu{sup 3+} doping concentration and intrinsic defects. Moreover, several Raman active modes have been probed in the Raman spectra with low frequency peaks (<300 cm{sup -1}) and moderate frequency peaks (∝481 and 567 cm{sup -1}) assigned to observable vibration of heavy atom Gd-Gd pairs and Gd-O groups, respectively. Apart from manifestation of phononic features, inclusion of Eu{sup 3+} in the host lattice would bring new insight on improving the red emission response prior to concentration quenching. (orig.)

  10. Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering for Biofilm Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Keleştemur

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are a communal way of living for microorganisms in which microorganism cells are surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS. Most microorganisms can live in biofilm form. Since microorganisms are everywhere, understanding biofilm structure and composition is crucial for making the world a better place to live, not only for humans but also for other living creatures. Raman spectroscopy is a nondestructive technique and provides fingerprint information about an analyte of interest. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is a form of this technique and provides enhanced scattering of the analyte that is in close vicinity of a nanostructured noble metal surface such as silver or gold. In this review, the applications of both techniques and their combination with other biofilm analysis techniques for characterization of composition and structure of biofilms are discussed.

  11. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  12. Analytical modeling of mid-infrared silicon Raman lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, J.; Fathpour, S.

    2012-01-01

    Silicon photonics has significantly matured in the near-infrared (telecommunication) wavelength range with several commercial products already in the market. More recently, the technology has been extended into the mid-infrared (mid- IR) regime with potential applications in biochemical sensing, tissue photoablation, environmental monitoring and freespace communications. The key advantage of silicon in the mid-IR, as compared with near-IR, is the absence of twophoton absorption (TPA) and free-carrier absorption (FCA). The absence of these nonlinear losses would potentially lead to high-performance nonlinear devices based on Raman and Kerr effects. Also, with the absence of TPA and FCA, the coupled-wave equations that are usually numerically solved to model these nonlinear devices lend themselves to analytical solutions in the mid-IR. In this paper, an analytical model for mid-IR silicon Raman lasers is developed. The validity of the model is confirmed by comparing it with numerical solutions of the coupled-wave equations. The developed model can be used as a versatile and efficient tool for analysis, design and optimization of mid-IR silicon Raman lasers, or to find good initial guesses for numerical methods. The effects of cavity parameters, such as cavity length and facet reflectivities, on the lasing threshold and input-output characteristics of the Raman laser are studied. For instance, for a propagation loss of 0.5 dB/cm, conversion efficiencies as high as 56% is predicted. The predicted optimum cavity (waveguide) length at 2.0 dB/cm propagation loss is { 3.4 mm. The results of this study predict strong prospects for mid-IR silicon Raman lasers for the mentioned applications.

  13. Raman spectroscopic study of solid solution spinel oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosterman, Brian D.

    Solid solution spinel oxides of composition MgxNi1-x Cr2O4, NiFexCr2-xO 4, and FexCr3-xO4 were synthesized and characterized using x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Frequencies of the Raman-active modes are tracked as the metal cations within the spinel lattice are exchanged. This gives information about the dependence of the lattice vibrations on the tetrahedral and octahedral cations. The highest frequency Raman-active mode, A1g, is unaffected by substitution of the divalent tetrahedral cation, whereas the lower frequency vibrations are more strongly affected by substitution of the tetrahedral cation. The change in frequency of many phonons is nonlinear upon cation exchange. All detected modes of MgxNi1-xCr2O4 and FexCr3-xO4 exhibit one-mode behavior. Additional modes are detected in NiFexCr2-xO4 due to cation inversion of the spinel lattice. Results from the FexCr3-xO4 spinels are applied to identifying the corrosion layers of several stainless steel samples exposed to lead-bismuth eutectic in a high-temperature, oxygen controlled environment. The Raman spectrum of the outer corrosion layer in all steels is identified as Fe3O4. The position of the A 1g mode for the inner corrosion layer indicates an iron chromium spinel oxide. Micro-Raman spectroscopy proves capable of determining structural and compositional differences between complex corrosion layers of stainless steels.

  14. Coral calcifying fluid aragonite saturation states derived from Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarlo, Thomas M.; D'Olivo, Juan P.; Foster, Taryn; Holcomb, Michael; Becker, Thomas; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2017-11-01

    Quantifying the saturation state of aragonite (ΩAr) within the calcifying fluid of corals is critical for understanding their biomineralization process and sensitivity to environmental changes including ocean acidification. Recent advances in microscopy, microprobes, and isotope geochemistry enable the determination of calcifying fluid pH and [CO32-], but direct quantification of ΩAr (where ΩAr = [CO32-][Ca2+]/Ksp) has proved elusive. Here we test a new technique for deriving ΩAr based on Raman spectroscopy. First, we analysed abiogenic aragonite crystals precipitated under a range of ΩAr from 10 to 34, and we found a strong dependence of Raman peak width on ΩAr with no significant effects of other factors including pH, Mg/Ca partitioning, and temperature. Validation of our Raman technique for corals is difficult because there are presently no direct measurements of calcifying fluid ΩAr available for comparison. However, Raman analysis of the international coral standard JCp-1 produced ΩAr of 12.3 ± 0.3, which we demonstrate is consistent with published skeletal Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, B/Ca, δ11B, and δ44Ca data. Raman measurements are rapid ( ≤ 1 s), high-resolution ( ≤ 1 µm), precise (derived ΩAr ± 1 to 2 per spectrum depending on instrument configuration), accurate ( ±2 if ΩAr Great Barrier Reef, and we evaluate the response of ΩAr in juvenile Acropora cultured under elevated CO2 and temperature.

  15. Detection and characterization of chemical aerosol using laser-trapping single-particle Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalume, Aimable; Beresnev, Leonid A; Santarpia, Joshua; Pan, Yong-Le

    2017-08-10

    Detection and characterization of the presence of chemical agent aerosols in various complex atmospheric environments is an essential defense mission. Raman spectroscopy has the ability to identify chemical molecules, but there are limited numbers of photons detectable from single airborne aerosol particles as they are flowing through a detection system. In this paper, we report on a single-particle Raman spectrometer system that can measure strong spontaneous, stimulated, and resonance Raman spectral peaks from a single laser-trapped chemical aerosol particle, such as a droplet of the VX nerve agent chemical simulant diethyl phthalate. Using this system, time-resolved Raman spectra and elastic scattered intensities were recorded to monitor the chemical properties and size variation of the trapped particle. Such a system supplies a new approach for the detection and characterization of single airborne chemical aerosol particles.

  16. Developer Driven and User Driven Usability Evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Anders

    2013-01-01

    to measure performance of usability evaluation efforts. These criteria cover thoroughness, validity, reliability, downstream utility and cost effectiveness. This leads to my overall research question: Can we provide support that enables software development practitioners and users to drive usability...... evaluations, and how do they perform with respect to the quality criteria? I studied the developer driven and user driven approaches by firstly conducting literature surveys related to each of these topics followed by artificial settings research and finally by conducting research in natural settings....... The four primary findings from my studies are: 1) The developer driven approach reveals a high level of thoroughness and downstream utility. 2) The user driven approach has higher performance regarding validity 3) The level of reliability is comparable between the two approaches. 4) The user driven...

  17. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  18. Stimulated Raman Scattering Imposes Fundamental Limits to the Duration and Bandwidth of Temporal Cavity Solitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yadong; Anderson, Miles; Coen, Stéphane; Murdoch, Stuart G.; Erkintalo, Miro

    2018-02-01

    Temporal cavity solitons (CS) are optical pulses that can persist in passive resonators, and they play a key role in the generation of coherent microresonator frequency combs. In resonators made of amorphous materials, such as fused silica, they can exhibit a spectral redshift due to stimulated Raman scattering. Here we show that this Raman-induced self-frequency-shift imposes a fundamental limit on the duration and bandwidth of temporal CSs. Specifically, we theoretically predict that stimulated Raman scattering introduces a previously unidentified Hopf bifurcation that leads to destabilization of CSs at large pump-cavity detunings, limiting the range of detunings over which they can exist. We have confirmed our theoretical predictions by performing extensive experiments in synchronously driven fiber ring resonators, obtaining results in excellent agreement with numerical simulations. Our results could have significant implications for the future design of Kerr frequency comb systems based on amorphous microresonators.

  19. Precision of Raman Spectroscopy Measurements in Detection of Microcalcifications in Breast Needle Biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Anushree; Barman, Ishan; Dingari, Narahara Chari; Galindo, Luis H.; Sattar, Abdus; Liu, Wendy; Plecha, Donna; Klein, Nina; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Fitzmaurice, Maryann

    2012-01-01

    Microcalcifications are an early mammographic sign of breast cancer and a target for stereotactic breast needle biopsy. We developed Raman spectroscopy decision algorithms to detect breast microcalcifications, based on fit coefficients (FC) derived by modeling tissue Raman spectra as a linear combination of the Raman spectra of 9 chemical and morphologic components of breast tissue. However, little or no information is available on the precision of such measurements and its effect on the ability of Raman spectroscopy to make predictions for breast microcalcification detection. Here we report the precision, that is, the closeness of agreement between replicate Raman spectral measurements - and the model FC derived from them - obtained ex vivo from fresh breast biopsies from patients undergoing stereotactic breast needle biopsy, using a compact clinical Raman system. The coefficients of variation of the model FC averaged 0.03 for normal breast tissue sites, 0.12 for breast lesions without and 0.22 for breast lesions with microcalcifications. Imprecision in the FC resulted in diagnostic discordance among replicates only for line-sitters, that is, tissue sites with FC values near the decision line or plane. The source of this imprecision and their implications for the use of Raman spectroscopy for guidance of stereotactic breast biopsies for microcalcifications are also discussed. In summary, we conclude that the precision of Raman spectroscopy measurements in breast tissue obtained using our compact clinical system is more than adequate to make accurate and repeatable predictions of microcalcifications in breast tissue using decision algorithms based on model FC. This provides strong evidence of the potential of Raman spectroscopy guidance of stereotactic breast needle biopsies for microcalcifications. PMID:22746329

  20. Strong Arcwise Connectedness

    OpenAIRE

    Espinoza, Benjamin; Gartside, Paul; Kovan-Bakan, Merve; Mamatelashvili, Ana

    2012-01-01

    A space is `n-strong arc connected' (n-sac) if for any n points in the space there is an arc in the space visiting them in order. A space is omega-strong arc connected (omega-sac) if it is n-sac for all n. We study these properties in finite graphs, regular continua, and rational continua. There are no 4-sac graphs, but there are 3-sac graphs and graphs which are 2-sac but not 3-sac. For every n there is an n-sac regular continuum, but no regular continuum is omega-sac. There is an omega-sac ...

  1. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally......'s scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims....

  2. Raman spectroscopy peer review report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkelman, W.D.; Eberlein, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    The Hanford Site in eastern Washington includes 177 underground storage tanks (UST), which contain waste materials produced during the production of nuclear fuels. The materials in the tanks must be characterized to support the retrieval, processing, and final disposition of the waste. Characterization is currently performed by removing waste samples for analyses in a hot cell or laboratory. A review of the Hanford Raman Spectroscopy Program was held in Richland on March 23 and 24, 1994. A team of principal investigators and researchers made presentations that covered both technical and programmatic aspects of the Hanford Site Raman work. After these presentations and discussions, the review panel met in a closed session to formalize a list of findings. The reviewers agreed that Raman spectroscopy is an excellent method to attack the tank waste characterization and screening problems that were presented. They agreed that there was a good chance that the method would be successful as presently envisioned. The reviewers provided the following primary recommendations: evaluation a laser with wavelength in the near infrared; provide optical filters at or near the sampling end of the fiber-optic probe; develop and implement a strategy for frequent calibration of the system; do not try to further increase Raman resolution at the expense of wavelength range; clearly identify and differentiate between requirements for providing a short-term operational system and requirements for optimizing a system for long-term field use; and determine the best optical configuration, which may include reduced fiber-optic diameter and/or short focal length and low F-number spectrographs

  3. Raman spectroscopic studies on bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquelin, Kees; Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Endtz, Hubert P.; Bruining, Hajo A.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    2000-11-01

    Routine clinical microbiological identification of pathogenic micro-organisms is largely based on nutritional and biochemical tests. Laboratory results can be presented to a clinician after 2 - 3 days for most clinically relevant micro- organisms. Most of this time is required to obtain pure cultures and enough biomass for the tests to be performed. In the case of severely ill patients, this unavoidable time delay associated with such identification procedures can be fatal. A novel identification method based on confocal Raman microspectroscopy will be presented. With this method it is possible to obtain Raman spectra directly from microbial microcolonies on the solid culture medium, which have developed after only 6 hours of culturing for most commonly encountered organisms. Not only does this technique enable rapid (same day) identifications, but also preserves the sample allowing it to be double-checked with traditional tests. This, combined with the speed and minimal sample handling indicate that confocal Raman microspectroscopy has much potential as a powerful new tool in clinical diagnostic microbiology.

  4. Single Molecule Raman Detection of Enkephalin on Silver Colloidal Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Holger; Abdali, Salim

    2004-01-01

    Enkephalin, an endogeneous substance in the human brain showing morphine-like biological functions, has been detected at the single molecule level based on the surface-enhanced Raman signal of the ring breathing mode of phenylalanine, which is one building block of the molecule. For enhancing...... the Raman signal the enkephalin molecules have been attached to silver colloidal cluster structures. The experiments demonstrate that the SERS signal of the strongly enhanced ring breathing vibration of phenylalanine at 1000 cm-1 can be used as “intrinsic marker” for detecting a single enkephalin molecule...... and for monitoring its diffusion on the surface of the silver colloidal cluster without using a specific label molecule....

  5. Sensitive metal ions (II) determination with resonance Raman method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhi; Bracero, Lucas A.; Chen, Lei; Song, Wei; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Bing

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a new proposal for the quantitative evaluation of divalent metal ions (M2+) is developed by the use of the competitive resonance Raman (RR)-based method. Upon excitation with light of the appropriate wavelength (532 nm), a strong electric field is generated that couples with the resonance of the complex (zincon-M2+), increasing the character signals of these complexes, resulting in sensitive detection. Herein, the RR probe, zincon-M2+ complex that the RR intensity gets lower with the decreasing of the M2+ concentration, which leads to the transformation of the Raman information. As a result, by using the proposed RR-based method, we could find the liner calibration curves of Cu2+ and Ni2+, which show the potential in quantitative evaluation of an unknown sample. In addition, the abundant fingerprint information shows that RR leads to the successful analysis of a blended solution, which contains two ions: Cu2+ and Ni2+.

  6. Unveiling the structure of polytetraruthenated nickel porphyrin by Raman spectroelectrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Luís M C; Grasseschi, Daniel; Santos, Mauro S F; Martins, Paulo R; Gutz, Ivano G R; Ferreira, Ana Maria C; Araki, Koiti; Toma, Henrique E; Angnes, Lúcio

    2015-04-14

    The structure of polytetraruthenated nickel porphyrin was unveiled for the first time by electrochemistry, Raman spectroelectrochemistry, and a hydroxyl radical trapping assay. The electrocatalytic active material, precipitated on the electrode surface after successive cycling of [NiTPyP{Ru(bipy)2Cl}4](4+) species in strong aqueous alkaline solution (pH 13), was found to be a peroxo-bridged coordination polymer. The electropolymerization process involves hydroxyl radicals (as confirmed by the characteristic set of DMPO/(•)OH adduct EPR peaks) as reaction intermediates, electrocatalytically generated in the 0.80-1.10 V range, that induce the formation of Ni-O-O-Ni coordination polymers, as evidenced by Raman spectroelectrochemistry and molecular modeling studies. The film growth is halted above 1.10 V due to the formation of oxygen gas bubbles.

  7. A strong comeback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marier, D.

    1992-01-01

    This article presents the results of a financial rankings survey which show a strong economic activity in the independent energy industry. The topics of the article include advisor turnover, overseas banks, and the increase in public offerings. The article identifies the top project finance investors for new projects and restructurings and rankings for lenders

  8. Discrimination of selected species of pathogenic bacteria using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy and principal components analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Siqueira e Oliveira, Fernanda SantAna; Giana, Hector Enrique; Silveira, Landulfo

    2012-10-01

    A method, based on Raman spectroscopy, for identification of different microorganisms involved in bacterial urinary tract infections has been proposed. Spectra were collected from different bacterial colonies (Gram-negative: Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae, and Gram-positive: Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus spp.), grown on culture medium (agar), using a Raman spectrometer with a fiber Raman probe (830 nm). Colonies were scraped from the agar surface and placed on an aluminum foil for Raman measurements. After preprocessing, spectra were submitted to a principal component analysis and Mahalanobis distance (PCA/MD) discrimination algorithm. We found that the mean Raman spectra of different bacterial species show similar bands, and S. aureus was well characterized by strong bands related to carotenoids. PCA/MD could discriminate Gram-positive bacteria with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and Gram-negative bacteria with sensitivity ranging from 58 to 88% and specificity ranging from 87% to 99%.

  9. Spatially dependent Rabi oscillations: An approach to sub-diffraction-limited coherent anti-Stokes Raman-scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeker, Willem; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.; Gross, P.; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) that is modulated by periodically depleting the ground-state population through Rabi oscillations driven by an additional control laser. We find that such a process generates optical sidebands in the CARS spectrum

  10. Design of an 1800 nm Raman Amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    , also extended band amplifiers are required. As a solution to the latter challenge, Raman amplifiers are suggested as promising candidates. The main hurdle when designing a long wavelength Raman amplifier is the increased intrinsic fiber attenuation which as a consequence leads to an increase...... in the pump power requirement and deteriorated noise properties. Here we demonstrate a Raman amplifier designed for signal wavelengths around 1800 nm. The amplification fiber is an OFS PM Raman fiber, and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser emitting at 1680 nm [4]. The amplifier was pumped co......-polarized and backward, with respect to the singal. In Fig. 2 a measured Raman on/off gain exceeding 9 dB for 285 mW of injected pump power is obtained in a 4.35 km long fiber. A broadband supercontinuum source was used as a signal from 1700 nm to 1900 nm....

  11. Design of an 1800nm Raman amplifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    We present the experimental results for a Raman amplifier that operates at 1810 nm and is pumped by a Raman fiber laser at 1680 nm. Both the pump laser and the Raman amplifier is polarization maintaining. A challenge when scaling Raman amplifiers to longer wavelengths is the increase...... in transmission loss, but also the reduction in the Raman gain coefficient as the amplifier wavelength is increased. Both polarization components of the Raman gain is characterized, initially for linearly co-polarized signal and pump, subsequently linearly polarized orthogonal signal and pump. The noise...... performance of the amplifier is also investigated for both configurations. Our results show an on/off gain exceeding 20 dB at 1810 nm for which the obtained effective noise figure is below 3 dB....

  12. On fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aagren, O; Moiseenko, V.E.; Noack, K.

    2008-10-01

    This report gives a brief description of ongoing activities on fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation of the long-lived radioactive isotopes in the spent nuclear waste from fission reactors. Driven subcritical systems appears to be the only option for efficient minor actinide burning. Driven systems offer a possibility to increase reactor safety margins. A comparatively simple fusion device could be sufficient for a fusion-fission machine, and transmutation may become the first industrial application of fusion. Some alternative schemes to create strong fusion neutron fluxes are presented

  13. On fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagren, O (Uppsala Univ., Aangstroem laboratory, div. of electricity, Uppsala (Sweden)); Moiseenko, V.E. (Inst. of Plasma Physics, National Science Center, Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology, Kharkov (Ukraine)); Noack, K. (Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany))

    2008-10-15

    This report gives a brief description of ongoing activities on fusion driven systems (FDS) for transmutation of the long-lived radioactive isotopes in the spent nuclear waste from fission reactors. Driven subcritical systems appears to be the only option for efficient minor actinide burning. Driven systems offer a possibility to increase reactor safety margins. A comparatively simple fusion device could be sufficient for a fusion-fission machine, and transmutation may become the first industrial application of fusion. Some alternative schemes to create strong fusion neutron fluxes are presented

  14. Raman spectroscopy in pharmaceutical product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paudel, Amrit; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    molecular-based drug discovery, design of innovative drug delivery systems and quality control of finished products. This review presents concise accounts of various conventional and emerging Raman instrumentations including associated hyphenated tools of pharmaceutical interest. Moreover, relevant...... application cases of Raman spectroscopy in early and late phase pharmaceutical development, process analysis and micro-structural analysis of drug delivery systems are introduced. Finally, potential areas of future advancement and application of Raman spectroscopic techniques are discussed....

  15. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Models of spontaneous breaking of electroweak symmetry by a strong interaction do not have fine tuning/hierarchy problem. They are conceptually elegant and use the only mechanism of spontaneous breaking of a gauge symmetry that is known to occur in nature. The simplest model, minimal technicolor with extended technicolor interactions, is appealing because one can calculate by scaling up from QCD. But it is ruled out on many counts: inappropriately low quark and lepton masses (or excessive FCNC), bad electroweak data fits, light scalar and vector states, etc. However, nature may not choose the minimal model and then we are stuck: except possibly through lattice simulations, we are unable to compute and test the models. In the LHC era it therefore makes sense to abandon specific models (of strong EW breaking) and concentrate on generic features that may indicate discovery. The Technicolor Straw Man is not a model but a parametrized search strategy inspired by a remarkable generic feature of walking technicolor,...

  16. Plasmons in strong superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldo, M.; Ducoin, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a study of the possible plasmon excitations that can occur in systems where strong superconductivity is present. In these systems the plasmon energy is comparable to or smaller than the pairing gap. As a prototype of these systems we consider the proton component of Neutron Star matter just below the crust when electron screening is not taken into account. For the realistic case we consider in detail the different aspects of the elementary excitations when the proton, electron components are considered within the Random-Phase Approximation generalized to the superfluid case, while the influence of the neutron component is considered only at qualitative level. Electron screening plays a major role in modifying the proton spectrum and spectral function. At the same time the electron plasmon is strongly modified and damped by the indirect coupling with the superfluid proton component, even at moderately low values of the gap. The excitation spectrum shows the interplay of the different components and their relevance for each excitation modes. The results are relevant for neutrino physics and thermodynamical processes in neutron stars. If electron screening is neglected, the spectral properties of the proton component show some resemblance with the physical situation in high-T c superconductors, and we briefly discuss similarities and differences in this connection. In a general prospect, the results of the study emphasize the role of Coulomb interaction in strong superconductors.

  17. What Good is Raman Water Vapor Lidar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, David

    2011-01-01

    Raman lidar has been used to quantify water vapor in the atmosphere for various scientific studies including mesoscale meteorology and satellite validation. Now the international networks of NDACC and GRUAN have interest in using Raman water vapor lidar for detecting trends in atmospheric water vapor concentrations. What are the data needs for addressing these very different measurement challenges. We will review briefly the scientific needs for water vapor accuracy for each of these three applications and attempt to translate that into performance specifications for Raman lidar in an effort to address the question in the title of "What good is Raman water vapor Iidar."

  18. Three-beam double stimulated Raman scatterings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-01-01

    Two-beam stimulated Raman scattering with pump and Stokes beams is manifest in both the Raman loss of the pump beam and the Raman gain of the Stokes beam, and it has been used in various label-free bioimaging applications. Here, a three-beam stimulated Raman scattering that involves pump, Stokes, and depletion beams is considered, where two stimulated Raman gain-loss processes are deliberately made to compete with each other. It is shown that the three-beam Raman scattering process can be described by coupled differential equations for the increased numbers of Stokes and depletion beam photons. From approximate solutions of the coupled differential equations and numerical calculation results, it is shown that a highly efficient suppression of the Stokes Raman gain is possible by using an intense depletion beam whose frequency difference from that of the pump beam is identical to another acceptor Raman mode frequency. I anticipate that the present work will provide a theoretical framework for super-resolution stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

  19. Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and its Application in Nanostructures is an original and timely contribution to a very active area of physics and materials science research. This book presents the theoretical and experimental phenomena of Raman spectroscopy, with specialized discussions on the physical fundamentals, new developments and main features in low-dimensional systems of Raman spectroscopy. In recent years physicists, materials scientists and chemists have devoted increasing attention to low-dimensional systems and as Raman spectroscopy can be used to study and analyse such materials as carbon nan

  20. Structural analysis of the antimalarial drug halofantrine by means of Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    The structure of the antimalarial drug halofantrine is analyzed by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, IR, and Raman spectroscopy. Strong, selective enhancements of the Raman bands of halofantrine at 1621 and 1590 cm(-1) are discovered by means of UV resonance Raman spectroscopy with excitation wavelength lambda(exc)=244 nm. These signal enhancements can be exploited for a localization of small concentrations of halofantrine in a biological environment. The Raman spectrum of halofantrine is calculated by means of DFT calculations [B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p)]. The calculation is very useful for a thorough mode assignment of the Raman bands of halofantrine. The strong bands at 1621 and 1590 cm(-1) in the UV Raman spectrum are assigned to combined C[Double Bond]C stretching vibrations in the phenanthrene ring of halofantrine. These bands are considered as putative marker bands for pipi interactions with the biological target molecules. The calculation of the electron density demonstrates a strong distribution across the phenanthrene ring of halofantrine, besides the electron withdrawing effect of the Cl and CF(3) substituents. This strong and even electron density distribution supports the hypothesis of pipi stacking as a possible mode of action of halofantrine. Complementary IR spectroscopy is performed for an investigation of vibrations of polar functional groups of the halofantrine molecule.

  1. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Raman Laser Amplification in Preformed Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, Daniel S.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2003-01-01

    Two critical issues in the amplification of laser pulses by backward Raman scattering in plasma slabs are the saturation mechanism of the amplification effect (which determines the maximum attainable output intensity of a Raman amplifier) and the optimal plasma density for amplification. Previous investigations [V.M. Malkin, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 82 (22):4448-4451, 1999] identified forward Raman scattering and modulational instabilities of the amplifying seed as the likely saturation mechanisms and lead to an estimated unfocused output intensities of 10 17 W/cm 2 . The optimal density for amplification is determined by the competing constraints of minimizing the plasma density so as to minimize the growth rate of the instabilities leading to saturation but also maintaining the plasma sufficiently dense that the driven Langmuir wave responsible for backscattering does not break prematurely. Here, particle-in-cell code are simulations presented which verify that saturation of backward Raman amplification does occur at intensities of ∼10 17 W/cm 2 by forward Raman scattering and modulational instabilities. The optimal density for amplification in a plasma with the representative temperature of T(sub)e = 200 eV is also shown in these simulations to be intermediate between the cold plasma wave-breaking density and the density limit found by assuming a water bag electron distribution function

  2. Microscopic theory of cavity-enhanced single-photon emission from optical two-photon Raman processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breddermann, Dominik; Praschan, Tom; Heinze, Dirk; Binder, Rolf; Schumacher, Stefan

    2018-03-01

    We consider cavity-enhanced single-photon generation from stimulated two-photon Raman processes in three-level systems. We compare four fundamental system configurations, one Λ -, one V-, and two ladder (Ξ -) configurations. These can be realized as subsystems of a single quantum dot or of quantum-dot molecules. For a new microscopic understanding of the Raman process, we analyze the Heisenberg equation of motion applying the cluster-expansion scheme. Within this formalism an exact and rigorous definition of a cavity-enhanced Raman photon via its corresponding Raman correlation is possible. This definition for example enables us to systematically investigate the on-demand potential of Raman-transition-based single-photon sources. The four system arrangements can be divided into two subclasses, Λ -type and V-type, which exhibit strongly different Raman-emission characteristics and Raman-emission probabilities. Moreover, our approach reveals whether the Raman path generates a single photon or just induces destructive quantum interference with other excitation paths. Based on our findings and as a first application, we gain a more detailed understanding of experimental data from the literature. Our analysis and results are also transferable to the case of atomic three-level-resonator systems and can be extended to more complicated multilevel schemes.

  3. Stimulated Raman scattering and ion dynamics: the role of Langmuir wave non-linearities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnaud, G.; Pesme, D.

    1988-02-01

    The non-linear evolution of stimulated Raman scattering by coupling of the SRS-driven Langmuir waves to ion acoustic waves is studied numerically, in a homogeneous density laser-irradiated plasma. The coupled wave amplitude behaviour is represented either by envelope equations or by complete wave-like equations. The various physical phenomena which are involved are described. This preliminary work has been presented at the 17th Anomalous Absorption Conference, held in last May, in Lake Tahoe City (USA) [fr

  4. Strong-coupling approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, R.B.

    1984-03-01

    Standard path-integral techniques such as instanton calculations give good answers for weak-coupling problems, but become unreliable for strong-coupling. Here we consider a method of replacing the original potential by a suitably chosen harmonic oscillator potential. Physically this is motivated by the fact that potential barriers below the level of the ground-state energy of a quantum-mechanical system have little effect. Numerically, results are good, both for quantum-mechanical problems and for massive phi 4 field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions. 9 references, 6 figures

  5. Strong interaction and QFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, T.

    1981-01-01

    With an assumed weak multiplet structure for bosonic hadrons, which is consistent with the ΔI = 1/2 rule, it is shown that the strong interaction effective hamiltonian is compatible with the weak SU(2) x U(1) gauge transformation. Especially the rho-meson transforms as a triplet under SU(2)sub(w), and this is the origin of the rho-photon analogy. It is also shown that the existence of the non-vanishing Cabibbo angle is a necessary condition for the absence of the exotic hadrons. (orig.)

  6. Femtosecond time-resolved studies of coherent vibrational Raman scattering in large gas-phase molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, C.C.; Chandler, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented from femtosecond time-resolved coherent Raman experiments in which we excite and monitor vibrational coherence in gas-phase samples of benzene and 1,3,5-hexatriene. Different physical mechanisms for coherence decay are seen in these two molecules. In benzene, where the Raman polarizability is largely isotropic, the Q branch of the vibrational Raman spectrum is the primary feature excited. Molecules in different rotational states have different Q-branch transition frequencies due to vibration--rotation interaction. Thus, the macroscopic polarization that is observed in these experiments decays because it has many frequency components from molecules in different rotational states, and these frequency components go out of phase with each other. In 1,3,5-hexatriene, the Raman excitation produces molecules in a coherent superposition of rotational states, through (O, P, R, and S branch) transitions that are strong due to the large anisotropy of the Raman polarizability. The coherent superposition of rotational states corresponds to initially spatially oriented, vibrationally excited, molecules that are freely rotating. The rotation of molecules away from the initial orientation is primarily responsible for the coherence decay in this case. These experiments produce large (∼10% efficiency) Raman shifted signals with modest excitation pulse energies (10 μJ) demonstrating the feasibility of this approach for a variety of gas phase studies. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  7. Enhanced Control of Transient Raman Scattering Using Buffered Hydrogen in Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; Novoa, D.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2017-12-01

    Many reports on stimulated Raman scattering in mixtures of Raman-active and noble gases indicate that the addition of a dispersive buffer gas increases the phase mismatch to higher-order Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands, resulting in a preferential conversion to the first few Stokes lines, accompanied by a significant reduction in the Raman gain due to collisions with gas molecules. Here we report that, provided the dispersion can be precisely controlled, the effective Raman gain in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber can actually be significantly enhanced when a buffer gas is added. This counterintuitive behavior occurs when the nonlinear coupling between the interacting fields is strong and can result in a performance similar to that of a pure Raman-active gas, but at a much lower total gas pressure, allowing competing effects such as Raman backscattering to be suppressed. We report high modal purity in all the emitted sidebands, along with anti-Stokes conversion efficiencies as high as 5% in the visible and 2% in the ultraviolet. This new class of gas-based waveguide device, which allows the nonlinear optical response to be beneficially pressure-tuned by the addition of buffer gases, may find important applications in laser science and spectroscopy.

  8. Drop coating deposition Raman spectroscopy of proteinogenic amino acids compared with their solution and crystalline state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazderka, Tomáš; Kopecký, Vladimír

    2017-10-01

    The Raman spectra of 20 proteinogenic amino acids were recorded in the solution, glass phase (as drop coating deposition Raman (DCDR) samples) and crystalline forms in the wide spectral range of 200-3200 cm- 1. The most apparent spectral differences between the Raman spectra of the crystalline forms, glass phases and aqueous solutions of amino acids were briefly discussed and described in the frame of published works. The possible density dependencies of spectral bands were noted. In some cases, a strong influence of the sample density, as well as of the organization of the water envelope, was observed. The most apparent changes were observed for Ser and Thr. Nevertheless, for the majority of amino acids, the DCDR sample form is an intermediate between the solution and crystalline forms. In contrast, aromatic amino acids have only a small sensitivity to the form of the sample. Our reference set of Raman spectra is useful for revealing discrepancies between the SERS and solid/solution spectra of amino acids. We also found that some previously published Raman spectra of polycrystalline samples resemble glassy state rather than crystalline spectra. Therefore, this reference set of spectra will find application in every branch of Raman spectroscopy where the spectra of biomolecules are collected from coatings.

