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Sample records for strong remanent magnetization

  1. Remanent magnetism at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S. A.; Ness, N. F.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that a strong case can be made for an intrinsic magnetic field of dynamo origin for Mars earlier in its history. The typical equatorial magnetic field intensity would have been equal to about 0.01-0.1 gauss. The earlier dynamo activity is no longer extant, but a significant remanent magnetic field may exist. A highly non-dipole magnetic field could result from the remanent magnetization of the surface. Remanent magnetization may thus play an important role in the Mars solar wind interactions, in contrast to Venus with its surface temperatures above the Curie point. The anomalous characteristics of Mars'solar wind interaction compared to that of Venus may be explicable on this basis.

  2. Remanence enhancement in magnetically interacting particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Heliang; Li, Jiang Yu

    2003-12-01

    In this paper, we report an effective-medium theory on the remanence of magnetically interacting particles to demonstrate the effect of intergranular magnetostatic interactions on the remanence enhancement of materials, which agrees excellently with micromagnetic simulations. A dimensionless parameter λ measuring the competition between anisotropy energy and magnetostatic energy is defined, which completely characterizes the remanence of magnets if the exchange coupling is negligible, appropriate when the grain size is 10 nm or larger. Three distinct regimes were observed: λ1 for soft magnets, where the dominance of magneto-static energy leads to much reduced remanence in the materials.

  3. The magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    We consider the magnetic properties of the hollow cylindrical ideal remanence magnet. This magnet is the cylindrical permanent magnet that generates a uniform field in the cylinder bore, using the least amount of magnetic energy to do so. The remanence distribution of this magnet is derived...... and the generated field is compared to that of a Halbach cylinder of equal dimensions. The ideal remanence magnet is shown in most cases to generate a significantly lower field than the equivalent Halbach cylinder, although the field is generated with higher efficiency. The most efficient Halbach cylinder is shown...... to generate a field exactly twice as large as the equivalent ideal remanence magnet....

  4. Induced remanent magnetization of social insects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wajnberg, E.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; El-Jaick, L.J.; Esquivel, D.M.S. E-mail: darci@cbpf.br

    2001-05-01

    The induced remanent magnetization (IRM) of honeybees Apis mellifera and ants as Pachycondyla marginata, a migratory species, and Solenopsis sp., a fire ant, was obtained using a SQUID magnetometer from 10 to 300 K. An anomalous sharp change of the remanent magnetization is observed at 67{+-}0.2 K for migratory ants. The IRM at room temperature indicates the presence of at least 10 times lower concentration of magnetic material in the whole fire ant as compared to the migratory ant abdomen (0.22{+-}0.33x10{sup -6} emu/ant, and 2.8{+-}1.2x10{sup -6} emu/abdomen, respectively). Our results in honeybee abdomen (4.6{+-}0.9x10{sup -6} emu/abdomen) agree with other reported values. IRM at room temperature in ants and honeybees indicates the presence of single domain (SD) or aggregates of magnetite nanoparticles. The loss of remanence from 77 to 300 K can be related to the stable-superparamagnetic (SPM) transition of small particles (less than ca. 30 nm). From these values and considering their estimated volumes an upper limit 10{sup 10} SPM and 10{sup 9} SD or aggregate particles are obtained in these insects.

  5. Induced remanent magnetization of social insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajnberg, E.; Cernicchiaro, G.; Acosta-Avalos, D.; El-Jaick, L. J.; Esquivel, D. M. S.

    2001-05-01

    The induced remanent magnetization (IRM) of honeybees Apis mellifera and ants as Pachycondyla marginata, a migratory species, and Solenopsis sp., a fire ant, was obtained using a SQUID magnetometer from 10 to 300 K. An anomalous sharp change of the remanent magnetization is observed at 67±0.2 K for migratory ants. The IRM at room temperature indicates the presence of at least 10 times lower concentration of magnetic material in the whole fire ant as compared to the migratory ant abdomen (0.22±0.33×10 -6 emu/ant, and 2.8±1.2×10 -6 emu/abdomen, respectively). Our results in honeybee abdomen (4.6±0.9×10 -6 emu/abdomen) agree with other reported values. IRM at room temperature in ants and honeybees indicates the presence of single domain (SD) or aggregates of magnetite nanoparticles. The loss of remanence from 77 to 300 K can be related to the stable-superparamagnetic (SPM) transition of small particles (less than ca. 30 nm). From these values and considering their estimated volumes an upper limit 10 10 SPM and 10 9 SD or aggregate particles are obtained in these insects.

  6. Magnetic Force Microscopy Observation of Perpendicular Recording Head Remanence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilekrojanavuti, P.; Saengkaew, K.; Cheowanish, I.; Damrongsak, B.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, magnetic force microscopy (MFM) was utilized to observe the magnetic write head remanence, which is the remaining out-of-plane magnetic field on magnetic write heads after a write current is turned off. This remnant field can write unwanted tracks or erase written tracks on a magnetic media. The write head remanence can also occur from device and slider fabrication, either by applying current to the write coil during the inspection or biasing the external magnetic field to magnetic recording heads. This remanence can attract magnetic nanoparticles, which is suspended in cleaning water or surrounding air, and cause device contamination. MFM images were used to examine locations of the remnant field on the surface of magnetic recording heads. Experimental results revealed that the remanence occurred mostly on the shield and is dependent on the initial direction of magnetic moments. In addition, we demonstrated a potential use of MFM imaging to investigate effects of different etching gases on the head remanence.

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Nondestructive Testing by Leakage Flux Method Using Remanent Magnetism

    OpenAIRE

    坪井, 始; 瀬島, 紀夫; 田中, 始男; ツボイ, ハジメ; セシマ, ノリオ; タナカ, モトオ; Hajime, TSUBOI; Norio, SESHIMA; Motoo, TANAKA

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic field analysis of nondestructive testing using remanent magnetism was performed by using two-dimensional finite element method. A leakage flux method using remanent magnetism is applied to magnetic material as nondestructive testing method. The remanent magnetism is approximated by equivalent magnetizing electric current. And we assumed that the remanent magnetization is in proportion to the magnetization in the magnetizing process. Formulation of the finite element method using magn...

  8. Influence of remanent magnetization on pitting corrosion in pipeline steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espina-Hernandez, J. H. [ESIME Zacatenco, SEPI Electronica Instituto Politecnico Nacional Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J. M. [DIM-ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Lopez-Montenegro, A.; Perez-Baruch, E. [Pemex Exploracion y Produccion, Region Sur Villahermosa, Tabasco (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Statistical studies performed in Mexico indicate that leakage due to external pitting corrosion is the most likely cause of failure of buried pipelines. When pipelines are inspected with the magnetic flux leakage (MFL) technology, which is routinely used, the magnetization level of every part of the pipeline changes as the MFL tool travels through it. Remanent magnetization stays in the pipeline wall after inspection, at levels that may differ from a point to the next. This paper studies the influence of the magnetic field on pitting corrosion. Experiments were carried out on grade 52 steel under a level of remanent magnetization and other laboratory conditions that imitated the conditions of a pipeline after an MLF inspection. Non-magnetized control samples and magnetized samples were subjected to pitting by immersion in a solution containing chlorine and sulfide ions for seven days, and then inspected with optical microscopy. Results show that the magnetic field in the pipeline wall significantly increases pitting corrosion.

  9. Magnetically Remanent Hydrogels with Colloidal Crosslinkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkum, S.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels are widely used in biomedical applications such as drug delivery and tissue engineering. In this research, the feasibility of a hydrogel with embedded magnetic nanoparticles, also called a ferrogel, for biosensor applications was tested. A pH sensitive poly(acrylic acid) hydrogel was used

  10. High resolution remanent magnetization scanner for long cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demory, François; Quesnel, Yoann; Uehara, Minoru; Rochette, Pierre; Zylberman, William; Romey, Carole; Pignol, Laure; Andrieu-Ponel, Valérie

    2017-04-01

    Superconducting rock magnetometer reaches saturation when measuring magnetic moments higher than 5 10-5 Am2. Due to the distance of the sensor from the measurement zone, the spatial resolution is low for continuous measurements led on U channel or cores. To solve these problems, we designed a core logger dedicated to the measurement of remanent magnetizations. Based on a fluxgate sensor located very close to the sample, the spatial resolution of the core logger is infra-centimetric. The fluxgate sensor is also able to detect magnetic fields of few nT produced by magnetic moments of the order of few 10-8 Am2. As the equipment does not reach saturation, we measured isothermal remanent magnetization of highly magnetic samples. This magnetization was acquired perpendicularly to the long axis of U-channels from Cassis paleo-lake (Romey et al., 2015) and of cores from Haughton impact structure (Zylberman et al., submitted) using Halbach cylinders (Rochette et al., 2001). To interpret local magnetic fields in terms of magnetic moments, we performed an inter-calibration with the superconducting rock magnetometer and signal inversion. This development led to the filing of a patent (FR.16/53142) and is funded by the ECCOREV project MESENVIMAG. References: Rochette, P., Vadeboin, F., Clochard, L., 2001. Rock magnetic applications of Halbach cylinders. Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 126, 109-117. Romey, C., Vella, C., Rochette, P., Andrieu-Ponel, V., Magnin, F., Veron, A., Talon, B., Landure, C., D'Ovidio, A.M., Delanghe, D., Ghilardi, M., Angeletti, B., 2015. Environmental imprints of landscape evolution and human activities during the Holocene in a small catchment of the Calanques Massif (Cassis, southern France). Holocene 25 (9), 1454-1469. Zylberman W., Quesnel Y., Rochette P., Osinski G. R., Marion C., Gattacceca J. (submitted to MAPS) Hydrothermally-enhanced magnetization at the center of the Haughton impact structure? (Nunavut, Canada).

  11. Magnetic anisotropy in rhyolitic ignimbrite, Snake River Plain: Implications for using remanent magnetism of volcanic rocks for correlation, paleomagnetic studies, and geological reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, David R.; Coe, Robert S.; Kelly, Henry; Branney, Michael; Knott, Thomas; Reichow, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Individual ignimbrite cooling units in southern Idaho display significant variation of magnetic remanence directions and other magnetic properties. This complicates paleomagnetic correlation. The ignimbrites are intensely welded and exhibit mylonite-like flow banding produced by rheomorphic ductile shear during emplacement, prior to cooling below magnetic blocking temperatures. Glassy vitrophyric lithologies commonly have discrepantly shallow remanence directions rotated closer to the orientation of the subhorizontal shear fabric when compared to the microcrystalline center of the same cooling unit. To investigate this problem, we conducted a detailed paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of a vertical profile through a single ignimbrite cooling unit and its underlying baked soil. The results demonstrate that large anisotropy of thermal remanent magnetization correlates with large (up to 38°) deflections of the stable remanence direction. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility revealed no strong anisotropy. A strong lineation and deflection of the remanence declination suggest that rheomorphic shear above magnetic blocking temperatures is the dominant mechanism controlling the formation of the magnetic fabric, with compaction contributing to a lesser extent. Nucleation and growth of anisotropic fine-grained magnetite in volcanic glass at high temperatures after, and perhaps also during, emplacement is indicated by systematic variation of magnetic properties from the quickly chilled ignimbrite base to the interior. These properties include remanence directions, anisotropy, coercivity, susceptibility, strength of natural remanent magnetization, and dominant unblocking temperature. The microcrystalline ignimbrite center has a magnetic direction that is the same as the underlying baked soil and, therefore, is a more reliable recorder of the paleofield direction than the glassy margins of highly welded ignimbrites.

  12. Complex remanent magnetization in the Kızılkaya ignimbrite (central Anatolia): Implication for paleomagnetic directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrò, Alessandro; Zanella, Elena; Le Pennec, Jean-Luc; Temel, Abidin

    2017-04-01

    site-mean paleomagnetic direction is consistent with data from the literature. At a few other sites, the remanence is more complex: the direction moves along a great circle during demagnetization and no stable end-point is reached. The occurrence of oxidized Ti-magnetite or hematite as well as two remanence components with overlapping coercivity and blocking temperature spectra suggest that the Kızılkaya ignimbrite acquired first a thermal remanent magnetization and then, during the final cooling or a short time later, a secondary remanent magnetization component which is interpreted as a CRM acquired during post-emplacement devitrification processes. Notwithstanding the Kızılkaya ignimbrite is a single cooling unit, its magnetic properties suffered substantial variations laterally and vertically within the deposit. The Kızılkaya case shows that thick pyroclastic deposits should be sampled using a stratigraphic approach, at different sites and different stratigraphic heights at each individual sampling location, otherwise, under-sampling may significantly affect the paleomagnetic results. When sampling is performed on a short duration or on very poorly preserved deposits we recommend drilling the lower-central portion in the most strongly welded and devitrified facies. Such sampling strategy avoids complications arising from the potential presence of a pervasive secondary CRM masking the original ChRM.

  13. Origin of stable remanent magnetization in LL6 chondrite, St. Séverin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yongjae; Doh, Seong-Jae; Kim, Wonnyon; Min, Kyoungwon

    2011-08-01

    Thermal demagnetization has been carried out on 20 mutually oriented chips to unravel the stable paleomagnetic record of LL6 St. Séverin. Whereas the higher unblocking fractions (520-560 °C) of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) are directionally scattered, the lower unblocking fractions (shock-induced metamorphism rather than a thermal origin of NRM.

  14. Study of pitting corrosion in line-pipe steel under the influence of remanent magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espina-Hernandez, J.H.; Caleyo, F.; Hallen, J.M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (IPN), Zacatenco (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    The influence of remanent magnetization on pitting corrosion in line-pipe steels is studied. Pitting corrosion experiments have been carried out on samples of an API 5L grade 52 steel under a magnetization level of the same order of magnitude of the remanent magnetization in the pipeline wall after in-line inspection based on magnetic flux leakage. The samples were magnetized using rings of the same grade as the investigated steel. Immediately after magnetization, the investigated samples were subjected to pitting by immersing them in a solution containing dissolved Cl{sup -} and SO{sup 2-}{sub 4} and ions. The pitting experiments were conducted during a seven days period. The pit depth distribution and the maximum pit depth in each sample were recorded and used to conduct extreme value analyses of the pitting process in magnetized and non-magnetized control samples. The statistical assessment of the pitting corrosion data collected during this study shows that the magnetic field reduces the average depth of the pit population and also the extreme pit depth values that can be predicted from the maximum values observed in the magnetized samples in comparison with to the non-magnetized control samples. Scanning electron microscopy observations show that the magnetic field alters the pit morphology by increasing the pit mouth opening. (author)

  15. The effect of speleothem surface slope on the remanent magnetic inclination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponte, J. M.; Font, E.; Veiga-Pires, C.; Hillaire-Marcel, C.; Ghaleb, B.

    2017-06-01

    Speleothems are of interest for high-resolution reconstruction of the Earth's magnetic field. However, little is known about the influence of speleothem morphologies on their natural remanent magnetization (NRM) record. Here we report on a high-resolution paleomagnetic study of a dome-shaped speleothem of middle Holocene age from southern Portugal, with special attention to the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and anisotropy of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (AARM). To assess the potential influence of the slope of the speleothem surface on the recorded remanent magnetization, we compare magnetic directions and AMS and AARM fabrics from subhorizontal to gradually subvertical calcite growth layers collected in a transversal cross section of the speleothem. A linear correlation is observed between magnetic inclinations, calcite laminae slope, and AARM k1 inclination. The AMS fabric is mostly controlled by calcite crystals, with direction of the minimum axes (k3) perpendicular to laminae growth. Magnetic inclinations recorded in inclined and vertical calcite growth layers are underestimated when compared to a global paleosecular variation (PSV) model. After extrapolating magnetic inclinations to the horizontal, the corrected data better fit the PSV model but are still lower than the predicted magnetic inclinations, suggesting that inclination shallowing affects the entire speleothem. We suggest that speleothem morphology exerts a critical role on the magnetic inclination recording, which is controlled by the Earth's magnetic field but also influenced by particle rolling along the sloping surfaces. These observations open new avenues for reconstructing high-resolution paleomagnetic secular variation records from speleothems and provide new insights into their NRM acquisition mechanisms.

  16. Anisotropies of anhysteretic remanence and magnetic susceptibility of marly clays from Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sagnotti

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Marly clays from an Upper Pliocene unit at Valle Ricca (Rorne were investigated for their Anisotropy of Anhysteretic Remanence (AAR and Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS. The study of AAR was accomplished for the first time in ltaly, developing a suitable laboratory technique and adapting a standard statistical procedure. The comparison between anhysteretic remanence and magnetic susceptibility anisotropies discriminates the fabric of the ferromagnetic fraction from that of the paramagnetic matrix of the rock. The separation of fabric components was applied to distinguish subsequent geological processes that affected the total rock fabric. The results indicate that the clayey units are particularly suitable for the empirical investigation of fabric to strain relationship in weakly deformed rocks.

  17. The effect of low-temperature hydrothermal alteration on the remanent magnetization of synthetic titanomagnetites - A case for acquisition of chemical remanent magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Paul R.; Banerjee, Subir K.; Worm, Horst-Ulrich

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were performed demonstrating that a chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) can be acquired during the aqueous oxidation of synthetic titanomagnetites (TM40:Fe/2.6/Ti/0.4/O4) by the removal of iron, as it does in the oceanic crust basalts. Results showed that the CRM is acquired along the ambient field direction during oxidation, and that there is no coupling of the CRM and the thermoremanent magnetization. The rate of oxidation was found to be pH-dependent, with the amount of CRM acquired varying inversely with the pH of the oxidizing solution. The reaction produced nascent hydrogen gas. Results support the chemical equation for titanomagnetic oxidation proposed by Worm and Banerjee (1984).

  18. Contributions of cretaceus quiet zone natural remanent magnetization to Magsat anomalies in the Southwest Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Lawrence G.; Frey, Herbert V.; Roark, James H.; Thomas, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    The Magsat magnetic anomalies over the Southwest Indian Ocean are modeled using a combination of induced plus viscous remanent magnetization (IM/VRM) and natural remanent magnetization (NRM). Two broad, roughly parallel, SW to NE trending triple-peaked positive anomalies dominate the region, one lying south of Africa and the other north of Antarctica. Although these anomaly peaks generally correspond with the Agulhas Plateau/Maud Rise, Mozambique Plateau/Astrid Ridge, and Madagascar Ridge/Conrad Rise conjugate pairs, the IM/VRM contribution from structural characteristics (i.e., crustal thickness) accounts for only about 20% of the anomaly amplitudes. A spatially variable but observationally constrained NRM contribution in Cretaceous Quiet Zone (KQZ) crust is required to account for the location, shape, and amplitude contrast of these anomalies. Many crustal features in the Southwest Indian Ocean near Antarctica have little geophysical data to constrain their structure but do hagve tectonic conjugates near Africa for which much more geophysical data are generally available. Using geophysical and geological constraints from one member to model the magnetization structure of its conjugate reproduces the observed Magsat reduced-to-pole anomalies over both structures very well. This suggests that no significant alteration in their magnetization structure has occurred since the features split. Models of these conjugate structures show that IM/VRM reproduces the Magsat anomalies associated with non-KQZ crust but that both IM/VRM and a dominant NRM component are required to explain the anomalies associated with KQZ crust.

  19. Acquisition of chemical remanent magnetization during experimental ferrihydrite-hematite conversion in Earth-like magnetic field-implications for paleomagnetic studies of red beds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Dekkers, Mark J.; Tauxe, Lisa; Qin, Huafeng; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2015-01-01

    Hematite-bearing red beds are renowned for their chemical remanent magnetization (CRM). If the CRM was acquired substantially later than the sediment was formed, this severely compromises paleomagnetic records. To improve our interpretation of the natural remanent magnetization, the intricacies of

  20. Remote remanence estimation (RRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, David A.; McKenzie, K. Blair; White, Tony S.

    2014-09-01

    The remote determination of magnetic remanence in rocks is a method that has largely been ignored because of the ambiguity associated with the estimation of both the Koenigsberger ratio and remanent magnetisation direction. Our research shows that the resultant magnetisation direction can be derived directly through inversion of magnetic data for an isolated magnetic anomaly from a compact magnetic source. The resultant magnetisation direction is a property of the target magnetic rocks and a robust inversion parameter. The departure angle of the resultant magnetisation vector from that of the inducing magnetic field is an important indicator of the existence of remanent magnetisation and the inversion process can detect departures that are not easily detected by visual inspection. This departure angle is called the apparent resultant rotation angle or ARRA. The induced field vector, remanent magnetisation vector and resultant magnetisation vector lie on the plane of a great circle. We find the intersection of the transformed polar wander vector trace with the great circle plane to obtain one or more possible solutions for the remanent magnetisation vector. Geological deduction will normally allow us to reduce the ambiguity for multiple solutions to obtain the most likely remanent magnetisation direction. Once the remanent magnetisation direction is established, it is then possible to determine the Koenigsberger ratio and magnetic susceptibility for the target. We illustrate the methodology using survey data over the Black Hill Norite which also has extensive palaeomagnetic data available for comparison with the inversion results. We then apply the remote remanence estimation (RRE) method to a systematic study of a large number of intrusive pipes in the Thomson Orogen, New South Wales. The corrected magnetic susceptibility and remanence properties, spatial distribution and underlying uncertainties are evaluated for their potential use by diamond explorers. The

  1. Intra-urban spatial variation of magnetic particles: Monitoring via leaf saturation isothermal remanent magnetisation (SIRM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardel, F.; Wuyts, K.; Maher, B. A.; Samson, R.

    2012-08-01

    Motorised traffic generates large numbers of small-sized, magnetisable particulate pollutants in the urban environment. Exposure to these small particles has been associated with adverse effects on human health. Magnetic properties of these particles are, therefore, increasingly used for assessing environmental stress. Biomonitoring of magnetic particles accumulated on leaf surfaces may provide information on the concentration of, and exposure to, atmospheric particles at high spatial resolution. In this study, leaf saturation isothermal remanent magnetisation (SIRM) of three urban tree types (Carpinus betulus and Tilia sp. with hairy and non-hairy leaves) was measured at high spatial resolution in the city of Gent, Belgium, in June and September 2009. We compared leaf SIRM between land use classes with different urban habitat quality. In a multiple regression model, we tried to explain the spatial variability in leaf SIRM by tree species, sampling height, distance to the nearest road and its traffic intensity, tram frequency and a measure for regional traffic emissions (derived from traffic intensity of and the distance to the most important highways around and in the city in the main four wind directions). We found that the leaf SIRM was significantly influenced by tree species, distance to the nearest road and its traffic intensity and tram frequency. The SIRM significantly increased with increasing traffic intensity and tram frequency and by decreasing distance to the nearest road. It is concluded that leaf SIRM is a good bio-indicator for monitoring spatial variation of magnetic particles in urban environments.

  2. Testing the origin of high remanent magnetization in Vredefort impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, J. M.; Pesonen, L. J.; Lahti, K.; Kannus, K.

    2010-12-01

    Vredefort impact structure (2.0 Ga) in South Africa with diameter 250-300 km [1] is considered largest impact structure on Earth. Values of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) for the impactites and some Archean host rocks of Vredefort impact structure are elevated compared to the values for similar rock types found elsewhere and these also show random directions of remanent magnetization [2, 3, 4, 5]. It has been suggested that the source for elevated NRM values and hence elevated Q values (Koenigsberger’s ratio) would be related to impact event in a way where an ultra-small single-domain magnetite formed in a high pressure/temperature environment and crystallized along planar deformation features [2, 6, 3]. It has been further suggested that a plasma field produced from the impact event generated small-wavelength magnetic fields of high intensity which randomized the directions of remanent magnetization [4, 8]. Results of [5] contradict these findings. As, firstly, concentration of elevated Q values near the center of the structure was not observed, as should be if of impact origin, and, secondly, the elevated Q values were also seen in samples from the Johannesburg Dome (120 km from Vredefort dome). Moreover a correlation between hysteresis data and elevated Q values of the basement rocks was not observed, as would be expected if the ultra-fine particles in the PDFs solely were the carriers of the high Q values [5]. This seems to rule out the direct connection of elevated NRM to the shock event. In order to further study the origin of elevated NRM values we have tried to simulate impact shock with conventional explosives and to simulate lighting strikes with high voltage measurements. Ten Archean host rock samples (masses between 0.5 and 1.5 kg) with normal Q values (0.7-2) for Vredefort impact structure were exploded using the plastic explosive with explosive velocity of 8.2 km/s. Three out of ten samples were covered with cement before exploding. Six

  3. Elevated temperature viscous remanent magnetization of natural and synthetic multidomain magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Paul R.; Banerjee, Subir K.

    1994-01-01

    The time-temperature relationship of magnetization is a subject of much interest and debate by paleomagnetists, rock magnetists, and magnetic anomaly modellers. We have investigated this relationship by studying the viscous remanent magnetization (VRM) of coarse-grained multidomain (MD) magnetite. Our experiments covered the temperature range from 22 to 400 C, times from minutes to months, and included both Australian granulite samples and multidomain magnetite samples synthesized by the glass ceramic method. VRM acquisition was found to generally increase with temperature but not always at the rate predicted from classical thermal fluctuation theories. Thermal cycling between room temperature (at which the measurements were made) and the VRM acquisition temperature sharply decreased the temperature dependence of the VRM. Room temperature VRM acquisition accelerates with time when plotted on a semilog plot, whereas at elevated temperature the curves are quasilinear against log(time) for both the natural and synthetic samples. This change in behavior may suggest a variation in the VRM acquisition mechanism as a function of temperature for MD magnetite. The granulites have a nearly linear increase in VRM acquisition rate with temperature whereas the glass ceramics display little change in the acquisition rate between 22 and 200 C, but increase by nearly a factor of 3 by 400 C. The increase in VRM of the glass ceramics between 200 and 400 C is in general qualitative agreement with thermal fluctuation theory. There was no systematic change in the rate of VRM acquisition with grain size for the multidomain magnetites used in this study. Elevated temperature (e.g., 400 C) VRM acquisition by the deep crustal granulites, if extrapolated over the Brunhes chron, would produce a magnetization of several A/m which, if true, is of the order required by models for the source of long-wavelength magnetic anomalies.

  4. Experimental and numerical simulation of the acquisition of chemical remanent magnetization and the Thellier procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, V. P.; Sycheva, N. K.; Gribov, S. K.

    2017-09-01

    The results of the Thellier-Coe experiments on paleointensity determination on the samples which contain chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) created by thermal annealing of titanomagnetites are reported. The results of the experiments are compared with the theoretical notions. For this purpose, Monte Carlo simulation of the process of CRM acquisition in the system of single-domain interacting particles was carried out; the paleointensity determination method based on the Thellier-Coe procedure was modeled; and the degree of paleointensity underestimation was quantitatively estimated based on the experimental data and on the numerical results. Both the experimental investigations and computer modeling suggest the following main conclusion: all the Arai-Nagata diagrams for CRM in the high-temperature area (in some cases up to the Curie temperature T c) contain a relatively long quasi-linear interval on which it is possible to estimate the slope coefficient k and, therefore, the paleointensity. Hence, if chemical magnetization (or remagnetization) took place in the course of the magnetomineralogical transformations of titanomagnetite- bearing igneous rocks during long-lasting cooling or during repeated heatings, it can lead to incorrect results in determining the intensity of the geomagnetic field in the geological past.

  5. Advanced methods of identification of the natural remanent magnetization carriers in meta-basites from Oscar II Land, Western Spitsbergen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burzyński, Mariusz; Michalski, Krzysztof; Nejbert, Krzysztof; Manby, Geoffrey; Domańska-Siuda, Justyna

    2017-04-01

    In this study, several rock-magnetic experiments were applied to gain a better understanding of composition and origin of Natural Remanent Magnetization (NRM) carriers in selected meta-dolerites and meta-volcanics of Oscar II Land (Western Spitsbergen). To rise the resolution of results, analyses were conducted on "Fe-containing" separated grains and they were combined with "whole-rock" mineralogical and rock-magnetic observations. Standard "whole- rock" magnetic studies were performed including: coercivity spectra measurements using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM), SIRM (saturation isothermal remanent magnetization) measurements, the three component IRM (Isothermal Remanent Magnetisation) procedures (Lowrie 1990). Additionally, the above experiments were supported by examination of the thin sections (optical/SEM/BSE). After that, investigated meta-basites were subjected to separation process during which seven different groups of grains has been distinguished. Six of them revealed shape and parameters of hysteresis loop characteristic for ferromagnetic phases. Separated magnetic phases were again subjected to rock-magnetic (SIRM/Micromag VSM) and mineralogical (optical/SEM/BSE) analyses. The results point to the presence of low coercivity magnetite/maghemite and pyrrhotite in the meta-dolerites while in the meta-volcanics the occurrence of magnetite/maghemite and hematite was recorded. The results indicated that late to post-Caledonian ferromagnetic minerals are dominant in the studied meta-basites. The investigations also confirmed that Caledonian metamorphic remineralization has completely replaced primary magmatic - Proterozoic/Lower Palaeozoic ferromagnetic carriers in the meta-dolerites. The present study was funded by Leading National Research Centre (KNOW) received by the Centre for Polar Studies for the period 2014-2018 and NSC (Polish National Science Centre) grant number 2011/03/D/ST10/05193.

  6. High-resolution imaging of remanent state and magnetization reversal of superdomain structures in high-density cobalt antidot arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, L A; Magén, C; Snoeck, E; Gatel, C; Castán-Guerrero, C; Sesé, J; García, L M; Herrero-Albillos, J; Bartolomé, J; Bartolomé, F; Ibarra, M R

    2014-09-26

    Remanent state and magnetization reversal processes of a series of cobalt antidot arrays with a fixed hole diameter (d ≈ 55 nm) and an array periodicity (p) ranging between 95 and 524 nm were studied by in situ Lorentz microscopy (LM) as a function of the magnetic field. At remanence, defocused LM images showed the periodicity dependence of the magnetic states inside the lattice. A remarkable transition was observed in the type of domain structures as a function of p: for the large periodicities (p > 300 nm), conventional 90° and 180° domain walls were formed, whereas in small-period antidot arrays (p ≦ 160 nm) magnetic superdomain walls (SDWs) were nucleated to separate regions with different average magnetization direction, the so-called magnetic superdomains. In the SDW regime, a low-frequency Fourier filtering method was implemented to allow a quantitative analysis of the LM images by the transport of intensity equation method. In situ LM experiments under applied magnetic fields were performed to study the reversal magnetization process in a particular array (p = 160 nm), and clear differences were observed as a function of the magnetic field orientation. The switching process under magnetic fields parallel to the horizontal antidot rows occurs in two stages: the system first nucleates and propagates horizontal SDWs, parallel to the field. Then, at higher magnetic fields, vertical SDWs, perpendicular to the field, appear before saturation. When the magnetic field is applied at 45° with respect to the antidot rows, both horizontal and vertical SDWs are nucleated and propagated simultaneously. All the experiments were successfully correlated with micromagnetic simulations. The current study sheds new light on the magnetization reversal processes of antidot arrays and opens new possibilities of exploiting the potential of high-resolution in situ LM and new data analysis procedures to probe magnetization processes in nanomagnetism, particularly in

  7. FeTi oxide mineralogy and the origin of normal and reverse remanent magnetization in dacitic pumice blocks from Mt. Shasta, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, C.A.; Nord, G.L.; Champion, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed mineralogical analyses and rock magnetic experiments have made it possible to directly identify the FeTi oxide phases responsible for the normal and reverse magnetic components of two dacitic pumice blocks from Mt. Shasta, California. Both samples contain a normal component carried by 100 ??m size multi-domain (MD) titanomagnetite (Usp11-24). One sample also contains a second normal component carried by magnetite (Usp1) found in the dacitic glass. The MD titanomagnetite and PSD or SD magnetite dominate the strong field magnetic signal, but only the PSD or SD magnetite has any influence on the remanence signal. Unlike the strong field signal, the remanence signal of both samples is dominated by a reverse NRM component. This reverse component is carried by 100 ??m size ferrian ilmenite (Ilm53-65). The compositions of the ilmenites in both samples are within the range of compositions (Ilm50-75) known to have the ability to acquire self-reversing thermoremanent magnetizations (TRM). The results of the Lowric-Fuller test indicate that the remanence signal is dominated by PSD or SD carriers. Because one sample contains only large MD titanomagnetite and no SD Ti-free magnetite (in addition to ferrian ilmenite), the ferrian ilmenite must be a PSD or SD carrier. Oxide and pyroxene geothermometry indicate the FeTi oxides in the pumice crystallized at temperatures between 880 and 945??C. This temperature range is within the disordered region of the ilmenite-hematite phase diagram for Ilm53-65. Previous work on synthetic Ilm70 and Ilm80 has shown that cooling through the order-disorder transition into the ordered region develops a transformation-induced microstructure consisting of cation-ordered domains with disordered domain boundaries. An Ilm58-59 grain from one of the Mt. Shasta samples was examined in the transmission electron microscope and was found to contain 100-200 A?? diameter cation-ordered domains. These domains arose during cooling through the transition

  8. Lithospheric Thickness Variations from Gravity and Topography in Areas of High Crustal Remanent Magnetization on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, S. E.; Raymond, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Large regions of intense crustal re- manent magnetization were fortuitously discovered on Mars by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. Gravity and topography admittance studies are used to examine lithospheric structure in the areas of intense magnetization. Areas with positively magnetized crust appear to have thinner crust and elastic lithosphere than negatively magnetized crust. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Recent advances in anisotropy of magnetic remanence: New software and practical examples

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin

    -, special issue (2012), s. 59-60 ISSN 1335-2806. [Castle meeting New Trends in Geomagnetism : Paleo, rock and environmental magnetism/13./. 17.06.2012-23.06.2012, Zvolen] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : magnetic susceptibility * anisotropy * anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography http://gauss.savba.sk/GPIweb/conferences/Castle2012/abstrCastle.pdf

  10. Remanence, self-demagnetization and their ramifications for magnetic modelling of iron oxide copper-gold deposits: An example from Candelaria, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, James; Geuna, Silvana; Clark, David; Hillan, Dean

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic modelling can be a powerful tool for understanding the architecture of numerous types of mineralized systems; e.g., iron ore, IOCG and porphyry deposits. In such modelling, the induced component is generally assumed to be dominant, whereas remanent magnetization is often neglected and, furthermore, the effects of self-demagnetization are commonly ignored. We present rock property measurements (magnetic susceptibility and remanent magnetization) from the Candelaria IOCG deposit in northern Chile. The results demonstrate that remanence is relatively weak (Candelaria, sub-perpendicular to a splay off the Atacama Fault Zone. We demonstrate that Candelaria's unusual magnetic anomaly is due to a combination of its highly magnetic sub-horizontal architecture, and self-demagnetization effects. A further simplified model was used to calculate two synthetic anomalies, one ignoring and the other incorporating the self-demagnetization effect. These synthetic anomalies demonstrate that the magnetic anomaly amplitude is suppressed by up to approximately 50% at Candelaria due to self-demagnetization, and that the induced magnetization is also slightly rotated from the regional inducing field towards the plane of the “mantos”. The dominant paleomagnetic component recorded by the Candelaria deposit and host rocks is a normal polarity remanence of moderate to high stability which is interpreted to have been acquired during the mid-Cretaceous alteration and mineralisation event(s) that generated the magnetic minerals (predominantly magnetite). However, the presence of a reversed polarity overprint component in some samples suggests that the Candelaria deposit and its immediate environs have experienced a post 83 Ma thermal or thermochemical event that has not been previously recognised. The remanence directions of both polarities are rotated clockwise with respect to the expected directions for mid-Cretaceous/Early Tertiary fields, indicating clockwise rotation of the

  11. Magnetostriction of a sphere: stress development during magnetization and residual stresses due to the remanent field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Felix A.; Rickert, Wilhelm; Stahn, Oliver; Müller, Wolfgang H.

    2017-03-01

    Based on the principles of rational continuum mechanics and electrodynamics (see Truesdell and Toupin in Handbuch der Physik, Springer, Berlin, 1960 or Kovetz in Electromagnetic theory, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000), we present closed-form solutions for the mechanical displacements and stresses of two different magnets. Both magnets are initially of spherical shape. The first (hard) magnet is uniformly magnetized and deforms due to the field induced by the magnetization. In the second problem of a (soft) linear-magnetic sphere, the deformation is caused by an applied external field, giving rise to magnetization. Both problems can be used for modeling parts of general magnetization processes. We will address the similarities between both settings in context with the solutions for the stresses and displacements. In both problems, the volumetric Lorentz force density vanishes. However, a Lorentz surface traction is present. This traction is determined from the magnetic flux density. Since the obtained displacements and stresses are small in magnitude, we may use Hooke's law with a small-strain approximation, resulting in the Lamé- Navier equations of linear elasticity theory. If gravity is neglected and azimuthal symmetry is assumed, these equations can be solved in terms of a series. This has been done by Hiramatsu and Oka (Int J Rock Mech Min Sci Geomech Abstr 3(2):89-90, 1966) before. We make use of their series solution for the displacements and the stresses and expand the Lorentz tractions of the analyzed problems suitably in order to find the expansion coefficients. The resulting algebraic system yields finite numbers of nonvanishing coefficients. Finally, the resulting stresses, displacements, principal strains and the Lorentz tractions are illustrated and discussed.

  12. Enhanced photoluminescence of core-shell CoFe2O4/SiO2/Y2O3:Eu3+ composite by remanent magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanmin; Zhou, Zhihua; Wei, Yongbin; Wu, Zheng; Wang, Haihang; Chen, Jianrong; Zhang, Yihe; Liu, Yongsheng

    2013-12-01

    A core-shell cobalt ferrite/silicon dioxide/europium ion-doped Y2O3 (CoFe2O4/SiO2/Y2O3:Eu3+) composite was synthesized by a facile layer-by-layer method. Magnetization of the composite under an external magnetic field of approximately 0.25 T enhanced the photoluminescence (PL) intensity by 56%. The remanent magnetization of the CoFe2O4 core increased the excited charge-transfer transition between O2- and Eu3+ in the Y2O3:Eu3+ shell, thus enhancing the probability of radiative transition (5D0→7F2) of Eu3+ ions and leading to enhanced PL. Remanent magnetization is a noncontact, easy-to-operate technique with high growth amplitude and potential for practical application for smart display devices.

  13. The Smoking Gun: Remanent Magnetic Anomalies on Mars and the Formation of the Crustal Dichotomy via Giant Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombard, A. J.; Johnson, C. L.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of large-scale crustal magnetic anomalies in the Southern Highlands of Mars is equivocal. Though some are indeed elongated primarily in the east-west direction, initial map projections exacerbated their linear nature, leading to the hypothesis that the anomalies are equivalent to magnetic stripes due to spreading of Earth's sea floor and hence to the proposal of plate tectonics on Mars. This interpretation, however, is inconsistent with Martian geology. For instance, a plate-tectonics model predicts the anomalies should be formed in thin, oceanic crust at low elevation, but instead they are found in the thick crust of the Highlands, not in the thin crust of the Northern Lowlands. Indeed, the formation of this Crustal Dichotomy is also equivocal, with models ranging from a giant impact (or multiple smaller impacts) near either the current north or south poles, to plate tectonics-like processes, to mantle convection, either eroding the crust in the northern hemisphere or thickening the crust in the south. Recently, the idea of a giant impact in the north has been resurrected, with the proposal that the Dichotomy results from the formation of an elliptical basin by a giant impact very early in Martian history. While it may be tempting to suggest that the current, generally demagnetized state of the Northern Lowlands may be related to this impact, this linkage makes implicit assumptions about the timing of dynamo shut-off on Mars, and it neglects other demagnetization mechanisms possibly operating in the Lowlands after such an impact (e.g., later hydrothermal processing). More direct magnetic evidence for the giant impact hypothesis would come if the remanent magnetism in Southern Highlands were relatable in a unique way to the putative impact. Here, we show that the positions of many of the dominant elongated magnetic anomalies on Mars are consistent with the first ring of a multi-ring basin. The best match comes from an ellipse ~2200 km wider than the

  14. Quantification of the effect of inhomogeneous magnetization or irregularity in shape on the measurement of remanent magnetization with a high-sensitivity multifunctional spinner magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Kazuto

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative assessments of the effect of inhomogeneous magnetization or irregularity in shape on the measurement of remanent magnetization were made experimentally and theoretically. Experiments were performed on artificial and natural samples, using a novel type of high-sensitivity spinner magnetometer (Kodama, G-cubed, 2016). The spinner has a wide dynamic range from 10-10-10-4 Am2 and a resolution of 10-11 Am2, incorporating two unique functions: a mechanism for adjusting flexibly the spacing between the sensor and the spinning axis, and a capability of measuring not only the fundamental component (5 Hz) but also the second (10 Hz) and the third (15 Hz) harmonic components. The former enabled the measurement of samples in any shape sized 10-50 mm, and the latter allowed the measurement of waveforms containing the harmonics leading to the analyses of their FFT spectrum. Numerical simulations using finite element method (FEM) were performed for assessing the effect of shape irregularity on the measured remanent magnetization. The effect of the heterogeneous magnetization was evaluated using a small dipole-simulating coil and a mini-core specimen of volcanic rock, and measured their magnetization by repositioning at different distances off the spinning axis. The effect of the offset was assessed in terms of the amplitude of the fundamental wave and the harmonics versus the amount of the offset. The measured amplitudes, without exception, increased with the amount of the offset, and their relationship was well approximated by a polynomial curve consisting of the second- to forth-order terms. This suggests that the contribution from the higher-order harmonic components could be represented in the form of a non-linear function of the offset distance. Measurements by a conventional spinner also demonstrated a similar increasing curve, but in association with a smaller increase rate and relatively large errors. The smaller increase rate is most likely due to its high

  15. On the generation of 'strong' magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, S. I.; Parker, E. N.; Rosner, R.

    1993-01-01

    We rediscuss the nature of magnetic field generation in astrophysical systems. We show that as a result of ineffective three-dimensional turbulent diffusion in the presence of strong azimuthal magnetic fields, the standard dynamo equations are not likely to provide a reasonable description of magnetic dynamos in systems such as late-type stars and galaxies. Instead, we propose a new set of dynamo equations, which take into account the modifications of turbulent diffusion by strong magnetic fields.

  16. Elasticity of a magnetic fluid in a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Platonov, V. B.; Sheldeshova, E. V.; Karpova, G. V.; Aref'ev, I. M.

    2017-07-01

    Complex measurements of the following elastic-magnetic parameters of a magnetic fluid suspended by magnetic levitation within a horizontal tube in a strong magnetic field were performed: the oscillation frequency and decay coefficient; the static, ponderomotive, and dynamic elasticity coefficients; the fluid displacement under hydrostatic pressure; magnetization curve; and the magnetic field strength and gradient. Calculations based on a model of ponderomotive elasticity with correction for the resistance of a viscous fluid in motion and on the fluid column displacement for two magnetic fluid samples agree well with the experimental magnetization curve. The discussed technique holds promise for research into magnetophoresis and nanoparticle aggregation in magnetic colloids.

  17. Strongly interacting matter in magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Landsteiner, Karl; Schmitt, Andreas; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2013-01-01

    The physics of strongly interacting matter in an external magnetic field is presently emerging as a topic of great cross-disciplinary interest for particle, nuclear, astro- and condensed matter physicists. It is known that strong magnetic fields are created in heavy ion collisions, an insight that has made it possible to study a variety of surprising and intriguing phenomena that emerge from the interplay of quantum anomalies, the topology of non-Abelian gauge fields, and the magnetic field. In particular, the non-trivial topological configurations of the gluon field induce a non-dissipative electric current in the presence of a magnetic field. These phenomena have led to an extended formulation of relativistic hydrodynamics, called chiral magnetohydrodynamics. Hitherto unexpected applications in condensed matter physics include graphene and topological insulators. Other fields of application include astrophysics, where strong magnetic fields exist in magnetars and pulsars. Last but not least, an important ne...

  18. Striped domains of coarse-grained magnetite observed by X-ray photoemission electron microscopy as a source of the high remanence of granites in the Vredefort dome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto eKubo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of a coarse-grained high-remanence magnetite obtained from shocked Vredefort granite were investigated by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD analysis and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS. The study utilized a spectroscopic photoelectron low-energy electron emission microscope (SPELEEM and was conducted in the SPring-8 large-synchrotron radiation facility. It is generally believed that the strong and stable bulk remanence of Vredefort granites is due to the presence of minerals that have been strongly magnetized by either an impact-generated magnetic field or terrestrial lightning strikes. Although coarse-grained magnetite is traditionally characterized by weak coercivity and remanence, the specimen used in the present study exhibited high coercivity and an intense remanent magnetization. The presence of hematite lamellae observed on the partially oxidized magnetite specimen indicated an array of striped domains, intensifying a remanence and coercivity. We also conducted XAS and XMCD analyses on a natural lodestone permanent magnet produced by lightning strikes; while maghemite was found to be present, no magnetic domain structures were observed. Considering that the nucleation of hematite lamellae on magnetite/maghemite grains is due to high-temperature oxidation, we attribute the intense remanent magnetization and magnetic hardening of Vredefort granites to post-impact hydrothermal activity.

  19. Wave spectra of strongly coupled magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaehlert, Hanno; Reynolds, Alexi; Ott, Torben; Bonitz, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Results are presented for the wave propagation in a strongly coupled, magnetized one-component plasma. For different angles of the wave vector with respect to the external magnetic field we discuss the dispersion and polarization based on the quasi-localized charge approximation (QLCA). Further, the results of the QLCA are compared with molecular dynamics simulations, extending previous results for two-dimensional systems, e.g.,. The dependence of the wave spectra on the coupling parameter and the magnetic field strength is examined. Support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft via SFB-TR 24 and DAAD via the RISE program is acknowledged.

  20. Nonlinear Electron Waves in Strongly Magnetized Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1980-01-01

    Weakly nonlinear dispersive electron waves in strongly magnetized plasma are considered. A modified nonlinear Schrodinger equation is derived taking into account the effect of particles resonating with the group velocity of the waves (nonlinear Landau damping). The possibility of including the ion...... dynamics in the analysis is also demonstrated. As a particular case the authors investigate nonlinear waves in a strongly magnetized plasma filled wave-guide, where the effects of finite geometry are important. The relevance of this problem to laboratory experiments is discussed....

  1. Oscillations of Magnetic Fluid Column in Strong Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, V. M.; Storozhenko, A. M.; Platonov, V. B.; Lobova, O. V.; Ryapolov, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper considers the results of measuring the elastic parameters (ponderomotive elasticity coefficient, oscillation frequency, attenuation coefficient) of the oscillatory system with an inertial element that is a magnetic fluid column retained in a tube due to magnetic levitation in a strong magnetic field. Elasticity is provided by the ponderomotive force which affects the upper and lower thin layers of the fluid column. Measurement results of vibration parameters of the oscillatory system can be useful for the investigations of magnetophoresis and aggregation of nanoparticles in magnetic fluids.

  2. A metafluid exhibiting strong optical magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, Sassan N; Alaeian, Hadiseh; Koh, Ai Leen; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2013-09-11

    Advances in the field of metamaterials have enabled unprecedented control of light-matter interactions. Metamaterial constituents support high-frequency electric and magnetic dipoles, which can be used as building blocks for new materials capable of negative refraction, electromagnetic cloaking, strong visible-frequency circular dichroism, and enhancing magnetic or chiral transitions in ions and molecules. While all metamaterials to date have existed in the solid-state, considerable interest has emerged in designing a colloidal metamaterial or "metafluid". Such metafluids would combine the advantages of solution-based processing with facile integration into conventional optical components. Here we demonstrate the colloidal synthesis of an isotropic metafluid that exhibits a strong magnetic response at visible frequencies. Protein-antibody interactions are used to direct the solution-phase self-assembly of discrete metamolecules comprised of silver nanoparticles tightly packed around a single dielectric core. The electric and magnetic response of individual metamolecules and the bulk metamaterial solution are directly probed with optical scattering and spectroscopy. Effective medium calculations indicate that the bulk metamaterial exhibits a negative effective permeability and a negative refractive index at modest fill factors. This metafluid can be synthesized in large-quantity and high-quality and may accelerate development of advanced nanophotonic and metamaterial devices.

  3. Super-strong Magnetic Field in Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takenori J.; Sakurai, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Sunspots are the most notable structure on the solar surface with strong magnetic fields. The field is generally strongest in a dark area (umbra), but sometimes stronger fields are found in non-dark regions, such as a penumbra and a light bridge. The formation mechanism of such strong fields outside umbrae is still puzzling. Here we report clear evidence of the magnetic field of 6250 G, which is the strongest field among Stokes I profiles with clear Zeeman splitting ever observed on the Sun. The field was almost parallel to the solar surface and located in a bright region sandwiched by two opposite-polarity umbrae. Using a time series of spectral data sets, we discuss the formation process of the super-strong field and suggest that this strong field region was generated as a result of compression of one umbra pushed by the horizontal flow from the other umbra, such as the subduction of the Earth’s crust in plate tectonics.

  4. Assessing atmospheric particulate matter distribution based on Saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization of herbaceous and tree leaves in a tropical urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barima, Yao Sadaiou Sabas; Angaman, Djédoux Maxime; N'gouran, Kobenan Pierre; Koffi, N'guessan Achille; Kardel, Fatemeh; De Cannière, Charles; Samson, Roeland

    2014-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions, and the associated human health risks, are likely to continue increasing in urban environments of developing countries like Abidjan (Ivory Cost). This study evaluated the potential of leaves of several herbaceous and tree species as bioindicators of urban particulate matter pollution, and its variation over different land use classes, in a tropical area. Four species well distributed (presence frequencies >90%) over all land use classes, easy to harvest and whose leaves are wide enough to be easily scanned were selected, i.e.: Amaranthus spinosus (Amaranthaceae), Eleusine indica (Poaceae), Panicum maximum (Poaceae) and Ficus benjamina (Moraceae). Leaf sampling of these species was carried out at 3 distances from the road and at 3 height levels. Traffic density was also noted and finally biomagnetic parameters of these leaves were determined. Results showed that Saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (SIRM) of leaves was at least 4 times higher (27.5×10(-6)A) in the vicinity of main roads and industrial areas than in parks and residential areas. The main potential sources of PM pollution were motor vehicles and industries. The slightly hairy leaves of the herbaceous plant A. spinosus and the waxy leaves of the tree F. benjamina showed the highest SIRM (25×10(-6)A). Leaf SIRM increased with distance to road (R(2)>0.40) and declined with sampling height (R(2)=0.17). The distance between 0 and 5m from the road seemed to be the most vulnerable in terms of PM pollution. This study has showed that leaf SIRM of herbaceous and tree species can be used to assess PM exposure in tropical urban environments. © 2013.

  5. SQUID measurements of remanent magnetisation in refillable 3He spin-filter cells (SFC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutanu, V.; Rupp, A.; Sander-Thömmes, T.

    2007-07-01

    A strong influence of external magnetic fields on the relaxation time constant T1 of glass cells serving as reservoirs for polarised 3He, observed for various alkali metal-coated cells made of different glass types, was initially associated with the presence of a large number of ferromagnetic clusters on the glass surface. Later experiments showed the presence of the so-called “ T1 hysteresis” phenomenon with a similar distinctiveness also in uncoated cells made of pure synthetic quartz glass. It suggests that the origin of such a relaxation is a macroscopic magnetisation in the bulk of the cell. We present the results of a multi-SQUID system investigation on magnetised and non-magnetised quartz glass cells, Cs coated as well as bare wall, to be used as neutron spin filters at HMI Berlin. The presence of a macroscopic remanent magnetic moment in the cells after their exposition to external magnetic fields has been experimentally shown. More than 80% of the remanent magnetic moment of the magnetised cells was found to be concentrated in the region of the glass valves. SQUID measurements reveal the existence of some remanent magnetisation in all valve parts and also in the vacuum grease, but most magnetic are the plastic parts and the O-ring. Different valve and sealing types have been compared in order to find the less magnetisable one.

  6. Physics in Strong Magnetic Fields Near Neutron Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Alice K.

    1991-01-01

    Discussed are the behaviors of particles and energies in the magnetic fields of neutron stars. Different types of possible research using neutron stars as a laboratory for the study of strong magnetic fields are proposed. (CW)

  7. Mechanism and Simulation of Generating Pulsed Strong Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xian-Jun; Wang, Shuai-Chuang; Deng, Ai-Dong; Gu, Zhuo-Wei; Luo, Hao

    2014-10-01

    A strong magnetic field (over 1000 T) was recently experimentally produced at the Academy of Engineering Physics in China. The theoretical methods, which include a simple model and MHD code, are discussed to investigate the physical mechanism and dynamics of generating the strong magnetic field. The analysis and simulation results show that nonlinear magnetic diffusion contributes less as compared to the linear magnetic diffusion. This indicates that the compressible hydrodynamic effect and solid imploding compression may have a large influence on strong magnetic field generation.

  8. Correlations of Strong Martian Crustal Magnetic Fields With Valley Networks and Phyllosilicate Exposures: Implications for Magnetic Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.; Harrison, K. P.; Langlais, B.; Lillis, R. J.; Poulet, F.

    2009-05-01

    A broad spatial correlation between strong martian crustal magnetic fields and the valley networks, which are indicative of surface water erosion, has previously been reported. In this paper, we report initial evidence for a correlation of phyllosilicate exposures identified to date using Mars Express OMEGA data with strong crustal fields and valley networks in the Noachian southern highlands. Two separate statistical methods confirm the significance of the phyllosilicate exposure correlation. Like the valley networks and crustal fields, the phyllosilicate exposures are distributed north and east of Hellas in the southern highlands but are nearly absent within, south, and west of this basin. Similarly, they are present north and west of Argyre but are sparse within, south, and east of this basin. All three tend to occur mainly at low paleolatitudes as inferred from magnetic anomaly modeling by several groups. We interpret the correlation to imply that the strongest crustal magnetization formed primarily while liquid water was present in the martian upper crust. The source of the water could have been from above (precipitation) or from below (mantle outgassing). A likely explanation is that the production in magnetic source regions of efficient remanence carriers was enhanced in the presence of magmatic heat through hydrothermal chemical processes. For example, magnetite production could have been enhanced through serpentinization. Geologic evidence suggests that magmatic intrusions occurred commonly in the upper highland crust during the Noachian. If these intrusions occurred in the form of dikes and/or dendritic conduits over regions as large as 200 - 600 km during time periods less than the dynamo reversal time scale, then magnetic source regions with dimensions comparable to those inferred from orbital data could be accounted for.

  9. Frictional Coulomb drag in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønsager, Martin Christian; Flensberg, Karsten; Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    1997-01-01

    ) is evaluated using diagrammatic techniques. The transresistivity is given by an integral over energy and momentum transfer weighted by the product of the screened interlayer interaction and the phase space for scattering events. We demonstrate, by a numerical analysis of the transresistivity, that for well......-resolved Landau levels the interplay between these two factors leads to characteristic features in both the magnetic field and the temperature dependence of rho(21). Numerical results are compared with recent experiments....

  10. Spin Wave Theory of Strongly Anisotropic Magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    A strong anisotropy gives rise to a non-spherical precession of the spins with different amplitudes in the x and y directions. The highly anharmonic exchange interaction thereby becomes effectively anisotropic. The possibility of detecting a genuine two-ion anisotropy is discussed, and comments a...

  11. Operating a magnetic nozzle helicon thruster with strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Kazunori, E-mail: kazunori@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Komuro, Atsushi; Ando, Akira [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    A pulsed axial magnetic field up to ∼2.8 kG is applied to a 26-mm-inner-diameter helicon plasma thruster immersed in a vacuum chamber, and the thrust is measured using a pendulum target. The pendulum is located 30-cm-downstream of the thruster, and the thruster rf power and argon flow rate are fixed at 1 kW and 70 sccm (which gives a chamber pressure of 0.7 mTorr). The imparted thrust increases as the applied magnetic field is increased and saturates at a maximum value of ∼9.5 mN for magnetic field above ∼2 kG. At the maximum magnetic field, it is demonstrated that the normalized plasma density, and the ion flow energy in the magnetic nozzle, agree within ∼50% and of 10%, respectively, with a one-dimensional model that ignores radial losses from the nozzle. This magnetic nozzle model is combined with a simple global model of the thruster source that incorporates an artificially controlled factor α, to account for radial plasma losses to the walls, where α = 0 and 1 correspond to zero losses and no magnetic field, respectively. Comparison between the experiments and the model implies that the radial losses in the thruster source are experimentally reduced by the applied magnetic field to about 10% of that obtained from the no magnetic field model.

  12. Strong horizontal photospheric magnetic field in a surface dynamo simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SchÜssler, M.; Vögler, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323397212

    2008-01-01

    Context. Observations with the Hinode spectro-polarimeter have revealed strong horizontal internetwork magnetic fields in the quiet solar photosphere. Aims. We aim to interpret the observations with results from numerical simulations. Methods. Radiative MHD simulations of dynamo action by

  13. Geometrical aspects of cylindric magnetic shields in strong static fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiwei, XIA; Wei, LI; Bo, LI; Qingwei, YANG

    2017-11-01

    Motivated by ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), research on a magnetic shield against a strong field has been carried out. In this paper, a cylindric magnetic shield is studied by using the finite element method with a nonlinear magnetization curve. The geometrical aspects of shielding performance are identified and corresponding suggestions for application are provided. Among them, the effects of the edge and cover thickness have not been mentioned elsewhere to our knowledge.

  14. Spectral confinement and current for atoms in strong magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fournais, Søren

    2007-01-01

    e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B<3......e study confinement of the ground state of atoms in strong magnetic fields to different subspaces related to the lowest Landau band. Using the results on confinement we can calculate the quantum current in the entire semiclassical region B

  15. Radial oscillations of neutron stars in strong magnetic fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The eigen frequencies of radial pulsations of neutron stars are calculated in a strong magnetic field. At low densities we use the magnetic BPS equation of state (EOS) similar to that obtained by Lai and Shapiro while at high densities the EOS obtained from the relativistic nuclear mean field theory is taken and ...

  16. Radial oscillations of neutron stars in strong magnetic fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The eigen frequencies of radial pulsations of neutron stars are calculated in a strong magnetic field. At low densities we use the magnetic BPS equation of state (EOS) similar to that obtained by Lai and Shapiro while at high densities the EOS obtained from the relativistic nuclear mean field theory is taken and extended to ...

  17. Environmental magnetism and application in the continental shelf sediments of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.

    environment using magnetic techniques and to gain an understanding on the factors controlling metal concentrations and distributions in the east and west coast of India. The strong relationships between Anhysteretic Remanent Magnetization (Chi ARM) and heavy...

  18. LDA+DMFT Approach to Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy of Strong Magnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Xin Zhu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The new challenges posed by the need of finding strong rare-earth-free magnets demand methods that can predict magnetization and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE. We argue that correlated electron effects, which are normally underestimated in band-structure calculations, play a crucial role in the development of the orbital component of the magnetic moments. Because magnetic anisotropy arises from this orbital component, the ability to include correlation effects has profound consequences on our predictive power of the MAE of strong magnets. Here, we show that incorporating the local effects of electronic correlations with dynamical mean-field theory provides reliable estimates of the orbital moment, the mass enhancement, and the MAE of YCo_{5}.

  19. Fine Structure of Self-reversed Thermo-remanent Magnetization: Effects of Composition Waves Produced by Ordering During Quench and Annealing of Metastable Ferri-ilmenite Solid Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnroe, Suzanne; Robinson, Peter; Fabian, Karl; Harrison, Richard; Thomas, Chris; Mukai, Hiroki; Fjellvåg, Helmer; Putnis, Andrew; Svendby, Kathrine

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic experiments on synthetic ferri-ilmenite samples in the bulk composition range Ilm 60-70, quenched and annealed at high temperatures (T), well above any magnetization temperature, throw new light on metastable chemical phenomena leading to fine-structure in the acquisition of thermoremanent magnetization. Growth of Fe-Ti -ordered domains in a disordered host, or growth and shrinking of adjacent Fe-Ti ordered domains against each other in the process of coarsening, lead to Fe-enrichment in some domains relative to others, influencing magnetization temperature. However, additional Fe-enrichment along domain boundaries during these processes produces Fe-enriched waves on the boundaries, where ferrimagnetic material near the wave crests, magnetizes at a higher T than the bulk of the sample. Because the boundaries are antiphase domain boundaries with opposite Fe-Ti ordering, opposite sides must acquire opposite magnetic moments during cooling, at a temperature above that where bulk normal magnetization begins. This is the "magnetic predestination T" or "TPD", because it sets the stage for normal and self-reversed magnetization on opposite sides of the phase domain boundary. The Fe-enrichment waves are not uniform in different parts of a sample; neither are the compositions along the domain walls. This means "TPD" is generally not a single temperature, but a T range, but reflecting only a small volume of the sample. With further cooling in a positive field, slightly less Fe-enriched but more voluminous ferrimagnetic regions begin to magnetize, leading to a positive magnetic peak, "TMAX". Already here, even less Fe-enriched but still more voluminous ferrimagnetic material, influenced by the domain wall, begins to acquire self-reversed magnetization. This dominates in cooling below "TMAX", eventually leading to totally self-reversed magnetization at "TFR". A Curie temperature obviously cannot be measured meaningfully from a cooling curve in this material of varied

  20. Wave propagation in a strongly coupled magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Alexi; Kählert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Strongly coupled plasmas play a growing role in many fields of physics--from dusty plasmas to compact stars and the quark-gluon plasma, e.g.. In many cases these plasmas are subject to a strong magnetic field. The one-component plasma (OCP) model is often used to theoretically analyze strong plasma correlations. Here the wave propagation in a strongly coupled OCP subject to an external magnetic field is investigated by means of the quasi- localized charge approximation. The dispersion relation and the wave polarization are studied for wave propagation across and along the magnetic field as well as for arbitrary directions of the wave vector. Support by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft via SFB-TR 24 and DAAD via the RISE program is acknowledged.

  1. Dynamic Elasticity of a Magnetic Fluid Column in a Strong Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polunin, V. M.; Ryapolov, P. A.; Shel'deshova, E. V.; Kuz'ko, A. E.; Aref'ev, I. M.

    2017-07-01

    The elastomagnetic parameters of a magnetic fluid kept by magnetic levitation in a tube placed horizontally in a strong magnetic field are measured, including the oscillation frequency, the ponderomotive and dynamic elasticity coefficients, the magnetization curve, and the magnetic field strength and its gradient. Results of calculations for the model of ponderomotive elasticity for the examined sample of the magnetic fluid corrected for the resistance of the moving viscous fluid are in good agreement with the experimental magnetization curve. The described method is of interest for a study of magnetophoresis, nanoparticle aggregations, viscosity, and their time dependences in magnetic colloids.

