WorldWideScience

Sample records for strong positive correlations

  1. Damping at positive frequencies in the limit J⊥-->0 in the strongly correlated Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Minette M.

    1992-08-01

    I show damping in the two-dimensional strongly correlated Hubbard model within the retraceable-path approximation, using an expansion around dominant poles for the self-energy. The damping half-width ~J2/3z occurs only at positive frequencies ω>5/2Jz, the excitation energy of a pure ``string'' state of length one, where Jz is the Ising part of the superexchange interaction, and occurs even in the absence of spin-flip terms ~J⊥ in contrast to other theoretical treatments. The dispersion relation for both damped and undamped peaks near the upper band edge is found and is shown to have lost the simple J2/3z dependence characteristic of the peaks near the lower band edge. The position of the first three peaks near the upper band edge agrees well with numerical simulations on the t-J model. The weight of the undamped peaks near the upper band edge is ~J4/3z, contrasting with Jz for the weight near the lower band edge.

  2. Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-03

    Strongly Correlated Topological Insulators In the past year, the grant was used for work in the field of topological phases, with emphasis on finding...surface of topological insulators. In the past 3 years, we have started a new direction, that of fractional topological insulators. These are materials...in which a topologically nontrivial quasi-flat band is fractionally filled and then subject to strong interactions. The views, opinions and/or

  3. PREFACE: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Siddharth S.; Littlewood, P. B.

    2012-07-01

    This special section is dedicated to the Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, which was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 is dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covers a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The selected papers derived from invited presentations seek to deepen our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. The focus is on quantum phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, quantum magnetism, unconventional superconductivity and metal-insulator transitions. Both experimental and theoretical work is presented. Based on fundamental advances in the understanding of electronic materials, much of 20th century materials physics was driven by miniaturisation and integration in the electronics industry to the current generation of nanometre scale devices. The achievements of this industry have brought unprecedented advances to society and well-being, and no doubt there is much further to go—note that this progress is founded on investments and studies in the fundamentals of condensed matter physics from more than 50 years ago. Nevertheless, the defining challenges for the 21st century will lie in the discovery in science, and deployment through engineering, of technologies that can deliver the scale needed to have an impact on the sustainability agenda. Thus the big developments in nanotechnology may lie not in the pursuit of yet smaller transistors, but in the design of new structures that can revolutionise the performance of solar cells, batteries, fuel cells, light-weight structural materials, refrigeration, water purification, etc. The science presented in the papers of this special section also highlights the underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which

  4. Strongly correlated systems experimental techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    The continuous evolution and development of experimental techniques is at the basis of any fundamental achievement in modern physics. Strongly correlated systems (SCS), more than any other, need to be investigated through the greatest variety of experimental techniques in order to unveil and crosscheck the numerous and puzzling anomalous behaviors characterizing them. The study of SCS fostered the improvement of many old experimental techniques, but also the advent of many new ones just invented in order to analyze the complex behaviors of these systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. The volume presents a representative collection of the modern experimental techniques specifically tailored for the analysis of strongly correlated systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognize...

  5. Strongly Correlated Systems Theoretical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Avella, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    The volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern theoretical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and materials science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciates consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as po...

  6. Strongly correlated systems numerical methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mancini, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    This volume presents, for the very first time, an exhaustive collection of those modern numerical methods specifically tailored for the analysis of Strongly Correlated Systems. Many novel materials, with functional properties emerging from macroscopic quantum behaviors at the frontier of modern research in physics, chemistry and material science, belong to this class of systems. Any technique is presented in great detail by its own inventor or by one of the world-wide recognized main contributors. The exposition has a clear pedagogical cut and fully reports on the most relevant case study where the specific technique showed to be very successful in describing and enlightening the puzzling physics of a particular strongly correlated system. The book is intended for advanced graduate students and post-docs in the field as textbook and/or main reference, but also for other researchers in the field who appreciate consulting a single, but comprehensive, source or wishes to get acquainted, in a as painless as possi...

  7. EDITORIAL: Strongly correlated electron systems Strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Filip; Batista, Cristian

    2011-03-01

    Strongly correlated electrons is an exciting and diverse field in condensed matter physics. This special issue aims to capture some of that excitement and recent developments in the field. Given that this issue was inspired by the 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2010), we briefly give some history in order to place this issue in context. The 2010 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, a reunion of sorts from the 1989 International Conference on the Physics of Highly Correlated Electron Systems that also convened in Santa Fe. SCES 2010—co-chaired by John Sarrao and Joe Thompson—followed the tradition of earlier conferences, in this century, hosted by Buzios (2008), Houston (2007), Vienna (2005), Karlsruhe (2004), Krakow (2002) and Ann Arbor (2001). Every three years since 1997, SCES has joined the International Conference on Magnetism (ICM), held in Recife (2000), Rome (2003), Kyoto (2006) and Karlsruhe (2009). Like its predecessors, SCES 2010 topics included strongly correlated f- and d-electron systems, heavy-fermion behaviors, quantum-phase transitions, non-Fermi liquid phenomena, unconventional superconductivity, and emergent states that arise from electronic correlations. Recent developments from studies of quantum magnetism and cold atoms complemented the traditional subjects and were included in SCES 2010. 2010 celebrated the 400th anniversary of Santa Fe as well as the birth of astronomy. So what's the connection to SCES? The Dutch invention of the first practical telescope and its use by Galileo in 1610 and subsequent years overturned dogma that the sun revolved about the earth. This revolutionary, and at the time heretical, conclusion required innovative combinations of new instrumentation, observation and mathematics. These same combinations are just as important 400 years later and are the foundation of scientific discoveries that were discussed

  8. Strongly correlating liquids and their isomorphs

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Ulf R.; Gnan, Nicoletta; Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schröder, Thomas B.; Dyre, Jeppe C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the properties of strongly correlating liquids, i.e., liquids with strong correlations between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations at constant volume. We proceed to focus on the experimental predictions for strongly correlating glass-forming liquids. These predictions include i) density scaling, ii) isochronal superposition, iii) that there is a single function from which all frequency-dependent viscoelastic response functions may be calculated, iv) that...

  9. Theoretical studies of strongly correlated fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, D. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1997-04-01

    Strongly correlated fermions are investigated. An understanding of strongly correlated fermions underpins a diverse range of phenomena such as metal-insulator transitions, high-temperature superconductivity, magnetic impurity problems and the properties of heavy-fermion systems, in all of which local moments play an important role. (author).

  10. Electronic Structure of Strongly Correlated Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Anisimov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Electronic structure and physical properties of strongly correlated materials containing elements with partially filled 3d, 4d, 4f and 5f electronic shells is analyzed by Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT). DMFT is the most universal and effective tool used for the theoretical investigation of electronic states with strong correlation effects. In the present book the basics of the method are given and its application to various material classes is shown. The book is aimed at a broad readership: theoretical physicists and experimentalists studying strongly correlated systems. It also serves as a handbook for students and all those who want to be acquainted with fast developing filed of condensed matter physics.

  11. Universal behavior of strongly correlated Fermi systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaginyan, Vasilii R [B.P. Konstantinov St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gatchina, Leningrad region, Rusian Federation (Russian Federation); Amusia, M Ya [A.F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Popov, Konstantin G [Komi Scientific Center, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Syktyvkar (Russian Federation)

    2007-06-30

    This review discusses the construction of a theory and the analysis of phenomena occurring in strongly correlated Fermi systems such as high-T{sub c} superconductors, heavy-fermion metals, and quasi-two-dimensional Fermi systems. It is shown that the basic properties and the universal behavior of strongly correlated Fermi systems can be described in the framework of the Fermi-condensate quantum phase transition and the well-known Landau paradigm of quasiparticles and the order parameter. The concept of fermion condensation may be fruitful in studying neutron stars, finite Fermi systems, ultra-cold gases in traps, and quark plasma. (reviews of topical problems)

  12. Universal behavior of strongly correlated Fermi systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaginyan, Vasilii R; Amusia, M Ya; Popov, Konstantin G

    2007-01-01

    This review discusses the construction of a theory and the analysis of phenomena occurring in strongly correlated Fermi systems such as high-T c superconductors, heavy-fermion metals, and quasi-two-dimensional Fermi systems. It is shown that the basic properties and the universal behavior of strongly correlated Fermi systems can be described in the framework of the Fermi-condensate quantum phase transition and the well-known Landau paradigm of quasiparticles and the order parameter. The concept of fermion condensation may be fruitful in studying neutron stars, finite Fermi systems, ultra-cold gases in traps, and quark plasma. (reviews of topical problems)

  13. Quantum Transport in Strongly Correlated Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Dan

    2007-01-01

    the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method. We present two DMRG setups for calculating the linear conductance of strongly correlated nanostructures in the infinitesimal source-drain voltage regime. The first setup describes the leads by modified real-space tight-binding chains, whereas the second...... screening plays a much less significant role than in bulk systems due to the reduced size of the objects, therefore making it necessary to consider the importance of correlations between electrons. The work presented in this thesis deals with quantum transport through strongly correlated systems using....... Thus both coherence and correlation effects are important in this model, and the methods applied should be able to handle both these effects rigorously. We present the DMRG setup for this model and benchmark against existing Greens function results for the model. Then we present initial DMRG results...

  14. Transport phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontani, Hiroshi [Nagoya Univ., Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-03-01

    Comprehensive overview. Written by an expert of this topic. Provides the reader with current developments in the field. In conventional metals, various transport coefficients are scaled according to the quasiparticle relaxation time, {tau}, which implies that the relaxation time approximation (RTA) holds well. However, such a simple scaling does not hold in many strongly correlated electron systems, reflecting their unique electronic states. The most famous example would be cuprate high-Tc superconductors (HTSCs), where almost all the transport coefficients exhibit a significant deviation from the RTA results. To better understand the origin of this discrepancy, we develop a method for calculating various transport coefficients beyond the RTA by employing field theoretical techniques. Near the magnetic quantum critical point, the current vertex correction (CVC), which describes the electron-electron scattering beyond the relaxation time approximation, gives rise to various anomalous transport phenomena. We explain anomalous transport phenomena in cuprate HTSCs and other metals near their magnetic or orbital quantum critical point using a uniform approach. We also discuss spin related transport phenomena in strongly correlated systems. In many d- and f-electron systems, the spin current induced by the spin Hall effect is considerably greater because of the orbital degrees of freedom. This fact attracts much attention due to its potential application in spintronics. We discuss various novel charge, spin and heat transport phenomena in strongly correlated metals.