  9. Significant Contributions of the Albrecht's A Term to Nonresonant Raman Scattering Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zu-Yong; Tian, Guangjun; Duan, Sai; Luo, Yi

    2015-11-10

    The Raman intensity can be well described by the famous Albrecht's Raman theory that consists of A and B terms. It is well-known that the contribution from Albrecht's A term can be neglected without any loss of accuracy for far-off resonant Raman scattering processes. However, as demonstrated in this study, we have found that this widely accepted long-standing assumption fails drastically for totally symmetric vibration modes of molecules in general off-resonant Raman scattering. Perturbed first-principles calculations for water molecule show that strong constructive interference between the A and B terms occurs for the Raman intensity of the symmetric O-H stretching mode, which can account for ∼40% of the total intensity. Meanwhile, a minor destructive interference is found for the angle bending mode. The state-to-state mapping between Albrecht's theory and perturbation theory allows us to verify the accuracy of the widely employed perturbation method for the dynamic/resonant Raman intensities. The model calculations rationalized from water molecule with the bending mode show that the perturbation method is a good approximation only when the absolute energy difference between the first excited state and the incident light is more than five times greater than the vibrational energy in the ground state.

  10. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-04-14

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution.

  11. Strong Coupling Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    2009-01-01

    We show that whenever a 4-dimensional theory with N particle species emerges as a consistent low energy description of a 3-brane embedded in an asymptotically-flat (4+d)-dimensional space, the holographic scale of high-dimensional gravity sets the strong coupling scale of the 4D theory. This connection persists in the limit in which gravity can be consistently decoupled. We demonstrate this effect for orbifold planes, as well as for the solitonic branes and string theoretic D-branes. In all cases the emergence of a 4D strong coupling scale from bulk holography is a persistent phenomenon. The effect turns out to be insensitive even to such extreme deformations of the brane action that seemingly shield 4D theory from the bulk gravity effects. A well understood example of such deformation is given by large 4D Einstein term in the 3-brane action, which is known to suppress the strength of 5D gravity at short distances and change the 5D Newton's law into the four-dimensional one. Nevertheless, we observe that the ...

  12. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy: principles and spectral interpretation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larkin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    "Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: Principles and Spectral Interpretation explains the background, core principles and tests the readers understanding of the important techniques of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy...

  13. Raman-Enhanced Phase-Sensitive Fibre Optical Parametric Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xuelei; Guo, Xiaojie; Shu, Chester

    2016-01-01

    Phase-sensitive amplification is of great research interest owing to its potential in noiseless amplification. One key feature in a phase-sensitive amplifier is the gain extinction ratio defined as the ratio of the maximum to the minimum gains. It quantifies the capability of the amplifier in performing low-noise amplification for high phase-sensitive gain. Considering a phase-sensitive fibre optical parametric amplifier for linear amplification, the gain extinction ratio increases with the phase-insensitive parametric gain achieved from the same pump. In this work, we use backward Raman amplification to increase the phase-insensitive parametric gain, which in turn improves the phase-sensitive operation. Using a 955 mW Raman pump, the gain extinction ratio is increased by 9.2 dB. The improvement in the maximum phase-sensitive gain is 18.7 dB. This scheme can significantly boost the performance of phase-sensitive amplification in a spectral range where the parametric pump is not sufficiently strong but broadband Raman amplification is available. PMID:26830136

  14. Rapid surface enhanced Raman scattering detection method for chloramphenicol residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei; Yao, Weirong

    2015-06-01

    Chloramphenicol (CAP) is a widely used amide alcohol antibiotics, which has been banned from using in food producing animals in many countries. In this study, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coupled with gold colloidal nanoparticles was used for the rapid analysis of CAP. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were conducted with Gaussian 03 at the B3LYP level using the 3-21G(d) and 6-31G(d) basis sets to analyze the assignment of vibrations. Affirmatively, the theoretical Raman spectrum of CAP was in complete agreement with the experimental spectrum. They both exhibited three strong peaks characteristic of CAP at 1104 cm-1, 1344 cm-1, 1596 cm-1, which were used for rapid qualitative analysis of CAP residues in food samples. The use of SERS as a method for the measurements of CAP was explored by comparing use of different solvents, gold colloidal nanoparticles concentration and absorption time. The method of the detection limit was determined as 0.1 μg/mL using optimum conditions. The Raman peak at 1344 cm-1 was used as the index for quantitative analysis of CAP in food samples, with a linear correlation of R2 = 0.9802. Quantitative analysis of CAP residues in foods revealed that the SERS technique with gold colloidal nanoparticles was sensitive and of a good stability and linear correlation, and suited for rapid analysis of CAP residue in a variety of food samples.

  15. Probing anisotropic magnetotransport in manganese perovskites using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.L.; Yoon, S.; Cooper, S.L.; Cheong, S.; Han, P.D.; Payne, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    We report an electronic Raman scattering study of the colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) manganese perovskites as a function of temperature, magnetic field, symmetry, and doping. The low-frequency electronic Raman spectrum in the paramagnetic-insulating phase of these materials is characterized by a diffusive Raman-scattering response, while a nearly flat continuum response is observed in the ferromagnetic-metallic state. We found that the B 1g -symmetry electronic scattering intensity is significantly reduced with applied magnetic field near T C , in a manner reminiscent of the dc magnetoresistivity. The strongly field-dependent scattering rate in the B 1g channel appears to reflect the highly field-dependent mobility along the Mn-O bond direction expected in the double exchange mechanism. In addition, we observe a persistent field dependence in the B 1g electronic scattering response for T C , suggesting that the ferromagnetic phase is inhomogeneous, perhaps consisting of both metallic and insulating components. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  16. Fragmentation of neutral van der Waals clusters with visible laser light: A new variant of the Raman effect?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatovic, A.; Howorka, F.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    We have observed strong photodissociation (using visible laser light) of neutral van der Waals clusters (Ar, N 2 , O 2 , CO 2 , SO 2 , NH 3 ) produced by supersonic expansion and detected by electron ionization/mass spectrometer. Several tests were performed, all of them supporting this surprising discovery. We suggest that Raman induced photodissociation (RIP) is responsible for this phenomenon. This first observation of Raman induced photodissociation provides a new technique for the study of neutral van der Waals clusters. (orig.)

  17. Analysis of ancient pigments by Raman microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Jian; Xu Cunyi

    1999-01-01

    Raman microscopy can be applied for the spatial resolution, and non-destructive in situ analysis of inorganic pigments in pottery, manuscripts and paintings. Compared with other techniques, it is the best single technique for this purpose. An overview is presented of the applications of Raman microscopy in the analysis of ancient pigments

  18. INFRARED AND RAMAN SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF ION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infrared and Raman spectroscopy techniques have been used to study the ionic interactions of strontium(II) and barium(II) with thiocyanate ion in liquid ammonia. A number of bands were observed in both n (CN) and n (CS) regions of infrared and Raman spectra and these were assigned to 1:1 contact ion pair, ...

  19. Resonance Raman spectroscopic investigation of MLCT character ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy, because of its utility in understanding resonant state dynamics and structure, is an ideal tool to investigate MLCT states of inorganic complexes. In particular, the tunability of the excitation wavelength and thus the resulting resonance Raman intensities provide information on the nuclear ...

  20. Applications of Raman spectroscopy in life science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Airton A.; T. Soto, Cláudio A.; Ali, Syed M.; Neto, Lázaro P. M.; Canevari, Renata A.; Pereira, Liliane; Fávero, Priscila P.

    2015-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied to the analysis of biological samples for the last 12 years providing detection of changes occurring at the molecular level during the pathological transformation of the tissue. The potential use of this technology in cancer diagnosis has shown encouraging results for the in vivo, real-time and minimally invasive diagnosis. Confocal Raman technics has also been successfully applied in the analysis of skin aging process providing new insights in this field. In this paper it is presented the latest biomedical applications of Raman spectroscopy in our laboratory. It is shown that Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been used for biochemical and molecular characterization of thyroid tissue by micro-Raman spectroscopy and gene expression analysis. This study aimed to improve the discrimination between different thyroid pathologies by Raman analysis. A total of 35 thyroid tissues samples including normal tissue (n=10), goiter (n=10), papillary (n=10) and follicular carcinomas (n=5) were analyzed. The confocal Raman spectroscopy allowed a maximum discrimination of 91.1% between normal and tumor tissues, 84.8% between benign and malignant pathologies and 84.6% among carcinomas analyzed. It will be also report the application of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy as an important sensor for detecting advanced glycation products (AGEs) on human skin.

  1. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.

    2009-01-01

    A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory.......A brief review of the Raman spectroscopic studies of methane gas hydrates is given, supported by some new measurements done in our laboratory....

  2. PULSED MULTICHANNEL RAMAN SPECTROMETRY OF TRANSIENT STATES

    OpenAIRE

    Buntinx, G.; Bridoux, M.; Deffontaine, A.; Poizat, O.

    1987-01-01

    Spontaneous Raman spectroscopy is a nonperturbing diagnostic tool that provides detailed structural information about molecules through the vibrational-line positions and intensities. Because of many specific properties, pulsed Raman spectroscopy can provide valuable information in situations in which ultrarapid recording of the vibrational spectra is of crucial importance.

  3. RAMAN-SPECTRA OF HUMAN DENTAL CALCULUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TSUDA, H; ARENDS, J

    1993-01-01

    Raman spectra of human dental calculus have been observed for the first time by use of micro-Raman spectroscopy. The spectral features of calculus were influenced easily by heating caused by laser irradiation. Therefore, the measurements were carried out at relatively low power (5 mW, 1-mu m spot

  4. Self-pulsation in Raman fiber amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated.......Dynamic behavior caused by Brillouin scattering in Raman fiber amplifiers is studied. Modes of self-pulsation steady state oscillations are found. Their dependence on amplification scheme is demonstrated....

  5. LIGO: The strong belief

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years of designing, building and testing a number of innovative technologies, with the strong belief that the endeavour would lead to a historic breakthrough. The Bulletin publishes an abstract of the Courier’s interview with Barry Barish, one of the founding fathers of LIGO.   The plots show the signals of gravitational waves detected by the twin LIGO observatories at Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington. (Image: Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab) On 11 February, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and Virgo collaborations published a historic paper in which they showed a gravitational signal emitted by the merger of two black holes. These results come after 20 years of hard work by a large collaboration of scientists operating the two LIGO observatories in the US. Barry Barish, Linde Professor of Physics, Emeritus at the California Institute of Technology and former Director of the Global Design Effort for the Internat...

  6. High Fidelity Raman Chemical Imaging of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Venkata Nagamalli Koteswara Rao

    The development of high fidelity Raman imaging systems is important for a number of application areas including material science, bio-imaging, bioscience and healthcare, pharmaceutical analysis, and semiconductor characterization. The use of Raman imaging as a characterization tool for detecting the amorphous and crystalline regions in the biopolymer poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) is the precis of my thesis. In the first chapter, a brief insight about the basics of Raman spectroscopy, Raman chemical imaging, Raman mapping, and Raman imaging techniques has been provided. The second chapter contains details about the successful development of tailored sample of PLLA. Biodegradable polymers are used in areas of tissue engineering, agriculture, packaging, and in medical field for drug delivery, implant devices, and surgical sutures. Detailed information about the sample preparation and characterization of these cold-drawn PLLA polymer substrates has been provided. Wide-field Raman hyperspectral imaging using an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) was demonstrated in the early 1990s. The AOTF contributed challenges such as image walk, distortion, and image blur. A wide-field AOTF Raman imaging system has been developed as part of my research and methods to overcome some of the challenges in performing AOTF wide-field Raman imaging are discussed in the third chapter. This imaging system has been used for studying the crystalline and amorphous regions on the cold-drawn sample of PLLA. Of all the different modalities that are available for performing Raman imaging, Raman point-mapping is the most extensively used method. The ease of obtaining the Raman hyperspectral cube dataset with a high spectral and spatial resolution is the main motive of performing this technique. As a part of my research, I have constructed a Raman point-mapping system and used it for obtaining Raman hyperspectral image data of various minerals, pharmaceuticals, and polymers. Chapter four offers

  7. Raman spectroscopy of skin neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moryatov, A. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Kaganov, O. I.; Orlov, A. E.; Zaharov, V. P.; Batrachenko, I. A.; Artemiev, D. N.; Blinov, N. V.

    2017-09-01

    Skin melanoma is spread inhomogeneously worldwide, particularly in Samara region there are high figures of skin neoplasms sick rate as well—18.6%. Research goal: to develop a new method of early non-invasive differential diagnostics of skin neoplasms. Registration of Raman spectrum was implemented in the distance of 3-4 mm, the spectrum registration from pathologically changed zone was subsequently conducted, then from healthy skin zone. The test time for 1 patient was no longer than 3-5 min. In a range of experiments ex vivo there were the following results: melanoma—24, basal cell cancer—25, squamosus cell sarcinoma—7, nevus pigmentosis—9, other malignant neoplasms—6; in vivo: melanoma—9, basal cell cancer—8, nevus pigmentosis—2, other benign neoplasms—2. The first results of the research dedicated to studying permissive opportunities of Raman spectroscopy, with successive two-phase analysis of received parameters display high efficiency of method of differential diagnostic for skin melanoma and other malignant neoplasms, pigment and benign skin neoplasms. Safety and rapidity of the research reveal a high potential of the technique.

  8. Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Emily L; Brandt, Nathaniel C; Cassabaum, Alyssa A; Frontiera, Renee R

    2015-08-07

    Ultrafast surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) with pico- and femtosecond time resolution has the ability to elucidate the mechanisms by which plasmons mediate chemical reactions. Here we review three important technological advances in these new methodologies, and discuss their prospects for applications in areas including plasmon-induced chemistry and sensing at very low limits of detection. Surface enhancement, arising from plasmonic materials, has been successfully incorporated with stimulated Raman techniques such as femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). These techniques are capable of time-resolved measurement on the femtosecond and picosecond time scale and can be used to follow the dynamics of molecules reacting near plasmonic surfaces. We discuss the potential application of ultrafast SERS techniques to probe plasmon-mediated processes, such as H2 dissociation and solar steam production. Additionally, we discuss the possibilities for high sensitivity SERS sensing using these stimulated Raman spectroscopies.

  9. Applications of Raman spectroscopy to gemology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Being nondestructive and requiring short measurement times, a low amount of material, and no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is used for routine investigation in the study of gemstone inclusions and treatments and for the characterization of mounted gems. In this work, a review of the use of laboratory Raman and micro-Raman spectrometers and of portable Raman systems in the gemology field is given, focusing on gem identification and on the evaluation of the composition, provenance, and genesis of gems. Many examples are shown of the use of Raman spectroscopy as a tool for the identification of imitations, synthetic gems, and enhancement treatments in natural gemstones. Some recent developments are described, with particular attention being given to the semiprecious stone jade and to two important organic materials used in jewelry, i.e., pearls and corals.

  10. Potential drug – nanosensor conjugates: Raman, infrared absorption, surface – enhanced Raman, and density functional theory investigations of indolic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pięta, Ewa, E-mail: Ewa.Pieta@ifj.edu.pl [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland); Paluszkiewicz, Czesława [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland); Oćwieja, Magdalena [J. Haber Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-30239 Krakow (Poland); Kwiatek, Wojciech M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, PL-31342 Krakow (Poland)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Molecular fragments involved in the adsorption process were determined. • Formation of hydrogen bonds with the negatively charged gold substrates was observed. • Indole moiety strongly interacts with gold nanosensors. • The synthesized sensors are characterized by high stability and reproducibility. • Chemical mechanism plays a crucial role in the enhancement of the Raman signal. - Abstract: An extremely important aspect of planning cancer treatment is not only the drug efficiency but also a number of challenges associated with the side effects and control of this process. That is why it is worth paying attention to the promising potential of the gold nanoparticles combined with a compound treated as a potential drug. This work presents Raman (RS), infrared absorption (IR) and surface–enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopic investigations of N–acetyl–5–methoxytryptamine (melatonin) and α–methyl–DL–tryptophan, regarding as anti breast cancer agents. The experimental spectroscopic analysis was supported by the quantum-chemical calculations based on the B3LYP hybrid density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP 6–311G(d,p) level of theory. The studied compounds were adsorbed onto two colloidal gold nanosensors synthesized by a chemical reduction method using sodium borohydride (SB) and trisodium citrate (TC), respectively. Its morphology characteristics were obtained using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It has been suggested that the NH moiety from the aromatic ring, a well-known proton donor, causes the formation of hydrogen bonds with the negatively charged gold surface.

  11. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on aluminum using near infrared and visible excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Gühlke, Marina; Kneipp, Janina

    2014-01-01

    We observed strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering on discontinuous nanostructured aluminum films using 785 nm excitation even though dielectric constants of this metal suggest plasmon supported spectroscopy in the ultraviolet range. The excitation of SERS correlates with plasmon resonances in ...... in the 1.3–2.5 eV range identified in electron energy loss spectra....

  12. In-situ Raman spectroscopy to elucidate the influence of adsorption in graphene electrochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beld, Wesley T. E.; Odijk, Mathieu; Vervuurt, Rene H. J.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Bol, Ageeth A.; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C. T.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemistry on graphene is of particular interest due to graphene’s high surface area, high electrical conductivity and low interfacial capacitance. Because the graphene Fermi level can be probed by its strong Raman signal, information on the graphene doping can be obtained which in turn can

  13. Nanostructure design for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy - prospects and limits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels Asger; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2008-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) allows single-molecule detection due to the strong field localization occurring at sharp bends or kinks of the metal-vacuum interface. An important question concerns the limits of the signal enhancement that can be achieved via a judicious design...

  14. Titania supported tungsten oxide species studied by Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hack Sung; Kim, Kwan

    1991-01-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the tungsta catalyst supported on titania. The surface tungsten species which forms on titania after calcination appeared to possess a structure that is independent of the initial impregnation condition. The surface polytungstate seemed to be stable only at the interfacial region since the crystalline WO 3 phase was observed as long as the tungsta loading was in excess of monolayer coverage. The close intact and strong interaction between the polytungstate and the titania could be evidenced from the inhibition of the phase transition of TiO 2 from anatase to rutile.(Author)

  15. Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for nanoscale strain characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, Alvarado; Hayazawa, Norihiko; Kawata, Satoshi

    2009-08-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), which utilizes the strong localized optical field generated at the apex of a metallic tip when illuminated, has been shown to successfully probe the vibrational spectrum of today's and tomorrow's state-of-the-art silicon and next-generation semiconductor devices, such as quantum dots. Collecting and analyzing the vibrational spectrum not only aids in material identification but also provides insight into strain distributions in semiconductors. Here, the potential of TERS for nanoscale characterization of strain in silicon devices is reviewed. Emphasis will be placed on the key challenges of obtaining spectroscopic images of strain in actual strained silicon devices.

  16. Negative Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Graphene Measured by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Duhee; Son, Young-Woo; Cheong, Heonsik

    2011-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of single-layer graphene is estimated with temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy in the temperature range between 200 and 400 K. It is found to be strongly dependent on temperature but remains negative in the whole temperature range, with a room temperature value of -8.0x10^{-6} K^{-1}. The strain caused by the TEC mismatch between graphene and the substrate plays a crucial role in determining the physical properties of graphene, and hence its effect...

  17. Negative thermal expansion coefficient of graphene measured by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Duhee; Son, Young-Woo; Cheong, Hyeonsik

    2011-08-10

    The thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of single-layer graphene is estimated with temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy in the temperature range between 200 and 400 K. It is found to be strongly dependent on temperature but remains negative in the whole temperature range with a room temperature value of (-8.0 ± 0.7) × 10(-6) K(-1). The strain caused by the TEC mismatch between graphene and the substrate plays a crucial role in determining the physical properties of graphene, and hence its effect must be accounted for in the interpretation of experimental data taken at cryogenic or elevated temperatures.

  18. Raman sidescatter instability in a nonuniform plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostrom, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    In the various laser-fusion concepts, an intense electromagnetic wave (the laser) must propagate through an under-dense plasma region where it could decay, via the stimulated Raman instability, into a Langmuir plasma wave and a scattered electromagnetic wave. This process could, therefore, scatter a significant fraction of the laser energy before it could be deposited in the plasma. A density gradient, in the direction of laser incidence, localizes the instability to a narrow resonance zone where the local plasma wave frequency approximately equals the difference-frequency between the incident and scattered electromagnetic waves. The narrowness of this zone can strongly inhibit the growth of back- or oblique-scattered electromagnetic waves since they quickly propagate out of their resonance region; however, the density gradient has a much weaker effect on side-scattered waves (which propagate perpendicular to the density gradient) since they remain in their resonance zone until refraction bends them out or they exit through the side of the finite diameter laser beam. Thus, we place particular emphasis on evaluating, in a manner valid for the side scattered electromagnetic waves (which are at their turning point), the level of exponentiation at which the growth is linearly saturated due to convection of the waves out of their resonance zone. We also determine the general nature and propagation of the scattered electromagnetic waves and obtain approximate values for the resonance zone size and the time required for the above saturation

  19. Structural, Raman, and dielectric studies on multiferroic Mn-doped Bi 1-xLax FeO 3 ceramics

    KAUST Repository

    Xing, Zhibiao

    2014-04-03

    Multiferroic Bi1-xLaxFeO3 [BLFO (x)] ceramics with x = 0.10-0.50 and Mn-doped BLFO (x = 0.30) ceramics with different doping contents (0.1-1.0 mol%) were prepared by solid-state reaction method. They were crystallized in a perovskite phase with rhombohedral symmetry. In the BLFO (x) system, a composition (x)-driven structural transformation (R3c→C222) was observed at x = 0.30. The formation of Bi2Fe 4O9 impure phase was effectively suppressed with increasing the x value, and the rhombohedral distortion in the BLFO ceramics was decreased, leading to some Raman active modes disappeared. A significant red frequency shift (~13 cm-1) of the Raman mode of 232 cm-1 in the BLFO ceramics was observed, which strongly perceived a significant destabilization in the octahedral oxygen chains, and in turn affected the local FeO6 octahedral environment. In the Mn-doped BLFO (x = 0.30) ceramics, the intensity of the Raman mode near 628 cm-1 was increased with increasing the Mn-doping content, which was resulted from an enhanced local Jahn-Teller distortions of the (Mn,Fe)O6 octahedra. Electron microscopy images revealed some changes in the ceramic grain sizes and their morphologies in the Mn-doped samples at different contents. Wedge-shaped 71° ferroelectric domains with domain walls lying on the {110} planes were observed in the BLFO (x = 0.30) ceramics, whereas in the 1.0 mol% Mn-doped BLFO (x = 0.30) samples, 71° ferroelectric domains exhibited a parallel band-shaped morphology with average domain width of 95 nm. Dielectric studies revealed that high dielectric loss of the BLFO (x = 0.30) ceramics was drastically reduced from 0.8 to 0.01 (measured @ 104 Hz) via 1.0 mol% Mn-doping. The underlying mechanisms can be understood by a charge disproportion between the Mn4+ and Fe2+ in the Mn-doped samples, where a reaction of Mn4+ + Fe2+→Mn3+ + Fe3+ is taken place, resulting in the reduction in the oxygen vacancies and a suppression of the electron hopping from Fe3+ to Fe2+ ions

  20. Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy of catalysts: Adsorption and coke formation in zeolites and vibrational spectra of supported metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Yek Tann

    2001-10-01

    The primary goal of this dissertation is to study the physicochemical and catalytic properties of zeolites and supported metal oxide catalysts using UV Raman spectroscopy. In order to reduce the thermal degradation and possible photodecomposition of adsorbates by UV radiation, we have developed a novel fluidized bed method for measuring the UV Raman spectra of catalysts and adsorbates. The UV Raman spectra of various organic compounds adsorbed in zeolites H-USY and H-ZSM-5 are recorded. When measurements are performed on stationary and spinning samples, the Raman spectra show the presence of coke, a typical end product of heat and photochemistry. In contrast, the Raman peaks of the unreacted adsorbates dominate the spectra measured using the fluidized bed method. These results indicate that the fluidized bed technique is a good method for measuring UV Raman spectra of catalysts and adsorbates. The formation of coke in the methanol-to-gasoline conversion over zeolite H-ZSM-5 causes deactivation of the catalyst. To gain insight into the formation of coke, we have studied this reaction using UV Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectral changes suggest coke is produced from conjugated olefins via cyclopentadiene intermediates. Aromatic compounds in gasoline may also be produced from cyclopentadienes. The adsorbate-induced structural changes of zeolites may alter the molecular sieving characteristics of these materials which ultimately affect their performance as catalysts and adsorbents. We have quantified the adsorbate-induced structural changes of zeolite H-RHO using UV Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra of the zeolite after the adsorption of water, methanol or acetonitrile are consistent with an increase in the average T-O-T angle of the zeolite of 5-8°. The adsorption of ammonia, on the other hand, decreases the average T-O-T angle by 5°. Because of certain advantages of UV Raman spectroscopy over visible Raman spectroscopy, recently there is a strong interest in

  1. John Strong (1941 - 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    Wickens, F

    Our friend and colleague John Strong was cruelly taken from us by a brain tumour on Monday 31st July, a few days before his 65th birthday John started his career working with a group from Westfield College, under the leadership of Ted Bellamy. He obtained his PhD and spent the early part of his career on experiments at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), but after the early 1970s his research was focussed on experiments in CERN. Over the years he made a number of notable contributions to experiments in CERN: The Omega spectrometer adopted a system John had originally developed for experiments at RAL using vidicon cameras to record the sparks in the spark chambers; He contributed to the success of NA1 and NA7, where he became heavily involved in the electronic trigger systems; He was responsible for the second level trigger system for the ALEPH detector and spent five years leading a team that designed and built the system, which ran for twelve years with only minor interventions. Following ALEPH he tur...

  2. Stirring Strongly Coupled Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Rajagopal, Krishna; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2009-01-01

    We determine the energy it takes to move a test quark along a circle of radius L with angular frequency w through the strongly coupled plasma of N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills (SYM) theory. We find that for most values of L and w the energy deposited by stirring the plasma in this way is governed either by the drag force acting on a test quark moving through the plasma in a straight line with speed v=Lw or by the energy radiated by a quark in circular motion in the absence of any plasma, whichever is larger. There is a continuous crossover from the drag-dominated regime to the radiation-dominated regime. In the crossover regime we find evidence for significant destructive interference between energy loss due to drag and that due to radiation as if in vacuum. The rotating quark thus serves as a model system in which the relative strength of, and interplay between, two different mechanisms of parton energy loss is accessible via a controlled classical gravity calculation. We close by speculating on the implicati...

  3. Strong-interaction nonuniversality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkas, R.R.; Foot, R.; He, X.; Joshi, G.C.

    1989-01-01

    The universal QCD color theory is extended to an SU(3) 1 direct product SU(3) 2 direct product SU(3) 3 gauge theory, where quarks of the ith generation transform as triplets under SU(3)/sub i/ and singlets under the other two factors. The usual color group is then identified with the diagonal subgroup, which remains exact after symmetry breaking. The gauge bosons associated with the 16 broken generators then form two massive octets under ordinary color. The interactions between quarks and these heavy gluonlike particles are explicitly nonuniversal and thus an exploration of their physical implications allows us to shed light on the fundamental issue of strong-interaction universality. Nonuniversality and weak flavor mixing are shown to generate heavy-gluon-induced flavor-changing neutral currents. The phenomenology of these processes is studied, as they provide the major experimental constraint on the extended theory. Three symmetry-breaking scenarios are presented. The first has color breaking occurring at the weak scale, while the second and third divorce the two scales. The third model has the interesting feature of radiatively induced off-diagonal Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

  4. Backward Raman Amplification in the Long-wavelength Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-29

    driven by strong-field science, including advanced proton acceleration [10], high harmonic genera- tion [11], mid-infrared supercontinuum generation...Engineering 13, 22 (2011). [38] F. Johansson et al., mpmath: a Python library for arbitrary-precision floating-point arithmetic (version 0.18) (2013), http://mpmath.org/. 20

  5. Enhancement of Laser Wakefields via a Backward Raman Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Joshua; Masson-Laborde, Paul-Edouard; Rozmus, Wojciech; Huller, Stefan; Wilks, Scott

    2017-10-01

    The Backward Raman Amplifier (BRA) is proposed as a possible scheme for improving laser driven plasma wakefields. One- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell code simulations with SCPIC and a 3-Wave coupling model are presented and compared to demonstrate how the BRA can be applied to the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) in the non-relativistic regime to counteract limitations such as pump depletion, diffraction, and dephasing. Simulation results show that amplification of the driving pulse is strongest in the central high amplitude portion, causing the pulse to shorten both transversely and longitudinally. This results in a reduction or alleviation of the effects of diffraction, an increase in wake amplitude and sustainability, and provides direct insight into new methods of controlling plasma wakes in LWFA and other applications. JL is grateful for support from LLNL through the summer scholar program. JL and WR would like to acknowledge partial support from NSERC.

  6. Light-Driven Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Antonyuk, Boris P

    2009-01-01

    This book deals with influencing the properties of solids by light-driven electron transport. The theoretical basis of these effects, light-driven ordering and self-organisation, as well as optical motors are presented. With light as a tool, new ways to produce materials are opened.

  7. Raman active components of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xu; Moy, Austin J; Nguyen, Hieu T M; Zhang, Jason; Fox, Matthew C; Sebastian, Katherine R; Reichenberg, Jason S; Markey, Mia K; Tunnell, James W

    2017-06-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) has shown great potential in noninvasive cancer screening. Statistically based algorithms, such as principal component analysis, are commonly employed to provide tissue classification; however, they are difficult to relate to the chemical and morphological basis of the spectroscopic features and underlying disease. As a result, we propose the first Raman biophysical model applied to in vivo skin cancer screening data. We expand upon previous models by utilizing in situ skin constituents as the building blocks, and validate the model using previous clinical screening data collected from a Raman optical fiber probe. We built an 830nm confocal Raman microscope integrated with a confocal laser-scanning microscope. Raman imaging was performed on skin sections spanning various disease states, and multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis was used to resolve the Raman spectra of individual in situ skin constituents. The basis spectra of the most relevant skin constituents were combined linearly to fit in vivo human skin spectra. Our results suggest collagen, elastin, keratin, cell nucleus, triolein, ceramide, melanin and water are the most important model components. We make available for download (see supplemental information) a database of Raman spectra for these eight components for others to use as a reference. Our model reveals the biochemical and structural makeup of normal, nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancers, and precancers and paves the way for future development of this approach to noninvasive skin cancer diagnosis.

  8. Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, M.C.; Rosenblatt, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (largely because of advances in laser and detector technology) is assuming a rapidly expanding role in many areas of research. This paper reviews the contribution of Raman spectroscopy in high temperature chemistry including molecular spectroscopy on static systems and gas diagnostic measurements on reactive systems. An important aspect of high temperature chemistry has been the identification and study of the new, and often unusual, gaseous molecules which form at high temperatures. Particularly important is the investigation of vibrational-rotational energy levels and electronic states which determine thermodynamic properties and describe chemical bonding. Some advantages and disadvantages of high temperature Raman spectrosocpy for molecular studies on static systems are compared: (1) Raman vs infrared; (2) gas-phase vs condensed in matries; and (3) atmospheric pressure Raman vs low pressure techniques, including mass spectroscopy, matrix isolation, and molecular beams. Raman studies on molecular properties of gases, melts, and surfaces are presented with emphasis on work not covered in previous reviews of high temperature and matrix isolation Raman spectroscopy

  9. sp Carbon chain interaction with silver nanoparticles probed by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucotti, A.; Casari, C. S.; Tommasini, M.; Li Bassi, A.; Fazzi, D.; Russo, V.; Del Zoppo, M.; Castiglioni, C.; Cataldo, F.; Bottani, C. E.; Zerbi, G.