  2. Canonical Transform Method for Treating Strongly Anisotropy Magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, J. F.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    An infinite-order perturbation approach to the theory of magnetism in magnets with strong single-ion anisotropy is given. This approach is based on a canonical transformation of the system into one with a diagonal crystal field, an effective two-ion anisotropy, and reduced ground-state corrections....... A matrix-element matching procedure is used to obtain an explicit expression for the spin-wave energy to second order. The consequences of this theory are illustrated by an application to a simple example with planar anisotropy and an external magnetic field. A detailed comparison between the results...

  3. Biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in limestone deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Bin R.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Stolz, John F.

    1987-06-01

    Studies on the microbial communities and magnetic phases of samples collected from carbonate oozes at Sugarloaf Key, FL, U.S.A. and calcareous laminated sediments from Laguna Figueroa, Baja California, Mexico have revealed the existence of magnetotactic bacteria and ultrafine-grained single domain magnetite in both environments. Magnetotactic bacteria were identified by light and electron microscopy. The single domain magnetite was detected by coercivity spectra analysis with a SQUID magnetometer and examined under the transmission electron microscope. The similarity, in terms of size and shape, between the single domain magnetite found in these sediments and the magnetite observed in the bacterial magnetosome from enriched cultures indicates the ultrafine-grained magnetite in these two marine environments was biologically formed. These results, combined with the common occurrences of ultrafine-grained magnetite in limestone deposits detected rock magnetically, suggest biogenic magnetite may be present and contribute to the magnetic remanence in these rocks. Several Cambrian limestone samples, separately collected from Siberia, China, and Kazakhstan, were examined for the presence of bacterial magnetite. Samples from the Lower Cambrian Sinskian Formation at Siberia Platform were found to contain both a large amount of apparently bacterial magnetite particles and a very stable primary magnetic component. Post-Cambrian diagenesis does not seem to affect the microgranulometry of these apparently bacterial magnetite crystals or the magnetic remanence carried by them. Assessing the potential role of biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in other Phanerozoic limestone deposits ought to be further pursued.

  4. Strongly magnetized strange baryonic matter in neutron star

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, K

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the strongly magnetized strange baryonic matter in a relativistic mean-field theory. We first take into account the hidden strange mesons and the field-dependent meson-baryon coupling constants. In low-density region the strongly magnetized neutron star (NS) matter is nearly iso-symmetric. The equation of state (EOS) therefore becomes softer than that of the normal NS matter. Because the magnetic field increases the threshold densities of \\Lambda and \\Xi^-, the EOS becomes stiffer in high-density region. However, the magnetic field has little effect on the effective masses of \\Lambda and \\Sigma. Taking into account the anomalous magnetic moments (AMMs) of baryons, the EOS becomes much stiffer although the threshold densities of \\Sigma^+, \\Sigma^0 and \\Xi^0 decrease largely. The density dependence of the effective mass of \\Xi precisely reflects the EOS while the effective masses of \\Lambda and \\Sigma are strongly influenced by the AMMs of nucleons th! rough the scalar mean-field.

  5. Strong magnetic response of submicron silicon particles in the infrared

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García-Etxarri, A; Gómez-Medina, R; Froufe-Pérez, L S; López, C; Chantada, L; Scheffold, F; Aizpurua, J; Nieto-Vesperinas, M; Sáenz, J J

    2011-01-01

    .... However, we find that Silicon particles with index of refraction∼3.5 and radius∼200 nm present strong electric and magnetic dipolar resonances in telecom and near-infrared frequencies, (i.e. at wavelengths≈1.2-2 mm...

  6. Resonances of the helium atom in a strong magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin Christian; Al-Hujaj, Omar-Alexander; Schmelcher, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present an investigation of the resonances of a doubly excited helium atom in a strong magnetic field covering the regime B=0–100  a.u. A full-interaction approach which is based on an anisotropic Gaussian basis set of one-particle functions being nonlinearly optimized for each field strength...

  7. Theory of Spin Waves in Strongly Anisotropic Magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Cooke, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    A new infinite-order perturbation approach to the theory of spin waves in strongly anisotropic magnets is introduced. The system is transformed into one with effective two-ion anisotropy and considerably reduced ground-state corrections. A general expression for the spin-wave energy, valid to any...

  8. Confinining properties of QCD in strong magnetic backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonati Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Strong magnetic backgrounds are known to modify QCD properties at a nonperturbative level. We discuss recent lattice results, obtained for Nf = 2 + 1 QCD with physical quark masses, concerning in particular the modifications and the anisotropies induced at the level of the static quark-antiquark potential, both at zero and finite temperature.

  9. Magnetic field distribution of strong hybrid magnet in high torque motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Kazuya; Mizutani, Akihiro; Ogino, Sanshiroh; Ochiai, Yasuzumi; Kawahata, Masahiro; Nishi, Yoshitake

    2002-11-01

    A variable reluctance hybrid magnet has been developed to apply new type of high torque motors. A permanent magnet, electromagnet and yoke construct the variable reluctance hybrid magnet. From an engineering point of view, it is important to know the magnetic field around a variable reluctance hybrid magnet. Based on the results of magnetic flux density measurement around the hybrid variable reluctance magnet, the high magnetic flux density was found at edges and joints. The high magnetic flux density was also obtained with electrical current of 10 A at optimum setting form. Therefore, we concluded that the strong force of rotor of the hybrid motor was generated by high surface flux density of the hybrid magnet.

  10. Nonlinear optics of graphene in a strong magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xianghan; Belyanin, Alexey

    2013-02-06

    Graphene placed in a magnetic field possesses an extremely high mid/far-infrared optical nonlinearity originating from its unusual band structure and selection rules for the optical transitions near the Dirac point. Here, we study the linear and nonlinear optical response of graphene in strong magnetic and optical fields using a quantum-mechanical density-matrix formalism. We calculate the power of the coherent terahertz radiation generated as a result of the four-wave mixing in graphene. We show that even one monolayer of graphene gives rise to an appreciable nonlinear frequency conversion efficiency and Raman gain for modest intensities of the incident infrared radiation.

  11. Photon splitting in a strongly magnetized, charge-asymmetric plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chistyakov M.V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of the photon splitting, γ → γγ, is investigated in the presence of strongly magnetized charge-asymmetric cold plasma. The dispersion properties of photons and the new polarization selection rules are obtained in such plasma. The absorption rate of the leading photon splitting channel are calculated with taking account of the photon dispersion and wave function renormalization. In addition, a comparison of the photon splitting and the Compton scattering processes is performed.

  12. Performance of remanent supermirror benders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeni, P.; Clemens, D.; Horisberger, M.; Rubio, D.; Tixier, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Hahn, W. [ISIS (United Kingdom)

    1997-09-01

    Polarising supermirrors composed of magnetic and non-magnetic layers have been deposited on thin glass sheets by means of reactive DC-magnetron sputtering. Benders that are composed of such glass have an excellent transmission and can be used for polarising neutrons in zero field. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 2 refs.

  13. Localized Electron Heating by Strong Guide-Field Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuehan; Sugawara, Takumichi; Inomoto, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Kotaro; Ono, Yasushi; UTST Team

    2015-11-01

    Localized electron heating of magnetic reconnection was studied under strong guide-field (typically Bt 15Bp) using two merging spherical tokamak plasmas in Univ. Tokyo Spherical Tokamak (UTST) experiment. Our new slide-type two-dimensional Thomson scattering system documented for the first time the electron heating localized around the X-point. The region of high electron temperature, which is perpendicular to the magnetic field, was found to have a round shape with radius of 2 [cm]. Also, it was localized around the X-point and does not agree with that of energy dissipation term Et .jt . When we include a guide-field effect term Bt / (Bp + αBt) for Et .jt where α =√{ (vin2 +vout2) /v∥2 } , the energy dissipation area becomes localized around the X-point, suggesting that the electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field parallel to the magnetic field and thermalized around the X-point. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus,'' a Grant-in-Aid from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 15J03758.

  14. Instability in strongly magnetized accretion discs: a global perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Upasana; Begelman, Mitchell C.; Lesur, Geoffroy

    2018-01-01

    We examine the properties of strongly magnetized accretion discs in a global framework, with particular focus on the evolution of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities such as the magnetorotational instability (MRI). Work by Pessah & Psaltis showed that MRI is stabilized beyond a critical toroidal field in compressible, differentially rotating flows and, also, reported the appearance of two new instabilities beyond this field. Their results stemmed from considering geometric curvature effects due to the suprathermal background toroidal field, which had been previously ignored in weak-field studies. However, their calculations were performed under the local approximation, which poses the danger of introducing spurious behaviour due to the introduction of global geometric terms in an otherwise local framework. In order to avoid this, we perform a global eigenvalue analysis of the linearized MHD equations in cylindrical geometry. We confirm that MRI indeed tends to be highly suppressed when the background toroidal field attains the Pessah-Psaltis limit. We also observe the appearance of two new instabilities that emerge in the presence of highly suprathermal toroidal fields. These results were additionally verified using numerical simulations in PLUTO. There are, however, certain differences between the the local and global results, especially in the vertical wavenumber occupancies of the various instabilities, which we discuss in detail. We also study the global eigenfunctions of the most unstable modes in the suprathermal regime, which are inaccessible in the local analysis. Overall, our findings emphasize the necessity of a global treatment for accurately modelling strongly magnetized accretion discs.

  15. Strong static-magnetic field alters operant responding by rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, M.; Matsuda, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Forty male rats of the Wistar ST strain were trained and observed for Sidman avoidance (SA) for 7 weeks or for discriminative avoidance (DA) for 14 weeks to determine the effects of exposure to a strong static-magnetic field. Before avoidance conditioning was completed, rats in the SA group were exposed to the static field at 0.6 T, 16 h/day for 4 days during the fifth week, and those in the DA group were exposed for 6 h/day for 4 days during the seventh week. In the SA conditioning, frequency of lever-pressing by exposed rats gradually decreased during 1 week of exposure and stayed low for at least 2 weeks after exposure. Frequencies of electric shocks received by the rats increased dramatically during the second day of exposure and consistently stayed higher than those of control rats. In the DA condition, exposed rats responded at lower rates than did control rats throughout the observation period. They received more shocks during the 2 weeks following exposure. The data indicate that performance of avoidance responses was inhibited by a comparatively long exposure to a strong magnetic field.

  16. Strong magnetic fields in normal galaxies at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, Martin L.; Miniati, Francesco; Lilly, Simon J.; Kronberg, Philipp P.; Dessauges-Zavadsky, Miroslava

    2008-07-01

    The origin and growth of magnetic fields in galaxies is still something of an enigma. It is generally assumed that seed fields are amplified over time through the dynamo effect, but there are few constraints on the timescale. It was recently demonstrated that field strengths as traced by rotation measures of distant (and hence ancient) quasars are comparable to those seen today, but it was unclear whether the high fields were in the unusual environments of the quasars themselves or distributed along the lines of sight. Here we report high-resolution spectra that demonstrate that the quasars with strong MgII absorption lines are unambiguously associated with larger rotation measures. Because MgII absorption occurs in the haloes of normal galaxies along the sightlines to the quasars, this association requires that organized fields of surprisingly high strengths are associated with normal galaxies when the Universe was only about one-third of its present age.

  17. Quark-gluon plasma in strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2013-04-15

    One of the fundamental problems in subatomic physics is the determination of properties of matter at extreme temperatures, densities and electromagnetic fields. The modern ultrarelativistic heavy-ion experiments are able to study such states (the quark-gluon plasma) and indicate that the physics at extreme conditions differs drastically from what is known from the conventional observations. Also the theoretical methods developed mostly within the perturbative framework face various conceptual problems and need to be replaced by a nonperturbative approach. In this thesis we study the physics of the strongly-coupled quark-gluon plasma in external magnetic fields as well as general electromagnetic and topological properties of the QCD and QCD-like systems. We develop and apply various nonperturbative techniques, based on e.g. gauge-gravity correspondence, lattice QCD simulations, relativistic hydrodynamics and condensed-matter-inspired models.

  18. Elevator mode convection in flows with strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Li; Zikanov, Oleg, E-mail: zikanov@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan-Dearborn, 48128-1491 Michigan (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Instability modes in the form of axially uniform vertical jets, also called “elevator modes,” are known to be the solutions of thermal convection problems for vertically unbounded systems. Typically, their relevance to the actual flow state is limited by three-dimensional breakdown caused by rapid growth of secondary instabilities. We consider a flow of a liquid metal in a vertical duct with a heated wall and strong transverse magnetic field and find elevator modes that are stable and, thus, not just relevant, but a dominant feature of the flow. We then explore the hypothesis suggested by recent experimental data that an analogous instability to modes of slow axial variation develops in finite-length ducts, where it causes large-amplitude fluctuations of temperature. The implications for liquid metal blankets for tokamak fusion reactors that potentially invalidate some of the currently pursued design concepts are discussed.

  19. Anomalous electrodynamics of neutral pion matter in strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauner, Tomáš [Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Stavanger,N-4036 Stavanger (Norway); Kadam, Saurabh V. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER),Pune 411008 (India)

    2017-03-03

    The ground state of quantum chromodynamics in sufficiently strong external magnetic fields and at moderate baryon chemical potential is a chiral soliton lattice (CSL) of neutral pions https://arxiv.org/abs/1609.05213. We investigate the interplay between the CSL structure and dynamical electromagnetic fields. Our main result is that in presence of the CSL background, the two physical photon polarizations and the neutral pion mix, giving rise to two gapped excitations and one gapless mode with a nonrelativistic dispersion relation. The nature of this mode depends on the direction of its propagation, interpolating between a circularly polarized electromagnetic wave https://www.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevD.93.085036 and a neutral pion surface wave, which in turn arises from the spontaneously broken translation invariance. Quite remarkably, there is a neutral-pion-like mode that remains gapped even in the chiral limit, in seeming contradiction to the Goldstone theorem. Finally, we have a first look at the effect of thermal fluctuations of the CSL, showing that even the soft nonrelativistic excitation does not lead to the Landau-Peierls instability. However, it leads to an anomalous contribution to pressure that scales with temperature and magnetic field as T{sup 5/2}(B/f{sub π}){sup 3/2}.

  20. Magnetic Reconnection in Strongly Magnetized Regions of the Low Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lei; Lukin, Vyacheslav S.; Murphy, Nicholas A.; Lin, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection in strongly magnetized regions around the temperature minimum region of the low solar atmosphere is studied by employing MHD-based simulations of a partially ionized plasma within a reactive 2.5D multi-fluid model. It is shown that in the absence of magnetic nulls in a low β plasma, the ionized and neutral fluid flows are well-coupled throughout the reconnection region. However, non-equilibrium ionization–recombination dynamics play a critical role in determining the structure of the reconnection region, leading to much lower temperature increases and a faster magnetic reconnection rate as compared to simulations that assume plasma to be in ionization–recombination equilibrium. The rate of ionization of the neutral component of the plasma is always faster than recombination within the current sheet region even when the initial plasma β is as high as {β }0=1.46. When the reconnecting magnetic field is in excess of a kilogauss and the plasma β is lower than 0.0145, the initially weakly ionized plasmas can become fully ionized within the reconnection region and the current sheet can be strongly heated to above 2.5× {10}4 K, even as most of the collisionally dissipated magnetic energy is radiated away. The Hall effect increases the reconnection rate slightly, but in the absence of magnetic nulls it does not result in significant asymmetries or change the characteristics of the reconnection current sheet down to meter scales.

  1. Application of orbital strong magnet in the extraction of deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chen Jia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the surgical method and efficacy of extraction of deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies by mean of an orbital strong magnet. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of clinical data of patients with deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies(OMFBin Hebei Eye Hospital from June 2014 to May 2017 was processed. A total of 23 eyes were enrolled, among them, 14 eyes of extraorbital OMFB, 9 eyes of intraorbital OMFB. The rate of extraction of foreign bodies and the postoperative complications were observed. RESULTS: All eyes of intraorbital foreign bodies were successfully extracted with 100% success rate. Twelve of 14 eyes of extraorbital foreign bodies were extracted with 86% success rate. Mild orbital hemorrhage were found in 2 eyes. There was no other obvious complication such as visual loss, orbital massive hemorrhage or limited ocular movement. CONCLUSION: It's an ideal surgical method to extract the deep orbital magnetic foreign bodies by mean of an orbital strong magnet, with mini-injury, high success rate, short duration and few complications.

  2. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co50Fe50 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We studied the magnetization reversal mechanism of single-layered Co50Fe50 nanomagnets by mea- suring the magnetization reversal and using the micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization reversal strongly depends on the thickness of the nanomagnets. In the remanent state, the magnetic force ...

  3. Magnetic force microscopy and simulation studies on Co50Fe50 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We studied the magnetization reversal mechanism of single-layered Co50Fe50 nanomagnets by measuring the magnetization reversal and using the micromagnetic simulations. The magnetization reversal strongly depends on the thickness of the nanomagnets. In the remanent state, the magnetic force microscopy studies ...

  4. Study of magnetic behavior in hexagonal-YMn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0 and 0.2) nanoparticles using remanent magnetization curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Samta; Singh, Amit Kumar; Srivastava, Saurabh Kumar; Chandra, Ramesh, E-mail: ramesfic@iitr.ac.in

    2016-09-15

    We have studied the magnetic behavior of YMn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0 and 0.2) nanoparticles synthesized by conventional solid state reaction method. The as-synthesized nanoparticles were found to have hexagonal phase with P6{sub 3cm} space group confirmed by X-Ray diffraction. The particle size was found to be ~70 nm as confirmed by both X-Ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. DC magnetization and memory effect measurements imply that the h-YMnO{sub 3} nanoparticles bear a resemblance to super spin-glass state following de Almeida–Thouless like behavior which is being suppressed by Fe-doping. The Fe-doping in YMnO{sub 3} enhances the antiferromagnetic (AFM) transition temperature T{sub N} to ~79 K and induces a new magnetic state due to the surface spins which is realized as diluted antiferromagnet in a field (DAFF) as explored by the thermoremanent and isothermoremanent magnetization measured with different applied magnetic field. - Highlights: • Magnetic behavior of h-YMn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0 and 0.2) nanoparticles have been studied. • The nanoparticles (~70 nm) were synthesized by solid state reaction method. • Magnetic data reveal spin-glass behavior in YMnO{sub 3} which was suppressed in YMn{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}. • The h-YMnO{sub 3} nanoparticles show memory effect and obey de-Almeida Thouless line. • TRM and IRM suggest spin glass nature for YMnO{sub 3}, while the YMn{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} resembles DAFF.

  5. Tracking in Strong Magnetic Field for Squash Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Vinogradov, L I; CERN. Geneva; Stolyarov, O I; Tsimbal, F A; Tulina, T A; Semenov, R I; Feofilov, G A; Sonderegger, P; Flegel, W; Varela, J; Fedorov, V M; Igolkin, S N; Yudkin, M I; Potapov, S V; Novikov, I A; Patarakin, O O; Sustavov, A F

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental feasibility tests of the MCP detector in magnetic fields combined with the motivation and technical proposals of high timing resolution detector inside the magnet for SQUASH experiment. Results have the additional direct outcome to the design of the Forward Multiplicity MCP based detector for ALICE.

  6. Chiral spiral induced by a strong magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuki Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the modification of the chiral phase structure of QCD due to an external magnetic field. We first demonstrate how the effect of magnetic field can systematically be incorporated into a generalized Ginzburg-Landau framework. We then analyze the phase structure in the vicinity of the chiral critical point. In the chiral limit, the effect is found to be so drastic that it brings a “continent” of chiral spiral in the phase diagram, by which the chiral tricritical point is totally washed out. This is the case no matter how small the intensity of magnetic field is. On the other hand, the current quark mass protects the chiral critical point from a weak magnetic field. However, the critical point will eventually be covered by the chiral spiral phase as the magnetic field grows.

  7. Magnetism of a novel tetranuclear nickel(II) cluster in strong magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataev, V [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, PO Box 270116, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Golze, C [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, PO Box 270116, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Alfonsov, A [Kazan Physical Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 420029 Kazan (Russian Federation); Klingeler, R [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, PO Box 270116, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Buechner, B [Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, PO Box 270116, 01171 Dresden (Germany); Goiran, M [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Broto, J-M [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Rakoto, H [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Mennerich, C [Institut fuer Physik der Kondens. Materie, TU Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Klauss, H-H [Institut fuer Physik der Kondens. Materie, TU Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Demeshko, S [Georg-August-University Goettingen, Institute of Inorg. Chem., 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Leibeling, G [Georg-August-University Goettingen, Institute of Inorg. Chem., 37077 Goettingen (Germany); Meyer, F [Georg-August-University Goettingen, Institute of Inorg. Chem., 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    High frequency Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) up to {nu} = 1 THz and magnetization M(B) of a tetranuclear-Ni(II) single molecular complex of type [L{sub 2}Ni{sub 4}(N{sub 3})(O{sub 2}CAda){sub 4}](ClO{sub 4}) featuring an unprecedented central {mu}{sub 4} - 1,1,3,3 azide have been studied in magnetic fields up to B = 55T. Bridging ligands provide intramolecular exchange paths of different strength between the four Ni ions each having a spin S{sub Ni} = 1. T- and {nu}-dependent ESR measurements enable to accurately determine the energy spectrum of the spin states of the cluster as a function of B. A predominantly antiferromagnetic character of exchange renders the ground state nonmagnetic, S = 0, with a number of excited magnetic multiplet states, S = 1,. . . ,4. Remarkably, ESR gives evidence for the spin-level crossing in a field of {approx} 25T which turns the ground state of the cluster to a strongly magnetic one. This observation is confirmed by the static M(B) data.

  8. Superconductivity in Strong Magnetic Field (Greater Than Upper Critical Field)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessema, G.X.; Gamble, B.K.; Skove, M.J.; Lacerda, A.H.; Mielke, C.H.

    1998-08-22

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation and other US federal Agencies, has in recent years built a wide range of magnetic fields, DC 25 to 35 Tesla, short pulse 50 - 60 Tesla, and quasi-continuous 60 Tesla. Future plans are to push the frontiers to 45 Tesla DC and 70 to 100 Tesla pulse. This user facility, is open for national and international users, and creates an excellent tool for materials research (metals, semiconductors, superconductors, biological systems ..., etc). Here we present results of a systematic study of the upper critical field of a novel superconducting material which is considered a promising candidate for the search for superconductivity beyond H{sub c2} as proposed by several new theories. These theories predict that superconductors with low carrier density can reenter the superconducting phase beyond the conventional upper critical field H{sub c2}. This negates the conventional thinking that superconductivity and magnetic fields are antagonistic.

  9. How strongly are the magnetic anisotropy and coordination numbers ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our calculations reveal that complex 3 possesses the highest barrier height for reorientation of magnetisation (Ueff) and predict that 3 is likely to exhibit Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) behaviour. Complex 5 on the other hand is predicted to preclude any SMM behaviour as there is no intrinsic barrier for reorientation of ...

  10. Magnetic dynamics of weakly and strongly interacting hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Bender Koch, Christian; Mørup, Steen

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic dynamics of two differently treated samples of hematite nanoparticles from the same batch with a particle size of about 20 nm have been studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy. The dynamics of the first sample, in which the particles are coated and dispersed in water, is in accordance...

  11. Neutrino-electron scattering in a dense strongly magnetized plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the process of neutrino-electron scattering in a dense plasma and magnetic field of arbitrary strength, where electrons can occupy the states corresponding to excited Landau levels. We calculate the total probability of this process, summarized over all initial states of the plasma electrons which is only physically meaningful. Possible astrophysical manifestations of the process are briefly discussed.

  12. Nondestructive evaluation for remanent life of aged 12Cr ferrite heat resisting steel by reversible permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Kwon-Sang, E-mail: ryuks@kriss.re.kr [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Centre for Materials Measurement, Doryong Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chung-Seok [Automotive Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Un-bong [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Centre for Materials Measurement, Doryong Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Suk [Gangneung-Wonju National University, Wonju 220-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    We present a magnetic and nondestructive method to evaluate the remanent life of advanced ferritic steel using the value of reversible permeability. The method to measure reversible permeability is based on the theory that the value of reversible permeability is the same differential of the hysteresis loop. The measurement principle is based on the foundation of harmonics voltage induced in a sensing coil using a lock-in amplifier tuned to the frequency of the exciting one. Results obtained for reversible permeability, Vickers hardness, and tensile strength on the aged samples show that the peak interval of reversible permeability, Vickers hardness and tensile strength decrease as aging time increases. We could estimate the remanent life of advanced ferritic steel by using the relationship between the peak interval of reversible permeability and the Larson-Miller parameter, non-destructively. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic, nondestructive evaluation method of remanent life of 12Cr ferritic steel is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Peak interval of reversible permeability decreases with the increase of aging time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanical properties decrease with the increase of aging time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic and mechanical properties are decreased with increase of Larson-Miller parameter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversible permeability is nondestructively used to estimate remanent life of 12Cr ferrite steel.

  13. Dosimetry in the presence of strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, D. J.; Schupp, N.; Pencea, S.; Dolan, J.; Sawakuchi, G. O.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT) is an emerging technology that requires the use of radiation fields in the presence of magnetic (B) fields. In the presence of B-fields the Lorentz force influences the trajectories of the secondary electrons, which in turn affects both the dose distribution in water and the dose-response of ionization chambers and several other detectors. Thus, dosimetry in the presence of a B-field requires understanding both the B-field effects on the dose distribution and the response of detectors. In this paper we present measured data to show effects of the B-field on the dose distributions, response of ionization chambers, and presence of air-gaps surrounding the sensitive volume of the detector.

  14. Growth of nanoparticles in a strongly magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couedel, Lenaic; Leblanc, Spencer; Hall, Taylor; Konopka, Uwe; Thomas, Edward

    2017-10-01

    This presentation reports on the growth of nanoparticles in the Magnetized Dusty Plasma Experiment (MDPX) device. Two methods of production are investigated: (i) radio-frequency (rf) plasmas are produced in reactive gases (methane and acetylene) mixed with argon or hydrogen and (ii) nanoparticles are grown by sputtering the rf electrode (made of carbon, aluminium, copper, etc). The growth of nanoparticles is followed by monitoring discharge parameters such as the powered electrode self bias and the rf current harmonic content. The dynamics of the growing dust particle cloud is investigated by recording the scattered light of a laser sheath with a high speed video camera. The size distribution and the internal structure of the produced nanoparticles are studied ex-situ using scanning and transmission electron microscopes. The influence of the strength of the magnetic field is explored and the changes in NP growth dynamics and transport are discussed. This work is supported by the US Dept. of Energy, DE-SC0016330.

  15. On the decay of strong magnetization in global disc simulations with toroidal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragile, P. Chris; Sądowski, Aleksander

    2017-05-01

    Strong magnetization in accretion discs could resolve a number of outstanding issues related to stability and state transitions in low-mass X-ray binaries. However, it is unclear how real discs become strongly magnetized and, even if they do, whether they can remain in such a state. In this paper, we address the latter issue through a pair of global disc simulations. Here, we only consider cases of initially purely toroidal magnetic fields contained entirely within a compact torus. We find that over only a few tens of orbital periods, the magnetization of an initially strongly magnetized disc, Pmag/Pgas ≥ 10, drops to ≲ 0.1, similar to the steady-state value reached in initially weakly magnetized discs. This is consistent with recent shearing box simulations with initially strong toroidal fields, the robust conclusion being that strongly magnetized toroidal fields cannot be locally self-sustaining. These results appear to leave net poloidal flux or extended radial fields as the only avenues for establishing strongly magnetized discs, ruling out the thermal collapse scenario.

  16. SU-E-T-368: Effect of a Strong Magnetic Field On Select Radiation Dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, M; Wen, Z; Tailor, R; Sawakuchi, G; Flint, D; Beddar, S; Ibbott, G [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of a strong magnetic field on TLD-100, OSLD (Al{sub 2}O{sub 2}:C), and PRESAGE dosimetry devices. This study will help to determine which types of dosimeters can be used for quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry measurements in a magnetic resonance imaginglinear accelerator (MRI-linac) system. Methods: The dosimeters were separated into two categories which were either exposed or not exposed to a strong magnetic field. In each category a set of dosimeters was irradiated with 0, 2, or 6 Gy. To expose the dosimeters to a magnetic field the samples in that category were place in a Bruker small animal magnetic resonance scanner at a field strength slightly greater than 2.5 T for at least 1 hour preirradiation and at least 1 hour post-irradiation. Irradiations were performed with a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian TrueBeam linac with 10×10 cm{sup 2} field at a 600 MU/min dose rate. The samples that received no radiation dose were used as control detectors. Results: The readouts of the dosimeters which were not exposed to a strong magnetic field were compared with the measurements of the dosimetry devices which were exposed to a magnetic field. No significant differences (less than 2% difference) in the performance of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE dosimeters due to exposure to a strong magnetic field were observed. Conclusion: Exposure to a strong magnetic field before and after irradiation does not appear to change the dosimetric properties of TLD, OSLD, or PRESAGE which indicates that these dosimeters have potential for use in quality assurance and in-vivo dosimetry in a MRI-linac. We plan to further test the effect of magnetic fields on these devices by irradiating them in the presence of a magnetic fields similar to those produced by a MRI-linac system. Elekta-MD Anderson Cancer Center Research Agreement.

  17. Magnetic Dissipation in Asymmetric Strong Guide 3D Simulations: Examples of Magnetic Diffusion and Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.; Daughton, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Interpretations of 2D simulations of magnetic reconnection are greatly simplified by using the flux function, usually the out of plane component of the vector potential. This theoretical device is no longer available when simulations are analyzed in 3-D. We illustrate the results of determining the locale rates of flux slippage in simulations by a technique based on Maxwell's equations. The technique recovers the usual results obtained for the flux function in 2D simulations, but remains viable in 3D simulations where there is no flux function. The method has also been successfully tested for full PIC simulations where reconnection is geometrically forbiddden. While such layers possess measurable flux slippages (diffusion) their level is not as strong as recorded in known 2D PIC reconnection sites using the same methodology. This approach will be used to explore the spatial incidence and strength of flux slippages across a 3D, asymmetric, strong guide field run discussed previously in the literature. Regions of diffusive behavior are illustrated where LHDI has been previously identified out on the separatrices, while much stronger flux slippages, typical of the X-regions of 2D simulations, are shown to occur elsewhere throughout the simulation. These results suggest that reconnection requires sufficiently vigorous flux slippage to be self sustaining, while non-zero flux slippage can and does occur without being at the reconnection site. A cross check of this approach is provided by the mixing ratio of tagged simulation particles of known spatial origin discussed by Daughton et al., 2013 (this meeting); they provide an integral measure of flux slippage up to the present point in the simulation. We will discuss the correlations between our Maxwell based flux slippage rates and the inferred rates of change of this mixing ratio (as recorded in the local fluid frame).

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Distortion and Targeting Errors from Strong Rare Earth Metal Magnetic Dental Implant Requiring Revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong-Cheol, Park; Chong Sik, Lee; Seok Min, Kim; Eu Jene, Choi; Do Hee, Lee; Jung Kyo, Lee

    2016-12-22

    Recently, the use of magnetic dental implants has been re-popularized with the introduction of strong rare earth metal, for example, neodymium, magnets. Unrecognized magnetic dental implants can cause critical magnetic resonance image distortions. We report a case involving surgical failure caused by a magnetic dental implant. A 62-year-old man underwent deep brain stimulation for medically insufficiently controlled Parkinson's disease. Stereotactic magnetic resonance imaging performed for the first deep brain stimulation showed that the overdenture was removed. However, a dental implant remained and contained a neodymium magnet, which was unrecognized at the time of imaging; the magnet caused localized non-linear distortions that were the largest around the dental magnets. In the magnetic field, the subthalamic area was distorted by a 4.6 mm right shift and counter clockwise rotation. However, distortions were visually subtle in the operation field and small for distant stereotactic markers, with approximately 1-2 mm distortions. The surgeon considered the distortion to be normal asymmetry or variation. Stereotactic marker distortion was calculated to be in the acceptable range in the surgical planning software. Targeting errors, approximately 5 mm on the right side and 2 mm on the left side, occurred postoperatively. Both leads were revised after the removal of dental magnets. Dental magnets may cause surgical failures and should be checked and removed before stereotactic surgery. Our findings should be considered when reviewing surgical precautions and making distortion-detection algorithm improvements.

  19. Direct URCA-processes in neutron star quark core with strong magnetic field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyaev Vasily

    2017-01-01

    In evaluations, the strength of magnetic field corresponds to the case, where the quarks of medium occupy a lot of Landau levels, while the electrons are in ground Landau level. The analytical dependence of neutrino emissivity on chemical potentials of quarks and electrons, temperature and magnetic field strength is obtained and briefly discussed. The result could be important in application to a massive strongly magnetized neutron star with quark core.

  20. Regularity and Chaos in the Hydrogen Atom Highly Excited with a Strong Magnetic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amdouni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the relativistic corrections on the energy spectra are analyzed. Effective simulations based on manipulations of operators in the Sturmian basis are developed. Discrete and continuous energy spectra of a hydrogen atom with realistic nucleus mass in a strong magnetic field are computed. The transition from regularity to chaos in diamagnetic problem with the effect of the nucleus recoil energy is explored. Anticrossing of energy levels is observed for strong magnetic field.

  1. Low-cost auxiliary system for broadband NMR on strongly magnetic systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nevald, Rolf; Hansen, Poul Erik

    1978-01-01

    A low cost auxiliary system consisting of He cryostat, superconducting magnet, and sample holder assembly with field probe has been constructed. The system meets the requirements of NMR on strongly paramagnetic or ordered magnetic materials, which are accurate temperature settings over a wide range...

  2. Working with MRI: An investigation of occupational exposure to strong static magnetic fields and associated symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, K.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) makes use of electromagnetic fields in the non-ionizing radiation frequency ranges. One of them is a continuously present strong static magnetic field (SMF), which extends up to several meters around the scanner. Each time an MRI worker performs tasks near the

  3. Saturation properties of nuclear matter in the presence of strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, Z. [Shiraz University, Department of Physics and Biruni Observatory, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bordbar, G.H. [Shiraz University, Department of Physics and Biruni Observatory, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center for Excellence in Astronomy and Astrophysics (CEAA-RIAAM)-Maragha, P.O. Box 55134-441, Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Different saturation properties of cold symmetric nuclear matter in strong magnetic field have been considered. We have seen that for magnetic fields about B>3 x 10{sup 17} G, for both cases with and without nucleon anomalous magnetic moments, the saturation density and saturation energy grow by increasing the magnetic field. It is indicated that the magnetic susceptibility of symmetric nuclear matter becomes negative showing the diamagnetic response especially at B<3 x 10{sup 17} G. We have found that for the nuclear matter, the magnitude of orbital magnetization reaches higher values comparing to the spin magnetization. Our results for the incompressibility show that at high enough magnetic fields, i.e. B>3 x 10{sup 17} G, the softening of the equation of state caused by Landau quantization is overwhelmed by stiffening due to the magnetization of nuclear matter. We have shown that the effects of strong magnetic field on nuclear matter may affect the constraints on the equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter obtained by applying the experimental observables. (orig.)

  4. Generation of strong magnetic field using 60 mm∅ superconducting bulk magnet and its application to magnetron sputtering device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Hazama, H.; Yokouchi, K.; Yoshikawa, M.; Itoh, Y.; Oka, T.; Ikuta, H.; Mizutani, U.

    2005-10-01

    To make a practical application of a superconducting bulk magnet (SBM), it is necessary that the SBM generates a strong and stable magnetic field in a working space and the magnet can be handled without any special care that would be needed because of the use of a superconductor. To satisfy these requirements, we have designed a portable and user-friendly magnet system consisting of a small air-cooled type refrigerator and a bulk superconductor. By using the stress-controlling magnetization technique, we could achieve a magnetic flux density of 8.0 T on the bulk surface and 6.5 T over the vacuum chamber surface of the refrigerator, when a 60 mm∅ Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductor reinforced with a 5 mm thick stainless steel ring was magnetized by field cooling in 8.5 T to 27 K. We have confirmed that the bulk magnet system coupled with a battery is quite portable and can be delivered to any location by using a car with an electric power outlet in the cabin. We have constructed a magnetron sputtering device that employs a bulk magnet system delivered from the place of magnetization by this method. This sputtering device exhibits several unique features such as deposition at a very low Ar gas pressure because the magnetic field is 20 times stronger than that obtained by a conventional device in the working space.

  5. Electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum induced by strong magnetic field: Numerical evidence in lattice gauge theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braguta, V.V. [IHEP, Protvino, Moscow region, 142284 (Russian Federation); ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya str. 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); Buividovich, P.V. [ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya str. 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); JINR, Joliot-Curie str. 6, Dubna, Moscow region, 141980 (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Chernodub, M.N., E-mail: maxim.chernodub@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [CNRS, Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique, Universite Francois-Rabelais Tours, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, Krijgslaan 281, S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Kotov, A.Yu.; Polikarpov, M.I. [ITEP, B. Cheremushkinskaya str. 25, Moscow, 117218 (Russian Federation); MIPT, Institutskii per. 9, Dolgoprudny, Moscow region, 141700 (Russian Federation)

    2012-12-05

    Using numerical simulations of quenched SU(2) gauge theory we demonstrate that an external magnetic field leads to spontaneous generation of quark condensates with quantum numbers of electrically charged {rho} mesons if the strength of the magnetic field exceeds the critical value eB{sub c}=0.927(77) GeV{sup 2} or B{sub c}=(1.56{+-}0.13) Dot-Operator 10{sup 16} Tesla. The condensation of the charged {rho} mesons in strong magnetic field is a key feature of the magnetic-field-induced electromagnetic superconductivity of the vacuum.

  6. Strong Gradients in Weak Magnetic Fields Induce DOLLOP Formation in Tap Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Sammer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2012 Coey proposed a theory on the mechanism of magnetic water treatment based on the gradient of the applied field rather than its absolute strength. We tested this theory by measuring the effect of very weak field magnets (≤ 10 G containing strong magnetic inhomogeneities (ΔB = 2 kG·m−1 on tap water samples by the use of electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS and laser scattering. Our results show an increased formation of nm-sized prenucleation clusters (dynamically ordered liquid like oxyanion polymers or “DOLLOPs” due to the exposure to the magnetic field and thus are consistent with Coey’s theory which is therefore also applicable to very weak magnetic fields as long as they contain strong gradients.

  7. STRONG SOLAR WIND DYNAMIC PRESSURE PULSES: INTERPLANETARY SOURCES AND THEIR IMPACTS ON GEOSYNCHRONOUS MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Pingbing; Feng, Xueshang; Wang, Yi [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Xie, Yanqiong [College of Meteorology and Oceanography, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing (China); Xu, Xiaojun, E-mail: pbzuo@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn [Space Science Institute, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macao (China)

    2015-10-20

    In this investigation, we first present a statistical result of the interplanetary sources of very strong solar wind dynamic pressure pulses (DPPs) detected by WIND during solar cycle 23. It is found that the vast majority of strong DPPs reside within solar wind disturbances. Although the variabilities of geosynchronous magnetic fields (GMFs) due to the impact of positive DPPs have been well established, there appears to be no systematic investigations on the response of GMFs to negative DPPs. Here, we study both the decompression effects of very strong negative DPPs and the compression from strong positive DPPs on GMFs at different magnetic local time sectors. In response to the decompression of strong negative DPPs, GMFs on the dayside near dawn and near dusk on the nightside, are generally depressed. But near the midnight region, the responses of GMF are very diverse, being either positive or negative. For part of the events when GOES is located at the midnight sector, the GMF is found to abnormally increase as the result of magnetospheric decompression caused by negative DPPs. It is known that under certain conditions magnetic depression of nightside GMFs can be caused by the impact of positive DPPs. Here, we find that a stronger pressure enhancement may have a higher probability of producing the exceptional depression of GMF at the midnight region. Statistically, both the decompression effect of strong negative DPPs and the compression effect of strong positive DPPs depend on the magnetic local time, which are stronger at the noon sector.

  8. In-medium covariant propagator of baryons under a strong magnetic field: Effect of the intrinsic magnetic moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, R.M.; Paoli, A.L. de [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, and IFLP, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    We obtain the covariant propagator at finite temperature for interacting baryons immersed in a strong magnetic field. The effect of the intrinsic magnetic moments on the Green function are fully taken into account. We make an expansion in terms of eigenfunctions of a Dirac field, which leads us to a compact form of its propagator. We present some simple applications of these propagators, where the statistical averages of nuclear currents and energy density are evaluated. (orig.)

  9. Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Tomishige, Masahiko; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masao; Shibata, Naho; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum was studied by using a superconducting magnet. Around a centre of a round vessel, random swimming at 0 T and aligned swimming parallel to the magnetic field (MF) of 8 T were observed. Near a wall of the vessel, however, swimming round and round along the wall at 0 T and aligned swimming of turning at right angles upon collision with the wall, which was remarkable around 1-4 T, were detected. It was experimentally revealed that the former MF-induced parallel swimming at the vessel centre was caused physicochemically by the parallel magnetic orientation of the cell itself. From magnetic field dependence of the extent of the orientation, the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (χ ∥-χ ⊥) was first obtained to be 3.4× 10-23 emu cell-1 at 298 K for Paramecium caudatum. The orientation of the cell was considered to result from the magnetic orientation of the cell membrane. On the other hand, although mechanisms of the latter swimming near the vessel wall regardless of the absence and presence of the magnetic field are unclear at present, these experimental results indicate that whether the cell exists near the wall alters the magnetic field effect on the swimming in the horizontal magnetic field.

  10. Viscosity of two-dimensional strongly coupled dusty plasma modified by a perpendicular magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yan; Lin, Wei; Murillo, M S

    2017-11-01

    Transport properties of two-dimensional (2D) strongly coupled dusty plasmas have been investigated in detail, but never for viscosity with a strong perpendicular magnetic field; here, we examine this scenario using Langevin dynamics simulations of 2D liquids with a binary Yukawa interparticle interaction. The shear viscosity η of 2D liquid dusty plasma is estimated from the simulation data using the Green-Kubo relation, which is the integration of the shear stress autocorrelation function. It is found that, when a perpendicular magnetic field is applied, the shear viscosity of 2D liquid dusty plasma is modified substantially. When the magnetic field is increased, its viscosity increases at low temperatures, while at high temperatures its viscosity diminishes. It is determined that these different variational trends of η arise from the different behaviors of the kinetic and potential parts of the shear stress under external magnetic fields.

  11. Kinetic simulation technique for plasma flow in strong external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, Frans H.; Sheehan, J. P.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Shebalin, John V.

    2017-12-01

    A technique for the kinetic simulation of plasma flow in strong external magnetic fields was developed which captures the compression and expansion of plasma bound to a magnetic flux tube as well as forces on magnetized particles within the flux tube. This quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) method resolves a single spatial dimension while modeling two-dimensional effects. The implementation of this method in a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code was verified with newly formulated test cases which include two-particle motion and particle dynamics in a magnetic mirror. Results from the Q1D method and fully two dimensional simulations were compared and error analyses performed verifying that the Q1D model reproduces the fully 2D results in the correct regimes. The Q1D method was found to be valid when the hybrid Larmor radius was less than 10% of the magnetic field scale length for magnetic field guided plasma expansions and less than 1% of the magnetic field scale length for a plasma in a converging-diverging magnetic field. The simple and general Q1D method can readily be incorporated in standard 1D PIC codes to capture multi-dimensional effects for plasma flow along magnetic fields in parameter spaces currently inaccessible by fully kinetic methods.

  12. Orbital effects of strong magnetic field on a two-dimensional Holstein polaron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Subhasree; Chakraborty, Monodeep; Taraphder, A.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the orbital effects of a strong external magnetic field on the ground-state properties of a two-dimensional (2D) Holstein polaron, employing variational approaches based on exact diagonalization. From the ground-state energy and the wave function, we calculate the electron-phonon correlation function, the average phonon number, and the Drude weight and investigate the evolution of a 2D Holstein polaron as a function of the magnetic flux. Although the external magnetic field affects the polaron throughout the parameter regime, we show that the magnetic field has a stronger effect on a loosely bound (spatially extended) polaron. We also find that the magnetic field can be used as a tuning parameter, particularly for a weakly coupled polaron, to reduce the spatial extent of a large polaron.

  13. Off-specular polarized neutron reflectometry study of magnetic dots with a strong shape anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Temst, K; Moshchalkov, V V; Bruynseraede, Y; Fritzsche, H; Jonckheere, R

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the off-specular polarized neutron reflectivity of a regular array of rectangular magnetic polycrystalline Co dots, which were prepared by a combination of electron-beam lithography, molecular beam deposition, and lift-off processes. The dots have a length-to-width ratio of 4:1 imposing a strong shape anisotropy. The intensity of the off-specular satellite reflection was monitored as a function of the magnetic field applied parallel to the rows of dots and in the plane of the sample, allowing us to analyze the magnetization-reversal process using the four spin-polarized cross sections. (orig.)

  14. Electromagnetic superconductivity of vacuum induced by strong magnetic field: numerical evidence in lattice gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    Braguta, V V; Chernodub, M N; Polikarpov, M I

    2011-01-01

    Using numerical simulations of SU(2) lattice gauge theory we demonstrate from first principles that an external magnetic field leads to spontaneous generation of quark condensates with quantum numbers of electrically charged rho mesons if the strength of the magnetic field exceeds the critical value eB_c = 0.927(77) GeV^2 or B_c =(1.56 \\pm 0.13) 10^{16} Tesla. The condensation of the charged $\\rho$ mesons in strong magnetic field is a key feature of the recently proposed electromagnetic superconductivity of the vacuum.

  15. Statistical Study of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections with Strong Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Matthew E.

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) with strong magnetic fields (B ) are typically associated with significant Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events, high solar wind speed and solar flare events. Successful prediction of the arrival time of a CME at Earth is required to maximize the time available for satellite, infrastructure, and space travel programs to take protective action against the coming flux of high-energy particles. It is known that the magnetic field strength of a CME is linked to the strength of a geomagnetic storm on Earth. Unfortunately, the correlations between strong magnetic field CMEs from the entire sun (especially from the far side or non-Earth facing side of the sun) to SEP and flare events, solar source regions and other relevant solar variables are not well known. New correlation studies using an artificial intelligence engine (Eureqa) were performed to study CME events with magnetic field strength readings over 30 nanoteslas (nT) from January 2010 to October 17, 2014. This thesis presents the results of this study, validates Eureqa to obtain previously published results, and presents previously unknown functional relationships between solar source magnetic field data, CME initial speed and the CME magnetic field. These new results enable the development of more accurate CME magnetic field predictions and should help scientists develop better forecasts thereby helping to prevent damage to humanity's space and Earth assets.

  16. Strong static magnetic fields elicit swimming behaviors consistent with direct vestibular stimulation in adult zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan K Ward

    Full Text Available Zebrafish (Danio rerio offer advantages as model animals for studies of inner ear development, genetics and ototoxicity. However, traditional assessment of vestibular function in this species using the vestibulo-ocular reflex requires agar-immobilization of individual fish and specialized video, which are difficult and labor-intensive. We report that using a static magnetic field to directly stimulate the zebrafish labyrinth results in an efficient, quantitative behavioral assay in free-swimming fish. We recently observed that humans have sustained nystagmus in high strength magnetic fields, and we attributed this observation to magnetohydrodynamic forces acting on the labyrinths. Here, fish were individually introduced into the center of a vertical 11.7T magnetic field bore for 2-minute intervals, and their movements were tracked. To assess for heading preference relative to a magnetic field, fish were also placed in a horizontally oriented 4.7T magnet in infrared (IR light. A sub-population was tested again in the magnet after gentamicin bath to ablate lateral line hair cell function. Free-swimming adult zebrafish exhibited markedly altered swimming behavior while in strong static magnetic fields, independent of vision or lateral line function. Two-thirds of fish showed increased swimming velocity or consistent looping/rolling behavior throughout exposure to a strong, vertically oriented magnetic field. Fish also demonstrated altered swimming behavior in a strong horizontally oriented field, demonstrating in most cases preferred swimming direction with respect to the field. These findings could be adapted for 'high-throughput' investigations of the effects of environmental manipulations as well as for changes that occur during development on vestibular function in zebrafish.

  17. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  18. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otabe, E S; Kuroki, S; Nikawa, J [Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, 680-4 Kawazu Iizuka Fukuoka 820-8502 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y [Fukuoka University, 8-19-1 Nanakuma, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka 814-0180 (Japan); Ooba, T [Fukuoka Industrial Technology Center, 1465-5 Aikawa-machi, Kurume, Fukuoka 839-0861 (Japan); Kiso, K [Fukuoka Regional Taxation Bureau, 2-11-1 Hakataekihigashi, Hakata-ku Fukuoka, 812-8547 (Japan); Hayashi, H [Kyushu Power Electric, 2-1-47 Shiobaru Minami-ku Fukuoka 815-8520 (Japan)], E-mail: otabe@cse.kyutech.ac.jp

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 {+-}0.2 x 10{sup 6}/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, {rho}, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by {rho} = {rho}o exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  19. Numerical simulation on magnetic assembled structures of iron-based metallic particles within MMCs by a homogeneous strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunwei; Sun, Zhi; Zheng, Lichun; Huang, Shuigen; Blanpain, Bart; Guo, Muxing

    2015-09-01

    Particle-reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) have excellent physicochemical properties as structural materials. The morphology and distribution control of reinforcement particles during the fabrication of MMCs are difficult-but-critical-to-achieve required properties of the materials. This research demonstrates a possibility to quantitatively control the distribution of particles in the metal matrix by applying a magnetic field. A 2D numerical model is developed and applied to evaluate the behaviour of Fe-based metallic particles in aluminum MMCs. By combination of 2D simulation with intersectional directions, this model also provides some hints for 3D practice. The assembled structure is found to be governed by the external magnetic field orientation, magnetic flux density and magnetic susceptibility of the particles. Both behaviours of particle agglomeration and dispersion are quantitatively characterized in different conditions. By using a strong magnetic field, it is found that assembled structures of weakly magnetic particles can be effectively manipulated. Therefore, it can be expected to fabricate particle-enhanced metal matrix composites/ceramics/glass with substantial improvements in physical and chemical properties by using a magnetic field.

  20. Study of rare earth local moment magnetism and strongly correlated phenomena in various crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Tai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    Benefiting from unique properties of 4f electrons, rare earth based compounds are known for offering a versatile playground for condensed matter physics research as well as industrial applications. This thesis focuses on three specific examples that further explore the rare earth local moment magnetism and strongly correlated phenomena in various crystal structures.

  1. Quantum magnetism in strongly interacting one-dimensional spinor Bose systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salami Dehkharghani, Amin; Volosniev, A. G.; Lindgren, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    -range inter-species interactions much larger than their intra-species interactions and show that they have novel energetic and magnetic properties. In the strongly interacting regime, these systems have energies that are fractions of the basic harmonic oscillator trap quantum and have spatially separated...

  2. Consequence of total lepton number violation in strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, V.B. [Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Ricci, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Šimkovic, F. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina F1, SK-842 15, Bratislava (Slovakia); Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Adam, J.; Tater, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics ASCR, CZ-250 68 Řež (Czech Republic); Truhlík, E., E-mail: truhlik@ujf.cas.cz [Institute of Nuclear Physics ASCR, CZ-250 68 Řež (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-15

    The influence of a neutrinoless electron to positron conversion on a cooling of strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs is studied. It is shown that they can be good candidates for soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars.

  3. Spin polarization in high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsue, Yasuhiko; Da Providência, João; Providência, Constança

    2016-01-01

    In high density quark matter under a strong external magnetic field, possible phases are investigated by using the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model with tensor-type four-point interaction between quarks, as well as the axial-vector-type four-point interaction. In the tensor......-type interaction under the strong external magnetic field, it is shown that a quark spin polarized phase is realized in all regions of the quark chemical potential under consideration within the lowest Landau level approximation. In the axial-vector-type interaction, it is also shown that the quark spin polarized...... phase appears in the wide range of the quark chemical potential. In both the interactions, the quark mass in zero and small chemical potential regions increases which indicates that the chiral symmetry breaking is enhanced, namely the magnetic catalysis occurs....

  4. First Detection of a Strong Magnetic Field on a Bursty Brown Dwarf: Puzzle Solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyugina, S. V.; Harrington, D. M.; Kuzmychov, O.; Kuhn, J. R.; Hallinan, G.; Kowalski, A. F.; Hawley, S. L.

    2017-09-01

    We report the first direct detection of a strong, 5 kG magnetic field on the surface of an active brown dwarf. LSR J1835+3259 is an M8.5 dwarf exhibiting transient radio and optical emission bursts modulated by fast rotation. We have detected the surface magnetic field as circularly polarized signatures in the 819 nm sodium lines when an active emission region faced the Earth. Modeling Stokes profiles of these lines reveals the effective temperature of 2800 K and log gravity acceleration of 4.5. These parameters place LSR J1835+3259 on evolutionary tracks as a young brown dwarf with the mass of 55+/- 4{M}{{J}} and age of 22 ± 4 Myr. Its magnetic field is at least 5.1 kG and covers at least 11% of the visible hemisphere. The active region topology recovered using line profile inversions comprises hot plasma loops with a vertical stratification of optical and radio emission sources. These loops rotate with the dwarf in and out of view causing periodic emission bursts. The magnetic field is detected at the base of the loops. This is the first time that we can quantitatively associate brown dwarf non-thermal bursts with a strong, 5 kG surface magnetic field and solve the puzzle of their driving mechanism. This is also the coolest known dwarf with such a strong surface magnetic field. The young age of LSR J1835+3259 implies that it may still maintain a disk, which may facilitate bursts via magnetospheric accretion, like in higher-mass T Tau-type stars. Our results pave a path toward magnetic studies of brown dwarfs and hot Jupiters.

  5. Theory of strong intrinsic mixing of particle suspensions in vortex magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James E

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that a type of triaxial magnetic field we call a vortex field can induce strong mixing in a magnetic particle suspension. A vortex triaxial field consists of a rotating magnetic field in a horizontal plane, with a dc field applied normal to this. The mixing torque is found to be independent of the field frequency and fluid viscosity over a broad range; scales as the square of the applied field; and is strongest for a balanced triaxial field-one in which the root-mean-square amplitudes of the three field components are equal. In this paper we show that these anomalous effects are consistent with the formation of volatile particle chains that have a precessionlike motion. Theoretical results are given for both particle chains and magnetic rods for arbitrary vortex field angles. A key conclusion is that the mixing torque is independent of particle size, making this mixing technique scale adaptive, and thus suitable for microfluidics applications.

  6. Thermal convection in a horizontal duct with strong axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-11-01

    The work is motivated by design of liquid metal blankets of nuclear fusion reactors. The effect of convection on the flow within a toroidally oriented duct is analyzed. Non-uniform strong heating arising from capture of high-speed neutrons is imposed internally, while the walls are assumed to be isothermal. Very strong heating (the Grashof number up to 1011) and strong magnetic field (the Hartmann number up to 104) corresponding to the realistic fusion reactor conditions are considered. Stability of two-dimensional flow states is analyzed using numerical simulations. The unstable modes at high Hartmann and Grashof number are found to have large wavelengths. The integral properties of developed three-dimensional flows are close to those of two-dimensional flows at the typical parameters of a fusion reactor. We also consider the effect of the weak transverse component of the magnetic field on the flow. Financial support was provided by the US NSF (Grant CBET 1232851).

  7. ON MULTIPLE RECONNECTION X-LINES AND TRIPOLAR PERTURBATIONS OF STRONG GUIDE MAGNETIC FIELDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, S.; Gosling, J. T. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Lapenta, G. [Center for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, University of Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Phan, T. D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lavraud, B. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planétologie, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Khotyaintsev, Yu. V. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden); Carr, C. M. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Markidis, S., E-mail: eriksson@lasp.colorado.edu [High Performance Computing and Visualization Department, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-05-20

    We report new multi-spacecraft Cluster observations of tripolar guide magnetic field perturbations at a solar wind reconnection exhaust in the presence of a guide field B{sub M} {sub  }which is almost four times as strong as the reversing field B{sub L}. The novel tripolar field consists of two narrow regions of depressed B{sub M}, with an observed 7%–14% ΔB{sub M} magnitude relative to the external field, which are found adjacent to a wide region of enhanced B{sub M} within the exhaust. A stronger reversing field is associated with each B{sub M} depression. A kinetic reconnection simulation for realistic solar wind conditions and the observed strong guide field reveals that tripolar magnetic fields preferentially form across current sheets in the presence of multiple X-lines as magnetic islands approach one another and merge into fewer and larger islands. The simulated ΔB{sub M}/ΔX{sub N} over the normal width ΔX{sub N} between a B{sub M} minimum and the edge of the external region agree with the normalized values observed by Cluster. We propose that a tripolar guide field perturbation may be used to identify candidate regions containing multiple X-lines and interacting magnetic islands at individual solar wind current sheets with a strong guide field.

  8. Experimental study of transport of relativistic electron beams in strong magnetic mirror field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Shohei; Kondo, Kotaro; Bailly-Grandvaux, Mathiu; Bellei, Claudio; Santos, Joao; Firex Project Team

    2015-11-01

    Relativistic electron beams REB produced by ultra high intense laser pulses have generally a large divergence angle that results in degradation of energy coupling between the REB and a fuel core in the fast ignition scheme. Guiding and focusing of the REB by a strong external magnetic field was proposed to achieve high efficiency. We investigated REB transport through 50 μm or 250 μm thick plastic foils CuI doped under external magnetic fields, in magnetic mirror configurations of 1.2 or 4 mirror ratio. The experiment was carried out at the GEKKO XII and LFEX laser facility. Spatial pattern of the REB was measured by coherent transition radiation and/or Cu Ka x ray emission from the rear surface of the foil targets. Strong collimation of the REB by the external magnetic field was observed with 50 μm thick plastic targets, while the REB scattered in 250 μm thick targets. The experimental results are compared with computer simulations to understand the physical mechanisms of the REB transport in the external magnetic field. This work is supported by NIFS (Japan), MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI (Japan), JSPS Fellowship (Japan), ANR (France) and COST (Europe).

  9. Magnetic anisotropy and anisotropic magnetoresistance in strongly phase separated manganite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandpal, Lalit M.; Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Pawan; Siwach, P. K.; Gupta, Anurag; Awana, V. P. S.; Singh, H. K.

    2016-06-01

    The present study reports the impact of magnetic anisotropy (MA) on magnetotransport properties such as the magnetic transitions, magnetic liquid behavior, glass transition and anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in epitaxial film (thickness 42 nm) of strongly phase separated manganite La5/8-yPryCa3/8MnO3 (y≈0.4). Angle dependent magnetization measurement confirms the out-of-plane magnetic anisotropy with the magnetic easy axes aligned in the plane of the film and the magnetic hard axis along the normal to the film plane. The more prominent divergence between the zero filed cooled (ZFC) and field cooled warming (FCW) and the stronger hysteresis between the field cooled cooling (FCC) and FCW magnetization for H ∥ shows the weakening of the magnetic liquid along the magnetic hard axis. The peak at Tp≈42 K in FCW magnetization, which characterizes the onset of spin freezing shifts down to Tp≈18 K as the field direction is switched from the easy axes (H ∥) to the hard axis (H ⊥). The glass transition, which appears at Tg≈28 K for H ∥ disappears for H ⊥. The easy axis magnetization (M∣∣) appears to saturate around H~20 kOe, but the hard axis counterpart (M⊥) does not show such tendency even up to H=50 kOe. MA appears well above the ferromagnetic (FM) transition at T≈170 K, which is nearly the same as the Neel temperature (TN) of M⊥ - T . The temperature dependent resistivity measured at H=10 kOe applied along the easy axis (ρ|| - T) and the hard axis (ρ⊥ - T) shows insulator metal transition (IMT) at ≈106 K and ≈99 K in the cooling cycle, respectively. The large difference between ρ⊥ - T and ρ|| - T during the cooling cycle and in the vicinity of IMT results in huge AMR of ≈-142% and -115%. The observed properties have been explained in terms of the MA induced variation in the relative fraction of the coexisting magnetic phases.

  10. Exchange interaction of strongly anisotropic tripodal erbium single-ion magnets with metallic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreiser, Jan; Wäckerlin, Christian; Ali, Md. Ehesan

    2014-01-01

    on a Ni thin film on Cu(100) single-crystalline surfaces. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements performed on Au(111) samples covered with molecular monolayers held at temperatures down to 4 K suggest that the easy axes of the strongly anisotropic molecules are randomly oriented......We present a comprehensive study of Er(trensal) single-ion magnets deposited in ultrahigh vacuum onto metallic surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the molecular structure is preserved after sublimation, and that the molecules are physisorbed on Au(111) while they are chemisorbed....... Furthermore XMCD indicates a weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling between the single-ion magnets and the ferromagnetic Ni/Cu(100) substrate. For the latter case, spin-Hamiltonian fits to the XMCD M(H) suggest a significant structural distortion of the molecules. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals...

  11. Thermal conductivity of magnetic insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamokostas, Georgios; Lapas, Panteleimon; Fiete, Gregory A.

    We study the influence of spin-orbit coupling on the thermal conductivity of various types of magnetic insulators. In the absence of spin-orbit coupling and orbital-degeneracy, the strong-coupling limit of Hubbard interactions at half filling can often be adequately described in terms of a pure spin Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form. However, in the presence of spin-orbit coupling the resulting exchange interaction can become highly anisotropic. The effect of the atomic spin-orbit coupling, taken into account through the effect of magnon-phonon interactions and the magnetic order and excitations, on the lattice thermal conductivity of various insulating magnetic systems is studied. We focus on the regime of low temperatures where the dominant source of scattering is two-magnon scattering to one-phonon processes. The thermal current is calculated within the Boltzmann transport theory. We are grateful for financial support from NSF Grant DMR-0955778.

  12. Transport through a strongly coupled graphene quantum dot in perpendicular magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Güttinger Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present transport measurements on a strongly coupled graphene quantum dot in a perpendicular magnetic field. The device consists of an etched single-layer graphene flake with two narrow constrictions separating a 140 nm diameter island from source and drain graphene contacts. Lateral graphene gates are used to electrostatically tune the device. Measurements of Coulomb resonances, including constriction resonances and Coulomb diamonds prove the functionality of the graphene quantum dot with a charging energy of approximately 4.5 meV. We show the evolution of Coulomb resonances as a function of perpendicular magnetic field, which provides indications of the formation of the graphene specific 0th Landau level. Finally, we demonstrate that the complex pattern superimposing the quantum dot energy spectra is due to the formation of additional localized states with increasing magnetic field.