  15. Strong Correlation Physics in Aromatic Hydrocarbon Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Massimo; Giovannetti, Gianluca

    2012-02-01

    We show, by means of ab-initio calculations, that electron-electron correlations play an important role in doped aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors, including potassium doped picene with Tc= 18K [1], coronene and phenanthrene [2]. For the case of picene the inclusion of exchange interactions by means of hybrid functionals reproduces the correct gap for the undoped compound and predicts an antiferromagnetic state for x=3, where superconductivity has been observed [3]. The latter finding is compatible with a sizable value of the correlation strength. The differences between the different compounds are analyzed and results of Dynamical Mean-Field Theory including both correlation effects and electron-phonon interactions are presented. Finally we discuss the consequences of strong correlations in an organic superconductor in relation to the properties of Cs3C60, in which electron correlations drive an antiferromagnetic state [4] but also lead to an enhancement of superconductivity [5]. 1. R. Mitsuhashi et al. Nature 464, 76 (2010)2. X.F. Wang et al, Nat. Comm. 2, 507 (2011)3. G. Giovannetti and M. Capone, Phys. Rev. B 83, 134508 (2011)4. Y. Takabayashi et al., Science 323, 1585 (2009)5. M. Capone et al. Rev. Mod. Phys. 81, 943 (2009

  16. Towards TDDFT for Strongly Correlated Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shree Ram Acharya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present some details of our recently-proposed Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT for strongly-correlated materials in which the exchange-correlation (XC kernel is derived from the charge susceptibility obtained using Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (the TDDFT + DMFT approach. We proceed with deriving the expression for the XC kernel for the one-band Hubbard model by solving DMFT equations via two approaches, the Hirsch–Fye Quantum Monte Carlo (HF-QMC and an approximate low-cost perturbation theory approach, and demonstrate that the latter gives results that are comparable to the exact HF-QMC solution. Furthermore, through a variety of applications, we propose a simple analytical formula for the XC kernel. Additionally, we use the exact and approximate kernels to examine the nonhomogeneous ultrafast response of two systems: a one-band Hubbard model and a Mott insulator YTiO3. We show that the frequency dependence of the kernel, i.e., memory effects, is important for dynamics at the femtosecond timescale. We also conclude that strong correlations lead to the presence of beats in the time-dependent electric conductivity in YTiO3, a feature that could be tested experimentally and that could help validate the few approximations used in our formulation. We conclude by proposing an algorithm for the generalization of the theory to non-linear response.

  17. Phase diagram of strongly correlated Fermi systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zverev, M.V.; Khodel', V.A.; Baldo, M.

    2000-01-01

    Phase transitions in uniform Fermi systems with repulsive forces between the particles caused by restructuring of quasiparticle filling n(p) are analyzed. It is found that in terms of variables, i.e. density ρ, nondimensional binding constant η, phase diagram of a strongly correlated Fermi system for rather a wide class of interactions reminds of a puff-pastry pie. Its upper part is filled with fermion condensate, the lower one - with normal Fermi-liquid. They are separated by a narrow interlayer - the Lifshits phase, characterized by the Fermi multibound surface [ru

  18. Machine Learning Phases of Strongly Correlated Fermions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin Ch’ng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning offers an unprecedented perspective for the problem of classifying phases in condensed matter physics. We employ neural-network machine learning techniques to distinguish finite-temperature phases of the strongly correlated fermions on cubic lattices. We show that a three-dimensional convolutional network trained on auxiliary field configurations produced by quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the Hubbard model can correctly predict the magnetic phase diagram of the model at the average density of one (half filling. We then use the network, trained at half filling, to explore the trend in the transition temperature as the system is doped away from half filling. This transfer learning approach predicts that the instability to the magnetic phase extends to at least 5% doping in this region. Our results pave the way for other machine learning applications in correlated quantum many-body systems.

  19. Transport phenomena in strongly correlated Fermi liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Kontani, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In conventional metals, various transport coefficients are scaled according to the quasiparticle relaxation time, \\tau, which implies that the relaxation time approximation (RTA) holds well. However, such a simple scaling does not hold in many strongly correlated electron systems, reflecting their unique electronic states. The most famous example would be cuprate high-Tc superconductors (HTSCs), where almost all the transport coefficients exhibit a significant deviation from the RTA results. To better understand the origin of this discrepancy, we develop a method for calculating various transport coefficients beyond the RTA by employing field theoretical techniques. Near the magnetic quantum critical point, the current vertex correction (CVC), which describes the electron-electron scattering beyond the relaxation time approximation, gives rise to various anomalous transport phenomena. We explain anomalous transport phenomena in cuprate HTSCs and other metals near their magnetic or orbital quantum critical poi...

  20. NMR study of strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaoka, Y.; Tou, H.; Zheng, G.-q.; Ishida, K.; Asayama, K.; Kobayashi, T. C.; Kohda, A.; Takeshita, N.; Amaya, K.; Onuki, Y.; Geibel, G.; Schank, C.; Steglich, F.

    1995-02-01

    Various types of ground states in strongly correlated electron systems have been systematically investigated by means of NMR/NQR at low temperatures under high magnetic field and pressure. We focus on two well-known heavy-electron families, CeCu 2X 2 (X = Si and Ge) (Ce(122)) and UM 2Al 3 (M = Ni and Pd) (U(123)). The Cu NQR experiments on CeCu 2X 2 under high pressure indicate that the physical property of CeCu 2Ge 2 at high pressure, i.e. above the transition at 7.6 GPa from antiferromagnetic (AF) to superconductivity, are clearly related to tha CeCu 2Si 2 at ambient pressure. In addition to the H-T phase diagram established below 7 T, NMR and specific heat experiments on polycrystal CeCu 2.05Si 2 have revealed the presence of a new phase above 7 T. In a high-quality polycrystal of UPd 2Al 3 with a record high- Tc of 2 K at ambient pressure and the narrowest Al NQR line width, the nuclear-spin lattice relaxation rate, 27(1/ T1) measured in zero field has been found to obey the T3 law down to 0.13 K, giving strong evidence that the energy gap vanishes along lines on the Fermi surface. Thus it seems that all heavy-electron superconductors exhibit lines of zero gap, regardless of their different magnetic properties.

  1. Strongly correlated superconductivity and quantum criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, A.-M. S.

    Doped Mott insulators and doped charge-transfer insulators describe classes of materials that can exhibit unconventional superconducting ground states. Examples include the cuprates and the layered organic superconductors of the BEDT family. I present results obtained from plaquette cellular dynamical mean-field theory. Continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo evaluation of the hybridization expansion allows one to study the models in the large interaction limit where quasiparticles can disappear. The normal state which is unstable to the superconducting state exhibits a first-order transition between a pseudogap and a correlated metal phase. That transition is the finite-doping extension of the metal-insulator transition obtained at half-filling. This transition serves as an organizing principle for the normal and superconducting states of both cuprates and doped organic superconductors. In the less strongly correlated limit, these methods also describe the more conventional case where the superconducting dome surrounds an antiferromagnetic quantum critical point. Sponsored by NSERC RGPIN-2014-04584, CIFAR, Research Chair in the Theory of Quantum Materials.

  2. Noise Spectroscopy in Strongly Correlated Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaqqa, Ali M.

    Strongly correlated materials are an interesting class of materials, thanks to the novel electronic and magnetic phenomena they exhibit as a result of the interplay of various degrees of freedom. This gives rise to an array of potential applications, from Mott-FET to magnetic storage. Many experimental probes have been used to study phase transitions in strongly correlated oxides. Among these, resistance noise spectroscopy, together with conventional transport measurements, provides a unique viewpoint to understand the microscopic dynamics near the phase transitions in these oxides. In this thesis, utilizing noise spectroscopy and transport measurements, four different strongly correlated materials were studied: (1) neodymium nickel oxide (NdNiO 3) ultrathin films, (2) vanadium dioxide (VO2) microribbons, (3) copper vanadium bronze (CuxV2O 5) microribbons and (4) niobium triselenide (NbSe3) microribbons. Ultra thin films of rare-earth nickelates exhibit several temperature-driven phase transitions. In this thesis, we studied the metal-insulator and Neel transitions in a series of NdNiO3 films with different lattice mismatches. Upon colling down, the metal-insulator phase transition is accompanied by a structural (orthorohombic to monoclinic) and magnetic (paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic) transitions as well, making the problem more interesting and complex at the same time. The noise is of the 1/f type and is Gaussian in the high temperature phase, however deviations are seen in the low temperature phases. Below the metal-insulator transition, noise magnitude increases by orders of magnitude: a sign of inhomogeneous electrical conduction as result of phase separation. This is further assured by the non-Gaussian noise signature. At very low temperatures (T thesis, we tried to answer this question by utilizing three different tuning parameters: temperature, voltage bias and strain. Our results point to an unusual noise behavior in the high-temperature metallic phase

  3. TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF THE STRONGLY CORRELATED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.Domanski

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport properties of various systems are studied here in the context of three different models. These are: - the disordered Hubbard model applicable to correlated binary alloys with a general disorder, - the Anderson model used in describing the Kondo physics of a quantum dot connected to the external superconducting leads, and - the Ranninger-Robaszkiewicz model applied to the study of optical properties of the system with preformed electron pairs above the temperature of transition to the superconducting state. We calculate the density of states, specific heat, the Wilson ratio and conductivity of the correlated binary alloy with off-diagonal disorder. We investigate the conditions under which the Kondo peak appears in the density of states and in the conductance of a dot coupled to the external superconducting leads. We analyze the effect of the pseudogap on the optical spectra in the high temperature superconductors described by the boson-fermion model.

  4. Superconductivity, Antiferromagnetism, and Kinetic Correlation in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yanagisawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ground state of two-dimensional Hubbard model on the basis of the variational Monte Carlo method. We use wave functions that include kinetic correlation and doublon-holon correlation beyond the Gutzwiller ansatz. It is still not clear whether the Hubbard model accounts for high-temperature superconductivity. The antiferromagnetic correlation plays a key role in the study of pairing mechanism because the superconductive phase exists usually close to the antiferromagnetic phase. We investigate the stability of the antiferromagnetic state when holes are doped as a function of the Coulomb repulsion U. We show that the antiferromagnetic correlation is suppressed as U is increased exceeding the bandwidth. High-temperature superconductivity is possible in this region with enhanced antiferromagnetic spin fluctuation and pairing interaction.

  5. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  6. Pair correlation functions of strongly coupled two-temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Nathaniel R.; Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2017-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we perform the first direct tests of three proposed models for the pair correlation functions of strongly coupled plasmas with species of unequal temperature. The models are all extensions of the Ornstein-Zernike/hypernetted-chain theory used to good success for equilibrium plasmas. Each theory is evaluated at several coupling strengths, temperature ratios, and mass ratios for a model plasma in which the electrons are positively charged. We show that the model proposed by Seuferling et al. [Phys. Rev. A 40, 323 (1989)] agrees well with molecular dynamics over a wide range of mass and temperature ratios, as well as over a range of coupling strength similar to that of the equilibrium hypernetted-chain (HNC) theory. The SVT model also correctly predicts the strength of interspecies correlations and exhibits physically reasonable long-wavelength limits of the static structure factors. Comparisons of the SVT model with the Yukawa one-component plasma (YOCP) model are used to show that ion-ion pair correlations are well described by the YOCP model up to Γe≈1 , beyond which it rapidly breaks down.

  7. Nonperturbative stochastic dynamics driven by strongly correlated colored noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jun; Li, Rui; You, J. Q.; Yu, Ting

    2015-02-01

    We propose a quantum model consisting of two remote qubits interacting with two correlated colored noises and establish an exact stochastic Schrödinger equation for this open quantum system. It is shown that the quantum dynamics of the qubit system is profoundly modulated by the mutual correlation between baths and the bath memory capability through dissipation and fluctuation. We report a physical effect on generating inner correlation and entanglement of two distant qubits arising from the strong bath-bath correlation.