    2009-08-01

    Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is exploited here to investigate the interaction of isolated sp carbon chains (polyynes) in a methanol solution with silver nanoparticles. Hydrogen-terminated polyynes show a strong interaction with silver colloids used as the SERS active medium revealing a chemical SERS effect. SERS spectra after mixing polyynes with silver colloids show a noticeable time evolution. Experimental results, supported by density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the Raman modes, allow us to investigate the behavior and stability of polyynes of different lengths and the overall sp conversion towards sp 2 phase.

  10. Exploring the chemical enhancement for surface-enhanced Raman scattering with Au bowtie nanoantennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fromm, David P.; Sundaramurthy, Arvind; Kinkhabwala, Anika; Schuck, P. James; Kino, Gordon S.; Moerner, W.E.

    2006-01-01

    Single metallic bowtie nanoantennas provide a controllable environment for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of adsorbed molecules. Bowties have experimentally measured electromagnetic enhancements, enabling estimation of chemical enhancement for both the bulk and the few-molecule regime. Strong fluctuations of selected Raman lines imply that a small number of p-mercaptoaniline molecules on a single bowtie show chemical enhancement >10 7 , much larger than previously believed, likely due to charge transfer between the Au surface and the molecule. This chemical sensitivity of SERS has significant implications for ultra-sensitive detection of single molecules

  11. Raman Chair | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raman Chair. The Raman Chair was instituted in 1972 by the Government of India to commemorate the memory of the founder of the Academy, Sir C. V. Raman. Eminent scientists are invited by the Council of the Academy to occupy the Chair, for periods of between six weeks and six months. Raman Professors who have ...

  12. Quick detection of traditional Chinese medicine ‘Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma’ pieces by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Hao; Shi, Hong; Chen, Weiwei; Yu, Yun; Lin, Duo; Xu, Qian; Feng, Shangyuan; Lin, Juqiang; Chen, Rong

    2013-01-01

    A surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) method was developed for the analysis of traditional Chinese medicine ‘Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma’ pieces (AMRP) for the first time with the aim to develop a quick method for traditional Chinese medicine detection. Both Raman spectra and SERS spectra were obtained from AMRP, and tentative assignments of the Raman bands in the measured spectra suggested that only a few weak Raman peaks could be observed in the regular Raman spectra, while primary Raman peaks at around 536, 555, 619, 648, 691, 733, 790, 958, 1004, 1031, 1112, 1244, 1324, 1395, 1469, 1574 and 1632 cm −1 could be observed in the SERS spectra, with the strongest signals at 619, 733, 958, 1324, 1395 and 1469 cm −1 . This was due to a strong interaction between the silver colloids and the AMRP, which led to an extraordinary enhancement in the intensity of the Raman scattering in AMRP. This exploratory study suggests the SERS technique has great potential for providing a novel non-destructive method for effectively and accurately detecting traditional Chinese medicine without complicated separation and extraction. (paper)

  13. Effect of laser irradiation on cell function and its implications in Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaofei; Song, Yanqing; Song, Yizhi; Xu, Jiabao; Wu, Yinhu; Glidle, Andrew; Cusack, Maggie; Ijaz, Umer Z; Cooper, Jonathan M; Huang, Wei E; Yin, Huabing

    2018-02-02

    Lasers are instrumental in advanced bioimaging and Raman spectroscopy. However, they are also well known for their destructive effects on living organisms, leading to concerns about the adverse effects of laser technologies. To implement Raman spectroscopy for cell analysis and manipulation, such as Raman activated cell sorting, it is crucial to identify non-destructive conditions for living cells. Here, we evaluated quantitatively the effect of 532 nm laser irradiation on bacterial cell fate and growth at the single-cell level. Using a purpose-built microfluidic platform, we were able to quantify the growth characteristics i.e. specific growth rate and lag time of individual cells as well as the survival rate of a population in conjunction with Raman spectroscopy. Representative Gram-negative and Gram-positive species show a similar trend in response to laser irradiation dose. Laser irradiation could compromise physiological function of cells and the degree of destruction is both dose and strain dependent, ranging from reduced cell growth to a complete loss of cell metabolic activity and finally to physical disintegration. Gram-positive bacterial cells are more susceptible than Gram-negative bacterial strains to irradiation-induced damage. By directly correlating Raman acquisition with single cell growth characteristics, we provide evidence of non-destructive characteristics of Raman spectroscopy on individual bacterial cells. However, while strong Raman signals can be obtained without causing cell death, the variety of responses from different strains and from individual cells justify careful evaluation of Raman acquisition conditions if cell viability is critical. IMPORTANCE In Raman spectroscopy, the use of powerful monochromatic light in laser-based systems facilitates detection of the inherently weak signals. This allows environmentally and clinically relevant microorganisms to be measured at the single cell level. The significance of being able to perform

  14. Coral calcifying fluid aragonite saturation states derived from Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. DeCarlo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the saturation state of aragonite (ΩAr within the calcifying fluid of corals is critical for understanding their biomineralization process and sensitivity to environmental changes including ocean acidification. Recent advances in microscopy, microprobes, and isotope geochemistry enable the determination of calcifying fluid pH and [CO32−], but direct quantification of ΩAr (where ΩAr =  [CO32−][Ca2+]∕Ksp has proved elusive. Here we test a new technique for deriving ΩAr based on Raman spectroscopy. First, we analysed abiogenic aragonite crystals precipitated under a range of ΩAr from 10 to 34, and we found a strong dependence of Raman peak width on ΩAr with no significant effects of other factors including pH, Mg∕Ca partitioning, and temperature. Validation of our Raman technique for corals is difficult because there are presently no direct measurements of calcifying fluid ΩAr available for comparison. However, Raman analysis of the international coral standard JCp-1 produced ΩAr of 12.3 ± 0.3, which we demonstrate is consistent with published skeletal Mg∕Ca, Sr∕Ca, B∕Ca, δ11B, and δ44Ca data. Raman measurements are rapid ( ≤  1 s, high-resolution ( ≤  1 µm, precise (derived ΩAr ± 1 to 2 per spectrum depending on instrument configuration, accurate ( ±2 if ΩAr < 20, and require minimal sample preparation, making the technique well suited for testing the sensitivity of coral calcifying fluid ΩAr to ocean acidification and warming using samples from natural and laboratory settings. To demonstrate this, we also show a high-resolution time series of ΩAr over multiple years of growth in a Porites skeleton from the Great Barrier Reef, and we evaluate the response of ΩAr in juvenile Acropora cultured under elevated CO2 and temperature.

  15. Intertwined electron-nuclear motion in frustrated double ionization in driven heteronuclear molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilà, A.; Zhu, J.; Scrinzi, A.; Emmanouilidou, A.

    2018-03-01

    We study frustrated double ionization (FDI) in a strongly-driven heteronuclear molecule HeH+ and compare with H2. We compute the probability distribution of the sum of the final kinetic energies of the nuclei for strongly-driven HeH+. We find that this distribution has more than one peak for strongly-driven HeH+, a feature we do not find to be present for strongly-driven H2. Moreover, we compute the probability distribution of the principal quantum number n of FDI. We find that this distribution has several peaks for strongly-driven HeH+, while the respective distribution has one main peak and a ‘shoulder’ at lower principal quantum numbers n for strongly-driven H2. Surprisingly, we find this feature to be a clear signature of the intertwined electron-nuclear motion.

  16. In situ Raman spectroelectrochemical study of 13C-labeled fullerene peapods and carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbác, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Zukalová, Markéta; Dunsch, Lothar

    2007-10-01

    C60 fullerene peapods and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) containing highly 13C enriched C60 and inner tubes, respectively, are studied using Raman spectroscopy and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry in order to follow the influence of 13C enrichment on the vibrational pattern of these carbon nanostructures. The Raman response of 13C60 after encapsulation in fullerene peapods differs from that of isotope-natural species, (Nat)C60. The Raman A(g)(2) mode of encapsulated 13C60 is upshifted in frequency compared to that of the (Nat)C60 peapods with the same filling factor. The chemical doping of 13C60 peapods (peapod = C(60)@SWCNT) with K-vapor leads to the downshift of the A(g)(2) mode, similar to the case of (Nat)C60 peapods. The 13C60 peapods were successfully transformed into DWCNTs, which confirms high filling of single-walled (SW) CNTs with 13C60. The DWCNTs exhibited distinctly downshifted G and D Raman modes for inner tubes, which proves that only inner tubes were enriched by 13C. The in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry of (Nat)C60 exhibits strong anodic enhancement, while for 13C60 peapods the enhancement is only weak. On the other hand, the electrochemical charging of the inner-tube-labeled DWCNTs (13C(i)-DWCNTs) followed the behavior of ordinary (Nat)C(i)-DWCNTs as indicated by in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry. In addition, the spectroelectrochemical behavior of the G mode of inner tubes in 13C(i)-DWCNTs is followed from the start of the electrochemical doping, which was not feasible for (Nat)C(i)-DWCNTs.

  17. Detection of melamine on fractals of unmodified gold nanoparticles by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Pradip Kumar; Huang, Yi-Fan; Chattopadhyay, Surojit

    2014-01-01

    A simple way of detecting melamine in raw milk is demonstrated via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using fractals of bare and nonfunctionalized ~30 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNP) distributed on a solid support. The technique demonstrates the formation of AuNP fractals, from a random distribution, upon exposure to melamine, that enhance the Raman scattering cross-section to enable detection by SERS. The agglomeration, which is pronounced at higher melamine concentrations, is demonstrated directly through imaging, and the red-shift of the plasmon absorption peak of the AuNP fractal away from 530 nm by finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations. The agglomeration results in a strong plasmon field, shown by FDTD, over the interparticle sites that enhances the Raman scattering cross-section of melamine and ensures unambiguous detection. Limit of detection of 100 ppb could be achieved reproducibly.

  18. Raman selection rule of surface optical phonon in ZnS nanobelts

    KAUST Repository

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    2016-02-18

    We report Raman scattering results of high-quality wurtzite ZnS nanobelts (NBs) grown by chemical vapor deposition. In Raman spectrum, the ensembles of ZnS NBs exhibit first order phonon modes at 274 cm-1 and 350 cm-1, corresponding to A1/E1 transverse optical and A1/E1 longitudinal optical phonons, in addition with strong surface optical (SO) phonon mode at 329 cm-1. The existence of SO band is confirmed by its shift with different surrounding dielectric media. Polarization dependent Raman spectrum was performed on a single ZnS NB and for the first time SO phonon band has been detected on a single nanobelt. Different selection rules of SO phonon modeshown from their corresponding E1/A1 phonon modeswere attributed to the anisotropic translational symmetry breaking on the NB surface.

  19. In-situ Raman spectroscopy to elucidate the influence of adsorption in graphene electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Beld, Wesley T E; Odijk, Mathieu; Vervuurt, René H J; Weber, Jan-Willem; Bol, Ageeth A; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C T

    2017-03-24

    Electrochemistry on graphene is of particular interest due to graphene's high surface area, high electrical conductivity and low interfacial capacitance. Because the graphene Fermi level can be probed by its strong Raman signal, information on the graphene doping can be obtained which in turn can provide information on adsorbed atoms or molecules. For this paper, the adsorption analysis was successfully performed using three electroactive substances with different electrode interaction mechanisms: hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride (RuHex), ferrocenemethanol (FcMeOH) and potassium ferricyanide/potassium ferrocyanide (Fe(CN) 6 ). The adsorption state was probed by analysing the G-peak position in the measured in-situ Raman spectrum during electrochemical experiments. We conclude that electrochemical Raman spectroscopy on graphene is a valuable tool to obtain in-situ information on adsorbed species on graphene, isolated from the rest of the electrochemical behaviour.

  20. Diffusion Raman et luminescence dans des aerogels de silice purs ou dopes Dy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerri, F.; Fabre, F.; Zwick, A.; Bournett, D.

    1994-02-01

    Light scattering studies of pure and Dy doped aerogels are presented. Careful examination of Stokes and anti-Stokes spectra allow the discrimination between Raman and luminescence processes. It is shown that in pure aerogels, scattered intensity is due to Raman processes only, and the density of vibrational states does not exhibit any singularity. The fractal properties of the structure imply modifications not only in the spectral distribution of the low frequency modes (usually labelled phonons and fractons) but alsoin the high frequency one, at least up to 600 cm-1. In Dy-doped dense silica, coupling between electronic and vibronic excitations is evidenced by the presence of anti-Stokes luminescence. In Dy-doped aerogels, the enlarged Dy3+ electronic levels, strongly coupled with vibrational states give rise to emission processes traducing the response of the sample as a whole, rather than resonant Raman scattering or luminescence processes.

  1. [The application of piecewise direct standardization with SNV in calibration transfer of Raman spectra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-wei; Dai, Lian-kui; Dong, Xue-feng

    2011-05-01

    To implement calibration transfer between Raman spectrometers, an improved piecewise direct standardization (PDS) is proposed in the present paper. Standard normal variate (SNV) is firstly introduced to reduce the influence of spectral background and intensity corresponding to the master spectrometer and the slave spectrometer; then PDS algorithm is used to eliminate the differences between Raman spectra for a specific sample. Moreover, a new quantitative criterion, called transfer error rate, is proposed to evaluate the performance of calibration model transfer. This improved PDS is applied to Raman spectral analysis of gasoline. The result shows that the proposed algorithm not only needs a small quantity of transfer samples, but also obtains high transfer accuracy and strong model robustness.

  2. Anomalous lattice vibrations of monolayer MoS 2 probed by ultraviolet Raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hsiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive Raman scattering study of monolayer MoS2 with increasing laser excitation energies ranging from the near-infrared to the deep-ultraviolet. The Raman scattering intensities from the second-order phonon modes are revealed to be enhanced anomalously by only the ultraviolet excitation wavelength 354 nm. We demonstrate theoretically that such resonant behavior arises from a strong optical absorption that forms near the Γ point and of the band structure and an inter-valley resonant electronic scattering by the M-point phonons. These results advance our understanding of the double resonance Raman scattering process in low-dimensional semiconducting nanomaterials and provide a foundation for the technological development of monolayer MoS2 in the ultraviolet frequency range. © the Owner Societies 2015.

  3. Biomedical Applications of Micro-Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    al., "Visible, near-infrared, and ultraviolet laser- excited Raman spectroscopy of the monocytes/macrophages (U937) cells", J. Raman Spectrosc., 41...Visible, near-infrared, and ultraviolet laser-excited Raman spectroscopy of the monocytes/macrophages (U937) cells,” J. Raman Spectrosc., 41(3), 268...spectroscopy,” Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B-Biology, 16(2), 211-233 (1992). [17] K. Kneipp, H. Kneipp, and H. G. Bohr, “Single-molecule SERS

  4. Intensity-carrying modes in Raman and Raman optical activity spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luber, Sandra; Reiher, Markus

    2009-08-24

    We describe a quantum-chemical approach for the determination of modes with maximum Raman and Raman optical activity (ROA) intensity by maximizing the intensities with respect to the Raman and Raman optical activity intensity, respectively, which is shown to lead to eigenvalue equations. The intensity-carrying modes are in general hypothetical modes and do not directly correspond to a certain normal mode in the spectrum. However, they provide information about those molecular distortions leading to intense bands in the spectrum. Modes with maximum Raman intensity are presented for propane-1,3-dione, propane-1,3-dionate, and Lambda-tris(propane-1,3-dionato)cobalt(III). Moreover, the mode with highest ROA intensity is examined for this chiral cobalt complex and also for the (chiral) amino acid L-tryptophan. The Raman and ROA high-intensity modes are an optimal starting guess for intensity-tracking calculations, in which selectively normal modes with high Raman or ROA intensity are converged. We present the first Raman and ROA intensity-tracking calculations. These reveal a high potential for large molecules, for which the selective calculation of normal modes with high intensity is desirable in view of the large computational effort required for the calculation of Raman and ROA polarizability property tensors.

  5. Defects in individual semiconducting single wall carbon nanotubes: Raman spectroscopic and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbac, Martin; Hsieh, Ya-Ping; Farhat, Hootan; Kavan, Ladislav; Hofmann, Mario; Kong, Jing; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2010-11-10

    Raman spectroscopy and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry have been used to study the influence of defects on the Raman spectra of semiconducting individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The defects were created intentionally on part of an originally defect-free individual semiconducting nanotube, which allowed us to analyze how defects influence this particular nanotube. The formation of defects was followed by Raman spectroscopy that showed D band intensity coming from the defective part and no D band intensity coming from the original part of the same nanotube. It is shown that the presence of defects also reduces the intensity of the symmetry-allowed Raman features. Furthermore, the changes to the Raman resonance window upon the introduction of defects are analyzed. It is demonstrated that defects lead to both a broadening of the Raman resonance profile and a decrease in the maximum intensity of the resonance profile. The in situ Raman spectroelectrochemical data show a doping dependence of the Raman features taken from the defective part of the tested SWCNT.

  6. Raman amplification in optical communication systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    Fiber Raman amplifiers are investigated with the purpose of identifying new applications and limitations for their use in optical communication systems. Three main topics are investigated, namely: New applications of dispersion compensating Raman amplifiers, the use Raman amplification to increase...... støjtal under 4,5 dB og en samlet udgangseffekt på 22 dBm. Med henblik på at forlænge rækkevidden af fremtidige access-netværk foreslås en ny arkitektur for såkaldte langdistance passive optiske netværk (PON). Dette system evalueres både teoretisk og eksperimentelt. Distribueret Raman-forstærkning bruges...

  7. Emerging Dental Applications of Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo-Smith, Lin-P'ing; Hewko, Mark; Sowa, Michael G.

    Until recently, the application of Raman spectroscopy to investigate dental tissues has primarily focused on using microspectroscopy to characterize dentin and enamel structures as well as to understand the adhesive interface of various resin and bonding agents used in restorative procedures. With the advent of improved laser, imaging/mapping and fibre optic technologies, the applications have expanded to investigate various biomedical problems ranging from oral cancer, bacterial identification and early dental caries detection. The overall aim of these applications is to develop Raman spectroscopy into a tool for use in the dental clinic. This chapter presents the recent dental applications of Raman spectroscopy as well as discusses the potential, strengths and limitations of the technology in comparison with alternative techniques. In addition, a discussion and rationale about combining Raman spectroscopy with other optical techniques will be included.

  8. Implementation of Deep Ultraviolet Raman Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chuan

    are located in the visible range, e.g. for petroleum product analysis. Deep Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy applied to this research field was claimed to be able to solve the problem. Chapter 5 is devoted to gasoline analysis by the use of the DUV Raman spectroscopy. Firstly, some sampling difficulties...... (absorption, condensation) are described. We have found a way to solve the problems, and our solution, using a special designed gas gap cell to obtain measurements of extraordinary high quality, are presented. The DUV Raman spectra of gasoline were excited by three different wavelengths, 257.3, 244.0 and 229...... spectra of the gasoline samples. It is virtually unimportant what the rest of the sample consisted of. The most intense characteristic band is located at 1381 cm-1. The Raman spectra of home-made artificial gasoline mixtures - with gradually increasing Naphthalene contents - can be used to determine...

  9. Energy dissipation by a longitudinal Raman process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano, U.; Inokuti, Mitio

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a longitudinal Raman process is introduced to encompass the indirect transmission of energy from slow electrons to nuclei through the reversible polarization of surrounding electrons. Experimental approaches are sought to assess this process quantitatively

  10. CAMEX-3 SCANNING RAMAN LIDAR V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Scanning Raman Lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) dataset collected data during the CAMEX-3 campaign on Andros Island during the period 6 August - 20 September...

  11. Development of a beveled fiber-optic confocal Raman probe for enhancing in vivo epithelial tissue Raman measurements at endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2013-07-01

    We report on the development of a beveled fiber-optic confocal Raman probe coupled with a ball lens for enhancing in vivo epithelial tissue Raman measurements at endoscopy. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that by selecting a proper fiber-ball lens distance and beveled angle of collection fibers, the confocal Raman probe design can be optimized for maximizing shallower tissue Raman measurements in epithelial tissue; in addition, the ratio of epithelium to stromal Raman photons collected using an optimized confocal Raman probe is approximately 19-fold higher than that using a volume-type Raman probe. Further experiments confirm that the confocal Raman endoscopic probe developed is in favor of probing superficial tissue Raman signals from a two-layer tissue phantom as well as esophagus tissue in vivo during endoscopy. This work suggests the great potential of applying the beveled fiber-optic confocal Raman probe for improving in vivo diagnosis of precancer occurring in epithelial tissue at endoscopy.

  12. Raman assisted lightwave synthesized frequency sweeper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Tegtmeier; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    We present a Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweeper comprising a Raman amplifier for loss compensation. The generated pulse train contains 123 pulses and has a flat signal level as well as a low noise level.......We present a Lightwave Synthesized Frequency Sweeper comprising a Raman amplifier for loss compensation. The generated pulse train contains 123 pulses and has a flat signal level as well as a low noise level....

  13. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy on chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hübner, Jörg; Anhøj, Thomas Aarøe; Zauner, Dan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report low resolution surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) conducted with a chip based spectrometer. The flat field spectrometer presented here is fabricated in SU-8 on silicon, showing a resolution of around 3 nm and a free spectral range of around 100 nm. The output facet...... fiber. The obtained spectra show that chip based spectrometer together with the SERS active surface can be used as Raman sensor....

  14. Raman active components of skin cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Xu; Moy, Austin J; Nguyen, Hieu T. M.; Zhang, Jason; Fox, Matthew C.; Sebastian, Katherine R.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Markey, Mia K.; Tunnell, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) has shown great potential in noninvasive cancer screening. Statistically based algorithms, such as principal component analysis, are commonly employed to provide tissue classification; however, they are difficult to relate to the chemical and morphological basis of the spectroscopic features and underlying disease. As a result, we propose the first Raman biophysical model applied to in vivo skin cancer screening data. We expand upon previous models by utilizing in situ...

  15. Chirped pulse Raman amplification in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieux, G; Lyachev, A; Yang, X; Ersfeld, B; Farmer, J P; Brunetti, E; Issac, R C; Raj, G; Welsh, G H; Wiggins, S M; Jaroszynski, D A, E-mail: d.a.jaroszynski@strath.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Raman amplification in plasma has been proposed to be a promising method of amplifying short radiation pulses. Here, we investigate chirped pulse Raman amplification (CPRA) where the pump pulse is chirped and leads to spatiotemporal distributed gain, which exhibits superradiant scaling in the linear regime, usually associated with the nonlinear pump depletion and Compton amplification regimes. CPRA has the potential to serve as a high-efficiency high-fidelity amplifier/compressor stage.

  16. PM Raman fiber laser at 1679 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Ask Sebastian; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth.......We demonstrate a PM Raman fiber laser emitting light at 1679 nm. The laser has an slope efficiency of 67 % and an output power of more than 275mWwith a 27 pm linewidth....

  17. Revealing New Structural Insights from Surfactant Micelles through DLS, Microrheology and Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiul Amin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between molecular changes and microstructural evolution of rheological properties has been demonstrated for the first time in a mixed anionic/zwitterionic surfactant-based wormlike micellar system. Utilizing a novel combination of DLS-microrheology and Raman Spectroscopy, the effect of electrostatic screening on these properties of anionic (SLES and zwitterionic (CapB surfactant mixtures was studied by modulating the NaCl concentration. As Raman Spectroscopy delivers information about the molecular structure and DLS-microrheology characterizes viscoelastic properties, the combination of data delivered allows for a deeper understanding of the molecular changes underlying the viscoelastic ones. The high frequency viscoelastic response obtained through DLS-microrheology has shown the persistence of the Maxwell fluid response for low viscosity solutions at high NaCl concentrations. The intensity of the Raman band at 170 cm−1 exhibits very strong correlation with the viscosity variation. As this Raman band is assigned to hydrogen bonding, its variation with NaCl concentration additionally indicates differences in water structuring due to potential microstructural differences at low and high NaCl concentrations. The microstructural differences at low and high NaCl concentrations are further corroborated by persistence of a slow mode at the higher NaCl concentrations as seen through DLS measurements. The study illustrates the utility of the combined DLS, DLS-optical microrheology and Raman Spectroscopy in providing new molecular structural insights into the self-assembly process in complex fluids.

  18. Discrimination analysis of human lung cancer cells associated with histological type and malignancy using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Yusuke; Shinzawa, Hideyuki; Takenaka, Tatsuji; Furihata, Chie; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2010-01-01

    The Raman spectroscopic technique enables the observation of intracellular molecules without fixation or labeling procedures in situ. Raman spectroscopy is a promising technology for diagnosing cancers-especially lung cancer, one of the most common cancers in humans-and other diseases. The purpose of this study was to find an effective marker for the identification of cancer cells and their malignancy using Raman spectroscopy. We demonstrate a classification of cultured human lung cancer cells using Raman spectroscopy, principal component analysis (PCA), and linear discrimination analysis (LDA). Raman spectra of single, normal lung cells, along with four cancer cells with different pathological types, were successfully obtained with an excitation laser at 532 nm. The strong appearance of bands due to cytochrome c (cyt-c) indicates that spectra are resonant and enhanced via the Q-band near 550 nm with excitation light. The PCA loading plot suggests a large contribution of cyt-c in discriminating normal cells from cancer cells. The PCA results reflect the nature of the original cancer, such as its histological type and malignancy. The five cells were successfully discriminated by the LDA.

  19. Universality of Coherent Raman Gain Suppression in Gas-Filled Broadband-Guiding Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; Mridha, M. K.; Novoa, D.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2017-03-01

    As shown in the early 1960s, the gain in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is drastically suppressed when the rate of creation of phonons (via a pump-to-Stokes conversion) is exactly balanced by the rate of phonon annihilation (via a pump-to-anti-Stokes conversion). This occurs when the phonon coherence waves—synchronized vibrations of a large population of molecules—have identical propagation constants for both processes; i.e., they are phase-velocity matched. As recently demonstrated, hydrogen-filled photonic crystal fiber pumped in the vicinity of its zero-dispersion wavelength provides an ideal system for observing this effect. Here we report that Raman gain suppression is actually a universal feature of SRS in gas-filled hollow-core fibers and that it can strongly impair SRS even when the phase mismatch is high, particularly at high pump powers when it is normally assumed that nonlinear processes become more (not less) efficient. This counterintuitive result means that intermodal stimulated Raman scattering (for example, between LP01 and LP11 core modes) begins to dominate at high power levels. The results reported have important implications for fiber-based Raman shifters, amplifiers, or frequency combs, especially for operation in the ultraviolet, where the Raman gain is much higher.

  20. Raman and DSC studies of fragility in tellurium-zinc oxide glass formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavrou, Elissaios; Kripotou, Sotiria; Raptis, Constantine; Turrell, Sylvia; Syassen, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Raman scattering and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements have been carried out in four mixed (TeO 2 ) 1-x (ZnO) x (x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4) glasses at high temperatures (Raman and DSC through the glass transition) and high pressures (Raman) with the aim of determining the fragility of these glass forming oxides. Four different criteria, corresponding to four parameters, were applied to assess the fragility of the glasses. From the DSC studies, we have obtained the fragility parameter m which corresponds to the slopes of Arrhenius (lnQ vs. 1/T g , were Q is the heating rate) plots, and the glass transition width ΔT g . Also, from the low-frequency Raman scattering, and in particular the boson peak intensity of the glasses at T g , we have estimated the fragility ratio r R (T g ) = I min /I max whose value serves as another (empirical) fragility criterion. Finally, from high pressure Raman measurements on the glasses, we have estimated the Grueneisen parameter γ T for each glass, which constitutes the fourth fragility parameter adopted in this work. Considering the four parameters ΔT g , m, r (T g ) and γ T and the generally accepted (empirical) fragility criteria, we conclude that the mixed tellurium-zinc oxides constitute strong-to-intermediate glass formers (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. The Raman and vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-containing complexes and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxton, P.M.; Schaeffer, M.W.; Ohline, S.M.; Kim, W.; Venturo, V.A.; Felker, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results pertaining to the excitation of intermolecular vibrations in the Raman and vibronic spectra of aromatic-containing, weakly bound complexes and clusters are reported. The theoretical analysis of intermolecular Raman activity is based on the assumption that the polarizability tensor of a weakly bound species is given by the sum of the polarizability tensors of its constituent monomers. The analysis shows that the van der Waals bending fundamentals in aromatic--rare gas complexes may be expected to be strongly Raman active. More generally, it predicts strong Raman activity for intermolecular vibrations that involve the libration or internal rotation of monomer moieties having appreciable permanent polarizability anisotropies. The vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-rare gas complexes is analyzed under the assumption that every vibronic band gains its strength from an aromatic-localized transition. It is found that intermolecular vibrational excitations can accompany aromatic-localized vibronic excitations by the usual Franck--Condon mechanism or by a mechanism dependent on the librational amplitude of the aromatic moiety during the course of the pertinent intermolecular vibration. The latter mechanism can impart appreciable intensity to bands that are forbidden by rigid-molecule symmetry selection rules. The applicability of such rules is therefore called into question. Finally, experimental spectra of intermolecular transitions, obtained by mass-selective, ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies, are reported for benzene--X (X=Ar, --Ar 2 , N 2 , HCl, CO 2 , and --fluorene), fluorobenzene--Ar and --Kr, aniline--Ar, and fluorene--Ar and --Ar 2 . The results support the conclusions of the theoretical analyses and provide further evidence for the value of Raman methods in characterizing intermolecular vibrational level structures

  2. Raman enhancement effect on two-dimensional layered materials: graphene, h-BN and MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xi; Fang, Wenjing; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Araujo, Paulo T; Zhang, Xu; Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin F; Lin, Yuxuan; Zhang, Jin; Kong, Jing; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2014-06-11

    Realizing Raman enhancement on a flat surface has become increasingly attractive after the discovery of graphene-enhanced Raman scattering (GERS). Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials, exhibiting a flat surface without dangling bonds, were thought to be strong candidates for both fundamental studies of this Raman enhancement effect and its extension to meet practical applications requirements. Here, we study the Raman enhancement effect on graphene, hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), by using the copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) molecule as a probe. This molecule can sit on these layered materials in a face-on configuration. However, it is found that the Raman enhancement effect, which is observable on graphene, hBN, and MoS2, has different enhancement factors for the different vibrational modes of CuPc, depending strongly on the surfaces. Higher-frequency phonon modes of CuPc (such as those at 1342, 1452, 1531 cm(-1)) are enhanced more strongly on graphene than that on h-BN, while the lower frequency phonon modes of CuPc (such as those at 682, 749, 1142, 1185 cm(-1)) are enhanced more strongly on h-BN than that on graphene. MoS2 demonstrated the weakest Raman enhancement effect as a substrate among these three 2D materials. These differences are attributed to the different enhancement mechanisms related to the different electronic properties and chemical bonds exhibited by the three substrates: (1) graphene is zero-gap semiconductor and has a nonpolar C-C bond, which induces charge transfer (2) h-BN is insulating and has a strong B-N bond, while (3) MoS2 is semiconducting with the sulfur atoms on the surface and has a polar covalent bond (Mo-S) with the polarity in the vertical direction to the surface. Therefore, the different Raman enhancement mechanisms differ for each material: (1) charge transfer may occur for graphene; (2) strong dipole-dipole coupling may occur for h-BN, and (3) both charge transfer and dipole-dipole coupling may

  3. Enhanced Raman Scattering by Molecular Nanoaggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Akins

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of a molecular aggregate in a confined, nanodimensioned region of space leads to what might be termed a ‘molecular nanoaggregate’. The present review deals with a theoretical formulation termed ‘aggregation-enhanced Raman scattering’ (AERS, and its use in discussion of relative Raman band intensities and selection rules for nanoaggregates. AERs represents a concept for discussion of nanoaggregates that is different from those provided by resonance Raman scattering, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and Mie scattering, all of which ignore the impact of aggregation of molecules on Raman scattering. Beyond the theoretical formulation behind the AERS phenomenon, also outlined in this review are representative samples of the publications of other authors and researchers using AERS to provide explanations for experimental findings. In addition to clarifying issues regarding the use of nanocomposites involving aggregated molecules, it is found that increasing use of AERS concepts is being made to rationalize Raman spectral observations in a range of other disciplines that fall in both the physical sciences and the medical fields.

  4. Prospects for in vivo Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, E.B.; Manoharan, R.; Koo, T.-W.; Shafer, K.E.; Motz, J.T.; Fitzmaurice, M.; Kramer, J.R.; Itzkan, I.; Dasari, R.R.; Feld, M.S.