  13. Drag force in strongly coupled { N }=4 supersymmetric Yang–Mills plasma in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-qiang; Ma, Ke; Hou, De-fu

    2018-02-01

    Applying AdS/CFT correspondence, we study the effect of a constant magnetic field { B } on the drag force associated with a heavy quark moving through a strongly-coupled { N }=4 supersymmetric Yang–Mills plasma. The quark is considered moving transverse and parallel to { B }. It is shown that for transverse case, the drag force is linearly dependent on { B } in all regions, while for parallel case, the drag force increases monotonously with increasing { B } and also reveals a linear behavior in the regions of strong { B }. In addition, we find that { B } has a more important effect in the transverse case than for the parallel.

  14. Adolf Remane (1898-1976) and his views on systematics, homology and the Modern Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachos, Frank E; Hossfeld, Uwe

    2006-03-01

    Adolf Remane was primarily a morphologist and systematist. In 1952, he published an influential book on the foundations of systematics and phylogenetics in which he advocated homology as the central concept of morphology and the basis of the natural system and discussed criteria serving to discriminate homology from homoplasy in great detail. During the decades when the Modern Synthesis of evolution was created, he repeatedly commented on and criticised the synthetic theory of evolution, which he never fully accepted. Remane disapproved of idealistic morphology and was strongly opposed to Lamarckian, saltationist and orthogenetic theories of evolution. Yet, while appreciating the synthetic theory's validity in the realm of speciation and microevolution, he rejected the claim that the current genetic knowledge was sufficient to explain complex morphological transformations on the basis of random mutations and selection. Instead, he seems to have favoured mutation pressure as the most important factor in macroevolution. Nevertheless, the sometimes vicious disputes between Remane and the adherents of the Modern Synthesis may at least partly have been brought about by personal factors rather than by scientific differences.

  15. Neutrino production of electron-positron pairs in a moderately strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A. V.; Rumyantsev, D. A.; Savin, V. N.

    2017-11-01

    Neutrino production of electron-positron pairs via the processes v\\bar v → e - e + and ν → νe - e + in a moderately strong magnetic field is investigated. Under these conditions electrons and positrons can be produced in the states corresponding to excited Landau levels. The results can be used for calculating the efficiency of the electron-positron plasma production by neutrinos in the conditions of the accretion disk around a Kerr black hole.

  16. Unexpected strong magnetism of Cu doped single-layer MoS₂ and its origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Won Seok; Lee, J D

    2014-05-21

    The magnetism of the 3d transition-metal (TM) doped single-layer (1L) MoS2, where the Mo atom is partially replaced by the 3d TM atom, is investigated using the first-principles density functional calculations. In a series of 3d TM doped 1L-MoS2's, the induced spin polarizations are negligible for Sc, Ti, and Cr dopings, while the induced spin polarizations are confirmed for V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn dopings and the systems become magnetic. Especially, the Cu doped system shows unexpectedly strong magnetism although Cu is nonmagnetic in its bulk state. The driving force is found to be a strong hybridization between Cu 3d states and 3p states of neighboring S, which results in an extreme unbalanced spin-population in the spin-split impurity bands near the Fermi level. Finally, we also discuss further issues of the Cu induced magnetism of 1L-MoS2 such as investigation of additional charge states, the Cu doping at the S site instead of the Mo site, and the Cu adatom on the layer (i.e., 1L-MoS2).

  17. Anomaly disturbances of the magnetic fields before the strong earthquake in Japan on March 11, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Hayakawa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    One of the strongest earthquakes, with magnitude M 8.9, occurred at the sea bottom near to the east coast of Japan on March 11, 2011. This study is devoted to the investigation of anomaly disturbances in the main magnetic field of the Earth and in ultra-low frequency magnetic variations (F <10 Hz observed before this earthquake. Secular variations of the main geomagnetic field were investigated using three-component 1-h data from three magnetic observatories over the 11-year period of January 1, 2000, to January 31, 2011. The Esashi and Mizusawa magnetic stations are situated northwest of the earthquake epicenter, at distances of around 170 km to 200 km, and the Kakioka observatory is situated southwest of the earthquake epicenter, at a distance of about 300 km. During this period, there were four local anomalies in the secular variations. The last anomaly was the biggest, which began around 3 years prior to the earthquake moment. All of the anomalies can be most distinctly recognized, in the form of differences in the corresponding magnetic components at these remote magnetic stations. For investigations of the ultra-low frequency magnetic field disturbances, three-component 1-s data at two magnetic stations (Kakioka and Uchiura were used. The Uchiura station is situated 119 km south of Kakioka, at a distance of about 420 km from the earthquake epicenter. Data from the time interval of February 18, 2011 to March 10, 2011 (only at night-time: 01:00 to 04:00 local time were investigated in a wide frequency range. In the frequency range of 0.033 Hz to 0.01 Hz, there was the clearest anomaly, seen as a decrease in the correlation coefficients of the corresponding magnetic components at these two stations, from February 22, 2011. Differences in the Z components showed an increase, and became positive after this date. This might suggest that the ultra-low frequency lithospheric source appeared north of the Kakioka station. Outside this specified

  18. A strong magnetic field around the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eatough, R P; Falcke, H; Karuppusamy, R; Lee, K J; Champion, D J; Keane, E F; Desvignes, G; Schnitzeler, D H F M; Spitler, L G; Kramer, M; Klein, B; Bassa, C; Bower, G C; Brunthaler, A; Cognard, I; Deller, A T; Demorest, P B; Freire, P C C; Kraus, A; Lyne, A G; Noutsos, A; Stappers, B; Wex, N

    2013-09-19

    Earth's nearest candidate supermassive black hole lies at the centre of the Milky Way. Its electromagnetic emission is thought to be powered by radiatively inefficient accretion of gas from its environment, which is a standard mode of energy supply for most galactic nuclei. X-ray measurements have already resolved a tenuous hot gas component from which the black hole can be fed. The magnetization of the gas, however, which is a crucial parameter determining the structure of the accretion flow, remains unknown. Strong magnetic fields can influence the dynamics of accretion, remove angular momentum from the infalling gas, expel matter through relativistic jets and lead to synchrotron emission such as that previously observed. Here we report multi-frequency radio measurements of a newly discovered pulsar close to the Galactic Centre and show that the pulsar's unusually large Faraday rotation (the rotation of the plane of polarization of the emission in the presence of an external magnetic field) indicates that there is a dynamically important magnetic field near the black hole. If this field is accreted down to the event horizon it provides enough magnetic flux to explain the observed emission--from radio to X-ray wavelengths--from the black hole.

  19. Dynamics of liquid metal droplets and jets influenced by a strong axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, D.; Karcher, Ch

    2017-07-01

    Non-contact electromagnetic control and shaping of liquid metal free surfaces is crucial in a number of high-temperature metallurgical processes like levitation melting and electromagnetic sealing, among others. Other examples are the electromagnetic bending or stabilization of liquid metal jets that frequently occur in casting or fusion applications. Within this context, we experimentally study the influence of strong axial magnetic fields on the dynamics of falling metal droplets and liquid metal jets. GaInSn in eutectic composition is used as test melt being liquid at room temperature. In the experiments, we use a cryogen-free superconducting magnet (CFM) providing steady homogeneous fields of up to 5 T and allowing a tilt angle between the falling melt and the magnet axis. We vary the magnetic flux density, the tilt angle, the liquid metal flow rate, and the diameter and material of the nozzle (electrically conducting/insulating). Hence, the experiments cover a parameter range of Hartmann numbers Ha, Reynolds numbers Re, and Weber numbers We within 0 magnetic field, droplet rotation ceases and the droplets are stretched in the field direction. Moreover, we observe that the jet breakup into droplets (spheroidization) is suppressed, and in the case of electrically conducting nozzles and tilt, the jets are bent towards the field axis.

  20. A strong magnetic field around the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eatough, R. P.; Falcke, H.; Karuppusamy, R.; Lee, K. J.; Champion, D. J.; Keane, E. F.; Desvignes, G.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Spitler, L. G.; Kramer, M.; Klein, B.; Bassa, C.; Bower, G. C.; Brunthaler, A.; Cognard, I.; Deller, A. T.; Demorest, P. B.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kraus, A.; Lyne, A. G.; Noutsos, A.; Stappers, B.; Wex, N.

    2013-09-01

    Earth's nearest candidate supermassive black hole lies at the centre of the Milky Way. Its electromagnetic emission is thought to be powered by radiatively inefficient accretion of gas from its environment, which is a standard mode of energy supply for most galactic nuclei. X-ray measurements have already resolved a tenuous hot gas component from which the black hole can be fed. The magnetization of the gas, however, which is a crucial parameter determining the structure of the accretion flow, remains unknown. Strong magnetic fields can influence the dynamics of accretion, remove angular momentum from the infalling gas, expel matter through relativistic jets and lead to synchrotron emission such as that previously observed. Here we report multi-frequency radio measurements of a newly discovered pulsar close to the Galactic Centre and show that the pulsar's unusually large Faraday rotation (the rotation of the plane of polarization of the emission in the presence of an external magnetic field) indicates that there is a dynamically important magnetic field near the black hole. If this field is accreted down to the event horizon it provides enough magnetic flux to explain the observed emission--from radio to X-ray wavelengths--from the black hole.

  1. Discovery of a Strong Spiral Magnetic Field Crossing the Inner Pseudoring of NGC 4736

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyży, Krzysztof T.; Buta, Ronald J.

    2008-04-01

    We report the discovery of a coherent magnetic spiral structure within the nearby ringed Sab galaxy NGC 4736. High-sensitivity radio polarimetric data obtained with the VLA at 8.46 and 4.86 GHz show a distinct ring of total radio emission precisely corresponding to the bright inner pseudoring visible in other wavelengths. However, unlike the total radio emission, the polarized radio emission reveals a clear pattern of ordered magnetic field of spiral shape, emerging from the galactic center. The magnetic vectors do not follow the tightly wrapped spiral arms that characterize the inner pseudoring, but instead cross the ring with a constant and large pitch angle of about 35°. The ordered field is thus not locally adjusted to the pattern of star formation activity, unlike what is usually observed in grand-design spirals. The observed asymmetric distribution of Faraday rotation suggests the possible action of a large-scale MHD dynamo. The strong magnetic total and regular field within the ring (up to 30 and 13 μG, respectively) indicates that a highly efficient process of magnetic field amplification is under way, probably related to secular evolutionary processes in the galaxy.

  2. Can a Hexapole magnet of an ECR Ion Source be too strong?

    CERN Document Server

    Drentje, A G; Kremers, H R; Meyer, D; Mulder, J; Sijbring, J

    1999-01-01

    Experience of many ECRIS designers and users during more than a decade has given a few experimental rules, or "scaling laws". Many of these have been discussed at the ECRIS workshops. After the 1993 workshop it was concluded that the properties of the magnetic trap, in particular the strength of the radial component, determine to a great deal the confinement characteristics. For that reason it was decided at the KVI to choose a very strong magnet for the new 14 GHz ECRIS4 to be used in the Atomic Physics experiments. The hexapole magnet designed by the Giessen group is a good example. The induction, measured 2.5 mm inside the pole tips (i.e. at the wall of the plasma chamber) amounts more than 1.2 T. The measured radial field component Br obeys closely the expression Br= 0.00136 r2. (with B in T, r in mm). The quality of the magnetic trap can be given by the "radial mirror ratio", which is usually defined as R = Bmax / Breson, with Breson equal 0.5 T for a 14 GHz ECRIS. For the KVI magnet this would give R= 2...

  3. Comptonization in Ultra-Strong Magnetic Fields: Numerical Solution to the Radiative Transfer Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccobello, C.; Farinelli, R.; Titarchuk, L.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the radiative transfer problem in a plane-parallel slab of thermal electrons in the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field (B approximately greater than B(sub c) approx. = 4.4 x 10(exp 13) G). Under these conditions, the magnetic field behaves like a birefringent medium for the propagating photons, and the electromagnetic radiation is split into two polarization modes, ordinary and extraordinary, that have different cross-sections. When the optical depth of the slab is large, the ordinary-mode photons are strongly Comptonized and the photon field is dominated by an isotropic component. Aims. The radiative transfer problem in strong magnetic fields presents many mathematical issues and analytical or numerical solutions can be obtained only under some given approximations. We investigate this problem both from the analytical and numerical point of view, provide a test of the previous analytical estimates, and extend these results with numerical techniques. Methods. We consider here the case of low temperature black-body photons propagating in a sub-relativistic temperature plasma, which allows us to deal with a semi-Fokker-Planck approximation of the radiative transfer equation. The problem can then be treated with the variable separation method, and we use a numerical technique to find solutions to the eigenvalue problem in the case of a singular kernel of the space operator. The singularity of the space kernel is the result of the strong angular dependence of the electron cross-section in the presence of a strong magnetic field. Results. We provide the numerical solution obtained for eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the space operator, and the emerging Comptonization spectrum of the ordinary-mode photons for any eigenvalue of the space equation and for energies significantly lesser than the cyclotron energy, which is on the order of MeV for the intensity of the magnetic field here considered. Conclusions. We derived the specific intensity of the

  4. Advanced UXO Discrimination using Magnetometry: Understanding Remanent Magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    of metals and metal- lography, 104(5):469(9), 2007. [12] Richard P. Feynman , Robert B. Leighton, and Matthew Sands. The Feynman Lectures on Physics...of low carbon steel, 730˚ Centigrade (C) ( Richards , 2004; Jubaraj Sahu, personal communication, May 11, 2006). However unexploded ordnance...Institute of Technology, 94p. Richards , Austin, 2004, Applications for High-Speed Infrared Imaging: SPIE International Congress on High-speed and

  5. Electron cyclotron maser instability (ECMI in strong magnetic guide field reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ECMI model of electromagnetic radiation from electron holes is shown to be applicable to spontaneous magnetic reconnection. We apply it to reconnection in strong current-aligned magnetic guide fields. Such guide fields participate only passively in reconnection, which occurs in the antiparallel components to both sides of the guide-field-aligned current sheets with current carried by kinetic Alfvén waves. Reconnection generates long (the order of hundreds of electron inertial scales electron exhaust regions at the reconnection site X point, which are extended perpendicular to the current and the guide fields. Exhausts contain a strongly density-depleted hot electron component and have properties similar to electron holes. Exhaust electron momentum space distributions are highly deformed, exhibiting steep gradients transverse to both the reconnecting and guide fields. Such properties suggest application of the ECMI mechanism with the fundamental ECMI X-mode emission beneath the nonrelativistic guide field cyclotron frequency in localized source regions. An outline of the mechanism and its prospects is given. Potential applications are the kilometric radiation (AKR in auroral physics, solar radio emissions during flares, planetary emissions and astrophysical scenarios (radiation from stars and compact objects involving the presence of strong magnetic fields and field-aligned currents. Drift of the exhausts along the guide field maps the local field and plasma properties. Escape of radiation from the exhaust and radiation source region still poses a problem. The mechanism can be studied in 2-D particle simulations of strong guide field reconnection which favours 2-D, mapping the deformation of the electron distribution perpendicular to the guide field, and using it in the numerical calculation of the ECMI growth rate. The mechanism suggests also that reconnection in general may become a source of the ECMI with or without guide fields. This is

  6. Brighter branes, enhancement of photon production by strong magnetic fields in the gauge/gravity correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arciniega, Gustavo; Nettel, Francisco; Ortega, Patricia; Patiño, Leonardo [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México,A.P. 50-542, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2014-04-30

    We use the gauge/gravity correspondence to calculate the rate of photon production in a strongly coupled N=4 plasma in the presence of an intense magnetic field. We start by constructing a family of back reacted geometries that include the black D3-brane solution, as a smooth limiting case for B=0, and extends to backgrounds with an arbitrarily large constant magnetic field. This family provides the gravitational dual of a field theory in the presence of a very strong magnetic field which intensity can be fixed as desired and allows us to study its effect on the photon production of a quark-gluon plasma. The inclusion of perturbations in the electromagnetic field on these backgrounds is consistent only if the metric is perturbed as well, so we use methods developed to treat operator mixing to manage these general perturbations. Our results show a clear enhancement of photon production with a significant anisotropy, which, in qualitative agreement with the experiments of heavy ion collisions, is particularly noticeable for low P.

  7. Active galaxies. A strong magnetic field in the jet base of a supermassive black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Vidal, Ivan; Muller, Sébastien; Vlemmings, Wouter; Horellou, Cathy; Aalto, Susanne

    2015-04-17

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) host some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. AGN are thought to be powered by accretion of matter onto a rotating disk that surrounds a supermassive black hole. Jet streams can be boosted in energy near the event horizon of the black hole and then flow outward along the rotation axis of the disk. The mechanism that forms such a jet and guides it over scales from a few light-days up to millions of light-years remains uncertain, but magnetic fields are thought to play a critical role. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), we have detected a polarization signal (Faraday rotation) related to the strong magnetic field at the jet base of a distant AGN, PKS 1830-211. The amount of Faraday rotation (rotation measure) is proportional to the integral of the magnetic field strength along the line of sight times the density of electrons. The high rotation measures derived suggest magnetic fields of at least tens of Gauss (and possibly considerably higher) on scales of the order of light-days (0.01 parsec) from the black hole. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Nuclear-spin-induced cotton-mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Li-Juan; Vaara, Juha

    2014-08-04

    Novel, high-sensitivity and high-resolution spectroscopic methods can provide site-specific nuclear information by exploiting nuclear magneto-optic properties. We present a first-principles electronic structure formulation of the recently proposed nuclear-spin-induced Cotton-Mouton effect in a strong external magnetic field (NSCM-B). In NSCM-B, ellipticity is induced in a linearly polarized light beam, which can be attributed to both the dependence of the symmetric dynamic polarizability on the external magnetic field and the nuclear magnetic moment, as well as the temperature-dependent partial alignment of the molecules due to the magnetic fields. Quantum-chemical calculations of NSCM-B were conducted for a series of molecular liquids. The overall order of magnitude of the induced ellipticities is predicted to be 10(-11) -10(-6) rad T(-1)  M(-1)  cm(-1) for fully spin-polarized nuclei. In particular, liquid-state heavy-atom systems should be promising for experiments in the Voigt setup. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Mixed convection in liquid metal flow in a horizontal duct with strong axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    The work is motivated by design of self-cooled liquid-metal breeder blankets for Tokamak fusion reactors. Thermal convection caused by non-uniform internal heating in a liquid metal flow in a horizontal duct with strong axial magnetic field is analyzed numerically. Axial magnetic field is considered strong enough (the Hartmann number up to 104 corresponding to typical reactor condition) to suppress the streamwise variation of the flow, so a two-dimensional fully developed flow is studied. Duct walls are assumed to be thermally and electrically insulated. The non-uniform internal heat deposited by captured neutrons is fully diverted by the mean flow. Realistically high Grashof (up to 1011) and Reynolds (up to 106) numbers are considered. It is found that the state of the flow is strongly affected by the vertical stable stratification developing in response to the streamwise growth of mean temperature. Two flow regimes are identified: the regime with developed transverse convection at moderate Grashof numbers, and the regime, in which convection is suppressed at high Grashof numbers. Financial support was provided by the U.S. National Science Foundation (Grant CBET 1435269) and by the University of Michigan - Dearborn.

  10. Highly controlled orientation of CaBi4Ti4O15 using a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tohru S.; Kimura, Masahiko; Shiratsuyu, Kosuke; Ando, Akira; Sakka, Yoshio; Sakabe, Yukio

    2006-09-01

    The texture of feeble magnetic ceramics can be controlled by a strong magnetic field. When the magnetic susceptibility of the c axis is smaller than that of the other axes, the c axis aligns perpendicular to the magnetic field; however, the direction is randomly oriented on the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The authors demonstrate in this letter that a highly controlled texture in bismuth titanate, which has a c-axis susceptibility smaller than the other axes, can be achieved using a two-step magnetic field procedure. This highly controlled orientation is effective for improving the electromechanical coupling coefficient.

  11. Charge density wave instabilities of type-II Weyl semimetals in a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trescher, Maximilian; Bergholtz, Emil J.; Udagawa, Masafumi; Knolle, Johannes

    2017-11-01

    Shortly after the discovery of Weyl semimetals, properties related to the topology of their bulk band structure have been observed, e.g., signatures of the chiral anomaly and Fermi arc surface states. These essentially single particle phenomena are well understood, but whether interesting many-body effects due to interactions arise in Weyl systems remains much less explored. Here, we investigate the effect of interactions in a microscopic model of a type-II Weyl semimetal in a strong magnetic field. We identify a charge density wave (CDW) instability even for weak interactions stemming from the emergent nesting properties of the type-II Weyl Landau level dispersion. We map out the dependence of this CDW on magnetic field strength. Remarkably, as a function of decreasing temperature, a cascade of CDW transitions emerges and we predict characteristic signatures for experiments.

  12. Classical Spin Liquid Instability Driven By Off-Diagonal Exchange in Strong Spin-Orbit Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis; Perkins, Natalia B.

    2017-04-01

    We show that the off-diagonal exchange anisotropy drives Mott insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling to a classical spin liquid regime, characterized by an infinite number of ground states and Ising variables living on closed or open strings. Depending on the sign of the anisotropy, quantum fluctuations either fail to lift the degeneracy down to very low temperatures, or select noncoplanar magnetic states with unconventional spin correlations. The results apply to all 2D and 3D tricoordinated materials with bond-directional anisotropy and provide a consistent interpretation of the suppression of the x-ray magnetic circular dichroism signal reported recently for β -Li2IrO3 under pressure.

  13. Turbulent convection in a horizontal duct with strong axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2014-11-01

    Convection in a horizontal duct with one heated wall is studied computationally. The work is motivated by the concept of a blanket for fusion reactors, according to which liquid metal slowly flows in toroidal ducts aligned with the main component of the magnetic field. We first assume that the magnetic field is sufficiently strong for the flow to be purely two-dimensional and analyze chaotic flow regimes at very high Grashof numbers. Furthermore, three-dimensional perturbations are considered and the relation between the length of the duct and the critical Hartmann number, below which the flow becomes three-dimensional, is determined. Financial support was provided by the US NSF (Grant CBET 1232851).

  14. Resonance enhancement of two photon absorption by magnetically trapped atoms in strong rf-fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, A.; Mishra, S. R.

    2018-01-01

    Applying a many mode Floquet formalism for magnetically trapped atoms interacting with a polychromatic rf-field, we predict a large two photon transition probability in the atomic system of cold 87Rb atoms. The physical origin of this enormous increase in the two photon transition probability is due to the formation of avoided crossings between eigen-energy levels originating from different Floquet sub-manifolds and redistribution of population in the resonant intermediate levels to give rise to the resonance enhancement effect. Other exquisite features of the studied atom-field composite system include the splitting of the generated avoided crossings at the strong field strength limit and a periodic variation of the single and two photon transition probabilities with the mode separation frequency of the polychromatic rf-field. This work can find applications to characterize properties of cold atom clouds in the magnetic traps using rf-spectroscopy techniques.

  15. Magnetic properties of a diluted transverse spin-1 Ising nanocube with a longitudinal crystal-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hamri, M.; Bouhou, S.; Essaoudi, I.; Ainane, A.; Ahuja, R.

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, the effective field theory with correlations based on the probability distribution technique has been used to investigate the effect of the surface shell longitudinal cristal field on the magnetic properties of a diluted antiferromagnetic spin-1 Ising nanocube particle. This effect has also been studied on the hysteresis loops of the system. It is found that this parameter has a strong effect on the magnetization profiles, compensation temperature, coercive field and remanent magnetization.

  16. Remanence rotation due to rock strain during folding and the stepwise application of the fold test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Kenneth P.

    1988-04-01

    Numerical modeling was conducted to determine the effects of simple models of folding strain on prefolding Fisherian distributions of magnetization. I found that the constant volume, simple shear associated with flexural slip/flexural flow folding can rotate a prefolding magnetization to have a maximum precision parameter K value at partial unfolding and thus appear to be synfolding in age. If the magnetization is treated as a passive line marker, this behavior only occurs for steep initial magnetizations. The initial homogeneity of the Fisherian precision parameters from each limb is degraded by this type of deformation and may be used to detect a strain modified remanence. If the magnetization is carried by rigid, mechanically active ellipsoidal or spherical particles, a maximum K value at partial unfolding will occur for any initial inclination, with the special case that rigid spheres will be rotated to cause a maximum K value at 50% unfolding for any initial inclination. Homogeneity of limb precisions is not affected in this case. A discontinuous model of strain during folding, in which pressure solution removes material at an axial-planar, spaced cleavage and causes limb dips steeper than bedding dips, could also produce a maximum K value at partial unfolding. Strain and remanence studies of flexural slip folding in the Allentown Formation dolomite and the Bloomsburg Formation red sandstones and mudstones suggest that (1) the rigid grain model may be a more realistic model of magnetic particle behavior during shear strain and (2) about one quarter to one third of the theoretically predicted, simple shear strain occurs in these rocks. This amount of strain cannot explain the synfolding behavior observed in the Allentown Formation but could explain the maximum K values at 80%-90% unfolding seen in the Bloomsburg Formation and, perhaps, other Appalachian clastic rocks.

  17. Integrated electronic transport and thermometry at milliKelvin temperatures and in strong magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkharadze, N; Kumar, A; Manfra, M J; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W; Csáthy, G A

    2011-05-01

    We fabricated a He-3 immersion cell for transport measurements of semiconductor nanostructures at ultra low temperatures and in strong magnetic fields. We have a new scheme of field-independent thermometry based on quartz tuning fork Helium-3 viscometry which monitors the local temperature of the sample's environment in real time. The operation and measurement circuitry of the quartz viscometer is described in detail. We provide evidence that the temperature of two-dimensional electron gas confined to a GaAs quantum well follows the temperature of the quartz viscometer down to 4 mK.

  18. Strong Coupling of Microwave Photons to Antiferromagnetic Fluctuations in an Organic Magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergenthaler, Matthias; Liu, Junjie; Le Roy, Jennifer J.; Ares, Natalia; Thompson, Amber L.; Bogani, Lapo; Luis, Fernando; Blundell, Stephen J.; Lancaster, Tom; Ardavan, Arzhang; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Leek, Peter J.; Laird, Edward A.

    2017-10-01

    Coupling between a crystal of di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium radicals and a superconducting microwave resonator is investigated in a circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit QED) architecture. The crystal exhibits paramagnetic behavior above 4 K, with antiferromagnetic correlations appearing below this temperature, and we demonstrate strong coupling at base temperature. The magnetic resonance acquires a field angle dependence as the crystal is cooled down, indicating anisotropy of the exchange interactions. These results show that multispin modes in organic crystals are suitable for circuit QED, offering a platform for their coherent manipulation. They also utilize the circuit QED architecture as a way to probe spin correlations at low temperature.

  19. Energy density and energy flow of surface waves in a strongly magnetized graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Afshin

    2018-01-01

    General expressions for the energy density and energy flow of plasmonic waves in a two-dimensional massless electron gas (as a simple model of graphene) are obtained by means of the linearized magneto-hydrodynamic model and classical electromagnetic theory when a strong external magnetic field perpendicular to the system is present. Also, analytical expressions for the energy velocity, wave polarization, wave impedance, transverse and longitudinal field strength functions, and attenuation length of surface magneto-plasmon-polariton waves are derived, and numerical results are prepared.

  20. Vertical oscillations of dust particles in a strongly magnetized plasma sheath induced by horizontal laser manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttscher, M.; Melzer, A.; Konopka, U.; LeBlanc, S.; Lynch, B.; Thomas, E.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental studies are presented where dust particles are suspended in the lower sheath region of an argon rf discharge at a strong vertical magnetic field from B =1.5 T up to 2.27 T. There the particles arranged in an ordered pattern imposed by the upper mesh electrode. It is observed that the particles jump to a new equilibrium position, where they exhibit self-excited vertical oscillations when illuminated by a horizontal laser beam. The dust motion is weakly damped during an upward jump and strongly damped during the return to the equilibrium after the laser is switched off. A model based on delayed charging is presented that can describe the observed behavior.

  1. Breakdown of the Chiral Anomaly in Weyl Semimetals in a Strong Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilkwang; Ryoo, Ji Hoon; Park, Cheol-Hwan

    2017-12-01

    The low-energy quasiparticles of Weyl semimetals are a condensed-matter realization of the Weyl fermions introduced in relativistic field theory. Chiral anomaly, the nonconservation of the chiral charge under parallel electric and magnetic fields, is arguably the most important phenomenon of Weyl semimetals and has been explained as an imbalance between the occupancies of the gapless, zeroth Landau levels with opposite chiralities. This widely accepted picture has served as the basis for subsequent studies. Here we report the breakdown of the chiral anomaly in Weyl semimetals in a strong magnetic field based on ab initio calculations. A sizable energy gap that depends sensitively on the direction of the magnetic field may open up due to the mixing of the zeroth Landau levels associated with the opposite-chirality Weyl points that are away from each other in the Brillouin zone. Our study provides a theoretical framework for understanding a wide range of phenomena closely related to the chiral anomaly in topological semimetals, such as magnetotransport, thermoelectric responses, and plasmons, to name a few.

  2. Charge transfer of He2 + with H in a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Lei; Zou, Shi-Yang; He, Bin; Wang, Jian-Guo

    2015-09-01

    By solving a time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), we studied the electron capture process in the He2 + +H collision system under a strong magnetic field in a wide projectile energy range. The strong enhancement of the total charge transfer cross section is observed for the projectile energy below 2.0 keV/u. With the projectile energy increasing, the cross sections will reduce a little and then increase again, compared with those in the field-free case. The cross sections to the states with different magnetic quantum numbers are presented and analyzed where the influence due to Zeeman splitting is obviously found, especially in the low projectile energy region. The comparison with other models is made and the tendency of the cross section varying with the projectile energy is found closer to that from other close coupling models. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11104017, 11025417, 11275029, and 11474032), the National Basic Research Programm of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200), and the Foundation for the Development of Science and Technology of the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2014B09036 and 2013A0102005).

  3. Combined Conformal Strongly-Coupled Magnetic Resonance for Efficient Wireless Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaz Rozman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a hybrid circuit between a conformal strongly-coupled magnetic resonance (CSCMR and a strongly-coupled magnetic resonance (SCMR, for better wireless power transmission (WPT. This combination promises to enhance the flexibility of the proposed four-loop WPT system. The maximum efficiency at various distances is achieved by combining coupling-matching between the source and transmitting coils along with the coupling factor between the transmitting and receiving coils. Furthermore, the distance between transmitting and receiving coils is investigated along with the distance relationship between the source loop and transmission coil, in order to achieve the maximum efficiency of the proposed hybrid WPT system. The results indicate that the proposed approach can be effectively employed at distances comparatively smaller than the maximum distance without frequency matching. The achievable efficiency can be as high as 84% for the whole working range of the transmitter. In addition, the proposed hybrid system allows more spatial freedom compared to existing chargers.

  4. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Increase the Gel Signal in Partially Hydrated DPPC/DMPC Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Tang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available NIt was recently reported that static magnetic fields increase lipid order in the hydrophobic membrane core of dehydrated native plant plasma membranes [Poinapen, Soft Matter 9:6804-6813, 2013]. As plasma membranes are multicomponent, highly complex structures, in order to elucidate the origin of this effect, we prepared model membranes consisting of a lipid species with low and high melting temperature. By controlling the temperature, bilayers coexisting of small gel and fluid domains were prepared as a basic model for the plasma membrane core. We studied molecular order in mixed lipid membranes made of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC and dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC using neutron diffraction in the presence of strong static magnetic fields up to 3.5 T. The contribution of the hydrophobic membrane core was highlighted through deuterium labeling the lipid acyl chains. There was no observable effect on lipid organization in fluid or gel domains at high hydration of the membranes. However, lipid order was found to be enhanced at a reduced relative humidity of 43%: a magnetic field of 3.5 T led to an increase of the gel signal in the diffraction patterns of 5%. While all biological materials have weak diamagnetic properties, the corresponding energy is too small to compete against thermal disorder or viscous effects in the case of lipid molecules. We tentatively propose that the interaction between the fatty acid chains’ electric moment and the external magnetic field is driving the lipid tails in the hydrophobic membrane core into a better ordered state.

  5. Steady-state rotational motions of a rigid body with a strong magnet in an alternating magnetic field in the presence of dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'in, A. A.; Kupriyanova, N. V.; Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.

    2009-06-01

    We consider steady-state rotational motions of a satellite, i.e., a rigid body with a passive magnetic attitude control system consisting of a strong constant magnet and a set of magnetic hysteresis rods. We use asymptotic methods to show that in the absence of dissipation there exists a one-parameter family of steady-state rotations of the rigid body with the strong magnet and that this one-parameter family passes into an isolated solution if a model dissipation is introduced. The motion thus obtained was discovered when processing the telemetry data from the first Russian nano-satellite TNS-0 launched in 2005.

  6. Orbital studies of lunar magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcleod, M. G.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Limitations of present lunar magnetic maps are considered. Optimal processing of satellite derived magnetic anomaly data is also considered. Studies of coastal and core geomagnetism are discussed. Lunar remanent and induced lunar magnetization are included.

  7. Strong impact of lattice vibrations on electronic and magnetic properties of paramagnetic Fe revealed by disordered local moments molecular dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alling, B.; Kormann, F.H.W.; Grabowski, B; Glensk, A; Abrikosov, I.A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the impact of lattice vibrations on magnetic and electronic properties of paramagnetic bcc and fcc iron at finite temperature, employing the disordered local moments molecular dynamics (DLM-MD) method. Vibrations strongly affect the distribution of local magnetic moments at finite

  8. Two types of proton-electron atoms in a vacuum and an extremely strong magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Fedaruk, R

    2010-01-01

    The Rutherford planetary model of a proton-electron atom is modified. Besides the Coulomb interaction of the point electron with the proton, its strong Coulomb interaction with the physical vacuum as well as the magnetic interaction between moving charges are taken into account. The vacuum interaction leads to the motion of the electron with the velocity of light \\textit{c} in the circle with the radius being equal to the so-called classical electron radius $r_e$. Therefore, the velocity of the electron consists of two components: the velocity $\\vec{\\upsilon }$ of the mechanical motion and the velocity $\\vec{c}$ of the photon-like motion. We postulate that $\\vec{\\upsilon }\\bot \\vec{c}$, and $\\upsilon > r_e $) and short ($ r > 10^8 T$) that are typical for neutron stars are discussed.

  9. Secondary Instabilities in 3-D Magnetic Reconnection under a Strong Guide Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueyi; Lin, Yu; Chen, Liu

    2017-10-01

    3-D magnetic reconnection is investigated using the gyrokinetic electron and fully-kinetic ion (GeFi) particle simulation model. The simulation is carried out for a force free current sheet with a strong guide field BG as occurring in solar and laboratory plasmas. It is found that secondary instabilities are excited in the separatrix region of the primary reconnection due to the 3-D effects associated with the finite kz, where kz is the wave number along the guide field direction. The instabilities are demonstrated as being of the MHD kink type, which lead to electron heating and acceleration in the parallel direction. The dependence of the growth rate of the secondary instabilities on the electron-ion resistivity, the ion-to-electron mass ratio mi /me , and the half-width of the current sheet are also investigated.

  10. Strong terahertz emission by optical rectification of shaped laser pulse in transversely magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Kishor; Singh, Monika; Rajouria, Satish Kumar; Sharma, R. P.

    2017-07-01

    This communication presents a theoretical model for efficient terahertz (THz) radiation generation by the optical rectification of shaped laser pulse in transversely magnetised ripple density plasma. The laser beam imparts a nonlinear ponderomotive force to the electron and this force exerts a nonlinear velocity component in both transverse and axial directions which have spectral components in the THz range. These velocity components couple with the pre-existing density ripple and give rise to a strong nonlinear current density which drives the THz wave in the plasma. The THz yield increases with the increasing strength of the background magnetic field and the sensitivity depends on the ripple wave number. The emitted power is directly proportional to the square of the amplitude of the density ripple. For exact phase matching condition, the normalised power of the generated THz wave can be achieved of the order of 10-4.

  11. Influence of strong magnetic fields on laser pulse propagation in underdense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. C.; Li, F. Y.; Weikum, M.; Sheng, Z. M.

    2017-06-01

    We examine the interaction between intense laser pulses and strongly magnetised plasmas in the weakly relativistic regime. An expression for the electron Lorentz factor coupling both relativistic and cyclotron motion nonlinearities is derived for static magnetic fields along the laser propagation axis. This is applied to predict modifications to the refractive index, critical density, group velocity dispersion and power threshold for relativistic self-focusing. It is found that electron quiver response is enhanced under right circularly-polarised light, decreasing the power threshold for various instabilities, while a dampening effect occurs under left circularly-polarised light, increasing the power thresholds. Derived theoretical predictions are tested by one- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  12. Strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy density at Fe alloy/HfO2 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yongxi; Ralph, D. C.; Buhrman, R. A.

    2017-05-01

    We report on the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) behavior of heavy metal (HM)/Fe alloy/MgO thin film heterostructures when an ultrathin HfO2 passivation layer is inserted between the Fe alloy and MgO. This is accomplished by depositing one to two atomic layers of Hf onto the Fe alloy before the subsequent rf sputter deposition of the MgO layer. This Hf layer is fully oxidized during the subsequent deposition of the MgO layer, as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The HfO2 insertion generates a strong interfacial perpendicular anisotropy energy density without any post-fabrication annealing treatment, for example, 1.7 erg / cm 2 for the Ta/Fe60Co20B20/HfO2/MgO heterostructure. We also demonstrate PMA even in Ni80Fe20/HfO2/MgO structures for low-damping, low-magnetostriction Ni80Fe20 thin films. Depending on the choice of the HM, further enhancements of the PMA can be realized by thermal annealing to at least 400 o C . We show that ultra-thin HfO2 layers offer a range of options for enhancing the PMA properties of magnetic heterostructures for spintronics applications.

  13. The Design of a Device for the Generation of a Strong Magnetic Field in an Air Gap Using Permanent Magnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žežulka, Václav; Straka, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2017), s. 250-256 ISSN 1226-1750 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : magnetic field * permanent magnets * NdFeB magnets * Halbach arrays Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.713, year: 2016

  14. Self-suspended permanent magnetic FePt ferrofluids

    KAUST Repository

    Dallas, Panagiotis

    2013-10-01

    We present the synthesis and characterization of a new class of self-suspended ferrofluids that exhibit remanent magnetization at room temperature. Our system relies on the chemisorption of a thiol-terminated ionic liquid with very low melting point on the surface of L10 FePt nanoparticles. In contrast, all types of ferrofluids previously reported employ either volatile solvents as the suspending media or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (that lacks permanent magnetization) as the inorganic component. The ferrofluids do not show any sign of flocculation or phase separation, despite the strong interactions between the magnetic nanoparticles due to the strong chemisorption of the ionic liquid as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy and thermal analysis. Composites with high FePt loading (40 and 70. wt%) exhibit a pseudo solid-like rheological behavior and high remanent magnetization values (10.1 and 12.8. emu/g respectively). At lower FePt loading (12. wt%) a liquid like behavior is observed and the remanent and saturation magnetization values are 3.5 and 6.2. emu/g, respectively. The magnetic and flow properties of the materials can be easily fine tuned by controlling the type and amount of FePt nanoparticles used. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Ion acceleration driven by a relativistic electron beam under a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Toshihiro; Antonsen, Thomas; Mima, Kunioki

    2017-10-01

    We have been investigating about an electron beam propagation under a strong magnetic field and found a very interesting phenomena. It is a generation of a large amplitude whistler wave, which is amplified by a nonlinear coupling of obliquely propagating circularly polarized waves. Since the previous work did not include ion motions, such a giant whistler wave mainly affects on beam electrons and they stagnate due to a large ponderomotive force of the electromagnetic wave. In order to investigate the influence of the strong wave on background ions, we have developed a new PIC code which has an open (upstream and downstream) boundaries. By using the new code, we have been studying the kinetic behavior of ions in a circumstance generating a large whistler wave. As a result, it is found that the electrostatic field induced by the stagnated beam electrons not only creates a density dip in the background electrons but also accelerates background ions. We will discuss the relation between the ion acceleration and a formation of a collisionless shock wave. This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B), 15H03758.

  16. COMPRESSIBLE RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN MAGNETICALLY DOMINATED PLASMAS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR A STRONG-COUPLING REGIME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamoto, Makoto [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Lazarian, Alexandre, E-mail: mtakamoto@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: alazarian@facstaff.wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    In this Letter, we report compressible mode effects on relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) turbulence in Poynting-dominated plasmas using three-dimensional numerical simulations. We decomposed fluctuations in the turbulence into 3 MHD modes (fast, slow, and Alfvén) following the procedure of mode decomposition in Cho and Lazarian, and analyzed their energy spectra and structure functions separately. We also analyzed the ratio of compressible mode to Alfvén mode energy with respect to its Mach number. We found the ratio of compressible mode increases not only with the Alfvén Mach number, but also with the background magnetization, which indicates a strong coupling between the fast and Alfvén modes. It also signifies the appearance of a new regime of RMHD turbulence in Poynting-dominated plasmas where the fast and Alfvén modes are strongly coupled and, unlike the non-relativistic MHD regime, cannot be treated separately. This finding will affect particle acceleration efficiency obtained by assuming Alfvénic critical-balance turbulence and can change the resulting photon spectra emitted by non-thermal electrons.

  17. Quantum magnetism in strongly interacting one-dimensional spinor Bose systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkharghani, Amin; Volosniev, Artem; Lindgren, Jonathan; Rotureau, Jimmy; Forssén, Christian; Fedorov, Dmitri; Jensen, Aksel; Zinner, Nikolaj

    2015-06-15

    Strongly interacting one-dimensional quantum systems often behave in a manner that is distinctly different from their higher-dimensional counterparts. When a particle attempts to move in a one-dimensional environment it will unavoidably have to interact and 'push' other particles in order to execute a pattern of motion, irrespective of whether the particles are fermions or bosons. A present frontier in both theory and experiment are mixed systems of different species and/or particles with multiple internal degrees of freedom. Here we consider trapped two-component bosons with short-range inter-species interactions much larger than their intra-species interactions and show that they have novel energetic and magnetic properties. In the strongly interacting regime, these systems have energies that are fractions of the basic harmonic oscillator trap quantum and have spatially separated ground states with manifestly ferromagnetic wave functions. Furthermore, we predict excited states that have perfect antiferromagnetic ordering. This holds for both balanced and imbalanced systems, and we show that it is a generic feature as one crosses from few- to many-body systems.

  18. Behavior of Particle Depots in Molten Silicon During Float-Zone Growth in Strong Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauss, T.; Croell, A.; SorgenFrei, T.; Azizi, M.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.; Volz, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Solar cells made from directionally solidified silicon cover 57% of the photovoltaic industry's market [1]. One major issue during directional solidification of silicon is the precipitation of foreign phase particles. These particles, mainly SiC and Si3N4, are precipitated from the dissolved crucible coating, which is made of silicon nitride, and the dissolution of carbon monoxide from the furnace atmosphere. Due to their hardness and size of several hundred micrometers, those particles can lead to severe problems during the wire sawing process for wafering the ingots. Additionally, SiC particles can act as a shunt, short circuiting the solar cell. Even if the particles are too small to disturb the wafering process, they can lead to a grit structure of silicon micro grains and serve as sources for dislocations. All of this lowers the yield of solar cells and reduces the performance of cells and modules. We studied the behaviour of SiC particle depots during float-zone growth under an oxide skin, and strong static magnetic fields. For high field strengths of 3T and above and an oxide layer on the sample surface, convection is sufficiently suppressed to create a diffusive like regime, with strongly dampened convection [2, 3]. To investigate the difference between atomically rough phase boundaries and facetted growth, samples with [100] and [111] orientation were processed.

  19. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radaelli, P. G.; Dhesi, S. S.

    2015-01-26

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007–2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described.

  20. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, P G; Dhesi, S S

    2015-03-06

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007-2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis of the a-Axis Textured Forsterite Aggregate Using Slip Casting in a Strong Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, S.; Suzuki, T. S.; Sakka, Y.; Hiraga, T.

    2014-12-01

    Since crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) is commonly observed in nature, it is important to understand how physical properties of rocks change with the development of CPO. For this purpose, we fabricated highly dense and fine grained mineral aggregates with controlling crystal orientation. Fine forsterite powders were prepared from high purity and fine grained reagents (slip casting in a high magnetic field (12T) was sintered under vacuum condition. The resultant materials were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), secondary electron microscopy (SEM) and Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The specimen prepared without an exposure to a strong magnetic field exhibited a randomly orientated forsterite grains whereas the specimen exposed to the magnetic field exhibited strong a-axis alignmentparallel to the magnetic direction with random distributions of b and c-axes on the plane perpendicular to the magnetic direction.

  2. Integrated nanoplasmonic waveguides for magnetic, nonlinear, and strong-field devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sederberg Shawn

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As modern complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS circuitry rapidly approaches fundamental speed and bandwidth limitations, optical platforms have become promising candidates to circumvent these limits and facilitate massive increases in computational power. To compete with high density CMOS circuitry, optical technology within the plasmonic regime is desirable, because of the sub-diffraction limited confinement of electromagnetic energy, large optical bandwidth, and ultrafast processing capabilities. As such, nanoplasmonic waveguides act as nanoscale conduits for optical signals, thereby forming the backbone of such a platform. In recent years, significant research interest has developed to uncover the fundamental physics governing phenomena occurring within nanoplasmonic waveguides, and to implement unique optical devices. In doing so, a wide variety of material properties have been exploited. CMOS-compatible materials facilitate passive plasmonic routing devices for directing the confined radiation. Magnetic materials facilitate time-reversal symmetry breaking, aiding in the development of nonreciprocal isolators or modulators. Additionally, strong confinement and enhancement of electric fields within such waveguides require the use of materials with high nonlinear coefficients to achieve increased nonlinear optical phenomenon in a nanoscale footprint. Furthermore, this enhancement and confinement of the fields facilitate the study of strong-field effects within the solid-state environment of the waveguide. Here, we review current state-of-the-art physics and applications of nanoplasmonic waveguides pertaining to passive, magnetoplasmonic, nonlinear, and strong-field devices. Such components are essential elements in integrated optical circuitry, and each fulfill specific roles in truly developing a chip-scale plasmonic computing architecture.

  3. Integrated nanoplasmonic waveguides for magnetic, nonlinear, and strong-field devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederberg, Shawn; Firby, Curtis J.; Greig, Shawn R.; Elezzabi, Abdulhakem Y.

    2017-01-01

    As modern complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry rapidly approaches fundamental speed and bandwidth limitations, optical platforms have become promising candidates to circumvent these limits and facilitate massive increases in computational power. To compete with high density CMOS circuitry, optical technology within the plasmonic regime is desirable, because of the sub-diffraction limited confinement of electromagnetic energy, large optical bandwidth, and ultrafast processing capabilities. As such, nanoplasmonic waveguides act as nanoscale conduits for optical signals, thereby forming the backbone of such a platform. In recent years, significant research interest has developed to uncover the fundamental physics governing phenomena occurring within nanoplasmonic waveguides, and to implement unique optical devices. In doing so, a wide variety of material properties have been exploited. CMOS-compatible materials facilitate passive plasmonic routing devices for directing the confined radiation. Magnetic materials facilitate time-reversal symmetry breaking, aiding in the development of nonreciprocal isolators or modulators. Additionally, strong confinement and enhancement of electric fields within such waveguides require the use of materials with high nonlinear coefficients to achieve increased nonlinear optical phenomenon in a nanoscale footprint. Furthermore, this enhancement and confinement of the fields facilitate the study of strong-field effects within the solid-state environment of the waveguide. Here, we review current state-of-the-art physics and applications of nanoplasmonic waveguides pertaining to passive, magnetoplasmonic, nonlinear, and strong-field devices. Such components are essential elements in integrated optical circuitry, and each fulfill specific roles in truly developing a chip-scale plasmonic computing architecture.

  4. Electrostatic focal spot correction for x-ray tubes operating in strong magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    correction technique. However, rotation of the x-ray tube by 30° toward the MR bore increases the parallel magnetic field magnitude (∼72 mT). The presence of this larger parallel field along with the orthogonal field leads to incomplete correction. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the mean energy of the x-ray spectrum is not noticeably affected by the electrostatic correction, but the output flux is reduced by 7.5%. The maximum orthogonal magnetic field magnitude that can be compensated for using the proposed design is 65 mT. Larger orthogonal field magnitudes cannot be completely compensated for because a pure electrostatic approach is limited by the dielectric strength of the vacuum inside the x-ray tube insert. The electrostatic approach also suffers from limitations when there are strong magnetic fields in both the orthogonal and parallel directions because the electrons prefer to stay aligned with the parallel magnetic field. These challenging field conditions can be addressed by using a hybrid correction approach that utilizes both active shielding coils and biasing electrodes.

  5. Accurate and balanced anisotropic Gaussian type orbital basis sets for atoms in strong magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuming; Trickey, S B

    2017-12-28

    In high magnetic field calculations, anisotropic Gaussian type orbital (AGTO) basis functions are capable of reconciling the competing demands of the spherically symmetric Coulombic interaction and cylindrical magnetic (B field) confinement. However, the best available a priori procedure for composing highly accurate AGTO sets for atoms in a strong B field [W. Zhu et al., Phys. Rev. A 90, 022504 (2014)] yields very large basis sets. Their size is problematical for use in any calculation with unfavorable computational cost scaling. Here we provide an alternative constructive procedure. It is based upon analysis of the underlying physics of atoms in B fields that allow identification of several principles for the construction of AGTO basis sets. Aided by numerical optimization and parameter fitting, followed by fine tuning of fitting parameters, we devise formulae for generating accurate AGTO basis sets in an arbitrary B field. For the hydrogen iso-electronic sequence, a set depends on B field strength, nuclear charge, and orbital quantum numbers. For multi-electron systems, the basis set formulae also include adjustment to account for orbital occupations. Tests of the new basis sets for atoms H through C (1 ≤ Z ≤ 6) and ions Li + , Be + , and B + , in a wide B field range (0 ≤ B ≤ 2000 a.u.), show an accuracy better than a few μhartree for single-electron systems and a few hundredths to a few mHs for multi-electron atoms. The relative errors are similar for different atoms and ions in a large B field range, from a few to a couple of tens of millionths, thereby confirming rather uniform accuracy across the nuclear charge Z and B field strength values. Residual basis set errors are two to three orders of magnitude smaller than the electronic correlation energies in multi-electron atoms, a signal of the usefulness of the new AGTO basis sets in correlated wavefunction or density functional calculations for atomic and molecular systems in an external strong B

  6. SU-E-T-227: Could the Alpha/Beta Ratio Change in a Strong Magnetic Field?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, G [Odette Cancer Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto M4N 3M5, Canada and Sunnybrook Research Institute and Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is being integrated into radiotherapy delivery for MRI-guided radiotherapy. The presence of a strong magnetic field from a MRI machine during radiotherapy delivery presents a new challenge since the trajectories of electrons liberated by ionizing radiation in patients are strongly dependent on the applied magnetic field. The purpose of this work is to explore the potential effect of a strong magnetic field on the α/β ratio, an important radiobiological parameter in radiotherapy. Methods: Based on the theory of dual radiation action, the α/β ratio can be expressed by an integral of the product of two microdosimetry quantities γ(x) and t(x), where γ(x) is the probability that two energy transfers, a distance x apart, results in a lesion, and t(x) is the proximity function, which is the energy-weighted point-pair distribution of distances between energy transfer points in a track. The quantity t(x) depends on the applied magnetic field. An analytical approach has been used to derive a formula that can be used to calculate the α/β ratio in an extremely strong magnetic field. Results: The α/β ratio has been evaluated in the special case when the applied magnetic field approaches infinity, which gives the upper limit of the potential change of the α/β ratio due to the presence of a strong magnetic field. For V79 Chinese hamster cells it has been shown that the α/β ratio could be increased by 2.90 times for Pd-103, 2.97 times for I-125 and about 2.3 times for Co-60 sources when the applied magnetic field approaches infinity. Conclusion: It has been shown theoretically that the α/β ratio can change in a strong magnetic field, and there could be up to a nearly three-fold increase in the α/β ratio, depending on the strength of the applied magnetic field, the cell type and the radiation used.

  7. Thermally robust Mo/CoFeB/MgO trilayers with strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, T; Zhang, Y; Cai, J W; Pan, H Y

    2014-01-01

    The recent discovery of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) at the CoFeB/MgO interface has accelerated the development of next generation high-density non-volatile memories by utilizing perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs...

  8. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields and recently updated safety guidelines for strong static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2011-01-01

    Humans are exposed daily to artificial and naturally occurring magnetic fields that originate from many different sources. We review recent studies that examine the biological effects of and medical applications involving electromagnetic fields, review the properties of static and pulsed electromagnetic fields that affect biological systems, describe the use of a pulsed electromagnetic field in combination with an anticancer agent as an example of a medical application that incorporates an electromagnetic field, and discuss the recently updated safety guidelines for static electromagnetic fields. The most notable modifications to the 2009 International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines are the increased exposure limits, especially for those who work with or near electromagnetic fields (occupational exposure limits). The recommended increases in exposure were determined using recent scientific evidence obtained from animal and human studies. Several studies since the 1994 publication of the guidelines have examined the effects on humans after exposure to high static electromagnetic fields (up to 9.4 tesla), but additional research is needed to ascertain further the safety of strong electromagnetic fields.

  9. Fully developed liquid-metal flow in multiple rectangular ducts in a strong uniform magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molokov, S. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Thermo- und Fluiddynamik (IATF))

    1993-01-01

    Fully developed liquid-metal flow in a straight rectangular duct with thin conducting walls is investigated. The duct is divided into a number of rectangular channels by electrically conducting dividing walls. A strong uniform magnetic field is applied parallel to the outer side walls and dividing walls and perpendicular to the top and the bottom walls. The analysis of the flow is performed by means of matched asymptotics at large values of the Hartmann number M. The asymptotic solution obtained is valid for arbitrary wall conductance ratio of the side walls and dividing walls, provided the top and bottom walls are much better conductors than the Hartmann layers. The influence of the Hartmann number, wall conductance ratio, number of channels and duct geometry on pressure losses and flow distribution is investigated. If the Hartmann number is high, the volume flux is carried by the core, occupying the bulk of the fluid and by thin layers with thickness of order M[sup -1/2]. In some of the layers, however, the flow is reversed. As the number of channels increases the flow in the channels close to the centre approaches a Hartmann-type flow with no jets at the side walls. Estimation of pressure-drop increase in radial ducts of a self-cooled liquid-metal blanket with respect to flow in a single duct with walls of the same wall conductance ratio gives an upper limit of 30%. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Spin state ordering of strongly correlating LaCoO3 induced at ultrahigh magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Akihiko; Nomura, Toshihiro; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H.; Matsuo, Akira; Kindo, Koichi; Sato, Keisuke

    2016-06-01

    Magnetization measurements of LaCoO3 have been carried out up to 133 T, generated with a destructive pulse magnet at a wide temperature range from 2 to 120 K. A novel magnetic transition was found at B >100 T and T >T*=32 ±5 K, which is characterized by its transition field increasing with increasing temperature. At T LaCoO3 at high magnetic fields.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis and Simulation of Theoretical Response of Ceramics to Strong Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    suspensions at relatively low (1.8 T) applied magnetic fields. This corresponds well to preliminary experimental results. Additionally, the sensitivity...of magnetic response to process variables, such as variations in applied magnetic field and suspension viscosity, is assessed. Results indicate that...susceptibilities of the crystallographic planes that are perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field following alignment respectively, µ0 is the

  12. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF A DELTA-SPOT. I. A REGION OF VERY STRONG, HORIZONTAL MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeggli, S. A., E-mail: sarah.jaeggli@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Laboratory, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Active region NOAA 11035 appeared in 2009 December, early in the new solar activity cycle. This region achieved a delta sunspot (δ spot) configuration when parasitic flux emerged near the rotationally leading magnetic polarity and traveled through the penumbra of the largest sunspot in the group. Both visible and infrared imaging spectropolarimetry of the magnetically sensitive Fe i line pairs at 6302 and 15650 Å show large Zeeman splitting in the penumbra between the parasitic umbra and the main sunspot umbra. The polarized Stokes spectra in the strongest field region display anomalous profiles, and strong blueshifts are seen in an adjacent region. Analysis of the profiles is carried out using a Milne–Eddington inversion code capable of fitting either a single magnetic component with stray light or two independent magnetic components to verify the field strength. The inversion results show that the anomalous profiles cannot be produced by the combination of two profiles with moderate magnetic fields. The largest field strengths are 3500–3800 G in close proximity to blueshifts as strong as 3.8 km s{sup −1}. The strong, nearly horizontal magnetic field seen near the polarity inversion line in this region is difficult to understand in the context of a standard model of sunspot magnetohydrostatic equilibrium.

  13. Method for Transformation of Weakly Magnetic Minerals (Hematite, Goethite into Strongly Magnetic Mineral (Magnetite to Improve the Efficiency of Technologies for Oxidized Iron Ores Benefication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponomarenko, O.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A new method for relatively simple transformation of weakly magnetic minerals (goethite (α-FeOOH and hematite (α-Fe2O3 into strongly magnetic mineral (magnetite (Fe3O4 was developed. It was shown, that transformation of structure and magnetic characteristics of go ethite and hematite are realized in the presence of starch at relatively low temperatures (in the range of 300—600 °С. Obtained results open up new possibilities for development of effective technologies for oxidized iron ore beneficiation.

  14. The sharp-front magnetic diffusion wave of a strong magnetic field diffusing into a solid metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Gu, Zhuo-Wei; Kan, Ming-Xian; Wang, Gang-Hua; Zhao, Jian-Heng; Computational Physics Team

    2016-10-01

    When a mega-gauss magnetic field diffuses into a solid metal, the Joule heat would rise rapidly the temperature of the metal, and the rise of temperature leads to an increase of the metal's resistance, which in turn accelerates the magnetic field diffusion. Those positive feedbacks acting iteratively would lead to an interesting sharp-front magnetic diffusion wave. By assuming that the metal's resistance has an abrupt change from a small value ηS to larger value ηL at some critical temperature Tc, the sharp-front magnetic diffusion wave can be solved analytically. The conditions for the emerging of the sharp-front magnetic diffusion wave are B0 >Bc , ηL /ηS >> 1 , and ηL/ηSB0/-Bc Bc >> 1 , where Bc =√{ 2μ0Jc } , B0 is the vacuum magnetic field strength, and Jc is the critical Joule heat density. The wave-front velocity of the diffusion wave is Vc =ηL/μ0B0/-Bc Bc1/xc , where xc is the depth the wave have propagated in the metal. In this presentation we would like to discuss the derivation of the formulas and its impact to magnetically driven experiments. The work is supported by the Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (No. 2015B0201023).

  15. Optical pulling and pushing forces exerted on silicon nanospheres with strong coherent interaction between electric and magnetic resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongfeng; Panmai, Mingcheng; Peng, Yuanyuan; Lan, Sheng

    2017-05-29

    We investigated theoretically and numerically the optical pulling and pushing forces acting on silicon (Si) nanospheres (NSs) with strong coherent interaction between electric and magnetic resonances. We examined the optical pulling and pushing forces exerted on Si NSs by two interfering waves and revealed the underlying physical mechanism from the viewpoint of electric- and magnetic-dipole manipulation. As compared with a polystyrene (PS) NS, it was found that the optical pulling force for a Si NS with the same size is enlarged by nearly two orders of magnitude. In addition to the optical pulling force appearing at the long-wavelength side of the magnetic dipole resonance, very large optical pushing force is observed at the magnetic quadrupole resonance. The correlation between the optical pulling/pushing force and the directional scattering characterized by the ratio of the forward to backward scattering was revealed. More interestingly, it was found that the high-order electric and magnetic resonances in large Si NSs play an important role in producing optical pulling force which can be generated by not only s-polarized wave but also p-polarized one. Our finding indicates that the strong coherent interaction between the electric and magnetic resonances existing in nanoparticles with large refractive indices can be exploited to manipulate the optical force acting on them and the correlation between the optical force and the directional scattering can be used as guidance. The engineering and manipulation of optical forces will find potential applications in the trapping, transport and sorting of nanoparticles.

  16. STRONG MAGNETIC-X-RAY DICHROISM IN 2P ABSORPTION-SPECTRA OF 3D TRANSITION-METAL IONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLAAN, G; THOLE, BT

    1991-01-01

    From atomic calculations in crystal-field symmetry we find a very strong circular and linear dichroism in the 2p x-ray absorption edges of magnetically ordered 3d transition-metal ions. The spectral shape changes drastically with the character of the ground state, which is determined by the presence

  17. Study of muon triggers and momentum reconstruction in a strong magnetic field for a muon detector at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Della Negra, Michel; Eggert, Karsten; Hervé, A; Wittgenstein, F; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, Ritva; Pimiä, M; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Dau, D; Ferrando, A; Torrente-Lujan, E; Bettini, A; Centro, Sandro; Martinelli, R; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Zotto, P L; Bacci, Cesare; Ceradini, F; Ciapetti, G; Lacava, F; Nisati, A; Petrolo, E; Pontecorvo, L; Veneziano, Stefano; Zanello, L; Cardarelli, R; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Santonico, R; Cline, D; Lazic, S; Mohammadi, M; Park, J; Szoncsó, F; Walzel, G; Wulz, Claudia Elisabeth; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1990-01-01

    We propose to construct a small fraction of a muon detector in a strong magnetic field, for possible use in an LHC experiment, and to test it in a beam containing hadrons and muons. Properties of muons from hadron decays and of hadron punch-through, i.e. angle, momentum and timing distributions of the outgoing particles, will be measured for various absorber thicknesses, including the effect of strong magnetization of the absorber. The efficiency of different muon triggers and the rejection against hadron punch-through and decay muons will be studied. Reconstruction of muons and their momentum measurement in magnetized iron will be investigated, including the effect of catastrophic energy losses of high momentum muons. The performance of resistive plate chambers (RPC) as fast trigger hodoscopes will be studied.