  8. Joint statistics of strongly correlated neurons via dimensionality reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Taşkın; Rotter, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The relative timing of action potentials in neurons recorded from local cortical networks often shows a non-trivial dependence, which is then quantified by cross-correlation functions. Theoretical models emphasize that such spike train correlations are an inevitable consequence of two neurons being part of the same network and sharing some synaptic input. For non-linear neuron models, however, explicit correlation functions are difficult to compute analytically, and perturbative methods work only for weak shared input. In order to treat strong correlations, we suggest here an alternative non-perturbative method. Specifically, we study the case of two leaky integrate-and-fire neurons with strong shared input. Correlation functions derived from simulated spike trains fit our theoretical predictions very accurately. Using our method, we computed the non-linear correlation transfer as well as correlation functions that are asymmetric due to inhomogeneous intrinsic parameters or unequal input.

  9. Reduced larval feeding rate is a strong evolutionary correlate of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2001) was an arte- fact of extreme directional selection for rapid development that led to changes in the correlational structure of develop- ment time, larval feeding rate, dry weight at eclosion, and preadult survivorship. A positive genetic correlation between larval feeding rate and development time in the control pop-.

  10. Neutron Scattering and Its Application to Strongly Correlated Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zaliznyak, Igor A.; Tranquada, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Neutron scattering is a powerful probe of strongly correlated systems. It can directly detect common phenomena such as magnetic order, and can be used to determine the coupling between magnetic moments through measurements of the spin-wave dispersions. In the absence of magnetic order, one can detect diffuse scattering and dynamic correlations. Neutrons are also sensitive to the arrangement of atoms in a solid (crystal structure) and lattice dynamics (phonons). In this chapter, we provide an ...

  11. Strong pressure-energy correlations in van der Waals liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ulf Rørbæk; Bailey, Nicholas; Schrøder, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    in the crystal and glass phases reflect an effective inverse power-law repulsive potential dominating fluctuations, even at zero and slightly negative pressure. In experimental data for supercritical argon, the correlations are found to be approximately 96%. Consequences for viscous liquid dynamics are discussed.......Strong correlations between equilibrium fluctuations of the configurational parts of pressure and energy are found in computer simulations of the Lennard-Jones liquid and other simple liquids, but not for hydrogen-bonding liquids such as methanol and water. The correlations that are present also...

  12. Charge frustration and quantum criticality for strongly correlated fermions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijse, L.; Halverson, J.; Fendley, P.; Schoutens, K.

    2008-01-01

    We study a model of strongly correlated electrons on the square lattice which exhibits charge frustration and quantum critical behavior. The potential is tuned to make the interactions supersymmetric. We establish a rigorous mathematical result which relates quantum ground states to certain tiling

  13. Reduced larval feeding rate is a strong evolutionary correlate of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 85; Issue 3. Reduced larval feeding rate is a strong evolutionary correlate of rapid development in Drosophila melanogaster. M. Rajamani N. Raghavendra ... Keywords. life-history evolution; development time; larval feeding rate; competition; tradeoffs; Drosophila melanogaster.

  14. Mismeasurement and the resonance of strong confounders: correlated errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J R; Hastrup, J L; Ross, J S

    1999-07-01

    Confounding in epidemiology, and the limits of standard methods of control for an imperfectly measured confounder, have been understood for some time. However, most treatments of this problem are based on the assumption that errors of measurement in confounding and confounded variables are independent. This paper considers the situation in which a strong risk factor (confounder) and an inconsequential but suspected risk factor (confounded) are each measured with errors that are correlated; the situation appears especially likely to occur in the field of nutritional epidemiology. Error correlation appears to add little to measurement error as a source of bias in estimating the impact of a strong risk factor: it can add to, diminish, or reverse the bias induced by measurement error in estimating the impact of the inconsequential risk factor. Correlation of measurement errors can add to the difficulty involved in evaluating structures in which confounding and measurement error are present. In its presence, observed correlations among risk factors can be greater than, less than, or even opposite to the true correlations. Interpretation of multivariate epidemiologic structures in which confounding is likely requires evaluation of measurement error structures, including correlations among measurement errors.

  15. Exact Kohn-Sham potential of strongly correlated finite systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbig, N.; Tokatly, I. V.; Rubio, A.

    2009-01-01

    The dissociation of molecules, even the most simple hydrogen molecule, cannot be described accurately within density functional theory because none of the currently available functionals accounts for strong on-site correlation. This problem led to a discussion of properties that the local Kohn-Sham potential has to satisfy in order to correctly describe strongly correlated systems. We derive an analytic expression for the nontrivial form of the Kohn-Sham potential in between the two fragments for the dissociation of a single bond. We show that the numerical calculations for a one-dimensional two-electron model system indeed approach and reach this limit. It is shown that the functional form of the potential is universal, i.e., independent of the details of the two fragments.

  16. Magnetic properties of metallic impurities with strongly correlated electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janiš, Václav; Ringel, Matouš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 1 (2009), s. 30-35 ISSN 0587-4246 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0644 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : And erson impurity * strong electron correlations * spin-polarized solution * three-channel parquet equations * magnetic field Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 0.433, year: 2009 http://przyrbwn.icm.edu.pl/APP/ABSTR/115/a115-1-5.html

  17. Multiorbital simplified parquet equations for strongly correlated electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Augustinský, Pavel; Janiš, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 3 (2011), "035114-1"-"035114-13" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC202/07/J047 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : multi-orbital model * strongly correlated electrons * parquet equations * Kondo regime Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 3.691, year: 2011 http://prb.aps.org/abstract/PRB/v83/i3/e035114

  18. Inhomogeneities in a strongly correlated d-wave superconductors in the limit of strong disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debmalya; Sensarma, Rajdeep; Ghosal, Amit

    2015-03-01

    The complex interplay of the strong correlations and impurities in a high temperature superconductor is analyzed within a Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory, augmented with Gutzwiller approximation for taking care of the strong electronic repulsion. The inclusion of such correlations is found to play a crucial role in reducing inhomogeneities in both qualitative and quantitative manner. This difference is comprehended by investigating the underlying one-particle ``normal states'' that includes the order parameters in the Hartree and Fock channels in the absence of superconductivity. This amounts to the renormalization of disorder both on the lattice sites and also on links. These two components of disorder turn out to be spatially anti-correlated through self-consistency. Interestingly, a simple pairing theory in terms of these normal states is found to describe the complex behaviors of dirty cuprates with reasonable accuracy. However, this framework needs modifications in the limit where disorder strengths are comparable to the band width. We will discuss appropriate updates in the formalism to describe physics of inhomogeneities with strong disorder.

  19. Towards a large deviation theory for strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, Guiomar, E-mail: guiomar.ruiz@upm.es [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas and National Institute of Science and Technology for Complex Systems, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Departamento de Matemática Aplicada y Estadística, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Pza. Cardenal Cisneros s.n., 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tsallis, Constantino, E-mail: tsallis@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas and National Institute of Science and Technology for Complex Systems, Rua Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States)

    2012-07-23

    A large-deviation connection of statistical mechanics is provided by N independent binary variables, the (N→∞) limit yielding Gaussian distributions. The probability of n≠N/2 out of N throws is governed by e{sup −Nr}, r related to the entropy. Large deviations for a strong correlated model characterized by indices (Q,γ) are studied, the (N→∞) limit yielding Q-Gaussians (Q→1 recovers a Gaussian). Its large deviations are governed by e{sub q}{sup −Nr{sub q}} (∝1/N{sup 1/(q−1)}, q>1), q=(Q−1)/(γ[3−Q])+1. This illustration opens the door towards a large-deviation foundation of nonextensive statistical mechanics. -- Highlights: ► We introduce the formalism of relative entropy for a single random binary variable and its q-generalization. ► We study a model of N strongly correlated binary random variables and their large-deviation probabilities. ► Large-deviation probability of strongly correlated model exhibits a q-exponential decay whose argument is proportional to N, as extensivity requires. ► Our results point to a q-generalized large deviation theory and suggest a large-deviation foundation of nonextensive statistical mechanics.

  20. Observations of strong ion-ion correlations in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.; Fletcher, L.; Pak, A.; Chapman, D. A.; Falcone, R. W.; Fortmann, C.; Galtier, E.; Gericke, D. O.; Gregori, G.; Hastings, J.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Neumayer, P.; Turnbull, D.; Vorberger, J.; White, T. G.; Wünsch, K.; Zastrau, U.; Glenzer, S. H.; Döppner, T.

    2014-05-01

    Using simultaneous spectrally, angularly, and temporally resolved x-ray scattering, we measure the pronounced ion-ion correlation peak in a strongly coupled plasma. Laser-driven shock-compressed aluminum at ~3× solid density is probed with high-energy photons at 17.9 keV created by molybdenum He-α emission in a laser-driven plasma source. The measured elastic scattering feature shows a well-pronounced correlation peak at a wave vector of k=4k=4Å-1. The magnitude of this correlation peak cannot be described by standard plasma theories employing a linear screened Coulomb potential. Advanced models, including a strong short-range repulsion due to the inner structure of the aluminum ions are however in good agreement with the scattering data. These studies have demonstrated a new highly accurate diagnostic technique to directly measure the state of compression and the ion-ion correlations. We have since applied this new method in single-shot wave-number resolved S(k) measurements to characterize the physical properties of dense plasmas.

  1. Intelligence and Semen Quality Are Positively Correlated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arden, Rosalind; Gottfredson, Linda S.; Miller, Geoffrey; Pierce, Arand

    2009-01-01

    Human cognitive abilities inter-correlate to form a positive matrix, from which a large first factor, called "Spearman's g" or general intelligence, can be extracted. General intelligence itself is correlated with many important health outcomes including cardio-vascular function and longevity. However, the important evolutionary question of…

  2. EEG Correlates of Ten Positive Emotions

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xin; Yu, Jianwen; Song, Mengdi; Yu, Chun; Wang, Fei; Sun, Pei; Wang, Daifa; Zhang, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the well documented neurophysiological findings on negative emotions, much less is known about positive emotions. In the present study, we explored the EEG correlates of ten different positive emotions (joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe, and love). A group of 20 participants were invited to watch 30 short film clips with their EEGs simultaneously recorded. Distinct topographical patterns for different positive emotions were found for th...

  3. Bound states in strongly correlated magnetic and electronic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trebst, S.

    2002-02-01

    A novel strong coupling expansion method to calculate two-particle spectra of quantum lattice models is developed. The technique can be used to study bosonic and fermionic models and in principle it can be applied to systems in any dimension. A number of strongly correlated magnetic and electronic systems are examined including the two-leg spin-half Heisenberg ladder, the dimerized Heisenberg chain with a frustrating next-nearest neighbor interaction, coupled Heisenberg ladders, and the one-dimensional Kondo lattice model. In the various models distinct bound states are found below the two-particle continuum. Quantitative calculations of the dispersion, coherence length and binding energy of these bound states are used to describe spectroscopic experiments on (Ca,La) 14 Cu 24 O 41 and NaV 2 O 5 . (orig.)