    2000-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a potentially important clinical tool for real-time diagnosis of disease and in situ evaluation of living tissue. The purpose of this article is to review the biological and physical basis of Raman spectroscopy of tissue, to assess the current status of the field and to explore future directions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy and the molecular level information it provides are explained. An overview of the evolution of Raman spectroscopic techniques in biology and medicine, from early investigations using visible laser excitation to present-day technology based on near-infrared laser excitation and charge-coupled device array detection, is presented. State-of-the-art Raman spectrometer systems for research laboratory and clinical settings are described. Modern methods of multivariate spectral analysis for extracting diagnostic, chemical and morphological information are reviewed. Several in-depth applications are presented to illustrate the methods of collecting, processing and analysing data, as well as the range of medical applications under study. Finally, the issues to be addressed in implementing Raman spectroscopy in various clinical applications, as well as some long-term directions for future study, are discussed. (author)

  5. Strong subadditivity inequality for quantum entropies and four-particle entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, Asoka; Agarwal, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    The strong subadditivity inequality for a three-particle composite system is an important inequality in quantum information theory which can be studied via a four-particle entangled state. We use two three-level atoms in Λ configuration interacting with a two-mode cavity and the Raman adiabatic passage technique for the production of the four-particle entangled state. Using this four-particle entanglement, we study various aspects of the strong subadditivity inequality

  6. Plasmonic optical antenna design for performing tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharintsev, S S; Fishman, A I; Salakhov, M Kh; Hoffmann, G G

    2013-01-01

    This paper highlights optical plasmonic antennas designed with dc-pulsed low-voltage electrochemical etching of a gold wire for implementing tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) measurements. We demonstrate a versatile electrochemical system that allows one to engineer TERS-active metallic gold tips with diverse shapes and sizes in a highly reproducible fashion. The underlying etching mechanism at a voltage-driven meniscus around a gold wire immersed into an electrolyte is discussed in detail. We show that the developed method is suitable to produce not only the simplest geometries such as cones and spheroids, but more complex designs. Attempts have been made to design plasmonic tapered antennas with quasi-uniformly spaced nano-sized bumps on the mesoscopic zone for the extra surface plasmon-light coupling. The capability of the patterned antenna to enhance and localize optical fields is demonstrated with near-field Raman microscopy and spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes bundles. (paper)

  7. NIR-FT Raman, FT-IR and surface-enhanced Raman scattering and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 122; Issue 4. NIR-FT Raman, FT-IR and surface-enhanced Raman scattering and DFT based theoretical studies on the adsorption behaviour of (S)-Phenylsuccinic acid on silver nanoparticles. D Sajan V Bena Jothy Thomas Kuruvilla I Hubert Joe. Full Papers Volume ...

  8. Integration of Correlative Raman microscopy in a dual beam FIB-SEM J. of Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Frank Jan; Liszka, B.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; van Wolferen, Hendricus A.G.M.; Otto, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    We present an integrated confocal Raman microscope in a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope (FIB SEM). The integrated system enables correlative Raman and electron microscopic analysis combined with focused ion beam sample modification on the same sample location. This provides new

  9. Development and Application of Raman Microspectroscopic and Raman Imaging Techniques for Cell Biological Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PUPPELS, G J; SCHUT, T C B; SIJTSEMA, N M; GROND, M; MARABOEUF, F; DEGRAUW, C G; FIGDOR, C G; GREVE, J

    1995-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is being used to study biological molecules for some three decades now. Thanks to continuing advances in instrumentation more and more applications have become feasible in which molecules are studied in situ, and this has enabled Raman spectroscopy to enter the realms of

  10. Quantum statistics of stimulated Raman and hyper-Raman scattering by master equation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, P.S.; Dash, J.

    1991-01-01

    A quantum theoretical density matrix formalism of stimulated Raman and hyper-Raman scattering using master equation approach is presented. The atomic system is described by two energy levels. The effects of upper level population and the cavity loss are incorporated. The photon statistics, coherence characteristics and the building up of the Stokes field are investigated. (author). 8 figs., 5 refs

  11. Bone fragility beyond strength and mineral density: Raman spectroscopy predicts femoral fracture toughness in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inzana, Jason A; Maher, Jason R; Takahata, Masahiko; Schwarz, Edward M; Berger, Andrew J; Awad, Hani A

    2013-02-22

    Clinical prediction of bone fracture risk primarily relies on measures of bone mineral density (BMD). BMD is strongly correlated with bone strength, but strength is independent of fracture toughness, which refers to the bone's resistance to crack initiation and propagation. In that sense, fracture toughness is more relevant to assessing fragility-related fracture risk, independent of trauma. We hypothesized that bone biochemistry, determined by Raman spectroscopy, predicts bone fracture toughness better than BMD. This hypothesis was tested in tumor necrosis factor-transgenic mice (TNF-tg), which develop inflammatory-erosive arthritis and osteoporosis. The left femurs of TNF-tg and wild type (WT) littermates were measured with Raman spectroscopy and micro-computed tomography. Fracture toughness was assessed by cutting a sharp notch into the anterior surface of the femoral mid-diaphysis and propagating the crack under 3 point bending. Femoral fracture toughness of TNF-tg mice was significantly reduced compared to WT controls (p=0.04). A Raman spectrum-based prediction model of fracture toughness was generated by partial least squares regression (PLSR). Raman spectrum PLSR analysis produced strong predictions of fracture toughness, while BMD was not significantly correlated and produced very weak predictions. Raman spectral components associated with mineralization quality and bone collagen were strongly leveraged in predicting fracture toughness, reiterating the limitations of mineralization density alone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Classification of oral cancers using Raman spectroscopy of serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Aditi; Talathi, Sneha; Sawant, Sharada; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Oral cancers are the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, with low 5-year disease free survival rates, attributable to late detection due to lack of reliable screening modalities. Our in vivo Raman spectroscopy studies have demonstrated classification of normal and tumor as well as cancer field effects (CFE), the earliest events in oral cancers. In view of limitations such as requirement of on-site instrumentation and stringent experimental conditions of this approach, feasibility of classification of normal and cancer using serum was explored using 532 nm excitation. In this study, strong resonance features of β-carotenes, present differentially in normal and pathological conditions, were observed. In the present study, Raman spectra of sera of 36 buccal mucosa, 33 tongue cancers and 17 healthy subjects were recorded using Raman microprobe coupled with 40X objective using 785 nm excitation, a known source of excitation for biomedical applications. To eliminate heterogeneity, average of 3 spectra recorded from each sample was subjected to PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out-cross-validation. Findings indicate average classification efficiency of ~70% for normal and cancer. Buccal mucosa and tongue cancer serum could also be classified with an efficiency of ~68%. Of the two cancers, buccal mucosa cancer and normal could be classified with a higher efficiency. Findings of the study are quite comparable to that of our earlier study, which suggest that there exist significant differences, other than β- carotenes, between normal and cancerous samples which can be exploited for the classification. Prospectively, extensive validation studies will be undertaken to confirm the findings.

  13. Thermodynamics of Silica Dissolution From In-situ Raman +Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. K.; Fumagalli, P.; Stixrude, L. P.

    2001-12-01

    Solubilities of cations, such as silicon, in water strongly effect both the physical and thermodynamical properties of supercritical metamorphic fluids. Modeling the thermodynamics of fluid-rock interactions requires therefore a profound understanding of cation dissolution and aqueous speciation. In-situ Raman experiments of the silica-water system were performed in an externally heated Bassett-type diamond-anvil cell at the Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan. Natural quartz samples (from Owl Creek Mountains, Wyoming) were loaded in the sample chamber with de-ionized or spectrographic water. All experiments used doubly polished rhenium gaskets with a thickness of 200 μ m, diameter of 1.0 mm, and a 500 μ m drillhole for the sample chamber. Temperature was measured using K-type thermocouples wrapped around both the upper and lower diamond anvils. Pressures are obtained on the basis of the shift of the 464 cm-1 Raman mode of quartz. In-situ Raman spectra were collected from 250-1200 cm-1, focusing on the vibrational modes of aqueous silica species at temperatures up to 700 ° C and pressures up to 14 kbar. We observed Si-O stretching modes attributable to dimer (H6Si2O7, 965 cm-1) and monomer (H4SiO4, 771 cm-1) aqueous silica species. The relative intensities of these two bands as a function of isochoric heating place constraints on the energetics of the polymerization reaction, if we assume that the intensity ratio is linearly related to concentration ratio. We have been able to perform experiments along two different isochores (0.9 and 0.75 g/cm3, respectively) from which we are able to derive the enthalpy of reaction.

  14. Raman spectra of selected transuranium trihalides in the solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmarth, W.R.; Begun, G.M.; Haire, R.G.; Peterson, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Raman spectral data have been obtained from a number of transuranium trihalides in the solid state. The Raman spectra of these actinide compounds are reported and compared to the published Raman spectra of isostructural compounds. Tentative symmetry assignments have been made for the observed Raman-active lattice vibrations based on nuclear site symmetry analysis of their respective crystal structures and comparisons to the symmetry assignments made for isostructural lanthanide compounds. The Raman spectral data obtained in this study represent a partial data base for the use of Raman spectroscopy for identifying the crystal structures exhibited by these and isostructural compounds

  15. Evaluation of Turmeric Powder Adulterated with Metanil Yellow Using FT-Raman and FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Schmidt, Walter; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon; Chan, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Turmeric powder (Curcuma longa L.) is valued both for its medicinal properties and for its popular culinary use, such as being a component in curry powder. Due to its high demand in international trade, turmeric powder has been subject to economically driven, hazardous chemical adulteration. This study utilized Fourier Transform-Raman (FT-Raman) and Fourier Transform-Infra Red (FT-IR) spectroscopy as separate but complementary methods for detecting metanil yellow adulteration of turmeric powder. Sample mixtures of turmeric powder and metanil yellow were prepared at concentrations of 30%, 25%, 20%, 15%, 10%, 5%, 1%, and 0.01% (w/w). FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were acquired for these mixture samples as well as for pure samples of turmeric powder and metanil yellow. Spectral analysis showed that the FT-IR method in this study could detect the metanil yellow at the 5% concentration, while the FT-Raman method appeared to be more sensitive and could detect the metanil yellow at the 1% concentration. Relationships between metanil yellow spectral peak intensities and metanil yellow concentration were established using representative peaks at FT-Raman 1406 cm−1 and FT-IR 1140 cm−1 with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.95, respectively. PMID:28231130

  16. Evaluation of Turmeric Powder Adulterated with Metanil Yellow Using FT-Raman and FT-IR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Sagar; Chao, Kuanglin; Schmidt, Walter; Qin, Jianwei; Kim, Moon; Chan, Diane

    2016-05-17

    Turmeric powder ( Curcuma longa L.) is valued both for its medicinal properties and for its popular culinary use, such as being a component in curry powder. Due to its high demand in international trade, turmeric powder has been subject to economically driven, hazardous chemical adulteration. This study utilized Fourier Transform-Raman (FT-Raman) and Fourier Transform-Infra Red (FT-IR) spectroscopy as separate but complementary methods for detecting metanil yellow adulteration of turmeric powder. Sample mixtures of turmeric powder and metanil yellow were prepared at concentrations of 30%, 25%, 20%, 15%, 10%, 5%, 1%, and 0.01% ( w/w ). FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were acquired for these mixture samples as well as for pure samples of turmeric powder and metanil yellow. Spectral analysis showed that the FT-IR method in this study could detect the metanil yellow at the 5% concentration, while the FT-Raman method appeared to be more sensitive and could detect the metanil yellow at the 1% concentration. Relationships between metanil yellow spectral peak intensities and metanil yellow concentration were established using representative peaks at FT-Raman 1406 cm -1 and FT-IR 1140 cm -1 with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.95, respectively.

  17. Evaluation of Turmeric Powder Adulterated with Metanil Yellow Using FT-Raman and FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Dhakal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Turmeric powder (Curcuma longa L. is valued both for its medicinal properties and for its popular culinary use, such as being a component in curry powder. Due to its high demand in international trade, turmeric powder has been subject to economically driven, hazardous chemical adulteration. This study utilized Fourier Transform-Raman (FT-Raman and Fourier Transform-Infra Red (FT-IR spectroscopy as separate but complementary methods for detecting metanil yellow adulteration of turmeric powder. Sample mixtures of turmeric powder and metanil yellow were prepared at concentrations of 30%, 25%, 20%, 15%, 10%, 5%, 1%, and 0.01% (w/w. FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were acquired for these mixture samples as well as for pure samples of turmeric powder and metanil yellow. Spectral analysis showed that the FT-IR method in this study could detect the metanil yellow at the 5% concentration, while the FT-Raman method appeared to be more sensitive and could detect the metanil yellow at the 1% concentration. Relationships between metanil yellow spectral peak intensities and metanil yellow concentration were established using representative peaks at FT-Raman 1406 cm−1 and FT-IR 1140 cm−1 with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.95, respectively.

  18. Value-driven attentional capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian A; Laurent, Patryk A; Yantis, Steven

    2011-06-21

    Attention selects which aspects of sensory input are brought to awareness. To promote survival and well-being, attention prioritizes stimuli both voluntarily, according to context-specific goals (e.g., searching for car keys), and involuntarily, through attentional capture driven by physical salience (e.g., looking toward a sudden noise). Valuable stimuli strongly modulate voluntary attention allocation, but there is little evidence that high-value but contextually irrelevant stimuli capture attention as a consequence of reward learning. Here we show that visual search for a salient target is slowed by the presence of an inconspicuous, task-irrelevant item that was previously associated with monetary reward during a brief training session. Thus, arbitrary and otherwise neutral stimuli imbued with value via associative learning capture attention powerfully and persistently during extinction, independently of goals and salience. Vulnerability to such value-driven attentional capture covaries across individuals with working memory capacity and trait impulsivity. This unique form of attentional capture may provide a useful model for investigating failures of cognitive control in clinical syndromes in which value assigned to stimuli conflicts with behavioral goals (e.g., addiction, obesity).

  19. In situ insights into shock-driven reactive flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Dana

    2017-06-01

    Shock-driven reactions are commonplace. Examples include the detonation of high explosives, shock-driven dissociation of polymers, and transformation of carbon from graphite to diamond phases. The study of shock-driven chemical reactions is important for understanding reaction thresholds, their mechanisms and rates, and associated state sensitivities under the extreme conditions generated by shock compression. Reactions are distinguished by their thermicity - e.g. the volume and enthalpy changes along the reaction coordinate. A survey of the hallmarks of shock-driven reactivity for a variety of simple molecules and polymers will be presented, including benzene, acetylenes and nitriles, and formic acid. Many of the examples will illustrate the nature of the reactive flow through particle velocity wave profiles measured by in situ electromagnetic gauging in gas gun-driven plate impact experiments. General trends will be presented linking molecular moieties, shock temperatures, and reaction state sensitivities. Progress in applying bond-specific diagnostics will also be presented, including time-resolved Raman spectroscopy, and recent results of in situ x-ray diffraction of carbon at the Linac Coherent Light Souce (LCLS) free electron laser.

  20. Investigation of stratigraphic mapping in paintings using micro-Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Georgios Th.; Apostolidis, Georgios K.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, microRaman spectroscopy is used to investigate the stratigraphic mapping in paintings. The objective of mapping imaging is to segment the dataset, here spectra, into clusters each of which consisting spectra that have similar characteristics; hence, similar chemical composition. The spatial distribution of such clusters can be illustrated in pseudocolor images, in which each pixel of image is colored according to its cluster membership. Such mapping images convey information about the spatial distribution of the chemical substances in an object. Moreover, the laser light source that is used has excitation in 1064 nm, i.e., near infrared (NIR), allowing the penetration of the radiation in deeper layers. Thus, the mapping images that are produced by clustering the acquired spectra (specifying specific bands of Raman shifts) can provide stratigraphic information in the mapping images, i.e., images that convey information of the distribution of substances from deeper, as well. To cluster the spectra, unsupervised machine learning algorithms are applied, e.g., hierarchical clustering. Furthermore, the optical microscopy camera (×50), where the Raman probe (B and WTek iRaman EX) is plugged in, is attached to a computerized numerical control (CNC) system which is driven by a software that is specially developed for Raman mapping. This software except for the conventional CNC operation allows the user to parameterize the spectrometer and check each and every measurement to ensure proper acquisition. This facility is important in painting investigation because some materials are vulnerable to such specific parameterization that other materials demand. The technique is tested on a portable experimental overpainted icon of a known stratigraphy. Specifically, the under icon, i.e., the wavy hair of "Saint James", can be separated from upper icon, i.e., the halo of Mother of God in the "Descent of the Cross".

  1. Probing of different conformations of piperazine using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SenGupta, Sumana, E-mail: sumansg@barc.gov.in; Maiti, Nandita, E-mail: nanbis@gmail.com; Chadha, Ridhima; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2014-06-03

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Most stable conformation of piperazine molecule is equatorial–equatorial chair form. • Equatorial–equatorial chair form is predominant in pure solid. • Strongly dipolar equatorial–axial form is most stabilized in aqueous solution. • Equatorial–axial form vertically binds to Ag/Ag{sup +} through axial N-atom. - Abstract: Piperazine exists in a number of energetically close structural conformations, and here, we investigated the dependence of their relative abundance on the surrounding conditions by using Raman and SERS spectroscopy in pure solid, aqueous solution and Ag hydrosol. The experimental results were interpreted by DFT calculations using B3LYP functional with aug-cc-pvdz/LANL2DZ basis sets. In the chair form of piperazine, which is more stable than the skewed boat by ∼8 kcal mol{sup −1}, the two N–H bonds can remain equatorial or axial, leading to three different conformations, eq–eq, eq–ax and ax–ax. The calculated Raman spectrum of the lowest energy eq–eq conformation corresponds well with the experimental spectrum in pure solid, indicating eq–eq to be predominant. But, the contribution of the eq–ax conformation was found to be maximum in aqueous solution. The SERS spectrum revealed that eq–ax conformation was preferably adopted as piperazine was adsorbed vertically through its axial N-atom over silver nanoparticle surface.

  2. Raman spectroscopic features of Al- Fe3+- poor magnesiochromite and Fe2+- Fe3+- rich ferrian chromite solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbish, Sherif

    2017-08-01

    Naturally occurring Al- Fe3 +- poor magnesiochromite and Fe2+- Fe3 +- rich ferrian chromite solid solutions have been analyzed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The results reflect a strong positive correlation between the Fe3 + # [Fe3+/(Fe3 ++Cr + Al)] and the positions of all Raman bands. A positive correlation of the Raman band positions with Mg# [Mg/(Mg + Fe2 +)] is less stringent. Raman spectra of magnesiochromite and ferrian chromite show seven and six bands, respectively, in the spectral region of 800 - 100 cm- 1. The most intense band in both minerals is identified as symmetric stretching vibrational mode, ν 1(A 1g ). In the intermediate Raman-shift region (400-600 cm- 1), the significant bands are attributed to the ν 3(F 2g ) > ν 4(F 2g ) > ν 2(E g ) modes. The bands with the lowest Raman shifts (< 200 cm- 1) are assigned to F 2g (trans) translatory lattice modes. Extra bands in magnesiochromite (two bands) and in ferrian chromite (one weak band) are attributed to lowering in local symmetry and order/disorder effects.

  3. On-site Raman analysis of ancient glasses and stained-glass windows: modeling, procedure, lixiviation and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournie, Aurelie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the possibilities of Raman spectrometry to identify on site old glasses (objects, stained-glass windows...) whatever been their preserving state. The efficiency of Raman analysis depends strongly of the structural organization of glasses and then of their technological history. In order to differentiate the great silicate family compounds from their Raman analysis, a methodology has been developed: data acquisition and spectrum processing, Raman parameters extraction and classification of these glasses. This approach has then been extended to crystalline phosphates and silicates. Beforehand, correlations between crystallo-chemical parameters and vibrational signatures have been considered. The old glasses are often recovered by a corrosion layer which induces important changes on the Raman signature. Four layers have been identified and characterized by a multi-scale study: leached porous layer, transition zone, cracked zone and sound glass. The results show that only an analytical chemistry approach (databases of Raman signatures) is not sufficient and that a solid chemistry and physics approach is required to explain the spectral answers and extract the relevant parameters from glasses preserving [fr

  4. Polarized Raman study on the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yang

    2014-11-01

    Polarized Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films on different substrates prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Interestingly, the Raman spectra of BiFeO3 films exhibit distinct polarization dependences. The symmetries of the fundamental Raman modes in 50-700 cm-1 were identified based on group theory. The symmetries of the high order Raman modes in 900-1500 cm-1 of BiFeO3 are determined for the first time, which can provide strong clarifications to the symmetry of the fundamental peaks in 400-700 cm-1 in return. Moreover, the lattice structures of BiFeO3 films are identified consequently on the basis of Raman spectroscopy. BiFeO3 films on SrRuO3 coated SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate, CaRuO3 coated SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate and tin-doped indium oxide substrate are found to be in the rhombohedral structure, while BiFeO3 film on SrRuO3 coated Nb: SrTiO3 (0 0 1) substrate is in the monoclinic structure. Our results suggest that polarized Raman spectroscopy would be a feasible tool to study the lattice structure of BiFeO3 films.

  5. Biological pH sensing based on the environmentally friendly Raman technique through a polyaniline probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songyang; Liu, Zhiming; Su, Chengkang; Chen, Haolin; Fei, Xixi; Guo, Zhouyi

    2017-02-01

    The biological pH plays an important role in various cellular processes. In this work, a novel strategy is reported for biological pH sensing by using Raman spectroscopy and polyaniline nanoparticles (PANI NPs) as the pH-sensitive Raman probe. It is found that the Raman spectrum of PANI NPs is strongly dependent on the pH value. The intensities of Raman spectral bands at 1225 and 1454 cm -1 increase obviously with pH value varying from 5.5 to 8.0, which covers the range of regular biological pH variation. The pH-dependent Raman performance of PANI NPs, as well as their robust Raman signals and sensitivities to pH, was well retained after the nanoparticles incorporated into living 4T1 breast adenocarcinoma cells. The data indicate that such PANI NPs can be used as an effective biological pH sensor. Most interestingly, the PANI spherical nanostructures can be acquired by a low-cost, metal-free, and one-pot oxidative polymerization, which gives them excellent biocompatibility for further biological applications.

  6. Determination of yolk contamination in liquid egg white using Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluff, K; Konda Naganathan, G; Jonnalagada, D; Mortensen, I; Wehling, R; Subbiah, J

    2016-07-01

    Purified egg white is an important ingredient in a number of baked and confectionary foods because of its foaming properties. However, yolk contamination in amounts as low as 0.01% can impede the foaming ability of egg white. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy to evaluate the hypothesis that yolk contamination in egg white could be detected based on its molecular optical properties. Yolk contaminated egg white samples (n = 115) with contamination levels ranging from 0% to 0.25% (on weight basis) were prepared. The samples were excited with a 785 nm laser and Raman spectra from 250 to 3,200 cm(-1) were recorded. The Raman spectra were baseline corrected using an optimized piecewise cubic interpolation on each spectrum and then normalized with a standard normal variate transformation. Samples were randomly divided into calibration (n = 77) and validation (n = 38) data sets. A partial least squares regression (PLSR) model was developed to predict yolk contamination levels, based on the Raman spectral fingerprint. Raman spectral peaks, in the spectral region of 1,080 and 1,666 cm(-1), had the largest influence on detecting yolk contamination in egg white. The PLSR model was able to correctly predict yolk contamination levels with an R(2) = 0.90 in the validation data set. These results demonstrate the capability of Raman spectroscopy for detection of yolk contamination at very low levels in egg white and present a strong case for development of an on-line system to be deployed in egg processing plants. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of urine by an ingenious near-infrared Raman spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shangyuan; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Yongzeng; Chen, Guannan; Huang, Zufang; Liao, Xiaohua; Xie, Zhiming; Chen, Rong

    2007-11-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of an elaborately devised near-infrared Raman system in analysis of urine. The broad band in the long-wavelength region of the electronic absorption spectra of the sol with added adsorbent at certain concentrations has been explained in terms of the aggregation of the colloidal silver particles. We have reported the surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectra of urine, and studied the silver solution enhanced effects on the urine Raman scattering. The Raman bands of human's urine was assigned to certain molecule vibrations. We have found that different donators have dissimilar SERS of urine in different physiological condition. Comparatively few studies have explored the ability of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of urine acid. In the present report, we investigated the ability of surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy to measure uric acid in the human urine. The results suggested that the present Raman system holds considerable promise for practical use. Practical applications such as the quantitative medical examination of urine metabolites may also be feasible in the near future.

  8. Self-consistent Langmuir waves in resonantly driven thermal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, R. R.; Charman, A. E.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2007-01-01

    The longitudinal dynamics of a resonantly driven Langmuir wave are analyzed in the limit that the growth of the electrostatic wave is slow compared to the bounce frequency. Using simple physical arguments, the nonlinear distribution function is shown to be nearly invariant in the canonical particle action, provided both a spatially uniform term and higher-order spatial harmonics are included along with the fundamental in the longitudinal electric field. Requirements of self-consistency with the electrostatic potential yield the basic properties of the nonlinear distribution function, including a frequency shift that agrees closely with driven, electrostatic particle simulations over a range of temperatures. This extends earlier work on nonlinear Langmuir waves by Morales and O'Neil [G. J. Morales and T. M. O'Neil, Phys. Rev. Lett. 28, 417 (1972)] and Dewar [R. L. Dewar, Phys. Plasmas 15, 712 (1972)], and could form the basis of a reduced kinetic treatment of plasma dynamics for accelerator applications or Raman backscatter

  9. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-01-01

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized

  10. Actively mode-locked Raman fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuezong; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Huawei; Fan, Tingwei; Feng, Yan

    2015-07-27

    Active mode-locking of Raman fiber laser is experimentally investigated for the first time. An all fiber connected and polarization maintaining loop cavity of ~500 m long is pumped by a linearly polarized 1120 nm Yb fiber laser and modulated by an acousto-optic modulator. Stable 2 ns width pulse train at 1178 nm is obtained with modulator opening time of > 50 ns. At higher power, pulses become longer, and second order Raman Stokes could take place, which however can be suppressed by adjusting the open time and modulation frequency. Transient pulse evolution measurement confirms the absence of relaxation oscillation in Raman fiber laser. Tuning of repetition rate from 392 kHz to 31.37 MHz is obtained with harmonic mode locking.

  11. Characterization of Kevlar Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washer, Glenn; Brooks, Thomas; Saulsberry, Regor

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the characterization of Kevlar composite materials using Raman spectroscopy. The goal of the research is to develop and understand the Raman spectrum of Kevlar materials to provide a foundation for the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies based on the interaction of laser light with the polymer Kevlar. The paper discusses the fundamental aspects of experimental characterization of the spectrum of Kevlar, including the effects of incident wavelength, polarization and laser power. The effects of environmental exposure of Kevlar materials on certain characteristics of its Raman spectrum are explored, as well as the effects of applied stress. This data may provide a foundation for the development of NDE technologies intended to detect the in-situ deterioration of Kevlar materials used for engineering applications that can later be extended to other materials such as carbon fiber composites.

  12. Raman scattering of rare earth hexaborides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogita, Norio; Hasegawa, Takumi; Udagawa, Masayuki; Iga, Fumitoshi; Kunii, Satoru

    2009-01-01

    Raman scattering spectra were measured for the rare-earth hexaborides RB 6 (R = Ce, Gd, or Dy). All Raman-active phonons due to B 6 vibrations were observed in the range 600 - 1400 cm -1 . Anomalous peaks were detected below 200 cm -1 , which correspond to vibrations of rare-earth ion excited by second-order Raman scattering process. The intensity and energy of the rare-earth mode decrease with decreasing temperature. This suggests that the rare-earth ion vibrates in a shallow and anharmonic potential due to the boron cage. Using the reported values of mean square displacement of rare-earth ion, we estimated the anharmonic contribution for the rare-earth vibrations.

  13. Quantum electrodynamics of strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, W.

    1983-01-01

    Quantum Electrodynamics of Strong Fields provides a broad survey of the theoretical and experimental work accomplished, presenting papers by a group of international researchers who have made significant contributions to this developing area. Exploring the quantum theory of strong fields, the volume focuses on the phase transition to a charged vacuum in strong electric fields. The contributors also discuss such related topics as QED at short distances, precision tests of QED, nonperturbative QCD and confinement, pion condensation, and strong gravitational fields In addition, the volume features a historical paper on the roots of quantum field theory in the history of quantum physics by noted researcher Friedrich Hund

  14. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopic measurement of air entrainment in argon plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fincke, J.R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into an argon plasma jet has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition to turbulence occurs, air is rapidly entrained into the jet core. The location of the transition region is thought to be driven by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Raman Spectroscopic Investigation of Dyes in Spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlemann, Ute; Ramoji, Anuradha; Rösch, Petra; Da Costa Filho, Paulo Augusto; Robert, Fabien; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-08-01

    In this study, a number of synthetic colorants for spices have been investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and surface enhanced (resonance) Raman spectroscopy (SER(S)). The aim of the study was the determination of limits of detection for each dye separately and in binary mixtures of dyes in spiked samples of the spices. Most of the investigated dyes have been azo dyes, some being water-soluble, the other being fat-soluble. Investigating the composition of food preparations is an ongoing and important branch of analytical sciences. On one hand, new ingredients have to be analyzed with regard to their contents, on the other hand, raw materials that have been tampered have to be eliminated from food production processes. In the last decades, the various Raman spectroscopic methods have proven to be successful in many areas of life and materials sciences. The ability of Raman spectroscopy to distinguish even structural very similar analytes by means of their vibrational fingerprint will also be important in this study. Nevertheless, Raman scattering is a very weak process that is oftentimes overlaid by matrix interferences or fluorescence. In order to achieve limits of detection in the nanomolar range, the signal intensity has to be increased. According to the well-known equations, there are several ways of achieving this increase: •increasing sample concentration •increasing laser power •decreasing the laser wavelength •using electronic resonance •increasing the local electromagnetic field In this study, nearly all of the above-mentioned principles were applied. In a first step, all dyes were investigated in solution at different concentrations to determine a limit of detection. In the second step, spiked spice samples have been extracted with a variety of solvents and process parameters tested. To lower the limit of detection even further, SERS spectroscopy has been used as well in as out of electronic resonance.

  16. The Driven Spinning Top

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosu, Ioan; Featonby, David

    2016-01-01

    This driven top is quite a novelty and can, with some trials, be made using the principles outlined here. This new top has many applications in developing both understanding and skills and these are detailed in the article. Depending on reader's available time and motivation they may feel an urge to make one themselves, or simply invest a few…

  17. Constellations-driven innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala

    2011-01-01

    a particularly useful point of departure for engaging in researching innovation and didactic design of digital teaching and learning instruments such as the Theme Board that are programmed and serviced 'in the sky'. I call this approach: constellation-driven innovations....

  18. Data-driven storytelling

    CERN Document Server

    Henry Riche, Nathalie

    2018-01-01

    This book is an accessible introduction to data-driven storytelling, resulting from discussions between data visualization researchers and data journalists. This book will be the first to define the topic, present compelling examples and existing resources, as well as identify challenges and new opportunities for research.

  19. Resonance Raman Optical Activity and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity analysis of Cytochrome C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim; White, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    High quality Resonance Raman (RR) and resonance Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of cytochrome c were obtained in order to perform full assignment of spectral features of the resonance ROA spectrum. The resonance ROA spectrum of cytochrome c revealed a distinct spectral signature pattern due...... Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (ChERS) spectra of the protein were successfully obtained at very low concentration (as low as 1 µM). The assignment of spectral features was based on the information obtained from the RR and resonance ROA spectra. Excellent agreement between RR and SERRS spectra is reported...

  20. Raman Optical Activity of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Barron, Laurence D.

    Now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure, Raman optical activity (ROA) measures a small difference in Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized light. As ROA spectra measure vibrational optical activity, they contain highly informative band structures sensitive to the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, nucleic acids, viruses and carbohydrates as well as the absolute configurations of small molecules. In this review we present a survey of recent studies on biomolecular structure and dynamics using ROA and also a discussion of future applications of this powerful new technique in biomedical research.