  18. Aversive responses of captive sandbar sharks Carcharhinus plumbeus to strong magnetic fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siegenthaler, A.; Niemantsverdriet, P.R.W.; Laterveer, M.; Heitkönig, I.M.A.

    2016-01-01

    This experimental study focused on the possible deterrent effect of permanent magnets on adult sandbar sharks Carcharhinus plumbeus. Results showed that the presence of a magnetic field significantly reduced the number of approaches of conditioned C. plumbeus towards a target indicating that

  19. Effect of angular momentum alignment and strong magnetic fields on the formation of protostellar discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, William J.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I.

    2018-01-01

    Star-forming molecular clouds are observed to be both highly magnetized and turbulent. Consequently, the formation of protostellar discs is largely dependent on the complex interaction between gravity, magnetic fields, and turbulence. Studies of non-turbulent protostellar disc formation with realistic magnetic fields have shown that these fields are efficient in removing angular momentum from the forming discs, preventing their formation. However, once turbulence is included, discs can form in even highly magnetized clouds, although the precise mechanism remains uncertain. Here, we present several high-resolution simulations of turbulent, realistically magnetized, high-mass molecular clouds with both aligned and random turbulence to study the role that turbulence, misalignment, and magnetic fields have on the formation of protostellar discs. We find that when the turbulence is artificially aligned so that the angular momentum is parallel to the initial uniform field, no rotationally supported discs are formed, regardless of the initial turbulent energy. We conclude that turbulence and the associated misalignment between the angular momentum and the magnetic field are crucial in the formation of protostellar discs in the presence of realistic magnetic fields.

  20. Chemical spots on the surface of the strongly magnetic Herbig Ae star HD 101412

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvinen, S. P.; Hubrig, S.; Schöller, M.

    2016-01-01

    values determined in previous low-resolution FORS 2 measurements, where hydrogen Balmer lines are the main contributors to the magnetic field measurements, indicating the presence of concentration of the studied iron-peak elements in the region of the magnetic equator. Further, we discuss the potential...

  1. Angular and geometry dependence of coercivity and remanence nickel nanotube isolated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, J.L.; Davila, Y.G.; Garcia, R.P.; Del Toro, A.D.; Martins, I.G.; Hernandez, E.P. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), PE (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    , where we vary the angle of the magnetic field applied to the ferromagnetic system. We investigated the role of geometry in the coercivity and remanence of hysteresis curves, where we analyze the types of magnetization reversal modes that can appear in isolated nanotube system. (author)

  2. Out-of-equilibrium dynamics in superspin glass state of strongly interacting magnetic nanoparticle assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamae, Sawako, E-mail: Sawako.nakamae@cea.fr

    2014-04-15

    Interacting magnetic nanoparticles display a wide variety of magnetic behaviors ranging from modified superparamagnetism, superspin glass to possibly, superferromagnetism. The superspin glass state is described by its slow and out-of-equilibrium magnetic behaviors akin to those found in atomic spin glasses. In this article, recent experimental findings on superspin correlation length growth and the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem obtained in concentrated frozen ferrofluids are presented to illustrate certain out-of-equilibrium dynamics behavior in superspin glasses. - Highlights: • Recent experimental findings on superspin glass dynamics in magnetic nanoparticle systems. • Advantages of magnetic nanoparticles for the study of spin glass physics. • Open questions and future directions in superspin glass research.

  3. Possible evidence for free precession of a strongly magnetized neutron star in the magnetar 4U 0142+61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makishima, K; Enoto, T; Hiraga, J S; Nakano, T; Nakazawa, K; Sakurai, S; Sasano, M; Murakami, H

    2014-05-02

    Magnetars are a special type of neutron stars, considered to have extreme dipole magnetic fields reaching ∼ 10(11) T. The magnetar 4 U 0142+61, one of the prototypes of this class, was studied in broadband x rays (0.5-70 keV) with the Suzaku observatory. In hard x rays (15-40 keV), its 8.69 sec pulsations suffered slow phase modulations by ± 0.7 sec, with a period of ∼ 15 h. When this effect is interpreted as free precession of the neutron star, the object is inferred to deviate from spherical symmetry by ∼ 1.6 × 10(-4) in its moments of inertia. This deformation, when ascribed to magnetic pressure, suggests a strong toroidal magnetic field, ∼ 10(12) T, residing inside the object. This provides one of the first observational approaches towards toroidal magnetic fields of magnetars.

  4. Magnetic-field dependence of strongly anisotropic spin reorientation transition in NdFeO3: a terahertz study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Junjie; Song, Gaibei; Wang, Dongyang; Jin, Zuanming; Tian, Zhen; Lin, Xian; Han, Jiaguang; Ma, Guohong; Cao, Shixun; Cheng, Zhenxiang

    2016-03-23

    One of the biggest challenges in spintronics is finding how to switch the magnetization of a material. One way of the spin switching is the spin reorientation transition (SRT), a switching of macroscopic magnetization rotated by 90°. The macroscopic magnetization in a NdFeO3 single crystal rotates from Γ4 to Γ2 via Γ24 as the temperature is decreased from 170 to 100 K, while it can be switched back to Γ4 again by increasing the temperature. However, the precise roles of the magnetic-field induced SRT are still unclear. By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), here, we show that the magnetic-field induced SRT between Γ4 and Γ2 is strongly anisotropic, depending on the direction of the applied magnetic field. Our experimental results are well interpreted by the anisotropy of rare-earth Nd(3+) ion. Furthermore, we find that the critical magnetic-field required for SRT can be modified by changing the temperature. Our study suggests that the anisotropic SRT in NdFeO3 single crystal provides a platform to facilitate the potential applications in robust spin memory devices.

  5. Shannon entropy as an indicator of atomic avoided crossings in strong parallel magnetic and electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Férez, R; Dehesa, J S

    2003-09-12

    Avoided crossings are the most distinctive atomic spectroscopic features in the presence of magnetic and electric fields. We point out the role of Shannon's information entropy as an indicator or predictor of these phenomena by studying the dynamics of some excited states of hydrogen in the presence of parallel magnetic and electric fields. Moreover, in addition to the well-known energy level repulsion, it is found that Shannon's entropy manifests the informational exchange of the involved states as the magnetic field strength is varied across the narrow region where an avoided crossing occurs.

  6. The exotic $H_3^{2+}$ ion in a strong magnetic field. Linear configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Turbiner, A. V.; Vieyra, J. C. López; Guevara, N. L.

    2004-01-01

    An accurate study of the lowest $1\\sigma_g$ and the low-lying excited $1\\sigma_u$, $1\\pi_{u,g}$, $1\\delta_{g,u}$ electronic states of the exotic molecular ion $H_3^{2+}$ in linear configuration parallel to a magnetic field is carried out. The magnetic field ranges from $10^{10}$ G up to $4.414 \\times 10^{13}$ G where non-relativistic considerations are justified. The variational method is exploited and the {\\it same} trial function is used for different magnetic fields. It is shown that the s...

  7. Pressure effect on the low-temperature remanences of multidomain magnetite: Change in the Verwey transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Nishioka, T.; Kodama, K.; Mochizuki, N.; Tsunakawa, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Verwey transition of magnetite is the basic issues for the rock magnetism, since main magnetic mineral of terrestrial rocks is magnetite and its associates. One of the most important issues concerning the Verwey transition is the change in transition temperature (Tv) due to pressure, which is thought to improve our understanding of its electric and magnetic nature in relation to the phase diagram. Recently, the opposite pressure effects of the transition temperature were reported applying the different experimental method. Measuring the electrical resistivity of single crystalline samples, Môri et al. [2002] reported that Tv becomes lower with increasing pressure by 9 GPa. In contrast, Pasternak et al. [2003] reported from Mössbauer experiment that transition temperature becomes higher with increasing pressure by 30 GPa. Thus the change in transition temperature with pressure has been controversial, and nature of the Verwey transition is still unclear. The magnetic property measurements using low temperature cycle are a powerful tool for identifying the state of magnetic minerals. Carporzen and Gilder [2010] conducted the thermal demagnetization experiment of low-temperature remanences of magnetite, and observed an increase in Tv with increasing pretreated pressure. From this result, they suggested that the Verwey transition of magnetite have the potential of a geobarometer. Modern techniques of high-pressure experiments enable us to measure sample magnetizations under pressure [Gilder et al., 2002; Kodama and Nishioka, 2005; Sadykov et al., 2008]. In the present study, systematic experiments of low-temperature remanences have been conducted for powder samples of stoichiometric magnetite under pressure up to 0.7 GPa using the high-pressure cell specially designed for MPMS, which was made of CuBe and ZrO2 [Kodama and Nishioka, 2005]. Natural magnetite of large single crystals were crushed by hand and sieved in an ultrasonic bath to be ~50 μm in size. For

  8. FABRICATION OF TEXTURED HEMATITE CERAMICS USING STRONG MAGNETIC ORIENTATION PROCESSING AND CHARACTERISTIC OF ANISOTROPIC PROPERTIES

    OpenAIRE

    山崎, 歩; YAMASAKI, Ayumu

    2015-01-01

    We utilized the crystallographic relationship between hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) and paramagnetic goethite (α-FeOOH) to fabricate oriented hematite sintered compact. Goethite powders were synthesized by alkaline precipitation of ferric nitrate solution using sodium hydroxide followed by aging. Goethite green compacts prepared by the magnetic field-assisted colloidal processing technique were sintered. The c-axis of hematite was aligned parallel to the applied magnetic field. Relativ...

  9. Molecule Induced Strong Exchange Coupling between Ferromagnetic Electrodes of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    OpenAIRE

    Tyagi, Pawan

    2011-01-01

    Multilayer edge molecular spintronics device (MEMSD) approach can produce novel logic and memory units for the computers. MEMSD are produced by bridging the molecular channels across the insulator, in the exposed edge region(s) of a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ). The bridged molecular channels start serving as the dominant exchange coupling medium between the two ferromagnetic electrodes of a MTJ. Present study focus on the effect of molecule enhanced exchange coupling on the magnetic proper...

  10. Stellar feedback strongly alters the amplification and morphology of galactic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kung-Yi; Hayward, Christopher C.; Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Kereš, Dušan

    2018-01-01

    Using high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic simulations of idealized, non-cosmological galaxies, we investigate how cooling, star formation and stellar feedback affect galactic magnetic fields. We find that the amplification histories, saturation values and morphologies of the magnetic fields vary considerably depending on the baryonic physics employed, primarily because of differences in the gas density distribution. In particular, adiabatic runs and runs with a subgrid (effective equation of state) stellar feedback model yield lower saturation values and morphologies that exhibit greater large-scale order compared with runs that adopt explicit stellar feedback and runs with cooling and star formation but no feedback. The discrepancies mostly lie in gas denser than the galactic average, which requires cooling and explicit fragmentation to capture. Independent of the baryonic physics included, the magnetic field strength scales with gas density as B ∝ n2/3, suggesting isotropic flux freezing or equipartition between the magnetic and gravitational energies during the field amplification. We conclude that accurate treatments of cooling, star formation and stellar feedback are crucial for obtaining the correct magnetic field strength and morphology in dense gas, which, in turn, is essential for properly modelling other physical processes that depend on the magnetic field, such as cosmic ray feedback.

  11. Strong 3D and 1D magnetism in hexagonal Fe-chalcogenides FeS and FeSe vs. weak magnetism in hexagonal FeTe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David S

    2017-06-13

    We present a comparative theoretical study of the hexagonal forms of the Fe-chalcogenides FeS, FeSe and FeTe with their better known tetragonal forms. While the tetragonal forms exhibit only an incipient antiferromagnetism and experimentally show superconductivity when doped, the hexagonal forms of FeS and FeSe display a robust magnetism. We show that this strong magnetism arises from a van Hove singularity associated with the direct Fe-Fe c-axis chains in the generally more three-dimensional NiAs structure. We also find that hexagonal FeTe is much less magnetic than the other two hexagonal materials, so that unconventional magnetically-mediated superconductivity is possible, although a large T c value is unlikely.

  12. Signatures of pairing in the magnetic excitation spectrum of strongly correlated two-leg ladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, A.; Patel, N. D.; Dagotto, E.; Alvarez, G.

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic interactions are widely believed to play a crucial role in the microscopic mechanism leading to high critical temperature superconductivity. It is therefore important to study the signatures of pairing in the magnetic excitation spectrum of simple models known to show unconventional superconducting tendencies. Using the density matrix renormalization group technique, we calculate the dynamical spin structure factor S (k ,ω ) of a generalized t -U -J Hubbard model away from half filling in a two-leg ladder geometry. The addition of J enhances pairing tendencies. We analyze quantitatively the signatures of pairing in the magnetic excitation spectra. We found that the superconducting pair-correlation strength, that can be estimated independently from ground state properties, is closely correlated with the integrated low-energy magnetic spectral weight in the vicinity of (π ,π ) . In this wave-vector region, robust spin incommensurate features develop with increasing doping. The branch of the spectrum with rung direction wave vector krung=0 does not change substantially with doping where pairing dominates and thus plays a minor role. We discuss the implications of our results for neutron scattering experiments, where the spin excitation dynamics of hole-doped quasi-one-dimensional magnetic materials can be measured and also address implications for recent resonant inelastic x-ray scattering experiments.

  13. Topological phases in superconductor-noncollinear magnet interfaces with strong spin-orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menke, H.; Schnyder, A.P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Toews, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Quantum Matter Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2016-07-01

    Majorana fermions are predicted to emerge at interfaces between conventional s-wave superconductors and non-collinear magnets. In these heterostructures, the spin moments of the non-collinear magnet induce a low-energy band of Shiba bound states in the superconductor. Depending on the type of order of the magnet, the band structure of these bound states can be topologically nontrivial. Thus far, research has focused on systems where the influence of spin-orbit coupling can be neglected. Here, we explore the interplay between non-collinear (or non-coplanar) spin textures and Rashba-type spin-orbit interaction. This situation is realized, for example, in heterostructures between helical magnets and heavy elemental superconductors, such as Pb. Using a unitary transformation in spin space, we show that the effects of Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling are equivalent to the effects of the non-collinear spin texture of the helical magnet. We explore the topological phase diagram as a function of spin-orbit coupling, spin texture, and chemical potential, and find many interesting topological phases, such as p{sub x}-, (p{sub x} + p{sub y})-, and (p{sub x} + i p{sub y})-wave states. Conditions for the formation and the nature of Majorana edge channels are examined. Furthermore, we study the topological edge currents of these phases.

  14. Standing Strong: Maloney Interdistrict Magnet School Japanese Language and Culture Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhi, Jessica; Yamashita-Iverson, Kazumi

    2009-01-01

    Maloney Interdistrict Magnet School (MIMS) is the only elementary school in Waterbury that has a world language program and is one of only two elementary Japanese programs in Connecticut. In the past 15 years, more than 1500 students have participated in its Japanese Language and Culture (JLC) Program in grades Prekindergarten through 5th. The JLC…

  15. Complex and strongly anisotropic magnetism in the pure spin system EuRh2Si2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiro, Silvia; Geibel, Christoph

    2014-01-29

    In divalent Eu systems, the 4f local moment has a pure spin state J = S = 7/2. Although the absence of orbital moment precludes crystal electric field effects, we report a sizable magnetic anisotropy in single crystals of EuRh2Si2. We observed a surprisingly complex magnetic behavior with three successive phase transitions. The Eu(2+) moments order in a probably amplitude-modulated structure below 24.5 K, undergoing a further transition to a structure that is possibly of the equal-moment type, and a first order transition at lower temperatures, presumably into a spin spiral structure. The sharp metamagnetic transition observed at low fields applied perpendicular to the hard axis is consistent with a change from a spiral to a fan structure. These magnetic structures are presumably formed by ferromagnetic planes perpendicular to the c axis, stacked antiferromagnetically along c but not of type I, at least just below the ordering temperature. Since EuRh2Si2 is isoelectronic and isostructural to EuFe2As2 at room temperature, our results are also relevant for the complex Eu-magnetism observed there, especially for the transition from an antiferromagnetic to a ferromagnetic state observed in EuFe2P2 upon substituting As by P.

  16. Can a Hexapole magnet of an ECR Ion Source be too strong?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drentje, A. G.; Barzangy, F.; Kremers, H. R.; Meyer, D.; Mulder, J.; Sijbring, J.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract: Experience of many ECRIS designers and users during more than a decade has given a few experimental rules, or "scaling laws". Many of these have been discussed at the ECRIS workshops. After the 1993 workshop it was concluded that the properties of the magnetic trap, in particular the

  17. Thermal transport in Weyl, double-Weyl, Dirac, and magnetically ordered systems with strong spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiete, Gregory A.

    In this talk I will discuss some of our recent work on the thermal transport properties of Weyl and Dirac semimetals, double-Weyl semimetals, and magnetically ordered insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling. The thermal properties will be described primarily within the context of a Boltzmann transport theory. For the Weyl/Dirac systems we study the temperature, disorder, carrier density, and field (both magnetic and electric) dependent response. The double-Weyl system is predicted to exhibit a spatially anisotropic response that would allow one to distinguish it from the single Weyl system in transport measurements. In addition, I will touch on some of our work related to electronic cooling by phonons in Dirac and Weyl semimetals. For the magnetically ordered insulators with strong spin-orbit coupling, we study the Kitaev-Heisenberg model which exhibits 4 different ordered phases depending on the relative importance of the spin-orbit coupling, and a model with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions motivated by thin film pyrochlore iridates. We compute the thermal conductivity tensor and conclude that some properties of the magnetic order and its excitations, including topological magnon bands, can be inferred from the anisotropies and temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. We gratefully acknowledge financial support from the ARO, DARPA, and NSF.

  18. Strong magnetic field generated by the extreme oxygen-rich red supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnaga, Hiroko; Claussen, Mark J.; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Shimojo, Masumi

    2017-12-01

    Evolved stars experience high mass-loss rates forming thick circumstellar envelopes (CSEs). The circumstellar material is made of the result of stellar nucleosynthesis and, as such, plays a crucial role in the chemical evolution of galaxies and the universe. Since asymmetric geometries of CSEs are common, and with very complex structures for some cases, radiative pressure from the stars can explain only a small portion of the mass-loss processes; thus the essential driving mechanism is still unknown, particularly for high-mass stars. Here we report on magnetic field measurements associated with the well-known extreme red supergiant (RSG) VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa). We measured the linear polarization and the Zeeman splitting of the SiO v = 0, J = 1-0 transition using a sensitive radio interferometer. The measured magnetic field strengths are surprisingly high; their upper limits range between 150 and 650 G within 530 au (˜80 R*) of the star. The lower limit of the field strength is expected to be at least ˜10 G based on the high degree of linear polarization. Since the field strengths are very high, the magnetic field must be a key element in understanding the stellar evolution of VY CMa, as well as the dynamical and chemical evolution of the complex CSE of the star. M-type RSGs, with large stellar surface, were thought to be very slow rotators. This would seem to make a dynamo in operation difficult, and would also dilute any fossil magnetic field. At least for VY CMa, we expect that powerful dynamo processes must still be active to generate the intense magnetic field.

  19. FTIR investigation of the effects of ultra-strong static magnetic field on the secondary structures of protein in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zichao; Hu, Xing; Zhao, Xusheng; Ren, Zhongming; Ding, Guoji

    2009-07-01

    Secondary structures of protein in Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus) exposed to the ultra-strong static magnetic field (SMF) were investigated by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Difference index D value of amide I (1600-1700 cm -1) showed that the ultra-strong magnetic field had little impact on S. aureus, but had strong impact on E. coli. The results indicated that 3.46-9.92% of the disorder coils in the secondary structures of protein in E. coli were turned into α-helices under SMF while applying deconvolution and curve fitting to amide I. At the same time, intermolecular β-sheets transforming into intramolecular ones suggested that cohesion among protein molecules had been destroyed and intramolecular hydrogen bonds strengthened. All the differences among the compositions of protein's secondary structures in E. coli were mostly due to the varying degrees of various proteins affected by the magnetic field. The results may provide new insights into the structural changes of proteins induced by the SMF.

  20. Biomaterials and magnetism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Senthilkumar (Newgen Imaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    for magnetic bioseparation, MRI contrast agent and drug delivery. For bioapplications (e.g. MRI contrast agent, bioseparation etc.), superparamagnetic particles are found superior to ferro/ferri magnetic particles due to absence of remanance. Since a magnetic mateiral exhibits magnetic properties only in the presence of a ...

  1. Microgravity simulation by diamagnetic levitation: effects of a strong gradient magnetic field on the transcriptional profile of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Raul; Larkin, Oliver J; Dijkstra, Camelia E; Hill, Richard J A; Anthony, Paul; Davey, Michael R; Eaves, Laurence; van Loon, Jack J W A; Medina, F Javier; Marco, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Many biological systems respond to the presence or absence of gravity. Since experiments performed in space are expensive and can only be undertaken infrequently, Earth-based simulation techniques are used to investigate the biological response to weightlessness. A high gradient magnetic field can be used to levitate a biological organism so that its net weight is zero. We have used a superconducting magnet to assess the effect of diamagnetic levitation on the fruit fly D. melanogaster in levitation experiments that proceeded for up to 22 consecutive days. We have compared the results with those of similar experiments performed in another paradigm for microgravity simulation, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM). We observed a delay in the development of the fruit flies from embryo to adult. Microarray analysis indicated changes in overall gene expression of imagoes that developed from larvae under diamagnetic levitation, and also under simulated hypergravity conditions. Significant changes were observed in the expression of immune-, stress-, and temperature-response genes. For example, several heat shock proteins were affected. We also found that a strong magnetic field, of 16.5 Tesla, had a significant effect on the expression of these genes, independent of the effects associated with magnetically-induced levitation and hypergravity. Diamagnetic levitation can be used to simulate an altered effective gravity environment in which gene expression is tuned differentially in diverse Drosophila melanogaster populations including those of different age and gender. Exposure to the magnetic field per se induced similar, but weaker, changes in gene expression.

  2. Evidence for strong enhancement of the magnetic ordering temperature of trivalent Nd metal under extreme pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Bi, W.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2017-05-01

    Four-point electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on Nd metal and dilute magnetic alloys containing up to 1 at.% Nd in superconducting Y for temperatures 1.5-295 K under pressures to 210 GPa. The magnetic ordering temperature To of Nd appears to rise steeply under pressure, increasing ninefold to 180 K at 70 GPa before falling rapidly. Y(Nd) alloys display both a resistivity minimum and superconducting pair breaking Δ Tc as large as 38 K/at.% Nd. The present results give evidence that for pressures above 30-40 GPa, the exchange coupling J between Nd ions and conduction electrons becomes negative, thus activating Kondo physics in this highly correlated electron system. The rise and fall of To and Δ Tc with pressure can be accounted for in terms of an increase in the Kondo temperature.

  3. Variational Monte Carlo calculations of lithium atom in strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doma, S. B., E-mail: sbdoma@alexu.edu.eg [Alexandria University, Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt); Shaker, M. O.; Farag, A. M. [Tanta University, Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt); El-Gammal, F. N., E-mail: famta-elzahraa4@yahoo.com [Menofia University, Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt)

    2017-01-15

    The variational Monte Carlo method is applied to investigate the ground state and some excited states of the lithium atom and its ions up to Z = 10 in the presence of an external magnetic field regime with γ = 0–100 arb. units. The effect of increasing field strength on the ground state energy is studied and precise values for the crossover field strengths were obtained. Our calculations are based on using accurate forms of trial wave functions, which were put forward in calculating energies in the absence of magnetic field. Furthermore, the value of Y at which ground-state energy of the lithium atom approaches to zero was calculated. The obtained results are in good agreement with the most recent values and also with the exact values.

  4. Probing the Electromagnetic Local Density of States with a Strongly Mixed Electric and Magnetic Dipole Emitter

    CERN Document Server

    Karaveli, Sinan; Zia, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We identify a solid-state quantum emitter whose room-temperature radiative decay is mediated by a nearly equal mixture of isotropic electric dipole (ED) and magnetic dipole (MD) transitions. Using energy-momentum spectroscopy, we experimentally show that the near-infrared $^3$T$_2{\\rightarrow}^3$A$_2$ emission from divalent-nickel-doped magnesium oxide (Ni$^{2+}$:MgO) is composed of $\\sim$50% MD and $\\sim$50% ED transitions. We then demonstrate that the spontaneous emission rate of these ions near planar interfaces is determined by the combined electric and magnetic local density of optical states (LDOS). This electromagnetic LDOS probes the total mode density, and thus similar to thermal emission, these unique electronic emitters effectively excite all polarizations and orientations of the electromagnetic field.

  5. High-latitude ionospheric convection during strong interplanetary magnetic field B-y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, C.S.; Sofko, G.J.; Murr, D.

    1999-01-01

    An unusual high-latitude ionospheric pattern was observed on March 23, 1995. ionospheric convection appeared as clockwise merging convection cell focused at 84 degrees magnetic latitude around 1200 MLT. No signature of the viscous convection cell in the afternoon sector was observed....... The interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions corresponding to the occurrence of the ionospheric convection were B-x approximate to 1 nT, B-y approximate to 10 nT, and B-z ... conditions. It is found that the location of the convection cell focus in this event is at least two hours earlier than those previously observed and about 5 hours earlier than that predicted by the MHD model. The observations may have some significant implications on the antiparallel merging theory....

  6. Thermally robust Mo/CoFeB/MgO trilayers with strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T; Zhang, Y; Cai, J W; Pan, H Y

    2014-07-31

    The recent discovery of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) at the CoFeB/MgO interface has accelerated the development of next generation high-density non-volatile memories by utilizing perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions (p-MTJs). However, the insufficient interfacial PMA in the typical Ta/CoFeB/MgO system will not only complicate the p-MTJ optimization, but also limit the device density scalability. Moreover, the rapid decreases of PMA in Ta/CoFeB/MgO films with annealing temperature higher than 300°C will make the compatibility with CMOS integrated circuits a big problem. By replacing the Ta buffer layer with a thin Mo film, we have increased the PMA in the Ta/CoFeB/MgO structure by 20%. More importantly, the thermal stability of the perpendicularly magnetized (001)CoFeB/MgO films is greatly increased from 300°C to 425°C, making the Mo/CoFeB/MgO films attractive for a practical p-MTJ application.

  7. High-coercivity magnetism in nanostructures with strong easy-plane anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, Balamurugan, E-mail: bbalasubramanian2@unl.edu, E-mail: dsellmyer@unl.edu; Manchanda, Priyanka; Skomski, Ralph; Mukherjee, Pinaki; Das, Bhaskar; Sellmyer, David J., E-mail: bbalasubramanian2@unl.edu, E-mail: dsellmyer@unl.edu [Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Valloppilly, Shah R. [Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Hadjipanayis, George C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2016-04-11

    We report the fabrication of a rare-earth-free permanent-magnet material Co{sub 3}Si in the form of nanoparticles and investigate its magnetic properties by experiments and density-functional theory (DFT). The DFT calculations show that bulk Co{sub 3}Si has an easy-plane anisotropy with a high K{sub 1} ≈ −64 Merg/cm{sup 3} (−6.4 MJ/m{sup 3}) and magnetic polarization of 9.2 kG (0.92 T). In spite of having a negative anisotropy that generally leads to negligibly low coercivities in bulk crystals, Co{sub 3}Si nanoparticles exhibit high coercivities (17.4 kOe at 10 K and 4.3 kOe at 300 K). This result is a consequence of the unique nanostructure made possible by an effective easy-axis alignment in the cluster-deposition method and explained using micromagnetic analysis as a nanoscale phenomenon involving quantum-mechanical exchange interactions.

  8. Magnetization analysis of Ba ferrite magnets by electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiso, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 1-1 Katahira, 2-Chome, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Shindo, D. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 1-1 Katahira, 2-Chome, Aobaku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)]. E-mail: shindo@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Sato, T. [NEC TOKIN Techno Service Ltd., 6-7-1 Koriyama, Taihaku-ku, Miyagi 982-8510 (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    The magnetization distributions of anisotropic and isotropic Ba ferrite magnets in demagnetized and remanent states are investigated by electron holography. A polar diagram is used to obtain the quantitative mapping of the magnetization distribution. Through the polar diagrams, it is clarified that the magnetization distribution of Ba ferrite magnets closely depends on their magnetic properties. The dispersions of the magnetization direction of the two specimens in the remanent states correlate well with their remanent flux density. In the anisotropic specimen, the magnetization reversal occurs drastically under an applied field of 360 kA/m, while in the isotropic one, the direction of magnetization changes gradually. The results exhibit a good correspondence between the change in the magnetization distribution and the shape of the demagnetization curves.

  9. The H$_2^+$ ion in a strong magnetic field. Lowest excited states

    OpenAIRE

    Turbiner, A. V.; Vieyra, J. C. Lopez

    2003-01-01

    As a continuation of our previous work ({\\it Phys. Rev. A68, 012504 (2003)}) an accurate study of the lowest $1\\si_g$ and the low-lying excited $1\\si_u$, $2\\si_g$, $1\\pi_{u,g}$, $1\\de_{g,u}$ electronic states of the molecular ion $H_2^+$ is made. Since the parallel configuration where the molecular axis coincides with the magnetic field direction is optimal, this is the only configuration which is considered. The variational method is applied and the {\\it same} trial function is used for diff...

  10. A strong, highly-tilted interstellar magnetic field near the Solar System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opher, M; Bibi, F Alouani; Toth, G; Richardson, J D; Izmodenov, V V; Gombosi, T I

    2009-12-24

    Magnetic fields play an important (sometimes dominant) role in the evolution of gas clouds in the Galaxy, but the strength and orientation of the field in the interstellar medium near the heliosphere has been poorly constrained. Previous estimates of the field strength range from 1.8-2.5 microG and the field was thought to be parallel to the Galactic plane or inclined by 38-60 degrees (ref. 2) or 60-90 degrees (ref. 3) to this plane. These estimates relied either on indirect observational inferences or modelling in which the interstellar neutral hydrogen was not taken into account. Here we report measurements of the deflection of the solar wind plasma flows in the heliosheath to determine the magnetic field strength and orientation in the interstellar medium. We find that the field strength in the local interstellar medium is 3.7-5.5 microG. The field is tilted approximately 20-30 degrees from the interstellar medium flow direction (resulting from the peculiar motion of the Sun in the Galaxy) and is at an angle of about 30 degrees from the Galactic plane. We conclude that the interstellar medium field is turbulent or has a distortion in the solar vicinity.

  11. Density-matrix-functional calculations for matter in strong magnetic fields: Ground states of heavy atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kristinn; Yngvason, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    We report on a numerical study of the density matrix functional introduced by Lieb, Solovej, and Yngvason for the investigation of heavy atoms in high magnetic fields. This functional describes exactly the quantum mechanical ground state of atoms and ions in the limit when the nuclear charge Z...... and the electron number N tend to infinity with N/Z fixed, and the magnetic field B tends to infinity in such a way that B/Z4/3→∞. We have calculated electronic density profiles and ground-state energies for values of the parameters that prevail on neutron star surfaces and compared them with results obtained...... by other methods. For iron at B=1012 G the ground-state energy differs by less than 2% from the Hartree-Fock value. We have also studied the maximal negative ionization of heavy atoms in this model at various field strengths. In contrast to Thomas-Fermi type theories atoms can bind excess negative charge...

  12. Guiding of relativistic electron beams in dense matter by longitudinally imposed strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly-Grandvaux, M; Bellei, C; Forestier-Colleoni, P; Fujioka, S; Giuffrida, L; Honrubia, J J; Batani, D; Bouillaud, R; Chevrot, M; Cross, J E; Crowston, R; Dorard, S; Dubois, J -L; Ehret, M; Gregori, G; Hulin, S; Kojima, S; Loyez, E; Marques, J -R; Morace, A; Nicolai, Ph; Roth, M; Sakata, S; Schaumann, G; Serres, F; Servel, J; Tikhonchuk, V T; Woolsey, N; Zhang, Z

    2016-01-01

    High-energy-density flows through dense matter are needed for effective progress in the production of laser-driven intense sources of energetic particles and radiation, in driving matter to extreme temperatures creating state regimes relevant for planetary or stellar science as yet inaccessible at the laboratory scale, or in achieving high-gain laser-driven thermonuclear fusion. When interacting at the surface of dense (opaque) targets, intense lasers accelerate relativistic electron beams which transport a significant fraction of the laser energy into the target depth. However, the overall laser-to-target coupling efficiency is impaired by the large divergence of the electron beam, intrinsic to the laser-plasma interaction. By imposing a longitudinal 600T laser-driven magnetic-field, our experimental results show guided >10MA-current of MeV-electrons in solid matter. Due to the applied magnetic field, the transported energy-density and the peak background electron temperature at the 60micron-thick targets re...

  13. Multicomponent magnetization in synthetic hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokking, Laura B.; Tauxe, Lisa

    We have investigated the directional properties of chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) carried by hematite synthesized in two successive generations in two distinct magnetic fields. Previously, we showed that the magnetization of hematite synthesized in a single generation under constant magnetic field conditions parallels the field in which it grew; we now demonstrate that hematite precipitated in two distinct magnetic fields carries a remanence that is far more complex. In the simplest of these two-field experiments, we precipitated hematite in one generation in the presence of a magnetic field ( B1) and in a second generation in zero field. The synthetic material acquired a single component of remanence approximately parallel to B1. We then precipitated hematite in two generations, but under constant magnetic field conditions. The resulting remanence was also uni-vectorial and paralleled the applied field. Finally, we synthesized hematite in two generations using perpendicular orientations of the applied field for the two generations. The resulting behavior of magnetic remanence was complex and samples recorded a variety of directions: both parallel and antiparallel to B1 and B2, as well as intermediate between the two fields. Four categories of behavior describe all observations. We suggest that the various types of behavior reflect the complexity inherent in the process of remanence acquisition by crystals precipitating from solution. The behavior of remanence can be explained in terms of a competition between the effect of the ambient magnetic field, the demagnetizing fields generated by pre-existing particles and possibly also exchange effects between the second-generation particles and first-generation particles used as seed crystals. A model that accurately predicts the behavior of remanence in a particular multigenerational experiment is difficult to conceive at present because of the complexity of the interplay of competing factors on the magnetization

  14. Microgravity simulation by diamagnetic levitation: effects of a strong gradient magnetic field on the transcriptional profile of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herranz Raul

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological systems respond to the presence or absence of gravity. Since experiments performed in space are expensive and can only be undertaken infrequently, Earth-based simulation techniques are used to investigate the biological response to weightlessness. A high gradient magnetic field can be used to levitate a biological organism so that its net weight is zero. Results We have used a superconducting magnet to assess the effect of diamagnetic levitation on the fruit fly D. melanogaster in levitation experiments that proceeded for up to 22 consecutive days. We have compared the results with those of similar experiments performed in another paradigm for microgravity simulation, the Random Positioning Machine (RPM. We observed a delay in the development of the fruit flies from embryo to adult. Microarray analysis indicated changes in overall gene expression of imagoes that developed from larvae under diamagnetic levitation, and also under simulated hypergravity conditions. Significant changes were observed in the expression of immune-, stress-, and temperature-response genes. For example, several heat shock proteins were affected. We also found that a strong magnetic field, of 16.5 Tesla, had a significant effect on the expression of these genes, independent of the effects associated with magnetically-induced levitation and hypergravity. Conclusions Diamagnetic levitation can be used to simulate an altered effective gravity environment in which gene expression is tuned differentially in diverse Drosophila melanogaster populations including those of different age and gender. Exposure to the magnetic field per se induced similar, but weaker, changes in gene expression.

  15. Liquid metal flow in a U-bend in a strong uniform magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molokov, S.; Buehler, L. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Thermo- und Fluiddynamik (IATF))

    1994-05-25

    Magnetohydrodynamic flows in a U-bend and in a right-angle bend are considered with reference to the toroidal concepts of self-cooled liquid-metal blankets. The ducts composing the bends have rectangular cross sections. The applied magnetic field is aligned with the toroidal duct and perpendicular to ducts supplying liquid metal. For high Hartmann numbers the flow region is divided into cores and boundary layers of different types. The magnetohydrodynamic equations are reduced to a system of partial differential equations governing wall electric potentials and the core pressure. The system is solved numerically. The results show that the flow is very sensitive to variations of certain parameters, such as the wall conductance ratio and the aspect ratio of the toroidal duct cross-section. Depending on these parameters, the flow exhibits a variety of qualitatively different flow patterns. In particular, structures of helical and vortex type are obtained. A high-velocity jet occurs at the plasma-facing first wall and there is mixing of the fluid in the toroidal duct. These factors lead to desirable heat-transfer conditions. (Author).

  16. Spin injection at remanence into III-V spin light-emitting diodes using (Co/Pt) ferromagnetic injectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarpellon, J.; Jaffrès, H.; Frougier, J.; Deranlot, C.; George, J. M.; Mosca, D. H.; Lemaître, A.; Freimuth, F.; Duong, Quang Ha; Renucci, P.; Marie, X.

    2012-11-01

    We have studied the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of Co/Pt multilayers and the electron spin injection efficiency by optical spectroscopy from a [Co(0.6 nm)/Pt(1 nm)]4/Fe(0.3 nm)/MgO perpendicular tunnel spin injector grown on AlGaAs/GaAs semiconductor light-emitting diodes. We observe a 2.5% circular polarization at low temperature close to the magnetic remanence when the 0.3 nm Fe film of the ferromagnetic injector is sufficiently thin to maintain the magnetization out of plane. The acquired squared magnetization cycle is explained by the remaining interlayer exchange coupling existing between Fe and the (Co/Pt) multilayer through Pt or possible perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at the MgO/Fe interface. The corresponding spin polarization of the current is then estimated as 7%, measured by photoluminescence techniques, after the necessary up-renormalization, taking into account the electron spin-flip rate in the quantum well. In contrast, no circular polarization is observed when the thin Fe layer is removed and despite the rather high magnetic polarizability of the 5d9 electronic open shell of Pt at the interface with MgO. This emphasizes the reduced size of tunneling branching of wave functions at the interface, of the order of the atomic plane unit.

  17. Magnetism and local symmetry breaking in a Mott insulator with strong spin orbit interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, L; Song, M; Liu, W; Reyes, A P; Kuhns, P; Lee, H O; Fisher, I R; Mitrović, V F

    2017-02-09

    Study of the combined effects of strong electronic correlations with spin-orbit coupling (SOC) represents a central issue in quantum materials research. Predicting emergent properties represents a huge theoretical problem since the presence of SOC implies that the spin is not a good quantum number. Existing theories propose the emergence of a multitude of exotic quantum phases, distinguishable by either local point symmetry breaking or local spin expectation values, even in materials with simple cubic crystal structure such as Ba 2 NaOsO 6 . Experimental tests of these theories by local probes are highly sought for. Our local measurements designed to concurrently probe spin and orbital/lattice degrees of freedom of Ba 2 NaOsO 6 provide such tests. Here we show that a canted ferromagnetic phase which is preceded by local point symmetry breaking is stabilized at low temperatures, as predicted by quantum theories involving multipolar spin interactions.

  18. Stable perfectly matched layers for a cold plasma in a strong background magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bécache, Eliane; Joly, Patrick; Kachanovska, Maryna

    2017-07-01

    This work addresses the question of the construction of stable perfectly matched layers (PMLs) for a cold plasma in the infinitely large background magnetic field. We demonstrate that the traditional, Bérenger's perfectly matched layers are unstable when applied to this model, due to the presence of the backward propagating waves. To overcome this instability, we use a combination of two techniques presented in the article. First of all, we consider a simplified 2D model, which shares with the 3D case one of the difficulties for the PML treatment, namely, the presence of the backward propagating waves. Based on the fact that for a fixed frequency either forward or backward propagating waves are present, we stabilize the PMLs with the help of a frequency-dependent correction. An extra difficulty of the 3D model compared to the 2D case is the presence of both forward and backward waves for a fixed frequency. To overcome this problem we construct a system of equations that consists of two independent systems, which are equivalent to the original model. The first of the systems behaves like the 2D plasma model, and hence the PMLs are stabilized again with the help of the frequency-dependent correction. The second system resembles the Maxwell equations in vacuum, and hence the standard Bérenger's PMLs are stable for it. The systems are solved inside the perfectly matched layer, and coupled to the original Maxwell equations, which are solved in a physical domain, on a discrete level through an artificial layer. The numerical experiments confirm the stability of the new technique.

  19. Comparative studies of density-functional approximations for light atoms in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuming; Zhang, Liang; Trickey, S. B.

    2014-08-01

    For a wide range of magnetic fields, 0≤B≤2000 a.u., we present a systematic comparative study of the performance of different types of density-functional approximations in light atoms (2≤Z≤6). Local, generalized-gradient approximation (GGA; semilocal), and meta-GGA ground-state exchange-correlation (xc) functionals are compared on an equal footing with exact-exchange, Hartree-Fock (HF), and current-density-functional-theory (CDFT) approximations. Comparison also is made with published quantum Monte Carlo data. Though all approximations give qualitatively reasonable results, the exchange energies from local and GGA functionals are too negative for large B. Results from the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof ground-state GGA and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) ground-state meta-GGA functionals are very close. Because of confinement, self-interaction error in such functionals is more severe at large B than at B =0, hence self-interaction correction is crucial. Exact exchange combined with the TPSS correlation functional results in a self-interaction-free (xc) functional, from which we obtain atomic energies of comparable accuracy to those from correlated wave-function methods. Specifically for the B and C atoms, we provide beyond-HF energies in a wide range of B fields. Fully self-consistent CDFT calculations were done with the Vignale-Rasolt-Geldart (VRG) functional in conjunction with the PW92 xc functional. Current effects turn out to be small, and the vorticity variable in the VRG functional diverges in some low-density regions. This part of the study suggests that nonlocal, self-interaction-free functionals may be better than local approximations as a starting point for CDFT functional construction and that some basic variable other than the vorticity could be helpful in making CDFT calculations practical.

  20. Strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at FeCoB/MgO interface with an ultrathin HfOx insertion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Yongxi; Ralph, Daniel; Buhrman, Robert

    The realization of robust perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in heavy metal(HM)/FeCoB/MgO thin-film heterostructures has enabled a pathway for the implementation of high density memory elements based on perpendicularly magnetized tunnel junctions, and also provides a platform for the study and control of domain walls and of novel magnetic chiral structures such as skyrmions in nanowire structures. Here we report on the achievement of more robust PMA in Ta/FeCoB/MgO heterostructures by the insertion of an ultrathin HfOx passivation layer at the FeCoB/MgO interface. This is accomplished by depositing one to two atomic layers of Hf onto the FeCoB before the subsequent rf sputter deposition of the MgO layer, which fully oxidizes the Hf layer as confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The result is a strong interfacial perpendicular anisotropy energy density as large as 1.7 erg/cm-2 without any post-fabrication annealing treatment. Similar results have been achieved with the use of W and Pt HM base layers. This work broadens the class and enhances the capabilities of PMA HM/FM heterostructures for spintronics research and applications.

  1. A device to measure the effects of strong magnetic fields on the image resolution of PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, D; Chesi, E; Clinthorne, N H; Cochran, E; Honscheid, K; Huh, S S; Kagan, H; Knopp, M; Lacasta, C; Mikuz, M; Schmalbrock, P; Studen, A; Weilhammer, P

    2009-01-01

    Very high resolution images can be achieved in small animal PET systems utilizing solid state silicon pad detectors. As these systems approach sub-millimeter resolutions, the range of the positron is becoming the dominant contribution to image blur. The size of the positron range effect depends on the initial positron energy and hence the radioactive tracer used. For higher energy positron emitters, such as and , which are gaining importance in small animal studies, the width of the annihilation point distribution dominates the spatial resolution. This positron range effect can be reduced by embedding the field of view of the PET scanner in a strong magnetic field. In order to confirm this effect experimentally, we developed a high resolution PET instrument based on silicon pad detectors that can operate in a 7 T magnetic field. In this paper, we describe the instrument and present initial results of a study of the effects of magnetic fields up to 7 T on PET image resolution for and point sources.

  2. Increase of the energy necessary to probe ultraviolet theories due to the presence of a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-y-Romero, Rodolfo P.; Patiño, Leonardo; Ramírez-Urrutia, Tiber

    2017-11-01

    We use the gauge gravity correspondence to study the renormalization group flow of a double trace fermionic operator in a quark-gluon plasma subject to the influence of a strong magnetic field and compare it with the results for the case at zero temperature and no magnetic field, where the flow between two fixed points is observed. Our results show that the energy necessary to access the physics of the ultraviolet theory increases with the intensity of the magnetic field under which the processes happen. We provide arguments to support that this increase is scheme independent, and to exhibit further evidence we do a very simple calculation showing that the dimensional reduction expected in the gauge theory in this scenario is effective up to an energy scale that grows with the strength of such a background field. We also show that independently of the renormalization scheme, the coupling of the double trace operators in the ultraviolet fixed point increases with the intensity of the background field. These effects combined can change both, the processes that are expected to be involved in a collision experiment at a given energy and the azimuthal anisotropy of the measurements resulting of them.

  3. Interfaces between strongly correlated oxides: controlling charge transfer and induced magnetism by hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibes, Manuel

    At interfaces between conventional materials, band bending and alignment are controlled by differences in electrochemical potential. Applying this concept to oxides in which interfaces can be polar and cations may adopt a mixed valence has led to the discovery of novel two-dimensional states between simple band insulators such as LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. However, many oxides have a more complex electronic structure, with charge, orbital and/or spin orders arising from correlations between transition metal and oxygen ions. Strong correlations thus offer a rich playground to engineer functional interfaces but their compatibility with the classical band alignment picture remains an open question. In this talk we will show that beyond differences in electron affinities and polar effects, a key parameter determining charge transfer at correlated oxide interfaces is the energy required to alter the covalence of the metal-oxygen bond. Using the perovskite nickelate (RNiO3) family as a template, we have probed charge reconstruction at interfaces with gadolinium titanate GdTiO3 using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. We show that the charge transfer is thwarted by hybridization effects tuned by the rare-earth (R) size. Charge transfer results in an induced ferromagnetic-like state in the nickelate (observed by XMCD), exemplifying the potential of correlated interfaces to design novel phases. Further, our work clarifies strategies to engineer two-dimensional systems through the control of both doping and covalence. Work supported by ERC CoG MINT #615759.

  4. Magnetism and the interior of the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyal, P.; Parkin, C. W.; Daily, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    During the time period 1961-1972, 11 magnetometers were sent to the moon. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the results of lunar magnetometer data analysis, with emphasis on the lunar interior. Magnetic fields have been measured on the lunar surface at the Apollo 12, 14, 15, and 16 landing sites. The remanent field values at these sites are 38, 103 (maximum), 3, and 327 gammas (maximum), respectively. Simultaneous magnetic field and solar plasma pressure measurements show that the Apollo 12 and 16 remanent fields are compressed during times of high plasma dynamic pressure. Apollo 15 and 16 subsatellite magnetometers have mapped in detail the field above portions of the lunar surface and have placed an upper limit on the global permanent dipole moment. Satellite and surface measurements show strong evidence that the lunar crust is magnetized over much of the lunar globe. Magnetic fields are stronger in highland regions than in mare regions and stronger on the lunar far side than on the near side. The largest magnetic anomaly measured to date is between the craters Van de Graaff and Aitken on the lunar far side.

  5. Shape, size, and distribution of magnetic particles in Bjurbole chondrules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava, David F.

    1994-01-01

    Chondrules from the Bjurbole chondritic meteorite (L4) exhibit saturation remanence magnetization (SIRM) values which vary over three orders of magnitude. REM values (Natural Remanence Magnetization/SIRM) for Allende (C3V) and Chainpur (LL3) are less than 0.01 but in Bjurbole some chondrules were found to have REM values greater than 0.1 with several greater than 0.2. REM values greater than 0.1 are abnormal and cannot be acquired during weak field cooling. If exposure to a strong field (whatever the source) during the chondrules' history is responsible for the high REM values, was such history associated with a different processing which might have resulted in different shape, size, and distribution of metal particles compared to chondrules having REM values of less than 0.01? Furthermore, magnetic hysteresis results show a broad range of magnetic hardness and other intrinsic magnetic properties. These features must be related to (1) size and amount of metal; and (2) properties of, and amount of, tetrataenite in the chondrules (all chondrules thus far subjected to thermomagnetic analysis show the presence of tetrataenite). A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study is underway to determine the relationship between the shape, size, and distribution of metal particles within individual chondrules and the magnetic properties of these chondrules. Results from the SEM study in conjunction with magnetic property data may also help to discern effects from possible lightning strikes in the nebula prior to incorporation of the chondrules into the parent body.

  6. Phase manipulation of Goos–Hänchen shifts in a single-layer of graphene nanostructure under strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solookinejad, Gh; Jabbari, M.; Panahi, M.; Ahmadi Sangachin, E.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we discuss the phase management of Goos–Hänchen (GH) shifts of a probe light through a cavity with a single-layer graphene nanostructure under a strong magnetic field. By using the quantum mechanical density matrix formalism we study the GH shifts of reflected and transmitted light beams. It is realized that negative or positive GH shifts can be achieved simultaneously by tuning some controllable parameters such as relative phase and the Rabi frequency of the applied fields. Moreover, the thickness effect of the cavity structure is considered as an effective parameter for adjusting the GH shifts of reflected and transmitted light beams. We find that by choosing suitable parameters, a maximum negative shift of 4.5 mm and positive shift of 5.4 mm are possible for GH shifts in reflected and transmitted light. Our proposed model may be useful for developing all-optical devices in the infrared region.

  7. Buoyant flow in long vertical enclosures in the presence of a strong horizontal magnetic field. Part 2. finite enclosures

    CERN Document Server

    Authie, G; Tagawa, T

    2003-01-01

    Numerical computations and experiments were carried out for a buoyant flow of liquid metal (mercury in the experiments) in a long vertical enclosure of square cross-section, in the presence of a uniform horizontal magnetic field. A strong emphasis is put on the case of a magnetic field perpendicular to the applied temperature gradient for two reasons: (1) the MHD damping is smaller than with any other orientation, and (2) the quasi-two-dimensionality of the flow in this case yields a quite efficient velocity measurement technique. The enclosure is heated by a thermally controlled flow of water from one of the vertical walls and cooled by a similar technique from the facing wall. Those two walls are good thermal conductors (thick copper plates in the experiments), whereas the four other walls are thermally insulating. All walls are electrically insulated from the fluid. In this paper, as well as in the companion paper by Tagawa et al. (Eur. J. Mech. B Fluids 21 (4) (2002) 383-398), we model analytically the Ha...

  8. A magnetic nanoparticle-based aptasensor for selective and sensitive determination of lysozyme with strongly scattering silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun Mei; Zhan, Lei; Zheng, Lin Ling; Li, Yuan Fang; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-05-10

    Qualitative and quantitative determination of lysozyme concentrations in urine and serum with high selectivity and sensitivity is important for diagnosing the progression of several diseases. In this report, we devised an improved method for specifically detecting lysozyme by combining magnetic nanoparticles (for separation and enrichment), an aptamer (for selective binding of lysozyme) and strongly scattering silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, for detection by light scattering, but also providing another level of selectivity due to their electrostatic binding with lysozyme). In this system, 0.4-30 nM lysozyme could be simply detected owing to the decreased light scattering of AgNPs in solution after magnetic separation, with a detection limit of 100 pM. In addition, lysozyme was also able to be semi-quantified by using the dark-field light scattering images of AgNPs after enrichment by the MNP-apt-lysozyme complex. Moreover, this design shows great promise for the robust and reliable detection of lysozyme in real samples, with a recovery rate ranging from 98.6% to 101.3% in human serum samples. Therefore, this assay provided robust measurements with good specificity, sensitivity, and tolerance of changes in the sample matrix. We expect that this MNP-based aptasensor may find utility in the accurate diagnosis of lysozyme-related diseases.

  9. Resonant nuclear reaction 23Mg (p,γ) 24Al in strongly screening magnetized neutron star crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Liu, Dong-Mei

    2017-12-01

    Based on the relativistic theory of superstrong magnetic fields (SMF), by using three models those of Lai (LD), Fushiki (FGP), and our own (LJ), we investigate the influence of SMFs due to strong electron screening (SES) on the nuclear reaction 23Mg (p,γ) 24Al in magnetars. In a relatively low density environment (e.g., ρ 7102), our reaction rates can be 1.58 times and about three orders of magnitude larger than those of FGP and LD, respectively (B 12, ρ 7 are in units of 1012G, 107g cm‑3). The significant increase of strong screening rate can imply that more 23Mg will escape from the Ne-Na cycle due to SES in a SMF. As a consequence, the next reaction, 24Al (β+, ν) 24Mg, will produce more 24Mg to participate in the Mg-Al cycle. Thus, it may lead to synthesis of a large amount of A>20 nuclides in magnetars. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11565020), the Counterpart Foundation of Sanya (2016PT43), the Special Foundation of Science and Technology Cooperation for Advanced Academy and Regional of Sanya (2016YD28), the Scientific Research Starting Foundation for 515 Talented Project of Hainan Tropical Ocean University (RHDRC201701) and the Natural Science Foundation of Hainan Province (114012)

  10. Testing the use of viscous remanent magnetisation to date flood events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eMuxworthy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using erratics associated with large flood events, this paper assesses whether their viscous remanent magnetisation (VRM can be used to date the flood events. We tested this method using flood erratics from three large events: (1 the Late Pleistocene Bonneville mega-flood in Idaho, USA, (~14-18 ka, (2 the 1918 A.D. Mt. Katla, Iceland, eruption and associated jökulhaup (meltwater flood at Mýrdalssandur, and (3 the Markarfljót jökulhaup due to an earlier eruption of Mt. Katla (~2.5 ka. We measured 236 specimens, 66 of which yielded clear identifiable and measurable viscous magnetisation signals from erratics with clustered VRM directions. From the VRM unblocking temperatures, age estimates were made. The age estimate for the most recent event (Mýrdalssandur worked well, with a median estimated age of 80 years (with individual erratic estimates distributed between 61 – 105 years compared to the known age of 91 years. The ages of the other two events were over-estimated. The estimates for Markarfljót (15 ka (7 – 33 ka were based on the results of just one erratic. For the Bonneville flood the estimates were too old, however, this locality had the largest uncertainty in the ambient temperature used in the age determination; the VRM acquired is strongly dependent on the ambient temperature, the older the event the greater the uncertainty. Southern Idaho currently has hot summers, with average summer maximum temperatures of ~31 ˚C, but a mean annual temperature of only ~ 9 ˚C. It is suggested that the VRM dating method works best for recent events (< 2-3 ka where the ambient temperature history can be constrained.

  11. Validation of numerical solvers for liquid metal flow in a complex geometry in the presence of a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anita; Pulugundla, Gautam; Smolentsev, Sergey; Abdou, Mohamed; Bhattacharyay, Rajendraprasad

    2017-11-01

    Following the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code validation and verification proposal by Smolentsev et al. (Fusion Eng Des 100:65-72, 2015), we perform code to code and code to experiment comparisons between two computational solvers, FLUIDYN and HIMAG, which are presently considered as two of the prospective CFD tools for fusion blanket applications. In such applications, an electrically conducting breeder/coolant circulates in the blanket ducts in the presence of a strong plasma-confining magnetic field at high Hartmann numbers, Ha (Ha^2 is the ratio between electromagnetic and viscous forces) and high interaction parameters, N (N is the ratio of electromagnetic to inertial forces). The main objective of this paper is to provide the scientific and engineering community with common references to assist fusion researchers in the selection of adequate computational means to be used for blanket design and analysis. As an initial validation case, the two codes are applied to the classic problem of a laminar fully developed MHD flows in a rectangular duct. Both codes demonstrate a very good agreement with the analytical solution for Ha up to 15, 000. To address the capabilities of the two codes to properly resolve complex geometry flows, we consider a case of three-dimensional developing MHD flow in a geometry comprising of a series of interconnected electrically conducting rectangular ducts. The computed electric potential distributions for two flows (Case A) Ha=515 , N=3.2 and (Case B) Ha=2059 , N=63.8 are in very good agreement with the experimental data, while the comparisons for the MHD pressure drop are still unsatisfactory. To better interpret the observed differences, the obtained numerical data are analyzed against earlier theoretical and experimental studies for flows that involve changes in the relative orientation between the flow and the magnetic field.

  12. Behavior of Particle Depots in Molten Silicon During Float-Zone Growth in Strong Static Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauss, T.; SorgenFrei, T.; Croell, A.; Azizi, M.; Reimann, C.; Friedrich, J.; Volz, M. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the photovoltaics industry, the largest market share is represented by solar cells made from multicrystalline silicon, which is grown by directional solidification. During the growth process, the silicon melt is in contact with the silicon nitride coated crucible walls and the furnace atmosphere which contains carbon monoxide. The dissolution of the crucible coating, the carbon bearing gas, and the carbon already present in the feedstock, lead to the precipitation of silicon carbide, and silicon nitride, at later stages of the growth process. The precipitation of Si3N4 and SiC particles of up to several hundred micrometers in diameter leads to severe problems during the wire sawing process for wafering the ingots. Furthermore the growth of the silicon grains can be negatively influenced by the presence of particles, which act as nucleation sources and lead to a grit structure of small grains and are sources for dislocations. If doped with Nitrogen from the dissolved crucible coating, SiC is a semi conductive material, and can act as a shunt, short circuiting parts of the solar cell. For these reasons, the incorporation of such particles needs to be avoided. In this contribution we performed model experiments in which the transport of intentionally added SiC particles and their interaction with the solid-liquid interface during float zone growth of silicon in strong steady magnetic fields was investigated. SiC particles of 7µm and 60µm size are placed in single crystal silicon [100] and [111] rods of 8mm diameter. This is achieved by drilling a hole of 2mm diameter, filling in the particles and closing the hole by melting the surface of the rod until a film of silicon covers the hole. The samples are processed under a vacuum of 1x10(exp -5) mbar or better, to prevent gas inclusions. An oxide layer to suppress Marangoni convection is applied by wet oxidation. Experiments without and with static magnetic field are carried out to investigate the influence of melt

  13. Strong magnetism observed in carbon nanoparticles produced by the laser vaporization of a carbon pellet in hydrogen-containing Ar balance gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asano, Hirohito; Muraki, Susumu; Endo, Hiroki; Bandow, Shunji; Iijima, Sumio, E-mail: bandow@meijo-u.ac.j [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Meijo University, 1-501 Shiogamaguchi, Tenpaku, Nagoya 468-8502 (Japan)

    2010-08-25

    Nanometer-scale carbon particles driven by the pulsed-laser vaporization of pelletized pure carbon powder at 1000 {sup 0}C in a hydrogen-containing environment show anomalous magnetism like a superparamagnet, while the sample prepared in 100% of Ar does not show such magnetism. The observed magnetism was unchanged over months in the ambient. The structure of this nanomaterial resembles the foam of a laundry detergent and transmission electron microscopy indicates a clear corrugated line contrast. On the other hand, a sample without strong magnetism does not give such an image contrast. The x-ray diffraction pattern coincides with that of graphite and no other peak is detected. Thermogravimetry indicates that all samples completely burn out up to approx. 820 {sup 0}C and no material remains after combustion, indicating that the sample does not contain impurity metals. Magnetization is easily saturated by {approx} 10 000 G at 280 K with no hysteresis, but the hysteresis appears at 4.2 K. This phenomenon is explained by introducing a crystalline anisotropy which restricts the motion of the magnetic moment and stabilizes the remnant magnetization at zero magnetic field. Magnitudes of the saturation magnetization are in the range of 1-5 emu G g{sup -1} at 4.2 K, which correspond to 0.002-0.01 Bohr magneton per carbon atom. This concentration may be increased by ten times or more, because only about 4-10% of particles have a magnetic domain in the present samples.

  14. Magnetic correlations between cobalt nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortright, Jeffrey

    2004-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles precipitated from solution with a protective organic shell tend to aggregate into self-assembled arrays. In such dense assemblies interparticle dipole interactions are expected to strongly influence magnetic properties. Macroscopic magnetic measurements and micromagnetic modeling studies that include magneto-static interactions both suggest the importance of dipolar interactions. It has remained difficult, however, to study the effects of these interactions directly at the interparticle length scales where they should be most pronounced. We describe recent resonant x-ray magnetic scattering measurements to gain direct sensitivity to magnetic structure at interparticle length scales in dense assemblies of 9 nm diameter epsilon-Co (lower anisotropy) and hcp-Co (higher anisotropy) particles. In isolation these particles are superparamagnetic. Following a simple theoretical model, we use field-dependent intensity changes of linearly polarized incident radiation tuned to the Co L3 edge to isolate scattering from magnetic-magnetic correlations from charge-charge and charge-magnetic correlations to assess the effects of interparticle interactions. Results confirm that ideal superparamagnetic behavior is strongly modified by dipole interactions that favor certain time-averaged interparticle orientations. At remanence we observe a strong tendency toward antiferromagnetic alignment in the sample plane, and also some tendency toward ferromagnetic interparticle alignment normal to the sample plane. These tendencies toward time-averaged magnetic order are much stronger in the epsilon-Co sample, consistent the lower anisotropy of these particles. While our measurements do not directly measure magnetization dynamics at interparticle length scales, the strong tendency toward preferred orientations suggests that any thermally activated reversal occurs in a coordinated fashion, and thus that magneto-static super-spin waves exist in these dense assemblies.

  15. <strong>Magnetic resonance imaging findings in 84 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: bone marrow oedema predicts erosive progressionstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, Espen A; Bøyesen, Pernille; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    (odds ratio = 2.77 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06 to 7.21)) and MRI erosive progression (B = 0.21 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.34)). Conclusions: MRI findings were common in early RA, and MRI bone marrow oedema was an independent predictor of radiographic damage. These results suggest that MRI scans...... of the dominant wrist may help clinicians to determine which patients need early and aggressive treatment to avoid subsequent joint damage.   Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory polyarthritis which frequently leads to progressive joint destruction. Many prognostic markers have been identified...... favourable prognosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly sensitive method for detecting early inflammatory and structural abnormalities in RA joints. 2 - 8 Although studies from smaller cohorts of 25-42 patients have shown encouraging data, less is known about the predictive value of MRI synovitis...