  4. Strong Country Level Correlation between Syphilis and HSV-2 Prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Richard Kenyon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Syphilis is curable but Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2 is not. As a result, the prevalence of syphilis but not HSV-2 may be influenced by the efficacy of national STI screening and treatment capacity. If the prevalence of syphilis and HSV-2 is found to be correlated, then this makes it more likely that something other than differential STI treatment is responsible for variations in the prevalence of both HSV-2 and syphilis. Methods. Simple linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between national antenatal syphilis prevalence and HSV-2 prevalence in women in two time periods: 1990–1999 and 2008. Adjustments were performed for the laboratory syphilis testing algorithm used and the prevalence of circumcision. Results. The prevalence of syphilis was positively correlated with that of HSV-2 for both time periods (adjusted correlations, 20–24-year-olds: 1990–99: R2=0.54, P<0.001; 2008: R2=0.41, P<0.001 and 40–44-year-olds: 1990–99: R2=0.42, P<0.001; 2008: R2=0.49, P<0.001. Conclusion. The prevalence of syphilis and HSV-2 is positively correlated. This could be due to a common set of risk factors underpinning both STIs.

  5. Strong Country Level Correlation between Syphilis and HSV-2 Prevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Chris Richard; Tsoumanis, Achilleas

    2016-01-01

    Background. Syphilis is curable but Herpes Simplex Virus-2 (HSV-2) is not. As a result, the prevalence of syphilis but not HSV-2 may be influenced by the efficacy of national STI screening and treatment capacity. If the prevalence of syphilis and HSV-2 is found to be correlated, then this makes it more likely that something other than differential STI treatment is responsible for variations in the prevalence of both HSV-2 and syphilis. Methods. Simple linear regression was used to evaluate the relationship between national antenatal syphilis prevalence and HSV-2 prevalence in women in two time periods: 1990–1999 and 2008. Adjustments were performed for the laboratory syphilis testing algorithm used and the prevalence of circumcision. Results. The prevalence of syphilis was positively correlated with that of HSV-2 for both time periods (adjusted correlations, 20–24-year-olds: 1990–99: R 2 = 0.54, P < 0.001; 2008: R 2 = 0.41, P < 0.001 and 40–44-year-olds: 1990–99: R 2 = 0.42, P < 0.001; 2008: R 2 = 0.49, P < 0.001). Conclusion. The prevalence of syphilis and HSV-2 is positively correlated. This could be due to a common set of risk factors underpinning both STIs. PMID:27069710

  6. Theory and simulation of strong correlations in quantum Coulomb systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, M.; Semkat, D.; Filinov, A.; Golubnychyi, V.; Kremp, D.; Gericke, D. O.; Murillo, M. S.; Filinov, V.; Fortov, V.; Hoyer, W.; Koch, S. W.

    2003-06-01

    Strong correlations in quantum Coulomb systems (QCS) are attracting increasing interest in many fields ranging from dense plasmas and semiconductors to metal clusters and ultracold trapped ions. Examples are bound states in dense plasmas (atoms, molecules, clusters) and semiconductors (excitons, trions, biexcitons) or Coulomb crystals. We present first-principle simulation results of these systems including path integral Monte Carlo simulations of the equilibrium behaviour of dense hydrogen and electron-hole plasmas and molecular dynamics and quantum kinetic theory simulations of the nonequilibrium properties of QCS. Finally, we critically assess potential and limitations of the various methods in their application to Coulomb systems.

  7. Quantum simulation of strongly correlated condensed matter systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, W.; Qin, T.

    2018-04-01

    We review recent experimental and theoretical progress in realizing and simulating many-body phases of ultracold atoms in optical lattices, which gives access to analog quantum simulations of fundamental model Hamiltonians for strongly correlated condensed matter systems, such as the Hubbard model. After a general introduction to quantum gases in optical lattices, their preparation and cooling, and measurement techniques for relevant observables, we focus on several examples, where quantum simulations of this type have been performed successfully during the past years: Mott-insulator states, itinerant quantum magnetism, disorder-induced localization and its interplay with interactions, and topological quantum states in synthetic gauge fields.

  8. Strongly correlated Fermi-Bose mixtures in disordered optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Palencia, L; Ahufinger, V; Kantian, A; Zakrzewski, J; Sanpera, A; Lewenstein, M

    2006-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the low-temperature physics of a two-component ultracold mixture of bosons and fermions in disordered optical lattices. We focus on the strongly correlated regime. We show that, under specific conditions, composite fermions, made of one fermion plus one bosonic hole, form. The composite picture is used to derive an effective Hamiltonian whose parameters can be controlled via the boson-boson and the boson-fermion interactions, the tunnelling terms and the inhomogeneities. We finally investigate the quantum phase diagram of the composite fermions and show that it corresponds to the formation of Fermi glasses, spin glasses and quantum percolation regimes

  9. Strongly correlated Fermi-Bose mixtures in disordered optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Palencia, L [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l' Institut d' Optique, CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud XI, Bat 503, Centre scientifique, F-91403 Orsay Cedex (France); Ahufinger, V [ICREA and Grup d' optica, Departament de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Belaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Kantian, A [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Zakrzewski, J [Instytut Fizyki imienia Mariana Smoluchowskiego i Centrum Badan Ukladow Zlozonych imienia Marka Kaca, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Sanpera, A [ICREA and Grup de FIsica Teorica, Departament de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Belaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Lewenstein, M [ICREA and ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Parc Mediterrani de la TecnologIa, E-08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2006-05-28

    We investigate theoretically the low-temperature physics of a two-component ultracold mixture of bosons and fermions in disordered optical lattices. We focus on the strongly correlated regime. We show that, under specific conditions, composite fermions, made of one fermion plus one bosonic hole, form. The composite picture is used to derive an effective Hamiltonian whose parameters can be controlled via the boson-boson and the boson-fermion interactions, the tunnelling terms and the inhomogeneities. We finally investigate the quantum phase diagram of the composite fermions and show that it corresponds to the formation of Fermi glasses, spin glasses and quantum percolation regimes.

  10. Kondo memory in driven strongly correlated quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2013-08-23

    We investigate the real-time current response of strongly correlated quantum dot systems under sinusoidal driving voltages. By means of an accurate hierarchical equations of motion approach, we demonstrate the presence of prominent memory effects induced by the Kondo resonance on the real-time current response. These memory effects appear as distinctive hysteresis line shapes and self-crossing features in the dynamic current-voltage characteristics, with concomitant excitation of odd-number overtones. They emerge as a cooperative effect of quantum coherence-due to inductive behavior-and electron correlations-due to the Kondo resonance. We also show the suppression of memory effects and the transition to classical behavior as a function of temperature. All these phenomena can be observed in experiments and may lead to novel quantum memory applications.

  11. EEG Correlates of Ten Positive Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Yu, Jianwen; Song, Mengdi; Yu, Chun; Wang, Fei; Sun, Pei; Wang, Daifa; Zhang, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Compared with the well documented neurophysiological findings on negative emotions, much less is known about positive emotions. In the present study, we explored the EEG correlates of ten different positive emotions (joy, gratitude, serenity, interest, hope, pride, amusement, inspiration, awe, and love). A group of 20 participants were invited to watch 30 short film clips with their EEGs simultaneously recorded. Distinct topographical patterns for different positive emotions were found for the correlation coefficients between the subjective ratings on the ten positive emotions per film clip and the corresponding EEG spectral powers in different frequency bands. Based on the similarities of the participants' ratings on the ten positive emotions, these emotions were further clustered into three representative clusters, as 'encouragement' for awe, gratitude, hope, inspiration, pride, 'playfulness' for amusement, joy, interest, and 'harmony' for love, serenity. Using the EEG spectral powers as features, both the binary classification on the higher and lower ratings on these positive emotions and the binary classification between the three positive emotion clusters, achieved accuracies of approximately 80% and above. To our knowledge, our study provides the first piece of evidence on the EEG correlates of different positive emotions.

  12. Strongly-correlated ultracold atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Tung-Lam

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the theoretical study of strongly correlated quantum states of ultra-cold fermionic atoms trapped in optical lattices. This field has grown considerably in recent years, following the experimental progress made in cooling and controlling atomic gases, which has led to the observation of the first Bose-Einstein condensation (in 1995). The trapping of these gases in optical lattices has opened a new field of research at the interface between atomic physics and condensed matter physics. The observation of the transition from a superfluid to a Mott insulator for bosonic atoms paved the way for the study of strongly correlated phases and quantum phase transitions in these systems. Very recently, the investigation of the Mott insulator state of fermionic atoms provides additional motivation to conduct such theoretical studies. This thesis can be divided broadly into two types of work: - On the one hand, we have proposed a new type of spectroscopy to measure single-particle correlators and associated physical observables in these strongly correlated states. - On the other hand, we have studied the ground state of the fermionic Hubbard model under different conditions (mass imbalance, population imbalance) by using analytical techniques and numerical simulations. In a collaboration with J. Dalibard and C. Salomon (LKB at the ENS Paris) and I. Carusotto (Trento, Italy), we have proposed and studied a novel spectroscopic method for the measurement and characterization of single particle excitations (in particular, the low energy excitations, namely the quasiparticles) in systems of cold fermionic atoms, with energy and momentum resolution. This type of spectroscopy is an analogue of angular-resolved photoemission in solid state physics (ARPES). We have shown, via simple models, that this method of measurement can characterize quasiparticles not only in the 'conventional' phases such as the weakly interacting gas in the lattice or in Fermi

  13. Correlated Fluctuations in Strongly Coupled Binary Networks Beyond Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dahmen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Randomly coupled Ising spins constitute the classical model of collective phenomena in disordered systems, with applications covering glassy magnetism and frustration, combinatorial optimization, protein folding, stock market dynamics, and social dynamics. The phase diagram of these systems is obtained in the thermodynamic limit by averaging over the quenched randomness of the couplings. However, many applications require the statistics of activity for a single realization of the possibly asymmetric couplings in finite-sized networks. Examples include reconstruction of couplings from the observed dynamics, representation of probability distributions for sampling-based inference, and learning in the central nervous system based on the dynamic and correlation-dependent modification of synaptic connections. The systematic cumulant expansion for kinetic binary (Ising threshold units with strong, random, and asymmetric couplings presented here goes beyond mean-field theory and is applicable outside thermodynamic equilibrium; a system of approximate nonlinear equations predicts average activities and pairwise covariances in quantitative agreement with full simulations down to hundreds of units. The linearized theory yields an expansion of the correlation and response functions in collective eigenmodes, leads to an efficient algorithm solving the inverse problem, and shows that correlations are invariant under scaling of the interaction strengths.