  1. Implementation of Deep Ultraviolet Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.

    2011-01-01

    Denne afhandling, "Implementation of Deep Ultraviolet Raman spectroscopy”, består i hovedsagen af to dele. Deep Ultraviolet – også kaldt DUV – står for bølgelængdeområdet 200 til 300 nm. Første del, kapitlerne 1 til 4, handler om den instrumentelle teknologi i DUV Raman-systemet. Anden del, kapitlerne 5 og 6 fokuserer på nogle få anvendelser af DUV Ramanspektroskopien. Kapitel 1 giver en kort introduktion til Ramanspektroskopi i almindelighed og DUVs relation hertil. DUV Ramanspektrometrien h...

  2. Upgrade of an old Raman Spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2004-01-01

    Improvement of a conventional Jeol Raman spectrometer with a single channel photo multiplier detector is described. New optical components (fibres, mirror, lens and CCD detector) have been chosen to design a high quality and easy-to-use instrument. Tests have shown that with this modified...... spectrometer Raman spectra can be acquired of a quality comparable to the spectra obtained previously, but the time needed to obtain a spectrum is markedly reduced. Selected test spectra and a simple calibration procedure to obtain the wavenumber values from the band CCD pixel position are presented....

  3. Transcutaneous Raman Spectroscopy of Murine Bone In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Cole, Jacqueline H.; Kreider, Jaclynn M.; Esmonde-White, Francis; Dooley, Kathryn A.; Goldstein, Steven A.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy can provide valuable information about bone tissue composition in studies of bone development, biomechanics, and health. In order to study the Raman spectra of bone in vivo, instrumentation that enhances the recovery of subsurface spectra must be developed and validated. Five fiber-optic probe configurations were considered for transcutaneous bone Raman spectroscopy of small animals. Measurements were obtained from the tibia of sacrificed mice, and the bone Raman signal was...

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on laser-engineered ruthenium dye-functionalized nanoporous gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Lina [Department of Chemistry, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany); Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Franzka, Steffen [Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Analytics on the Nanoscale (ICAN), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47047 Duisburg (Germany); Biener, Monika; Biener, Jürgen [Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Hartmann, Nils, E-mail: nils.hartmann@uni-due.de [Department of Chemistry, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany); Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Interdisciplinary Center for Analytics on the Nanoscale (ICAN), University of Duisburg-Essen, 47047 Duisburg (Germany)

    2016-06-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Photothermal laser processing is used to modify the surface structure of nanoporous gold. • Laser-fabricated structures exhibit pore sizes in the range from 25 nm to 200 nm and higher. • Ru-dye-functionalized surface structures are used in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) studies. • Raman peak intensities of N719, a commercial Ru-dye, exhibit a strong dependence on the pore size. • Maximum Raman peak intensities are observed for small pore sizes close to 25 nm. - Abstract: Photothermal processing of nanoporous gold with a microfocused continuous-wave laser at λ = 532 nm provides a facile means in order engineer the pore and ligament size of nanoporous gold. In this report we take advantage of this approach in order to investigate the size-dependence of enhancement effects in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Surface structures with laterally varying pore sizes from 25 nm to ≥200 nm are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and then functionalized with N719, a commercial ruthenium complex, which is widely used in dye-sensitized solar cells. Raman spectroscopy reveals the characteristic spectral features of N719. Peak intensities strongly depend on the pore size. Highest intensities are observed on the native support, i.e. on nanoporous gold with pore sizes around 25 nm. These results demonstrate the particular perspectives of laser-fabricated nanoporous gold structures in fundamental SERS studies. In particular, it is emphasized that laser-engineered porous gold substrates represent a very well defined platform in order to study size-dependent effects with high reproducibility and precision and resolve conflicting results in previous studies.

  5. Strong WW Interaction at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaez, Jose R

    1998-12-14

    We present a brief pedagogical introduction to the Effective Electroweak Chiral Lagrangians, which provide a model independent description of the WW interactions in the strong regime. When it is complemented with some unitarization or a dispersive approach, this formalism allows the study of the general strong scenario expected at the LHC, including resonances.

  6. Strong-back safety latch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch

  7. Strong-back safety latch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSantis, G.N.

    1995-03-06

    The calculation decides the integrity of the safety latch that will hold the strong-back to the pump during lifting. The safety latch will be welded to the strong-back and will latch to a 1.5-in. dia cantilever rod welded to the pump baseplate. The static and dynamic analysis shows that the safety latch will hold the strong-back to the pump if the friction clamps fail and the pump become free from the strong-back. Thus, the safety latch will meet the requirements of the Lifting and Rigging Manual for under the hook lifting for static loading; it can withstand shock loads from the strong-back falling 0.25 inch.

  8. Differentiation and classification of bacteria using vancomycin functionalized silver nanorods array based surface-enhanced raman spectroscopy an chemometric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intrinsic surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used for differentiating and classifying bacterial species with chemometric data analysis. Such differentiation has often been conducted with an insufficient sample population and strong interference from the food matrices. To address these ...

  9. In-situ Raman spectroscopy to elucidate the influence of adsorption in graphene electrochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    van den Beld, Wesley T. E.; Odijk, Mathieu; Vervuurt, Rene H. J.; Weber, Jan-Willem; Bol, Ageeth A.; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C. T.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemistry on graphene is of particular interest due to graphene?s high surface area, high electrical conductivity and low interfacial capacitance. Because the graphene Fermi level can be probed by its strong Raman signal, information on the graphene doping can be obtained which in turn can provide information on adsorbed atoms or molecules. For this paper, the adsorption analysis was successfully performed using three electroactive substances with different electrode interaction mechan...

  10. Measuring the One-Particle Excitations of Ultracold Fermionic Atoms by Stimulated Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.-L.; Georges, Antoine; Dalibard, Jean; Salomon, Christophe; Carusotto, Iacopo

    2007-01-01

    We propose a Raman spectroscopy technique which is able to probe the one-particle Green function, the Fermi surface, and the quasiparticles of a gas of strongly interacting ultracold atoms. We give quantitative examples of experimentally accessible spectra. The efficiency of the method is validated by means of simulated images for the case of a usual Fermi liquid as well as for more exotic states: specific signatures of, e.g., a d-wave pseudogap are clearly visible

  11. Study of the low-frequency Raman scattering in NaNbO sub 3 crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Bouziane, E; Ayadi, M

    2003-01-01

    The Raman scattering spectrum of the sodium niobate crystal, in both P and R phases, has been investigated from room temperature up to 440 sup d eg C. The dependence of the low-frequency (LF) spectrum clearly reveals, for the first time, over a wide temperature range, the presence of a strong quasi-elastic scattering below a LF zone centre phonon. The phase transition mechanism is discussed, considering an order-disorder process induced by the relaxation of the Nb ions.

  12. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and biocompatibility, nanodiamonds are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent nanodiamonds have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centres with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing nanodiamonds exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp(3) vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and nanodiamond size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of nanodiamonds internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively.

  13. Applications of Micro-Raman Imaging in Biomedical Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Cornelis; de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Duindam, J.J.; Duindam, J.J.; Sijtsema, N.M.; Greve, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Recent results are presented of the application of imaging micro-Raman spectrometers in cellular biophysics and biomedical research. Various micro-Raman spectrometers have been developed that are now routinely applied in these fields. Results are presented that were obtained with a linescan Raman

  14. Raman Chair | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Raman Chair was instituted in 1972 by the Government of India to commemorate the memory of the founder of the Academy, Sir C. V. Raman. Eminent scientists are invited by the Council of the Academy to occupy the Chair, for periods of between six weeks and six months. Raman Professors who have occupied the ...

  15. A Raman Study of Titanate Nanotubes | Liu | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the addition of NaOH or KOH on commercial Degussa Titania P25 was investigated using TEM, Raman and in situ Raman spectroscopy. Treatment of titania with conc. NaOH generated a tubular material corresponding to a sodium titanate. An in situ Raman study on the sodium titanate nanotubes as a function ...

  16. Operando Raman Micro Spectroscopy of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-16

    exchange site local symmetry. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by ECS. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons...Operando Raman spectroscopy.—All operando Raman spectra were acquired using a WITec Inc. (Ulm, Germany) Confocal Raman Microscope ( CRM 200). A 488

  17. The theory of the Raman effect in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindus, L.

    1976-01-01

    The most important Raman scattering mechanism in crystals is one in which the radiation interacts indirectly with the lattice via the electrons. The study of Raman scattering from crystals is an important method for obtaining information about their lattice vibration frequencies. In this synthesis paper the theory of the first order Raman effect in crystals is considered based on the essential papers. (author)

  18. Raman spectroscopy as a tool for investigating lipid protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a very well-established technique for noninvasive probing of chemical compounds. The fad that Raman scattering is an inherently weak effect has prompted many new developments in sample signal enhancement and techniques (such as surface-enhancement Raman spectroscopy [SERS]) ...

  19. A comparative performance evaluation of micro-Raman ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An indigenously designed and developed micro-Raman spectrograph, con- sisting of a diode-pumped solid-state green laser for the excitation of Raman scattering, a Raman imaging microscope, CCD as a detector and a notch filter, has been extensively studied to evaluate its performance. A dielectric edge filter ...

  20. Light-field-driven currents in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Takuya; Heide, Christian; Ullmann, Konrad; Weber, Heiko B.; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2017-10-01

    The ability to steer electrons using the strong electromagnetic field of light has opened up the possibility of controlling electron dynamics on the sub-femtosecond (less than 10‑15 seconds) timescale. In dielectrics and semiconductors, various light-field-driven effects have been explored, including high-harmonic generation, sub-optical-cycle interband population transfer and the non-perturbative change of the transient polarizability. In contrast, much less is known about light-field-driven electron dynamics in narrow-bandgap systems or in conductors, in which screening due to free carriers or light absorption hinders the application of strong optical fields. Graphene is a promising platform with which to achieve light-field-driven control of electrons in a conducting material, because of its broadband and ultrafast optical response, weak screening and high damage threshold. Here we show that a current induced in monolayer graphene by two-cycle laser pulses is sensitive to the electric-field waveform, that is, to the exact shape of the optical carrier field of the pulse, which is controlled by the carrier-envelope phase, with a precision on the attosecond (10‑18 seconds) timescale. Such a current, dependent on the carrier-envelope phase, shows a striking reversal of the direction of the current as a function of the driving field amplitude at about two volts per nanometre. This reversal indicates a transition of light–matter interaction from the weak-field (photon-driven) regime to the strong-field (light-field-driven) regime, where the intraband dynamics influence interband transitions. We show that in this strong-field regime the electron dynamics are governed by sub-optical-cycle Landau–Zener–Stückelberg interference, composed of coherent repeated Landau–Zener transitions on the femtosecond timescale. Furthermore, the influence of this sub-optical-cycle interference can be controlled with the laser polarization state. These coherent electron

  1. Redshift of A 1(longitudinal optical) mode for GaN crystals under strong electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hong; Wu, Kaijie; Zheng, Shunan; Shi, Lin; Zhang, Min; Liu, Zhenghui; Liu, Xinke; Wang, Jianfeng; Zhou, Taofei; Xu, Ke

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the property of GaN crystals under a strong electric field. The Raman spectra of GaN were measured using an ultraviolet laser, and a remarkable redshift of the A 1(LO) mode was observed. The role of the surface depletion layer was discussed, and the interrelation between the electric field and phonons was revealed. First-principles calculations indicated that, in particular, the phonons that vibrate along the [0001] direction are strongly influenced by the electric field. This effect was confirmed by a surface photovoltage experiment. The results revealed the origin of the redshift and presented the phonon property of GaN under a strong electric field.

  2. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  3. High-performance dispersive Raman and absorption spectroscopy as tools for drug identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluczyk, Olga; Andrey, Sam; Nogas, Paul; Roy, Andrew; Pawluczyk, Romuald

    2009-02-01

    Due to increasing availability of pharmaceuticals from many sources, a need is growing to quickly and efficiently analyze substances in terms of the consistency and accuracy of their chemical composition. Differences in chemical composition occur at very low concentrations, so that highly sensitive analytical methods become crucial. Recent progress in dispersive spectroscopy with the use of 2-dimensional detector arrays, permits for signal integration along a long (up to 12 mm long) entrance slit of a spectrometer, thereby increasing signal to noise ratio and improving the ability to detect small concentration changes. This is achieved with a non-scanning, non-destructive system. Two different methods using P&P Optica high performance spectrometers were used. High performance optical dispersion Raman and high performance optical absorption spectroscopy were employed to differentiate various acetaminophen-containing drugs, such as Tylenol and other generic brands, which differ in their ingredients. A 785 nm excitation wavelength was used in Raman measurements and strong Raman signals were observed in the spectral range 300-1800 cm-1. Measurements with the absorption spectrometer were performed in the wavelength range 620-1020 nm. Both Raman and absorption techniques used transmission light spectrometers with volume phase holographic gratings and provided sufficient spectral differences, often structural, allowing for drug differentiation.

  4. Silver Nanoparticle-Enhanced Resonance Raman Sensor of Chromium(III) in Seawater Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Nguyễn Hoàng; Joo, Sang-Woo

    2015-04-29

    Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (Tris-EDTA), upon binding Cr(III) in aqueous solutions at pH 8.0 on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), was found to provide a sensitive and selective Raman marker band at ~563 cm-1, which can be ascribed to the metal-N band. UV-Vis absorption spectra also supported the aggregation and structural change of EDTA upon binding Cr(III). Only for Cr(III) concentrations above 500 nM, the band at ~563 cm-1 become strongly intensified in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra. This band, due to the metal-EDTA complex, was not observed in the case of 50 mM of K+, Cd2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Na+, Cu2+, NH4+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Fe3+, Pb2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ ions. Seawater samples containing K, Mg, Ca, and Na ion concentrations higher than 8 mM also showed the characteristic Raman band at ~563 cm-1 above 500 nM, validating our method. Our approach may be useful in detecting real water samples by means of AgNPs and Raman spectroscopy.

  5. Measurement of benzenethiol adsorption to nanostructured Pt, Pd, and PtPd films using Raman spectroelectrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomfret, Michael B; Pietron, Jeremy J; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C

    2010-05-04

    Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical methods were used to study the behavior of the model adsorbate benzenethiol (BT) on nanostructured Pt, Pd, and PtPd electrodes as a function of applied potential. Benzenethiol adsorbs out of ethanolic solutions as the corresponding thiolate, and voltammetric stripping data reveal that BT is oxidatively removed from all of the nanostructured metals upon repeated oxidative and reductive cycling. Oxidative stripping potentials for BT increase in the order Pt < PtPd < Pd, indicating that BT adsorbs most strongly to nanoscale Pd. Yet, BT Raman scattering intensities, measured in situ over time scales of minutes to hours, are most persistent on the film of nanostructured Pt. Raman spectra indicate that adsorbed BT desorbs from nanoscale Pt at oxidizing potentials via cleavage of the Pt-S bond. In contrast, on nanoscale Pd and PtPd, BT is irreversibly lost due to cleavage of BT C-S bonds at oxidizing potentials, which leaves adsorbed sulfur oxides on Pd and PtPd films and effects the desulfurization of BT. While Pd and PtPd films are less sulfur-resistant than Pt films, palladium oxides, which form at higher potentials than Pt oxides, oxidatively desulfurize BT. In situ spectroelectrochemical Raman spectroscopy provides real-time, chemically specific information that complements the cyclic voltammetric data. The combination of these techniques affords a powerful and convenient method for guiding the development of sulfur-tolerant PEMFC catalysts.

  6. Silver Nanoparticle-Enhanced Resonance Raman Sensor of Chromium(III in Seawater Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyễn Hoàng Ly

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tris(hydroxymethylaminomethane ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (Tris-EDTA, upon binding Cr(III in aqueous solutions at pH 8.0 on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, was found to provide a sensitive and selective Raman marker band at ~563 cm−1, which can be ascribed to the metal-N band. UV-Vis absorption spectra also supported the aggregation and structural change of EDTA upon binding Cr(III. Only for Cr(III concentrations above 500 nM, the band at ~563 cm−1 become strongly intensified in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra. This band, due to the metal-EDTA complex, was not observed in the case of 50 mM of K+, Cd2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Na+, Cu2+, NH4+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Fe3+, Pb2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ ions. Seawater samples containing K, Mg, Ca, and Na ion concentrations higher than 8 mM also showed the characteristic Raman band at ~563 cm−1 above 500 nM, validating our method. Our approach may be useful in detecting real water samples by means of AgNPs and Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Study of nanophase TiO2 grain boundaries by Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melendres, C.A.; Narayanasamy, A.; Maroni, V.A.; Siegel, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    Raman spectra have been recorded for as-consolidated nanophase TiO 2 samples with differing grain sizes and on samples annealed in air at a variety of temperatures up to 1273 K. The nanophase samples with the smallest grain size, about 12 nm average diameter, could have 15-30% of their atoms in grain boundaries; nevertheless, the strong Raman-active lines representative of the rutile structure were found to dominate all of the observed spectra, independent of grain size and annealing treatment. These lines were quite broad in the as-consolidated nanophase samples, equally in 12 nm and 100 nm grain-size compacts, but sharpened considerably upon annealing at elevated temperatures. The Raman data give no indication of grain-boundary structures in nanophase TiO 2 that are significantly different from those in conventional polycrystals. However, defect structures within the grains, which anneal out at elevated temperatures, are evidenced by changes in the Raman spectra. 15 refs., 2 figs

  8. High axial resolution Raman probe made of a single hollow optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yuko S; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Matsuura, Yuji; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-01-01

    A ball lens mounted hollow optical fiber Raman probe (BHRP) consisting of a single hollow optical fiber (HOF) and a micro-ball lens was developed for performing a high axial resolution and high-sensitivity remote Raman analysis of biomedical tissues. The total diameter of the probe head is 640 microm. The BHRP is useful in the measurement of thin-layered tissues that are in contact with the probe's surface because the probe has a limited depth-of-field optical property. An optical calculation study suggested that it is possible to vary the probe's working distance by selecting different materials and diameters for the ball lens. Empirical studies revealed that this probe has a higher axial resolution and a higher sensitivity than an HOF Raman probe without the ball lens. The spectrum of a mouse stomach measured with the BHRP had better quality and considerably lower noise than that measured with a conventional Raman microscope. These results strongly suggest that the BHRP can be used effectively in biomedical applications.

  9. Dual-wavelength external cavity laser device for fluorescence suppression in Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuting; Cai, Zhijian; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely used in the detection of drugs, pesticides, explosives, food additives and environmental pollutants, for its characteristics of fast measurement, easy sample preparation, and molecular structure analyzing capability. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to these applications, with strong fluorescence background covering up the weak Raman signals. Recently shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) not only can completely remove the fluorescence background, but also can be easily integrated into portable Raman spectrometers. Usually, SERDS uses two lasers with small wavelength gap to excite the sample, then acquires two spectra, and subtracts one to the other to get the difference spectrum, where the fluorescence background will be rejected. So, one key aspects of successfully applying SERDS method is to obtain a dual-wavelength laser source. In this paper, a dual-wavelength laser device design based on the principles of external cavity diode laser (ECDL) is proposed, which is low-cost and compact. In addition, it has good mechanical stability because of no moving parts. These features make it an ideal laser source for SERDS technique. The experiment results showed that the device can emit narrow-spectral-width lasers of two wavelengths, with the gap smaller than 2 nanometers. The laser power corresponding to each wavelength can be up to 100mW.

  10. Raman Spectroscopy Study of Annealing-Induced Effects on Graphene Prepared by Micromechanical Exfoliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ji Eun; Ko, Taeg Yeoung; Ryu, Sun Min

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was combined with AFM to investigate the effects of thermal annealing on the graphene samples prepared by the widely used micromechanical exfoliation method. Following annealing cycles, adhesive residues were shown to contaminate graphene sheets with thin molecular layers in their close vicinity causing several new intense Raman bands. Detailed investigation shows that the Raman scattering is very strong and may be enhanced by the interaction with graphene. Although the current study does not pinpoint detailed origins for the new Raman bands, the presented results stress that graphene prepared by the above method may require extra cautions when treated with heat or possibly solvents. Since its isolation from graphite, graphene has drawn a lot of experimental and theoretical research. These efforts have been mostly in pursuit of various applications such as electronics, sensors, stretchable transparent electrodes, and various composite materials. To accomplish such graphene-based applications, understanding chemical interactions of this new material with environments during various processing treatments will become more important. Since thermal annealing is widely used in various research of graphene for varying purposes such as cleaning, nanostructuring, reactions, etc., understanding annealing-induced effects is prerequisite to many fundamental studies of graphene. In this regard, it is to be noted that there has been a controversy on the cause of the annealing-induced hole doping in graphene

  11. Interplay of structural and electronic phase separation in single crystalline La(2)CuO(4.05) studied by neutron and Raman scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Gnezdilov, V. P.; Pashkevich, Yu. G.; Tranquada, J. M.; Lemmens, P.; Guentherodt, G.; Yeremenko, A. V.; Barilo, S. N.; Shiryaev, S. V.; Kurnevich, L. A.; Gehring, P. M.

    2004-01-01

    We report a neutron and Raman scattering study of a single-crystal of La(2)CuO(4.05) prepared by high temperature electrochemical oxidation. Elastic neutron scattering measurements show the presence of two phases, corresponding to the two edges of the first miscibility gap, all the way up to 300 K. An additional oxygen redistribution, driven by electronic energies, is identified at 250 K in Raman scattering (RS) experiments by the simultaneous onset of two-phonon and two-magnon scattering, wh...

  12. A Raman Study of Titanate Nanotubes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    The nano titania produced by the electrochemical and template methods, gave amorphous titania while titania nanotubes produced by 'soft' chemical processes gave materials with good crystallinity. Initially it was believed that the tubular material had the anatase structure.13,14,16,21 Indeed XRD and Raman studies.

  13. Dynamic characterization of MEMS using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Z X; Hedley, J; Gallacher, B J; Arce-Garcia, I

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on utilizing Raman spectroscopy to characterize the motion and measure strain levels in dynamic micromechanical structures. The main advantages of such a technique is that surface features are not required to characterize the 3D motion as the crystal lattice is used as the reference frame and that it is suited to high frequency measurements. Two methodologies are presented. The first utilizes a strobed diode laser probe beam with the centre position of the Raman peak giving a measure of strain as a function of phase. A measurement resolution of 210 µstrain is obtained at frequencies up to 100 kHz. The second method uses a HeNe laser probe beam with the broadening of the Raman peak, indicating strain levels. Although no phase data are available in the latter technique, the technique is rapid and may be utilized on a Raman system without any modification. A measurement resolution of 30 µstrain is achieved and strain mapping of a region may be performed within minutes. As strobing is not used here, the technique is not frequency limited. Comparisons with alternative optical characterization techniques are made

  14. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Blanch, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA) directly monitors the stereochemistry of chiral molecules and is now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure. ROA spectra contain a wealth of information on tertiary folding, secondary structure and even the orientation of individual residues in proteins and nucleic...

  15. Basic principles of ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One such nonlinear process, namely, the third order nonlinear spectroscopy has become a popular tool to study molecular structure. Thus, the spectroscopy based on the third order optical nonlinearity called stimulated Raman spectroscopy (SRS) is a tool to extract the structural and dynamical information about a molecular ...

  16. Measured stimulated Raman gain in methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopert, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    This report is about the stimulated Raman effect in methane due to the nu 1 vibration. For various gas pressures between 150 torr and 30 atm, the Raman lineshape function was both experimentally measured and synthesized using a computer model. The stimulated Raman gain was measured by sending a pump laser beam provided by an argon-ion laser and a weak probe beam provided by a tunable dye laser through a cell of methane gas. The stimulated Raman effect caused some of the energy from the pump beam to be transferred to the probe beam. The intensity of the pump beam was low so the gain of the probe beam was on the order of parts per million. A two detector arrangement and a differential amplifier system that had a feedback loop to balance the detectors was constructed to measure the small gains. A detailed description of this detection system that was able to measure gains as small as 0.2 parts per million is provided

  17. Optical Sensors based on Raman Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jernshøj, Kit Drescher

    Formålet med denne afhandling er at give en systematisk og uddybende videnskabelig diskussion af molekylær Raman spredning, som kan danne grundlag for udviklingen af molekylespecifikke optiske sensorer til on-site, ikke-destruktiv måling. Afhandlingen falder i tre dele, to teoriafsnit, hvor første...

  18. Resonance raman studies of phenylcyclopropane radical cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godbout, J.T.; Zuilhof, H.; Heim, G.; Gould, I.R.; Goodman, J.L.; Dinnocenzo, J.P.; Myers Kelley, A.

    2000-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the radical cations of phenylcyclopropane and trans-1-phenyl-2-methylcyclopropane are reported. A near-UV pump pulse excites a photosensitizer which oxidizes the species of interest, and a visible probe pulse delayed by 35 ns obtains the spectrum of the radical ion. The

  19. Resonance Raman study of benzyl radical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, F.W.; Bajdor, K.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1992-01-01

    symmetric a1 modes. The remaining observed bands are tentatively assigned to fundamental modes of b1, a2, and b2 symmetry, and to overtones and combinations. The resonance Raman spectra are found to be quite different from previous fluorescence spectra of benzyl, and the origins of these differences...

  20. Raman spectroscopic measurements on fluoromethane clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, T. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering, Div. of Applied Physics; Ohmura, R. [Keio Univ., Kohoku-ku, Yokohama (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Hori, A. [Kitami Inst. of Technology, Kitami (Japan). Course of Civil Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The occupation of guest molecules in clathrate-structure cages is of interest to researchers, since this property is involved in the estimation of guest molecule density, the stability of clathrate hydrates, and other features. However, such occupation is known to be non-stoichiometric. It remains difficult to accurately estimate the total amount of natural gases in the hydrates located in the deep ocean or in permafrost. This paper discussed the systematic observations of fluoromethane clathrate hydrates using Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with previously obtained Raman spectra for methane (CH{sub 4}) hydrate. Four types of fluoromethane were utilized as standard guest molecules to investigate cage occupation in the hydrates, as all of them were included in the same crystal structure and shared similar functional groups. The types of fluoromethane that were used included fluoromethane (CH{sub 3}F), difluoromethane (CH{sub 2}F{sub 2}), trifluoromethane (CHF{sub 3}), and tetrafluoromethane (CF{sub 4}). The paper discussed the experimental methods including the temperature and pressure conditions of fluorocarbon hydrate formation. It was concluded that the summary of the Raman peak positions of fluoromethane molecules indicate that the influence of deuterized host molecules on the intramolecular vibration frequencies is less than that suggested by experimental error. The obtained data were confirmed to agree with the empirical model for the Raman peak positions on guest molecules, when the relative position of the guest molecule in a host cage structure is considered. 28 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  1. Application of Raman spectroscopy for cancer diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnakumar, N.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading causes of death next to heart diseases, Half of all cancer cases occur in developing countries. The conventional histopathology is usually the most trustable gold standard for pre-cancer and cancer diagnosis. However, the applicability of this method is more or less restricted because of the requirement of removing human tissues and the difficulty of real time diagnosis. Recently, there has been increased interest in 'optical biopsy' system using tissue spectroscopy to establish the pathological changes. Among optical based methods, Raman spectroscopy is a unique vibrational spectroscopic technique capable of probing biomolecular structures and conformation of tissues, and has excelled in the early detection of pre-cancer and cancer in the number of organs with high diagnostic specificity. Raman spectroscopy offers certain distinct advantages over than other optical diagnostic techniques such as high spatial resolution, use of less harmful NIR radiation, less or no sample preparation, no influence of water bands which facilitates in vivo/in situ measurements. This makes Raman spectroscopy also very useful for biomedical applications. Several research groups have demonstrated the efficacy of this technique in biomedical applications. The background and principle of these techniques will be discussed with some examples and discussions on how Raman spectroscopy can act as a promising technique for rapid in vivo diagnosis and detection of various cancers at the molecular level. (author)

  2. Construction of coherent antistokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zidan, M. D.; Jazmati, A.

    2007-01-01

    Coherent Antistokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) has been built. It consists of a Raman cell, which is filled with CO 2 gas at 5 atm pressure and a frequency doubled Nd-YAG laser pumped dye laser. The two beams are focused by means of a bi-convex lens into Raman cell. The Antistokes signals (CARS signals) are generated due to Four-wave mixing process. The antistokes signals were directed to monochrometer entrance slit by prism . The signals are detected by photomultiplier detector which is fixed on the exit slit and connected to data acquisition card located inside the computed case. The dye laser frequency has to be tuned to satisfy the energy difference between the ν 1 beam (Nd- YAG laser beam) and the ν 2 beam (the stokes beam or the dye laser beam) exactly corresponds to a vibrational - rotational Raman resonance (ν 2 - ν 1 = ν M ) in the 12 CO 2 or 13 CO 2 molecule, then the antistokes signals (ν 3 ) will be generated. The spectra of the CARS signals have been recorded to determine the isotope shift of 12 CO 2 , 13 CO 2 , which is 18.3 cm -1 . (author)

  3. Raman spectroscopy of saliva as a perspective method for periodontitis diagnostics Raman spectroscopy of saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.; Bakhmutov, D.; Minaeva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In view of its potential for biological tissues analyses at a molecular level, Raman spectroscopy in optical range has been the object of biomedical research for the last years. The main aim of this work is the development of Raman spectroscopy for organic content identifying and determination of biomarkers of saliva at a molecular level for periodontitis diagnostics. Four spectral regions were determined: 1155 and 1525 cm-1, 1033 and 1611 cm-1, which can be used as biomarkers of this widespread disease.

  4. Test-driven programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Bozhidar; Georgieva, Adriana

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, are presented some possibilities concerning the implementation of a test-driven development as a programming method. Here is offered a different point of view for creation of advanced programming techniques (build tests before programming source with all necessary software tools and modules respectively). Therefore, this nontraditional approach for easier programmer's work through building tests at first is preferable way of software development. This approach allows comparatively simple programming (applied with different object-oriented programming languages as for example JAVA, XML, PYTHON etc.). It is predictable way to develop software tools and to provide help about creating better software that is also easier to maintain. Test-driven programming is able to replace more complicated casual paradigms, used by many programmers.

  5. Optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of single nanostructures using standing-wave Raman tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mu-ying; He, Lin; Chen, Gui-hua; Yang, Guang; Li, Yong-qing

    2017-08-01

    Optical tweezers integrated with Raman spectroscopy allows analyzing a single trapped micro-particle, but is generally less effective for individual nano-sized objects in the 10-100 nm range. The main challenge is the weak gradient force on nanoparticles that is insufficient to overcome the destabilizing effect of scattering force and Brownian motion. Here, we present standing-wave Raman tweezers for stable trapping and sensitive characterization of single isolated nanostructures with a low laser power by combining a standing-wave optical trap (SWOT) with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This scheme has stronger intensity gradients and balanced scattering forces, and thus is more stable and sensitive in measuring nanoparticles in liquid with 4-8 fold increase in the Raman signals. It can be used to analyze many nanoparticles that cannot be measured with single-beam Raman tweezers, including individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT), graphene flakes, biological particles, polystyrene beads (100 nm), SERS-active metal nanoparticles, and high-refractive semiconductor nanoparticles with a low laser power of a few milliwatts. This would enable sorting and characterization of specific SWCNTs and other nanoparticles based on their increased Raman fingerprints.

  6. Gas-driven microturbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.; McWhorter, P.J.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Miller, W.M.

    1996-06-27

    This paper describes an invention which relates to microtechnology and the fabrication process for developing microelectrical systems. It describes a means for fabricating a gas-driven microturbine capable of providing autonomous propulsion in which the rapidly moving gases are directed through a micromachined turbine to power devices by direct linkage or turbo-electric generators components in a domain ranging from tenths of micrometers to thousands of micrometers.

  7. Affinity driven social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruyú, B.; Kuperman, M. N.

    2007-04-01

    In this work we present a model for evolving networks, where the driven force is related to the social affinity between individuals of a population. In the model, a set of individuals initially arranged on a regular ordered network and thus linked with their closest neighbors are allowed to rearrange their connections according to a dynamics closely related to that of the stable marriage problem. We show that the behavior of some topological properties of the resulting networks follows a non trivial pattern.

  8. Strongly interacting matter under rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yin; Lin, Zi-Wei; Huang, Xu-Guang; Liao, Jinfeng

    2018-02-01

    The vorticity-driven effects are systematically studied in various aspects. With AMPT the distributions of vorticity has been investigated in heavy ion collisions with different collision parameters. Taking the rotational polarization effect into account a generic condensate suppression mechanism is discussed and quantitatively studied with NJL model. And in chiral restored phase the chiral vortical effects would generate a new collective mode, i.e. the chiral vortical wave. Using the rotating quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions as a concrete example, we show the formation of induced flavor quadrupole in QGP and estimate the elliptic flow splitting effect for Λ baryons.