  16. The D sup - centre in a quantum well in the presence of parallel electric and strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Monozon, B S

    2003-01-01

    An analytical approach to the problem of a negatively charged donor in an infinitely deep quantum well (QW) in the presence of parallel electric and strong magnetic external fields both directed perpendicular to the heteroplanes is developed. The double adiabatic approximation is employed. The dependences of the binding energy on the field strengths, the width of the well and the position of the impurity within the well are derived in explicit form. The effect of the inversion of the electric field is investigated. It is shown that the combined potential acting on the 'outer' electron resembles that of a double QW. When the levels associated with the two effective QWs anticross, a resonant structure arises. The explicit dependence of the resonant splitting on the width of the QW, the strength of the electric field and the position of the impurity are obtained. Using the parameters associated with the GaAs QW, estimates of the inversion shift of the binding energy and the frequency of the emitted resonant radi...

  17. On the recording of an emission with a reduced brightness in the region of a strong sunspot magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogod, V. M.; Peterova, N. G.; Ryabov, B. I.; Topchilo, N. A.

    2015-01-01

    Observations are reviewed of active regions where radio emission depressions in radio sources above large sunspots is observed. The depression value can be significant and can reach 2000-4000 K relative to the temperature around a quiet Sun. However, the number of cases of strong depression is small, which is apparently related to the specific features and conditions of sunspot observations and the limited or restrict telescope possibilities of the present day. Usage of the RATAN-600 radio telescope with a high spectral resolution (1%) made it possible to establish that this phenomenon is observed in a limited wavelength range (1.7-3.0) cm. Owing to the special method of RATAN-600 polarization measurements, it has been indicated that the emission depression effect takes place in the ordinary o-mode emission, whereas the emission source above a sunspot is always brighter than the background in the extraordinary e-mode. Two new active regions where the depression phenomenon was registered have been considered, and a comparison with the data from the NoRH radioheliograph, SSRT, and spacecraft has been performed. The values of the magnetic fields above the sunspots at which the region of ordinary and extraordinary wave generation penetrates in the coronal temperature region have been measured. A depression phenomenon modeling, indicating that electron density decreases and the situation is similar to coronal holes, has been performed based on the set of observational data. Possible directions in the study of this phenomenon are discussed.

  18. Direct observation of temperature-driven magnetic symmetry transitions by vectorial resolved MOKE magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuñado, Jose Luis F.; Pedrosa, Javier; Ajejas, Fernando; Perna, Paolo; Miranda, Rodolfo; Camarero, Julio

    2017-10-01

    Angle- and temperature-dependent vectorial magnetometry measurements are necessary to disentangle the effective magnetic symmetry in magnetic nanostructures. Here we present a detailed study on an Fe(1 0 0) thin film system with competing collinear biaxial (four-fold symmetry) and uniaxial (two-fold) magnetic anisotropies, carried out with our recently developed full angular/broad temperature range/vectorial-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometer, named TRISTAN. The data give direct views on the angular and temperature dependence of the magnetization reversal pathways, from which characteristic axes, remanences, critical fields, domain wall types, and effective magnetic symmetry are obtained. In particular, although the remanence shows four-fold angular symmetry for all investigated temperatures (15 K-400 K), the critical fields show strong temperature and angular dependencies and the reversal mechanism changes for specific angles at a given (angle-dependent) critical temperature, showing signatures of an additional collinear two-fold symmetry. This symmetry-breaking is more relevant as temperature increases to room temperature. It originates from the competition between two anisotropy contributions with different symmetry and temperature evolution. The results highlight the importance of combining temperature and angular studies, and the need to look at different magnetic parameters to unravel the underlying magnetic symmetries and temperature evolutions of the symmetry-breaking effects in magnetic nanostructures.

  19. Magnetic studies of Co2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+-modified DNA double-crossover lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugasani, Sreekantha Reddy; Oh, Young Hoon; Gnapareddy, Bramaramba; Park, Tuson; Kang, Won Nam; Park, Sung Ha

    2018-01-01

    We fabricated divalent-metal-ion-modified DNA double-crossover (DX) lattices on a glass substrate and studied their magnetic characteristics as a function of ion concentrations [Co2+], [Ni2+] and [Zn2+]. Up to certain critical concentrations, the DNA DX lattices with ions revealed discrete S-shaped hysteresis, i.e. characteristics of strong ferromagnetism, with significant changes in the coercive field, remanent magnetization, and susceptibility. Induced magnetic dipoles formed by metal ions in DNA duplex in the presence of a magnetic field imparted ferromagnetic behaviour. By considering hysteresis and the magnitude of magnetization in a magnetization-magnetic field curve, Co2+-modified DNA DX lattices showed a relatively strong ferromagnetic nature with an increasing (decreasing) trend of coercive field and remanent magnetization when [Co2+] ≤ 1 mM ([Co2+] > 1 mM). In contrast, Ni2+ and Zn2+-modified DNA DX lattices exhibited strong and weak ferromagnetic behaviours at lower (≤1 mM for Ni2+ and ≤0.5 mM for Zn2+) and higher (>1 mM for Ni2+ and >0.5 mM for Zn2+) concentrations of ions, respectively. About 1 mM of [Co2+], [Ni2+] and [Zn2+] in DNA DX lattices was of special interest with regard to physical characteristics and was identified to be an optimum concentration of each ion. Finally, we measured the temperature-dependent magnetic characteristics of the metal-ion-modified DNA DX lattices. Nonzero magnetization and inverse susceptibility with almost constant values were observed between 25 and 300 K, with no indication of a magnetic transition. This indicated that the magnetic Curie temperatures of Co2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+-modified DNA DX lattices were above 300 K.

  20. Three-dimensional visualization of magnetic domain structure with strong uniaxial anisotropy via scanning hard X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motohiro; Kim, Kab-Jin; Kim, Sanghoon; Yoshikawa, Hiroki; Tono, Takayuki; Yamada, Kihiro T.; Taniguchi, Takuya; Mizuno, Hayato; Oda, Kent; Ishibashi, Mio; Hirata, Yuushou; Li, Tian; Tsukamoto, Arata; Chiba, Daichi; Ono, Teruo

    2018-03-01

    An X-ray tomographic technique was developed to investigate the internal magnetic domain structure in a micrometer-sized ferromagnetic sample. The technique is based on a scanning hard X-ray nanoprobe using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). From transmission XMCD images at the Gd L3 edge as a function of the sample rotation angle, the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of a single component of the magnetic vector in a GdFeCo microdisc was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of 360 nm, using a modified algebraic reconstruction algorithm. The method is applicable to practical magnetic materials and can be extended to 3D visualization of the magnetic domain formation process under external magnetic fields.

  1. EBSD Study on the Effect of a Strong Axial Magnetic Field on the Microstructure and Crystallography of Al-Ni Alloys During Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Gagnoud, Annie; Moreau, Rene; Du, Dafan; Ren, Zhongming; Lu, Xionggang

    2016-03-01

    The effect of a strong magnetic field on the microstructure and crystallography of the primary and eutectic Al3Ni phases in Al-Ni alloys was investigated by using EBSD. The results show that the magnetic field significantly affected the microstructures and crystallography during both volume and directional solidification. As a result, the Al3Ni primary phases were aligned with the crystal direction along the magnetic field and formed a layer-like structure. The magnetic field intensity, solidification temperature, growth speed, and alloy composition played important roles during the alignment process of the Al3Ni primary phase. Indeed, the alignment degree increased with the magnetic field and the solidification temperature during normal solidification. Moreover, the effect of the magnetic field on the crystallography of the Al-Al3Ni eutectic in the Al-Ni alloys was also studied. The applied magnetic field modified the orientation of the preferred growth direction of the Al3Ni eutectic fiber and the crystallographic orientation relationship of the Al-Al3Ni eutectic. The orientation of the preferred growth direction of the Al3Ni eutectic fiber depended mainly on the solidification direction and the alignment of the Al3Ni primary phase. Furthermore, a method for controlling the crystallization process by adjusting the angle between the solidification direction and the magnetic field was proposed.

  2. Thermoelectric power in carbon nanotubes and quantum wires of nonlinear optical, optoelectronic, and related materials under strong magnetic field : Simplified theory and relative comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghatak, K.P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Benedictus, R.; Choudhury, S.

    2008-01-01

    We study thermoelectric power under strong magnetic field (TPM) in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and quantum wires (QWs) of nonlinear optical, optoelectronic, and related materials. The corresponding results for QWs of III-V, ternary, and quaternary compounds form a special case of our generalized

  3. Electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance of sodium macrostructures in strongly irradiated NaCl-K crystals: Manifestation of quasi-one-dimensional behavior of electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cherkasov, FG; Mustafin, RG; L'vov, SG; Denisenko, GA; den Hartog, HW; Vainshtein, D. I.

    1998-01-01

    Data from an investigation of electron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance of NaCl-K (similar to 1 mole%) crystals strongly irradiated with electrons imply the observation of a metal-insulator transition with decreasing temperature and the manifestation of quasi-one-dimensional electron

  4. Reprint of: Out-of-equilibrium dynamics in superspin glass state of strongly interacting magnetic nanoparticle assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamae, Sawako, E-mail: Sawako.nakamae@cea.fr

    2014-11-15

    Interacting magnetic nanoparticles display a wide variety of magnetic behaviors ranging from modified superparamagnetism, superspin glass to possibly, superferromagnetism. The superspin glass state is described by its slow and out-of-equilibrium magnetic behaviors akin to those found in atomic spin glasses. In this article, recent experimental findings on superspin correlation length growth and the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem obtained in concentrated frozen ferrofluids are presented to illustrate certain out-of-equilibrium dynamics behavior in superspin glasses. - Highlights: • Recent experimental findings on superspin glass dynamics in magnetic nanoparticle systems. • Advantages of magnetic nanoparticles for the study of spin glass physics. • Open questions and future directions in superspin glass research.

  5. Generating the optimal magnetic field for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Insinga, Andrea Roberto; Smith, Anders

    2016-01-01

    In a magnetic refrigeration device the magnet is the single most expensive component, and therefore it is crucially important to ensure that an effective magnetic field as possible is generated using the least amount of permanent magnets. Here we present a method for calculating the optimal...... remanence distribution for any desired magnetic field. The method is based on the reciprocity theorem, which through the use of virtual magnets can be used to calculate the optimal remanence distribution. Furthermore, we present a method for segmenting a given magnet design that always results...... in the optimal segmentation, for any number of segments specified. These two methods are used to determine the optimal magnet design of a 12-piece, two-pole concentric cylindrical magnet for use in a continuously rotating magnetic refrigeration device....

  6. Hematite Versus Magnetite as the Signature for Planetary Magnetic Anomalies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetshka, Gunther; Taylor, Patrick T.; Wasilewski, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies are the result of adjacent geologic units having contrasting magnetization. This magnetization arises from induction and/or remanence. In a planetary context we now know that Mars has significant crustal magnetic anomalies due to remanent magnetization, while the Earth has some anomalies where remanence can be shown to be important. This picture, however, is less clear because of the nature and the magnitude of the geomagnetic field which is responsible for superimposed induced magnetization. Induced magnetization assumes a magnetite source, because of its much greater magnetic susceptibility when compared with other magnetic minerals. We investigated the TRM (thermoremanent magnetization) acquisition of hematite, in weak magnetic fields up to 1 mT, to determine if the remanent and induced magnetization of hematite could compete with magnetite. TRM acquisition curves of magnetite and hematite show that multi-domain hematite reaches TRM saturation (0.3 - 0.4 A sq m/kg) in fields as low as 100 microT. However, multi-domain magnetite reaches only a few percent of its TRM saturation in a field of 100 microT (0.02 - 0.06 A sq m/kg). These results suggest that a mineral such as hematite and, perhaps, other minerals with significant remanence and minor induced magnetization may play an important role in providing requisite magnetization contrast. Perhaps, and especially for the Mars case, we should reevaluate where hematite and other minerals, with efficient remanence acquisition, exist in significant concentration, allowing a more comprehensive explanation of Martian anomalies and better insight into the role of remanent magnetization in terrestrial crustal magnetic anomalies.

  7. Rotationally modulated variability and pulsations of the He-rich star CPD -62°2124 with an extraordinarily strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubrig, S.; Mikulášek, Z.; Kholtygin, A. F.; Ilyin, I.; Schöller, M.; Järvinen, S. P.; Scholz, R.-D.; Zejda, M.

    2017-11-01

    A longitudinal magnetic field with a strength of 5.2 kG was recently detected in CPD -62°2124, which has a fractional main-sequence lifetime of about 60 per cent. Strongly magnetic early-B type chemically peculiar stars in an advanced evolutionary state are of special interest to understand the evolution of the angular momentum and spin-down time-scales in the presence of a global magnetic field. We made use of 17 FORS 2 low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations and 844 ASAS3 photometric measurements for the determination of the rotation period, pulsationsand the magnetic field geometry of the star. We calculated periodograms and applied phenomenological models of photometric, spectral and spectropolarimetric variability. We found that all quantities studied, specifically equivalent widths, the mean longitudinal magnetic field 〈Bz〉 and the flux in the V filter, vary with the same period P = 2.628 d, which was identified as the rotation period. The observed variations can be fully explained by a rigidly rotating main-sequence star with an uneven distribution of chemical elements, photometric spots and a stable, nearly dipolar magnetic field with a polar field strength of about 21 kG, frozen into the body of the star. The magnetic field of CPD -62°2124 is tilted to the rotation axis by β = 28° ± 7°, while the inclination of the rotation axis towards the line of sight is only I = 20° ± 5°. In the acquired FORS 2 spectra, we detect short-term line profile variations indicating the presence of β Cephei type pulsations. As of today, no other pulsating star of this type is known to possess such a strong magnetic field.

  8. Liquid metal flows in manifolds and expansions of insulating rectangular ducts in the plane perpendicular to a strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molokov, S.

    1994-01-01

    It is demonstrated the flow pattern in basic insulating 3-D geometries for the actual and for more advanced liquid-metal blanket concepts and discussed the ways to avoid pressure losses caused by flow redistribution. Flows in several geometries, such as symmetric and non-symmetric 180 turns with and without manifolds, sharp elbows, sharp and linear expansions with and without manifolds, T-junction, etc., have been calculated. They demonstrate high reliability of poloidal concepts of liquid-metal blankets, since they guarantee uniform conditions for heat transfer. If changes of the duct cross-section occur in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field (ideally a coolant should flow always in the radial-poloidal plane) the disturbances are local and the slug velocity profile is reached roughly at the distance equivalent to one duct width from the manifolds, expansions, etc. The effects of inertia in these flows are unimportant for the determination of the pressure drop and mean velocity profiles in the core of the flow but may favour heat transfer characteristics via instabilities and strongly anisotropic turbulence. (orig./HP) [Deutsch] Es werden Stroemungsstrukturen in isolierten, dreidimensionalen Basisgeometrien fuer aktuelle und fortgeschrittenere Fluessigmetall-Blankets diskutiert und Wege aufgezeigt, wie Druckverluste hervorgerufen durch Stroemungsumverteilung vermieden werden koennen. Stroemungen in unterschiedlichen Geometrien, wie z.B. in symmetrischen und asymmetrischen Umlenkungen mit und ohne Verzweigung, in scharfkantigen Kruemmern, in linearen Expansionen mit und ohne Verzweigung, in T-Stuecken, etc. werden berechnet. Sie erhoehen die Zuverlaessigkeit von poloidalen Fluessigmetallkonzepten, da sie homogene Waermeuebertragungsbedingungen garantieren. Falls Querschnittsveraenderungen in einer Ebene senkrecht zum Magnetfeld auftreten (unter idealen Bedingungen sollte das Kuehlmittel in der poloidal-radialen Ebene fliessen) sind Stoerungen lokal, und

  9. Nondestructive Characterization for Remanent Life of Advanced Ferritic Steel by Reversible Permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chung Seok; Hong, Seung Pyo [Dept. of Metallurgical Material Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju, (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Kwon Sang [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    We present nondestructive characterization for remanent life of advanced ferritic steels, next-gen energy facility materials by reversible permeability. The reversible permeability is based on the theory that the value of reversible permeability is the same differential of the hysteresis loop. The measurement principle is based on the foundation of harmonics voltage induced in a sensing coil using a lock-in amplifier tuned to the frequency of the exciting one. The peak interval of reversible permeability(PIRP), Vickers hardness, and tensile strength(TS) of the aged samples decreased with aging time. We could estimate the remanent life of advanced ferritic steel by using the relationship between the peak interval of reversible permeability and Larson-Miller parameter(LMP), non-destructively.

  10. Remanences of Hellenistic Culture in a Dramatic Text by Arturo Clavijo Tisseur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Antonio Ramírez-Castellanos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of remanences Greco-Roman cultural tradition in works of Santiago de Cuba literature from the colonial era to the present Republican era is a topic of attention from the most contemporary literary research in the region. From this epistemological approach, revisit texts and authors who are part of the patrimonial heritage in Santiago de Cuba, at present, little known or forgotten, can elucidate how the ideo-aesthetic components of the classical tradition has survived in the collective cultural imagination through times. Such is the case of the work of Arturo Clavijo Tisseur, poet, journalist, novelist and playwright, whose imprint has not been studied in detail. This paper therefore offers an analysis of the remanences of Hellenistic culture on the play El Arte entre sudarios (The art between shrouds, the first of the dramatic texts of this author, published in Santiago de Cuba in 1922. 

  11. An Assessment of Magnetic Conditions for Strong Coronal Heating in Solar Active Regions by Comparing Observed Loops with Computed Potential Field Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, G. A.; Moore, R. L.; Porter, J. G.; Falconer, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    We report further results on the magnetic origins of coronal heating found from registering coronal images with photospheric vector magnetograms. For two complementary active regions, we use computed potential field lines to examine the global non-potentiality of bright extended coronal loops and the three-dimensional structure of the magnetic field at their feet, and assess the role of these magnetic conditions in the strong coronal heating in these loops. The two active regions are complementary, in that one is globally potential and the other is globally nonpotential, while each is predominantly bipolar, and each has an island of included polarity in its trailing polarity domain. We find the following: (1) The brightest main-arch loops of the globally potential active region are brighter than the brightest main- arch loops of the globally strongly nonpotential active region. (2) In each active region, only a few of the mainarch magnetic loops are strongly heated, and these are all rooted near the island. (3) The end of each main-arch bright loop apparently bifurcates above the island, so that it embraces the island and the magnetic null above the island. (4) At any one time, there are other main-arch magnetic loops that embrace the island in the same manner as do the bright loops but that are not selected for strong coronal heating. (5) There is continual microflaring in sheared core fields around the island, but the main-arch bright loops show little response to these microflares. From these observational and modeling results we draw the following conclusions: (1) The heating of the main-arch bright loops arises mainly from conditions at the island end of these loops and not from their global non-potentiality. (2) There is, at most, only a loose coupling between the coronal heating in the bright loops of the main arch and the coronal heating in the sheared core fields at their feet, although in both the heating is driven by conditions/events in and around the

  12. B fields in OB stars (BOB). Detection of a strong magnetic field in the O9.7 V star HD 54879

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, N.; Fossati, L.; Hubrig, S.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Schöller, M.; Ilyin, I.; Carrol, T. A.; Langer, N.; Morel, T.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Przybilla, N.; Herrero, A.; de Koter, A.; Oskinova, L. M.; Reisenegger, A.; Sana, H.; BOB Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    The number of magnetic stars detected among massive stars is small; nevertheless, the role played by the magnetic field in stellar evolution cannot be disregarded. Links between line profile variability, enhancements/depletions of surface chemical abundances, and magnetic fields have been identified for low-mass B-stars, but for the O-type domain this is almost unexplored. Based on FORS 2 and HARPS spectropolarimetric data, we present the first detection of a magnetic field in HD 54879, a single slowly rotating O9.7 V star. Using two independent and different techniques we obtained the firm detection of a surface average longitudinal magnetic field with a maximum amplitude of about 600 G, in modulus. A quantitative spectroscopic analysis of the star with the stellar atmosphere code fastwind results in an effective temperature and a surface gravity of 33 000 ± 1000 K and 4.0 ± 0.1 dex. The abundances of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, and magnesium are found to be slightly lower than solar, but compatible within the errors. We investigate line-profile variability in HD 54879 by complementing our spectra with spectroscopic data from other recent OB-star surveys. The photospheric lines remain constant in shape between 2009 and 2014, although Hα shows a variable emission. The Hα emission is too strong for a standard O9.7 V and is probably linked to the magnetic field and the presence of circumstellar material. Its normal chemical composition and the absence of photospheric line profile variations make HD 54879 the most strongly magnetic, non-variable single O-star detected to date. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla and Paranal observatories under programme ID 191.D-0255(C, F).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Core Problem: Does the CV Parent Body Magnetization require differentiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T.; Tarduno, J. A.; Smirnov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Evidence for the presence of past dynamos from magnetic studies of meteorites can provide key information on the nature and evolution of parent bodies. However, the suggestion of a past core dynamo for the CV parent body based on the study of the Allende meteorite has led to a paradox: a core dynamo requires differentiation, evidence for which is missing in the meteorite record. The key parameter used to distinguish core dynamo versus external field mechanisms is absolute field paleointensity, with high values (>>1 μT) favoring the former. Here we explore the fundamental requirements for absolute field intensity measurement in the Allende meteorite: single domain grains that are non-interacting. Magnetic hysteresis and directional data define strong magnetic interactions, negating a standard interpretation of paleointensity measurements in terms of absolute paleofield values. The Allende low field magnetic susceptibility is dominated by magnetite and FeNi grains, whereas the magnetic remanence is carried by an iron sulfide whose remanence-carrying capacity increases with laboratory cycling at constant field values, indicating reordering. The iron sulfide and FeNi grains are in close proximity, providing mineralogical context for interactions. We interpret the magnetization of Allende to record the intense early solar wind with metal-sulfide interactions amplifying the field, giving the false impression of a higher field value in some prior studies. An undifferentiated CV parent body is thus compatible with Allende's magnetization. Early solar wind magnetization should be the null hypothesis for evaluating the source of magnetization for chondrites and other meteorites.

  14. Far-from-equilibrium dynamics of a strongly coupled non-Abelian plasma with non-zero charge density or external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    III, John F. Fuini; Yaffe, Laurence G. [Department of Physics, University of Washington,Seattle WA 98195 (United States)

    2015-07-22

    Using holography, we study the evolution of a spatially homogeneous, far from equilibrium, strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma with a non-zero charge density or a background magnetic field. This gauge theory problem corresponds, in the dual gravity description, to an initial value problem in Einstein-Maxwell theory with homogeneous but anisotropic initial conditions. We explore the dependence of the equilibration process on different aspects of the initial departure from equilibrium and, while controlling for these dependencies, examine how the equilibration dynamics are affected by the presence of a non-vanishing charge density or an external magnetic field. The equilibration dynamics are remarkably insensitive to the addition of even large chemical potentials or magnetic fields; the equilibration time is set primarily by the form of the initial departure from equilibrium. For initial deviations from equilibrium which are well localized in scale, we formulate a simple model for equilibration times which agrees quite well with our results.

  15. Far-from-equilibrium dynamics of a strongly coupled non-Abelian plasma with non-zero charge density or external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuini, John F.; Yaffe, Laurence G.

    2015-07-01

    Using holography, we study the evolution of a spatially homogeneous, far from equilibrium, strongly coupled supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma with a non-zero charge density or a background magnetic field. This gauge theory problem corresponds, in the dual gravity description, to an initial value problem in Einstein-Maxwell theory with homogeneous but anisotropic initial conditions. We explore the dependence of the equilibration process on different aspects of the initial departure from equilibrium and, while controlling for these dependencies, examine how the equilibration dynamics are affected by the presence of a non-vanishing charge density or an external magnetic field. The equilibration dynamics are remarkably insensitive to the addition of even large chemical potentials or magnetic fields; the equilibration time is set primarily by the form of the initial departure from equilibrium. For initial deviations from equilibrium which are well localized in scale, we formulate a simple model for equilibration times which agrees quite well with our results.

  16. Effects of temperature on the ground state of a strongly-coupling magnetic polaron and mean phonon number in RbCl quantum pseudodot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yong; Ding, Zhao-Hua; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2016-07-01

    On the condition of strong electron-LO phonon coupling in a RbCl quantum pseudodot (QPD), the ground state energy and the mean number of phonons are calculated by using the Pekar variational method and quantum statistical theory. The variations of the ground state energy and the mean number with respect to the temperature and the cyclotron frequency of the magnetic field are studied in detail. We find that the absolute value of the ground state energy increases (decreases) with increasing temperature when the temperature is in the lower (higher) temperature region, and that the mean number increases with increasing temperature. The absolute value of the ground state energy is a decreasing function of the cyclotron frequency of the magnetic field whereas the mean number is an increasing function of it. We find two ways to tune the ground state energy and the mean number: controlling the temperature and controlling the cyclotron frequency of the magnetic field.

  17. Engineering and Scaling the Spontaneous Magnetization Reversal of Faraday Induced Magnetic Relaxation in Nano-Sized Amorphous Ni Coated on Crystalline Au

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsien Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on the generation of large inverse remanent magnetizations in nano-sized core/shell structure of Au/Ni by turning off the applied magnetic field. The remanent magnetization is very sensitive to the field reduction rate as well as to the thermal and field processes before the switching off of the magnetic field. Spontaneous reversal in direction and increase in magnitude of the remanent magnetization in subsequent relaxations over time were found. All of the various types of temporal relaxation curves of the remanent magnetizations are successfully scaled by a stretched exponential decay profile, characterized by two pairs of relaxation times and dynamic exponents. The relaxation time is used to describe the reduction rate, while the dynamic exponent describes the dynamical slowing down of the relaxation through time evolution. The key to these effects is to have the induced eddy current running beneath the amorphous Ni shells through Faraday induction.

  18. Engineering and Scaling the Spontaneous Magnetization Reversal of Faraday Induced Magnetic Relaxation in Nano-Sized Amorphous Ni Coated on Crystalline Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Hsien; Lee, Chi-Hung; Kuo, Chen-Chen

    2016-05-28

    We report on the generation of large inverse remanent magnetizations in nano-sized core/shell structure of Au/Ni by turning off the applied magnetic field. The remanent magnetization is very sensitive to the field reduction rate as well as to the thermal and field processes before the switching off of the magnetic field. Spontaneous reversal in direction and increase in magnitude of the remanent magnetization in subsequent relaxations over time were found. All of the various types of temporal relaxation curves of the remanent magnetizations are successfully scaled by a stretched exponential decay profile, characterized by two pairs of relaxation times and dynamic exponents. The relaxation time is used to describe the reduction rate, while the dynamic exponent describes the dynamical slowing down of the relaxation through time evolution. The key to these effects is to have the induced eddy current running beneath the amorphous Ni shells through Faraday induction.

  19. Relative Geomagnetic Paleointensity, Environmental Magnetism, and Cyclicity of Contourites from the West Iberian Margin (IODP Site U1389)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, C.; Horton, L. B.; Acton, G.; Sidorovskaia, N.; Sierro, F. J.; Xuan, C.; Verosub, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    The Mediterranean Outflow Expedition provides an outstanding opportunity to address paleoceanographic questions about the evolution of the Mediterranean and North Atlantic climate system over the past 6 million years. As part of the overall project, we present high-resolution paleomagnetic and rock magnetic results from the top ~36 meters composite depth (mcd) of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1389 (36º 25.515'N; 7º 16.683'W, 644 m water depth) located approximately 90 km west of Cádiz. The sedimentary section is represented by a thick, rapidly accumulated (mean sediment accumulation rate of ~40 cm/kyr), and very uniform series of contouritic sediment. The age model was obtained by tuning the planktonic foraminifer oxygen isotope data to the NGRIP ice core record. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic measurements were collected at 1-cm interval resolution on U-channel samples covering the top ~36 mcd, with the goal of extracting a high-resolution record of paleosecular variation, relative geomagnetic paleointensity change, and the variability of the paleoenvironmental conditions. Detailed demagnetization of the natural remanence (NRM) reveals the successful removal of a secondary magnetization and identification of a stable and strong primary magnetization carried by the sediment samples (average MAD associated with principal component analysis: 0.97º). Isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition curves and excellent behavior of the samples during alternating field demagnetization suggest magnetite as the main magnetic remanence carrier. Relative paleointensity estimates were calculated by normalizing NRM with ARM, IRM, as well as magnetic susceptibility. Time-frequency analyses of high-resolution concentration and grain-size dependent paleomagnetic proxy data and other physical properties are in progress and will be presented with the goal of identifying the driver of cyclic changes in the sedimentary section.

  20. High-Resolution Magnetic Properties and Cyclicity of Contourites from IODP Site U1389 (West Iberian Margin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, C.; Adesiyun, O.; Acton, G.; Sidorovskaia, N.; Sierro, F. J.; Xuan, C.; Verosub, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    We present high-resolution paleomagnetic and rock magnetic results from the lower part of the APC-cored section (36 - 107 meters composite depth) of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site U1389 (36º 25.515'N; 7º 16.683'W, 644 m water depth). This site was cored as part of the IODP Mediterranean Outflow Expedition to address paleoceanographic questions about the evolution of the North Atlantic Mediterranean and climate system over the past 6 million years. The recovered section at Site U1389 consists of a thick, rapidly accumulated (~40 cm/kyr), and very uniform series of contouritic sediment. Ages were obtained by tuning the planktonic foraminifer oxygen isotope data to the NGRIP ice core record. We collected rock magnetic and paleomagnetic measurements at 1-cm resolution on 71-m of U-channel samples (representing ~145 k.yr.), with the goal of extracting a high-resolution record of paleoenvironmental variability, relative geomagnetic paleointensity, and paleosecular variation. Stepwise demagnetization of the natural remanence (NRM) demonstrates the successful removal of a secondary, predominantly drill-string induced, magnetization and identification of a stable and strong primary magnetization carried by the sediment samples (average MAD calculated by principal component analysis: ~1º). Excellent behavior of the samples during alternating field demagnetization and isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition suggest magnetite as the main carrier of magnetic remanence. Relative paleointensity estimates were determined by normalizing the NRM by the ARM, IRM, and magnetic susceptibility. Time-frequency analyses of high-resolution concentration and grain-size dependent paleomagnetic proxy data for the entire 107-m (200 k.yr.) long APC section of Site U1389 will be presented with the goal of identifying the driver of cyclic changes in the sedimentary section.

  1. Small Angle Shubnikov-de Haas Measurements in Silicon MOSFET's : The Effect of Strong In-Plane Magnetic Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitkalov, S.A.; Zheng, H.; Sarachik, M.P.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements in magnetic fields applied at small angles relative to the electron plane in silicon MOSFETs indicate a factor of two increase of the frequency of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at H>H_{sat}. This signals the onset of full spin polarization above H_{sat}, the parallel field above which

  2. Microgravity simulation by diamagnetic levitation: effects of a strong gradient magnetic field on the transcriptional profile of Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herranz, R.; Larkin, O.J.; Dijkstra, C.E.; Hill, R.J.A.; Anthony, P.; Davey, M.R.; Michael, R.; Eaves, L.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Medina, F.J.; Marco, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many biological systems respond to the presence or absence of gravity. Since experiments performed in space are expensive and can only be undertaken infrequently, Earth-based simulation techniques are used to investigate the biological response to weightlessness. A high gradient magnetic

  3. Of the consequences of the inferred constitutive nature of state of matter possibly characteristic of a class of strongly magnetized plasma in astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevsky, Daniel Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    We conjecture that the structure of a class of solar transients (magnetic cloud, MC) is constituted by matter coalescent to a super strong magnetic field, which high temperature manifests itself through the presence of a hot electron gas, possibly constituted by the halo-part of the e-distribution. We identify the presence of this state of matter in strongly magnetized transients in the solar wind beyond a few solar radii from the Sun and extending well beyond 1 AUa. We present a few constitutive properties resulting of a recent thermodynamic study identifying this state of matter. These main outcomes are evaluated for a case study, the June 2, 1998 MC observed with SC Wind. In our view the most relevant outcome is the estimation of its magnetic permeability, two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the vacuum. This implies a highly diamagnetic material. Other properties to be discussed are the anomalous adiabatic behavior of this conjectured e-gas. In addition, and with the help of a simple MHD 3-D evolutionary model of the structureb, we present estimate values to its: (a) acoustic speed, (b) free current density, (c) and low limit to the electrical permittivity.aBerdichevsky, D. B., and K. Schefers, under review (ApJ, 2014).bBerdichevsky, D. B., Sol Phys, 284, 245-259, 2013.

  4. Electron gas interacting in a metal, submitted to a strong magnetic field; Gas de eletrons interagentes num metal, sujeito a um campo magnetico forte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, Francisco Castilho

    1977-07-01

    Using the propagator's technique in the grand ensemble developed by Montroll and Ward we investigate the magnetic properties of an interacting electron gas in a strong magnetic field. The free propagator properly constructed shows that the spin paramagnetism does not have a term with strong temperature dependence, contrary to the result of Isihara. Considering the electron density to be constant, the dHVA oscillations in the magnetic susceptibility and sound velocity, considering the effects of first exchange interactions, show only one phase in agreement with experimental result, while Ichimura and Isihara obtained two phases differing by {pi}/2. The effects of first order exchange interactions in the dHVA oscillations of the magnetic susceptibility and sound velocity give rise to an exponential factor in the amplitudes of oscillator (Dingle factor), being the Dingle temperature linearly dependent of the Fermi velocity. The calculations of the ring diagram contribution to the grand partition function, show that the approximation used by Isihara for this calculations is not good and the dHVA oscillations of the contributions from the ring diagrams for the grand partition function have a phase differing by {pi}/2 from that obtained by Isihara. (author)

  5. Bat head contains soft magnetic particles: evidence from magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lanxiang; Lin, Wei; Zhang, Shuyi; Pan, Yongxin

    2010-10-01

    Recent behavioral observations have indicated that bats can sense the Earth's magnetic field. To unravel the magnetoreception mechanism, the present study has utilized magnetic measurements on three migratory species (Miniopterus fuliginosus, Chaerephon plicata, and Nyctalus plancyi) and three non-migratory species (Hipposideros armiger, Myotis ricketti, and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum). Room temperature isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition and alternating-field demagnetization showed that the bats' heads contain soft magnetic particles. Statistical analyses indicated that the saturation isothermal remanent magnetization of brains (SIRM(1T_brain)) of migratory species is higher than those of non-migratory species. Furthermore, the SIRM(1T_brain) of migratory bats is greater than their SIRM(1T_skull). Low-temperature magnetic measurements suggested that the magnetic particles are likely magnetite (Fe3O4). This new evidence supports the assumption that some bats use magnetite particles for sensing and orientation in the Earth's magnetic field.

  6. Effect of a strong, DC-induced magnetic field on circadian singing activity of the house cricket (orthoptera:gryllidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, K.C.; Bitzer, R.J.; Galliart, L. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effect of a strong, DC-induced electromagnetic field (EMF) on the circadian singing activity of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus (L.). Groups of 10 crickets were exposed to strong, DC-induced EMFs under two light regimes, 12:12 (L:D) h and 0:24 (L:D) h. Exposure to the strong EMF resulted in an increase in mean time per hour during which one or more crickets were singing and in number of crickets singing per hour. Correcting for phase shift during O:24 (L:D) h, the daily pattern of singing was apparently unaffected by any treatment. The greatest percentage of singing and number of crickets singing per hour occurred during actual or expected scotophase. This is the first report of an increase in insect activity during exposure to a strong DC-induced EMF.

  7. Explicitly-correlated non-born-oppenheimer calculations of the HD molecule in a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, Ludwik; Stanke, Monika; Tellgren, Erik; Helgaker, Trygve

    2017-08-01

    Explicitly correlated all-particle Gaussian functions with shifted centers (ECGs) are implemented within the earlier proposed effective variational non-Born-Oppenheimer method for calculating bound states of molecular systems in magnetic field (Adamowicz et al., 2015). The Hamiltonian used in the calculations is obtained by subtracting the operator representing the kinetic energy of the center-of-mass motion from the total laboratory-frame Hamiltonian. Test ECG calculations are performed for the HD molecule.

  8. Recent progress on contactless inductive flow tomography for continuous casting in the presence of strong static magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Wondrak, T; Ratajczak, M.; Timmel, K; Stefani, F.; Eckert, S.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The flow structure of liquid steel in the mold of a continuous caster has huge impact on the quality of the produced steel. In order to influence the flow during the casting process electromagnetic brakes (EMBr) are used. Even a rough knowledge of the flow field would be highly desirable. The contactless inductive flow tomography is a technique for reconstructing the velocity field in electrically conducting melts from externally measured induced magnetic fields. For a...

  9. Laser-driven strong magnetostatic fields with applications to charged beam transport and magnetized high energy-density physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Joao

    2017-10-01

    Powerful laser-plasma processes are explored to generate discharge currents of a few 100 kA in coil targets, yielding magnetostatic fields (B-fields) in the kTesla range. The B-fields are measured by proton-deflectometry and high-frequency bandwidth B-dot probes. According to our modeling, the quasi-static currents are provided from hot electron ejection from the laser-irradiated surface, accounting for the space charge neutralization and the plasma magnetization. The major control parameter is the laser irradiance Iλ2 . The B-fields ns-scale is long enough to magnetize secondary targets through resistive diffusion. We applied it in experiments of laser-generated relativistic electron transport into solid dielectric targets, yielding an unprecedented enhancement of a factor 5 on the energy-density flux at 60 µm depth, compared to unmagnetized transport conditions. These studies pave the ground for magnetized high-energy density physics investigations, related to laser-generated secondary sources of radiation and/or high-energy particles and their transport, to high-gain fusion energy schemes and to laboratory astrophysics. We acknowledge funding from French National Agency for Research (ANR), Grant TERRE ANR-2011-BS04-014, and from EUROfusion Consortium, European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, Grant 633053.

  10. Separation of species of a binary fluid mixture confined in a channel in presence of a strong transverse magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Bishwaram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of a transverse magnetic field on separation of a binary mixture of incompressible viscous thermally and electrically conducting fluids confined between two stationary parallel plates are examined. Both the plates are maintained at constant temperatures. It is assumed that one of the components, which is rarer and lighter, is present in the mixture in a very small quantity. The equations governing the motion, temperature and concentration in Cartesian coordinate are solved analytically. The solution obtained for concentration distribution is plotted against the width of the channel for various values of non-dimensional parameters. It is found that the effect of transverse magnetic field is to separate the species of rarer and lighter component by contributing its effect directly to the temperature gradient and the pressure gradient. The effects of increase in the values of Hartmann number, magnetic Reynolds number, barodiffusion number, thermal diffusion number, electric field parameter and the product of Prandtl number and Eckert number are to collect the rarer and lighter component near the upper plate and throw away the heavier component towards the lower plate. The problem discussed here derives its application in the basic fluid dynamics separation processes to separate the rare component of the different isotopes of heavier molecules where electromagnetic method of separation does not work.

  11. Magnetic volcanos in gadolinium Langmuir-Blodgett films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tishin, A.M.; Snigirev, O.V.; Khomutov, G.B.

    2001-01-01

    -plane and out-of-plane pre-magnetization in a field of 1.4 T at 300 K. Randomly placed “magnetic volcanos” with a remanent magnetic moment of the order of 10−13 A m2 was observed. A decay of the remanent magnetization with a characteristic time of about 120 h was observed. It is suggested that the magnetic...... order is relatively long ranged, and that topological defects (vortices) lead to the observed out-of-plane field lines, and are responsible for the magnetic volcanos. Finally, it is hypothesized that a similar topology of field lines is responsible for superconductivity as observed in ceramic high...

  12. Study of Muon Triggers and Momentum Reconstruction in a Strong Magnetic Field for a Muon Detector at LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-5 \\\\ \\\\ A small fraction of a muon detector for possible use in an LHC experiment is installed in the SPS H2 beam. It consists of a 3T superconducting solenoid enclosing a 10$\\lambda$ deep calorimeter made of stainless steel plates interleaved with Honeycomb strip chambers. Behind this magnet are located 3 muon stations for triggering and momentum measurement. These stations, consisting of UA1 muon chambers backed up with Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC), are inserted in a 1.5~T absorber magnet of 20$\\lambda$ total thickness, station 2 being located after 10$\\lambda$. \\\\ \\\\During the data taking period (1991-1994) 10$^{7}$ muon and hadron events were recorded. Beams of negative muons and pions and of positive muons and hadrons $ (\\pi^+, K ^+ $ and protons) were used with a momentum ranging from 10~to~300~GeV/c. \\\\ \\\\The RD-5 program has covered several topics related to muon detection at LHC: \\\\ \\\\\\begin{description} \\item[(i)]~~study of the behaviour of muons from hadron punchthrough and decays, and also ...

  13. Stabilization of weak ferromagnetism by strong magnetic response to epitaxial strain in multiferroic BiFeO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Hemant; Lee, Jun Hee; Krogel, Jaron T; Okamoto, Satoshi; Cooper, Valentino R

    2015-08-06

    Multiferroic BiFeO3 exhibits excellent magnetoelectric coupling critical for magnetic information processing with minimal power consumption. However, the degenerate nature of the easy spin axis in the (111) plane presents roadblocks for real world applications. Here, we explore the stabilization and switchability of the weak ferromagnetic moments under applied epitaxial strain using a combination of first-principles calculations and group-theoretic analyses. We demonstrate that the antiferromagnetic moment vector can be stabilized along unique crystallographic directions ([110] and [-110]) under compressive and tensile strains. A direct coupling between the anisotropic antiferrodistortive rotations and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moria interactions drives the stabilization of the weak ferromagnetism. Furthermore, energetically competing C- and G-type magnetic orderings are observed at high compressive strains, suggesting that it may be possible to switch the weak ferromagnetism "on" and "off" under the application of strain. These findings emphasize the importance of strain and antiferrodistortive rotations as routes to enhancing induced weak ferromagnetism in multiferroic oxides.

  14. Decoupling of hyperfine structure of Cs $D_1$ line in strong magnetic field studied by selective reflection from a nanocell

    CERN Document Server

    Sargsyan, Armen; Hakhumyan, Grant; Tonoyan, Ara; Papoyan, Aram; Leroy, Claude; Sarkisyan, David

    2016-01-01

    Decoupling of total electronic and nuclear spin moments of Cs atoms in external magnetic field for the case of atomic $D_1$ line, leading to onset of the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime has been studied theoretically and experimentally. Selective reflection of laser radiation from an interface of dielectric window and atomic vapor confined in a nanocell with 300 nm gap thickness was implemented for the experimental studies. The real time derivative of selective reflection signal with a frequency position coinciding with atomic transitions was used in measurements, providing $\\sim$ 40 MHz spectral resolution and linearity of signal response in respect to transition probability. Behavior of 28 individual Zeeman transitions in a wide range of longitudinal magnetic field (0 - 6 kG) has been tracked under excitation of Cs vapor by a low-intensity $\\sigma^+$- polarized cw laser radiation. For $B\\ge 6~$kG, only 8 transitions with nearly equal probabilities and the same frequency slope remained in the spectrum, which i...

  15. Experimental determination of magnetic characteristics of Kunashak L3 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanul; Yu, Yongjae; Ryeol Lee, Seung

    2017-04-01

    A systematic alternating-field (AF) demagnetization on mutually oriented fragments of Kunashak L3 Chondrite was carried out. AF demagnetization spectra for natural remanent magnetization (NRM), anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) were compared. We found that NRM, ARM, and SIRM are controlled by two dominant coercivity fractions, one being in the order of 100 mT, were identified. Higher coercivity fraction was stable whose remanence appears to be carried by Fe-Ni alloys. It is apparent that softer coercivity fraction was governed by the metal-sulfur meting produced by shock metamorphism. Directions of NRM were consistent in mm-scale, implying that brecciation process is responsible for the consistent NRM direction of Kunashak L3 Chondrite.

  16. New developments in magneto-optical imaging applied to rock magnetism: a case study on meteorites (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, M.; Gattacceca, J.; van der Beek, C. J.; Leroux, H.; Jacob, D.

    2010-12-01

    We present results of an integrated study of metallic grains in meteorites, combining magneto-optical imaging (MOI), petrography, FE-SEM, TEM, and microprobe analyses. Indeed, metallic Fe-Ni grains in meteorites have inner structures due to Ni diffusion during slow cooling subsequent to metamorphism on their parent body. Previous magnetic studies suggested that tetrataenite (ordered FeNi) is the stable magnetic carriers in these meteorites. On the other hand, mineralogical studies showed that tetrataenite is intimately mixed with other Fe-Ni phases (kamacite and taenite, that contain less than 10 wt.% and around 30 wt.% Ni, respectively), and forms complex microstructures (see below). However, due to the typical spatial resolution of classical bulk magnetic measurements (~1 mm), it has been so far difficult to isolate the contribution of these different Fe-Ni minerals. The MOI technique measures the magnetic flux threading a magneto-optically active film directly placed on the sample. This film rotates the polarization direction of transmitted light (Faraday rotation). Through the analyzer of a reflected light microscope, the vertical component of surface magnetic field of the sample is observed with a spatial resolution of a few µm, which allows direct comparison between mineralogical and magnetic microstructures of metal grains. We studied Agen (H5) and Ausson (L5) ordinary chondrites. Optical and electron microscopies showed two types of micron- to submicron-scaled tetrataenite-bearing microstructures: (1) Zoned taenite particles that consist of a taenite core, surrounded by a "cloudy zone" (20-150 nm large tetrataenite granules embedded in taenite matrix), and a 1-10 µm thick tetrataenite rim. (2) Zoneless plessite particles that consist of < 10 µm large tetrataenite grains embedded in a kamacite matrix. MOI of saturation remanence showed that only the nm-sized tetrataenite granules in cloudy zone carry very strong remanence. Micron-scale mapping of

  17. The enigma of lunar magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.

    1981-01-01

    Current understandings of the nature and probable origin of lunar magnetism are surveyed. Results of examinations of returned lunar samples are discussed which reveal the main carrier of the observed natural remanent magnetization to be iron, occasionally alloyed with nickel and cobalt, but do not distinguish between thermoremanent and shock remanent origins, and surface magnetometer data is presented, which indicates small-scale magnetic fields with a wide range of field intensities implying localized, near-surface sources. A detailed examination is presented of orbital magnetometer and charged particle data concerning the geologic nature and origin of magnetic anomaly sources and the directional properties of the magnetization, which exhibit a random distribution except for a depletion in the north-south direction. A lunar magnetization survey with global coverage provided by a polar orbiting satellite is suggested as a means of placing stronger constraints on the origin of lunar crustal magnetization.

  18. Strong interlayer exchange coupling and high post-annealing stability in perpendicularly magnetized [Pt/Co]/Ru/[Co/Pt] structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok Jin Yun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Strong interlayer exchange coupling (IEC and high post-annealing stability are demonstrated for perpendicular synthetic ferrimagnets (p-SyFs with [Pt/Co]6/Ru/[Co/Pt]3 structures. The observed IEC strength was 2.55 ergs/cm2 for a Ru thickness of 0.35 nm, representing the highest value achieved up to date for similar structures. The IEC remained strong even after annealing at 450oC, for the practically important Ru layer thickness of 0.85 nm. The biquadratic IEC, a parameter quantifying the pinhole effects in SyFs, was confirmed by analyzing the experimental results by using the total energy functional, and its strength increased with decreasing the temperature and Ru layer thickness.

  19. Strong static magnetic fields of NMR: Do they affect tissue perfusion. Beeinflussen starke statische Magnetfelder in der NMR-Tomographie die Gewebedurchblutung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stick, C.; Hinkelmann, K. (Kiel Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physiologie und Medizinische Klimatologie); Eggert, P. (Kiel Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Allgemeine Paediatrie); Wendhausen, H. (Kiel Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Radiologie)

    1991-03-01

    Findings obtained in humans and test animals raised the question whether strong static magnetic fields as used in NMR-tomography may affect tissue perfusion. In two test series including 20 subjects, each skin blood flow at the thumb was determined by heat clearance, and forearm blood flow was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography. For comparative purposes, measurements were carried out bilaterally at both extremities. The experiments consisted of three sections that lasted 10 min each. During the second section the thumb or the forearm were unilaterally exposed to magnetic fields of 0,9 to 1 T and 0.4 to 0.5 T, respectively. The results of this section were compared with the values obtained during the experimental sections prior to and after the exposure to the magnetic field. The results were also compared with the blood flow measured at the contralateral extremity. Neither at the skin of the thumb nor at the forearm were there changes in local blood flow attributable to the magnetic fields applied. (orig.).

  20. Investigations of ultrafast ligand rebinding to heme and heme proteins using temperature and strong magnetic field perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    This thesis is written to summarize investigations of the mechanisms that underlie the kinetics of diatomic ligand rebinding to the iron atom of the heme group, which is chelated inside heme proteins. The family of heme proteins is a major object of studies for several branches of scientific research activity. Understanding the ligand binding mechanisms and pathways is one of the major goals for biophysics. My interests mainly focus on the physics of this ligand binding process. Therefore, to investigate the problem, isolated from the influence of the protein matrix, Fe-protophorphyrin IX is chosen as the prototype system in my studies. Myoglobin, the most extensively and intensively studied protein, is another ideal system that allows coupling the protein polypeptide matrix into the investigation. A technique to synchro-lock two laser pulse trains electronically is applied to our pump-probe spectroscopic studies. Based on this technique, a two color, fs/ps pump-probe system is developed which extends the temporal window for our investigation to 13ns and fills a gap existing in previous pump-probe investigations. In order to apply this newly-developed pump-probe laser system to implement systematic studies on the kinetics of diatomic ligand (NO, CO, O2) rebinding to heme and heme proteins, several experimental setups are utilized. In Chapter 1, the essential background knowledge, which helps to understand the iron-ligand interaction, is briefly described. In Chapter 2, in addition to a description of the preparation protocols of protein samples and details of the method for data analysis, three home-made setups are described, which include: a picosecond laser regenerative amplifier, a pump-probe application along the bore (2-inch in diameter) of a superconducting magnet and a temperature-controllable cryostat for spinning sample cell. Chapter 3 presents high magnetic field studies of several heme-ligand or protein-ligand systems. Pump-probe spectroscopy is used to

  1. Study of Increased Radiation When an X-ray Tube is Placed in a Strong Magnetic Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Z.F.; /Stanford U., Dept. Radiol. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Pelc, N.J.; /Stanford U., Dept. Radiol. /Stanford U., Dept. Bioeng.; Nelson, W.R.; /SLAC; Fahrig, R.; /Stanford U., Dept. Radiol.

    2007-01-12

    When a fixed anode x-ray tube is placed in a magnetic field (B) that is parallel to the anode-cathode axis, the x-ray exposure increases with increasing B. It was hypothesized that the increase was caused by backscattered electrons which were constrained by B and reaccelerated by the electric field onto the x-ray tube target. We performed computer simulations and physical experiments to study the behavior of the backscattered electrons in a magnetic field, and their effects on the radiation output, x-ray spectrum, and off-focal radiation. A Monte Carlo program (EGS4) was used to generate the combined energy and angular distribution of the backscattered electrons. The electron trajectories were traced and their landing locations back on the anode were calculated. Radiation emission from each point was modeled with published data (IPEM Report 78), and thus the exposure rate and x-ray spectrum with the contribution of backscattered electrons could be predicted. The point spread function for a pencil beam of electrons was generated and then convolved with the density map of primary electrons incident on the anode as simulated with a finite element program (Opera-3d, Vector Fields, UK). The total spatial distribution of x-ray emission could then be calculated. Simulations showed that for an x-ray tube working at 65 kV, about 54% of the electrons incident on the target were backscattered. In a magnetic field of 0.5 T, although the exposure would be increased by 33%, only a small fraction of the backscattered electrons landed within the focal spot area. The x-ray spectrum was slightly shifted to lower energies and the half value layer (HVL) was reduced by about 6%. Measurements of the exposure rate, half value layer and focal spot distribution were acquired as functions of B. Good agreement was observed between experimental data and simulation results. The wide spatial distribution of secondary x-ray emission can degrade the MTF of the x-ray system at low spatial

  2. Design Features of a Planar Hybrid/Permanent Magnet Strong Focusing Undulator for Free Electron Laser (FEL) And Synchrotron Radiation (SR) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatchyn, Roman; /SLAC

    2011-09-09

    Insertion devices for Angstrom-wavelength Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifiers driven by multi-GeV electron beams generally require distributed focusing substantially stronger than their own natural focusing fields. Over the last several years a wide variety of focusing schemes and configurations have been proposed for undulators of this class, ranging from conventional current-driven quadrupoles external to the undulator magnets to permanent magnet (PM) lattices inserted into the insertion device gap. In this paper we present design studies of a flexible high-field hybrid/PM undulator with strong superimposed planar PM focusing proposed for a 1.5 Angstrom Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) driven by an electron beam with a 1 mm-mr normalized emittance. Attainable field parameters, tuning modes, and potential applications of the proposed structure are discussed.

  3. MHD pressure drop characteristics in a three-surface-multi-layered channel under a strong magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyagi, M., E-mail: mao@karma.qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Ito, S.; Hashizume, H. [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-01-2 Aramaki-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Muroga, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    A three-surface-multi-layered channel is one of the possible methods for reducing the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in a Li/V blanket. In this study, experimental and numerical evaluations of the liquid metal MHD flow in a three-surface-multi-layered channel were conducted to confirm the extent of MHD pressure reduction in the channel. The MHD flow was tested using a Bi-Sn eutectic alloy (MHD liquid) and an open annular channel under up to 5 T magnetic field. Experimentally determined pressure drops differed from those predicted by numerical analysis. This may be as a result of an increase in the friction force caused by an oxide appearing on the liquid free surface and a decrease in the electromagnetic force owing to the formation of a contact resistance between the Bi-Sn alloy and the bottom wall of the stainless steel channel.

  4. Ionospheric convection response to changes of interplanetary magnetic field B-z component during strong B-y component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, C.S.; Murr, D.; Sofko, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    the dawn-dusk meridian plane, which is interpreted as propagation or expansion of newly generated convection cells in the cusp region. Other studies showed that the change in convection pattern in response to IMF reorientations is spatially fixed. In this paper, we investigate the ionospheric convection...... response to IMF Bz changes during strong IMF BZ. On March 23, 1995, B-x was small, B-y was strongly positive (7-11 nT), and the B-z polarity changed several times after 1300 UT. The dayside ionospheric convection is dominated by a large clockwise convection cell. The cell focus (the "eye" of the convection...... pattern) is located in the prenoon sector for northward B-z and in the postnoon sector for southward B-z. It is found that the cell focus shifts from the prenoon sector to the postnoon sector following a southward BL turning and vice versa for a northward B-z turning. However, the motion of the convection...

  5. Tensor order parameters for magnetic-structural phase transitions in crystals with strong spin-lattice coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birman, Joseph L.; Izyumov, Yuri A.

    1980-02-01

    We formulate the thermodynamic theory of phase transitions in magnetically ordered systems in terms of a tensor, or coupled, order parameter. This basis is constructed by coupling atomic spin and lattice displacement. Symmetry lowering is predicted at the second-order phase transition point (tricritical points are not considered here). Lower-symmetry phases should in general be classified according to the Shubnikov symmetry space group Sh, which will reveal the total broken symmetry due to the coupled order parameter. In case the apparatus is "blind" to one portion of the order parameter: either spin or displacement, the apparent symmetry group will not be Sh, but a related space group, which will reveal "partial information." Comparing this formulation and the usual (uncoupled) theory, new results are obtained here: for example "pseudoscalar order parameters" can arise and different "symmetry-broken" groups. An illustration is given by applying the formulation to the spinel-structure space group: O7h-Fd3m. It is conjectured that for TbNi2 the tensor order parameter Γ1- may be relevant, so that the phase transition which has been identified as O7h-->Sh101166 may actually be O7h-->Sh132227, caused by a pseudoscalar.

  6. Simulation of remanent dose rates and benchmark measurements at the CERN-EU high energy reference field facility

    CERN Document Server

    Roesler, S; Donjoux, Y; Mitaroff, Angela

    2003-01-01

    A new approach is presented for the calculation of remanent dose rates from induced radioactivity with the FLUKA Monte-Carlo code. It is based on an explicit calculation of isotope production followed by the transport of photons, positrons, and electrons from the radioactive decay to the point of interest. The approach is benchmarked with a measurement in which samples of different materials were irradiated by the stray radiation field produced by interactions of high-energy hadrons in a copper target. Remanent dose rates were measured at different cooling times with a NaI scintillator-based survey instrument. The results of the simulations are generally in good agreement with the measurements. The method is applied to the prediction of remanent dose rates around the beam cleaning insertions of the LHC. 10 Refs.

  7. Comparison between strong η-fiber-oriented high-silicon steel and grain-oriented high-silicon steel on magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jing; Yue, Ye; Zhang, Yinghui; Cao, Yanyan; Yang, Ping

    2017-10-01

    Two kinds of 0.23 mm-thick high-silicon steel sheets with strong η-fiber texture and Goss texture were produced by rolling methods. Their final microstructures, textures and magnetic properties were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and classical loss separation. The results showed that the core loss of strong η-fiber-oriented high-silicon steel was lower than that of grain-oriented high-silicon steel at frequencies ranging from 40 Hz to 20 kHz, and their differences in core loss were more obvious at 400 Hz and higher frequencies. The hysteresis losses and anomalous losses of the strong η-fiber-oriented high-silicon steel were lower than that of grain-oriented high-silicon steel at frequencies ranging from 40 Hz to 1000 Hz, and the losses were closely related to final cleanness and grain sizes. A few stable remained nitride precipitates increased the hysteresis loss of the grain-oriented high-silicon steel. The effect of decreasing grain sizes on decreasing core losses at high frequencies was significant, and the strong η-fiber-oriented high-silicon steel was more suitable for high frequency applications because of smaller grain sizes compared to the grain-oriented high-silicon steel.

  8. Martian meteorites and Martian magnetic anomalies: a new perspective from NWA 7034 (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattacceca, J.; Rochette, P.; Scozelli, R. B.; Munayco, P.; Agee, C. B.; Quesnel, Y.; Cournede, C.; Geissman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The magnetic anomalies observed above the Martian Noachian crust [1] require strong crustal remanent magnetization in the 15-60 A/m range over a thickness of 20-50 km [2,3]. The Martian rocks available for study in the form of meteorites do contain magnetic minerals (magnetite and/or pyrrhotite) but in too small amount to account for such strong remanent magnetizations [4]. Even though this contradiction was easily explained by the fact that Martian meteorites (mostly nakhlites and shergottites) are not representative of the Noachian Martian crust, we were left with no satisfactory candidate lithology to account for the Martian magnetic anomalies. The discovery in the Sahara of a new type of Martian meteorite (NWA 7034 [5] and subsequent paired stones which are hydrothermalized volcanic breccia) shed a new light on this question as it contains a much larger amount of ferromagnetic minerals than any other Martian meteorite. We present here a study of the magnetic properties of NWA 7034, together with a review of the magnetic properties of thirty other Martian meteorites. Magnetic measurements (including high and low temperature behavior and Mössbauer spectroscopy) show that NWA 7034 contains about 15 wt.% of magnetite with various degrees of substitution and maghemitization up to pure maghemite, in the pseudo-single domain size range. Pyrrhotite, a common mineral in other Martian meteorites is not detected. Although it is superparamagnetic and cannot carry remanent magnetization, nanophase goethite is present in significant amounts confirming that NWA 7034 is the most oxidized Martian meteorite studied so far, as already indicated by the presence of maghemite (this study) and pyrite [5]. These magnetic properties show that a kilometric layer of a lithology similar to NWA 7034 magnetized in a dynamo field would be enough to account for the strongest Martian magnetic anomalies. Although the petrogenesis of NWA 7034 is still debated, as the brecciation could be either

  9. Directed flow of charm quarks as a witness of the initial strong magnetic field in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Santosh K.; Plumari, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Alam, J.; Scardina, F.; Greco, V.

    2017-05-01

    Ultra-relativistic Heavy-Ion Collision (HIC) generates very strong initial magnetic field (B →) inducing a vorticity in the reaction plane. The high B → influences the evolution dynamics that is opposed by the large Faraday current due to electric field generated by the time varying B → . We show that the resultant effects entail a significantly large directed flow (v1) of charm quarks (CQs) compared to light quarks due to a combination of several favorable conditions for CQs, mainly: (i) unlike light quarks formation time scale of CQs, τf ≃ 0.1 fm /c is comparable to the time scale when B → attains its maximum value and (ii) the kinetic relaxation time of CQs is similar to the QGP lifetime, this helps the CQ to retain the initial kick picked up from the electromagnetic field in the transverse direction. The effect is also odd under charge exchange allowing to distinguish it from the vorticity of the bulk matter due to the initial angular momentum conservation; conjointly thanks to its mass, Mc > >ΛQCD, there should be no mixing with the chiral magnetic dynamics. Hence CQs provide very crucial and independent information on the strength of the magnetic field produced in HIC.

  10. Strong pressure dependences of the magnetization and Curie temperature for CrTe and MnAs with NiAs-type structure

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, H; Kondo, K; Goto, T

    2002-01-01

    To study the strong magneto-volume effects observed in CrTe and MnAs with NiAs-type crystal structure, first-principle band calculations are carried out by a self-consistent linear muffin-tin orbital method within the atomic sphere approximation. The equilibrium volume of the unit cell is obtained as a function of the magnetization M, which gives the volume magnetostriction. The dependence on M of the bulk modulus is also estimated. The coefficients a sub 0 and b sub 0 in the Landau expansion, DELTA E(M) = a sub 0 M sup 2 /2 + b sub 0 M sup 4 /4, are estimated by the fixed-spin-moment method. The calculated results for CrTe and MnAs are compared with those for bcc Fe. It is shown that the values of vertical bar a sub 0 vertical bar and b sub 0 for CrTe and MnAs are so small that the correction term from the magneto-volume coupling constants becomes significant. This fact gives a strong pressure dependence of the spontaneous magnetization. The pressure dependence of the Curie temperature is also discussed by m...

  11. Radio emission from the X-ray pulsar Her X-1: a jet launched by a strong magnetic field neutron star?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eijnden, J.; Degenaar, N.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Wijnands, R.; Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Rupen, M. P.

    2018-01-01

    Her X-1 is an accreting neutron star (NS) in an intermediate-mass X-ray binary. Like low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), it accretes via Roche lobe overflow, but similar to many high-mass X-ray binaries containing a NS; Her X-1 has a strong magnetic field and slow spin. Here, we present the discovery of radio emission from Her X-1 with the Very Large Array. During the radio observation, the central X-ray source was partially obscured by a warped disc. We measure a radio flux density of 38.7 ± 4.8 μJy at 9 GHz but cannot constrain the spectral shape. We discuss possible origins of the radio emission, and conclude that coherent emission, a stellar wind, shocks and a propeller outflow are all unlikely explanations. A jet, as seen in LMXBs, is consistent with the observed radio properties. We consider the implications of the presence of a jet in Her X-1 on jet formation mechanisms and on the launching of jets by NSs with strong magnetic fields.