  14. Imaginary-time formulation of strongly correlated nonequilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heary, Ryan Joseph

    Strongly correlated nanostructures and lattices of electrons are studied when these systems reside in a steady-state nonequilibrium. Much of the work done to date has made use of the nonequilibrium real-time Keldysh Green function technique. These methods include: the Keldysh Green function perturbation theory, time-dependent numerical renormalization group, density matrix renormalization group, and diagrammatic quantum Monte Carlo. In the special case of steady-state nonequilibrium we construct an imaginary-time theory. The motivation to do this is simple: there exist an abundant number of well-established strongly correlated computational solvers for imaginary-time theory and perturbation theory on the imaginary-time contour is much more straightforward than that of the real-time contour. The first model system we focus on is a strongly interacting quantum dot situated between source and drain electron reservoirs. The steady-state nonequilibrium boundary condition is established by applying a voltage bias phi across the reservoirs, in turn modifying the chemical potentials of the leads. For a symmetric voltage drop we have mu source = phi/2 and mudrain = -phi/2. The dynamics of the electrons are governed by the Hamiltonian Ĥ which is inherently independent of the imbalance in the source and drain chemical potentials. The statistics though are determined by the operator Ĥ-Ŷ , where Ŷ imposes the nonequilibrium boundary condition. We show that it is possible to construct a single effective Hamiltonian K̂ able to describe both the dynamics and statistics of the system. Upon formulating the theory we explicitly show that it is consistent with the real-time Keldysh theory both formally and through an example using perturbation theory. In these systems there exists a strong interplay between the interactions and nonequilibrium leading to novel nonperturbative phenomena. Therefore, we combine our theory with the Hirsch-Fye quantum Monte Carlo algorithm to study

  15. Muon spin relaxation studies in strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemura, Y. J.; Luke, G. M.

    1993-05-01

    We describe recent progress of muon spin relaxation (μSR) studies in heavy-fermion (HF) and other strongly correlated electron systems. Measurements of the magnetic field penetration depth λ in HF superconductors UPt 3, URu 2Si 2, UPd 2Al 3 and U 2PtC 2 have revealed that these systems are characterized by large ratios Tc/ TF = 0.1-0.01 of Tc vs Fermi temperature TF derived from λ. This feature is common to high- Tc cuprate and other exotic superconductors. Zero-field μSR studies of magnetic order have elucidated a cross-over from spin glass ordering to nonmagnetic ground states in the ‘quadrupolar Kondo regime’ of (Y 1- xU x)Pd 3, and also suggested a possibility of incommensurate spin-density-wave (SDW) ordering in UNi 2Al 3.

  16. Doubly excited helium. From strong correlation to chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yuhai

    2006-03-01

    In the present dissertation, the double excitation states of helium including the autoionization decay of these states were studied experimentally and theoretically in a broad energy region, which includes the transition from strong correlation below the low single ionization thresholds (SIT) to the region of quantum chaos at energies very close to the double-ionization threshold. Two kind of experiments were performed, namely total-ion-yield measurements with the aim to observe total cross sections (TCS) and electron time-of-flight (TOF) measurements to obtain partial cross sections (PCS) as well as angular distribution parameters (ADP). Both types of measurements were performed at the third generation synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin. The TCSs were recorded up to the SIT I 15 , and they were found to be in in excellent agreement with state-of-the-art complex-rotation calculations performed recently by D. Delande. These experimental and theoretical data on the TCSs were analyzed in order to study quantum chaos in doubly excited helium, and interesting signatures of quantum chaos were found. The TOF technique allowed to measure PCSs and ADPs in the energy regions from I 5 to I 9 and I 7 , respectively. These experimental data provide a critical assessment of theoretical models that can be used to explore the dynamics of strong correlation as well as quantum chaos in helium. In the theoretical part of this dissertation, the n- and l-specific PCSs and ADPs below I 4 were calculated employing the R-matrix method. The present theoretical results agree well with a recent experimental study of l-specific PCSs below I 4 by J.R. Harries et al. An analysis of patterns in the PCSs and ADPs on the basis of the present experimental and theoretical l-specific data allowed to improve the present understanding of autoionization decay dynamics in this two-electron atom. (orig.)

  17. Doubly excited helium. From strong correlation to chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yuhai

    2006-03-15

    In the present dissertation, the double excitation states of helium including the autoionization decay of these states were studied experimentally and theoretically in a broad energy region, which includes the transition from strong correlation below the low single ionization thresholds (SIT) to the region of quantum chaos at energies very close to the double-ionization threshold. Two kind of experiments were performed, namely total-ion-yield measurements with the aim to observe total cross sections (TCS) and electron time-of-flight (TOF) measurements to obtain partial cross sections (PCS) as well as angular distribution parameters (ADP). Both types of measurements were performed at the third generation synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin. The TCSs were recorded up to the SIT I{sub 15}, and they were found to be in in excellent agreement with state-of-the-art complex-rotation calculations performed recently by D. Delande. These experimental and theoretical data on the TCSs were analyzed in order to study quantum chaos in doubly excited helium, and interesting signatures of quantum chaos were found. The TOF technique allowed to measure PCSs and ADPs in the energy regions from I{sub 5} to I{sub 9} and I{sub 7}, respectively. These experimental data provide a critical assessment of theoretical models that can be used to explore the dynamics of strong correlation as well as quantum chaos in helium. In the theoretical part of this dissertation, the n- and l-specific PCSs and ADPs below I{sub 4} were calculated employing the R-matrix method. The present theoretical results agree well with a recent experimental study of l-specific PCSs below I{sub 4} by J.R. Harries et al. An analysis of patterns in the PCSs and ADPs on the basis of the present experimental and theoretical l-specific data allowed to improve the present understanding of autoionization decay dynamics in this two-electron atom. (orig.)

  18. Weak-coupling superconductivity in a strongly correlated iron pnictide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnukha, A; Post, K W; Thirupathaiah, S; Pröpper, D; Wurmehl, S; Roslova, M; Morozov, I; Büchner, B; Yaresko, A N; Boris, A V; Borisenko, S V; Basov, D N

    2016-01-05

    Iron-based superconductors have been found to exhibit an intimate interplay of orbital, spin, and lattice degrees of freedom, dramatically affecting their low-energy electronic properties, including superconductivity. Albeit the precise pairing mechanism remains unidentified, several candidate interactions have been suggested to mediate the superconducting pairing, both in the orbital and in the spin channel. Here, we employ optical spectroscopy (OS), angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), ab initio band-structure, and Eliashberg calculations to show that nearly optimally doped NaFe0.978Co0.022As exhibits some of the strongest orbitally selective electronic correlations in the family of iron pnictides. Unexpectedly, we find that the mass enhancement of itinerant charge carriers in the strongly correlated band is dramatically reduced near the Γ point and attribute this effect to orbital mixing induced by pronounced spin-orbit coupling. Embracing the true band structure allows us to describe all low-energy electronic properties obtained in our experiments with remarkable consistency and demonstrate that superconductivity in this material is rather weak and mediated by spin fluctuations.

  19. PREFACE: Introduction to Strongly Correlated Electrons in New Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2003-09-01

    The discovery of new natural and artificial materials has revolutionized condensed matter physics and our views on the role of correlations between electrons. Novel properties such as high-temperature superconductivity and colossal magnetoresistance discovered in these materials have overturned our conventional representations of condensed matter physics and pushed us to reconsider many well-established concepts. For example, we must treat the Coulomb interaction between electrons far beyond perturbation theory; we must recall long-forgotten ideas of electronic phase separation introduced originally by Nagaev in the 1960s; we must reconsider the role of electron--phonon and electron--magnon interactions, orbital degrees of freedom, the Rashba effect and many other aspects of condensed matter physics that are becoming increasingly important. In many novel materials, such as the two-dimensional electron gas, the energy associated with the Coulomb interaction is typically of the order of (or even larger than) the kinetic energy of electrons or the Fermi energy. Therefore perturbation theory and associated renormalization group methods are not applicable to these situations and we may expect to find a novel state of matter associated with correlation effects. It is worth mentioning the known examples of these states proposed recently, such as marginal Fermi liquids, novel metal--insulator phase transitions in the two-dimensional electron gas associated with new metallic and insulating states, structured liquids, microscopic electronic phase separations, stripes, strings, polarons and others. The discussion of these states is now on the frontier of modern condensed matter physics and is partially covered in this special issue. The demand to treat the Coulomb interaction properly has stimulated a development of many-body theory, which considers correlations as fully as possible. Strong correlations may play an important role in the dynamics of the electronic system. In a

  20. PREFACE: International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, P. B.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Saxena, S. S.; Sutherland, M. L.; Sebastian, S. E.; Artacho, E.; Grosche, F. M.; Hadzibabic, Z.

    2012-11-01

    The Strongly Correlated Electron Systems Conference (SCES) 2011, was held from 29 August-3 September 2011, in Cambridge, UK. SCES'2011 was dedicated to 100 years of superconductivity and covered a range of topics in the area of strongly correlated systems. The correlated electronic and magnetic materials featured include f-electron based heavy fermion intermetallics and d-electron based transition metal compounds. The meeting welcomed to Cambridge 657 participants from 23 countries, who presented 127 talks (including 16 plenary, 57 invited, and 54 contributed) and 736 posters in 40 sessions over five full days of meetings. This proceedings volume contains papers reporting on the science presented at the meeting. This work deepens our understanding of the rich physical phenomena that arise from correlation effects. Strongly correlated systems are known for their remarkable array of emergent phenomena: the traditional subjects of superconductivity, magnetism and metal-insulator transitions have been joined by non-Fermi liquid phenomena, topologically protected quantum states, atomic and photonic gases, and quantum phase transitions. These are some of the most challenging and interesting phenomena in science. As well as the science driver, there is underlying interest in energy-dense materials, which make use of 'small' electrons packed to the highest possible density. These are by definition 'strongly correlated'. For example: good photovoltaics must be efficient optical absorbers, which means that photons will generate tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) that must then be ionised at a heterointerface and transported to contacts; efficient solid state refrigeration depends on substantial entropy changes in a unit cell, with large local electrical or magnetic moments; efficient lighting is in a real sense the inverse of photovoltaics; the limit of an efficient battery is a supercapacitor employing mixed valent ions; fuel cells and solar to fuel conversion

  1. Correlated electron-ion collisions in a strong laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristow, T.

    2007-01-01

    Electron-ion-collisions in plasmas in the presence of an ultra-short intensive laser pulse can cause high energy transfers to the electrons. During the collision the oscillation energy of the electron in the laser field is changed into drift energy. In this regime, multi-photon processes, known from the ionization of neutral atoms (Above-Threshold Ionization), and successive, so called correlated collisions, are important. The subject of the thesis is a study of binary Coulomb collisions in strong laser fields. The collisions are treated both in the context of classical Newtonian mechanics and in the quantum-mechanical framework by the Schroedinger equation. In the classical case a simplified instantaneous collision model and a complete dynamical treatment are discussed. Collisions can be treated instantaneously, if the ratio of the impact parameter to the quiver amplitude is small. The energy distributions calculated in this approximation show an elastic peak and a broad plateau due to rescattered electrons. At incident velocities smaller than the quiver velocity, correlated collisions are observed in the electron trajectories of the dynamical model. This effect leads to characteristic momentum distributions of the electrons, that are explicitly calculated and compared with the results of the instantaneous model. In addition, the time-dependence of the collisions is discussed in the framework of a singular perturbation theory. The complete description of the Coulomb scattering requires a quantum-mechanical description. A time-dependent method of wave-packet scattering is used and the corresponding time-dependent three-dimensional Schroedinger equation is solved by an implicit ADImethod on a spatial grid. The momentum and the energy distributions of the scattered electrons are calculated by the Fourier transformation of the wavefunction. A comparison of the scattering from a repulsive and an attractive potential is used to distinguish between simple collisions and

  2. Strongly correlated electron physics in nanotube-encapsulated metallocene chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Suárez, V. M.; Ferrer, J.; Lambert, C. J.