  9. Strongly interacting matter under rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Yin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The vorticity-driven effects are systematically studied in various aspects. With AMPT the distributions of vorticity has been investigated in heavy ion collisions with different collision parameters. Taking the rotational polarization effect into account a generic condensate suppression mechanism is discussed and quantitatively studied with NJL model. And in chiral restored phase the chiral vortical effects would generate a new collective mode, i.e. the chiral vortical wave. Using the rotating quark-gluon plasma in heavy ion collisions as a concrete example, we show the formation of induced flavor quadrupole in QGP and estimate the elliptic flow splitting effect for Λ baryons.

  10. Electrically enhanced hot hole driven oxidation catalysis at the interface of a plasmon-exciton hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weihua; Cao, En; Zhang, Liqiang; Xu, Xuefeng; Song, Yuzhi; Liang, Wenjie; Sun, Mengtao

    2018-03-28

    In this work, an electro-optical device based on a graphene-Ag nanoparticle hybrid is fabricated as the substrate of graphene mediated surface enhanced Raman scattering (G-SERS) manipulated by the gate and bias voltages. Plasmon-exciton coupling promotes co-driven surface catalytic reactions, where the density of states (DOS) of holes and electrons on graphene is well controlled by the gate voltage, and the kinetic energy of holes and electrons is driven by the bias voltage (or current). Our experimental results reveal that the hot holes on graphene mainly contribute to plasmon-exciton co-driven oxidation reactions. The contribution of hot electrons to oxidation reactions is less important. Our novel electro-optical device can be potentially applied in controlling plasmon-exciton co-driven oxidation or reduction reactions by tuning the gate and bias voltages.

  11. Spectroscopy and Raman imaging of inhomogeneous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslova, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is aimed at developing methodologies in Raman spectroscopy and imaging. After reviewing the statistical instruments which allow treating giant amount of data (multivariate analysis and classification), the study is applied to two families of well-known materials which are used as models for testing the limits of the implemented developments. The first family is a series of carbon materials pyrolyzed at various temperatures and exhibiting inhomogeneities at a nm scale which is suitable for Raman-X-ray diffraction combination. Another results concern the polishing effect on carbon structure. Since it is found to induce Raman artifacts leading to the overestimation of the local structural disorder, a method based on the use of the G band width is therefore proposed in order to evaluate the crystallite size in both unpolished and polished nano-graphites. The second class of materials presents inhomogeneities at higher (micrometric) scales by the example of uranium dioxide ceramics. Being well adapted in terms of spatial scale, Raman imaging is thus used for probing their surfaces. Data processing is implemented via an approach combining the multivariate (principal component) analysis and the classical fitting procedure with Lorentzian profiles. The interpretation of results is supported via electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) analysis which enables us to distinguish the orientation effects of ceramic grains from other underlying contributions. The last ones are mainly localized at the grain boundaries, that is testified by the appearance of a specific Raman mode. Their origin seems to be caused by stoichiometric oxygen variations or impurities, as well as strain inhomogeneities. The perspectives of this work include both the implementation of other mathematical methods and in-depth analysis of UO 2 structure damaged by irradiation (anisotropic effects, role of grain boundaries). (author) [fr

  12. In-pile Thermal Conductivity Characterization with Time Resolved Raman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinwei

    2018-03-19

    Executive Summary The project is designed to achieve three objectives: (1) Develop a novel time resolved Raman technology for direct measurement of fuel and cladding thermal conductivity. (2) Validate and improve the technology development by measuring ceramic materials germane to the nuclear industry. (3) Conduct instrumentation development to integrate optical fiber into our sensing system for eventual in-pile measurement. We have developed three new techniques: time-domain differential Raman (TD-Raman), frequency-resolved Raman (FR-Raman), and energy transport state-resolved Raman (ET-Raman). The TD-Raman varies the laser heating time and does simultaneous Raman thermal probing, the FR-Raman probes the material’s thermal response under periodical laser heating of different frequencies, and the ET-Raman probes the thermal response under steady and pulsed laser heating. The measurement capacity of these techniques have been fully assessed and verified by measuring micro/nanoscale materials. All these techniques do not need the data of laser absorption and absolute material temperature rise, yet still be able to measure the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity with unprecedented accuracy. It is expected they will have broad applications for in-pile thermal characterization of nuclear materials based on pure optical heating and sensing.

  13. Condensing Raman spectrum for single-cell phenotype analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shiwei

    2015-12-09

    Background In recent years, high throughput and non-invasive Raman spectrometry technique has matured as an effective approach to identification of individual cells by species, even in complex, mixed populations. Raman profiling is an appealing optical microscopic method to achieve this. To fully utilize Raman proling for single-cell analysis, an extensive understanding of Raman spectra is necessary to answer questions such as which filtering methodologies are effective for pre-processing of Raman spectra, what strains can be distinguished by Raman spectra, and what features serve best as Raman-based biomarkers for single-cells, etc. Results In this work, we have proposed an approach called rDisc to discretize the original Raman spectrum into only a few (usually less than 20) representative peaks (Raman shifts). The approach has advantages in removing noises, and condensing the original spectrum. In particular, effective signal processing procedures were designed to eliminate noise, utilising wavelet transform denoising, baseline correction, and signal normalization. In the discretizing process, representative peaks were selected to signicantly decrease the Raman data size. More importantly, the selected peaks are chosen as suitable to serve as key biological markers to differentiate species and other cellular features. Additionally, the classication performance of discretized spectra was found to be comparable to full spectrum having more than 1000 Raman shifts. Overall, the discretized spectrum needs about 5storage space of a full spectrum and the processing speed is considerably faster. This makes rDisc clearly superior to other methods for single-cell classication.

  14. Experimental investigation of two-dimensional critical surface structure, stimulated Raman scattering, and two-plasmon decay instability. Annual report, January 1, 1981-April 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, A.Y.; Eggleston, D.L.; Tanikawa, T.; Qian, S.J.

    1982-11-01

    Experimental observations of the space and time evolution of resonantly enhanced electrostatic electric fields and plasma density in cylindrical geometry demonstrate the development of two-dimensional caviton structure when an initial density perturbation is imposed on the plasma in the direction perpendicular to the driver field. This two-dimensional structure is observed after the development of profile modification and grows on the ion time scale. The existence of a large azimuthal electric field component is an observational signature of two-dimensional structure. Enhanced electric field maxima are found to be azimuthally correlated with the density minima. Both the density cavities and electric field peaks exhibit increased azimuthal location with the growth of two-dimensional structure. The two-dimensional development exhibits a strong dependence on both perturbation wavenumber and driver power. The related theoretical literature is reviewed and numerical, analytical, and qualitative hybrid models for a driven, two-dimensional, inhomogeneous plasma are presented. Preliminary work is presented in the following additional areas: weak magnetic field effects on critical surface physics, optical measurements of fast electron production, two-dimensional effects in microwave-plasma interactions, Langmuir wave trapping, stimulated Raman scattering and two-plasmon decay instability

  15. Fiber-optic Raman probe couples ball lens for depth-selected Raman measurements of epithelial tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, Jianhua; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we present a fiber-optic ball lens Raman probe design for improving depth-selected Raman measurements of epithelial tissue. The Monte Carlo simulation results show that tissue Raman collection efficiency can be improved by properly selecting the refractive index and the diameter of the ball lens for the Raman probe design and the depth-selectivity of Raman measurements can also be improved by either increasing the refractive index or reducing the diameter of the ball lens. An a...

  16. Value-driven attentional capture in the auditory domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that the visual attention system is shaped by reward learning. When visual features are associated with a reward outcome, they acquire high priority and can automatically capture visual attention. To date, evidence for value-driven attentional capture has been limited entirely to the visual system. In the present study, I demonstrate that previously reward-associated sounds also capture attention, interfering more strongly with the performance of a visual task. This finding suggests that value-driven attention reflects a broad principle of information processing that can be extended to other sensory modalities and that value-driven attention can bias cross-modal stimulus competition.

  17. Coherent Raman scattering: Applications in imaging and sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Meng

    In this thesis, I discuss the theory, implementation and applications of coherent Raman scattering to imaging and sensing. A time domain interferometric method has been developed to collect high resolution shot-noise-limited Raman spectra over the Raman fingerprint regime and completely remove the electronic background signal in coherent Raman scattering. Compared with other existing coherent Raman microscopy methods, this time domain approach is proved to be simpler and more robust in rejecting background signal. We apply this method to image polymers and biological samples and demonstrate that the same setup can be used to collect two photon fluorescence and self phase modulation signals. A signal to noise ratio analysis is performed to show that this time domain method has a comparable signal to noise ratio to spectral domain methods, which we confirm experimentally. The coherent Raman method is also compared with spontaneous Raman scattering. The conditions under which coherent methods provide signal enhancement are discussed and experiments are performed to compare coherent Raman scattering with spontaneous Raman scattering under typical biological imaging conditions. A critical power, above which coherent Raman scattering is more sensitive than spontaneous Raman scattering, is experimentally determined to be ˜1mW in samples of high molecule concentration with a 75MHz laser system. This finding is contrary to claims that coherent methods provide many orders of magnitude enhancement under comparable conditions. In addition to the far field applications, I also discuss the combination of our time domain coherent Raman method with near field enhancement to explore the possibility of sensing and near field imaging. We report the first direct time-resolved coherent Raman measurement performed on a nanostructured substrate for molecule sensing. The preliminary results demonstrate that sub 20 fs pulses can be used to obtain coherent Raman spectra from a small number

  18. QCD and strongly coupled gauge theories: challenges and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambilla, N.; Vairo, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department, Garching (Germany); Eidelman, S. [SB RAS, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Foka, P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Gardner, S. [University of Kentucky, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lexington, KY (United States); Kronfeld, A.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Theoretical Physics Department, Batavia, IL (United States); Alford, M.G.; Schwenzer, K. [Washington University, Department of Physics, St Louis, MO (United States); Alkofer, R. [University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Butenschoen, M. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Wien (Austria); Cohen, T.D. [University of Maryland, Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics and Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Erdmenger, J. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Fabbietti, L. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster ' ' Origin and Structure of the Universe' ' , Garching (Germany); Faber, M.; Hoellwieser, R. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Vienna (Austria); Goity, J.L. [Hampton University, Hampton, VA (United States); Jefferson Laboratory, Newport News, VA (United States); Ketzer, B. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department, Garching (Germany); Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Lin, H.W. [University of Washington, Department of Physics, Seattle, WA (United States); Llanes-Estrada, F.J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Department Fisica Teorica I, Madrid (Spain); Meyer, H.B.; Wittig, H.; Hippel, G.M. von [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, PRISMA Cluster of Excellence, Institut fuer Kernphysik and Helmholtz Institut Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Pakhlov, P.; Polikarpov, M.I. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Pallante, E.; Papadodimas, K. [University of Groningen, Centre for Theoretical Physics, Groningen (Netherlands); Sazdjian, H. [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Schmitt, A. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Vienna (Austria); Snow, W.M. [Indiana University, Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter and Department of Physics, Bloomington, IN (United States); Vogt, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Physics Division, Livermore, CA (United States); University of California, Physics Department, Davis, CA (United States); Vuorinen, A. [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics and Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Arnold, P. [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Christakoglou, P. [NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Di Nezza, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Frascati (Italy); Fodor, Z. [Wuppertal University, Wuppertal (Germany); Eoetvoes University, Budapest (Hungary); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Garcia i Tormo, X. [Universitaet Bern, Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Bern (Switzerland); Janik, M.A. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Kalweit, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Keane, D. [Kent State University, Department of Physics, Kent, OH (United States); Kiritsis, E. [University of Crete, Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Heraklion (Greece); Universite Paris Diderot, Laboratoire APC, Sorbonne Paris-Cite (France); CERN, Theory Group, Physics Department, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mischke, A. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mizuk, R. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Physical Engineering Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Odyniec, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Pich, A. [Universitat de Valencia, CSIC, IFIC, Valencia (Spain); Pittau, R. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos y CAFPE, Granada (Spain); Qiu, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, C.N. Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Ricciardi, G. [Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Dipartimento di Fisica, Napoli (Italy); INFN, Napoli (Italy); Salgado, C.A. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Fisica de Particulas y IGFAE, Galicia (ES); Stefanis, N.G. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Bochum (DE); Zakharov, V.I. [Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich (DE); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (RU); Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny (RU); Far Eastern Federal University, School of Biomedicine, Vladivostok (RU)

    2014-10-15

    We highlight the progress, current status, and open challenges of QCD-driven physics, in theory and in experiment. We discuss how the strong interaction is intimately connected to a broad sweep of physical problems, in settings ranging from astrophysics and cosmology to strongly coupled, complex systems in particle and condensed-matter physics, as well as to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. We also discuss how success in describing the strong interaction impacts other fields, and, in turn, how such subjects can impact studies of the strong interaction. In the course of the work we offer a perspective on the many research streams which flow into and out of QCD, as well as a vision for future developments. (orig.)

  19. Fiber-optic Raman probe couples ball lens for depth-selected Raman measurements of epithelial tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jianhua; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2010-06-28

    In this study, we present a fiber-optic ball lens Raman probe design for improving depth-selected Raman measurements of epithelial tissue. The Monte Carlo simulation results show that tissue Raman collection efficiency can be improved by properly selecting the refractive index and the diameter of the ball lens for the Raman probe design and the depth-selectivity of Raman measurements can also be improved by either increasing the refractive index or reducing the diameter of the ball lens. An appropriate arrangement of the Raman probe-tissue distance can also optimize the collection efficiency for depth-resolved Raman measurements. Experimental evaluation of a ball lens Raman probe design on a two-layer tissue phantom confirms the potential of the ball lens Raman probe design for efficient depth-selected measurement on epithelial tissue. This work suggests that the fiber-optic Raman probe coupled with a ball lens can facilitate the depth-selected Raman measurements of epithelial tissue, which may improve the diagnosis of epithelial precancer and early cancer at the molecular level.

  20. The Raman and SERS spectra of indigo and indigo-Ag2complex: DFT calculation and comparison with experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Marilena; Lofrumento, Cristiana; Becucci, Maurizio; Castellucci, Emilio M

    2018-01-05

    Using time-dependent density functional theory in conjunction with B3LYP functional and LANL2DZ/6-31+g(d,p) basis sets, static and pre-resonance Raman spectra of the indigo-Ag 2 complex have been calculated. Structure optimization, excitation energies and pre-resonance Raman spectra of the indigo molecule have been obtained at the same level of theory. The available experimental Raman spectra at 1064, 785 and 514nm and the SERS spectra at 785 and 514nm have been well reproduced by the calculation. Experimental SERS spectra are confronted with the calculated pre-resonance Raman spectra obtained for the indigo-Ag 2 complex. The Raman activities calculated under the infinite lifetime approximation show a strong dependence upon the proximity to the energy and the oscillator strength of the excitation electronic transition. The comparison of the integrated EFs for indigo and indigo-Ag 2 calculated Raman spectra, gave some hints as to the enhancement mechanisms acting for the different excitation wavelengths. Whereas for excitation at a wavelength corresponding to 785nm, the enhancement mechanism for the Raman spectrum of the metal complex seems the chemical one, the strong increment (ten times) of the integrated EF of the Raman spectra of the complex in the case of 514nm excitation, suggests the onset of other enhancement mechanisms. Assuming that intra-cluster transitions with high oscillator strength can be thought of as to mimic surface plasmons excitations, we suggest the onset of the electromagnetic mechanisms (EM) as the origin of the Raman spectrum enhancement. Nevertheless, other enhancement effects cannot be ruled out, as a new molecular transition gains strength in the proximity of the excitation wavelength, as a consequence of the symmetry lowering of the molecule in the complex. A large variation across vibrational modes, by a factor of at least 10 4 , was found for the EFs. This large variation in the EFs can indicate that B-term Herzberg-Teller scattering

  1. Development of in situ time-resolved Raman spectroscopy facility for dynamic shock loading in materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, S.; Rastogi, V.; Rao, U.; Sijoy, C. D.; Mishra, V.; Deo, M. N.

    2017-11-01

    The transient state of excitation and relaxation processes in materials under shock compression can be investigated by coupling the laser driven shock facility with Raman spectroscopy. For this purpose, a time resolved Raman spectroscopy setup has been developed to monitor the physical and the chemical changes such as phase transitions, chemical reactions, molecular kinetics etc., under shock compression with nanosecond time resolution. This system consist of mainly three parts, a 2 J/8 ns Nd:YAG laser system used for generation of pump and probe beams, a Raman spectrometer with temporal and spectral resolution of 1.2 ns and 3 cm-1 respectively and a target holder in confinement geometry assembly. Detailed simulation for the optimization of confinement geometry targets is performed. Time resolved measurement of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) targets at focused laser intensity of 2.2 GW/cm2 has been done. The corresponding pressure in the Aluminum and PTFE are 3.6 and 1.7 GPa respectively. At 1.7 GPa in PTFE, a red shift of 5 cm-1 is observed for the CF2 twisting mode (291 cm-1). Shock velocity in PTFE is calculated by measuring rate of change of ratios of the intensity of Raman lines scattered from shocked volume to total volume of sample in the laser focal spot along the laser axis. The calculated shock velocity in PTFE is found to be 1.64 ± 0.16 km/s at shock pressure of 1.7 GPa, for present experimental conditions.

  2. The SNAP Strong Lens Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, P.

    2005-01-03

    Basic considerations of lens detection and identification indicate that a wide field survey of the types planned for weak lensing and Type Ia SNe with SNAP are close to optimal for the optical detection of strong lenses. Such a ''piggy-back'' survey might be expected even pessimistically to provide a catalogue of a few thousand new strong lenses, with the numbers dominated by systems of faint blue galaxies lensed by foreground ellipticals. After sketching out our strategy for detecting and measuring these galaxy lenses using the SNAP images, we discuss some of the scientific applications of such a large sample of gravitational lenses: in particular we comment on the partition of information between lens structure, the source population properties and cosmology. Understanding this partitioning is key to assessing strong lens cosmography's value as a cosmological probe.

  3. Strong coupling phase in QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Ken-ichi

    1988-01-01

    Existence of a strong coupling phase in QED has been suggested in solutions of the Schwinger-Dyson equation and in Monte Carlo simulation of lattice QED. In this article we recapitulate the previous arguments, and formulate the problem in the modern framework of the renormalization theory, Wilsonian renormalization. This scheme of renormalization gives the best understanding of the basic structure of a field theory especially when it has a multi-phase structure. We resolve some misleading arguments in the previous literature. Then we set up a strategy to attack the strong phase, if any. We describe a trial; a coupled Schwinger-Dyson equation. Possible picture of the strong coupling phase QED is presented. (author)

  4. Temperature dependence of low-frequency polarized Raman scattering spectra in TlInS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paucar, Raul; Wakita, Kazuki [Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan); Shim, YongGu; Mimura, Kojiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka (Japan); Alekperov, Oktay; Mamedov, Nazim [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2017-06-15

    In this work, we examined phase transitions in the layered ternary thallium chalcogenide TlInS{sub 2} by studying the temperature dependence of polarized Raman spectra with the aid of the Raman confocal microscope system. The Raman spectra were measured over the temperature range of 77-320 K (which includes the range of successive phase transitions) in the low-frequency region of 35-180 cm{sup -1}. The optical phonons that showed strong temperature dependence were identified as interlayer vibrations related to phase transitions, while the phonons that showed weak temperature dependence were identified as intralayer vibrations. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Autoionizing states driven by stochastic electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouloudakis, G.; Lambropoulos, P.

    2018-01-01

    We have examined the profile of an isolated autoionizing resonance driven by a pulse of short duration and moderately strong field. The analysis has been based on stochastic differential equations governing the time evolution of the density matrix under a stochastic field. Having focused our quantitative analysis on the 2{{s}}2{{p}}({}1{{P}}) resonance of helium, we have investigated the role of field fluctuations and of the duration of the pulse. We report surprisingly strong distortion of the profile, even for peak intensity below the strong field limit. Our results demonstrate the intricate connection between intensity and pulse duration, with the latter appearing to be the determining influence, even for a seemingly short pulse of 50 fs. Further effects that would arise under much shorter pulses are discussed.

  6. Raman spectroscopic study of synthetic pyrope-grossular garnets: structural implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Han, Baofu; Clark, Simon Martin; Wang, Yichuan; Liu, Xi

    2017-06-01

    A study of the effect of substitution of Mg and Ca in garnet solid solution (Grtss) was carried out using Raman spectroscopy to probe changes to the crystal lattice. The garnet solid solutions with composition changing along pyrope (Py; Mg3Al2Si3O12) and grossular (Gr; Ca3Al2Si3O12) binary were synthesized from glass at 6 GPa and 1400 °C and a second series of Grtss with composition Py40Gr60 were synthesized at 6 GPa but different temperatures from 1000 to 1400 °C. Raman mode assignments were made based on a comparison with the two end members pyrope and grossular, which show consistent result with literature study on single crystals data. The correlation between the Raman mode frequencies and compositional changes along the pyrope-grossular binary suggests a two-mode behavior for Mg and Ca cations in the garnet structure. The full widths at half-maximum of selected Raman modes increase on moving away from the end members and are about double the end-member values in the mid-position, where the frequencies closely linearly change with composition. The frequencies of the translational modes of the SiO4 tetrahedron (T(SiO4)) show large deviations from linearity indicating a strong kinematic coupling with the translational modes of the Ca and Mg cations. The anomalies in T(SiO4) are linked to mixing unit cell volume, suggesting that the nonlinear mixing volume behavior along the pyrope-grossular binary is related to the resistance of the Si-O bond to expansion and compression, which is caused by substitution of Mg and Ca cations in the dodecahedral sites. Annealing temperature also shows effect on Raman mode frequencies, but the main factor controlling the changes in mode frequencies along pyrope-grossular binary is composition.

  7. Chip-Scale Bioassays Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Fundamentals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye-Young [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This work explores the development and application of chip-scale bioassays based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for high throughput and high sensitivity analysis of biomolecules. The size effect of gold nanoparticles on the intensity of SERS is first presented. A sandwich immunoassay was performed using Raman-labeled immunogold nanoparticles with various sizes. The SERS responses were correlated to particle densities, which were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The response of individual particles was also investigated using Raman-microscope and an array of gold islands on a silicon substrate. The location and the size of individual particles were mapped using AFM. The next study describes a low-level detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and simulants of biological warfare agents in a sandwich immunoassay format using SERS labels, which have been termed Extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs). A new ERL scheme based on a mixed monolayer is also introduced. The mixed monolayer ERLs were created by covering the gold nanoparticles with a mixture of two thiolates, one thiolate for covalently binding antibody to the particle and the other thiolate for producing a strong Raman signal. An assay platform based on mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold is then presented. The mixed SAMs were prepared from dithiobis(succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) to covalently bind antibodies on gold substrate and oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated thiol to prevent nonspecific adsorption of antibodies. After the mixed SAMs surfaces, formed from various mole fraction of DSU were incubated with antibodies, AFM was used to image individual antibodies on the surface. The final study presents a collaborative work on the single molecule adsorption of YOYO-I labeled {lambda}-DNA at compositionally patterned SAMs using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The role of solution pH, {lambda}-DNA concentration, and domain size was investigated. This work also revealed

  8. Raman spectroscopic study of synthetic pyrope-grossular garnets: structural implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wei; Han, Baofu; Clark, Simon Martin; Wang, Yichuan; Liu, Xi

    2018-02-01

    A study of the effect of substitution of Mg and Ca in garnet solid solution (Grtss) was carried out using Raman spectroscopy to probe changes to the crystal lattice. The garnet solid solutions with composition changing along pyrope (Py; Mg3Al2Si3O12) and grossular (Gr; Ca3Al2Si3O12) binary were synthesized from glass at 6 GPa and 1400 °C and a second series of Grtss with composition Py40Gr60 were synthesized at 6 GPa but different temperatures from 1000 to 1400 °C. Raman mode assignments were made based on a comparison with the two end members pyrope and grossular, which show consistent result with literature study on single crystals data. The correlation between the Raman mode frequencies and compositional changes along the pyrope-grossular binary suggests a two-mode behavior for Mg and Ca cations in the garnet structure. The full widths at half-maximum of selected Raman modes increase on moving away from the end members and are about double the end-member values in the mid-position, where the frequencies closely linearly change with composition. The frequencies of the translational modes of the SiO4 tetrahedron (T(SiO4)) show large deviations from linearity indicating a strong kinematic coupling with the translational modes of the Ca and Mg cations. The anomalies in T(SiO4) are linked to mixing unit cell volume, suggesting that the nonlinear mixing volume behavior along the pyrope-grossular binary is related to the resistance of the Si-O bond to expansion and compression, which is caused by substitution of Mg and Ca cations in the dodecahedral sites. Annealing temperature also shows effect on Raman mode frequencies, but the main factor controlling the changes in mode frequencies along pyrope-grossular binary is composition.

  9. Quantitative analysis of microbicide concentrations in fluids, gels and tissues using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oranat Chuchuen

    Full Text Available Topical vaginal anti-HIV microbicides are an important focus in female-based strategies to prevent the sexual transmission of HIV. Understanding microbicide pharmacokinetics is essential to development, characterization and implementation of efficacious microbicide drug delivery formulations. Current methods to measure drug concentrations in tissue (e.g., LC-MS/MS, liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry are highly sensitive, but destructive and complex. This project explored the use of confocal Raman spectroscopy to detect microbicide drugs and to measure their local concentrations in fluids, drug delivery gels, and tissues. We evaluated three candidate microbicide drugs: tenofovir, Dapivirine and IQP-0528. Measurements were performed in freshly excised porcine buccal tissue specimens, gel vehicles and fluids using two Horiba Raman microscopes, one of which is confocal. Characteristic spectral peak calibrations for each drug were obtained using serial dilutions in the three matrices. These specific Raman bands demonstrated strong linear concentration dependences in the matrices and were characterized with respect to their unique vibrational signatures. At least one specific Raman feature was identified for each drug as a marker band for detection in tissue. Sensitivity of detection was evaluated in the three matrices. A specific peak was also identified for tenofovir diphosphate, the anti-HIV bioactive product of tenofovir after phosphorylation in host cells. Z-scans of drug concentrations vs. depth in excised tissue specimens, incubated under layers of tenofovir solution in a Transwell assay, showed decreasing concentration with depth from the surface into the tissue. Time-dependent concentration profiles were obtained from tissue samples incubated in the Transwell assay, for times ranging 30 minutes - 6 hours. Calibrations and measurements from tissue permeation studies for tenofovir showed good correlation with gold

  10. Functional Domain Driven Design

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera Guzmán, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Las tecnologías están en constante expansión y evolución, diseñando nuevas técnicas para cumplir con su fin. En el desarrollo de software, las herramientas y pautas para la elaboración de productos software constituyen una pieza en constante evolución, necesarias para la toma de decisiones sobre los proyectos a realizar. Uno de los arquetipos para el desarrollo de software es el denominado Domain Driven Design, donde es importante conocer ampliamente el negocio que se desea modelar en form...

  11. Resonance Raman spectra of metal halide vapor complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paptheodorou, G.N.

    1978-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of complex vapor phase compounds formed by reacting ''acidic'' gases (A 2 X 6 = Al 2 Cl 6 , Al 2 Br 6 , In 2 Cl 6 ) with metal halides have been measured. Spectra obtained from equilibrium vapor mixtures of A 2 X 6 over solid MX 2 (= PdCl 2 , PdBr 2 , CuCl 2 , CoBr 2 , TiCl 2 , FeCl 2 , NiCl 2 , PtCl 2 ) were a superposition of the A 2 X 6 -AX 3 bands and in few cases of new resonance-enhanced polarized bands due to MA 2 X 8 and/or MAX 5 complexes. At temperatures above 800 0 K, characteristic bands due to MX 2 (g) (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) and M 2 X 4 (g) (M = Cu) were observed. The predominant features of the PdAl 2 Cl 8 , CuAl 2 Cl 8 , and PdAl 2 Br 6 spectra were three high-intensity, polarized bands which were attributed to the vibrational modes of the complex coupled to the electronic state of the central atom. The spectra of CuAlCl 5 (g), CuInCl 5 (g) and Cu 2 Cl 4 (g) species showed resonance enhancement of selective fundamentals which were attributed to vibrational modes of trigonally coordinated Cu(II). Resonance Raman spectra of U 2 Cl 10 (g) and UCl 5 .AlCl 3 (g) were characterized by the presence of a strong band attributed to the U-Cl/sub t/ stretching frequency. Raman band intensity measurements were carried out for the iron(III) chloride vapors and for the vapor complexes of CuAl 2 Cl 8 , CuInCl 5 and UCl 5 .AlCl 3 using different laser powers and frequencies. The measurements suggested increasing spectroscopic temperatures and decomposition of the vapor complexes. The data are discussed in terms of the distribution of vibrational modes and the structure of the vapor species. 22 figs

  12. Analogy between optically driven injection-locked laser diodes and driven damped linear oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Atsushi; Shore, K. Alan

    2006-01-01

    An analytical study of optically driven laser diodes (LDs) has been undertaken to meet the requirement for a theoretical treatment for chaotic drive and synchronization occurring in the injection-locked LDs with strong injection. A small-signal analysis is performed for the sets of rate equations for the injection-locked LDs driven by a sinusoidal optical signal. In particular, as a model of chaotic driving signals from LD dynamics, an optical signal caused by direct modulation to the master LD is assumed, oscillating both in field amplitude and phase as is the case with chaotic driving signals. Consequently, we find conditions that allow reduction in the degrees of freedom of the driven LD. Under these conditions, the driven response is approximated to a simple form which is found to be equivalent to driven damped linear oscillators. The validity of the application of this theory to previous work on the synchronization of chaos and related phenomena occurring in the injection-locked LDs is demonstrated

  13. Electronic Transport and Raman Spectroscopy Characterization in Ion-Implanted Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus, R. F.; Turatti, A. M.; Camargo, B. C.; da Silva, R. R.; Kopelevich, Y.; Behar, M.; Balzaretti, N. M.; Gusmão, M. A.; Pureur, P.

    2018-02-01

    We report on Raman spectroscopy, temperature-dependent in-plane resistivity, and in-plane magnetoresistance experiments in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) implanted with As and Mn. A pristine sample was also studied for comparison. Two different fluences were applied, φ = 0.5× 10^{16} {ions}/{cm}2 and φ = 1.0× 10^{16} {ions}/{cm}2. The implantations were carried out with 20 keV ion energy at room temperature. The Raman spectroscopy results reveal the occurrence of drastic changes of the HOPG surface as a consequence of the damage caused by ionic implantation. For the higher dose, the complete amorphization limit is attained. The resistivity and magnetoresistance results were obtained placing electrical contacts on the irradiated sample surface. Owing to the strong anisotropy of HOPG, the electrical current propagates mostly near the implanted surface. Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations were observed in the magnetoresistance at low temperatures. These results allow the extraction of the fundamental SdH frequencies and the carriers' effective masses. In general, the resistivity and magnetoresistance results are consistent with those obtained from Raman measurements. However, one must consider that the electrical conduction in our samples occurs as in a parallel association of a largely resistive thin sheet at the surface strongly modified by disorder with a thicker layer where damage produced by implantation is less severe. The SdH oscillations do not hint to significant changes in the carrier density of HOPG.