  12. Magnetic record associated with tree ring density: Possible climate proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruner Petr

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A magnetic signature of tree rings was tested as a potential paleo-climatic indicator. We examined wood from sequoia tree, located in Mountain Home State Forest, California, whose tree ring record spans over the period 600 – 1700 A.D. We measured low and high-field magnetic susceptibility, the natural remanent magnetization (NRM, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM, and stability against thermal and alternating field (AF demagnetization. Magnetic investigation of the 200 mm long sequoia material suggests that magnetic efficiency of natural remanence may be a sensitive paleoclimate indicator because it is substantially higher (in average >1% during the Medieval Warm Epoch (700–1300 A.D. than during the Little Ice Age (1300–1850 A.D. where it is

  13. Direct measurement of internal magnetic fields in natural sands using scanning SQUID microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walbrecker, Jan O; Kalisky, Beena; Grombacher, Denys; Kirtley, John; Moler, Kathryn A; Knight, Rosemary

    2014-05-01

    NMR experiments are ideally carried out in well-controlled magnetic fields. When samples of natural porous materials are studied, the situation can be complicated if the sample itself contains magnetic components, giving rise to internal magnetic fields in the pore space that modulate the externally applied fields. If not properly accounted for, the internal fields can lead to misinterpretation of relaxation, diffusion, or imaging data. To predict the potential effect of internal fields, and develop effective mitigation strategies, it is important to develop a quantitative understanding of the magnitude and distribution of internal fields occurring in natural porous media. To develop such understanding, we employ scanning SQUID microscopy, a technique that can detect magnetic field variations very accurately at high spatial resolution (∼3μm). We prepared samples from natural unconsolidated aquifer material, and scanned areas of about 200×200μm in a very low background magnetic field of ∼2μT. We found large amplitude variations with a magnitude of about 2mT, across a relatively long spatial scale of about 200μm, that are associated with a large magnetic grain (>50μm radius) with a strong magnetic remanence. We also detected substantial variations exceeding 60μT on small spatial scales of about ∼10μm. We attribute these small-scale variations to very fine-grained magnetic material. Because we made our measurements at very low background field, the observed variations are not induced by the background field but due to magnetic remanence. Consequently, the observed internal fields will affect even low-field NMR experiments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Rock Magnetism: Successes and Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Louis Néel once proposed making ships "invisible" (i.e., magnetically undetectable) by giving them a permanent or remanent magnetism that would cancel the signal induced by the Earth's magnetic field. Like much of rock magnetism, this borders on the magical. Rocks possess a magnetic memory that verges on the phenomenal. An adequate magnetic lifetime for your credit card is until its expiry date and one must avoid exposure to magnetic fields and heat. But a rock's magnetic memory is forever, and the recipe for that durability includes, for igneous and metamorphic rocks, exposure to ancient fields while hot - near the Curie temperature in fact. The thermal remanent magnetism (TRM) thus produced is largely immune to later field changes at lower temperatures although luckily a fraction - a partial TRM overprint - does record later heating events, e.g., burial during major orogenies. When we lift the veil and look closely, on a microscale or nanoscale, it is perplexing to understand why paleomagnetism works so well when rocks seemingly contain so few of Néel's ideal recorders: single-domain grains with tightly coupled atomic spins. In larger grains with multiple domains, the walls between neighbouring domains move readily, like dislocations in crystals, enlarging some domains at the expense of others. This mutability makes any magnetic memory of multi-domain grains suspect. But around the threshold between single-domain and multi-domain structures - a specific grain size that varies widely from one magnetic mineral to another - there are recent predictions and observations of novel structures, including linked magnetic moments of nearby grains and interfacial moments of exsolved phases, that could go some way towards explaining why single-domain-like behaviour is so widespread. Many magnetic properties show an almost continuous variation with grain size, quite unlike the expected discontinuity at the single-domain threshold. Among these is initial susceptibility which

  15. Study of reaction and heat release from solid combustion in strong magnetic field; Kyojiba wo riyoshita hikinshitsu kotai nensho shori no hanno to netsu no seigy ni kansuru kiso kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, K.; Fujita, O.; Iiya, M.; Kudo, K. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    To establish the inhomogeneous solid combustion control technology, effects of the strong magnetic field on the solid combustion were examined. When applying the sufficiently strong magnetic field, it is possible to control the air flow in combustion field by utilizing the force applying to constituent oxygen with large susceptibility. Based on this possibility, combustion experiments of expanded polystyrene plates were conducted between the magnetic poles of electro-magnet having the maximum flux density of 1 T and the maximum magnetic field gradient of 0.5 T/cm. To observe the effects of magnetic field without the effects of natural convection, combustion experiments of acrylic sheets were conducted between the magnetic poles of electro-magnet having the maximum flux density of 0.6 T and the magnetic field gradient of about 0.1 T/cm under the microgravity conditions between 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -5}g using a microgravity test facility. Consequently, prospective combustion results could be obtained, in which the force of flame received from the magnetic field is almost equivalent to the buoyancy of flame. It was demonstrated that combustion can be controlled by the magnetic field. 1 ref., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. An expansion of the field modulus suitable for the description of strong field gradients in axisymmetric magnetic fields: application to single-sided magnet design, field mapping and STRAFI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugon, Cedric; Aubert, Guy; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2012-01-01

    Mapping (or plotting) the magnetic field has a critical importance for the achievement of the homogeneous magnetic field necessary to standard MR experiments. A powerful tool for this purpose is the Spherical Harmonic Expansion (SHE), which provides a simple way to describe the spatial variations of a field in free space. Well-controlled non-zero spatial variations of the field are critical to MRI. The resolution of the image is directly related to the strength of the gradient used to encode space. As a result, it is desirable to have strong variations of the field. In that case, the SHE cannot be used as is, because the field modulus variations are affected by the variations of all components of the field. In this paper, we propose a method based on the SHE to characterize such variations, theoretically and experimentally, in the limit of an axisymmetric magnetic field. Practical applications of this method are proposed through the examples of single-sided magnet design and characterization, along with Stray-Field Imaging (STRAFI). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rock magnetic properties of the Arunta Block, Central Australia, and their implication for the interpretation of long-wavelength magnetic anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Paul R.; Banerjee, Subir K.; Teyssier, Christian

    1993-01-01

    Rock magnetic and petrologic studies of a suite of deep crustal rocks from the Arunta Block of Central Australia reveal that the granulite grade rocks are in general much more magnetic than the amphibolite grade samples irrespective of bulk rock composition. The dominant magnetic mineral in all samples is relatively pure magnetite as determined from thermomagnetic and electron microprobe analysis. The bulk magnetic properties are typical of pseudosingle-domain to multidomain size material. The samples from our study have very large remanences compared to previous crustal magnetic studies, with the granulites having a median natural remanent magnetization of 4.1 A/m and Koenigsberger ratio of 7.2. These remanences are relatively resistant to the thermal demagnetization, with nearly 50 percent of the magnetization remaining after 400 C demagnetization. Thus remanence may contribute significantly to the observed magnetic anomalies, including long-wavelength magnetic anomalies, the source of which resides at depth and therefore at elevated temperature, where a thermoviscous remanant magnetization along the present-day field is likely to dominate.

  18. Magnetic properties of cubic FeCo nanoparticles with anisotropic long chain structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinming Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cubic FeCo alloy nanoparticles (NPs with body-centered cubic (bcc phase were prepared using sputter based gas-condensation method. When the NPs formed long chain assemblies, the magnetic properties were quite different from that of well-dispersed NPs. Most of the well-dispersed NPs were superparamagnetic at room temperature while the long chain NP assemblies were ferromagnetic with coercivities around 765 Oe, which displayed quite different magnetic properties. The ferromagnetism of long chain NPs was from the exchange coupling between NPs, which eventually led to the transition from superparamagnetism (SPM to superferromagetism (SFM. Zero-field-cooled (ZFC and field-cooled (FC curves were obtained and long chain NP assemblies displayed ferromagnetism at the temperature ranging from 10 K to 400 K. Time-dependent remanent magnetic moment curves also indicated that the long chain structure had better thermal stability due to the strong exchange coupling.

  19. Detection of an Unconventional Superconducting Phase in the Vicinity of the Strong First-Order Magnetic Transition in CrAs Using As 75 -Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotegawa, Hisashi; Nakahara, Shingo; Akamatsu, Rui; Tou, Hideki; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Harima, Hisatomo

    2015-03-01

    Pressure-induced superconductivity was recently discovered in the binary helimagnet CrAs. We report the results of measurements of nuclear quadrupole resonance for CrAs under pressure. In the vicinity of the critical pressure Pc between the helimagnetic (HM) and paramagnetic (PM) phases, a phase separation is observed. The large internal field remaining in the phase-separated HM state indicates that the HM phase disappears through a strong first-order transition. This indicates the absence of a quantum critical point in CrAs; however, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1 /T1 reveals that substantial magnetic fluctuations are present in the PM state. The absence of a coherence effect in 1 /T1 in the superconducting state provides evidence that CrAs is the first Cr-based unconventional superconductor.

  20. Shell-ferromagnetism of nano-Heuslers generated by segregation under magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakır, A.; Acet, M.; Farle, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a new functional property in an AF martensitic Heusler Ni50Mn45In5, which when annealed at high temperatures under a magnetic field, segregates and forms Ni50Mn25In25 Heusler precipitates embedded in a Ni50Mn50 matrix. The precipitates are paramagnetic whereas the matrix is antiferromagnetic. However, the spins at the interface with the Ni50Mn50 matrix align with the field during their nucleation and growth and become strongly pinned in the direction of the applied field during annealing, whereas the core spins become paramagnetic. This shell-ferromagnetism persists up to 600 K and is so strongly pinned that the remanent magnetization remains unchanged, even when the field is reversed or when the temperature is cycled between low temperatures and close to the annealing temperature. PMID:27412644

  1. The First in situ Observation of Kelvin-Helmholtz Waves at High-Latitude Magnetopause during Strongly Dawnward Interplanetary Magnetic Field Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, K.-J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Wang, Y.; Vinas, A. F.; Sibeck, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    We report the first in situ observation of high-latitude magnetopause (near the northern duskward cusp) Kelvin-Helmholtz waves (KHW) by Cluster on January 12, 2003, under strongly dawnward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. The fluctuations unstable to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) are found to propagate mostly tailward, i.e., along the direction almost 90 deg. to both the magnetosheath and geomagnetic fields, which lowers the threshold of the KHI. The magnetic configuration across the boundary layer near the northern duskward cusp region during dawnward IMF is similar to that in the low-latitude boundary layer under northward IMF, in that (1) both magnetosheath and magnetospheric fields across the local boundary layer constitute the lowest magnetic shear and (2) the tailward propagation of the KHW is perpendicular to both fields. Approximately 3-hour-long periods of the KHW during dawnward IMF are followed by the rapid expansion of the dayside magnetosphere associated with the passage of an IMF discontinuity that characterizes an abrupt change in IMF cone angle, Phi = acos (B(sub x) / absolute value of Beta), from approx. 90 to approx. 10. Cluster, which was on its outbound trajectory, continued observing the boundary waves at the northern evening-side magnetopause during sunward IMF conditions following the passage of the IMF discontinuity. By comparing the signatures of boundary fluctuations before and after the IMF discontinuity, we report that the frequencies of the most unstable KH modes increased after the discontinuity passed. This result demonstrates that differences in IMF orientations (especially in f) are associated with the properties of KHW at the high-latitude magnetopause due to variations in thickness of the boundary layer, and/or width of the KH-unstable band on the surface of the dayside magnetopause.

  2. Strong Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity of Magnetically Recyclable Sol-Gel-Synthesized ZnFe2O4 for Rhodamine B Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoli; Xiao, Lingbo; Jia, Yanmin; Hong, Yuantign; Ma, Jiangping; Wu, Zheng

    2018-01-01

    Visible light-responsive ZnFe2O4 photocatalyst with a spinel structure was synthesized via a sol-gel method. The visible light photocatalysis of ZnFe2O4 was investigated by decomposing Rhodamine B (RhB) solution. Under ˜30 min of visible light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of RhB is up to ˜97.4%. The excellent photocatalytic performance of ZnFe2O4 photocatalyst is attributed to the high effective oxidation-reduction reaction caused by light irradiation excitation. With the increase of decomposition time, the wavelength of the maximum absorption peak of RhB solutions shifts from 557 nm to 498 nm ("blue shift"), which is because of the N-deethylation and cleavage of the conjugated chromophore structure of RhB. ZnFe2O4 photocatalyst also exhibits a weak ferromagnetism performance. The decomposition ratio of RhB for the magnetically recycled ZnFe2O4 is ˜94.6%. Strong visible light photocatalysis and convenience of magnetic recycling make ZnFe2O4 promising for photocatalytic applications in dye wastewater treatment.

  3. Optimally segmented permanent magnet structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Insinga, Andrea Roberto; Bjørk, Rasmus; Smith, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We present an optimization approach which can be employed to calculate the globally optimal segmentation of a two-dimensional magnetic system into uniformly magnetized pieces. For each segment the algorithm calculates the optimal shape and the optimal direction of the remanent flux density vector......, with respect to a linear objective functional. We illustrate the approach with results for magnet design problems from different areas, such as a permanent magnet electric motor, a beam focusing quadrupole magnet for particle accelerators and a rotary device for magnetic refrigeration....

  4. Magnetic transitions and spin-glass reentrance in two-dimensional [MnII(TCNE)(NCMe)2]X (X = PF6,AsF6,SbF6) molecular magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C. S.; Heth, C. L.; Alema, F. L.; Lapidus, S. H.; Stephens, P. W.; Pokhodnya, K. I.

    2013-06-01

    The structural, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of the two-dimensional (2D) molecule-based magnets of [MnII(TCNE)(NCMe)2]X (X = PF6, AsF6, SbF6; TCNE = tetracyanoethylene, NCMe = acetonitrile) composition are reported. It is shown that the alteration of the interlayer distance by increasing the anion size has little effect on the critical magnetic ordering temperature, Tc, suggesting that it depends predominantly on the intra-plane magnetic exchange. The observed field-induced irreversibility in static magnetization, a slow decay of isothermal remanence below Tc, and the dynamic susceptibility data are in accord with a re-entrant spin-glass nature of the ground state of all materials. In contrast to the isostructural Fe-based magnets, in which strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy facilitates the finite temperature magnetic ordering with the magnetization easy axis perpendicular to the μ4-TCNE•- plane, in the studied Mn-based magnets the easy axis is canted away from the normal direction, due to a small magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The two magnetic transitions observed on cooling are assigned to the ferrimagnetic long-range ordering of the normal magnetization component followed by the re-entrant spin-glass type transition resulting from a random freezing of the in-plane magnetization component.

  5. Relating Magnetic Properties and High Hyperthermia Performance of Iron Oxide Nanoflowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bender, Philipp; Fock, Jeppe; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2018-01-01

    We investigated in depth the interrelations among structure, magnetic properties, relaxation dynamics and magnetic hyperthermia performance of magnetic nanoflowers. The nanoflowers are about 39 nm in size, and consist of densely packed iron oxide cores. They display a remanent magnetization, which...

  6. Virtual Pole from Magnetic Anomaly (VPMA): A procedure to estimate the age of a rock from its magnetic anomaly only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordani, Renato; Shukowsky, Wladimir

    2009-10-01

    Virtual Pole from Magnetic Anomaly (VPMA) is a new multi-disciplinary methodology that estimates the age of a source rock from its magnetic anomaly, taken directly from available aeromagnetic data. The idea is to use those anomalies in which a strong remanent magnetic component is likely to occur. Once the total magnetization of the anomaly is computed through any of the currently available methods, the line that connects all virtual paleogeographic poles is related with the position, on a paleogeographic projection, of the appropriate age fragment of the APWP curve. We applied this procedure to five (5) well-known magnetic anomalies of the South American plate in SE Brazil, all of them associated to alkaline complexes of Mesozoic age. The apparent ages obtained from VPMA on three of the anomalies where the radiometric age of the source rock is known - Tapira, Araxá and Juquiá - were inside the error interval of the published ages. The VPMA apparent ages of the other two, where the age of the source rock is not known (Registro and Pariqueraçu magnetic anomalies) were geologically coherent. We expect that the application of the VPMA methodology as a reconnaissance geochronological tool may contribute to geological knowledge over continental areas, especially when the source rocks of the magnetic anomalies are unknown or buried below superficial sediments.

  7. Differential displacement and rotation in thrust fronts: A magnetic, calcite twinning and palinspastic study of the Jones Valley thrust, Alabama, US Appalachians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnat, James S.; van der Pluijm, Ben A.; Van der Voo, Rob; Thomas, William A.

    2008-06-01

    To test whether a displacement gradient along a curved fault structure requires rotation, we studied the northeast-striking, northwest-verging, large-displacement Jones Valley thrust fault of the Appalachian thrust belt in Alabama. Paleomagnetism, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and calcite twinning analysis, complemented by balanced cross-sections, were used to evaluate the presence and magnitude of any rotation. Remanence directions from the Silurian Red Mountain Formation reveal a prefolding magnetization acquired in the Pennsylvanian, whereas magnetic analysis shows a strong, bedding-parallel compaction fabric with a tectonic lineation. Paleomagnetic directions and magnetic lineations reveal no relative rotation between the hanging wall and footwall of the thrust fault. Rather than rotation, therefore, we interpret the Jones Valley thrust sheet as a structure that developed in a self-similar fashion, with lateral growth of the fault surface occurring coincident with growth into the foreland.

  8. Ferrimagnetic Tb-Fe Alloy Thin Films: Composition and Thickness Dependence of Magnetic Properties and All-Optical Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit eHebler

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ferrimagnetic rare earth - transition metal Tb-Fe alloy thin films exhibit a variety of different magnetic properties, which depends strongly on composition and temperature. In this study, first the influence of the film thickness (5 - 85 nm on the sample magnetic properties was investigated in a wide composition range between 15 at.% and 38 at.% of Tb. From our results, we find that the compensation point, remanent magnetization, and magnetic anisotropy of the Tb-Fe films depend not only on the composition but also on the thickness of the magnetic film up to a critical thickness of about 20-30 nm. Beyond this critical thickness, only slight changes in magnetic properties are observed. This behavior can be attributed to a growth-induced modification of the microstructure of the amorphous films, which affects the short range order. As a result, a more collinear alignment of the distributed magnetic moments of Tb along the out-of-plane direction with film thickness is obtained. This increasing contribution of the Tb sublattice magnetization to the total sample magnetization is equivalent to a sample becoming richer in Tb and can be referred to as an effective composition. Furthermore, the possibility of all-optical switching, where the magnetization orientation of Tb-Fe can be reversed solely by circularly polarized laser pulses, was analyzed for a broad range of compositions and film thicknesses and correlated to the underlying magnetic properties.

  9. Remanence of the interparticle interactions and its influence on the microwave absorption in Co-ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mata-Zamora, M.E. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico de la, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-360, Coyoacan DF 04510 (Mexico)], E-mail: memzamora@yahoo.com.mx; Montiel, H. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico de la, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-360, Coyoacan DF 04510 (Mexico); Alvarez, G. [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-360, Coyoacan DF 04510 (Mexico); Barron, J.F. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico de la, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-360, Coyoacan DF 04510 (Mexico); Arriola, H. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica y Nuclear, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-360, Coyoacan DF 04510 (Mexico); Saniger, J.M. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico de la, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-360, Coyoacan DF 04510 (Mexico); Valenzuela, R. [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-360, Coyoacan DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2008-07-15

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were obtained by the sol-gel method at several annealing temperatures: 400, 450, 500, 550 and 600 deg. C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed the formation of the spinel phase with a nanoparticle size in the 17-26 nm range as function of the annealing temperature. The Moessbauer spectra at room temperature showed the presence of a partial inverse spinel structure. Saturation magnetization and the coercive field are strongly dependent on the annealing temperature and they can be associated with variations of the nanoparticles size. Microwave power absorption (MPA) (dP/dH) measurements were carried out as a function of DC field (H{sub DC}) in asymmetric sweeps in the 0 kOe{<=}H{sub DC}{<=}9 kOe range, at X-band (9.4 GHz), for all annealing temperatures. The large hysteresis in the MPA is due to interparticle interaction associated with its demagnetizing-like nature.

  10. Fast ignition realization experiment with high-contrast kilo-joule peta-watt LFEX laser and strong external magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke, E-mail: sfujioka@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Kojima, Sadaoki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Lee, Seung Ho; Morace, Alessio; Vaisseau, Xavier; Sakata, Shohei; Abe, Yuki; Matsuo, Kazuki; Farley Law, King Fai; Tosaki, Shota; Yogo, Akifumi; Shigemori, Keisuke; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Yamanoi, Kohei; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Tokita, Shigeki; Nakata, Yoshiki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 Japan (Japan); and others

    2016-05-15

    by imploding plasma. Following the above improvements, conversion of 13% of the LFEX laser energy to a low energy portion of the REB, whose slope temperature is 0.7 MeV, which is close to the ponderomotive scaling value, was achieved. To meet the second requirement, the compression of a solid spherical ball with a diameter of 200-μm to form a dense core with an areal density of ∼0.07 g/cm{sup 2} was induced by a laser-driven spherically converging shock wave. Converging shock compression is more hydrodynamically stable compared to shell implosion, while a hot spot cannot be generated with a solid ball target. Solid ball compression is preferable also for compressing an external magnetic field to collimate the REB to the fuel core, due to the relatively small magnetic Reynolds number of the shock compressed region. To meet the third requirement, we have generated a strong kilo-tesla magnetic field using a laser-driven capacitor-coil target. The strength and time history of the magnetic field were characterized with proton deflectometry and a B-dot probe. Guidance of the REB using a 0.6-kT field in a planar geometry has been demonstrated at the LULI 2000 laser facility. In a realistic FI scenario, a magnetic mirror is formed between the REB generation point and the fuel core. The effects of the strong magnetic field on not only REB transport but also plasma compression were studied using numerical simulations. According to the transport calculations, the heating efficiency can be improved from 0.4% to 4% by the GEKKO and LFEX laser system by meeting the three requirements described above. This efficiency is scalable to 10% of the heating efficiency by increasing the areal density of the fuel core.

  11. Functionalization of strongly interacting magnetic nanocubes with (thermo)responsive coating and their application in hyperthermia and heat-triggered drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakwere, Hamilton; Leal, Manuel Pernia; Materia, Maria Elena; Curcio, Alberto; Guardia, Pablo; Niculaes, Dina; Marotta, Roberto; Falqui, Andrea; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2015-05-20

    Herein, we prepare nanohybrids by incorporating iron oxide nanocubes (cubic-IONPs) within a thermoresponsive polymer shell that can act as drug carriers for doxorubicin(doxo). The cubic-shaped nanoparticles employed are at the interface between superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic behavior and have an exceptionally high specific absorption rate (SAR), but their functionalization is extremely challenging compared to bare superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as they strongly interact with each other. By conducting the polymer grafting reaction using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization in a viscous solvent medium, we have here developed a facile approach to decorate the nanocubes with stimuli-responsive polymers. When the thermoresponsive shell is composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-polyethylene glycolmethyl ether acrylate), nanohybrids have a phase transition temperature, the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), above 37 °C in physiological conditions. Doxo loaded nanohybrids exhibited a negligible drug release below 37 °C but showed a consistent release of their cargo on demand by exploiting the capability of the nanocubes to generate heat under an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Moreover, the drug free nanocarrier does not exhibit cytotoxicity even when administered at high concentration of nanocubes (1g/L of iron) and internalized at high extent (260 pg of iron per cell). We have also implemented the synthesis protocol to decorate the surface of nanocubes with poly(vinylpyridine) polymer and thus prepare pH-responsive shell coated nanocubes.

  12. Construction of three-dimensional graphene interfaces into carbon fiber textiles for increasing deposition of nickel nanoparticles: flexible hierarchical magnetic textile composites for strong electromagnetic shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xing-Ming; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Wang, Chan-Yuan; Xie, Qing; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Bi, Song; Hou, Zhi-Ling

    2017-01-27

    Since manipulating electromagnetic waves with electromagnetic active materials for environmental and electric engineering is a significant task, here a novel prototype is reported by introducing reduced graphene oxide (RGO) interfaces in carbon fiber (CF) networks for a hierarchical carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel (CF-RGO-Ni) composite textile. Upon charaterizations of the microscopic morphologies, electrical and magnetic properties, the presence of three-dimensional RGO interfaces and bifunctional nickel nanoparticles substantially influences the related physical properties in the resulting hierarchical composite textiles. Eletromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance suggests that the hierarchical composite textiles hold a strong shielding effectiveness greater than 61 dB, showing greater advantages than conventional polymeric and foamy shielding composites. As a polymer-free lightweight structure, flexible CF-RGO-Ni composites of all electromagnetic active components offer unique understanding of the multi-scale and multiple mechanisms in electromagnetic energy consumption. Such a novel prototype of shielding structures along with convenient technology highlight a strategy to achieve high-performance EMI shielding, coupled with a universal approach for preparing advanced lightweight composites with graphene interfaces.

  13. Functionalization of Strongly Interacting Magnetic Nanocubes with (Thermo)responsive Coating and their Application in Hyperthermia and Heat-Triggered Drug Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Kakwere, Hamilton

    2015-04-03

    Herein we prepare nanohybrids by incorporating iron oxide nanocubes (cubic-IONPs) within a thermo-responsive polymer shell that can act as drug carriers for doxorubicin(doxo). The cubic-shaped nanoparticles employed are at the interface between superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic behavior and have an exceptionally high specific absorption rate (SAR) but their functionalization is extremely challenging compared to bare superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as they strongly interact with each other. By conducting the polymer grafting reaction using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization in a viscous solvent medium, we have here developed a facile approach to decorate the nanocubes with stimuli-responsive polymers. When the thermo-responsive shell is composed of poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-polyethylene glycolmethylether acrylate), nanohybrids have a phase transition temperature, the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), above 37 °C in physiological conditions. Doxo loaded nanohybrids exhibited a negligible drug release below 37 °C but showed a consistent release of their cargo on demand by exploiting the capability of the nanocubes to generate heat under an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Moreover, the drug free nanocarrier does not exhibit cytotoxicity even when administered at high concentration of nanocubes (1g/L of iron) and internalized at high extent (260 pg of iron per cell). We have also implemented the synthesis protocol to decorate the surface of nanocubes with poly(vinylpyridine) polymer and thus prepare pH-responsive shell coated nanocubes.

  14. Construction of three-dimensional graphene interfaces into carbon fiber textiles for increasing deposition of nickel nanoparticles: flexible hierarchical magnetic textile composites for strong electromagnetic shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xing-Ming; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Wang, Chan-Yuan; Xie, Qing; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Bi, Song; Hou, Zhi-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Since manipulating electromagnetic waves with electromagnetic active materials for environmental and electric engineering is a significant task, here a novel prototype is reported by introducing reduced graphene oxide (RGO) interfaces in carbon fiber (CF) networks for a hierarchical carbon fiber/reduced graphene oxide/nickel (CF-RGO-Ni) composite textile. Upon charaterizations of the microscopic morphologies, electrical and magnetic properties, the presence of three-dimensional RGO interfaces and bifunctional nickel nanoparticles substantially influences the related physical properties in the resulting hierarchical composite textiles. Eletromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding performance suggests that the hierarchical composite textiles hold a strong shielding effectiveness greater than 61 dB, showing greater advantages than conventional polymeric and foamy shielding composites. As a polymer-free lightweight structure, flexible CF-RGO-Ni composites of all electromagnetic active components offer unique understanding of the multi-scale and multiple mechanisms in electromagnetic energy consumption. Such a novel prototype of shielding structures along with convenient technology highlight a strategy to achieve high-performance EMI shielding, coupled with a universal approach for preparing advanced lightweight composites with graphene interfaces.

  15. Strong interfacial magnetic coupling in epitaxial bilayers of LaCoO{sub 3}/LaMnO{sub 3} prepared by chemical solution deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vila-Fungueiriño, José Manuel; Rivas-Murias, Beatriz, E-mail: beatriz.rivas@usc.es; Rivadulla, Francisco

    2014-02-28

    We report the synthesis of high quality epitaxial bilayers of LaMnO{sub 3}/LaCoO{sub 3} (LCO/LMO) on (001) LaAlO{sub 3}, by spin-coating of a polymeric aqueous solutions. The bilayer shows a very large increase of the magnetization coercive field (≈ 3000%) with respect to the isolated LMO or LCO films. We suggest that the origin of this effect is a strong Mn{sup 4+}–O–Co{sup 2+} exchange interaction at the interface. Our results demonstrate that a simple chemical method is able to produce high quality epitaxial heterostructures in which interfacial effects can modify substantially the properties of the individual layers. - Highlights: • Synthesis of high quality epitaxial bilayers of LaMnO{sub 3}/LaCoO{sub 3} on (001) LaAlO{sub 3} • Polymer assisted deposition method • Interfacial effects can modify substantially the properties of the individual layers.

  16. Magnetism and the history of the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangway, D. W.; Gose, W. A.; Pearce, G. W.; Carnes, J. G.

    1973-01-01

    All lunar samples measured to date contain a weak but stable remanent magnetization of lunar origin. The magnetization is carried by metallic iron and is considered to be caused by cooling from above the Curie point in the presence of a magnetic field. Although at present the moon does not have a global field, the remanent magnetization of the rock samples and the presence of magnetic anomalies, both on the near and far side of the moon, imply that the moon experienced a magnetic field during some portion of its history. The field could have been generated in a liquid iron core sustaining a self-exciting dynamo, but there are some basic thermal and geochemical objections that need to be resolved.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of mixed zinc-cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: structural and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, P.; da Silva, F. G.; Gomide, G.; Paula, F. L. O.; Campos, A. F. C.; Perzynski, R.; Kern, C.; Depeyrot, J.; Aquino, R.

    2016-05-01

    We synthesize Zn-substituted cobalt ferrite (Zn x Co1- x Fe2O4, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1) magnetic nanoparticles by a hydrothermal co-precipitation method in alkaline medium. The chemical composition is evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques. The structure and morphology of the nanopaticles are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. XRD Rietveld refinements reveal the cation distribution among the tetrahedral (A) and octahedral (B) sites. It shows that up to x 0.5 zinc ions occupy preferably A-sites, above which Zn ions begin also a gradual occupancy of B-sites. TEM images show nanoparticles with different shapes varying from spheres, cubes, to octahedrons. Hysteresis loop properties are studied at 300 and 5 K. These properties are strongly influenced by the Zn and Co proportion in the nanoparticle composition. At 300 K, only samples with high Co content present hysteresis. At 5 K, the reduced remanent magnetization ratio ( M R/ M S) and the coercivity ( H C) suggest that nanoparticles with x < 0.5 have cubic anisotropy. A kink on the hysteresis loop, close to the remanence, is observed at low temperature. This feature is presumably associated to interplay between hard and soft anisotropy regimes in the powder samples.

  18. Soil magnetic susceptibility mapping as a pollution and provenance tool: an example from southern New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. P.; Ohneiser, C.; Turnbull, R. E.; Strong, D. T.; Demler, S.

    2018-02-01

    The presence or absence, degree and variation of heavy metal contamination in New Zealand soils is a matter of ongoing debate as it affects soil quality, agriculture and human health. In many instances, however, the soil heavy metal concentration data do not exist to answer these questions and the debate is ongoing. To address this, magnetic susceptibility (a common proxy for heavy metal contamination) values were measured in topsoil (0-30 cm) and subsoil (50-70 cm) at grid sites spaced at 8 km intervals across ca. 20 000 km2 of southern New Zealand. Samples were measured for both mass- and volume-specific magnetic susceptibility, with results being strongly, positively correlated. Three different methods of determining anomalies were applied to the data including the topsoil-subsoil difference method, Tukey boxplot method and geoaccumulation index method, with each method filtering out progressively more anomalies. Additional soil magnetic (hysteresis, isothermal remanence and thermomagnetic) measurements were made on a select subset of samples from anomalous sites. Magnetite is the dominant remanence carrying mineral, and magnetic susceptibility is governed by that minerals concentration in soils, rather than mineral type. All except two anomalous sites have a dominant geogenic source (cf. anthropogenic). By proxy, heavy metal contamination in southern New Zealand soils is minimal, making them relatively pristine. The provenance of the magnetic minerals in the anomalous sites can be traced back to likely sources in outcrops of igneous rocks within the same catchment, terrane or rock type: a distance of <100 km but frequently <1 km. Soil provenance is a key step when mapping element or isotopic distribution, vectoring to mineralization or studying soil for agricultural suitability, water quality or environmental regulation. Measuring soil magnetic susceptibility is a useful, quick and inexpensive tool that usefully supplements soil geochemical data.

  19. The physical principles of rock magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Frank

    1974-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 5: The Physical Principles of Rock Magnetism explores the physical principles of rock magnetism, with emphasis on the properties of finely divided magnetic materials. It discusses the origin and stability of rock magnetizations, the role of remanent magnetism in interpreting magnetic surveys, magnetic anisotropy as an indicator of rock fabric, and the relationship between piezomagnetic changes and seismic activity. Organized into 13 chapters, this volume discusses the properties of solids, magnetite and hematite grains, and rocks with magnetite grains

  20. Fast Ignition Realization Experiment with High-Contrast Kilo-Joule Peta-Watt Laser ``LFEX'' and Strong External Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke

    2015-11-01

    We report on progresses of the Fast Ignition Realization Experiment (FIREX) project that has been curried out at the Institute of Laser Engineering to assess the feasibility of high density core heating with a high-power, short-pulse laser including the construction of the Kilo-Joule, Petawatt class LFEX laser system. Our recent studies identify three scientific challenges to achieve high heating efficiency in the fast ignition (FI) scheme with the current GEKKO and LFEX laser systems: (i) control of energy distribution of relativistic electron beam (REB), (ii) guiding and focusing of REB to a fuel core, and (iii) formation of a high areal-density core. The control of the electron energy distribution has been experimentally confirmed by improving the intensity contrast of the LFEX laser up to >109 and an ultra-high contrast of 1011 with a plasma mirror. After the contrast improvement, 50% of the total REB energy is carried by a low energy component of the REB, which slope temperature is close to the ponderomotive scaling value (~ 1 MeV). To guide the electron beam, we apply strong external magnetic field to the REB transport region. Guiding of the REB by 0.6 kT field in a planar geometry has already been demonstrated at LULI 2000 laser facility in a collaborative experiment lead by CELIA-Univ. Bordeaux. Considering more realistic FI scenario, we have performed a similar experiment using the Kilo-Joule LFEX laser to study the effect of guiding and magnetic mirror on the electron beam. A high density core of a laser-imploded 200 μm-diameter solid CD ball was radiographed with picosecond LFEX-produced K-alpha backlighter. Comparisons of the experimental results and integrated simulations using hydrodynamic and electron transport codes suggest that 10% of the efficiency can be achievable with the current GEKKO and LFEX laser system with the success of the above challenges. This work is supported by NIFS (Japan), MEXT/JSPS KAKENHI (Japan), JSPS Fellowship (Japan), ANR

  1. Biomonitoring of particulate matter by magnetic properties of Ulmus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explains the results of an air pollution biomonitoring in Isfahan (Iran) with regards to the magnetic properties of tree leaves of Elm (Ulmus carpinifolia). Isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM300 mT) of U. carpinifolia leaves was determined. Data collection apparatus was a magnetometer. Four stations in ...

  2. Localized magnetic fields in arbitrary directions using patterned nanomagnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNeil, Robert P G; Schneble, Jeff; Kataoka, Masaya

    2010-01-01

    Control of the local magnetic fields desirable for spintronics and quantum information technology is not well developed. Existing methods produce either moderately small local fields or one held orientation. We present designs of patterned magnetic elements that produce remanent fields of 50 mT (...

  3. Magnetic domain structures and stray fields of individual elongated magnetite grains revealed by magnetic force microscopy (MFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Cathrine; Stipp, S. L. S.; McEnroe, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    In order to clarify the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic magnetic features of a rock, we applied magnetic force microscopy (MFM) as a local probe on a sample with an intense natural remanent magnetisation, a norite from Heskestad, Norway. We studied in detail seven magnetite (Fe3O...

  4. Simple anthropometric measures correlate with metabolic risk indicators as strongly as magnetic resonance imaging-measured adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Bacchetti, Peter; Kotler, Donald; Lewis, Cora E; Shlipak, Michael G; Heymsfield, Steven B; Grunfeld, Carl

    2008-06-01

    Studies in persons without HIV infection have compared percentage body fat (%BF) and waist circumference as markers of risk for the complications of excess adiposity, but only limited study has been conducted in HIV-infected subjects. We compared anthropometric and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based adiposity measures as correlates of metabolic complications of adiposity in HIV-infected and control subjects. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 666 HIV-positive and 242 control subjects in the Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) study assessing body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumferences, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), %BF, and MRI-measured regional adipose tissue. Study outcomes were 3 metabolic risk variables [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol]. Analyses were stratified by sex and HIV status and adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and HIV-related factors. In HIV-infected and control subjects, univariate associations with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL were strongest for WC, MRI-measured visceral adipose tissue, and WHR; in all cases, differences in correlation between the strongest measures for each outcome were small (r strong as MRI-measured whole-body adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

  5. Distribution of buried hydrothermal alteration deduced from high-resolution magnetic surveys in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouligand, Claire; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2014-04-01

    Yellowstone National Park (YNP) displays numerous and extensive hydrothermal features. Although hydrothermal alteration in YNP has been extensively studied, the volume, geometry, and type of rock alteration at depth remain poorly constrained. In this study, we use high-resolution airborne and ground magnetic surveys and measurements of remanent and induced magnetization of field and drill core samples to provide constraints on the geometry of hydrothermal alteration within the subsurface of three thermal areas in YNP (Firehole River, Smoke Jumper Hot Springs, and Norris Geyser Basin). We observe that hydrothermal zones from both liquid- and vapor-dominated systems coincide with magnetic lows observed in aeromagnetic surveys and with a decrease of the amplitude of short-wavelength anomalies seen in ground magnetic surveys. This suggests a strong demagnetization of both the shallow and deep substratum within these areas associated with the removal of magnetic minerals by hydrothermal alteration processes. Such demagnetization is confirmed by measurements of rock samples from hydrothermal areas which display significantly decreased total magnetization. A pronounced negative anomaly is observed over the Lone Star Geyser and suggests a significant demagnetization of the substratum associated with areas displaying large-scale fluid flow. The ground and airborne magnetic surveys are used to evaluate the distribution of magnetization in the subsurface. This study shows that significant demagnetization occurs over a thickness of at least a few hundred meters in hydrothermal areas at YNP and that the maximum degree or maximum thickness of demagnetization correlates closely with the location of hydrothermal activity and mapped alteration.

  6. Designing a magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerk, R.

    2010-03-15

    This thesis investigates the design and optimization of a permanent magnet assembly for use in a magnetic refrigeration device. The heart of magnetic refrigeration is the adiabatic temperature change in the magnetocaloric material which is caused by the magnetic field. In order to design an ideal magnet assembly the magnetocaloric materials and the refrigeration process itself and their properties and performance as a function of magnetic field are investigated. For the magnetocaloric materials it is the magnetization, specific heat capacity and adiabatic temperature that are investigated as functions of the magnetic field. Following this the process utilized by a magnetic refrigerator to provide cooling is investigated using a publicly available one dimensional numerical model. This process is called active magnetic regeneration (AMR). The aim is to determine the performance of the AMR as a function of the magnetic field in order to learn the properties of the optimal magnet assembly. The performance of the AMR as a function of the synchronization and width of the magnetic field with respect to the AMR cycle, the ramp rate and maximum value of the magnetic field are investigated. Other published magnet designs used in magnetic refrigeration devices are also evaluated, using a figure of merit based on the properties of the investigated magnetocaloric materials, to learn the properties of the best magnet designs to date. Following this investigation the Halbach cylinder, which is a hollow permanent magnet cylinder with a rotating remanent flux density, is investigated in detail as it forms the basis of many magnet designs used in magnetic refrigeration. Here the optimal dimensions of a Halbach cylinder, as well as analytical calculations of the magnetic field for a Halbach cylinder of infinite length, are presented. Once it has been determined which properties are desirable for a magnet used in magnetic refrigeration the design of a new magnet is described. This is

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  8. Magnetic vortex state and multi-domain pattern in electrodeposited hemispherical nanogranular nickel films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samardak, Alexander; Sukovatitsina, Ekaterina; Ognev, Alexey; Stebliy, Maksim; Davydenko, Alexander; Chebotkevich, Ludmila [Laboratory of Thin Film Technologies, School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Keun Kim, Young [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nasirpouri, Forough [Department of Physics, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Janjan, Seyed-Mehdi [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz 51335-1996 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nasirpouri, Farzad, E-mail: nasirpouri@sut.ac.ir [Faculty of Materials Engineering, Sahand University of Technology, Tabriz 51335-1996 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    Magnetic states of nickel nanogranular films were studied in two distinct structures of individual and agglomerated granules electrodeposited on n-type Si(1 1 1) surface from a modified Watts bath at a low pH of 2. Magnetic force microscopy and micromagnetic simulations revealed three-dimensional out-of-plane magnetic vortex states in stand-alone hemispherical granules and their arrays, and multi-domain patterns in large agglomerates and integrated films. Once the granules coalesce into small chains or clusters, the coercivity values increased due to the reduction of inter-granular spacing and strengthening of the magnetostatic interaction. Further growth leads to the formation of a continuous granulated film which strongly affected the coercivity and remanence. This was characterized by the domain wall nucleation and propagation leading to a stripe domain pattern. Magnetoresistance measurements as a function of external magnetic field are indicative of anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) for the continuous films electrodeposited on Si substrate. - Highlights: • Magnetic states of electrodeposited nickel in isolated spherical and agglomerated nanogranules, and a continuous film. • Preferential magnetization reversal mechanism in isolated granules is vortex state. • Micromagnetic simulations confirm the three-dimensional vortex. • Transition between the vortex state and multi-domain magnetic pattern causes a significant decrease in the coercive force. • Continuous nickel films electrodeposited on silicon substrate exhibit AMR whose magnitude increases with the film thickness.

  9. Electron self-injection for the acceleration in laser-pulse-wakes in the presence of a `strong' external magnetic field

    OpenAIRE

    Zhidkov, A.; Hosokai, T.; Masuda, S.; Oishi, Y.; Fujii, T.; Kodama, R.

    2012-01-01

    An external static magnetic field with its strength B~10T may result in the laser wake wave-breaking upon changing the electron motion in the vicinity of maximal density ramp of a wave period. This, as shown by numerical simulations, can change the resonance character of the electron self-injection in the laser wake-field; a total charge loaded in the acceleration phase of laser pulse wake can be controlled by a proper choice of the magnetic field strength.

  10. Method for the detection of a magnetic field utilizing a magnetic vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosad, Valentyn [Chicago, IL; Buchanan, Kristen [Batavia, IL

    2010-04-13

    The determination of the strength of an in-plane magnetic field utilizing one or more magnetically-soft, ferromagnetic member, having a shape, size and material whereas a single magnetic vortex is formed at remanence in each ferromagnetic member. The preferred shape is a thin circle, or dot. Multiple ferromagnetic members can also be stacked on-top of each other and separated by a non-magnetic spacer. The resulting sensor is hysteresis free. The sensor's sensitivity, and magnetic saturation characteristics may be easily tuned by simply altering the material, size, shape, or a combination thereof to match the desired sensitivity and saturation characteristics. The sensor is self-resetting at remanence and therefore does not require any pinning techniques.

  11. Measurements of Magnetic Fields in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, R. R.; Andrade Lima, E.; Weiss, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    magnetization blocked up to 200 mT in addition to the MC component. The HC component is not present in surrounding bulk samples, suggesting that it pre-dates the accretion of the meteorite and likely records nebular magnetic fields. Using the anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) normalization method, the HC component corresponds to a paleointensity of 6 μT. Analysis of additional dusty olivine-bearing chondrules, including thermal demagnetization, is ongoing. The existence of pre-accretional remanence in chondrules implies that magnetic fields during chondrule formation were stable on the timescale of chondrule cooling. The relatively low paleointensity of 6 μT, if confirmed by further experiments, is consistent with magnetic fields in the hypothesized "dead zone" at the mid-plane of the solar nebula where the MRI is expected to be weak. Chondrule records of dead zone magnetic fields imply that chondrule formation occurred near the disk mid-plane at between approximately 0.5 and 10 AU. Furthermore, this paleointensity may not be consistent with chondrule formation mechanisms that generate strong local magnetic fields, such as the nebular lightning and the X-winds models.

  12. Enhancement of magnetic domain topologies in Co/Pt thin films by fine tuning the magnetic field path throughout the hysteresis loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, Andrew S. [Physics Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Chesnel, Karine, E-mail: kchesnel@byu.edu [Physics Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Hatch, Kelsey; Salter, Philip [Physics Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Hellwig, Olav [HGST a Western Digital Company, San Jose, CA 95135 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the influence of magnetic history on the topology of perpendicular magnetic domains in a thin ferromagnetic film made of [Co(8 Å)/Pt(7 Å)]{sub 50} multilayers. More specifically, we have followed the morphological changes in the domain pattern when applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the layer, throughout minor and major magnetization loops, and in the resulting remanent state. We carried out this study by using MFM microscopy with an in-situ magnetic field. We find that the morphology of the magnetic domain pattern is greatly influenced by the magnetic history of the material and that some features, such as the degree of bubbliness (i.e., the extent of bubble domain formation) and density of isolated domains can be enhanced by fine tuning the magnetic field path within the major hysteresis loop towards different remanent states. In particular, we see how hysteresis is correlated to irreversible changes in the domain morphology. More interestingly, we find that the magnetic domain morphology at remanence can be changed from an interconnected labyrinthine stripe state to a state of many separated bubble domains by fine tuning the magnitude of the field previously applied to the material. These results agree well with other findings, such as the magnetic reversal behavior and magnetic memory effects in Co/Pt multilayers, and provide opportunities for potential technological applications. - Highlights: • Morphology of magnetic domains in Co/Pt thin films changes with magnetic history. • Domain morphology evolves from a maze to a bubble pattern when field approaches H{sub p}. • Domain morphology at remanence depends on magnitude H{sub m} of previously applied field. • A topological maze-to-bubble phase transition occurs at remanence when H{sub m} is near H{sup ⁎}. • Density of oppositely aligned domains peaks up when H{sub m} is near H{sup ⁎}.

  13. Tunable magnetic nanowires for biomedical and harsh environment applications

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2016-04-13

    We have synthesized nanowires with an iron core and an iron oxide (magnetite) shell by a facile low-cost fabrication process. The magnetic properties of the nanowires can be tuned by changing shell thicknesses to yield remarkable new properties and multi-functionality. A multi-domain state at remanence can be obtained, which is an attractive feature for biomedical applications, where a low remanence is desirable. The nanowires can also be encoded with different remanence values. Notably, the oxidation process of single-crystal iron nanowires halts at a shell thickness of 10 nm. The oxide shell of these nanowires acts as a passivation layer, retaining the magnetic properties of the iron core even during high-temperature operations. This property renders these core-shell nanowires attractive materials for application to harsh environments. A cell viability study reveals a high degree of biocompatibility of the core-shell nanowires.

  14. Magnetic and Sedimentological Analyses of Sediment Cores from Otsego Lake Reveal Climate and Possible Delta Dynamics Throughout the Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, C. E.; Hasbargen, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Otsego Lake (42°43'N, -74°54'W) is a large oligotrophic, monomictic lake in upstate New York that occupies a narrow, N-S trending basin (approx. 13 km length, 2 km width) and has a maximum water depth of approx. 50 m. We collected two sediment cores from a shallow (4 m water depth) bench near the SW shore of the lake. The cores were collected approximately 200 m off-shore from a small stream delta. Age control was established through five 14C AMS-dates obtained from terrestrial plant macrofossils. We analyzed sediments for their magnetic properties (magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic- and isothermal remanent magnetization, hysteresis properties and coercivity distributions) and performed loss-on-ignition and X-ray analyses to determine the relative abundance of organic matter, quartz and calcite. The watershed of Otsego Lake rests in glacial debris and Devonian shale and limestone. The base of the core (> 9 ka) consists mostly of silt-sized, massive to weakly laminated siliceous and strongly magnetic sediments. Between 8-9 ka the climate warmed sufficiently to allow for the formation of calcareous sediments. Between 8 - 6 ka magnetic minerals are characterized by low abundance and small grainsize, while organic and inorganic carbon increase. Sedimentation rates decrease significantly between 6-2 ka (from ~100 cm/ka to 12-15 cm/ka). During this time interval the relative abundance of quartz increases, sediment becomes slightly more magnetic, and the magnetic grain-size increases as well. We interpret this time period as a low-stand, when lower lake levels allow for the redeposition and possible loss of sediment into the deeper part of the lake, as well as increased terrigenous input from the nearby lakeshore. This lowstand is clearly identified as a strong, continuous reflector in GPR profiles. Sediments younger than 2 ka are characterized by variable abundances of magnetic minerals, with magnetic remanence peaks appearing semi-periodically approximately every

  15. Strong Field Spherical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dormy, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Numerical models of the geodynamo are usually classified in two categories: those denominated dipolar modes, observed when the inertial term is small enough, and multipolar fluctuating dynamos, for stronger forcing. I show that a third dynamo branch corresponding to a dominant force balance between the Coriolis force and the Lorentz force can be produced numerically. This force balance is usually referred to as the strong field limit. This solution co-exists with the often described viscous branch. Direct numerical simulations exhibit a transition from a weak-field dynamo branch, in which viscous effects set the dominant length scale, and the strong field branch in which viscous and inertial effects are largely negligible. These results indicate that a distinguished limit needs to be sought to produce numerical models relevant to the geodynamo and that the usual approach of minimizing the magnetic Prandtl number (ratio of the fluid kinematic viscosity to its magnetic diffusivity) at a given Ekman number is mi...

  16. Magnetic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Essam Aboud; Nabil El-Masry; Atef Qaddah; Faisal Alqahtani; Mohammed R.H. Moufti

    2015-01-01

    .... A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth...

  17. The Effects of Wildfires on the Magnetic Properties of Soils in the Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javier, J.; Clement, B. M.; Sah, J.; Ross, M.

    2008-12-01

    As part of an effort to better understand the role of wildfire in the Everglades ecosystem, we are studying the effects of fires on the magnetic properties of Everglades soils. We present results from a suite of soil samples collected at vegetation survey sites within the Cape Sable seaside sparrow (CSSS) habitat in southern Everglades, for which vegetation data, hydrologic data, organic carbon content, iron concentration and the fire history of the sites (burn frequency and time since the most recent burn) are available. We conducted a series of rock magnetic experiments (initial susceptibility, frequency dependent susceptibility, anhysteretic remanence acquisition and isothermal remanence acquisition) designed to identify the magnetic minerals present in these soils. Each of the samples is characterized by contributions from both low and very high-coercivity magnetic components. We interpret these components as magnetite-maghemite and goethite respectively. Following a major fire in the late Spring of 2008, we collected 20 soil cores (10 cm) from within the fire boundary, and 10 cores from nearby unburned sites. Each core was sub-sampled from the surface, and from 2 and 7 cm depths. The sites burned in 2008 showed a consistent pattern defined by a major decrease to complete removal of the very high-coercivity phase iron oxyhydroxides (goethite) in the surface and shallow samples, while greater concentrations of this phase persist at depth. The iron oxyhydroxides appeared to be nearly completely replaced by the more reduced, low-coercivity phase (magnetite/maghemite) in the surface/shallow samples as a result of the fire. Because phosphorous is strongly adsorbed onto iron oxyhydroxides (such as goethite), these results may have important implications for phosphorous cycling in fire-prone environments.

  18. Magnetic susceptibility and its relationship with paleoenvironments, diagenesis and remagnetization: examples from the Devonian carbonates of Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Silva, A.-C.; Dekkers, M.J.; Mabille, C.; Boulvain, F.

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the origin of the initial magnetic susceptibility (χin) signal in carbonate sequences, a rock magnetic investigation that includes analysis of acquisition curves of the isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) and hysteresis parameters, was undertaken on Devonian carbonates from

  19. Magnetic iron-nickel sulphides in the Pliocene and Pleistocene marine marls from the Vrica section (Calabria, Italy)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velzen, A.J. van; Dekkers, M.J.; Zijderveld, J.D.A.

    1993-01-01

    The rock magnetic properties of the late Pliocene and early Pleistocene open-marine marls from the Vrica section in Calabria (Italy) point to magnetic sulphide as the main magnetic mineral and remanence carrier. The maximum blocking temperatures, however, are between 340 and 360°C, which is too

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  3. Saturated-absorption spectroscopy revisited: atomic transitions in strong magnetic fields ($>$20 mT) with a micrometer-thin cell

    OpenAIRE

    Sargsyan, A.; Tonoyan, A.(Department for Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway); Mirzoyan, R.; Sarkisyan, D; Stabrawa, A. M. Wojciechowski A.; Gawlik, W.

    2014-01-01

    The existence of cross-over resonances makes saturated-absorption spectra very complicated when external magnetic field B is applied. It is demonstrated for the first time that the use of micrometric-thin cells (MTC, $L\\approx40\\,\\mu$m) allows application of SA for quantitative studies of frequency splittings and shifts of the Rb atomic transitions in a wide range of external magnetic fields, from 0.2 up to 6 kG (20-600 mT). We compare the SA spectra obtained with the MTC with those obtained ...

  4. Experimental validation of a distribution theory based analysis of the effect of manufacturing tolerances on permanent magnet synchronous machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscaino, V.; Cipriani, G.; Di Dio, V.; Corpora, M.; Curto, D.; Franzitta, V.; Trapanese, M.

    2017-05-01

    An experimental study on the effect of permanent magnet tolerances on the performances of a Tubular Linear Ferrite Motor is presented in this paper. The performances that have been investigated are: cogging force, end effect cogging force and generated thrust. It is demonstrated that: 1) the statistical variability of the magnets introduces harmonics in the spectrum of the cogging force; 2) the value of the end effect cogging force is directly linked to the values of then remanence field of the external magnets placed on the slider; 3) the generated thrust and its statistical distribution depend on the remanence field of the magnets placed on the translator.

  5. <strong>Mini-project>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katajainen, Jyrki

    2008-01-01

    In this project the goal is to develop the safe * family of containers for the CPH STL. The containers to be developed should be safer and more reliable than any of the existing implementations. A special focus should be put on strong exception safety since none of the existing prototypes availab...... at the CPH STL can give this guarantee for all operations. In spite of the safety requirements, the strict running-time requirements specified in the C++ standard, and additional requirements specified in the CPH STL design documents, must be fulfilled....

  6. Magnetism of nakhlites and chassignites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisowski, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Hysteresis measurements on three shergottite and two nakhlite meteorites indicate single domain grain size behavior for the highly shocked Shergotty, Zagami, and EETA 79001 meteorites, with more multidomain-like behavior for the unshocked Nakhla and Governador Valadares meteorites. High viscosity and initial susceptibility for Antarctic shergottite ALHA 7705 indicate the presence of superparamagnetic grains in this specimen. Thermomagnetic analysis indicate Shergotty and Zagami as the least initially oxidized, while EETA 79001 appears to be the most oxidized. Cooling of the meteorite samples from high temperature in air results in a substantial increase in magnetization due to the production of magnetite through oxidation exsolution of titanomagnetite. However, vacuum heating substantially suppresses this process, and in the case of EETA 79001 and Nakhla, results in a rehomogenization of the titanomagnetite grains. Remanence measurements on several subsamples of Shergotty and Zagami meteorites reveal a large variation in intensity that does not seem related to the abundance of remanence carriers. The other meteorites carry only weak remanence, suggesting weak magnetizing fields as the source of their magnetic signal. The meteorites' weak field environment is consistent with Martian or asteroidal body origin but inconsistent with terrestrial origin.

  7. High resolution NMR study of T1 magnetic relaxation dispersion. III. Influence of spin 1/2 hetero-nuclei on spin relaxation and polarization transfer among strongly coupled protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korchak, Sergey E; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Kaptein, Robert; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2012-09-07

    Effects of spin-spin interactions on the nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) of protons were studied in a situation where spin ½ hetero-nuclei are present in the molecule. As in earlier works [K. L. Ivanov, A. V. Yurkovskaya, and H.-M. Vieth, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 234513 (2008); S. E. Korchak, K. L. Ivanov, A. V. Yurkovskaya, and H.-M. Vieth, ibid. 133, 194502 (2010)], spin-spin interactions have a pronounced effect on the relaxivity tending to equalize the longitudinal relaxation times once the spins become strongly coupled at a sufficiently low magnetic field. In addition, we have found influence of (19)F nuclei on the proton NMRD, although in the whole field range, studied protons and fluorine spins were only weakly coupled. In particular, pronounced features in the proton NMRD were found; but each feature was predominantly observed only for particular spin states of the hetero-nuclei. The features are explained theoretically; it is shown that hetero-nuclei can affect the proton NMRD even in the limit of weak coupling when (i) protons are coupled strongly and (ii) have spin-spin interactions of different strengths with the hetero-nuclei. We also show that by choosing the proper magnetic field strength, one can selectively transfer proton spin magnetization between spectral components of choice.

  8. Impact of a Strong Magnetic Storm and Two X-Ray Flares on the Ionospheric HF Channel in the Summer Solstice of 2015 According to Oblique Sounding in the Eurasian Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uryadov, V. P.; Kolchev, A. A.; Vertogradov, G. G.; Vybornov, F. I.; Egoshin, I. A.; Sklyarevsky, M. S.; Shumaev, V. V.; Chernov, A. G.

    2017-10-01

    We present the results of observations of the impact a strong magnetic storm and two X-ray flares in the summer solstice of 2015 on the HF signal characteristics during oblique sounding of the ionosphere in the Eurasian region. It was found that the negative phase of the magnetic storm led to a strong degradation of the ionospheric channel, up to a long blackout on the paths adjacent to the subauroral latitudes. On the midlatitude paths, a decrease in the maximum observable frequency of the F layer reached 50% with respect to the average values for an undisturbed ionosphere. The propagation velocity of the negative phase of a disturbance from the subauroral to the midlatitude ionosphere is determined (it is equal to about 100 m/s). It is shown that during a magnetic storm the least observable frequency and the average signal-to-noise ratio for the propagation mode via the sporadic E s layer correlate well with the auroral AE index. Anomalous signals were detected in the main phase of the magnetic storm on the Cyprus—Rostov-on-Don path when a chirp ionosonde-radio direction finder was operated in the over-the-horizon HF radar mode. On the basis of modeling and comparison with experimental data, it is shown that the anomalous signals are due to scattering of radio waves by small-scale irregularities located in the subauroral ionospheric F region.

  9. Magnet properties of Mn{sub 70}Ga{sub 30} prepared by cold rolling and magnetic field annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ener, Semih, E-mail: ener@fm.tu-darmstadt.de [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Skokov, Konstantin P. [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Karpenkov, Dmitriy Yu. [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Faculty of Physics, Tver State University, 170100 Tver (Russian Federation); Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University, 236041 Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Kuz' min, Michael D. [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Gutfleisch, Oliver [Materials Science, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Fraunhofer IWKS, Project Group for Material Cycles and Resource Strategy, 63457 Hanau (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    The remanence and coercivity of arc melted Mn{sub 70}Ga{sub 30} can be substantially improved by cold rolling. For best performance the rolled material should be annealed at T=730 K in the presence of a magnetic field of 1 T. The so-obtained magnet has a remanence of 0.239 T and a coercivity of 1.24 T at room temperature. The underlying reason for the high coercivity and remanence is the increase of the content of a metastable ferrimagnetic D0{sub 22} phase at the expense of the normally stable anti-ferromagnetic D0{sub 19}. Magnetic field significantly increases the nucleation rate of the ferromagnetic D0{sub 22} phase that leads to grain size refinement and as a consequence of improving remanence and coercive field. - Highlights: • Alternative synthesis method for D0{sub 22} phase formation in Mn–Ga is developed. • Effect of cold rolling and annealing on magnetic properties of Mn{sub 70}Ga{sub 30} is examined. • Small magnetic fields are sufficient to accelerate nucleation of the D0{sub 22} phase.

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  11. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  14. Magnetic phase separation and strong enhancement of the Néel temperature at high pressures in a new multiferroic Ba3TaFe3Si2O14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubutin, I. S.; Starchikov, S. S.; Gavriliuk, A. G.; Troyan, I. A.; Nikiforova, Yu. A.; Ivanova, A. G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.

    2017-01-01

    The high-pressure properties of a new multiferroic of the langasite family Ba3TaFe3Si2O14 were investigated in diamond-anvil cells (DAC) in the temperature range of 4.2-295 K by a new method of synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy. Strong enhancement of the Néel temperature T N was observed at pressures above 20 GPa associated with the structural transformation. The highest value of T N is about 130 K which is almost five times larger than the value at ambient pressure (about 27 K). It was suggested that the high value of T N appears due to redistribution of Fe ions over 3 f and 2 d tetrahedral sites of the langasite structure. In this case, the short Fe-O distances and favorable Fe-O-Fe bond angles create conditions for strong superexchange interactions between iron ions, and effective two-dimensional (2D) magnetic ordering appears in the ( ab) plane. The separation of the sample into two magnetic phases with different T N values of about 50 and 130 K was revealed, which can be explained by the strong 2D magnetic ordering in the ab plane and 3D ordering involving inter-plane interaction.

  15. Saturated-absorption spectroscopy revisited: atomic transitions in strong magnetic fields (>20  mT) with a micrometer-thin cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, A; Tonoyan, A; Mirzoyan, R; Sarkisyan, D; Wojciechowski, A M; Stabrawa, A; Gawlik, W

    2014-04-15

    The existence of crossover resonances makes saturated-absorption (SA) spectra very complicated when external magnetic field B is applied. It is demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that the use of micrometric-thin cells (MTCs, L≈40  μm) allows application of SA for quantitative studies of frequency splitting and shifts of the Rb atomic transitions in a wide range of external magnetic fields, from 0.2 up to 6 kG (20-600 mT). We compare the SA spectra obtained with the MTC with those obtained with other techniques and present applications for optical magnetometry with micrometer spatial resolution and a broadly tunable optical frequency lock.