    2006-11-01

    The structural, electronic, and transport properties of metallocene molecules (MCp2) and isolated or nanotube-encapsulated metallocene chains are studied by using a combination of density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green’s functions. The analysis first discusses the whole series of isolated (MCp2) molecules, where M=V , Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Ru, and Os. The series presents a rich range of electronic and magnetic behaviors due to the interplay between the crystal field interaction and Hund’s rules, as the occupation of the d shell increases. The article then shows how many of these interesting properties can also be seen when (MCp2) molecules are linked together to form periodic chains. Interestingly, a large portion of these chains display metallic, and eventually magnetic, behavior. These properties may render these systems as useful tools for spintronics applications but this is hindered by the lack of mechanical stability of the chains. It is finally argued that encapsulation of the chains inside carbon nanotubes, that is exothermic for radii larger than 4.5Å , provides the missing mechanical stability and electrical isolation. The structural stability, charge transfer, magnetic, and electronic behavior of the ensuing chains, as well as the modification of the electrostatic potential in the nanotube wall produced by the metallocenes are thoroughly discussed. We argue that the full devices can be characterized by two doped, strongly correlated Hubbard models whose mutual hybridization is almost negligible. The charge transferred from the chains produces a strong modification of the electrostatic potential in the nanotube walls, which is amplified in case of semiconducting and endothermic nanotubes. The transport properties of isolated metallocenes between semi-infinite nanotubes are also analyzed and shown to lead to important changes in the transmission coefficients of clean nanotubes for high energies.

  3. Nonlinear phononics and structural control of strongly correlated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankowsky, Roman

    2016-01-20

    Mid-infrared light pulses can be used to resonantly excite infrared-active vibrational modes for the phase control of strongly correlated materials on subpicosecond timescales. As the energy is transferred directly into atomic motions, dissipation into the electronic system is reduced, allowing for the emergence of unusual low energy collective properties. Light-induced superconductivity, insulator-metal transitions and melting of magnetic order demonstrate the potential of this method. An understanding of the mechanism, by which these transitions are driven, is however missing. The aim of this work is to uncover this process by investigating the nonlinear lattice dynamics induced by the excitation and to elucidate their contribution to the modulation of collective properties of strongly correlated materials. The first signature of nonlinear lattice dynamics was reported in the observation of coherent phonon oscillations, resonant with the excitation of an infrared-active phonon mode in a manganite. This nonlinear phononic coupling can be described within a model, which predicts not only oscillatory coherent phonons dynamics but also directional atomic displacements along the coupled modes on average, which could cause the previously observed transitions. We verified this directional response and quantified the anharmonic coupling constant by tracing the atomic motions in a time-resolved hard X-ray diffraction experiment with sub-picometer spatial and femtosecond temporal resolution. In a subsequent study, we investigated the role of nonlinear lattice dynamics in the emergence of superconductivity far above the equilibrium transition temperature, an intriguing effect found to follow lattice excitation of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}. By combining density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the anharmonic coupling constants with time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments, we identified a structural rearrangement, which appears and decays with the same temporal

  4. Fulleride Superconductors are Phonon-Driven and Strongly Correlated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosatti, Erio; Capone, Massimo; Castellani, Claudio; Fabrizio, Michele

    2010-03-01

    Superconductivity in trivalent alkali fullerides is believed to be phonon-driven and s-wave, similar in that to ordinary BCS systems. There is nonetheless in these materials a metal-Mott insulator transition upon lattice expansion, indicating exceedingly strong electron-electron correlations. Using Dynamical Mean Field Theory we solved a 3-band Hubbard model, including both electron-electron and (simplified) electron-phonon interactions, which yields a phase diagram [1] in striking agreement with the experimental one for the recently discovered expanded fulleride Cs3C60 as a function of pressure.[2] A dome-shaped superconducting order parameter, a pseudogap phase, and the subsequent Mott transition upon expansion thus assimilate the phonon driven fulleride superconductors to cuprates and to 2D organics, despite their obvious differences. Some experimental predictions are made, including a kinetic energy gain and a Drude weight increase in the superconducting state relative to the normal state, contrary to BCS, but similar to cuprates. [1] M. Capone, et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 81,943 (2009); [2] Y. Takabayashi et al., Science 323, 1585 (2009).

  5. Visual evoked potentials show strong positive association with intracranial pressure in patients with cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Adriano da Cunha Silva Vieira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective : To verify the relationship between intracranial pressure and flash visual evoked potentials (F-VEP in patients with cryptococcal meningitis. Method The sample included adults diagnosed with cryptococcal meningitis admitted at a reference hospital for infectious diseases. The patients were subjected to F-VEP tests shortly before lumbar puncture. The Pearson’s linear correlation coefficient was calculated and the linear regression analysis was performed. Results : Eighteen individuals were subjected to a total of 69 lumbar punctures preceded by F-VEP tests. At the first lumbar puncture performed in each patient, N2 latency exhibited a strong positive correlation with intracranial pressure (r = 0.83; CI = 0.60 - 0.94; p < 0.0001. The direction of this relationship was maintained in subsequent punctures. Conclusion : The intracranial pressure measured by spinal tap manometry showed strong positive association with the N2 latency F-VEP in patients with cryptococcal meningitis.

  6. Superconductivity in strongly correlated electron systems: successes and open questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shastry, B. Sriram

    2000-01-01

    Correlated electronic systems and superconductivity is a field which has unique track record of producing exciting new phases of matter. The article gives an overview of trends in solving the problems of superconductivity and correlated electronic systems

  7. Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody: positivity and clinical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Téllez, Goitybell; Torres Rives, Bárbara; Rangel Velázquez, Suchiquil; Sánchez Rodríguez, Vicky; Ramos Ríos, María Antonia; Fuentes Smith, Lisset Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    To determine positivity and clinical correlation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), taking into account the interference of antinuclear antibodies (ANA). A prospective study was conducted in the Laboratory of Immunology of the National Cuban Center of Medical Genetic during one year. Two hounded sixty-seven patients with indication for ANCA determination were included. ANCA and ANA determinations with different cut off points and assays were determined by indirect immunofluorescense. Anti proteinase 3 and antimyeloperoxidase antibodies were determined by ELISA. Most positivity for ANCA was seen in patients with ANCA associated, primary small-vessel vasculitides, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Presence of ANCA without positivity for proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase was higher in patients with ANA and little relation was observed between the perinuclear pattern confirmed in formalin and specificity by myeloperoxidase. Highest sensibility and specificity values for vasculitides diagnostic were achieved by ANCA determination using indirect immunofluorescense with a cut off 1/80 and confirming antigenic specificities with ELISA. ANCA can be present in a great number of chronic inflammatory or autoimmune disorders in the population studied. This determination using indirect immunofluorescence and following by ELISA had a great value for vasculitis diagnosis. Anti mieloperoxidasa assay has a higher utility than the formalin assay when ANA is present. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Excitonic condensation in systems of strongly correlated electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuneš, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 33 (2015), s. 333201 ISSN 0953-8984 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electronic correlations * exciton * Bose-Einstein condensation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.209, year: 2015

  9. Defensive marketing: how a strong incumbent can protect its position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, John H

    2005-11-01

    There has been a lot of research on marketing as an offensive tactic-how it can help companies successfully launch new products, enter new markets, or gain share with existing products in their current markets. But for nearly every new product launch, market entrant, or industry upstart grabbing market share, there is an incumbent that must defend its position. And there has been little research on how these defenders can use marketing to preemptively respond to new or anticipated threats. John H. Roberts outlines four basic types of defensive marketing strategies: positive, inertial, parity, and retarding. With the first two, you establish and communicate your points of superiority relative to the new entrant; with the second two, you establish and communicate strategic points of comparability with your rival. Before choosing a strategy, you need to assess the weapons you have available to protect your market position-your brand identity, the products and services that support that identity, and your means of communicating it. Then assess your customers' value to you and their vulnerability to being poached by rivals. The author explains how Australian telecommunications company Telstra, facing deregulation, used a combination of the four strategies (plus the author's customer response model) to fend off market newcomer Optus. Telstra was prepared, for instance, to reach deep into its pockets and engage in a price war. But the customer response model indicated that a parity strategy-in which Telstra would offer lower rates on some routes and at certain times of day, even though its prices, on average, were higher than its rival's-was more likely to prevent consumers from switching. Ultimately, Telstra was able to retain several points of market share it otherwise would have lost. The strategies described here, though specific to Telstra's situation, offer lessons for any company facing new and potentially damaging competition.

  10. Rydberg-atom formation in strongly correlated ultracold plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannasch, G.; Pohl, T.

    2011-01-01

    In plasmas at very low temperatures, the formation of neutral atoms is dominated by collisional three-body recombination, owing to the strong ∼T -9/2 scaling of the corresponding recombination rate with the electron temperature T. While this law is well established at high temperatures, the unphysical divergence as T→0 clearly suggests a breakdown in the low-temperature regime. Here, we present a combined molecular dynamics Monte Carlo study of electron-ion recombination over a wide range of temperatures and densities. Our results reproduce the known behavior of the recombination rate at high temperatures, but reveal significant deviations with decreasing temperature. We discuss the fate of the kinetic bottleneck and resolve the divergence problem as the plasma enters the ultracold, strongly coupled domain.

  11. Some Applications of Holography to Study Strongly Correlated Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatnagar Neha

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study the transport coefficients of strongly coupled condensed matter systems using gauge/gravity duality (holography. We consider examples from the real world and evaluate the conductivities from their gravity duals. Adopting the bottom-up approach of holography, we obtain the frequency response of the conductivity for (1+1-dimensional systems. We also evaluate the DC conductivities for non-relativistic condensed matter systems with hyperscaling violating geometry.

  12. Electronic properties of strongly correlated fermions in nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Sandoval, R; Pastor, G M

    2004-01-01

    Lattice density-functional theory is applied to small clusters described by the Hubbard model in order to study the effect of the correlation on these nano-objects. Results for the ground-state energy and charge excitation gap of small clusters are presented and discussed as a function of the number of sites N a , Coulomb repulsion U/t, and band filling n

  13. The Electron-Phonon Interaction in Strongly Correlated Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, C.; Grilli, M.

    1995-01-01

    We analyze the effect of strong electron-electron repulsion on the electron-phonon interaction from a Fermi-liquid point of view and show that the electron-electron interaction is responsible for vertex corrections, which generically lead to a strong suppression of the electron-phonon coupling in the v F q/ω >>1 region, while such effect is not present when v F q/ω F is the Fermi velocity and q and ω are the transferred momentum and frequency respectively. In particular the e-ph scattering is suppressed in transport properties which are dominated by low-energy-high-momentum processes. On the other hand, analyzing the stability criterion for the compressibility, which involves the effective interactions in the dynamical limit, we show that a sizable electron-phonon interaction can push the system towards a phase-separation instability. Finally a detailed analysis of these ideas is carried out using a slave-boson approach for the infinite-U three-band Hubbard model in the presence of a coupling between the local hole density and a dispersionless optical phonon. (author)

  14. Can strong correlations be experimentally revealed for Ҡ -mesons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiesmayr Beatrix C.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1964 the physicists John St. Bell working at CERN took the 1935-idea of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen seriously and found that all theories based on local realism have to satisfy a certain inequality, nowadays dubbed Bell’s inequality. Experiments with ordinary matter systems or light show violations of Bell’s inequality favouring the quantum theory though a loophole free experiment has not yet been performed. This contribution presents an experimentally feasible Bell inequality for systems at higher energy scales, i.e. entangled neutral Ҡ -meson pairs that are typically produced in Φ -mesons decays or proton-antiproton annihilation processes. Strong requirements have to be overcome in order to achieve a conclusive tests, such a proposal was recently published. Surprisingly, this new Bell inequality reveals new features for weakly decaying particles, in particular, a strong sensitivity to the combined charge-conjugation-parity (CP symmetry. Here-with, a puzzling relation between a symmetry breaking for mesons and Bell’s inequality—which is a necessary and sufficient condition for the security of quantum cryptography protocols— is established. This becomes the more important since CP symmetry is related to the cosmological question why the antimatter disappeared after the Big Bang.