  14. Polarized radiative transfer through terrestrial atmosphere accounting for rotational Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Luca; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper is devoted to the phenomenological derivation of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) accounting for first-order source terms of rotational Raman scattering (RRS), which is responsible for the in-filling of Fraunhofer and telluric lines by inelastic scattered photons. The implementation of the solution of the VRTE within the framework of the forward-adjoint method is given. For the Ca II and the oxygen A-band (O2 A) spectral windows, values of reflectance, degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and in-filling, in zenith and nadir geometry, are compared with results given in literature. Moreover, the dependence of these quantities on the columnar loading and vertical layering of non-spherical dust aerosols is investigated, together with their changes as function of two habits of ice crystals, modeled as regular icosahedra and severely rough aggregated columns. Bi-directional effects of an underlying polarizing surface are accounted for. The forward simulations are performed for one selected wavelength in the continuum and one in the strong absorption of the O2 A, as their combination can be exploited for the spaceborne retrieval of aerosol and cloud properties. For this reason, we also mimic seasonal maps of reflectance, DOLP and in-filling, that are prototypical measurements of the Ultraviolet-Visible-Near Infrared (UVN) sensor, at a nominal spectral resolution of 0.12 nm. UVN is the core payload of the upcoming European Sentinel-4 mission, that will observe Europe in geostationary orbit for air quality monitoring purposes. In general, in the core of O2 A, depending on the optical thickness and altitude of the scatterers, we find RRS-induced in-filling values ranging from 1.3% to 1.8%, while DOLP decreases by 1%. Conversely, while negligible differences of RRS in-filling are calculated with different ice crystal habits, the severely rough aggregated column model can reduce DOLP by a factor up to 10%. The UVN maps of in-filling show values varying

  15. Combination of surface- and interference-enhanced Raman scattering by CuS nanocrystals on nanopatterned Au structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Milekhin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a Raman study of optical phonons in CuS nanocrystals (NCs with a low areal density fabricated through the Langmuir–Blodgett technology on nanopatterned Au nanocluster arrays using a combination of surface- and interference-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS and IERS, respectively. Micro-Raman spectra of one monolayer of CuS NCs deposited on a bare Si substrate reveal only features corresponding to crystalline Si. However, a new relatively strong peak occurs in the Raman spectrum of CuS NCs on Au nanocluster arrays at 474 cm−1. This feature is related to the optical phonon mode in CuS NCs and manifests the SERS effect. For CuS NCs deposited on a SiO2 layer this phonon mode is also observed due to the IERS effect. Its intensity changes periodically with increasing SiO2 layer thickness for different laser excitation lines and is enhanced by a factor of about 30. CuS NCs formed on Au nanocluster arrays fabricated on IERS substrates combine the advantages of SERS and IERS and demonstrate stronger SERS enhancement allowing for the observation of Raman signals from CuS NCs with an ultra-low areal density.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman scattering by organic and inorganic semiconductors formed on laterally ordered arrays of Au nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milekhin, Alexander G., E-mail: milekhin@thermo.isp.nsc.ru [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Lavrentiev av. 13, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov str. 2, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Yeryukov, Nikolay A., E-mail: yeryukov@isp.nsc.ru [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Lavrentiev av. 13, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sveshnikova, Larisa L.; Duda, Tatyana A.; Rodyakina, Ekaterina E. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Lavrentiev av. 13, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sheremet, Evgeniya S.; Ludemann, Michael; Gordan, Ovidiu D. [Semiconductor Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, D-09107, Chemnitz (Germany); Latyshev, Alexander V. [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Lavrentiev av. 13, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogov str. 2, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zahn, Dietrich R.T. [Semiconductor Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, D-09107, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2013-09-30

    This work is devoted to the investigation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering by vibrational modes of cobalt phthalocyanine ultrathin films and CuS nanocrystals prepared using by organic molecular beam vapor deposition and the Langmuir–Blodgett technique, respectively, on laterally ordered arrays of Au nanoclusters formed by electron beam lithography on Si and GaAs substrates. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering study of cobalt phthalocyanine films demonstrates the strong dependence of Raman intensity of vibrational modes in cobalt phthalocyanine on the laser excitation wavelength as well as on the size and period of Au nanoclusters. By tuning the optical resonance conditions a maximal enhancement factor of 2 × 10{sup 4} is achieved. The investigation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering by cobalt phthalocyanine deposited on laterally ordered arrays of paired Au nanoclusters (dimers) reveals anisotropic enhancement with respect to polarization of the scattered light parallel or perpendicular to the dimer axis. - Highlights: • Controllable and reproducible Au nanocluster and dimer arrays were fabricated. • Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by CuS nanocrystals was observed. • SERS by ultrathin cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) films was observed. • Dependence of SERS enhancement factor on the size of Au nanoclusters is resonant. • SERS by ultrathin CoPc films formed on Au dimer arrays is polarization dependent.

  17. Raman spectroscopy as a non-invasive technique for the quantification of melanins in feathers and hairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Ismael; Jorge, Alberto; Ito, Kazuma; Tabuchi, Keisuke; Solano, Francisco; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa

    2013-11-01

    The quantification of melanins is a complex task due to the chemical heterogeneity of the pigments and the difficulty of their isolation. The best accepted procedure currently consists in the chemical cleavage of melanins and the subsequent detection of degradation products by HPLC, which implies the destruction of samples. Here, we show that Raman spectroscopy is a non-invasive technique that can be used to quantify melanins. We made parallel analyses of the characteristics of pheomelanin and eumelanin Raman spectra as measured by confocal Raman microscopy and of degradation products of pheomelanin (4-amino-3-hydroxyphenylalanine, 4-AHP) and eumelanin (pyrrole-2,3,5-tricarboxylic acid, PTCA) as measured by HPLC in feathers of red-legged partridges and hairs of wild boars and humans. We found strong correlations between the spectral Raman characteristics and 4-AHP and PTCA levels, which indicates that the Raman spectra of melanins can be used to determine their content. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Strong Decomposition of Random Variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann-Jørgensen, Jørgen; Kagan, Abram M.; Pitt, Loren D.

    2007-01-01

    A random variable X is stongly decomposable if X=Y+Z where Y=Φ(X) and Z=X-Φ(X) are independent non-degenerated random variables (called the components). It is shown that at least one of the components is singular, and we derive a necessary and sufficient condition for strong decomposability...

  19. Strong interaction at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We review two methods discussed in the literature to determine the effective parameters of strongly interacting particles as they move through a heat bath. The first one is the general method of chiral perturbation theory, which may be readily applied to this problem. The other is the method of thermal QCD sum rules ...

  20. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-08-02

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders.

  1. Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiang, Ji

    2004-01-01

    The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders

  2. LOSA-M2 aerosol Raman lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balin, Yu S.; Bairashin, G. S.; Kokhanenko, G. P.; Penner, I. E.; Samoilova, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    The scanning LOSA-M2 aerosol Raman lidar, which is aimed at probing atmosphere at wavelengths of 532 and 1064 nm, is described. The backscattered light is received simultaneously in two regimes: analogue and photon-counting. Along with the signals of elastic light scattering at the initial wavelengths, a 607-nm Raman signal from molecular nitrogen is also recorded. It is shown that the height range of atmosphere probing can be expanded from the near-Earth layer to stratosphere using two (near- and far-field) receiving telescopes, and analogue and photon-counting lidar signals can be combined into one signal. Examples of natural measurements of aerosol stratification in atmosphere along vertical and horizontal paths during the expeditions to the Gobi Desert (Mongolia) and Lake Baikal areas are presented.

  3. Stimulated Raman backscattering at high laser intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Tajima, Toshiki; Sasaki, Akira; Maluckov, A.; Jovanovic, M.

    1998-03-01

    Signatures of Stimulated Raman backscattering of a short-pulse high-intensity laser interacting with an underdense plasma are discussed. We introduce a nonlinear three-wave interaction model that accounts for laser pump depletion and relativistic detuning. A mechanism is revealed based on a generic route to chaos, that predicts a progressive increase of the backscatter complexity with a growing laser intensity. Importance of kinetic effects is outlined and demonstrated in fluid-hybrid and particle simulations. As an application, we show that spectral anomalies of the backscatter, predicted by the above model, are consistent with recent sub-picosecond, high-intensity laser gas-target measurements at Livermore and elsewhere. Finally, a recently proposed scheme for generation of ultra-short, low-prepulse laser pulses by Raman backscattering in a thin foil target, is shown. (author)

  4. Raman spectroscopy in cervical cancers: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rubina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer among women worldwide. Developing countries contribute more than 80% towards global burden. Over the last 2 decades, Raman spectroscopy (RS has been actively pursued for cervical cancer detection. In view of latest development in Raman spectroscopic applications in cervical cancers, especially in vivo studies, an update of the same is presented in this article. This articles opens with a brief note on Anatomy of cervix followed by Etiology, and conventional Screening and Diagnosis of Cervical cancers. In subsequent sections, brief description of Theory and Instrumentation of RS is followed by a review of recent developments in cervical cancer detection; with emphasis on cell lines, exfoliated cells, ex vivo and in vivo, and therapeutic response monitoring applications in cervical cancer.

  5. Raman spectroscopic biochemical mapping of tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nicholas; Hart Prieto, Maria C.; Kendall, Catherine A.; Shetty, Geeta; Barr, Hugh

    2006-02-01

    Advances in technologies have brought us closer to routine spectroscopic diagnosis of early malignant disease. However, there is still a poor understanding of the carcinogenesis process. For example it is not known whether many cancers follow a logical sequence from dysplasia, to carcinoma in situ, to invasion. Biochemical tissue changes, triggered by genetic mutations, precede morphological and structural changes. These can be probed using Raman or FTIR microspectroscopy and the spectra analysed for biochemical constituents. Local microscopic distribution of various constituents can then be visualised. Raman mapping has been performed on a number of tissues including oesophagus, breast, bladder and prostate. The biochemical constituents have been calculated at each point using basis spectra and least squares analysis. The residual of the least squares fit indicates any unfit spectral components. The biochemical distribution will be compared with the defined histopathological boundaries. The distribution of nucleic acids, glycogen, actin, collagen I, III, IV, lipids and others appear to follow expected patterns.

  6. Raman spectra of deuteriated taurine single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, J. M. de; Lima, R. J. C.; Freire, P. T. C.; Sasaki, J. M.; Melo, F. E. A.; Filho, J. Mendes; Jones, Derry W.

    2005-05-01

    The polarized Raman spectra of partially deuteriated taurine [(ND 3+) 0.65(NH 3+) 0.35(CH 2) 2SO 3-] crystals from x( zz) x and x( zy) x scattering geometries of the A g and B g irreducible representations of the factor group C 2h are reported. The temperature-dependent Raman spectra of partially deuteriated taurine do not reveal any evidence of the structural phase transition undergone by normal taurine at about 250 K, but an anomaly observed in the 180 cm -1 band at ˜120 K implies a different dynamic for this band (which is involved in a pressure-induced phase transition) in the deuteriated crystal.

  7. Analysis of human hair by Raman microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Castro, A. S.; Cordova-Fraga, T.; Piña-Ruiz, A. L.; Hernández-Rayas, A.; Bernal, J. J.

    2017-04-01

    Raman microspectroscopy is an optical compound identification technique, which is widely used nowadays for different field applications. A crucial part of this technique is the focus given to the sample in the microscope because it depends on which part of the sample it will analyze. In this work, the effects of irradiating a natural hair samples, obtained from women aged 18 to 55, with a monochromatic light of the Raman spectrometer in two different focus is presented. Two different spectra were obtained with a peak in common. Depending on the information wanted, how the sample is focused plays a crucial role, either way the spectra is information-rich and may be used for biomedical applications.

  8. Raman Amplification with a Flying Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, D.; Bucht, S.; Davies, A.; Haberberger, D.; Kessler, T.; Shaw, J. L.; Froula, D. H.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new laser amplifier scheme utilizing stimulated Raman scattering in plasma in conjunction with a "flying focus"—a chromatic focusing system combined with a chirped pump beam that provides spatiotemporal control over the pump's focal spot. Pump intensity isosurfaces are made to propagate at v =-c so as to be in sync with the injected counterpropagating seed pulse. By setting the pump intensity in the interaction region to be just above the ionization threshold of the background gas, an ionization wave is produced that travels at a fixed distance ahead of the seed. Simulations show that this will make it possible to optimize the plasma temperature and mitigate many of the issues that are known to have impacted previous Raman amplification experiments, in particular, the growth of precursors.

  9. Elucidating doping driven microstructure evolution and optical properties of lead sulfide thin films grown from a chemical bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Bhaskar Chandra; Bector, Keerti; Laha, Ranjit

    2018-03-01

    Doping driven remarkable microstructural evolution of PbS thin films grown by a single-step chemical bath deposition process at 60 °C is reported. The undoped films were discontinuous with octahedral-shaped crystallites after 30 min of deposition, whereas Cu doping led to a distinctly different surface microstructure characterized by densely packed elongated crystallites. A mechanism, based on the time sequence study of microstructural evolution of the films, and detailed XRD and Raman measurements, has been proposed to explain the contrasting microstructure of the doped films. The incorporation of Cu forms an interface layer, which is devoid of Pb. The excess Cu ions in this interface layer at the initial stages of film growth strongly interact and selectively stabilize the charged {111} faces containing either Pb or S compared to the uncharged {100} faces that contain both Pb and S. This interaction interferes with the natural growth habit resulting in the observed surface features of the doped films. Concurrently, the Cu-doping potentially changed the optical properties of the films: A significant widening of the bandgap from 1.52 eV to 1.74 eV for increase in Cu concentration from 0 to 20% was observed, making it a highly potential absorber layer in thin film solar cells.

  10. Raman Spectra of Nanodiamonds: New Treatment Procedure Directed for Improved Raman Signal Marker Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul R. Nigmatullin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs have shown to be promising agents in several industries, ranging from electronic to biomedical applications. These NDs are characterized by small particle size ranging from 3 to 6 nm, while having a reactive surface and a stable inert core. Nanodiamonds can exhibit novel intrinsic properties such as fluorescence, high refractive index, and unique Raman signal making them very attractive imaging agents. In this work, we used several nanodiamond preparations for Raman spectroscopic studies. We exposed these nanodiamonds to increasing temperature treatments at constant heating rates (425–575°C aiding graphite release. We wanted to correlate changes in the nanodiamond surface and properties with Raman signal which could be used as a detection marker. These observations would hold potential utility in biomedical imaging applications. First, the procedure of optimal linear smoothing was applied successfully to eliminate the high-frequency fluctuations and to extract the smoothed Raman spectra. After that we applied the secondary Fourier transform as the fitting function based on some significant set of frequencies. The remnant noise was described in terms of the beta-distribution function. We expect this data treatment to provide better results in biomolecule tracking using nanodiamond base Raman labeling.

  11. Transmutation and accelerator driven systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapira, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Today, countries who are presently involved in nuclear energy are facing many challenges to maintain this option open for the next few decades. Among them, management of nuclear wastes produced in nuclear reactors and in fuel cycle operations has become a very strong environmental issue among the public. In most countries with sizeable commercial nuclear programs, deep geological disposal of ultimate highly active and long-lived nuclear wastes is considered as the reference long-term management scheme. But, many questions arise on the possibility to demonstrate that such wastes can be dealt in such a way as to protect the future generations and the environment. The characteristics of nuclear wastes, the various back end policies concerning spent fuels and the nuclear wastes long-term management options will be first described. Then recent proposals, based on transmutation, especially those using accelerator driven systems (ADS) and/or thorium will be presented. Finally, the possibility for the nuclear physics community to play a part in alleviating the nuclear wastes burden will be pointed out. (author)

  12. Raman microspectroscopy of the yeast vacuoles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednárová, Lucie; Gregorová, Š.; Bauerová, Václava; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Palacký, J.; Mojzeš, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 1 (2014), s. 15 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /12./. 13.03.2014-15.03.2014, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0376 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Raman microspectroscopy * yeast vacuoles Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: nonlocal limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Raza, S.; Xiao, Sanshui

    2012-01-01

    for our understanding of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The intrinsic length scale of the electron gas serves to smear out assumed field singularities, leaving the SERS enhancement factor finite, even for geometries with infinitely sharp features. For silver nanogroove structures, mimicked...... by periodic arrays of half-cylinders (up to 120 nm in radius), we find no enhancement factors exceeding 10 orders of magnitude (10(10)). (C) 2012 Optical Society of America...

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: nonlocal limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toscano, Giuseppe; Raza, Søren; Xiao, Sanshui

    2012-01-01

    for our understanding of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The intrinsic length scale of the electron gas serves to smear out assumed field singularities, leaving the SERS enhancement factor finite, even for geometries with infinitely sharp features. For silver nanogroove structures, mimicked...... by periodic arrays of half-cylinders (up to 120 nm in radius), we find no enhancement factors exceeding 10 orders of magnitude (1010)....

  15. Raman Microspectroscopy of the Yeast Vacuoles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednárová, Lucie; Palacký, J.; Bauerová, Václava; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva; Mojzeš, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 27, 5-6 (2012), s. 503-507 ISSN 0712-4813 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/0376; GA ČR GA310/09/1945 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Raman microspectroscopy * living cell * yeast * vacuole * chemical composition * polyphospate * Candida albicans Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2012

  16. Raman spectroscopy and oral exfoliative cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Aditi; Shah, Nupur; Mahimkar, Manoj; Garud, Mandavi; Pagare, Sandeep; Nair, Sudhir; Krishna, C. Murali

    2014-03-01

    Early detection of oral cancers can substantially improve disease-free survival rates. Ex vivo and in vivo Raman spectroscopic (RS) studies on oral cancer have demonstrated the applicability of RS in identifying not only malignant and premalignant conditions but also cancer-field-effects: the earliest events in oral carcinogenesis. RS has also been explored for cervical exfoliated cells analysis. Exfoliated cells are associated with several advantages like non-invasive sampling, higher patient compliance, transportation and analysis at a central facility: obviating need for on-site instrumentation. Thus, oral exfoliative cytology coupled with RS may serve as a useful adjunct for oral cancer screening. In this study, exfoliated cells from healthy controls with and without tobacco habits, premalignant lesions (leukoplakia and tobacco-pouch-keratosis) and their contralateral mucosa were collected using a Cytobrush. Cells were harvested by vortexing and centrifugation at 6000 rpm. The cellular yield was ascertained using Neubauer's chamber. Cell pellets were placed on a CaF2 window and Raman spectra were acquired using a Raman microprobe (40X objective) coupled HE-785 Raman spectrometer. Approximately 7 spectra were recorded from each pellet, following which pellet was smeared onto a glass slide, fixed in 95% ethanol and subjected to Pap staining for cytological diagnosis (gold standard). Preliminary PC-LDA followed by leave-one-out cross validation indicate delineation of cells from healthy and all pathological conditions. A tendency of classification was also seen between cells from contralateral, healthy tobacco and site of premalignant lesions. These results will be validated by cytological findings, which will serve as the basis for building standard models of each condition.

  17. In situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry of graphene oxide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bouša, Milan; Frank, Otakar; Jirka, Ivan; Kavan, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 250, č. 12 (2013), s. 2662-2667 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-07724S Grant - others:European Commission CORDIS(XE) FP7- ENERGY -2010-FET, projekt 256617 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electrochemical reduction * Raman spectroscopy * graphene oxide Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.605, year: 2013

  18. Enhanced Raman scattering on functionalized graphene substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valeš, Václav; Kovaříček, Petr; Fridrichová, Michaela; Ji, X.; Ling, X.; Kong, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Kalbáč, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 025087. ISSN 2053-1583 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Grant - others:AVČR PPPLZ(CZ) L200401551 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spectroscopy * molecules * graphene * graphene enhanced Raman scattering * functionalized graphene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor : 6.937, year: 2016

  19. Candida parapsilosis Biofilm Identification by Raman Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Samek, Ota; Mlynariková, K.; Bernatová, Silvie; Ježek, Jan; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Šiler, Martin; Zemánek, Pavel; Růžička, F.; Holá, Miroslava; Mahelová, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2014), s. 23924-23935 E-ISSN 1422-0067 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR GAP205/11/1687 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * Candida parapsilosis * biofilm Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.862, year: 2014

  20. Enhanced Raman scattering on functionalized graphene substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valeš, Václav; Kovaříček, Petr; Fridrichová, Michaela; Ji, X.; Ling, X.; Kong, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Kalbáč, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 2 (2017), č. článku 025087. ISSN 2053-1583 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Grant - others:AVČR PPPLZ(CZ) L200401551 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : spectroscopy * molecules * graphene * graphene enhanced Raman scattering * functionalized graphene Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 6.937, year: 2016

  1. The third generation of multichannel Raman spectrometers

    OpenAIRE

    Deffontaine, A.; Bridoux, M.; Delhaye, M.; Da Silva, E.; Hug, W.

    1984-01-01

    A new multichannel Raman spectrometer is described. Each component of the optical part (sample compartment, sample adjustment provisions, filters, fore-monochromator, spectrograph) have been carefully designed to build a high quality, high reliability and easy to use instrument. The detection system uses a self-scanned photodiode array and the read-out electronics and data acquisition system are based on electronic circuits and logics specially developed to give a high dynamic range with low ...

  2. Field Raman Spectrograph for Environmental Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sylvia, J.M.; Haas, J.W.; Spencer, K.M.; Carrabba, M.M.; Rauh, R.D.; Forney, R.W.; Johnston, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    The widespread contamination found across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex has received considerable attention from the government and public alike. A massive site characterization and cleanup effort has been underway for several years and is expected to continue for several decades more. The scope of the cleanup effort ranges from soil excavation and treatment to complete dismantling and decontamination of whole buildings. To its credit, DOE has supported research and development of new technologies to speed up and reduce the cost of this effort. One area in particular has been the development of portable instrumentation that can be used to perform analytical measurements in the field. This approach provides timely data to decision makers and eliminates the expense, delays, and uncertainties of sample preservation, transport, storage, and laboratory analysis. In this program, we have developed and demonstrated in the field a transportable, high performance Raman spectrograph that can be used to detect and identify contaminants in a variety of scenarios. With no moving parts, the spectrograph is rugged and can perform many Raman measurements in situ with flexible fiber optic sampling probes. The instrument operates under computer control and a software package has been developed to collect and process spectral data. A collection of Raman spectra for 200 contaminants of DOE importance has been compiled in a searchable format to assist in the identification of unknown contaminants in the field

  3. Raman exfoliative cytology for oral precancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Aditi; Gera, Poonam; Pai, Venkatesh; Dubey, Abhishek; Tyagi, Gunjan; Waghmare, Mandavi; Pagare, Sandeep; Mahimkar, Manoj; Murali Krishna, C.

    2017-11-01

    Oral premalignant lesions (OPLs) such as leukoplakia, erythroplakia, and oral submucous fibrosis, often precede oral cancer. Screening and management of these premalignant conditions can improve prognosis. Raman spectroscopy has previously demonstrated potential in the diagnosis of oral premalignant conditions (in vivo), detected viral infection, and identified cancer in both oral and cervical exfoliated cells (ex vivo). The potential of Raman exfoliative cytology (REC) in identifying premalignant conditions was investigated. Oral exfoliated samples were collected from healthy volunteers (n=20), healthy volunteers with tobacco habits (n=20), and oral premalignant conditions (n=27, OPL) using Cytobrush. Spectra were acquired using Raman microprobe. Spectral acquisition parameters were: λex: 785 nm, laser power: 40 mW, acquisition time: 15 s, and average: 3. Postspectral acquisition, cell pellet was subjected to Pap staining. Multivariate analysis was carried out using principal component analysis and principal component-linear discriminant analysis using both spectra- and patient-wise approaches in three- and two-group models. OPLs could be identified with ˜77% (spectra-wise) and ˜70% (patient-wise) sensitivity in the three-group model while with 86% (spectra-wise) and 83% (patient-wise) in the two-group model. Use of histopathologically confirmed premalignant cases and better sampling devices may help in development of improved standard models and also enhance the sensitivity of the method. Future longitudinal studies can help validate potential of REC in screening and monitoring high-risk populations and prognosis prediction of premalignant lesions.

  4. A Raman-Based Portable Fuel Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    Fuel is the single most import supply during war. Consider that the US Military is employing over 25,000 vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan. Most fuel is obtained locally, and must be characterized to ensure proper operation of these vehicles. Fuel properties are currently determined using a deployed chemical laboratory. Unfortunately, each sample requires in excess of 6 hours to characterize. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a portable fuel analyzer capable of determine 7 fuel properties that allow determining fuel usage. The analyzer uses Raman spectroscopy to measure the fuel samples without preparation in 2 minutes. The challenge, however, is that as distilled fractions of crude oil, all fuels are composed of hundreds of hydrocarbon components that boil at similar temperatures, and performance properties can not be simply correlated to a single component, and certainly not to specific Raman peaks. To meet this challenge, we measured over 800 diesel and jet fuels from around the world and used chemometrics to correlate the Raman spectra to fuel properties. Critical to the success of this approach is laser excitation at 1064 nm to avoid fluorescence interference (many fuels fluoresce) and a rugged interferometer that provides 0.1 cm-1 wavenumber (x-axis) accuracy to guarantee accurate correlations. Here we describe the portable fuel analyzer, the chemometric models, and the successful determination of these 7 fuel properties for over 100 unknown samples provided by the US Marine Corps, US Navy, and US Army.

  5. UTI diagnosis and antibiogram using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastanos, Evdokia; Kyriakides, Alexandros; Hadjigeorgiou, Katerina; Pitris, Constantinos

    2009-07-01

    Urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram require a 48 hour waiting period using conventional methods. This results in ineffective treatments, increased costs and most importantly in increased resistance to antibiotics. In this work, a novel method for classifying bacteria and determining their sensitivity to an antibiotic using Raman spectroscopy is described. Raman spectra of three species of gram negative Enterobacteria, most commonly responsible for urinary tract infections, were collected. The study included 25 samples each of E.coli, Klebsiella p. and Proteus spp. A novel algorithm based on spectral ratios followed by discriminant analysis resulted in classification with over 94% accuracy. Sensitivity and specificity for the three types of bacteria ranged from 88-100%. For the development of an antibiogram, bacterial samples were treated with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin to which they were all sensitive. Sensitivity to the antibiotic was evident after analysis of the Raman signatures of bacteria treated or not treated with this antibiotic as early as two hours after exposure. This technique can lead to the development of new technology for urinary tract infection diagnosis and antibiogram with same day results, bypassing urine cultures and avoiding all undesirable consequences of current practice.

  6. Polarized Raman microspectroscopy on intact human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Katrin R; Koster, Joachim; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2008-10-01

    Polarization-resolved Raman microspectroscopy with near-infrared laser excitation was applied to intact human hair in order to non-invasively investigate the conformation and orientation of the polypeptide chains. By varying the orientation of the hair shaft relative to the polarization directions of the laser/analyzer, a set of four polarized Raman spectra is obtained; this allows to simultaneously determine both the secondary structure of hair proteins and the orientation of the polypeptide strands relative to the axis of the hair shaft. For the amide I band, results from a quantitative analysis of the polarized Raman spectra are compared with theoretically expected values for fibers with uniaxial symmetry. Based on the polarization behavior of the amide I band and further vibrational bands, a partial ordering of alpha-helical polypeptide strands parallel to the hair shaft can be concluded. We suggest that this microspectroscopic approach may be used for human hair diagnostics by detecting structural or orientational alterations of keratins.

  7. Raman study of opal at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, G.; Wang, S.; Mao, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    More commonly known for their beauty and lore as gemstones, opals are also intriguing geological materials which may have potential for materials science applications. Opal lacks a definite crystalline structure, and is composed of an amorphous packing of hydrated silica (SiO2) spheroids, which provides us with a unique nano-scaled mineraloid with properties unlike those of other amorphous materials like glass. Opals from different localities were studied at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell to apply pressure and Raman spectroscopy to look at changes in bonding as pressure was increased. We first tested different samples from Virgin Valley, NV, Spencer, ID, Juniper Ridge, OR, and Australia, which contain varying amounts of water at ambient conditions, using Raman spectroscopy to determine if they were opal-CT (semicrystalline cristobalite-trydimite volcanic origin) or opal-A (amorphous sedimentary origin). We then used x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in a diamond anvil cell to see how their bonding and structure changed under compression and to determine what effect water content had on their high pressure behavior. Comparison of our results on opal to other high pressure studies of amorphous materials like glass has implications from a geological and materials science standpoint.

  8. Raman spectral indicators of catalyst decoupling for transfer of CVD grown 2D materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whelan, Patrick Rebsdorf; Jessen, Bjarke Sørensen; Wang, Ruizhi

    2017-01-01

    Through a combination of monitoring the Raman spectral characteristics of 2D materials grown on copper catalyst layers, and wafer scale automated detection of the fraction of transferred material, we reproducibly achieve transfers with over 97.5% monolayer hexagonal boron nitride and 99.7% monola......Through a combination of monitoring the Raman spectral characteristics of 2D materials grown on copper catalyst layers, and wafer scale automated detection of the fraction of transferred material, we reproducibly achieve transfers with over 97.5% monolayer hexagonal boron nitride and 99.......7% monolayer graphene coverage, for up to 300 mm diameter wafers.We find a strong correlation between the transfer coverage obtained for graphene and the emergence of a lower wavenumber 2D peak component, with the concurrent disappearance of the higher wavenumber 2Dþ peak component during oxidation...

  9. Damping of Landau levels in neutral graphene at low magnetic fields: A phonon Raman scattering study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardito, F. M.; Mendes-de-Sá, T. G.; Cadore, A. R.; Gomes, P. F.; Mafra, D. L.; Barcelos, I. D.; Lacerda, R. G.; Iikawa, F.; Granado, E.

    2018-01-01

    Landau level broadening mechanisms in electrically neutral and quasineutral graphene were investigated through micro-magneto-Raman experiments in three different samples, namely, a natural single-layer graphene flake and a back-gated single-layer device, both deposited over Si/SiO 2 substrates, and a multilayer epitaxial graphene employed as a reference sample. Interband Landau level transition widths were estimated through a quantitative analysis of the magnetophonon resonances associated with optically active Landau level transitions crossing the energy of the E2 g Raman-active phonon. Contrary to multilayer graphene, the single-layer graphene samples show a strong damping of the low-field resonances, consistent with an additional broadening contribution of the Landau level energies arising from a random strain field. This extra contribution is properly quantified in terms of a pseudomagnetic field distribution Δ B =1.0 -1.7 T in our single-layer samples.

  10. Fine-filter method for Raman lidar based on wavelength division multiplexing and fiber Bragg grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Zheng, Jiao; Lu, Hong; Yan, Qing; Wang, Li; Liu, Jingjing; Hua, Dengxin

    2017-11-01

    Atmospheric temperature is one of the important parameters for the description of the atmospheric state. Most of the detection approaches to atmospheric temperature monitoring are based on rotational Raman scattering for better understanding atmospheric dynamics, thermodynamics, atmospheric transmission, and radiation. In this paper, we present a fine-filter method based on wavelength division multiplexing, incorporating a fiber Bragg grating in the visible spectrum for the rotational Raman scattering spectrum. To achieve high-precision remote sensing, the strong background noise is filtered out by using the secondary cascaded light paths. Detection intensity and the signal-to-noise ratio are improved by increasing the utilization rate of return signal form atmosphere. Passive temperature compensation is employed to reduce the temperature sensitivity of fiber Bragg grating. In addition, the proposed method provides a feasible solution for the filter system with the merits of miniaturization, high anti-interference, and high stability in the space-based platform.

  11. Determination of iron redox ratio in borosilicate glasses and melts from Raman spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochain, B. [SCDV-Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols-sur-ceze (France); Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, CNRS-IPGP, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex05 (France); Neuville, D.R.; Richet, P. [Physique des Mineraux et des Magmas, CNRS-IPGP, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex05 (France); Henderson, G.S. [Dept of Geology, University of Toronto, 22 Russell Street, Toronto (Canada); Pinet, O. [SCDV-Laboratoire d' Etudes de Base sur les Verres, CEA Valrho, Centre de Marcoule, 30207 Bagnols-sur-ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    A method is presented to determine the redox ratio of iron in borosilicate glasses and melts relevant to nuclear waste storage from an analysis of Raman spectra recorded at room or high temperature. The basis of this method is the strong variation of the spectral feature observed between 800 and 1200 cm{sup -1}, in which it is possible to assign a band to vibrational modes involving ferric iron in tetrahedral coordination whose intensity increases with iron content and iron oxidation. After baseline correction and normalization, fits to the Raman spectra made with Gaussian bands enable us to determine the proportion of ferric iron provided the redox ratio is known independently for at least two redox states for a given glass composition. This method is particularly useful for in situ determinations of the kinetics and mechanisms of redox reactions. (authors)

  12. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy (CARS): Instrumentation and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djaker, Nadia; Lenne, Pierre-Francois; Marguet, Didier; Colonna, Anne; Hadjur, Christophe; Rigneault, Herve

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in laser physics have permitted the development of a new kind of microscopy based on stimulated Raman scattering. This new technique known as Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy allows vibrational imaging with high sensitivity, high spectral resolution and three-dimensional sectioning capabilities. We review recent advances in CARS microscopy, with applications to chemical and biological systems. We also present an application of CARS microscopy with high optical resolution and spectral selectivity, in resolving structures in surface ex vivo stratum corneum by looking at the CH 2 stretching vibrational band. A strong CARS signal is backscattered from an intense forward generated CARS signal in thick samples. This makes noninvasive imaging of deep structures possible, without labeling or chemical treatments

  13. Simulations and analysis of the Raman scattering and differential Raman scattering/Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of amino acids, peptides and proteins in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Nieminen, R. M.; Bohr, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    The Raman and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of amino acids and small peptides in aqueous solution have been simulated by density functional theory and restricted Hartree/Fock methods. The treatment of the aqueous environment in treated in two ways. The water molecules in the first hydration...