  16. A new dielectric metamaterial building block with a strong magnetic response in the sub-1.5-micrometer region: silicon colloid nanocavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Tuzer, T Umut; Fenollosa, Roberto; Meseguer, Francisco

    2012-11-20

    A new dielectric metamaterial building block based on high refractive index silicon spherical nanocavities with Mie resonances appearing in the near infrared optical region is prepared and characterized. It is demonstrated both experimentally and theoretically that a single silicon nanocavity supports well-defined and robust magnetic resonances, even in a liquid medium environment, at wavelength values up to six times larger than the cavity radius. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Three-Dimensional Self-Assembly of Core/Shell-Like Nanostructures for High-Performance Nanocomposite Permanent Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailing; Li, Xiaohong; Guo, Defeng; Lou, Li; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xiangyi

    2016-09-14

    Core/shell nanostructures are fascinating for many advanced applications including strong permanent magnets, magnetic recording, and biotechnology. They are generally achieved via chemical approaches, but these techniques limit them to nanoparticles. Here, we describe a three-dimensional (3D) self-assembly of core/shell-like nanocomposite magnets, with hard-magnetic Nd2Fe14B core of ∼45 nm and soft-magnetic α-Fe shell of ∼13 nm, through a physical route. The resulting Nd2Fe14B/α-Fe core/shell-like nanostructure allows both large remanent magnetization and high coercivity, leading to a record-high energy product of 25 MGOe which reaches the theoretical limit for isotropic Nd2Fe14B/α-Fe nanocomposite magnets. Our approach is based on a sequential growth of the core and shell nanocrystals in an alloy melt. These results make an important step toward fabricating core/shell-like nanostructure in 3D materials.

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  19. Magnetization Process of High Anisotropy CoPt Nanosized Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikuchi, Nobuaki; Murillo Vallejo, R.; Lodder, J.C.; Mitsuzuka, K.; Shimatsu, T.; Shimatsu, T.

    2005-01-01

    Dot arrays with diameter ranging from 80 to 245 nm are made of Co80Pt20 films with large perpendicular anisotropy. Magnetic properties are investigated by detecting the anomalous Hall effect. The all arrays show angular dependence of remanent coercivity similar to coherent rotation. The result shows

  20. Magnetic Dating of Ancient Residential Areas of Teotihuacan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, F.; Rodriguez, M.; Soler-Arechalde, A. M.; Goguitchaishvili, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Manzanilla, L.

    2005-05-01

    In total of 143 archeological samples were obtained from the Xalla site and 40 samples from Teopancazco, both belonging to Teotihuacan culture. Five contructive stages are recognized at Xalla. The samples consist mainly burned stuccos dated as 550 AD by C14 systematics and other unburned specimens (containing fine grained scoria) spending time interval between 100 AD and 350 AD. Vectorial composition of natural remanent magnetization were investigated using stepwise alternating field treatment. Mainly univectorial components were obtained for the majority of samples showing well clustered remanence directions. The possible dates are retrieved using a new paleosecular variation reference curve (Hueda et. Al., 2004).

  1. Spin dynamics in the strongly magnetically frustrated compounds YBaCo{sub 3}AlO{sub 7} and YBaCo{sub 3}FeO{sub 7} probed by NMR and ESR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iakovleva, Margarita [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); E. K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan (Russian Federation); Zeisner, Julian; Zimmermann, Stephan; Buechner, Bernd [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany); TU Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Valldor, Martin [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Dresden (Germany); Vavilova, Evgeniia [E. K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan (Russian Federation); Grafe, Hans-Joachim; Alfonsov, Alexey; Kataev, Vladislav [IFW Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the Swedenborgite type compounds YBaCo{sub 3}AlO{sub 7} and YBaCo{sub 3}FeO{sub 7} the magnetic lattice can be described as a stacking of kagome layers, where unconventional ground states such as a spin liquid state can be expected due to the strong geometrical frustration. We performed a combined experimental study of magnetic properties of single crystals of YBaCo{sub 3}AlO{sub 7} and YBaCo{sub 3}FeO{sub 7} with high field ESR and high field NMR spectroscopy. The experimental results show the occurrence of short-range quasi static electron spin correlations at T{sup *} ∼ 22 K for YBaCo{sub 3}AlO{sub 7} and T{sup *} ∼ 60K for YBaCo{sub 3}FeO{sub 7} but not a long-range antiferromagnetic order. We compare our results with AC and DC susceptibility measurements and discuss a possible competition between a spin glass-like state due to intrinsic structural disorder and a spin liquid state arising from strong magnetic frustration in this materials.

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  6. Separation of species of a binary fluid mixture confined between two concentric rotating circular cylinders in presence of a strong radial magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, B.R. [Dibrugarh University, Department of Mathematics, Dibrugarh, Assam (India); Singh, R.N. [Marwari Hindi High School, Dibrugarh (India)

    2010-08-15

    The effect of a radial magnetic field on separation of a binary mixture of incompressible viscous thermally and electrically conducting fluids confined between two concentric rotating circular cylinders with different angular velocity is examined. The equations governing the motion, temperature and concentration in cylindrical polar coordinate are solved analytically. The solution obtained in closed form for concentration distribution is plotted against the radial distances from the surface of the inner circular cylinder for various values of non-dimensional parameters. It is found that the non-dimensional parameters viz. the Hartmann number, thermal diffusion number, baro diffusion number, rotational Reynolds number, the product of Prandtl number and Eckert number, magnetic Prandtl number and the ratio of the angular velocities of inner and outer cylinders affects the species separation of rarer and lighter component significantly. The problem discussed here derives its application in the basic fluid dynamics separation processes to separate the rarer component of the different isotopes of heavier molecules where electromagnetic method of separation does not work. (orig.)

  7. Strong uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy of (001)- and (011)-oriented La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 thin films on NdGaO3 substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschker, H.; Mathews, M.; Houwman, E. P.; Nishikawa, H.; Vailionis, A.; Koster, G.; Rijnders, G.; Blank, D. H. A.

    2009-06-01

    Epitaxial La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) ferromagnetic thin films were coherently grown on NdGaO3 (NGO) substrates with different crystal orientations of the surface plane. On the (110)o - and (001)o -oriented substrates, the film grows in the (001)pc orientation, and on the (100)o -, (010)o -, and (112)o -oriented substrates the film is (011)pc oriented (we will use subindices o and pc for the orthorhombic and pseudocubic crystal structures, respectively). The lattice parameters and pseudocube angles of the deformed LSMO pseudocube have been determined from x-ray diffraction measurements. The in-plane magnetic easy and hard directions of these films have been determined from the dependence of the remnant magnetization on the angle of the in-plane applied field. For all substrate orientations there is a strong in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy, determined by the crystal directions of the substrate surface. The easy and hard magnetic-anisotropy directions are explained consistently by the (bulk) inverse magnetostriction model, except for the film on NGO (112)o .

  8. Novel structural and magnetic properties of Mg doped copper nanoferrites prepared by conventional and wet methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Afify, H. H.; El Zawawia, I. K.; Azab, A. A.

    2012-07-01

    Nanoferrites of the general formula Cu1-xMgxFe2O4 with 0≤x≤0.6 were prepared by standard ceramic and wet methods. The structure was studied by X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The density and lattice constant were calculated and reported. The particle size of the prepared nanoferrites ranged from 8.7 to 41.1 nm. It was found that the lattice parameter decreases with increasing cation substitution of Mg2+ due to the difference of ionic radius and atomic mass. The dc magnetic susceptibility was measured out using Faraday's method. The magnetic hysteresis measurement was performed using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Magnetic constants such as Curie temperature, effective magnetic moment, saturation magnetization, remanent magnetization and corecivicty were obtained and reported. The magnetic constants decrease with increasing Mg2+, except the remanent magnetization which increased.

  9. Strong cardiovascular prognostic implication of quantitative left atrial contractile function assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with chronic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsang Sui

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progressive left ventricular (LV diastolic dysfunction due to hypertension (HTN alters left atrial (LA contractile function in a predictable manner. While increased LA size is a marker of LV diastolic dysfunction and has been shown to be predictive of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, the prognostic significance of altered LA contractile function is unknown. Methods A consecutive group of patients with chronic hypertension but without significant valvular disease or prior MI underwent clinically-indicated CMR for assessment of left ventricular (LV function, myocardial ischemia, or viability. Calculation of LA volumes used in determining LA emptying functions was performed using the biplane area-length method. Results Two-hundred and ten patients were included in this study. During a median follow-up of 19 months, 48 patients experienced major adverse cardiac events (MACE, including 24 deaths. Decreased LA contractile function (LAEFContractile demonstrated strong unadjusted associations with patient mortality, non-fatal events, and all MACE. For every 10% reduction of LAEFContractile, unadjusted hazards to MACE, all-cause mortality, and non-fatal events increased by 1.8, 1.5, and 1.4-folds, respectively. In addition, preservation of the proportional contribution from LA contraction to total diastolic filling (Contractile/Total ratio was strongly associated with lower MACE and patient mortality. By multivariable analyses, LAEFContractile was the strongest predictor in each of the best overall models of MACE, all-cause mortality, and non-fatal events. Even after adjustment for age, gender, left atrial volume, and LVEF, LAEFContractile maintained strong independent associations with MACE (p Conclusions In hypertensive patients at risk for left ventricular diastolic dysfunction, a decreased contribution of LA contractile function to ventricular filling during diastole is strongly predictive of adverse cardiac events and death.

  10. Permanent magnet microstructures using dry-pressed magnetic powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oniku, Ololade D.; Bowers, Benjamin J.; Shetye, Sheetal B.; Wang, Naigang; Arnold, David P.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents microfabrication methods and performance analysis of bonded powder permanent magnets targeting dimensions ranging from 10 µm to greater than 1 mm. For the structural definition and pattern transfer, a doctor blade technique is used to dry press magnetic powders into pre-etched cavities in a silicon substrate. The powders are secured in the cavities by one of the three methods: capping with a polyimide layer, thermal reflow of intermixed wax-binder particles, or conformal coating with a vapor-deposited parylene-C film. A systematic study of micromagnets fabricated using these methods is conducted using three different types of magnetic powders: 50 µm Nd-Fe-B, 5 µm Nd-Fe-B and 1 µm barium ferrite powder. The isotropic magnets are shown to exhibit intrinsic coercivities (Hci) as high as 720 kA m-1, remanences (Br) up to 0.5 T and maximum energy products (BHmax) up to 30 kJ m-3, depending on the magnetic powder used. Process compatibility experiments demonstrate the potential for the magnets to withstand typical microfabrication chemical exposure and thermal cycles, thereby facilitating their integration into more complex process flows. The remanences are also characterized at elevated temperatures to determine thermal sensitivities and maximum operating temperature ranges.

  11. Active elimination of radio frequency interference for improved signal-to-noise ratio for in-situ NMR experiments in strong magnetic field gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M; Pardi, C I; Brown, T W C; McDonald, P J

    2018-02-01

    Improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) systems may be achieved either by increasing the signal amplitude or by decreasing the noise. The noise has multiple origins - not all of which are strictly "noise": incoherent thermal noise originating in the probe and pre-amplifiers, probe ring down or acoustic noise and coherent externally broadcast radio frequency transmissions. The last cannot always be shielded in open access experiments. In this paper, we show that pulsed, low radio-frequency data communications are a significant source of broadcast interference. We explore two signal processing methods of de-noising short T 2 ∗ NMR experiments corrupted by these communications: Linear Predictive Coding (LPC) and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Results are shown for numerical simulations and experiments conducted under controlled conditions with pseudo radio frequency interference. We show that both the LPC and DWT methods have merit. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of W additions on the structural and magnetic properties of Ni{sub 50}Ti{sub 50−x}W{sub x} and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x}W{sub x} systems obtained by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jara, Angelica; Arjona, Jose David; Bautista, Pedro; Gonzalez, Gema, E-mail: gemagonz@ivic.gob.ve

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • W additions strongly affect the magnetic and structural properties of Ni-Ti. • The saturation magnetization and magnetic remanence decreases with W addition. • W additions induces amophization of Ni-Ti. - Abstract: The effect of tungsten (W{sub x}) additions (x = 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 at.%), on the structural and magnetic properties of the binary systems Ni{sub 50}Ti{sub 50−x} and Ti{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x} obtained by mechanical alloying was studied. The elementary powders were milled in a Spex 8000 horizontal mill, under N{sub 2} atmosphere, for 5 and 20 h. After 20 h of milling a homogenous microstructure was observed, particularly for small W additions. For this milling time a mixed of nanocrystalline and amorphous structure was obtained. As W concentration increases (1, 1.5 and 2 at.%), in both systems, the presence of small β-W reflections and the presence of very small peaks corresponding to the formation of an incipient new phase, identified as a NiTi(W) solid solution was observed, especially evident for 2 at.%W. The saturation magnetization and magnetic remanence decreases with the addition of W down to a minimum value at 1.5 at.%W, for both systems. The samples were characterized by SEM, EDS, XRD and magnetic measurements by VSM. The structural and magnetic behavior for both ternary alloys was very similar with the W additions.

  13. Micrometer-scale magnetic imaging of geological samples using a quantum diamond microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, D. R.; Fu, R. R.; Kehayias, P.; Le Sage, D.; Lima, E. A.; Weiss, B. P.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2017-08-01

    Remanent magnetization in geological samples may record the past intensity and direction of planetary magnetic fields. Traditionally, this magnetization is analyzed through measurements of the net magnetic moment of bulk millimeter to centimeter sized samples. However, geological samples are often mineralogically and texturally heterogeneous at submillimeter scales, with only a fraction of the ferromagnetic grains carrying the remanent magnetization of interest. Therefore, characterizing this magnetization in such cases requires a technique capable of imaging magnetic fields at fine spatial scales and with high sensitivity. To address this challenge, we developed a new instrument, based on nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond, which enables direct imaging of magnetic fields due to both remanent and induced magnetization, as well as optical imaging, of room-temperature geological samples with spatial resolution approaching the optical diffraction limit. We describe the operating principles of this device, which we call the quantum diamond microscope (QDM), and report its optimized image-area-normalized magnetic field sensitivity (20 µTṡµm/Hz1/2), spatial resolution (5 µm), and field of view (4 mm), as well as trade-offs between these parameters. We also perform an absolute magnetic field calibration for the device in different modes of operation, including three-axis (vector) and single-axis (projective) magnetic field imaging. Finally, we use the QDM to obtain magnetic images of several terrestrial and meteoritic rock samples, demonstrating its ability to resolve spatially distinct populations of ferromagnetic carriers.

  14. Magnetic properties of the magnetic hybrid membranes based on various polymer matrices and inorganic fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybak, Aleksandra, E-mail: Aleksandra.Rybak@polsl.pl [Department of Physical Chemistry and Technology of Polymers, Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, Strzody 9, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Kaszuwara, Waldemar [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Woloska 141, 02-507 Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-11-05

    Magnetic hybrid membranes based on ethylcellulose (EC), poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO) and various magnetic praseodymium and neodymium powder microparticles as fillers were obtained. Permeability, diffusion and sorption coefficients of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and synthetic air components were estimated for homogeneous and heterogeneous membranes using the Time Lag method based on constant pressure permeation technique. The microstructure studies and the phase analysis of magnetic membranes were also performed using SEM and XRD. The influence of magnetic parameters, like coercivity, remanence and saturation magnetization of created membranes on the gas transport properties was studied. The results showed that their coercivity depended on composition and microstructure of the magnetic powder. On the other hand, remanence and saturation magnetization increased with the increase of the powder addition in the membrane. It was found that the magnetic membrane's gas transport properties were improved with the increase of membrane's remanence, saturation magnetization and magnetic particle filling. The decrease in powder particle size and associated increase of the membrane's coercivity also positively influenced the gas transport and separation properties of investigated membranes. It was observed that the magnetic ethylcellulose and poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) membranes had higher gas permeability, while their permselectivity and solubility coefficient values were rather maintained or slightly increased. The results also showed that the magnetic powder content enhanced significantly gas diffusivity in EC and PPO membranes. It was also analyzed the dependence of the drift coefficient w on the magnetic parameters of investigated membranes. The correlation between the membrane selectivity, permeability and magnetic properties with their XRD characteristics was stated. - Highlights: • Membrane's production consisting of EC or PPO

  15. Magnetic study of turbidites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanty, Cyrielle; Valet, Jean Pierre; Carlut, Julie

    2015-04-01

    Turbidites induce sedimentary reworking and re-deposition caused by tsunami, earthquake, volcanic processes, and other catastrophic events. They result from rapid depositional processes and are thus considered not being pertinent for comparison with pelagic sediments. Turbidites are evidently ruled out from paleomagnetic records dealing with time-series. Consequently, no attention has ever been paid to the magnetization of turbidites which is fully justified if the high level of turbulence governing the depositional processes influences the acquisition of magnetization. In certain conditions like channeled turbidity currents, levees of sediment are generated and then associated with relatively calm although very fast redeposition processes. Such conditions will thus govern the subsequent acquisition of magnetization through mechanical lock-in of the magnetic grains. This situation is actually quite similar to what happens during the experiences of artificial redeposition that are conducted in laboratory. Therefore, combining laboratory experiments and studies of natural turbidites could reveal important information on the processes involved in the acquisition of magnetization, especially if the comparison with the overlying hemipelagic sediments does not show any striking difference. We will present the results of magnetic measurements performed on four different and relatively recent turbidites. We selected different origins associated either with spillover of channeled turbidity currents or with co-seismic faulting. Each event is characterized by a different thickness (ten to few tens of cm), lithology and mean granulometry (few tens of μm to hundreds of μm). We have carried out measurements of magnetic susceptibility, magnetic remanence, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and we also scrutinize the evolution of various rock magnetic parameters (ARM, IRM, S ratio, magnetic grain sizes, hysteresis parameters…). The magnetic characteristics of the

  16. Ellipsoids (v1.0: 3-D magnetic modelling of ellipsoidal bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Takahashi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A considerable amount of literature has been published on the magnetic modelling of uniformly magnetized ellipsoids since the second half of the nineteenth century. Ellipsoids have flexibility to represent a wide range of geometrical forms, are the only known bodies which can be uniformly magnetized in the presence of a uniform inducing field and are the only finite bodies for which the self-demagnetization can be treated analytically. This property makes ellipsoids particularly useful for modelling compact orebodies having high susceptibility. In this case, neglecting the self-demagnetization may strongly mislead the interpretation of these bodies by using magnetic methods. A number of previous studies consider that the self-demagnetization can be neglected for the case in which the geological body has an isotropic susceptibility lower than or equal to 0.1 SI. This limiting value, however, seems to be determined empirically and there has been no discussion about how this value was determined. In addition, the geoscientific community lacks an easy-to-use tool to simulate the magnetic field produced by uniformly magnetized ellipsoids. Here, we present an integrated review of the magnetic modelling of arbitrarily oriented triaxial, prolate and oblate ellipsoids. Our review includes ellipsoids with both induced and remanent magnetization, as well as with isotropic or anisotropic susceptibility. We also discuss the ambiguity between confocal ellipsoids with the same magnetic moment and propose a way of determining the isotropic susceptibility above which the self-demagnetization must be taken into consideration. Tests with synthetic data validate our approach. Finally, we provide a set of routines to model the magnetic field produced by ellipsoids. The routines are written in Python language as part of the Fatiando a Terra, which is an open-source library for modelling and inversion in geophysics.

  17. Ellipsoids (v1.0): 3-D magnetic modelling of ellipsoidal bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Diego; Oliveira, Vanderlei C., Jr.

    2017-09-01

    A considerable amount of literature has been published on the magnetic modelling of uniformly magnetized ellipsoids since the second half of the nineteenth century. Ellipsoids have flexibility to represent a wide range of geometrical forms, are the only known bodies which can be uniformly magnetized in the presence of a uniform inducing field and are the only finite bodies for which the self-demagnetization can be treated analytically. This property makes ellipsoids particularly useful for modelling compact orebodies having high susceptibility. In this case, neglecting the self-demagnetization may strongly mislead the interpretation of these bodies by using magnetic methods. A number of previous studies consider that the self-demagnetization can be neglected for the case in which the geological body has an isotropic susceptibility lower than or equal to 0.1 SI. This limiting value, however, seems to be determined empirically and there has been no discussion about how this value was determined. In addition, the geoscientific community lacks an easy-to-use tool to simulate the magnetic field produced by uniformly magnetized ellipsoids. Here, we present an integrated review of the magnetic modelling of arbitrarily oriented triaxial, prolate and oblate ellipsoids. Our review includes ellipsoids with both induced and remanent magnetization, as well as with isotropic or anisotropic susceptibility. We also discuss the ambiguity between confocal ellipsoids with the same magnetic moment and propose a way of determining the isotropic susceptibility above which the self-demagnetization must be taken into consideration. Tests with synthetic data validate our approach. Finally, we provide a set of routines to model the magnetic field produced by ellipsoids. The routines are written in Python language as part of the Fatiando a Terra, which is an open-source library for modelling and inversion in geophysics.

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  20. Vibrating sample magnetometer 2D and 3D magnetization effects associated with different initial magnetization states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. Lukins

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Differences in VSM magnetization vector rotation associated with various initial magnetization states were demonstrated. Procedures and criteria were developed to select sample orientation and initial magnetization states to allow for the combination of two different 2D measurements runs (with the same field profiles to generate a dataset that can be representative of actual 3D magnetization rotation. Nickel, cast iron, and low moment magnetic tape media were used to demonstrate these effects using hysteresis and remanent magnetization test sequences. These results can be used to generate 2D and 3D magnetic properties to better characterize magnetic phenomena which are inherently three dimensional. Example applications are magnetic tape-head orientation sensitivity, reinterpretation of 3D coercivity and other standard magnetic properties, and multi-dimensional shielding effectiveness.

  1. Visualized effect of oxidation on magnetic recording fidelity in pseudo-single-domain magnetite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Kasama, Takeshi; Muxworthy, Adrian R.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an important magnetic mineral to Earth scientists, as it carries the dominant magnetic signature in rocks, and the understanding of its magnetic recording fidelity provides a critical tool in the field of palaeomagnetism. However, reliable interpretation of the recording...... of environmental transmission electron microscopy and off-axis electron holography to induce and visualize the effects of oxidation on the magnetization of individual nanoscale Fe3O4 particles as they transform towards γ-Fe2O3. Magnetic induction maps demonstrate a change in both strength and direction of remanent...... fidelity of Fe3O4 particles is greatly diminished over time by progressive oxidation to less magnetic iron oxides, such as maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), with consequent alteration of remanent magnetization potentially having important geological significance. Here we use the complementary techniques...

  2. Structural and magnetic properties of Sr1− xLaxFe12− x (Cu0. 5Co0 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The morphology of the materials was characterized by a field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The particles were hexagonal platelets. Magnetic properties of the materials were measured by a permanent magnetic measure equipment. The remanence of the materials increases with from 0 to 0.50. However, the ...

  3. Enhanced methane flux event and sediment dispersal pattern in the Krishna–Godavari offshore basin: Evidences from rock magnetic techniques

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Usapkar, A.; Dewangan, P.; Kocherla, M.; Ramprasad, T.; Mazumdar, A.; Ramana, M.V.

    substantial loss in the concentration of primary magnetic iron oxide minerals. Anomalous low value of XARM/X and XARM/SIRM at GC-07 suggests that the magnetic remanence property is governed by coarser pseudo-single domain (PSD) or multi-domain (MD) grains...

  4. High resolution three-dimensional magnetization mapping in Tokachidake Volcano using low altitude airborne magnetic survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, M.; Mogi, T.; Okuma, S.; Nakatsuka, T.

    2016-12-01

    Tokachidake Volcano, central Hokkaido, Japan erupted in 1926, 1962 and 1988-1989 in the 20th century from the central part. In recent years, expansions of the edifice of the volcano at shallow depth and increases of the volcanic smoke in the Taisho crater were observed (Meteorological Agency of Japan, 2014). Magnetic changes were observed at the 62-2 crater by repeated magnetic measurements in 2008-2009, implying a demagnetization beneath the crater (Hashimoto at al., 2010). Moreover, a very low resistivity part was found right under the 62-2 crater from an AMT survey (Yamaya et al., 2010). However, since the station numbers of the survey are limited, the area coverage is not sufficient. In this study, we have re-analyzed high-resolution aeromagnetic data to delineate the three-dimensional magnetic structure of the volcano to understand the nature of other craters.A low altitude airborne magnetic survey was conducted in 2014 mainly over the active areas of the volcano by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism to manage land slide risk in the volcano. The survey was flown at an altitude of 60 m above ground by a helicopter with a Cesium magnetometer in the towed-bird 30m below the helicopter. The low altitude survey enables us to delineate the detailed magnetic structure. We calculated magnetic anomaly distribution on a smooth surface assuming equivalent anomalies below the observation surface. Then the 3D magnetic imaging method (Nakatsuka and Okuma, 2014) was applied to the magnetic anomalies to reveal the three-dimensional magnetic structure.As a result, magnetization highs were seen beneath the Ground crater, Suribachi crater and Kitamuki crater. This implies that magmatic activity occurred in the past at these craters. These magma should have already solidified and acquired strong remanent magnetization. Relative magnetization lows were seen beneath the 62-2 crater and the Taisho crater where fumarolic activity is active. However a

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  8. Structural and magnetic characterization and cation distribution of nanocrystalline Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} ferrites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahba, Adel Maher, E-mail: a_m_wahba@yahoo.co.uk [Department of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering, Tanta University (Egypt); Bakr Mohamed, Mohamed [Physics Department, Taibah University, Al-Madinah Al-Munawara (Saudi Arabia); Ain shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-03-15

    Structural and magnetic properties have been investigated for Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} nanoferrites (x=0.5–1.2, with a step increment of 0.1) prepared by a citrate-precursor autocombustion method. X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectra prove the formation of a cubic spinel phase of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, besides x-dependent FeCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel for samples with x≥0.7. Size of the formed nano-crystals ranges from 34 to 45 nm, which is further confirmed with a TEM micrograph. Investigating magnetic parameters such as saturation magnetization, coercivity, and remanence field, through vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) data, revealed a strong dependence of the magnetic properties of each sample on its own cation distribution being suggested according to the experimental results of XRD, VSM, and IR data. - Highlights: • Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4} nanoferrites have been prepared by citrate-precursor method. • XRD peaks and IR bands confirmed pure spinel structure for x≥0.7. • Structural and magnetic parameters strongly depend on the cation distribution. • A cation distribution was proposed based on and quite matching experimental data.

  9. Temperature dependence of the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, P.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic hysteresis properties of amorphous alloys have recently been discussed in terms of an exchange-enhanced applied field. This absolute-zero model is here extended to finite temperatures. The modified treatment predicts a remanent magnetization which is unaffected by thermal activation while the coercive force falls (finally to zero) as temperature increases. Comparison with experiment for TbFe/sub 2/ suggests that regions of volume approx. =7500 A/sup 3/ reverse coherently.

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis of mixed zinc–cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: structural and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppola, P. [Univ. de Brasília, Complex Fluids Group, Instituto de Química (Brazil); Silva, F. G. da [Univ. de Brasília, Laboratório de Nanociência Ambiental e Aplicada - LNAA, Faculdade UnB Planaltina (Brazil); Gomide, G.; Paula, F. L. O. [Univ. de Brasília, Complex Fluids Group, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Campos, A. F. C. [Univ. de Brasília, Laboratório de Nanociência Ambiental e Aplicada - LNAA, Faculdade UnB Planaltina (Brazil); Perzynski, R. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS, Laboratoire PHENIX (France); Kern, C. [Univ. de Brasília, Complex Fluids Group, Instituto de Química (Brazil); Depeyrot, J. [Univ. de Brasília, Complex Fluids Group, Instituto de Física (Brazil); Aquino, R., E-mail: reaquino@unb.br [Univ. de Brasília, Laboratório de Nanociência Ambiental e Aplicada - LNAA, Faculdade UnB Planaltina (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    We synthesize Zn-substituted cobalt ferrite (Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1) magnetic nanoparticles by a hydrothermal co-precipitation method in alkaline medium. The chemical composition is evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques. The structure and morphology of the nanopaticles are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. XRD Rietveld refinements reveal the cation distribution among the tetrahedral (A) and octahedral (B) sites. It shows that up to x ~0.5 zinc ions occupy preferably A-sites, above which Zn ions begin also a gradual occupancy of B-sites. TEM images show nanoparticles with different shapes varying from spheres, cubes, to octahedrons. Hysteresis loop properties are studied at 300 and 5 K. These properties are strongly influenced by the Zn and Co proportion in the nanoparticle composition. At 300 K, only samples with high Co content present hysteresis. At 5 K, the reduced remanent magnetization ratio (M{sub R}/M{sub S}) and the coercivity (H{sub C}) suggest that nanoparticles with x < 0.5 have cubic anisotropy. A kink on the hysteresis loop, close to the remanence, is observed at low temperature. This feature is presumably associated to interplay between hard and soft anisotropy regimes in the powder samples.Graphical Abstract.

  11. Magnetic dipolar ordering and hysteresis of geometrically defined nanoparticle clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kure, Mathias; Beleggia, Marco; Frandsen, Cathrine

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle clusters have several biomedical and engineering applications, and revealing the basic interplay between particle configuration and magnetic properties is important for tuning the clusters for specific uses. Here, we consider the nanoparticles as macrospins and use computer...... simulations to determine their magnetic configuration when placed at the vertices of various polyhedra. We find that magnetic dipoles of equal magnitude arrange in flux-closed vortices on a layer basis, giving the structures a null remanent magnetic moment. Assigning a toroidal moment to each layer, we find...

  12. Using thermal remanent magnetisation (TRM) to distinguish block and ash flow and debris flow deposits, and to estimate their emplacement temperature: 1991-1995 lava dome eruption at Mt. Unzen Volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, D.; Cas, R. A. F.; Folkes, C.; Takarada, S.; Oda, H.; Porreca, M.

    2015-09-01

    The 1991-1995 Mt. Unzen eruption (Kyushu, Japan) produced 13 lava domes, approximately 9400 block and ash pyroclastic flows (BAF) resulting from lava dome collapse events and syn- and post-dome collapse debris flow (DF) events. In the field, it can be very difficult to distinguish from field facies characteristics which deposits are primary hot BAF, cold BAF or rock avalanche, or secondary DF deposits. In this study we use a combination of field observations and thermal remanent magnetisation (TRM) analysis of juvenile, lava dome derived clasts from seven deposits of the 1991-1995 Mt. Unzen eruption in order to distinguish between primary BAF deposits and secondary DF deposits and to determine their emplacement temperature. Four major TRM patterns were identified: (1) Type I: clasts with a single magnetic component oriented parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at time and site of emplacement. This indicates that these deposits were deposited at very high temperature, between the Curie temperature of magnetite (~ 540 °C) and the glass transition temperature of the lava dome (~ 745 °C). These clasts are found in high temperature BAF deposits. (2) Type II: clasts with two magnetic components of magnetisation. The lower temperature magnetic components are parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at time of the Unzen eruption. Temperature estimations for these deposits can range from 80 to 540 °C. We found this paleomagnetic behaviour in moderate temperature BAF or warm DF deposits. (3) Type III: clasts with three magnetic components, with a lower temperature component oriented parallel to the Earth's magnetic field at Unzen. The individual clast temperatures estimated for this kind of deposit are usually less than 300 °C. We interpret this paleomagnetic behaviour as the effect of different thermal events during their emplacement history. There are several interpretations for this paleomagnetic behaviour including remobilisation of moderate temperature BAF, warm DF

  13. Magnetic properties of ilmenite-hematite single crystals from the Ecstall pluton near Prince Rupert, British Columbia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brownlee, Sarah J.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Kasama, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    and hematite, the primary paleomagnetic recorder in the Ecstall pluton. Measurements of hysteresis properties, low-temperature remanence, and room temperature isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition and observations from magnetic force microscopy and off-axis electron holography indicate that samples...... fall into three groups. The groups are defined by the presence of mineral microstructures that are related to distance from the Quotoon plutonic complex. The two groups closest to the Quottoon Pluton contain magnetite within hematite and ilmenite lamellae. Reheating of the Ecstall pluton led...

  14. Magnetic properties in an ash flow tuff with continuous grain size variation: a natural reference for magnetic particle granulometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, J.L.; Jackson, M.J.; Rosenbaum, J.G.; Solheid, P.

    2011-01-01

    The Tiva Canyon Tuff contains dispersed nanoscale Fe-Ti-oxide grains with a narrow magnetic grain size distribution, making it an ideal material in which to identify and study grain-size-sensitive magnetic behavior in rocks. A detailed magnetic characterization was performed on samples from the basal 5 m of the tuff. The magnetic materials in this basal section consist primarily of (low-impurity) magnetite in the form of elongated submicron grains exsolved from volcanic glass. Magnetic properties studied include bulk magnetic susceptibility, frequency-dependent and temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility, anhysteretic remanence acquisition, and hysteresis properties. The combined data constitute a distinct magnetic signature at each stratigraphic level in the section corresponding to different grain size distributions. The inferred magnetic domain state changes progressively upward from superparamagnetic grains near the base to particles with pseudo-single-domain or metastable single-domain characteristics near the top of the sampled section. Direct observations of magnetic grain size confirm that distinct transitions in room temperature magnetic susceptibility and remanence probably denote the limits of stable single-domain behavior in the section. These results provide a unique example of grain-size-dependent magnetic properties in noninteracting particle assemblages over three decades of grain size, including close approximations of ideal Stoner-Wohlfarth assemblages, and may be considered a useful reference for future rock magnetic studies involving grain-size-sensitive properties.

  15. The application of magnetic carriers in wastewater treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hredzák Slavomír

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Ferromagnetic fluid is a kind of polyphase liquid, which is a stable colloid system of sufficiently small mono-domain magnetic particles covered by a film of surfactant and dispersed in a base liquid. Ferrofluids can be prepared in various base liquids such as water, hydrocarbons, mercury, etc., according to them utilisation. The basic properties of ferrofluids, i.e. the high magnetic polarisation of saturation and zero remanence predestine their application in various industrial branches including mineral processing and wastewater treatment.Wastewater treatment by the application of ferrofluids under magnetic field resides in the action of the field on the ferrofluid added to the oil substance. Strongly magnetically polarisable fluids enable to increase the magnetic susceptibility of oil substances to suitable level for their removal from water by a magnetic way. It was observed that the oil drop with the weight of 3.10 -3g and the ferrofluid concentration of 3% starts to move in the direction of the magnetic intensity growth at the minimal value of 105 A.m-1. It means that ordinary permanent magnet with the magnetic induction of 0.1 T causes the movement of the oil drops with a relatively small admixture of ferrofluid on the water level. This knowledge is very important for the design of magnetic filtration device which will be able to separate oil substances from water.Modification of magnetic properties of weakly magnetic materials by ferrofluids was also carried out in the case of magnetic filtration of water contaminated by fine grains of copper concentrate created by chalcopyrite. After admixing the ferrofluid into the suspension the recovery of mineral to the magnetic filter product ranges from 75 % to 98 % depending on the kind of ferrofluid and pH values. It was observed that in the case of water-based ferrofluid the recovery decreases with the increasing of pH value. But, on the other hand the increasing of pH value under the

  16. cis-Thioindigo (TI) - a new ligand with accessible radical anion and dianion states. Strong magnetic coupling in the {[TI-(μ2-O),(μ-O)]Cp*Cr}2 dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Khasanov, Salavat S; Shestakov, Alexander F; Fatalov, Alexey M; Batov, Mikhail S; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2017-10-24

    Reaction of decamethylchromocene (Cp*2Cr) with thioindigo (TI) yields a coordination complex {[TI-(μ2-O), (μ-O)]Cp*Cr}2·C6H14 (1) in which one Cp* ligand in Cp*2Cr is substituted by TI. TI adopts cis-conformation in 1 allowing the coordination of both carbonyl groups to chromium. Additionally, one oxygen atom of TI becomes a μ2-bridge for two chromium atoms to form {[TI-(μ2-O), (μ-O)]Cp*Cr}2 dimers with a CrCr distance of 3.12 Å. According to magnetic data, diamagnetic TI2- dianions and two Cr3+ atoms with a high S = 3/2 spin state are present in a dimer allowing strong antiferromagnetic coupling between two Cr3+ spins with an exchange interaction of -35.4 K and the decrease of molar magnetic susceptibility below 140 K. Paramagnetic TI˙- radical anions with the S = 1/2 spin state have also been obtained and studied in crystalline {cryptand[2,2,2](Na+)}(TI˙-) (2) salt showing that both radical anion and dianion states are accessible for TI.

  17. Magnetic 'zig-zag' behavior in lunar rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, K. A.; Banerjee, S. K.

    1975-01-01

    A lunar olivine basalt sample is analyzed which exhibits unorthodox alternating field (AF) demagnetization behavior characterized by nonreproducible remanent magnetization values upon demagnetization at a given peak AF. It is shown that the direction of the remanence following AF demagnetization is roughly confined to a particular plane and that this behavior is an intrinsic property of certain magnetic carriers present in the sample. The viscous acquisition coefficient is found to be about 1-1/2 times greater than the absolute value of the decay coefficient. It is suggested that the behavior of this sample is due to the presence of a few planar, multidomain grains which represent a local mineral fabric, do not demagnetize, and may interfere with the determination of a meaningful time variation of lunar magnetic paleointensity.

  18. Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the beam requirements for accelerator magnets, we will outline the main issues and the physical limitations for producing strong and pure magnetic fields with superconductors. The seminar will mainly focus on the magnets for the accelerator, and give some hints on the magnets for the experiments. Prerequisite knowledge: Basic knowledge of Maxwell equations, and linear optics for particle accelerators (FODO cell, beta functions).

  19. Episodic accretion on to strongly magnetic stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Angelo, C.R.; Spruit, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Some accreting neutron stars and young stars show unexplained episodic flares in the form of quasi-periodic oscillations or recurrent outbursts. In a series of two papers, we present new work on an instability that can lead to episodic outbursts when the accretion disc is truncated by the star's

  20. Palaeomagnetism and rock magnetism of the Tortonian—Messinian boundary stratotype at Falconara, Sicily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langereis, C.G.; Dekkers, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Langereis, C.G. and Dekkers, MJ., 1992. Palaeomagnetism and rock magnetism of the Tortonian—Messinian boundary stratotype at Falconara, Sicily. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 71: 100—111. The Tortonian—Messinian boundary stratotype at Stazione Falconara (Sicily) yields normal polarity remanent

  1. Field dependence of magnetic viscosity of CoCrTa in-plane media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phan le kim, P.L.K.; Lodder, J.C.; Popma, T.J.A.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we will present a study of magnetic viscosity as a function of applied field of CoCrTa/Cr in-plane media. The viscosity versus applied field curves (viscosity curves) of the samples exhibit a sharp peak at remanence coercivity (Hcr). Their activation volume was found to be close to the

  2. Discrimination of Terrestrial Source Materials to the Northern North Atlantic Using Particle Size Specific Magnetic Measurements and Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, R. G.; Stoner, J. S.; Tepley, F. J., III

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the magnetic properties of different terrestrial sediment fractions (sand, silt, and clay) from Iceland and Greenland as major sediment sources to the northern North Atlantic (NNA). Magnetic susceptibility (MS) and hysteresis data have previously shown to be strongly particle size dependent with silt (3-63μm) important for hosting the ferrimagnetic fraction and discriminating source. Here we expand upon these data with more fundamental observations including low temperature remanence, low and high temperature MS, and electron microscopy. All Iceland fractions lack a Verwey transition (Tv) and MS decreases gradually on heating between 100-500°C, consistent with (TM60) titanomagnetite. Frequency dependent MS (fd%; 1-998 Hz) of ~8% across all Iceland fractions implies significant SP grain populations within the average Day plot determined PSD grain size. Homogeneity in magnetic grain size across all Icelandic fractions implies a disconnect with physical grain size that is visualized in electron backscatter images as fine Fe-rich fragments are included within larger host grains. In contrast Greenlandic silt and sand possess a strong Tv and MS values that fall steeply between 560-580°C on heating, consistent with magnetite. Greenlandic ferrimagnetic fragments within the silt and sand size fractions exist as discrete particles and average magnetic grain size scales with physical grain size; the sand fraction is dominated by MD grains and silts are coarse PSD in size. While finer PSD clays are indistinguishable from all Iceland fractions on a Day plot SP contributions are lower and the Tv is more pronounced in Greenland clay. These new magnetic mineralogy, magnetic grain size, and electron microscopy measurements expand the differentiation of source and grain size of NNA source materials, and further highlight the necessity for grain-size specific magnetic measurements to isolate source from physical grain size variation in bulk marine sediment cores.

  3. Independent control of the vortex chirality and polarity in a pair of magnetic nanodots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junqin; Wang, Yong, E-mail: wangyong@sinap.ac.cn; Cao, Jiefeng; Meng, Xiangyu; Zhu, Fangyuan; Wu, Yanqing; Tai, Renzhong

    2017-08-01

    Independent control of the vortex chirality and polarity is realized by changing the in-plane magnetic field direction in nanodot pair through Object Oriented Micromagnetic Framework (OOMMF) simulation. The two magnetic circles are close to each other and have magnetic interaction. The two circles always have the same polarity and opposite chirality at every remanent state. There are totally four predictable magnetic states in the nanodot pair which can be obtained in the remanent state relaxed from the saturation state along all possible directions. An explanation on the formation of vortex states is given by vortex dynamics. The vortex states are stable in large out-of-plane magnetic field which is in a direction opposite to the vortex polarity. The geometry of the nanodot pair gives a way to easily realize a vortex state with specific polarity and chirality.

  4. Globally Optimal Segmentation of Permanent-Magnet Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Insinga, Andrea Roberto; Bjørk, Rasmus; Smith, Anders

    2016-01-01

    functional that is linear in the magnetic field. This approach, however, yields a continuously varying remanent flux density, while in practical applications, magnetic assemblies are realized by combining uniformly magnetized segments. The problem of determining the optimal shape of each of these segments...... remains unsolved. We show that the problem of optimal segmentation of a two-dimensional permanent-magnet assembly with respect to a linear objective functional can be reduced to the problem of piecewise linear approximation of a plane curve by perimeter maximization. Once the problem has been cast...

  5. Quantitative analysis of magnetization reversal in Ni thin films on unpoled and poled (0 1 1) [PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3]0.68-[PbTiO3]0.32 piezoelectric substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkach, Alexander; Kehlberger, Andreas; Büttner, Felix; Jakob, Gerhard; Eisebitt, Stefan; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-08-01

    The field angle dependence of the magnetization reversal in 20 nm thick polycrystalline Ni films grown on piezoelectric (0 1 1) [PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3]0.68-[PbTiO3]0.32 (PMN-PT) substrates is analysed quantitatively to study the magnetic anisotropy induced in the film by poling the piezosubstrate. While the PMN-PT is in the unpoled state, the magnetization reversal is almost isotropic as expected from the polycrystalline nature of the film and corresponding to an orientation ratio (OR) of 1.2. The orientation ratio is obtained by fitting the angular dependence of normalized remanent magnetization to an adapted Stoner-Wohlfarth relation. Upon poling the piezosubstrate, a strong uniaxial anisotropy, whose hard axis is oriented along the [1 0 0] direction of the PMN-PT, is induced, yielding an OR of 3.1. The angular dependence of the coercivity for the poled state is found to consist of a strong increase for increasing field angles away from the easy axis direction and of a sharp decrease for angles close to the hard direction. It is best described by a two-phase model, implying that the magnetization reversal is determined by both, coherent rotation of the magnetic moments, according to the Stoner-Wohlfarth model, and the gradual displacement of the domain walls in obedience to the Kondorsky model.

  6. From Mn3O4/MnO core-shell nanoparticles to hollow MnO: evolution of magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelianchik, A; Singh, G; McDonagh, Brigitte H; Rodionova, V; Fiorani, D; Peddis, D; Laureti, S

    2018-02-02

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles (MNOPs), when dispersed in a water solution, show a magnetic behavior that drastically changes after an aging process. In this paper, the variation in the magnetic properties has been correlated with the structural evolution of the nanoparticles: in particular, the as prepared Mn3O4/MnO core/shell system manifests a low temperature magnetization reversal that is strongly affected by the presence of the MnO shell and, in particular, by the existence of a frustrated interfacial region playing a key role in determining the low temperature irreversibility, the finite coercivity slightly above the Curie temperature of the Mn3O4 phase and the horizontal displacement of the FC-hysteresis loop. On the other hand, the magnetic behavior of the aged system results dominated by the presence of Mn3O4 whose highly anisotropic character (i.e. high coercivity and high magnetization remanence) is attributed to the presence of a large fraction of surface spins. Such a result is consistent with the structural evolution, from core/shell to hollow nanoparticles, as shown by TEM observation.

  7. From Mn3O4/MnO core–shell nanoparticles to hollow MnO: evolution of magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelianchik, A.; Singh, G.; McDonagh, Brigitte H.; Rodionova, V.; Fiorani, D.; Peddis, D.; Laureti, S.

    2018-02-01

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles (MNOPs), when dispersed in a water solution, show a magnetic behavior that drastically changes after an aging process. In this paper, the variation in the magnetic properties has been correlated with the structural evolution of the nanoparticles: in particular, the as prepared Mn3O4/MnO core/shell system manifests a low temperature magnetization reversal that is strongly affected by the presence of the MnO shell and, in particular, by the existence of a frustrated interfacial region playing a key role in determining the low temperature irreversibility, the finite coercivity slightly above the Curie temperature of the Mn3O4 phase and the horizontal displacement of the FC-hysteresis loop. On the other hand, the magnetic behavior of the aged system results dominated by the presence of Mn3O4 whose highly anisotropic character (i.e. high coercivity and high magnetization remanence) is attributed to the presence of a large fraction of surface spins. Such a result is consistent with the structural evolution, from core/shell to hollow nanoparticles, as shown by TEM observation.

  8. Dynamic phase transition properties and hysteretic behavior of a ferrimagnetic core-shell nanoparticle in the presence of a time dependent magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Yusuf; Vatansever, Erol; Polat, Hamza

    2012-10-31

    We have presented dynamic phase transition features and stationary-state behavior of a ferrimagnetic small nanoparticle system with a core-shell structure. By means of detailed Monte Carlo simulations, a complete picture of the phase diagrams and magnetization profiles has been presented and the conditions for the occurrence of a compensation point T(comp) in the system have been investigated. According to Néel nomenclature, the magnetization curves of the particle have been found to obey P-type, N-type and Q-type classification schemes under certain conditions. Much effort has been devoted to investigating the hysteretic response of the particle, and we observed the existence of triple hysteresis loop behavior, which originates from the existence of a weak ferromagnetic core coupling J(c)/J(sh), as well as a strong antiferromagnetic interface exchange interaction J(int)/J(sh). Most of the calculations have been performed for a particle in the presence of oscillating fields of very high frequencies and high amplitudes in comparison with exchange interactions, which resembles a magnetic system under the influence of ultrafast switching fields. Particular attention has also been paid to the influence of the particle size on the thermal and magnetic properties, as well as magnetic features such as coercivity, remanence and the compensation temperature of the particle. We have found that, in the presence of ultrafast switching fields, the particle may exhibit a dynamic phase transition from paramagnetic to a dynamically ordered phase with increasing ferromagnetic shell thickness.

  9. Large scale displacements and internal deformations of the Outer Western Carpathians during the Cenozoic as manifested in paleomagnetic rotations and in the magnetic fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márton, Emö; Tokarski, Antek K.

    2016-04-01

    The paleomagnetic and magnetic anisotropy results interpreted in this presentation in terms of tectonics were obtained on the fine grained members, mostly mudstones/claystones, of the flysch from the Magura, the Silesian and the Dukla rootless nappes. The results are the best from the Upper Oligocene Krosno beds, which were affected by compression soon after deposition. These beds were available for sampling in the Silesian and Dukla nappes, but absent in the Magura nappe. Thus, in the latter older Paleogene strata were tested. A common feature of all sampled sediments is the low susceptibility (in the range of 10-4 SI or lower), weak remanence and the presence of pyrite. AMS measurements point to quite strong and probably repeated deformation in the Magura nappe, and the remanence is of-post-folding age. The AMS of the Silesian and Dukla nappes indicate weaker deformation, the orientations of the AMS lineations reflect compression. The remanence is of pre-folding age in the western and central segments of the Silesian nappe and is a mixture of pre and post-folding magnetization in the eastern segment. All the so far mentioned areas must have been affected by about 60° CCW rotation which followed the internal deformation. The Dukla nappe also rotated in the CCW sense, but the angle is far from well-defined. This can be attributed to the complicated internal structure of the nappe (e.g. presence of olistoliths) and non-removable overprint magnetizations. The relationship between local tectonic strikes and AMS lineations seems to imply that the ductile deformation responsible for the AMS lineations were acquired first, and the map-scale structures came into being during the CCW rotation of the studied segment of the nappe. AARM measurements documented that the fabrics of the ferrimagnetic minerals are often different from the orientation of the AMS fabrics. In such cases, they either fail to define an ellipsoid or the general orientations of the maxima are different

  10. Hyperfine interaction and tuning of magnetic anisotropy of Cu doped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batoo, Khalid Mujasam, E-mail: khalid.mujasam@gmail.com [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, P.O. Box-2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Salah, Dina [Department of Physics, Ain Shams University, Khalifa El-Maamon, Street, 11566 Cairo (Egypt); Kumar, Gagan; Kumar, Arun; Singh, Mahavir [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Summer Hill, Shimla 171005 (India); Abd El-sadek, M. [Nanomaterials Lab, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University, Qena 83523 (Egypt); Mir, Feroz Ahmad [University Science Instrumentation Centre, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190006 (India); Imran, Ahamad [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, P.O. Box-2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Jameel, Daler Adil [School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham Nanotechnology and Nanoscience Center, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-01

    Ferrimagnetic oxides may contain single or multi domain particles which get converted into superparamagnetic state near a critical size. To explore the existence of these particles, we have made Mössbauer and magnetic studies of Cu{sup 2+} substitution effect in CoFe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} Ferrites (0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5). All the samples have a cubic spinel structure with lattice parameters increasing linearly with increase in Cu content. The hysteresis loops yield a saturation magnetization, coercive field, and remanent magnetization that vary significantly with Cu content. The magnetic hysteresis curves shows a reduction in saturation magnetization and an increase in coercitivity with Cu{sup 2+} ion substitution. The anisotropy constant, K{sub 1,} is found strongly dependent on the composition of Cu{sup 2+} ions. The variation of saturation magnetization with increasing Cu{sup 2+} ion content has been explained in the light of Neel's molecular field theory. Mössbauer spectra at room temperature shows two ferrimagnetically relaxed Zeeman sextets. The dependence of Mössbauer parameters such as isomer shift, quadrupole splitting, line width and hyperfine magnetic field on Cu{sup 2+} ion concentration have been discussed. - Highlights: • Synthesis of the nanoparticles of Cu doped CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles. • The samples were characterized for the structural, morphological and magnetic studies using XRD, TEM, VSM and Mossbauer spectroscopy. • It has been found that the all the magnetic and Mossbauer parameters are diluted with the addition of Cu content in the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} matrix. • The Mossbauer and magnetic properties were studied in the light of size of nanoparticles and also with respect to the doping composition.

  11. Insertion of a hydroxido bridge into a diphenoxido dinuclear copper(II) complex: drastic change of the magnetic property from strong antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic and enhancement in the catecholase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Apurba; Das, Lakshmi Kanta; Drew, Michael G B; Diaz, Carmen; Ghosh, Ashutosh

    2012-10-01

    A diphenoxido-bridged dinuclear copper(II) complex, [Cu(2)L(2)(ClO(4))(2)] (1), has been synthesized using a tridentate reduced Schiff base ligand, 2-[[2-(diethylamino)ethylamino]methyl]phenol (HL). The addition of triethylamine to the methanolic solution of this complex produced a novel triple bridged (double phenoxido and single hydroxido) dinuclear copper(II) complex, [Cu(2)L(2)(OH)]ClO(4) (2). Both complexes 1 and 2 were characterized by X-ray structural analyses, variable-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements, and spectroscopic methods. In 1, the two phenoxido bridges are equatorial-equatorial and the species shows strong antiferromagnetic coupling with J = -615.6(6.1) cm(-1). The inclusion of the equatorial-equatorial hydroxido bridge in 2 changes the Cu···Cu distance from 3.018 Å (avg.) to 2.798 Å (avg.), the positions of the phenoxido bridges to axial-equatorial, and the magnetic coupling to ferromagnetic with J = 50.1(1.4) cm(-1). Using 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol as the substrate, the catecholase activity of the complexes has been studied in a methanol solution; compound 2 shows higher catecholase activity (k(cat) = 233.4 h(-1)) than compound 1 (k(cat) = 93.6 h(-1)). Both complexes generate identical species in solution, and they are interconvertible simply by changing the pH of their solutions. The higher catecholase activity of 2 seems to be due to the presence of the OH group, which increases the pH of its solution.

  12. The magnetic effects of brecciation and shock in meteorites. I - The LL-chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecher, A.; Stein, J.; Fuhrman, M.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic behavior of eight LL chondrites is analyzed in detail, and some implications for their modes of formation and evolutionary history are examined. Petrographic features of the specimens are described, and their initial magnetic characteristics are discussed. The demagnetization behavior of the initial magnetization is investigated along with the saturation remanence behavior and paleomagnetic-field intensities. The results indicate that a magnetic field of 0.01 to 0.1 Oe may have been present during postimpact cooling and that severe shock metamorphism may have given rise to the observed magnetic moments and behavior, even in the absence of ambient magnetic fields.

  13. Switching Magnetization Magnetic Force Microscopy — An Alternative to Conventional Lift-Mode MFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambel, Vladimír; Gregušová, Dagmar; Eliáš, Peter; Fedor, Ján; Kostič, Ivan; Maňka, Ján; Ballo, Peter

    2011-01-01

    In the paper we present an overview of the latest progress in the conventional lift-mode magnetic force microscopy (MFM) technique, achieved by advanced MFM tips and by lowering the lift height. Although smaller lift height offers improved spatial resolution, we show that lowered tip-sample distance mixes magnetic, atomic and electric forces. We describe an alternative to the lift-mode procedure - Switching Magnetization Magnetic Force Microscopy [SM-MFM], which is based on two-pass scanning in tapping mode AFM with reversed tip magnetization between the scans. We propose design and calculate the magnetic properties of such SM-MFM tips. For best performance the tips must exhibit low magnetic moment, low switching field, and single-domain state at remanence. The switching field of such tips is calculated for Permalloy hexagons.

  14. A novel method for the identification and characterization of magnetic sources in sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, E.; Spassov, S.

    2003-04-01

    Two of the main tasks of environmental magnetism are the identification and the quantification of different magnetic phases in a sample, a procedure usually referred to as the unmixing of magnetic components. The multi-parameter approach is based on the measurement of different bulk magnetic properties, whereby characteristic values are assumed for each component. The analysis of magnetization curves does not need a knowledge of the magnetic properties of the individual components, nevertheless the identification of each component is based on arbitrary model functions, generally derived from logarithmic Gaussian distributions (Robertson and France, 1994). Egli (2003) developed a particular family of model functions, called skewed generalized Gauss functions (SGG) to fit the main properties of a magnetization curve. A novel method, which is based on the analysis of alternating field demagnetization curves of anhysteretic remanent magnetizations (ARM) and isothermal remanent magnetizations (IRM), has been developed to identify different magnetic components. The demagnetization curves are fitted using SGG functions, each of which represents a magnetic component and is described by 5 parameters: ARM/IRM, median destructive field MDF, dispersion parameter DP, DMDF and DDP. DMDF and DDP are the differences between the MDF and the DP of ARM and IRM. Many well-known rock magnetic diagrams (e.g. King plots, Fuller plots and the Lowrie-Fuller test) are related to these parameters. A wide variety of sediments and sedimetary rocks as well as some sources of magnetic particles have been analyzed using this technique, including sediments from rivers, lakes and oceans, recent soils, paleosols, loesses, red clays, limestones, atmospheric dust, urban pollution and magnetotactic bacteria. Distinct groups of magnetic particles with characteristic values of ARM/ IRM, MDF, DP, DMDF and DDP have been identified. Each group can be associated with a particular source of magnetic particles

  15. A simple route to synthesize conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole nanocomposite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties and their performance for removal of hexavalent chromium ions from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Hasan, E-mail: samarhass@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mohammad Mostafizar; Ali, Mohammad Azgar [Department of Chemistry, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh); Minami, Hideto [Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tauer, Klaus [Max Planck Institute of Colloid and Interfaces, Am Mühlenberg, 14476 Golm (Germany); Gafur, Mohammad Abdul [Pilot Plant and Process Development Centre, BCSIR, Dhaka 1205 (Bangladesh); Rahman, Mohammad Mahbubor [Department of Chemistry, Rajshahi University, Rajshahi 6205 (Bangladesh)

    2016-08-15

    A combination of maghemite polypyrrole (PPy/γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and stimuli-responsive properties in the same hydrogel microspheres is expected to enhance their application potential in various fields such as tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, biosensors, biomedical applications and removal of heavy metals from waste water, catalysis etc. In this investigation a simple two step process is used to prepare conductive stimuli-responsive polypyrrole (PPy) composite hydrogel particles with strong magnetic properties. Poly(styrene-methacrylic acid-N-isopropylacrylamide-polyethelene glycol methacrylate) or P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles are first prepared by soap-free precipitation copolymerization. The copolymer hydrogel particles exhibited both temperature- and pH-responsive volume phase transition. Conductive P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite hydrogel particles are then prepared by seeded chemical oxidative polymerization of pyrrole in the presence of P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel seed particles using FeCl{sub 3} as a oxidant and p-toluene sulfonic acid ( p-TSA) as a dopant. In the reaction system FeCl{sub 3} functioned as a source of Fe(III) for the formation of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This reaction also requires the initial presence of Fe(II) provided by the addition of FeCl{sub 2}. The size and size distribution, surface structure, and morphology of the prepared conductive composite hydrogel particles are confirmed by FTIR, electron micrographs, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV–visible spectroscopy. The performance of nanocomposite hydrogel particles has been evaluated for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr) ions from water. - Highlights: • P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA) hydrogel particles were prepared. • P(S-NIPAM-MAA-PEGMA)/PPy/γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite hydrogel particles were prepared. • Oxidative polymerization of pyrrole and precipitation of γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3

  16. A laboratory study of the magnetic properties of synthetic titanomaghemites: Implications for the magnetic properties of ocean basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, B. M.

    1980-12-01

    An investigation of the magnetic properties of: (1) synthetic titanomaghemites with composition X = .6 and (2) oceanic basalts from DSDP site 417D is presented. The main objective of this study was to determine the variation of viscous remanent magnetization (VRM) with low temperature oxidation (z). The results of the VRM studies on the basalts from site 417D indicate that activation of small sections of domain walls may be responsible for the VRM in the massive flows, giving way to activation of larger sections or entire domain walls as grain size decreases. The predominant influence controlling VRM at site 417D is grain size and not oxidation. The effects of a diffusive magnetic after effect were also observed in these basalts. It is shown that a theoretical approach for determining domain transitions in magnetite and titanomaghemite is possible. The magnetite calculations show that for parallelepiped-shaped grains, the canonical case of a PSD grain or psark can be a major contributor to remanence in rocks containing magnetite. The calculations also predict that domain transitions increase with z for titanomaghemites and qualitatively explains some of the observed trends in magnetic properties of oceanic basalts. The model predicts that psarks may be the major contributors to remanence in oxidized pillow basalts.

  17. The Role of Magnetic Vortex Formation in Chains of Spherical FeNi Nanoparticles: A Micromagnetics Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barpandal, Prabeer; Scheinfein, Michael R.; Kasama, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic remanent states and magnetization reversal mechanisms in linear chains of three closely-spaced Fe1-xNix nanoparticles are studied using micromagnetic simulations, for particle sizes of between 10 and 150 nm. The role of the formation and switching of magnetic vortices in the particles is...... is demonstrated for external fields applied parallel to the chain axes. Variations in vortex core diameter, coercivity and vortex rotation plane with applied field are discussed....

  18. Mineral magnetism of dusty olivine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappe, Sophie-Charlotte L. L.; Church, Nathan S.; Kasama, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic properties of olivine-hosted Fe-Ni particles have been studied to assess the potential of "dusty olivine" to retain a pre-accretionary remanence in chondritic meteorites. Both body-centered (bcc) and face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe-Ni phases were formed by reduction of a terrestrial...... olivine precursor. The presence of Ni complicates the magnetic properties during heating and cooling due to the fcc-bcc martensitic transition. First-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams contain a central ridge with a broad coercivity distribution extending to 600 mT, attributed to non-interacting single...... a credible recorder of pre-accretionary magnetic fields. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union....

  19. Manipulation of incoherent and coherent spin ensembles in diluted magnetic semiconductors via ferromagnetic fringe fields; Manipulation inkohaerenter und kohaerenter Spinensembles in verduennt-magnetischen Halbleitern mittels ferromagnetischer Streufelder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halm, Simon

    2009-05-19

    In this thesis it is demonstrated that fringe fields of nanostructured ferromagnets provide the opportunity to manipulate both incoherent and coherent spin ensembles in a dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS). Fringe fields of Fe/Tb ferromagnets with a remanent out-of-plane magnetization induce a local magnetization in a (Zn,Cd,Mn)Se DMS. Due to the sp-d exchange interaction, optically generated electron-hole pairs align their spin along the DMS magnetization. One obtains a local, remanent spin polarization which was probed by spatially resolved, polarization sensitive photoluminescence spectroscopy. Fringe fields from in-plane magnetized Co ferromagnets allow to locally modify the precession frequency of the Manganese magnetic moments of the DMS in an external magnetic field. This was probed by time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. The inhomogeneity of the fringe field leads to a shortening of the ensemble decoherence time and to the effect of a time-dependent ensemble precession frequency. (orig.)