  15. Strongly correlated electron materials. I. Theory of the quasiparticle structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Costa-Quintana, J.; Puig-Puig, L. (Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain))

    1993-07-01

    In this paper we give a method for analyzing the renormalized electronic structure of the Hubbard systems. The first step is the determination of effective interactions from the random-phase approximation (RPA) and from an extended RPA (ERPA) that introduces vertex effects within the bubble polarization. The second step is the determination of the density of states deduced from the spectral functions. Its analysis leads us to conclude that these systems can exhibit three types of resonances in their electronic structures: the lower-, middle-, and upper-energy resonances. Furthermore, we analyze the conditions for which there is only one type of resonance and the causes that lead to the disappearance of the heavy-fermion state. We finally introduce the RPA and ERPA effective interactions within the strong-coupling theory and we give the conditions for obtaining coupling and superconductivity.

  16. Vector neural net identifying many strongly distorted and correlated patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryzhanovsky, Boris V.; Mikaelian, Andrei L.; Fonarev, Anatoly B.

    2005-01-01

    We suggest an effective and simple algorithm providing a polynomial storage capacity of a network of the form M ~ N2s+1, where N is the dimension of the stored binary patterns. In this problem the value of the free parameter s is restricted by the inequalities N >> slnN >= 1. The algorithm allows us to identify a large number of highly distorted similar patterns. The negative influence of correlations of the patterns is suppressed by choosing a sufficiently large value of the parameter s. We show the efficiency of the algorithm by the example of a perceptron identifier, but it also can be used to increase the storage capacity of full connected systems of associative memory.

  17. Lattice disorder in strongly correlated lanthanide and actinide intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, C.H.; Bauer, E.D.; Maple, M.B.; Lawrence, J.M.; Kwei, G.H.; Sarrao, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Lanthanide and actinide intermetallic compounds display a wide range of correlated-electron behavior, including ferromagnetism, antiferromagnetism, nonmagnetic (Kondo) ground states, and so-called 'non-Fermi liquid' (NFL) behavior. The interaction between f electrons and the conduction band is a dominant factor in determining the ground state of a given system. However, lattice disorder can create a distribution of interactions, generating unusual physical properties. These properties may include NFL behavior in many materials. In addition, lattice disorder can cause deviations from standard Kondo behavior that is less severe than NFL behavior. A review of the lattice disorder mechanism within a tight-binding model is presented, along with measurements of the YbBCu 4 and UPd x Cu 5-x systems, demonstrating the applicability of the model. These measurements indicate that while the YbBCu 4 system appears to be well ordered, both site interchange and continuous bond-length disorder occur in the UPd x Cu 5-x series. Nevertheless, the measured bond-length disorder in UPdCu 4 does not appear to be enough to explain the NFL properties simply with the Kondo disorder model. (au)

  18. Quantum phase transitions of strongly correlated electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, Masatoshi

    1998-01-01

    Interacting electrons in solids undergo various quantum phase transitions driven by quantum fluctuations. The quantum transitions take place at zero temperature by changing a parameter to control quantum fluctuations rather than thermal fluctuations. In contrast to classical phase transitions driven by thermal fluctuations, the quantum transitions have many different features where quantum dynamics introduces a source of intrinsic fluctuations tightly connected with spatial correlations and they have been a subject of recent intensive studies as we see below. Interacting electron systems cannot be fully understood without deep analyses of the quantum phase transitions themselves, because they are widely seen and play essential roles in many phenomena. Typical and important examples of the quantum phase transitions include metal-insulator transitions, (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9) metal-superconductor transitions, superconductor-insulator transitions, magnetic transitions to antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic phases in metals as well as in Mott insulators, and charge ordering transitions. Here, we focus on three different types of transitions

  19. Lattice disorder in strongly correlated lanthanide and actinide intermetallics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, C H; Bauer, E D; Maple, M B; Lawrence, J M; Kwei, G H; Sarrao, J L

    2001-03-01

    Lanthanide and actinide intermetallic compounds display a wide range of correlated-electron behavior, including ferromagnetism, antiferromagnetism, nonmagnetic (Kondo) ground states, and so-called 'non-Fermi liquid' (NFL) behavior. The interaction between f electrons and the conduction band is a dominant factor in determining the ground state of a given system. However, lattice disorder can create a distribution of interactions, generating unusual physical properties. These properties may include NFL behavior in many materials. In addition, lattice disorder can cause deviations from standard Kondo behavior that is less severe than NFL behavior. A review of the lattice disorder mechanism within a tight-binding model is presented, along with measurements of the YbBCu4 and UPd(x)Cu(5-x) systems, demonstrating the applicability of the model. These measurements indicate that while the YbBCu4 system appears to be well ordered, both site interchange and continuous bond-length disorder occur in the UPd(x)Cu(5-x) series. Nevertheless, the measured bond-length disorder in UPdCu4 does not appear to be enough to explain the NFL properties simply with the Kondo disorder model.

  20. Positive semidefinite matrix completion, universal rigidity and the Strong Arnold Property

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Laurent (Monique); A. Varvitsiotis (Antonios)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractThis paper addresses the following three topics: positive semidefinite (psd) matrix completions, universal rigidity of frameworks, and the Strong Arnold Property (SAP). We show some strong connections among these topics, using semidefinite programming as unifying theme. Our main

  1. Positive transfer operators and decay of correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Baladi, Viviane

    2000-01-01

    Although individual orbits of chaotic dynamical systems are by definition unpredictable, the average behavior of typical trajectories can often be given a precise statistical description. Indeed, there often exist ergodic invariant measures with special additional features. For a given invariant measure, and a class of observables, the correlation functions tell whether (and how fast) the system "mixes", i.e. "forgets" its initial conditions.This book, addressed to mathematicians and mathematical (or mathematically inclined) physicists, shows how the powerful technology of transfer operators,

  2. Ensemble DFT Approach to Excited States of Strongly Correlated Molecular Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ensemble density functional theory (DFT) is a novel time-independent formalism for obtaining excitation energies of many-body fermionic systems. A considerable advantage of ensemble DFT over the more common Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT and time-dependent DFT formalisms is that it enables one to account for strong non-dynamic electron correlation in the ground and excited states of molecular systems in a transparent and accurate fashion. Despite its positive aspects, ensemble DFT has not so far found its way into the repertoire of methods of modern computational chemistry, probably because of the perceived lack of practically affordable implementations of the theory. The spin-restricted ensemble-referenced KS (REKS) method is perhaps the first computationally feasible implementation of the ideas behind ensemble DFT which enables one to describe accurately electronic transitions in a wide class of molecular systems, including strongly correlated molecules (biradicals, molecules undergoing bond breaking/formation), extended π-conjugated systems, donor-acceptor charge transfer adducts, etc.

  3. Three-qutrit correlations violate local realism more strongly than those of three qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszlikowski, Dagomir; Gosal, Darwin; Ling, E.J.; Oh, C.H.; Kwek, L.C.; Zukowski, Marek

    2002-01-01

    We present numerical data showing that three-qutrit correlations for a pure state, which is not maximally entangled, violate local realism more strongly than three-qubit correlations. The strength of violation is measured by the minimal amount of noise that must be admixed to the system so that the noisy correlations have a local and realistic model

  4. Positive semidefinite matrix completion, universal rigidity and the Strong Arnold Property

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurent, Monique; Varvitsiotis, A.

    This paper addresses the following three topics: positive semidefinite (psd) matrix completions, universal rigidity of frameworks, and the Strong Arnold Property (SAP). We show some strong connections among these topics, using semidefinite programming as unifying theme. Our main contribution is a

  5. Description of the magnetic properties of strongly correlated disordered solid solutions in the coherent potential approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotin, M. A.; Skorikov, N. A.

    2015-06-01

    A method for electronic structure calculations of strongly correlated materials based on the coherent potential approximation is formulated and implemented. Method is applied for investigation of the electronic structure and local magnetic moments of the strongly correlated systems with d- and f-electrons: NiO-ZnO solid solution, nonstoichiometric perovskite LaMnO3-x, doped compound TiO2:Fe, and rare-earth transition-metal intermetallic compound GdNi2:Mn.

  6. Strongly correlated one-dimensional Bose–Fermi quantum mixtures: symmetry and correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decamp, Jean; Jünemann, Johannes; Albert, Mathias; Rizzi, Matteo; Minguzzi, Anna; Vignolo, Patrizia

    2017-12-01

    We consider multi-component quantum mixtures (bosonic, fermionic, or mixed) with strongly repulsive contact interactions in a one-dimensional harmonic trap. In the limit of infinitely strong repulsion and zero temperature, using the class-sum method, we study the symmetries of the spatial wave function of the mixture. We find that the ground state of the system has the most symmetric spatial wave function allowed by the type of mixture. This provides an example of the generalized Lieb–Mattis theorem. Furthermore, we show that the symmetry properties of the mixture are embedded in the large-momentum tails of the momentum distribution, which we evaluate both at infinite repulsion by an exact solution and at finite interactions using a numerical DMRG approach. This implies that an experimental measurement of the Tan’s contact would allow to unambiguously determine the symmetry of any kind of multi-component mixture.

  7. Record statistics of a strongly correlated time series: random walks and Lévy flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, Claude; Majumdar, Satya N.; Schehr, Grégory

    2017-08-01

    We review recent advances on the record statistics of strongly correlated time series, whose entries denote the positions of a random walk or a Lévy flight on a line. After a brief survey of the theory of records for independent and identically distributed random variables, we focus on random walks. During the last few years, it was indeed realized that random walks are a very useful ‘laboratory’ to test the effects of correlations on the record statistics. We start with the simple one-dimensional random walk with symmetric jumps (both continuous and discrete) and discuss in detail the statistics of the number of records, as well as of the ages of the records, i.e. the lapses of time between two successive record breaking events. Then we review the results that were obtained for a wide variety of random walk models, including random walks with a linear drift, continuous time random walks, constrained random walks (like the random walk bridge) and the case of multiple independent random walkers. Finally, we discuss further observables related to records, like the record increments, as well as some questions raised by physical applications of record statistics, like the effects of measurement error and noise.