  14. Strong expectations cancel locality effects: evidence from Hindi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Husain

    Full Text Available Expectation-driven facilitation (Hale, 2001; Levy, 2008 and locality-driven retrieval difficulty (Gibson, 1998, 2000; Lewis & Vasishth, 2005 are widely recognized to be two critical factors in incremental sentence processing; there is accumulating evidence that both can influence processing difficulty. However, it is unclear whether and how expectations and memory interact. We first confirm a key prediction of the expectation account: a Hindi self-paced reading study shows that when an expectation for an upcoming part of speech is dashed, building a rarer structure consumes more processing time than building a less rare structure. This is a strong validation of the expectation-based account. In a second study, we show that when expectation is strong, i.e., when a particular verb is predicted, strong facilitation effects are seen when the appearance of the verb is delayed; however, when expectation is weak, i.e., when only the part of speech "verb" is predicted but a particular verb is not predicted, the facilitation disappears and a tendency towards a locality effect is seen. The interaction seen between expectation strength and distance shows that strong expectations cancel locality effects, and that weak expectations allow locality effects to emerge.

  15. The use of lasers as sources for Raman spectrometry, resonance Raman spectrometry, and light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitini, R.; Ceccaldi, M.; Leicknam, J.P.; Plus, R.

    1975-01-01

    The activity of the laboratory is principally centred on the determination of molecular structures and the study of molecular interactions in solution by infrared and Raman spectrometry. With the development of work on relatively large molecules, particularly biological molecules, it became necessary to complete information on the molecular weight and on the intra and intermolecular geometry and interactions of these bodies. In order to obtain these informations Rayleigh scattering and resonance Raman spectrometry were used. The advantages of using vibrational spectrometry, particularly Raman, in conjunction with the diffusion of light for these structural and molecular interaction studies is emphasized. It is shown that these two techniques could not have developed as they have done in the last few years without the use of lasers as light source [fr

  16. Strongly correlated systems experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The continuous evolution and development of experimental techniques is at the basis of any fundamental achievement in modern physics. Strongly correlated systems (SCS), more than any other, need to be investigated through the greatest variety of experimental techniques in order to unveil and crosscheck the numerous and puzzling anomalous behaviors characterizing them. The study of SCS fostered the improvement of many old experimental techniques, but also the advent of many new ones just invented in order to analyze the complex behaviors of these systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. The volume presents a representative collection of the modern experimental techniques specifically tailored for the analysis of strongly correlated systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognize...

  17. Strongly Correlated Systems Theoretical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Avella, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    The volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern theoretical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciates consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as po...

  18. Strongly correlated systems numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    This volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern numerical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and material science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciate consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as possi...

  19. Strongly nonlinear oscillators analytical solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Cveticanin, Livija

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the presentation of the motion of pure nonlinear oscillatory systems and various solution procedures which give the approximate solutions of the strong nonlinear oscillator equations. The book presents the original author’s method for the analytical solution procedure of the pure nonlinear oscillator system. After an introduction, the physical explanation of the pure nonlinearity and of the pure nonlinear oscillator is given. The analytical solution for free and forced vibrations of the one-degree-of-freedom strong nonlinear system with constant and time variable parameter is considered. Special attention is given to the one and two mass oscillatory systems with two-degrees-of-freedom. The criteria for the deterministic chaos in ideal and non-ideal pure nonlinear oscillators are derived analytically. The method for suppressing chaos is developed. Important problems are discussed in didactic exercises. The book is self-consistent and suitable as a textbook for students and also for profess...

  20. Flavour Democracy in Strong Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, S A; Abel, Steven; King, Steven

    1998-01-01

    We show that the fermion mass spectrum may naturally be understood in terms of flavour democratic fixed points in supersymmetric theories which have a large domain of attraction in the presence of "strong unification". Our approach provides an alternative to the approximate Yukawa texture zeroes of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss a particular model based on a broken gauged $SU(3)_L\\times SU(3)_R$ family symmetry which illustrates our approach.

  1. Simultaneous Conoscopic Holography and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kaiser, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    A new instrument was developed for chemical characterization of surfaces that combines the analytical power of Raman spectroscopy with the three-dimensional topographic information provided by conoscopic holography. The figure schematically depicts the proposed hybrid instrument. The output of the conoscopic holographic portion of the instrument is a topographical map of the surface; the output of the Raman portion of the instrument is hyperspectral Raman data, from which the chemical and/or biological composition of the surface would be deduced. By virtue of the basic principles of design and operation of the instrument, the hyperspectral image data would be inherently spatially registered with the topographical data. In conoscopic holography, the object and reference beams of classical holography are replaced by the ordinary and extraordinary components generated by a single beam traveling through a birefringent, uniaxial crystal. In the basic conoscopic configuration, a laser light is projected onto a specimen and the resulting illuminated spot becomes a point source of diffuse light that propagates in every direction. The laser beam is rasterscanned in two dimensions (x and y) perpendicular to the beam axis (z), and at each x,y location, the pattern of interference between the ordinary and extraordinary rays is recorded. The recorded interferogram constitutes the conoscopic hologram. Of particular significance for the proposed instrument is that the conoscopic hologram contains information on the z coordinate (height) of the illuminated surface spot. Hence, a topographical map of the specimen is constructed point-by-point by rastering the laser beam in the x and y directions and correlating the x and y coordinates with the z information obtained from the interferograms. Conoscopic imaging is an established method, and conoscopic laboratory instruments for surface metrology are commercially available. In Raman spectroscopy of a surface, one measures the spectrum

  2. On surface Raman scattering and luminescence radiation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tanaka, T; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-02-03

    The discrepancy between Raman spectra of boron carbide obtained by Fourier transform Raman and conventional Raman spectrometry is systematically investigated. While at photon energies below the exciton energy (1.560 eV), Raman scattering of bulk phonons of boron carbide occurs, photon energies exceeding the fundamental absorption edge (2.09 eV) evoke additional patterns, which may essentially be attributed to luminescence or to the excitation of Raman-active processes in the surface region. The reason for this is the very high fundamental absorption in boron carbide inducing a very small penetration depth of the exciting laser radiation. Raman excitations essentially restricted to the boron carbide surface region yield spectra which considerably differ from bulk phonon ones, thus indicating structural modifications.

  3. Standoff ultracompact micro-Raman sensor for planetary surface explorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, M Nurul; Bradley, Arthur T; Misra, Anupam K; Bai, Yingxin; Hines, Glenn D; Sharma, Shiv K

    2018-01-01

    We report the development of an innovative standoff ultracompact micro-Raman instrument that would solve some of the limitations of traditional micro-Raman systems to provide a superior instrument for future NASA missions. This active remote sensor system, based on a 532 nm laser and a miniature spectrometer, is capable of inspection and identification of minerals, organics, and biogenic materials within several centimeters (2-20 cm) at a high 10 μm resolution. The sensor system is based on inelastic (Raman) light scattering and laser-induced fluorescence. We report on micro-Raman spectroscopy development and demonstration of the standoff Raman measurements by acquiring Raman spectra in daylight at a 10 cm target distance with a small line-shaped laser spot size of 17.3 μm (width) by 5 mm (height).

  4. Scanning Angle Raman spectroscopy in polymer thin film characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Vy H.T. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-12-19

    The focus of this thesis is the application of Raman spectroscopy for the characterization of thin polymer films. Chapter 1 provides background information and motivation, including the fundamentals of Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, scanning angle Raman scattering and scanning angle Raman scattering for applications in thin polymer film characterization. Chapter 2 represents a published manuscript that focuses on the application of scanning angle Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of submicron thin films with a description of methodology for measuring the film thickness and location of an interface between two polymer layers. Chapter 3 provides an outlook and future directions for the work outlined in this thesis. Appendix A, contains a published manuscript that outlines the use of Raman spectroscopy to aid in the synthesis of heterogeneous catalytic systems. Appendix B and C contain published manuscripts that set a foundation for the work presented in Chapter 2.

  5. 3 GHz, watt-level femtosecond Raman soliton source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jinkang; Chen, Hung-Wen; Xu, Shanhui; Yang, Zhongmin; Chang, Guoqing; Kärtner, Franz X

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate a 3 GHz repetition rate, femtosecond Raman soliton source with its wavelength tunable from 1.15 to 1.35 μm. We investigate the dependence of Raman soliton formation on different photonic-crystal fibers (PCFs), input powers, and fiber lengths. To produce a Raman soliton peaking at the same wavelength, shorter PCFs demand higher input average powers and consequently generate stronger Raman soliton pulses. Using 30 cm PCF NL-3.2-945, the resulting Raman soliton pulse at 1.35 μm has 0.9 W average power. The integrated relative intensity noise of the Raman soliton pulse at 1.35 μm generated from the 54-cm PCF NL-3.2-945 is as low as 0.33% from 100 Hz to 10 MHz.

  6. UV Resonant Raman Spectrometer with Multi-Line Laser Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James L.; Kohel, James M.; Kirby, James P.; Morookian, John Michael; Pelletier, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    A Raman spectrometer employs two or more UV (ultraviolet) laser wavel engths to generate UV resonant Raman (UVRR) spectra in organic sampl es. Resonant Raman scattering results when the laser excitation is n ear an electronic transition of a molecule, and the enhancement of R aman signals can be several orders of magnitude. In addition, the Ra man cross-section is inversely proportional to the fourth power of t he wavelength, so the UV Raman emission is increased by another fact or of 16, or greater, over visible Raman emissions. The Raman-scatter ed light is collected using a high-resolution broadband spectrograph . Further suppression of the Rayleigh-scattered laser light is provi ded by custom UV notch filters.

  7. Raman optical activity spectroscopy by visible-excited coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Kotaro; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Nagata, Takashi; Kano, Hideaki

    2015-09-01

    We developed a Raman optical activity (ROA) spectroscopic system with visible-excited coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). A supercontinuum within the visible region was generated with a photonic crystal fiber pumped with both 532 and 1064 nm excitation, generating a multiplexed CARS-ROA spectrum covering the whole fingerprint region. In visible excitation, the CARS-ROA spectrum of (-)-β-pinene shows a higher contrast ratio of the chirality-induced signal to the achiral background than that of the previously reported near-infrared CARS-ROA spectrum.

  8. Super-Resolution Raman Spectroscopy by Digital Image Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Tomita, Motohiro; Hashiguchi, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Takuya; Takei, Munehisa; Kosemura, Daisuke; Ogura, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the results of a strain (stress) evaluation obtained from Raman spectroscopy measurements with the super-resolution method (the so-called super-resolution Raman spectroscopy) for a Si substrate with a patterned SiN film (serving as a strained Si sample). To improve the spatial resolution of Raman spectroscopy, we used the super-resolution method and a high-numerical-aperture immersion lens. Additionally, we estimated the spatial resolution by an edge force model (EFM) calculati...

  9. C. V. Raman and Colonial Physics: Acoustics and the Quantum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Somaditya

    2014-06-01

    Presenting the social and historical context of Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman, this paper clarifies the nature and development of his work in early twentieth-century colonial India. Raman's early fascination with acoustics became the basis of his later insights into the nature of the light quantum. His work on light scattering played an important role in the experimental verification of quantum mechanics. In general, Raman's worldview corrects certain Orientalist stereotypes about scientific practice in Asia.

  10. Preventing Raman Lasing in High-Q WGM Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    A generic design has been conceived to suppress the Raman effect in whispering- gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonators that have high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). Although it is possible to exploit the Raman effect (even striving to maximize the Raman gain to obtain Raman lasing), the present innovation is intended to satisfy a need that arises in applications in which the Raman effect inhibits the realization of the full potential of WGM resonators as frequency-selection components. Heretofore, in such applications, it has been necessary to operate high-Q WGM resonators at unattractively low power levels to prevent Raman lasing. (The Raman-lasing thresholds of WGM optical resonators are very low and are approximately proportional to Q(sup -2)). Heretofore, two ways of preventing Raman lasting at high power levels have been known, but both entail significant disadvantages: A resonator can be designed so that the optical field is spread over a relatively large mode volume to bring the power density below the threshold. For any given combination of Q and power level, there is certain mode volume wherein Raman lasing does not start. Unfortunately, a resonator that has a large mode volume also has a high spectral density, which is undesirable in a typical photonic application. A resonator can be cooled to the temperature of liquid helium, where the Raman spectrum is narrower and, therefore, the Raman gain is lower. However, liquid-helium cooling is inconvenient. The present design overcomes these disadvantages, making it possible to operate a low-spectral-density (even a single-mode) WGM resonator at a relatively high power level at room temperature, without risk of Raman lasing.

  11. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopic Study of Carbon-Cobalt Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Tembre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of carbon-cobalt thin films using infrared spectroscopy has shown existence of carbon-cobalt stretching mode and great porosity. The Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy have been used in order to investigate the microstructure of the films. These films exhibit complex Raman spectra suggesting the presence of amorphous and crystallized phases. The different fractions of phases and the correlation between the atomic bond structures and the Raman features depend on the cobalt content.

  12. Infrared and Raman Spectroscopic Study of Carbon-Cobalt Composites

    OpenAIRE

    André Tembre; Jacques Hénocque; Martial Clin

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of carbon-cobalt thin films using infrared spectroscopy has shown existence of carbon-cobalt stretching mode and great porosity. The Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy have been used in order to investigate the microstructure of the films. These films exhibit complex Raman spectra suggesting the presence of amorphous and crystallized phases. The different fractions of phases and the correlation between the atomic bond structures and the Raman feat...

  13. Rationale for single molecule detection by means of Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, S.V.; Guzatov, D.V.

    2009-01-01

    A consistent quantum electrodynamical description is proposed of Raman scattering of light by a molecule in a medium with a modified photon density of states. Enhanced local density of states near a metal nanobody is shown to increase a scattering rate by several orders of magnitude, thus providing a rationale for experimental detection of single molecules by means of Raman spectroscopy. For an ellipsoidal particle 10 14 -fold enhancement of the Raman scattering cross-section is obtained. (authors)

  14. Pressure Driven Poiseuille Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stotz, Ingo Leonardo; Iaffaldano, Giampiero; Davies, D. Rhodri

    2018-01-01

    and lithosphere mutually exchange, by virtue of Newton's third law of motion. In light of these constraints, the notion that subduction is the main driver of present–day Pacific plate motion becomes somewhat unviable, as the pulling force that would be required by slabs exceeds the maximum available from......The Pacific plate is thought to be driven mainly by slab pull, associated with subduction along the Aleutians–Japan, Marianas–Izu–Bonin and Tonga–Kermadec trenches. This implies that viscous flow within the sub–Pacific asthenosphere is mainly generated by overlying plate motion (i.e. Couette flow......), and that the associated shear–stresses at the lithosphere's base are resisting such motion. Recent studies on glacial isostatic adjustment and lithosphere dynamics provide tighter constraints on the viscosity and thickness of Earth's asthenosphere and, therefore, on the amount of shear–stress that asthenosphere...

  15. Soliton driven angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, L L; Carretero, M; Terragni, F; Birnir, B

    2016-08-09

    Angiogenesis is a multiscale process by which blood vessels grow from existing ones and carry oxygen to distant organs. Angiogenesis is essential for normal organ growth and wounded tissue repair but it may also be induced by tumours to amplify their own growth. Mathematical and computational models contribute to understanding angiogenesis and developing anti-angiogenic drugs, but most work only involves numerical simulations and analysis has lagged. A recent stochastic model of tumour-induced angiogenesis including blood vessel branching, elongation, and anastomosis captures some of its intrinsic multiscale structures, yet allows one to extract a deterministic integropartial differential description of the vessel tip density. Here we find that the latter advances chemotactically towards the tumour driven by a soliton (similar to the famous Korteweg-de Vries soliton) whose shape and velocity change slowly. Analysing these collective coordinates paves the way for controlling angiogenesis through the soliton, the engine that drives this process.

  16. Employee-driven innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2015-01-01

    of contemporary research on routine and organizational decision making to the specific case of EDI. Findings – The main result of the paper is that, from a theoretical point of view, it makes perfect sense to involve ordinary employees in innovation decisions. However, it is also outlined that naıve or ungoverned...... participation is counterproductive, and that it is quite difficult to realize the hidden potential in a supportive way. Research limitations/implications – The main implication is that basic mechanisms for employee participation also apply to innovation decisions, although often in a different way. However......Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to outline the “grand structure” of the phenomenon in order to identify both the underlying processes and core drivers of employee-driven innovation (EDI). Design/methodology/approach – This is a conceptual paper. It particularly applies the insights...

  17. Consistent model driven architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepostyn, Stanisław J.

    2015-09-01

    The goal of the MDA is to produce software systems from abstract models in a way where human interaction is restricted to a minimum. These abstract models are based on the UML language. However, the semantics of UML models is defined in a natural language. Subsequently the verification of consistency of these diagrams is needed in order to identify errors in requirements at the early stage of the development process. The verification of consistency is difficult due to a semi-formal nature of UML diagrams. We propose automatic verification of consistency of the series of UML diagrams originating from abstract models implemented with our consistency rules. This Consistent Model Driven Architecture approach enables us to generate automatically complete workflow applications from consistent and complete models developed from abstract models (e.g. Business Context Diagram). Therefore, our method can be used to check practicability (feasibility) of software architecture models.

  18. Modeling of laser-driven hydrodynamics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Stefano, Carlos; Doss, Forrest; Rasmus, Alex; Flippo, Kirk; Desjardins, Tiffany; Merritt, Elizabeth; Kline, John; Hager, Jon; Bradley, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Correct interpretation of hydrodynamics experiments driven by a laser-produced shock depends strongly on an understanding of the time-dependent effect of the irradiation conditions on the flow. In this talk, we discuss the modeling of such experiments using the RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code. The focus is an instability experiment consisting of a period of relatively-steady shock conditions in which the Richtmyer-Meshkov process dominates, followed by a period of decaying flow conditions, in which the dominant growth process changes to Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The use of a laser model is essential for capturing the transition. also University of Michigan.

  19. Effects-Driven IT Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We present effects-driven IT development as an instrument for pursuing and reinforcing Participatory Design (PD) when it is applied in commercial information technology (IT) projects. Effects-driven IT development supports the management of a sustained PD process throughout design and organizatio......We present effects-driven IT development as an instrument for pursuing and reinforcing Participatory Design (PD) when it is applied in commercial information technology (IT) projects. Effects-driven IT development supports the management of a sustained PD process throughout design...

  20. Application of micro Raman spectroscopy to industrial FC membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikvaidze, G; Gabrusenoks, J; Kleperis, J; Vaivars, G

    2007-01-01

    Raman spectra of as-received and protonated membranes (Nafion NRE-212, Fumapem F-14100 and Fumasep FAA) were measured with He-Cd and Ar laser. For the first time the Raman and IR spectra are reported of Fumasep membranes. Most of peaks in vibration spectra active in Raman and IR of membranes are interpreted with C-F, C-S, C-O-C, SO 3 , C-C bonds. The vibration region connected with protons and H-O bond in both types of membranes is found in Raman and IR spectra

  1. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy: principles and spectral interpretation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larkin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    .... The book reviews basic principles, instrumentation, sampling methods, quantitative analysis, origin of group frequencies and qualitative interpretation using generalized Infrared (IR) and Raman spectra...

  2. All passive architecture for high efficiency cascaded Raman conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaswamy, V.; Arun, S.; Chayran, G.; Supradeepa, V. R.

    2018-02-01

    Cascaded Raman fiber lasers have offered a convenient method to obtain scalable, high-power sources at various wavelength regions inaccessible with rare-earth doped fiber lasers. A limitation previously was the reduced efficiency of these lasers. Recently, new architectures have been proposed to enhance efficiency, but this came at the cost of enhanced complexity, requiring an additional low-power, cascaded Raman laser. In this work, we overcome this with a new, all-passive architecture for high-efficiency cascaded Raman conversion. We demonstrate our architecture with a fifth-order cascaded Raman converter from 1117nm to 1480nm with output power of ~64W and efficiency of 60%.

  3. Quantitative aspects of near-infrared Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walder, F. T.; Smith, M. J.

    Three fundamental behaviors of vibrational spectroscopy data manipulation routinely associated with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy are evaluated for near-infrared (NIR) Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy. Spectral reproducibility, spectral subtraction and sensitivity are examined relative to the NIR FT-Raman experiment. Quantitative predictive ability is compared for identical sets of samples containing mixtures of the three xylene isomers. Partial least-squares analysis is used to compare predictive ability. IR performance is found to be better than Raman, though the potential for method development using NIR FT-Raman is shown to be quite promising.

  4. DEB-silicone rubber hydrogen absorbing Raman detection technology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Suolong; Zhong Jingrong; Wang Huang; Yang Kaixu; Xiao Jiqun; Liu Jiaxi; Liao Junsheng

    2012-01-01

    The DEB-Pd/C hydrogen getter powder and DEB-Pd/C-silicone rubber getter film were prepared and used for hydrogen detection in close systems by laser Raman method. The DEB alkanes Raman peak intensity changes with the getter time were monitored by Raman spectrometer. As a result, silicone rubber has good compatibility with DEB getter, slow access to hydrogen and good flexible. The alkanes peak intensity-getter time followed a exponential rule. DEB getter films are suitable for Raman on-line monitor of cumulative hydrogen of a closed system at long time. (authors)

  5. Raman spectrometric studies of selected lanthanide tribromides and trichlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, J.F.

    1988-03-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy was used to identify the crystal structures of lanthanide and actinide compounds. The phonon Raman spectrum is characteristic of the particular crystal structure. GdCl 3 exhibits two crystal structures, the UCl 3 -type hexagonal and the PuBr 3 -type orthorhombic. In the literature it is reported that the low temperature form is orthorhombic; results of experiments here suggest that it is hexagonal. Interconversion between these two forms can be accomplished with temperature andor pressure. In the present work laser Raman spectrometry was used to monitor crystal structure changes in GdCl 3 as a function of temperature or pressure to determine the temperature or pressure at which the hexagonal-to-orthorhombic transformation occurs. Raman spectroscopy was also used to determine the symmetry assignments for the Raman-active bands of a single crystal. Raman spectra of polycrystalline NdBr 3 have been recorded at room temperature and pressure and at approximately 100/degree/K. In addition, polarized Raman spectra of a single crystal NdBr 3 have been measured. Based on these polarization measurements, symmetry assignments of eight Raman-active modes were made. These assignments are useful in interpreting the phonon Raman spectrum of any compound exhibiting the PuBr 3 -type orthorhombic structure. 24 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Depth of a strong jovian jet from a planetary-scale disturbance driven by storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lavega, A; Orton, G S; Hueso, R; García-Melendo, E; Pérez-Hoyos, S; Simon-Miller, A; Rojas, J F; Gómez, J M; Yanamandra-Fisher, P; Fletcher, L; Joels, J; Kemerer, J; Hora, J; Karkoschka, E; de Pater, I; Wong, M H; Marcus, P S; Pinilla-Alonso, N; Carvalho, F; Go, C; Parker, D; Salway, M; Valimberti, M; Wesley, A; Pujic, Z

    2008-01-24

    The atmospheres of the gas giant planets (Jupiter and Saturn) contain jets that dominate the circulation at visible levels. The power source for these jets (solar radiation, internal heat, or both) and their vertical structure below the upper cloud are major open questions in the atmospheric circulation and meteorology of giant planets. Several observations and in situ measurements found intense winds at a depth of 24 bar, and have been interpreted as supporting an internal heat source. This issue remains controversial, in part because of effects from the local meteorology. Here we report observations and modelling of two plumes in Jupiter's atmosphere that erupted at the same latitude as the strongest jet (23 degrees N). The plumes reached a height of 30 km above the surrounding clouds, moved faster than any other feature (169 m s(-1)), and left in their wake a turbulent planetary-scale disturbance containing red aerosols. On the basis of dynamical modelling, we conclude that the data are consistent only with a wind that extends well below the level where solar radiation is deposited.

  7. Energy diffusion in strongly driven quantum chaotic systems: the role of correlations of the matrix elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elyutin, P V; Rubtsov, A N

    2008-01-01

    The energy evolution of a quantum chaotic system under the perturbation that harmonically depends on time is studied for the case of large perturbation, in which the rate of transition calculated from the Fermi golden rule (FGR) is about or exceeds the frequency of perturbation. For this case, the models of the Hamiltonian with random non-correlated matrix elements demonstrate that the energy evolution retains its diffusive character, but the rate of diffusion increases slower than the square of the magnitude of perturbation, thus destroying the quantum-classical correspondence for the energy diffusion and the energy absorption in the classical limit ℎ → 0. The numerical calculation carried out for a model built from the first principles (the quantum analog of the Pullen-Edmonds oscillator) demonstrates that the evolving energy distribution, apart from the diffusive component, contains a ballistic one with the energy dispersion that is proportional to the square of time. This component originates from the chains of matrix elements with correlated signs and vanishes if the signs of matrix elements are randomized. The presence of the ballistic component formally extends the applicability of the FGR to the non-perturbative domain and restores the quantum-classical correspondence

  8. Measurement of fluorescence emission spectrum of few strongly driven atoms using an optical nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manoj; Shirasaki, A; Nayak, K P; Morinaga, M; Le Kien, Fam; Hakuta, K

    2010-08-02

    We show that the fluorescence emission spectrum of few atoms can be measured by using an optical nanofiber combined with the optical heterodyne and photon correlation spectroscopy. The observed fluorescence spectrum of the atoms near the nanofiber shows negligible effects of the atom-surface interaction and agrees well with the Mollow triplet spectrum of free-space atoms at high excitation intensity.

  9. Atoms in strong laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'Huillier, A.

    2002-01-01

    When a high-power laser focuses into a gas of atoms, the electromagnetic field becomes of the same magnitude as the Coulomb field which binds a 1s electron in a hydrogen atom. 3 highly non-linear phenomena can happen: 1) ATI (above threshold ionization): electrons initially in the ground state absorb a large number of photons, many more than the minimum number required for ionization; 2) multiple ionization: many electrons can be emitted one at a time, in a sequential process, or simultaneously in a mechanism called direct or non-sequential; and 3) high order harmonic generation (HHG): efficient photon emission in the extreme ultraviolet range, in the form of high-order harmonics of the fundamental laser field can occur. The theoretical problem consists in solving the time dependent Schroedinger equation (TDSE) that describes the interaction of a many-electron atom with a laser field. A number of methods have been proposed to solve this problem in the case of a hydrogen atom or a single-active electron atom in a strong laser field. A large effort is presently being devoted to go beyond the single-active approximation. The understanding of the physics of the interaction between atoms and strong laser fields has been provided by a very simple model called ''simple man's theory''. A unified view of HHG, ATI, and non-sequential ionization, originating from the simple man's model and the strong field approximation, expressed in terms of electrons trajectories or quantum paths is slowly emerging. (A.C.)

  10. Strongly Interacting Light Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bruggisser, Francesco Riva, Alfredo Urbano

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM can appear weakly coupled at small energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  11. Strongly interacting light dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruggisser, Sebastian; Riva, Francesco; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    In the presence of approximate global symmetries that forbid relevant interactions, strongly coupled light Dark Matter (DM) can appear weakly coupled at small-energy and generate a sizable relic abundance. Fundamental principles like unitarity restrict these symmetries to a small class, where the leading interactions are captured by effective operators up to dimension-8. Chiral symmetry, spontaneously broken global symmetries and non-linearly realized supersymmetry are examples of this. Their DM candidates (composite fermions, pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone Bosons and Goldstini) are interesting targets for LHC missing-energy searches.

  12. Rydberg atoms in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Tsimmerman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical achievements in studying Rydberg atoms in external fields are considered. Only static (or quasistatic) fields and ''one-electron'' atoms, i.e. atoms that are well described by one-electron states, are discussed. Mainly behaviour of alkali metal atoms in electric field is considered. The state of theoretical investigations for hydrogen atom in magnetic field is described, but experimental data for atoms of alkali metals are presented as an illustration. Results of the latest experimental and theoretical investigations into the structure of Rydberg atoms in strong fields are presented

  13. Scalar strong interaction hadron theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoh, Fang Chao

    2015-01-01

    The scalar strong interaction hadron theory, SSI, is a first principles' and nonlocal theory at quantum mechanical level that provides an alternative to low energy QCD and Higgs related part of the standard model. The quark-quark interaction is scalar rather than color-vectorial. A set of equations of motion for mesons and another set for baryons have been constructed. This book provides an account of the present state of a theory supposedly still at its early stage of development. This work will facilitate researchers interested in entering into this field and serve as a basis for possible future development of this theory.

  14. Strong Plate, Weak Slab Dichotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, R. I.; Stegman, D. R.; Tackley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Models of mantle convection on Earth produce styles of convection that are not observed on Earth.Moreover non-Earth-like modes, such as two-sided downwellings, are the de facto mode of convection in such models.To recreate Earth style subduction, i.e. one-sided asymmetric recycling of the lithosphere, proper treatment of the plates and plate interface are required. Previous work has identified several model features that promote subduction. A free surface or pseudo-free surface and a layer of material with a relatively low strength material (weak crust) allow downgoing plates to bend and slide past overriding without creating undue stress at the plate interface. (Crameri, et al. 2012, GRL)A low viscosity mantle wedge, possibly a result of slab dehydration, decouples the plates in the system. (Gerya et al. 2007, Geo)Plates must be composed of material which, in the case of the overriding plate, are is strong enough to resist bending stresses imposed by the subducting plate and yet, as in the case of the subducting plate, be weak enough to bend and subduct when pulled by the already subducted slab. (Petersen et al. 2015, PEPI) Though strong surface plates are required for subduction such plates may present a problem when they encounter the lower mantle.As the subducting slab approaches the higher viscosity, lower mantle stresses are imposed on the tip.Strong slabs transmit this stress to the surface.There the stress field at the plate interface is modified and potentially modifies the style of convection. In addition to modifying the stress at the plate interface, the strength of the slab affects the morphology of the slab at the base of the upper mantle. (Stegman, et al 2010, Tectonophysics)Slabs that maintain a sufficient portion of their strength after being bent require high stresses to unbend or otherwise change their shape.On the other hand slabs that are weakened though the bending process are more amenable to changes in morphology. We present the results of

  15. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  16. A low-cost Raman spectrometer design used to study Raman ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The paper discusses the design of a low cost Raman spectrometer. Single- walled nanotubes ... SWNT, whereas the TM provides the insight into the electronic properties of the nano- tubes.8–10 There is also a ... microscope objective with long working-distance as well as a large numerical aperture. The objective used is ...

  17. NIR–FT Raman, FT–IR and surface-enhanced Raman scattering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Jana Chocholousova, Vladimir Spirko and Pavel. Hobza 2004 Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 6 37. 36. Erik T J Nibbering Thomas Elsaesser 2004 Chem. Rev. 104 10. 37. Markovits A, Garcia-Hernandez M, Ricart J M and. Illas F 1999 J. Phys. Chem. B103 509. 38. Jung Sang Suh and Jurae Kim 1998 J. Raman Spec- trosc.

  18. Doping of C60 fullerene peapods with lithium: Raman spectroscopic and Raman spectroelectrochemical studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Zukalová, Markéta; Dunsch, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 20 (2008), s. 6231-5236 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400601 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : electrochemistry * fullerenes * lithium * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 5.454, year: 2008

  19. A low-cost Raman spectrometer design used to study Raman ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The paper discusses the design of a low cost Raman spectrometer. Single- walled nanotubes (SWNT) have been studied to demonstrate the reach of such a system. We observe both the radial-breathing mode (RBM) and the tangential mode from the SWNT. The tube diameters of the SWNT used in these ...

  20. Raman Spectroscopy and in Situ Raman Spectroelectrochemistry of Isotopically Engineered Graphene Systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Otakar; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Kalbáč, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2015), s. 111-118 ISSN 0001-4842 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13022; GA MŠk LL1301 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * spectroelectrochemistry * graphene Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 22.003, year: 2015