  20. Environmental Magnetic Signature Of Late Quaternary Climate and Paleoceanography in the Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzman, E. S.; Lund, S.; Kirby, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    High latitude drilling during IODP expedition 323 in the Bering Sea provides a unique opportunity to study in detail the evolution of Quaternary paleoceanography, climate and glacial history of the Bering Sea gateway to the Arctic Ocean. Our study focuses on a 400 ky interval of Quaternary marine sediments cored along the Bering Slope. Samples for magnetic analysis were obtained from sites U1339, U1343, U1344, U1345, at depths of 1008-3484 m. Sediments in these cores are a mixture of siliclastic material, derived primarily from terrigeneous sources, and biogenic material. Detailed measurements of the variation in bulk magnetic properties including natural remanent magnetization (NRM), susceptibility, ARM, and IRM, have been used to monitor changes in concentration, composition and grainsize of the magnetic components. In addition, sediment grain size analysis was preformed on biogenic free aliquots at selected intervals. Our results indicate that the dramatic bimodal magnetic intensity signal that alternates between a strong and weak NRM and magnetic susceptibility is associated with relatively course and fine grain sizes repectively. This is the opposite to the pattern estimated by our initial IODP Ex. 323 reports. Current models propose that, as has been observed in the North Atlantic, high intensities are likely to be related to high contributions of terrigenous and glaciomarine sediments deposited during glacial periods and low intensities are likely to occur during interglacials when continental sediments become trapped on the on the shelf. Contrary to this hypothesis, however, we find compelling evidence for a substantial increase in terrigenous input during the interglacial periods and what appears to be a predominantly pelagic signal during the glacial periods. Comparison of our data with other proxy data including oxygen isotopes, NGR, GRA allows us to investigate the possible causal links between these changes and the environmental history of the North

  1. Environmental rock-magnetism of Cenozoic red clay in the South Pacific Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimono, Takaya; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu

    2016-04-01

    Nonfossiliferous red clay can be used for elucidating long-range environmental changes, although such studies were limited so far because of the difficulty in precise age estimation and extremely low sedimentation rates. We conducted an environmental rock-magnetic study of Cenozoic red clay at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Site U1365 in the South Pacific Gyre. Magnetostratigraphy could be established only above ˜6 m below the seafloor (mbsf) (˜5 Ma). Below ˜6 mbsf, the ages of the cores were transferred from the published ages of nearby Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 596, which is based mainly on a constant Cobalt flux model, by intercore correlation using magnetic susceptibility and rare earth element content variation patterns. Rock-magnetic analyses including first-order reversal curve diagrams, the ratio of anhysteretic remanent magnetization susceptibility to saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM), and IRM component analyses revealed that magnetic minerals consist mainly of biogenic magnetite and terrigenous maghemite, and that the proportion of the terrigenous component increased since ˜23 Ma. We consider that the increase reflects a growth of eolian dust flux associated with a northward shift of Australia and the site to an arid region of the middle latitudes. The increase of the terrigenous component accelerated after ˜5 Ma, which may be associated with a further growth of the Antarctic glaciation at that time. This is coeval with the onset of the preservation of magnetostratigraphy, suggesting that the primary remanent magnetization is carried by the terrigenous component.

  2. Enhancing the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlburg, Jakob; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Stingaciu, Marian

    Strong magnets with a high energy product are vital when optimizing the efficiency in the electric industry. But since the rare earth metals, normally used for making strong permanent magnets, are both expensive and difficult to mine, a great demand has come to cheaper types of magnets with a sim...

  3. Magnetization of the oceanic crust: TRM or CRM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, C. A.; Labrecque, J. L.

    1987-01-01

    A model was proposed in which chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) acquired within the first 20 Ma of crustal evolution may account for 80% of the bulk natural remanent magnetization (NRM) of older basalts. The CRM of the crust is acquired as the original thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) is lost through low temperature alteration. The CRM intensity and direction are controlled by the post-emplacement polarity history. This model explains several independent observations concerning the magnetization of the oceanic crust. The model accounts for amplitude and skewness discrepancies observed in both the intermediate wavelength satellite field and the short wavelength sea surface magnetic anomaly pattern. It also explains the decay of magnetization away from the spreading axis, and the enhanced magnetization of the Cretaceous Quiet Zones while predicting other systematic variations with age in the bulk magnetization of the oceanic crust. The model also explains discrepancies in the anomaly skewness parameter observed for anomalies of Cretaceous age. Further studies indicate varying rates of TRM decay in very young crust which depicts the advance of low temperature alteration through the magnetized layer.

  4. A New Tool for Separating the Magnetic Mineralogy of Complex Mineral Assemblages from Low Temperature Magnetic Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Lagroix

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available One timeless challenge in rock magnetic studies, inclusive of paleomagnetism and environmental magnetism, is decomposing a sample's bulk magnetic behavior into its individual magnetic mineral components. We present a method permitting to decompose the magnetic behavior of a bulk sample experimentally and at low temperature avoiding any ambiguities in data interpretation due to heating-induced alteration. A single instrument is used to measure the temperature dependence of remanent magnetizations and to apply an isothermal demagnetization step at any temperature between 2 and 400 K. The experimental method is validated on synthetic mixtures of magnetite, hematite, goethite as well as on natural loess samples where the contributions of magnetite, goethite, hematite and maghemite are successfully isolated. The experimental protocol can be adapted to target other iron bearing minerals relevant to the rock or sediment under study. One limitation rests on the fact that the method is based on remanent magnetizations. Consequently, a quantitative decomposition of absolute concentration of individual components remains unachievable without assumptions. Nonetheless, semi-quantitative magnetic mineral concentrations were determined on synthetic and natural loess/paleosol samples in order to validate and test the method as a semi-quantitative tool in environmental magnetism studies.

  5. Palaeomagnetism and rock magnetism of the Tortonian—Messinian boundary stratotype at Falconara, Sicily

    OpenAIRE

    C. G. Langereis; Dekkers, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    Langereis, C.G. and Dekkers, MJ., 1992. Palaeomagnetism and rock magnetism of the Tortonian—Messinian boundary stratotype at Falconara, Sicily. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 71: 100—111. The Tortonian—Messinian boundary stratotype at Stazione Falconara (Sicily) yields normal polarity remanent magnetizations of post-tilting age, implying that the entire section is (sub)recently remagnetized. The absence of direct time control on the biostratigraphic datum levels in the section makes it therefore...

  6. Influence of Thermal Treatment on Magnetic Properties of Steel Sheet Material Utilised in Cable Routing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elemir Usak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of relax annealing aimed at removal of the residual stresses (so-called stress-relief annealing on various magnetic parameters, such as the relative magnetic amplitude permeability, coercivity, remanent flux density, etc. is discussed. Samples of steel cable tray material which is a part of commercially available cable routing system were investigated in order to find information about the properties important from the point of view of EMC requirements in extremely demanding industrial environment.

  7. Weathering, diagenesis, and pedogenesis in Paleocene-Eocene paleosols from the Bighorn Basin, WY: evidence from environmental magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxbauer, Daniel P.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Fox, David L.; Clyde, William C.

    2016-04-01

    Environmental magnetism of loessic soils and recent paleosols has proven to be a useful tool in the reconstruction of climatic conditions in Quaternary systems. However, it remains unclear how applicable these tools are in more ancient systems where diagenetic and surficial weathering processes may act to alter the original assemblage of magnetic minerals. Here, we evaluate the magnetic properties of nine paleosols that span the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM ~55 Ma) in the Bighorn Basin, WY. Each paleosol layer has been sampled from both drill core and outcrop exposure. Outcrops in this system are exposed to a pervasive weathering front, which is observed to alter sediment color in the upper 25 meters of drill cores. Importantly, these nine paleosol layers occur in the core far below this pervasive weathering front and are presumably unweathered. Our results show a consistent increase in both magnetic remanence measured between 100 - 1000 mT and a quantitative redness index in outcrops relative to equivalent core sediment. We suggest these patterns indicate the production of pigmentary hematite in outcrops as a result of oxidative weathering processes. There is no clear affect of weathering on the low-coercivity mineral component. However, comparison of the low-coercivity component with pedogenic magnetite in modern soils suggests that additional diagenetic processes may act to alter low-coercivity minerals irrespective of surface weathering. Despite these alterations, magnetic enhancement ratios for paleosol B-horizons show strong correlations with independent geochemical paleoprecipitation estimates across the PETM, derived from the same paleosol B-horizons. This suggests that magnetic minerals and bulk geochemistry record similar information about pedogenesis and that more work should continue to pursue environmental magnetism as a tool in reconstructing paleoclimate in ancient terrestrial systems.

  8. Mosaic anisotropy model for magnetic interactions in mesostructured crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby R. Goldman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new model for interpreting the magnetic interactions in crystals with mosaic texture called the mosaic anisotropy (MA model. We test the MA model using hematite as a model system, comparing mosaic crystals to polycrystals, single crystal nanoparticles, and bulk single crystals. Vibrating sample magnetometry confirms the hypothesis of the MA model that mosaic crystals have larger remanence (Mr/Ms and coercivity (Hc compared to polycrystalline or bulk single crystals. By exploring the magnetic properties of mesostructured crystalline materials, we may be able to develop new routes to engineering harder magnets.

  9. Intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic properties of the naturally layered manganites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, A.; Mitchell, J. F.; Miller, D. J.; Jiang, J. S.; Bader, S. D.

    1999-11-30

    Structural and magnetic properties of the two-layered Ruddlesden-Popper phase SrO(La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3}){sub 2} with x = 0.3--0.5 are highlighted. Intrinsic properties of these naturally layered manganites include a colossal magnetoresistance, a composition-dependent magnetic anisotropy, and almost no remanence. Above the Curie temperature there is a non-vanishing extrinsic magnetization attributed to intergrowths (stacking faults in the layered structure). These lattice imperfections consist of additional or missing manganite layers, as observed in transmission electron microscopy. Their role in influencing the properties of the host material is highlighted.

  10. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, D. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Strongly correlated fermions are investigated. An understanding of strongly correlated fermions underpins a diverse range of phenomena such as metal-insulator transitions, high-temperature superconductivity, magnetic impurity problems and the properties of heavy-fermion systems, in all of which local moments play an important role. (author).

  11. Manipulating the dipolar magnetic interactions in FePt square arrays: The role of edge roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norpoth, J.; Dreyer, S.; Jooss, Ch.; Sievers, S.

    2007-05-01

    The high magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy in hard magnetic materials may sustain magnetization distributions in the remanent state, which exhibit a high number of magnetic surface charges and thus significant magnetic stray fields. Here, we focus onto the stray field distribution in the exterior and the demagnetization field distribution in the interior of hard magnetic FePt elements without and with artificial saw tooth edge roughness. Our experiments and calculations reveal that external stray fields and internal demagnetization fields are considerably modified by the artificial edge roughness.

  12. Analysis of the magnetic field, force, and torque for two-dimensional Halbach cylinders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Smith, Anders; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden

    2010-01-01

    for a two dimensional Halbach cylinder are derived. The remanent flux density of a Halbach magnet is characterized by the integer p. For a number of applications the force and torque between two concentric Halbach cylinders are important. These quantities are calculated and the force is shown to be zero...... except for the case where p for the inner magnet is one minus p for the outer magnet. Also the force is shown never to be balancing. The torque is shown to be zero unless the inner magnet p is equal to minus the outer magnet p. Thus there can never be a force and a torque in the same system....

  13. Magnetic properties of Fe{sub 20} Ni{sub 80} antidots: Pore size and array disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, J.L., E-mail: juan.palma.s@usach.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile); Gallardo, C. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile); Spinu, L.; Vargas, J.M. [Advanced Material Research Institute (AMRI) and Department of Physics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Dorneles, L.S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria UFSM, Av. Roraima 1000, Camobi, Santa Maria, RS 97105-900 (Brazil); Denardin, J.C.; Escrig, J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile); Center for the Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (CEDENNA), Avda. Ecuador 3493, 917-0124 Santiago (Chile)

    2013-10-15

    Magnetic properties of nanoscale Fe{sub 20}Ni{sub 80} antidot arrays with different hole sizes prepared on top of nanoporous alumina membranes have been studied by means of magnetometry and micromagnetic simulations. The results show a significant increase of the coercivity as well as a reduction of the remanence of the antidot arrays, as compared with their parent continuous film, which depends on the hole size introduced in the Fe{sub 20}Ni{sub 80} thin film. When the external field is applied parallel to the antidots, the reversal of magnetization is achieved by free-core vortex propagation, whereas when the external field is applied perpendicular to the antidots, the reversal occurs through a process other than the coherent rotation (a maze-like pattern). Besides, in-plane hysteresis loops varying the angle show that the degree of disorder in the sample breaks the expected hexagonal symmetry. - Highlights: • Magnetic properties are strongly influenced by the pore diameter of the samples. • Coercive fields for antidots are higher than the values for the continuous film. • Disorder breaks the hexagonal symmetry of the sample. • Each hole acts as a vortex nucleation point. • Antidots have unique properties that allow them to be used in applications.

  14. Magnetic volcanos in gadolinium Langmuir-Blodgett films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tishin, A.M. E-mail: amt@mailaps.org; Snigirev, O.V.; Khomutov, G.B.; Gudoshnikov, S.A.; Bohr, J

    2001-09-01

    Magnetic, structural and electronic properties of Langmuir-Blodgett films with incorporated Gd{sup 3+} ions has been detected using a scanning DC SQUID microscope, scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The magnetic images of 28 and 50 layer thick films at 77 K have been obtained after in-plane and out-of-plane pre-magnetization in a field of 1.4 T at 300 K. Randomly placed 'magnetic volcanos' with a remanent magnetic moment of the order of 10{sup -13} A m{sup 2} was observed. A decay of the remanent magnetization with a characteristic time of about 120 h was observed. It is suggested that the magnetic order is relatively long ranged, and that topological defects (vortices) lead to the observed out-of-plane field lines, and are responsible for the magnetic volcanos. Finally, it is hypothesized that a similar topology of field lines is responsible for superconductivity as observed in ceramic high-T{sub C} superconductors.

  15. Magnetization curve modelling of soft magnetic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meszaros, I, E-mail: meszaros@eik.bme.hu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Bertalan L. street 7., Budapest, H-1111 (Hungary)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present an application of the so called hyperbolic model of magnetization. The model was modified and it was applied for nine different soft magnetic alloys. The tested samples were electro-technical steels (FeSi alloys) and a permalloy (FeNi alloy) with strongly different magnetic properties. Among them there are top, medium and definitely poor quality soft magnetic materials as well. Their minor hysteresis loops and normal magnetization curves were measured by alternating current measurement. The hyperbolic model of magnetization was applied for the experimental normal magnetization curves. It was proved that the applied model is excellent for describing mathematically the experimental magnetization curves.

  16. Magnetism of quaternary sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Friedrich

    Magnetism of Quaternary sediments was the topic of a well-attended symposium held during the 13th INQUA (International Union of Quaternary Research) congress in Beijing, China, August 2-9. More than 40 papers were delivered by scientists from Belgium, England, France, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United States, the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, and other countries. The host country contributed to a productive session that was part of the first large scientific meeting to take place in Beijing after the June 4, 1989, upheaval.Nearly half of the studies focused on paleomagnetic and rock magnetic properties of loess in Alaska, Central Asia, China, and New Zealand. Magnetostratigraphic polarity dating was done at some sections in the western (Shaw et al.) and central Chinese loess plateau (Bai and Hus; Wang and Evans; Yue). The interpretation of the polarity pattern found in the western loess plateau still is not unambiguous. In the central part, certain polarity boundaries, such as the Brunhes/Matuyama (B/M) boundary, are found in slightly different stratigraphic positions (Hus et al.; Yue). In deep-sea sediments the lock-in depth of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) at the B/M boundary seems to be a linear function of sedimentation rate (de Menocal et al.). Although the magnetization process in the Chinese loess is not well understood, detailed records of polarity transitions have been reported for the B/M and the Jaramillo R→N transition (Ma et al.; Rolph).

  17. Structure and magnetic properties of Co{sub 2}(Cr{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x})Al, (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) Heusler alloys prepared by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Yogesh, E-mail: 123209001_yogesh@manit.ac.in [Department of Materials Science & Metallurgical Engineering, Ceramic & Powder Metallurgy Laboratory, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh 462003 (India); Vajpai, Sanjay Kumar, E-mail: vajpaisk@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science & Metallurgical Engineering, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh 462003 (India); Srivastava, Sanjay, E-mail: s.srivastava.msme@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science & Metallurgical Engineering, Maulana Azad National Institute of Technology, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh 462003 (India)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • A series of nanocrystalline Co{sub 2}(Cr{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x})Al Heusler alloy by powder metallurgy. • Effect of substitution of Fe for Cr on the microstructure and magnetic properties. • Increasing amounts of B2 type disordered structure with increasing Fe content. • Enhanced Ms, Mr, Hc, and Tc with increasing Fe content. • Relative magnetic anisotropy decreased with increasing Fe content. - Abstract: In the present study, a series of nanocrystalline Co{sub 2}(Cr{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x})Al Heusler alloy powders were successfully prepared by high energy ball milling and the effect of substitution of Fe for Cr on the microstructure and magnetic properties was investigated in detail. The Co{sub 2}CrAl alloy powder consisted of only A2 type disordered structure whereas the substitution of Cr by Fe led to the appearance of increasing amounts of B2 type disordered structure along with A2 type structure. All the Co{sub 2}(Cr{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x})Al Heusler alloy powders demonstrated high spontaneous magnetization together with a very small hysteresis losses. The saturation magnetization, remanence, coercivity, and Curie temperature increased with increasing Fe content. The increasing magnetization with increasing Fe content was attributed to the replacement of antiferromagnetic Cr by strongly ferromagnetic Fe and an increasing amounts of relatively more ordered, atomically as well as ferromagnetically, B2 structure as compared to that of A2 phase. The increment in remanence and coercivity with increasing Fe content were associated with the variation in microstructural characteristics, such as grain size, lattice defects, and the presence of small amounts of magnetic/nonmagnetic secondary phases. The increment in Curie temperature with increasing Fe content was attributed to the enhancement of d-d exchange interaction due to the possible occupancy of vacant sites by Fe atoms. All the Heusler alloys indicated extremely low magnetic anisotropy and the

  18. Evolution of magnetic properties in the vicinity of the Verwey transition in Fe3O4 thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. H.; Liu, W.; Zhang, Z. D.

    2017-09-01

    We have systematically studied the evolution of magnetic properties, especially the coercivity and the remanence ratio in the vicinity of the Verwey transition temperature (TV), of high-quality epitaxial Fe3O4 thin films grown on MgO (001), MgAl2O4 (MAO) (001), and SrTiO3 (STO) (001) substrates. We observed rapid change of magnetization, coercivity, and remanence ratio at TV, which are consistent with the behaviors of resistivity versus temperature [ρ (T )] curves for the different thin films. In particular, we found quite different magnetic behaviors for the thin films on MgO from those on MAO and STO, in which the domain size and the strain state play very important roles. The coercivity is mainly determined by the domain size but the demagnetization process is mainly dependent on the strain state. Furthermore, we observed a reversal of remanence ratio at TV with thickness for the thin films grown on MgO: from a rapid enhancement for 40-nm- to a sharp drop for 200-nm-thick film, and the critical thickness is about 80 nm. Finally, we found an obvious hysteretic loop of coercivity (or remanence ratio) with temperature around TV, corresponding to the hysteretic loop of the ρ (T ) curve, in Fe3O4 thin film grown on MgO.

  19. Strong moderate deviation theorems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inglot, Tadeusz; Kallenberg, W.C.M.; Ledwina, Teresa

    1992-01-01

    Strong moderate deviation theorems are concerned with relative errors in the tails caused by replacing the exact distribution function by its limiting distribution function. A new approach for deriving such theorems is presented using strong approximation inequalities. In this way a strong moderate

  20. A detailed rock-magnetic and archeomagnetic study of lime-plasters from central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-Arechalde, A. M.; Rodriguez, M.; Ramirez, O.; Gogichaishvili, A.; Caballero-Miranda, C.; Hueda-Tanabe, Y.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2003-04-01

    We carried out a reconnaissance rock-magnetic and archeomagnetic investigations of lime-plasters at some most important pre-Hispanic sites in Central Mexico. Both burned and unburned lime plasters (in total 30 samples) were analyzed from Teotihuacan, Tlatelolco, Santa Cruz Atizapan and Pañhu. The characteristic directions determined in this study are considered to be of primary origin. Thermomagnetic investigation show that the remanence is carried in most cases by magnetite or Ti-poor titanomagnetite. Unblocking temperature spectra and relatively high coercivity point to 'small' pseudo-single domain magnetic structure grains as responsible for remanent magnetization. Single-component, linear demagnetization plots were observed in most of cases. The mean site directions are consistent with the available reference master curve for Mesoamerica.

  1. Early sediment diagenesis on the Blake/Bahama Outer Ridge, North Atlantic Ocean, and its effects on sediment magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Martha; Lund, Steve P.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Schwartz, Richard; Wong, Kathy

    1997-04-01

    Sediment magnetic and geochemical studies of a suite of deep-sea sediment cores from the Blake/Bahama Outer Ridge (BBOR), North Atlantic Ocean, have identified two current redox boundaries in surficial (Holocene), carbonate-rich sediments over much of the BBOR. The upper Mn+4/Mn+2 redox boundary is associated with a spike in the concentration of solid-phase Mn (as MnO2); the lower Fe+3/Fe+2 redox boundary is associated with a spike in the concentration of solid-phase Fe (as goethite, αFeOOH). Over much of the BBOR, high sediment magnetic intensities occur in surficial, carbonate-rich sediments associated with these redox boundaries and lower intensities occur in deeper (late Pleistocene) carbonate-poor sediments. This relationship is opposite to that expected if sediment magnetism simply reflects the clastic (noncarbonate) sediment fraction. The surficial, high sediment magnetic intensities are due primarily to the following two factors: (1) magnetic mineral authigenesis associated with early diagenesis and (2) the presence of abundant bacterial magnetosomes. Magnetosomes are almost absent in the late Pleistocene low-carbonate sediments owing, most likely, to local Pleistocene environmental conditions (high clastic flux, low organic flux) which did not favor their growth. The sediment natural remanent magnetization is strongly correlated with the sediment clastic fraction and is relatively unaffected by early diagenesis and the presence of abundant bacterial magnetite. If this is typical, bacterial magnetite may be more abundant in nature but less important to sediment paleomagnetic records, than previously thought.

  2. Stingless bee antennae: a magnetic sensory organ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucano, M J; Cernicchiaro, G; Wajnberg, E; Esquivel, D M S

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic material in the body parts of the stingless bee Schwarziana quadripunctata, heads, pairs of antennae, thorax and abdomens, were investigated by SQUID magnetometry and Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR). The saturation, J(s) and remanent, J(r), magnetizations and coercive field H(c) are determined from the hysteresis curves. From H(c) and J(r)/J(s) the magnetic particle sizes are estimated. The J(s) and the FMR spectral absorption areas yield 23+/-3%, 45+/-5%, 15+/-2% and 19+/-4% magnetic material contributions of head, pair of antennae, thorax and abdomen, respectively, similar to those observed in the migratory ant Pachycondyla marginata. This result is discussed in light of the hypothesis of antennae as a magnetosensor structure.

  3. Comparison of leaf saturation isothermal remanent magnetisation (SIRM) with anatomical, morphological and physiological tree leaf characteristics for assessing urban habitat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardel, Fatemeh; Wuyts, Karen; Khavaninzhadeh, Ali Reza; Wuytack, Tatiana; Babanezhad, Manoochehr; Samson, Roeland

    2013-12-01

    Leaf saturation isothermal remanent magnetisation (SIRM) is known as a good proxy of atmospheric, traffic related particulate matter (PM) concentration. In this study, we compared leaf SIRM with Leaf area (LA), leaf dry weight (LDW), specific leaf area (SLA), stomatal density (SD), relative chlorophyll content (RCC), chlorophyll fluorescence parameters (Fv/Fm and PI) for three urban tree types in the city of Ghent, Belgium. A negative significant relationship of LA, LDW and Fv/Fm, and a positive significant relationship of SLA with leaf SIRM was observed. Among all considered parameters, leaf SIRM had the highest potential for discrimination between contrasting land use classes. It was concluded that urban habitat quality can be monitored with leaf SIRM, independent of the other above mentioned plant parameters. The anatomical, morphological and physiological tree leaf characteristics considered are not good indicators for atmospheric PM, but might be interesting bio-indicators of other air pollutants than PM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Untangling inconsistent magnetic polarity records through an integrated rock magnetic analysis: A case study on Neogene sections in East Timor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aben, F. M.; Dekkers, M. J.; Bakker, R. R.; van Hinsbergen, D. J. J.; Zachariasse, W. J.; Tate, G. W.; McQuarrie, N.; Harris, R.; Duffy, B.

    2014-06-01

    Inconsistent polarity patterns in sediments are a common problem in magnetostratigraphic and paleomagnetic research. Multiple magnetic mineral generations result in such remanence "haystacks." Here we test whether end-member modeling of isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curves as a basis for an integrated rock magnetic and microscopic analysis is capable of isolating original magnetic polarity patterns. Uppermost Miocene-Pliocene deep-marine siliciclastics and limestones in East Timor, originally sampled to constrain the uplift history of the young Timor orogeny, serve as case study. An apparently straightforward polarity record was obtained that, however, proved impossible to reconcile with the associated biostratigraphy. Our analysis distinguished two magnetic end-members for each section, which result from various greigite suites and a detrital magnetite suite. The latter yields largely viscous remanence signals and is deemed unsuited. The greigite suites are late diagenetic in the Cailaco River section and early diagenetic, thus reliable, in the Viqueque Type section. By selecting reliable sample levels based on a quality index, a revised polarity pattern of the latter section is obtained: consistent with the biostratigraphy and unequivocally correlatable to the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale. Although the Cailaco River section lacks a reliable magnetostratigraphy, it does record a significant postremagnetization tectonic rotation. Our results shows that the application of well-designed rock magnetic research, based on the end-member model and integrated with microscopy and paleomagnetic data, can unravel complex and seemingly inconsistent polarity patterns. We recommend this approach to assess the veracity of the polarity of strata with complex magnetic mineralogy.

  5. Rock magnetism linked to human brain magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    Magnetite has a long and distinguished career as one of the most important minerals in geophysics, as it is responsible for most of the remanent magnetization in marine sediments and the oceanic crust. It may come as a surprise to discover that it also ranks as the third or fourth most diverse mineral product formed biochemically by living organisms, and forms naturally in a variety of human tissues [Kirschvink et al., 1992].Magnetite was discovered in teeth of the Polyplacophora mollusks over 30 years ago, in magnetotactic bacteria nearly 20 years ago, in honey bees and homing pigeons nearly 15 years ago, but only recently in human tissue.

  6. Influences of Laser Spot Welding on Magnetic Property of a Sintered NdFeB Magnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baohua Chang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser welding has been considered as a promising method to join sintered NdFeB permanent magnets thanks to its high precision and productivity. However, the influences of laser welding on the magnetic property of NdFeB are still not clear. In the present paper, the effects of laser power on the remanence (Br were experimentally investigated in laser spot welding of a NdFeB magnet (N48H. Results show that the Br decreased with the increase of laser power. For the same welding parameters, the Br of magnets, that were magnetized before welding, were much lower than that of magnets that were magnetized after welding. The decrease in Br of magnets after laser welding resulted from the changes in microstructures and, in turn, the deterioration of magnetic properties in the nugget and the heat affected zone (HAZ in a laser weld. It is recommended that the dimensions of nuggets and HAZ in laser welds of a NdFeB permanent magnet should be as small as possible, and the magnets should be welded before being magnetized in order to achieve a better magnetic performance in practical engineering applications.

  7. Endmember analysis of isothermal and high-temperature magnetization data from ODP 910C, Yermak Plateau, NW Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Karl; Knies, Jochen; Kosareva, Lina; Nurgaliev, Danis

    2017-04-01

    Room temperature magnetic initial curves, upper hysteresis curves, acquisition curves of induced remanent magnetization (IRM), and backfield (BF) curves have been measured between -1.5 T and 1.5 T for more than 430 samples from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 910C. The core was drilled in 556.4 m water depth on the southern Yermak Plateau (80°15.896'N, 6°35.430'E), NW Svalbard. In total, 507.4 m of sediments were cored, and average recovery was 57%, with 80% between 170 and 504.7 meter below seafloor (mbsf). For this study, the borehole was re-sampled between 150 mbsf and 504.7 mbsf for environmental magnetic, inorganic geochemical, and sedimentological analyses (443 samples). The lithology is mainly silty-clay with some enrichments of fine sands in the lower section (below 400 mbsf). For all samples, a Curie express balance was used to obtain the temperature dependence of induced magnetization in air at a heating rate of 100 °C/min up to a maximum temperature of 800 °C. The hysteresis curves were used to infer classical hysteresis parameters like saturation remanence (Mrs), saturation magnetization (Ms), remanence coercivity (Hcr) or coercivity (Hc). In addition several other parameters, like hysteresis energy, high-field slope or saturation field have been determined and help to characterize the down-core variation of the magnetic fractions. Acquisition curves of isothermal remanent magnetization are decomposed into endmembers using non-negative matrix factorization. The obtained mixing coefficients decompose hysteresis loops, back-field, thermomagnetic curves, geochemistry, and sedimentological parameters into their related endmember components. Down-core variation of the endmembers enables reconstruction of sediment transport processes and in-situ formation of magnetic mineral phases.

  8. Magnetic properties and element concentrations in lichens exposed to airborne pollutants released during cement production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoli, Luca; Winkler, Aldo; Guttová, Anna; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Grassi, Alice; Lackovičová, Anna; Senko, Dušan; Loppi, Stefano

    2017-05-01

    The content of selected elements (Al, As, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, S, Ti, V and Zn) was measured in samples of the lichen Evernia prunastri exposed for 30, 90 and 180 days around a cement mill, limestone and basalt quarries and urban and agricultural areas in SW Slovakia. Lichens transplanted around the investigated quarries and the cement mill rapidly (30 days) reflected the deposition of dust-associated elements, namely Ca (at the cement mill and the limestone quarry) and Fe, Ti and V (around the cement mill and the basalt quarry), and their content remained significantly higher throughout the whole period (30-180 days) with respect to the surrounding environment. Airborne pollutants (such as S) progressively increased in the study area from 30 to 180 days. The magnetic properties of lichen transplants exposed for 180 days have been characterized and compared with those of native lichens (Xanthoria parietina) and neighbouring bark, soil and rock samples, in order to test the suitability of native and transplanted samples as air pollution magnetic biomonitors. The magnetic mineralogy was homogeneous in all samples, with the exception of the samples from the basalt quarry. The transplants showed excellent correlations between the saturation remanent magnetization (Mrs) and the content of Fe. Native samples had a similar magnetic signature, but the values of the concentration-dependent magnetic parameters were up to two orders of magnitude higher, reflecting higher concentrations of magnetic particles. The concentrations of As, Ca and Cr in lichens correlated with Mrs values after neglecting the samples from the basalt quarry, which showed distinct magnetic properties, suggesting the cement mill as a likely source. Conversely, Ti and Mn were mostly (but not exclusively) associated with dust from the basalt quarry. It is suggested that the natural geological characteristics of the substrate may strongly affect the magnetic properties of lichen thalli

  9. Magnetization-induced enhancement of photoluminescence in core-shell CoFe2O4@YVO4:Eu3+ composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yanmin; Zhou, Zhihua; Wei, Yongbin; Wu, Zheng; Chen, Jianrong; Zhang, Yihe; Liu, Yongsheng

    2013-12-01

    After the core-shell CoFe2O4@YVO4:Eu3+ composite synthesized through a facile sol-gel method was magnetized under an external magnetic field of 0.25 T for 4 h, an enhancement of ˜56% in photoluminescence intensity was observed. The remanent magnetization of the CoFe2O4 core increases the intensity of the excited charge transfer transition of VO43- group in YVO4:Eu3+ shell, which may enhance the probability related to the Eu3+ radiative transition 5D0-7F2, yielding to a high photoluminescence. The obvious remanent-magnetization-induced enhancement in photoluminescence is helpful in developing excellent magnetic/luminescent material for the practical display devices.

  10. Storing Information in Single Atom Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natterer, Fabian; Yang, Kai; Paul, William; Wilke, Philip; Choi, Taeyoung; Greber, Thomas; Heinrich, Andreas J.; Lutz, Chris P.

    In a Gedankenexperiment about shrinking the size of a magnetic bit, the single atom magnet is the natural limit. Previous experimental efforts reached a size of few atoms per individually addressable magnetic bit, but a recent report of magnetic remanence for ensembles of holmium (Ho) atoms on magnesium oxide (MgO) promised a path toward stable magnetic bits at the atomic limit. It remained unclear, however, how to access the individual magnetic centers. Here we demonstrate the reading and writing of individual Ho atoms on MgO, and show that they independently retain their magnetic information over several hours. We read the Ho states by tunnel magnetoresistance and write with current pulses using a scanning tunneling microscope. We prove magnetic origin of the long-lived states by single-atom electron spin resonance (ESR) and measure a large magnetic moment of (10.1 +/-0.1) Bohr magnetons. The high magnetic stability combined with electrical reading and writing shows that single atom magnetic memory has become a physical reality. SNF Ambizione Grant PZ00P2 167965.

  11. Magnetic investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, G.D.; Jahren, C.E.; Rosenbaum, J.G. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA); Baldwin, M.J. [Fenix and Scisson, Inc., Mercury, NV (USA)

    1983-12-31

    Air and ground magnetic anomalies in the Climax stock area of the NTS help define the gross configuration of the stock and detailed configuration of magnetized rocks at the Boundary and Tippinip faults that border the stock. Magnetizations of geologic units were evaluated by measurements of magnetic properties of drill core, minimum estimates of magnetizations from ground magnetic anomalies for near surface rocks, and comparisons of measured anomalies with anomalies computed by a three-dimensional forward program. Alluvial deposits and most sedimentary rocks are nonmagnetic, but drill core measurements reveal large and irregular changes in magnetization for some quartzites and marbles. The magnetizations of quartz monzonite and granodiorite near the stock surface are weak, about 0.15 A/m, and increase at a rate of 0.00196 A/m/m to 1.55 A/m, at depths greater than 700 m (2300 ft). The volcanic rocks of the area are weakly magnetized. Aeromagnetic anomalies 850 m (2800 ft) above the stock are explained by a model consisting of five vertical prisms. Prisms 1, 2, and 3 represent the near surface outline of the stock, prism 4 is one of the models developed by Whitehill (1973), and prism 5 is modified from the model developed by Allingham and Zietz (1962). Most of the anomaly comes from unsampled and strongly-magnetized deep sources that could be either granite or metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. 48 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties of NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} prepared via sol–gel auto-combustion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Li, E-mail: sunlitut@163.com [Key Lab of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Ru; Wang, Zhenduo [College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Ju, Lin [College of Physics and Electrical Engineering, Anyang Normal University, Anyang 455000 (China); Cao, Ensi; Zhang, Yongjia [College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Nickelferrite (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4})powders were synthesized via sol–gel auto-combustion method and the corresponding temperature dependence of microstructure, dielectric and magnetic properties have been investigated. Results of XRD and SEM indicate that the NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples exhibit a typical single phase spinel structure and a uniform particle distribution. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss measurements show strong frequency dependence of all the samples. The peak observed in frequency dependence of dielectric loss measurements shifts to higher frequency with the increasing sintering temperature, indicating a Debye-like dielectric relaxation. The remanent magnetization increases with the increasing grain size while the coercivity is just the opposite. The saturation magnetization can achieve 50 emu/g when the sintering temperature is more than 1000 °C, and the lowest coercivity (159.49 Oe) was observed in the NFO sample sintered at 1300 °C for 2 h. - Highlights: • Mr value increases with the increasing grain size while Hc is just the opposite. • Ms achieve 50 emu/g when the sintering temperature is more than 1000 °C. • The lowest Hc value is 159.49 Oe for the NFO sample sintered at 1300 °C.

  13. Magnetic Studies of Co-Doped ZnO Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, S. K.; Singh, N. Surajkumar; Himanshu, A. K.; Chakraborty, Keka R.; Das, D.; Mukhopadhyay, P. K.; Mondal, Nagendra

    2011-07-01

    ZnO doped with Co has been synthesised at various concentrations from 1 to 20 atom % in bulk polycrystalline form by wet chemical method. Particle size was ranging from 40-50 nm. There was a signature of ferromagnetism at 7 atom % and higher with S-type curves in M-H plots. Remanent magnetization was quite appreciable. But, there is anomaly with decrease in moment at higher atomic concentrations. No sign of superparamagnetism due to nanoparticles was there. Magnetism is thought to be due to interaction between nearest neighbor Co(II) ions along with clusters of Co(II) in isolation, which may be due to precipitation.

  14. Enhancing the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlburg, Jakob; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Stingaciu, Marian

    Enhancing the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles J. V. Ahlburg, M. S. Músquiz, C. Zeuthen, S. Kjeldgaard, M. Stingaciu, M. Christensen Center for Materials Crystallography, Departement of Chemistry & iNano, Aarhus University, Denmark Strong magnets with a high energy product are vital...

  15. Assaying Carcinoembryonic Antigens by Normalized Saturation Magnetization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Shi, Jin-Cheng; Chiang, Ming-Hsien

    2015-07-01

    Biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs) that provide unique advantages have been extensively used to develop immunoassay methods. However, these developed magnetic methods have been used only for specific immunoassays and not in studies of magnetic characteristics of materials. In this study, a common vibration sample magnetometer (VSM) was used for the measurement of the hysteresis loop for different carcinoembryonic antigens (CEA) concentrations ( Φ CEA) based on the synthesized BMNs with anti-CEA coating. Additionally, magnetic parameters such as magnetization ( M), remanent magnetization ( M R), saturation magnetization ( M S), and normalized parameters (Δ M R/ M R and Δ M S/ M S) were studied. Here, Δ M R and Δ M s were defined as the difference between any ΦCEA and zero Φ CEA. The parameters M, Δ M R, and Δ M S increased with Φ CEA, and Δ M S showed the largest increase. Magnetic clusters produced by the conjugation of the BMNs to CEAs showed a Δ M S greater than that of BMNs. Furthermore, the relationship between Δ M S/ M S and Φ CEA could be described by a characteristic logistic function, which was appropriate for assaying the amount of CEAs. This analytic Δ M S/ M S and the BMNs used in general magnetic immunoassays can be used for upgrading the functions of the VSM and for studying the magnetic characteristics of materials.

  16. Magnetic minerals in soils across the forest-prairie ecotone in NW Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxbauer, D.; Feinberg, J. M.; Fox, D. L.; Nater, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Soil pedogenesis results in a complex assemblage of iron oxide minerals that can be disentangled successfully using sensitive magnetic techniques to better delineate specific soil processes. Here, we evaluate the variability in soil processes within forest, prairie, and transitional soils along an 11 km transect of anthropogenically unaltered soils that span the forest-to-prairie ecotone in NW Minnesota. All soils in this study developed on relatively uniform topography, similar glacial till parent material, under a uniform climate, and presumably over similar time intervals. The forest-to-prairie transition zone in this region is controlled by naturally occurring fires, affording the opportunity to evaluate differences in soil processes related to vegetation (forest versus prairie) and burning (prairie and transitional soils). Results suggest that the pedeogenic fraction of magnetite/maghemite in soils is similar in all specimens and is independent of soil type, vegetation, and any effects of burning. Magnetically enhanced horizons have 45% of remanence held by a low-coercivity pedogenic component (likely magnetite/maghemite) regardless of vegetation cover and soil type. Enhancement ratios for magnetic susceptibility and low-field remanences, often used as indicators of pedogenic magnetic minerals, are more variable but remain statistically equivalent across the transect. These results support the hypothesis that pedogenic magnetic minerals in soils mostly reflect ambient climatic conditions regardless of the variability in soil processes related to vegetation and soil type. The non-pedogenic magnetic mineral assemblage shows clear distinctions between the forest, prairie, and transitional soils in hysteresis properties (remanence and coercivity ratios; Mr/Ms and Bc/Bcr, respectively), suggesting that variable processes in these settings influence the local magnetic mineral assemblage, and that it may be possible to use magnetic minerals in paleosols to constrain

  17. Coercivity enhancement of (Nd,Ce)-Fe-B sintered magnets by doping Nd-Fe additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K.; Guo, S.; Fan, X. D.; Ding, G. F.; Di, J. H.; Chen, R. J.; Lee, D.; Yan, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of Nd-Fe additives on magnetic properties and microstructure in (Nd,Ce)-Fe-B sintered magnet has been investigated. By doping 3wt% Nd-Fe additives, the coercivity of the magnet increases from 10.56kOe to 12.69kOe with slight remanence decrease. Microstructure observation reveals that the volume fraction of the grain boundary phase increases accompanying with the thickening of the thin grain boundary between the adjacent grains. The RE6Fe13Cu phase which has low melting temperature develops at the triple junction position and the out shell of the matrix grains get magnetically hardened with 3wt% Nd-Fe additives. The results of the dynamic magnetic domains between the original magnet and processed magnet elucidate that the formation of reversed magnetic domains are more difficult for the processed magnet which is the direct evidence to clarify the coercivity enhancement.

  18. Coercivity enhancement of (Nd,Ce-Fe-B sintered magnets by doping Nd-Fe additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Chen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Nd-Fe additives on magnetic properties and microstructure in (Nd,Ce-Fe-B sintered magnet has been investigated. By doping 3wt% Nd-Fe additives, the coercivity of the magnet increases from 10.56kOe to 12.69kOe with slight remanence decrease. Microstructure observation reveals that the volume fraction of the grain boundary phase increases accompanying with the thickening of the thin grain boundary between the adjacent grains. The RE6Fe13Cu phase which has low melting temperature develops at the triple junction position and the out shell of the matrix grains get magnetically hardened with 3wt% Nd-Fe additives. The results of the dynamic magnetic domains between the original magnet and processed magnet elucidate that the formation of reversed magnetic domains are more difficult for the processed magnet which is the direct evidence to clarify the coercivity enhancement.

  19. Lunar magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.; Sonett, C. P.; Srnka, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of lunar paleomagnetic and electromagnetic sounding results which appear inconsistent with the hypothesis that an ancient core dynamo was the dominant source of the observed crustal magnetism are discussed. Evidence is summarized involving a correlation between observed magnetic anomalies and ejecta blankets from impact events which indicates the possible importance of local mechanisms involving meteoroid impact processes in generating strong magnetic fields at the lunar surface. A reply is given to the latter argument which also presents recent evidence of a lunar iron core.

  20. Strong intrinsic motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Dessi, Roberta; Rustichini, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    A large literature in psychology, and more recently in economics, has argued that monetary rewards can reduce intrinsic motivation. We investigate whether the negative impact persists when intrinsic motivation is strong, and test this hypothesis experimentally focusing on the motivation to undertake interesting and challenging tasks, informative about individual ability. We find that this type of task can generate strong intrinsic motivation, that is impervious to the effect of monetary incen...

  1. Fundamental relations of mineral specific magnetic carriers for paleointensity determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetschka, G.; Wieczorek, M. A.

    2017-11-01

    A fundamental linear relationship exists between the efficiency of thermoremanent magnetization measured at room temperature and the magnitude of the ambient field at the time of acquisition. The magnetic efficiency (the ratio of thermoremanent magnetization to saturation remanent magnetization) multiplied by the saturation magnetization is proportional to the magnetizing field, where the proportionality constant is independent of magnetic mineralogy and domain state. The empirical constant for this equation was determined using existing experimental data of single domain through pseudosingle domain to multidomain states of iron, meteoritic iron, magnetite, maghemite, pyrrhotite, and hematite. We show that the acquired magnetic efficiency is closely related to two types of demagnetizing fields that act as barriers against domain wall pinning during magnetic acquisition. The first relates to the saturation magnetization that is derived from the distribution of Bohr magnetons within the crystal lattice, and the second originates from grain shape. Theoretical considerations imply a factor of two difference in the magnetic efficiency acquired during laboratory and geologic timescales. This equation reveals that troilite may be a potentially important magnetic carrier for extraterrestrial magnetism. Using magnetic scanning techniques, our relationship allows for estimating the paleointensity from samples that contain more than one magnetic species.

  2. Effect of diffusing TbF3 powder on magnetic properties and microstructure transformation of sintered Nd-Fe-Cu-B magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Guo, Shuai; Ding, Guangfei; Cao, Xuejing; Zeng, Jiling; Song, Jie; Lee, Don; Yan, Aru

    2017-12-01

    The coercivity of sintered Nd-Fe-Cu-B magnets is markedly enhanced from 12.57 to 21.70 kOe while the remanence decreases from 13.80 to 13.49 kGs by grain boundary diffusion of TbF3 powder for 2 h. Microstructure analysis suggests that, during the diffusion process, F diffuses into the magnets easily and forms a new F-rich phase. The enrichment of F in grain boundary near the surface leads to the Cu movement into the interior and the Cu reduction in the surface of magnets. Diffusion of Tb leads to an increase of local total rare earth elements content. Under the combined effect of Cu reduction and increase of local total rare earth elements content, grain growth area is formed and further diffusion is suppressed. That excessive Tb diffuses into matrix phase leads to a decrease in remanence. When the grain growth area is removed, the deterioration of remanence recovers to 13.80 kGs without any reduction of coercivity.

  3. Magnetic cristobalite (?) - A possible new magnetic phase produced by the thermal decomposition of nontronite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, B. M.; Hargraves, R. B.

    1984-09-01

    The effect of heat treatment for 1 h or more at 900-1000 C on the magnetic properties of nontronite, an iron-rich smectite clay thought to be an important component of Martian regolith, is investigated experimentally, extending the findings of Moskowitz and Hargraves (1982). The results are presented in graphs and tables and discussed. A phase with Curie temperature 200-220 C, remanent coercivity greater than 800 mT, and a type-2 room-temperature-coercivity response to thermomagnetic cycling is observed and attributed to an iron-substituted cristobalite which may form by topotactic growth from a smectite precursor.

  4. High resolution NMR study of T1 magnetic relaxation dispersion. III. Influence of spin 1/2 hetero-nuclei on spin relaxation and polarization transfer among strongly coupled protons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korchak, S.E.; Ivanov, K.L.; Pravdivtsev, A.N.; Yurkovskaya, A.V.; Kaptein, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074334603; Vieth, H.-M.

    2012-01-01

    Effects of spin-spin interactions on the nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) of protons were studied in a situation where spin ½ hetero-nuclei are present in the molecule. As in earlier works [K. L. Ivanov, A. V. Yurkovskaya, and H.-M. Vieth, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 234513

  5. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  6. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  7. Magnetic properties and emplacement of the Bishop tuff, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, H.C.; MacDonald, W.D.; Gromme, C.S.; Ellwood, B.B.

    1996-01-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and characteristic remanence were measured for 45 sites in the 0.76 Ma Bishop tuff, eastern California. Thirty-three sites were sampled in three stratigraphic sections, two in Owens gorge south of Long Valley caldera, and the third in the Adobe lobe north of Long Valley. The remaining 12 sites are widely distributed, but of limited stratigraphic extent. Weakly indurated, highly porous to dense, welded ash-flow tuffs were sampled. Saturation magnetization vs temperature experiments indicate two principal iron oxide phases: low Ti magnetites with 525-570 ??C Curie temperatures, and maghemite with 610??-640??C Curie temperatures. AF demagnetization spectra of isothermal remanent magnetizations are indicative of magnetite/maghemite predominantly in the multidomain to pseudo-single domain size ranges. Remeasurement of AMS after application of saturating direct fields indicates that randomly oriented single-domain grains are also present. The degree of anisotropy is only a few percent, typical of tuffs. The AMS ellipsoids are oblate with Kmin axes normal to subhorizontal foliation and Kmax axes regionally aligned with published source vents. For 12 of 16 locality means, Kmax axes plunge sourceward, confirming previous observations regarding flow sense. Topographic control on flow emplacement is indicated by the distribution of tuff deposits and by flow directions inferred from Kmax axes. Deposition east of the Benton range occurred by flow around the south end of the range and through two gaps (Benton notch and Chidago gap). Flow down Mammoth pass of the Sierra Nevada is also evident. At least some of the Adobe lobe in the northeast flowed around the west end of Glass mountain. Eastward flow directions in the upper Owens gorge and southeast directions in the lower Owens gorge are parallel to the present canyon, suggesting that the present drainage has been established along the pre-Bishop paleodrainage. Characteristic remanence

  8. On Strong Anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepp, N; Turvey, M T

    2010-06-01

    We examine Dubois's (2003) distinction between weak anticipation and strong anticipation. Anticipation is weak if it arises from a model of the system via internal simulations. Anticipation is strong if it arises from the system itself via lawful regularities embedded in the system's ordinary mode of functioning. The assumption of weak anticipation dominates cognitive science and neuroscience and in particular the study of perception and action. The assumption of strong anticipation, however, seems to be required by anticipation's ubiquity. It is, for example, characteristic of homeostatic processes at the level of the organism, organs, and cells. We develop the formal distinction between strong and weak anticipation by elaboration of anticipating synchronization, a phenomenon arising from time delays in appropriately coupled dynamical systems. The elaboration is conducted in respect to (a) strictly physical systems, (b) the defining features of circadian rhythms, often viewed as paradigmatic of biological behavior based in internal models, (c) Pavlovian learning, and (d) forward models in motor control. We identify the common thread of strongly anticipatory systems and argue for its significance in furthering understanding of notions such as "internal", "model" and "prediction".

  9. The Magnetic Field of the Earth's Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, Erwan; Purucker, Michael; Whaler, Kathryn A.; Langlais, Benoit; Sabaka, Terence J.

    2010-08-01

    The lithospheric contribution to the Earth's magnetic field is concealed in magnetic field data that have now been measured over several decades from ground to satellite altitudes. The lithospheric field results from the superposition of induced and remanent magnetisations. It therefore brings an essential constraint on the magnetic properties of rocks of the Earth's sub-surface that would otherwise be difficult to characterize. Measuring, extracting, interpreting and even defining the magnetic field of the Earth's lithosphere is however challenging. In this paper, we review the difficulties encountered. We briefly summarize the various contributions to the Earth's magnetic field that hamper the correct identification of the lithospheric component. Such difficulties could be partially alleviated with the joint analysis of multi-level magnetic field observations, even though one cannot avoid making compromises in building models and maps of the magnetic field of the Earth's lithosphere at various altitudes. Keeping in mind these compromises is crucial when lithospheric field models are interpreted and correlated with other geophysical information. We illustrate this discussion with recent advances and results that were exploited to infer statistical properties of the Earth's lithosphere. The lessons learned in measuring and processing Earth's magnetic field data may prove fruitful in planetary exploration, where magnetism is one of the few remotely accessible internal properties.

  10. The effect of nano-TiC addition on sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mural, Zorjana, E-mail: zorjana.mural@ttu.ee [Department of Materials Engineering, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Kollo, Lauri [Department of Materials Engineering, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Xia, Manlong; Bahl, Christian R.H. [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Abrahamsen, Asger Bech [Department of Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Bez, Henrique Neves [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, 4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Link, Joosep [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Veinthal, Renno [Department of Materials Engineering, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2017-05-01

    This paper addresses the effect of nano-TiC addition on sintered Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets. TiC nanoparticles were added to sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets with a specific aim to improve the Curie temperature and thermal stability. A standard powder metallurgy route was adopted to prepare the magnets. It was found that introducing nano-TiC prior to jet milling was effective as the nanoparticles dispersed in the final alloy, concentcalcrating in the neodymium-rich phase of the magnets. Magnets with optimal properties were obtained with the addition of 1 wt% TiC nanoparticles. The hysteresis loop for such magnets showed an improved shape and VSM analysis a coercivity value of 1188 kA/m, a remanence value of 0.96 T and a maximum energy product of 132 kJ/m{sup 3}. The maximum working point and the Curie temperature of the developed magnets were 373 K and 623 K respectively. - Highlights: • Improvement of thermal stability of Nd-Fe-B magnets by introducing nano-TiC prior sintering is proposed. • The mechanism relies on nano-TiC particles behaving as grain growth inhibitors between thin RE-rich phase regions. • The concentration of up to 1 wt% of nano-TiC appears to increase coercivity without a significant decrease in remanence. • The maximum working point and the Curie temperature of the developed magnets are 373 K and 623 K respectively.

  11. Magnetic properties and opaque mineralogy of rocks from selected seafloor hydrothermal sites at oceanic ridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, A.L. (Univ. of Miami, FL (United States) NOAA, Miami, FL (United States)); Harrison, C.G.A. (Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)); Rona, P.A. (NOAA, Miami, FL (United States)); Haggerty, S.E. (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst (United States))

    1990-08-10

    Magnetic properties (natural remanent magnetization, susceptibility, Curie point temperature, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization, and Koeenigsberger ratio) and opaque mineralogy were determined for basalts, diabases, gabbros, peridotites, and serpentinites collected by dredging and submersible from the rift valley at five hydrothermal sites (the Snake Pit hydrothermal field, the Tag hydrothermal field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the Sea Cliff hydrothermal field on the northern Gorda Ridge). Evidence for unequivocal magnetic mineral modification by hydrothermal action is present only in a small percentage of extrusive basalts but is pervasive in diabases, gabbros, and ultramafic rocks. The studies reveal distinct correlations between magnetization intensity, thermomagnetic behavior, and magnetic mineralogy, grain size, style, and intensity of alteration and rock type. Layer 2A basalts are the source of median valley magnetic anomalies. The magnetic source may shift from the surface to deeper horizons with progressive seafloor aging and enhanced deuteric oxidation in layer 2B dikes and layer 3 gabbros and the formation of magnetite in derpentinized peridotites. This shift is influenced by fluctuations in the Curie isotherm related to the duration of active magma chambers and convective hydrothermal cells. The magnetic and mineralogic properties of oceanic rocks determined show the effects of a wide range of alteration processes that are variously related to depth in oceanic lithosphere, magmatic cooling history, and hydrothermal circulation.

  12. Magnetic Nanocomposite Cilia Sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2016-07-19

    Recent progress in the development of artificial skin concepts is a result of the increased demand for providing environment perception such as touch and flow sensing to robots, prosthetics and surgical tools. Tactile sensors are the essential components of artificial skins and attracted considerable attention that led to the development of different technologies for mimicking the complex sense of touch in humans. This dissertation work is devoted to the development of a bioinspired tactile sensing technology that imitates the extremely sensitive hair-like cilia receptors found in nature. The artificial cilia are fabricated from permanent magnetic, biocompatible and highly elastic nanocomposite material, and integrated on a giant magneto-impedance magnetic sensor to measure the stray field. A force that bends the cilia changes the stray field and is therefore detected with the magnetic sensor, providing high performance in terms of sensitivity, power consumption and versatility. The nanocomposite is made of Fe nanowires (NWs) incorporated into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Fe NWs have a high remanent magnetization, due the shape anisotropy; thus, they are acting as permanent nano-magnets. This allows remote device operation and avoids the need for a magnetic field to magnetize the NWs, benefiting miniaturization and the possible range of applications. The magnetic properties of the nanocomposite can be easily tuned by modifying the NWs concentration or by aligning the NWs to define a magnetic anisotropy. Tactile sensors are realized on flexible and rigid substrates that can detect flow, vertical and shear forces statically and dynamically, with a high resolution and wide operating range. The advantage to operate the sensors in liquids and air has been utilized to measure flows in different fluids in a microfluidic channel. Various dynamic studies were conducted with the tactile sensor demonstrating the detection of moving objects or the texture of objects. Overall

  13. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally...... wrong even though that human being is not being deprived of a "valuable future". So Marquis would be wrong in thinking that what is essential about the wrongness of killing an adult human being is that they are being deprived of a valuable future. This paper shows that whichever way the concept...... of "valuable future" is interpreted, the proposed counterexamples fail: if it is interpreted as "future like ours", the proposed counterexamples have no bearing on Marquis's argument. If the concept is interpreted as referring to the patient's preferences, it must be either conceded that the patients in Strong...

  14. E-W extension and block rotation of the southeastern Tibet: Unravelling late deformation stages in the eastern Himalayas (NW Bhutan) by means of pyrrhotite remanences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolín, B.; Schill, E.; Grujic, D.; Baule, S.; Quidelleur, X.; Appel, E.; Waldhör, M.

    2012-09-01

    In the Himalayan chain the collision of India into Eurasia has produced some of the most complex crustal interactions along the Himalayan-Alpine Orogen. In NW Bhutan, middle to late Miocene deformation has been partitioned between conjugate strike-slip faulting, E-W extension along the Yadong-Gulu graben and kilometre-scale folding. To better understand the late deformation stages and their implications for the evolution of the eastern Himalayas, the palaeomagnetism in the erosional remnant of the Tethyan Himalayan rocks outcropping in NW Bhutan has been studied. Their position to the south of the trace of the inner South Tibetan Detachment, to the south of the Tibetan Plateau offers a unique possibility to study the Tertiary rotation of the Himalayas. Pyrrhotite is the carrier of the characteristic magnetisation based on 270-325 °C unblocking temperatures. The age of the remanence is ca. 13 Ma indicated by illite 40K/40Ar cooling ages and a negative fold test. Small circle intersection method applied to the pyrrhotite components shows a ca. 32° clockwise rotation with respect to stable India since 13 Ma. We suggest that this clockwise rotation is related to strain partitioning between NE-directed shortening, sinistral-slip along the Lingshi fault, and east-west extension. This represents a field-based explanation and a minimum onset age for present-day eastward motion of the upper-crust of SE-Tibet and NE-Himalayas.

  15. Particle-in-cell simulations of the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies: Magnetic cusp regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Farrell, W. M.

    2012-09-01

    As the solar wind is incident upon the lunar surface, it will occasionally encounter lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields. These magnetic fields are small-scale, highly non-dipolar, have strengths up to hundreds of nanotesla, and typically interact with the solar wind in a kinetic fashion. Simulations, theoretical analyses, and spacecraft observations have shown that crustal fields can reflect solar wind protons via a combination of magnetic and electrostatic reflection; however, analyses of surface properties have suggested that protons may still access the lunar surface in the cusp regions of crustal magnetic fields. In this first report from a planned series of studies, we use a 11/2-dimensional, electrostatic particle-in-cell code to model the self-consistent interaction between the solar wind, the cusp regions of lunar crustal remanent magnetic fields, and the lunar surface. We describe the self-consistent electrostatic environment within crustal cusp regions and discuss the implications of this work for the role that crustal fields may play regulating space weathering of the lunar surface via proton bombardment.

  16. Hysteretic features of Ising-type segmented nanostructure with alternating magnetic wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantar, Ersin, E-mail: ersinkantar@erciyes.edu.tr

    2016-08-15

    In the present study, a theoretical approach to investigate the hysteresis behaviors in segmented nanowires is described and applied to spin-1/2 and spin-1 hexagonal nanowire. The hysteresis loop, coercive field and remanent magnetization of a segmented Ising nanowire (SIN) are obtained by using the effective-field theory with correlations. The effects of the temperature, crystal field and geometrical parameters of nanowires on the hysteresis behaviors of the system are investigated. A number of characteristic behaviors are found, such as the occurrence of single and triple hysteresis loops for appropriate values of the crystal field. The hysteresis behaviors are also strongly dependent on geometrical parameters. Comparisons between the obtained theoretical results and some experimental works of segmented nanowire arrays with hysteresis behaviors are made and a very good agreement is obtained. - Highlights: • The hysteresis behaviors of a segmented Ising nanowire are obtained. • The effective-field theory with correlations are used to calculations. • The effects of the temperature and crystal field on the system are investigated. • The geometrical parameters have a significant effect on the system are observed. • The single and triple loops for appropriate values of the crystal field are obtained.

  17. Inflight magnetic characterization of the test masses onboard LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Lobo, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a science and technology demonstrator of the European Space Agency within the framework of its LISA mission, the latter aiming to be the first space-borne gravitational wave observatory. The payload of LISA Pathfinder is the so-called LISA Technology Package, which is designed to measure relative accelerations between two test masses in nominal free fall. The diagnostics subsystem consists of several modules, one of which is the magnetic diagnostics unit. Its main function is the assessment of the differential acceleration noise between the test masses due to magnetic effects. This subsystem is composed of two onboard coils intended to produce controlled magnetic fields at the location of the test masses. These magnetic fields couple with the remanent magnetic moment and susceptibility and produce forces and torques on the test masses. These, in turn, produce kinematic excursions of the test masses which are sensed by the onboard interferometer. We prove that adequately processing these exc...

  18. Strongly interacting Fermi gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakr W.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Strongly interacting gases of ultracold fermions have become an amazingly rich test-bed for many-body theories of fermionic matter. Here we present our recent experiments on these systems. Firstly, we discuss high-precision measurements on the thermodynamics of a strongly interacting Fermi gas across the superfluid transition. The onset of superfluidity is directly observed in the compressibility, the chemical potential, the entropy, and the heat capacity. Our measurements provide benchmarks for current many-body theories on strongly interacting fermions. Secondly, we have studied the evolution of fermion pairing from three to two dimensions in these gases, relating to the physics of layered superconductors. In the presence of p-wave interactions, Fermi gases are predicted to display toplogical superfluidity carrying Majorana edge states. Two possible avenues in this direction are discussed, our creation and direct observation of spin-orbit coupling in Fermi gases and the creation of fermionic molecules of 23Na 40K that will feature strong dipolar interactions in their absolute ground state.

  19. A characterisation of the magnetically induced movement of NdFeB-particles in magnetorheological elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schümann, M.; Borin, D. Y.; Huang, S.; Auernhammer, G. K.; Müller, R.; Odenbach, S.

    2017-09-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers are a type of smart hybrid material where elastic properties of a soft elastomer matrix are combined with magnetic properties of magnetic micro particles. This combination leads to a complex interplay of magnetic and elastic phenomena, of which the magnetorheological effect is the best described. In this paper, magnetically hard NdFeB-particles were used to obtain remanent magnetic properties. X-ray microtomography has been utilised to analyse the particle movement induced by magnetic fields. A particle tracking was performed; thus, it was possible to characterise the movement of individual particles. Beyond that, a comprehensive analysis of the orientation of all particles was performed at different states of magnetisation and global particle arrangements. For the first time, this method was successfully applied to a magnetorheological material with a technically relevant amount of magnetic NdFeB-particles. A significant impact of the magnetic field on the rotation and translation of the particles was shown.

  20. Magnet losses in inverter-fed two-pole PM machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Adolfo Garcia; Millinger, J.; Soulard, J.

    2016-01-01

    This article deals with the estimation of magnet losses in a permanent-magnet motor inserted in a nut-runner. This type of machine has interesting features such as being two-pole, slot-less and running at a high speed (30000 rpm). Two analytical models were chosen from the literature. A numerical...... estimation of the losses with 2D Finite Element Method was carried out. A detailed investigation of the effect of simulation settings (e.g., mesh size, time-step, remanence flux density in the magnet, superposition of the losses, etc.) was performed. Finally, calculation of losses with 3D-FEM were also run...