  8. Atomic physics of strongly correlated systems: Progress report, 1 February 1988--15 January 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chii-Dong.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the progress made in our continuing study of strongly correlated atomic systems for the last contract period. In the area of hyperspherical coordinates for Coulombic three-body systems of arbitrary masses a general computing code has been developed. Calculation of the adiabatic potential curves have been accomplished for the e/sup /minus//e + e/sup /minus// system of arbitrary L, S and parity π. It was found that these curves behave very similar to the potential curves of H/sup /minus// except for a mass scaling. We have also examined the mass dependence of the ground state potential curves for systems of three charged particles, AAB, and showed that the curves become more attractive as the mass m/sub A/ becomes larger than m/sub B/. For ion-atom collisions we have examined the transfer-excitation (TE) processes to establish the importance of electron correlations in these two-electron transitions. We have also examined the orientation parameters for excited states formed in collisions with positive and negative charged particles to establish the relation between the sign of the charge of the incident particles to the sign of

  9. Microscopic theory of photon-correlation spectroscopy in strong-coupling semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneebeli, Lukas

    2009-11-27

    would be a great contribution in the growing field of quantum optics in semiconductors. The efforts in QD systems are again driven by the atomic systems which not only have shown the vacuum Rabi splitting, but also the second rung, e.g. via direct spectroscopy and via photon-correlation measurements. In this thesis, it is shown that spectrally resolved photon-statistics measurements of the resonance fluorescence from realistic semiconductor quantum-dot systems allow for high contrast identification of the two-photon strong-coupling states. Using a microscopic theory, the second-rung resonance of Jaynes-Cummings ladder is analyzed and optimum excitation conditions are determined. The computed photon-statistics spectrum displays gigantic, experimentally robust resonances at the energetic positions of the second-rung emission. The resonance fluorescence equations are derived and solved for strong-coupling semiconductor quantum-dot systems using a fully quantized multimode theory and a cluster-expansion approach. A reduced model is developed to explain the origin of auto- and cross-correlation resonances in the two-photon emission spectrum of the fluorescent light. These resonances are traced back to the two-photon strong-coupling states of Jaynes-Cummings ladder. The accuracy of the reduced model is verified via numerical solution of the resonance fluorescence equations. The analysis reveals the direct relation between the squeezed-light emission and the strong-coupling states in optically excited semiconductor systems. (orig.)

  10. Sociotropic personality traits positively correlate with the severity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ] People with ... of psychotherapy practice, the therapeutic relationship with the patient and ... Sociotropic personality characteristics in patients with SAD have been found to positively correlate with depression and social anxiety levels.

  11. Wilson loop correlators at strong coupling: from matrices to bubbling geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis, Jaume; Matsuura, Shunji; Okuda, Takuya; Trancanelli, Diego

    2008-08-01

    We compute at strong coupling the large N correlation functions of supersymmetric Wilson loops in large representations of the gauge group with local operators of Script N = 4 super Yang-Mills. The gauge theory computation of these correlators is performed using matrix model techniques. We show that the strong coupling correlator of the Wilson loop with the stress tensor computed using the matrix model exactly matches the semiclassical computation of the correlator of the 't Hooft loop with the stress tensor, providing a non-trivial quantitative test of electric-magnetic duality of Script N = 4 super Yang-Mills. We then perform these calculations using the dual bulk gravitational picture, where the Wilson loop is described by a ``bubbling'' geometry. By applying holographic methods to these backgrounds we calculate the Wilson loop correlation functions, finding perfect agreement with our gauge theory results.

  12. Disorder and pseudogap in strongly correlated systems: Phase diagram in the DMFT + Σ approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuleeva, N. A.; Kuchinskii, E. Z.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of disorder and pseudogap fluctuations on the Mott insulator-metal transition in strongly correlated systems has been studied in the framework of the generalized dynamic mean field theory (DMFT + Σ approach). Using the results of investigations of the density of states (DOS) and optical conductivity, a phase diagram (disorder-Hubbard interaction-temperature) is constructed for the paramagnetic Anderson-Hubbard model, which allows both the effects of strong electron correlations and the influence of strong disorder to be considered. Strong correlations are described using the DMFT, while a strong disorder is described using a generalized self-consistent theory of localization. The DOS and optical conductivity of the paramagnetic Hubbard model have been studied in a pseudogap state caused by antiferromagnetic spin (or charge) short-range order fluctuations with a finite correlation length, which have been modeled by a static Gaussian random field. The effect of a pseudogap on the Mott insulator-metal transition has been studied. It is established that, in both cases, the static Gaussian random field (related to the disorder or pseudogap fluctuations) leads to suppression of the Mott transition, broadening of the coexistence region of the insulator and metal phases, and an increase in the critical temperature at which the coexistence region disappears

  13. Nonlinear waves from a localized vortex source in strongly correlated fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akanksha; Ganesh, Rajaraman; Joy, Ashwin

    2017-11-01

    Highly charged quasi two-dimensional grain medium (complex plasma) is a remarkable test-bed to study wave like phenomena. Understanding of such wave propagation has many important applications in geophysics, petroleum engineering, and mining, earthquakes, and seismology. In the present study, for the first time, the propagation of nonlinear wave which originates from localized coherent vortex source has been studied using molecular dynamics simulation taking Yukawa liquids as a prototype for strongly correlated fluid. In this work, the coupling of transverse and longitudinal mode, effect of azimuthal speed of vortex source on the linear and nonlinear properties of generated wave will be presented as a function of strong correlation.

  14. Subgap Two-Photon States in Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Evidence for Strong Electron Correlations

    OpenAIRE

    Aryanpour, K.; Roberts, A.; Sandhu, A.; Rathore, R.; Shukla, A.; Mazumdar, S.

    2013-01-01

    Strong electron correlation effects in the photophysics of quasi-one-dimensional $\\pi$-conjugated organic systems such as polyenes, polyacetylenes, polydiacetylenes, etc., have been extensively studied. Far less is known on correlation effects in two-dimensional $\\pi$-conjugated systems. Here we present theoretical and experimental evidence for moderate repulsive electron-electron interactions in a number of finite polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules with $D_{6h}$ symmetry. We show that...

  15. Correlation between number and position of floral organs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penin, Aleksey A; Logacheva, Maria D

    2011-07-01

    The study of variation in number, position and type of floral organs may serve as a key to understanding the mechanisms underlying their variation, and will make it possible to improve the analysis of gene function in model plant species by means of a more accurate characterization of mutant phenotypes. The present analysis was carried out in order to understand the correlation between number and position of floral organs in Arabidopsis thaliana. An analysis of number and position of organs in flowers of wild type as well as in a series of mutations with floral organ position alterations was carried out, using light and electron microscopy. Variation common to different genotypes was analysed by means of individual diagrams, upon which generalized diagrams depicting variation in number and position of organs, were built by superimposition. It is shown that in the Arabidopsis flower a correlation exists between positions of petals and sepals, as well as between positions of stamens and carpels, whereas the position of carpels does not seem to depend on number and position of petals and stamens. This suggests that the position of organs in the basal (sepals) and apical (carpels) parts of the flower are determined before that in the intermediate zone. This assumption is consistent with the results of mathematical modelling and is supposed to be the consequence of stem-cell activity in the flower.

  16. Communication: Thermodynamics of condensed matter with strong pressure-energy correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Trond; Bøhling, Lasse; Schrøder, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    in the phase diagram of invariant structure and dynamics) are described by h(ρ)/T = Const., (2) the density-scaling exponent is a function of density only, and (3) a Grüneisen-type equation of state applies for the configurational degrees of freedom. For strongly correlating atomic systems one has h(ρ) = ∑n...

  17. The Role of screening in the strongly correlated 2D systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, E H

    2003-01-01

    We investigate recently observed experiments in the strongly correlated 2D systems (r sub s >> 1) (low-density 2D plasmons, metallic behaviour of 2D systems and frictional drag resistivity between two 2D hole layers). We compare them with our theoretical results calculated within a conventional Fermi liquid theory with RPA screening.

  18. Study of rare earth local moment magnetism and strongly correlated phenomena in various crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Tai [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    Benefiting from unique properties of 4f electrons, rare earth based compounds are known for offering a versatile playground for condensed matter physics research as well as industrial applications. This thesis focuses on three specific examples that further explore the rare earth local moment magnetism and strongly correlated phenomena in various crystal structures.

  19. Strongly Correlated Electron Systems in The Half Filled Band of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strong correlation of interacting electrons has been widely studied under the single band Hubbard model with the aid of several techniques. These numerous studies have been carried out at different band filling. In this work, the ground state properties in the half filled band in one dimension are studied employing a ...

  20. Strongly correlated photons generated by coupling a three- or four-level system to a waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Gauthier, Daniel J.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2012-04-01

    We study the generation of strongly correlated photons by coupling an atom to photonic quantum fields in a one-dimensional waveguide. Specifically, we consider a three-level or four-level system for the atom. Photon-photon bound states emerge as a manifestation of the strong photon-photon correlation mediated by the atom. Effective repulsive or attractive interaction between photons can be produced, causing either suppressed multiphoton transmission (photon blockade) or enhanced multiphoton transmission (photon-induced tunneling). As a result, nonclassical light sources can be generated on demand by sending coherent states into the proposed system. We calculate the second-order correlation function of the transmitted field and observe bunching and antibunching caused by the bound states. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the proposed system can produce photon pairs with a high degree of spectral entanglement, which have a large capacity for carrying information and are important for large-alphabet quantum communication.

  1. Confidence and memory: assessing positive and negative correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, Henry L; DeSoto, K Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to learn and remember surely evolved to help animals solve problems in their quest to reproduce and survive. In humans we assume that metacognitive processes also evolved, so that we know when to trust what we remember (i.e., when we have high confidence in our memories) and when not to (when we have low confidence). However this latter feature has been questioned by researchers, with some finding a high correlation between confidence and accuracy in reports from memory and others finding little to no correlation. In two experiments we report a recognition memory paradigm that, using the same materials (categorised lists), permits the study of positive correlations, zero correlations, and negative correlations between confidence and accuracy within the same procedure. We had subjects study words from semantic categories with the five items most frequently produced in norms omitted from the list; later, subjects were given an old/new recognition test and made confidence ratings on their judgements. Although the correlation between confidence and accuracy for studied items was generally positive, the correlation for the five omitted items was negative in some methods of analysis. We pinpoint the similarity between lures and targets as creating inversions between confidence and accuracy in memory. We argue that, while confidence is generally a useful indicant of accuracy in reports from memory, in certain environmental circumstances even adaptive processes can foster illusions of memory. Thus understanding memory illusions is similar to understanding perceptual illusions: Processes that are usually adaptive can go awry under certain circumstances.

  2. Positive correlation between menthol content and in vitro menthol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    A positive correlation was observed in the present study between menthol content in oils of evaluated geno- types and the level of .... In this case, menthol the major monoterpene component of the essential oil, which is known to be cytotoxic to the plant at higher con- centrations, is expected to be produced up to a level that.

  3. Habitual physical activity levels are positively correlated with CD4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... month) and functional independence as assessed from the responses to the questionnaire. There was a positive and significant correlation between the patients' length of time on ARV medication and CD4 cell counts (p < 0.0001, r = 0.45), and between CD4 cell counts and total habitual physical activity levels (p = 0.0067, ...

  4. Energy deposition of heavy ions in the regime of strong beam-plasma correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gericke, D O; Schlanges, M

    2003-03-01

    The energy loss of highly charged ions in dense plasmas is investigated. The applied model includes strong beam-plasma correlation via a quantum T-matrix treatment of the cross sections. Dynamic screening effects are modeled by using a Debye-like potential with a velocity dependent screening length that guarantees the known low and high beam velocity limits. It is shown that this phenomenological model is in good agreement with simulation data up to very high beam-plasma coupling. An analysis of the stopping process shows considerably longer ranges and a less localized energy deposition if strong coupling is treated properly.

  5. Thermal Phase Transitions of Strongly Correlated Bosons with Spin-Orbit Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Ciarán; Paramekanti, Arun

    2014-12-01

    Experiments on ultracold atoms have started to explore lattice effects and thermal fluctuations for two-component bosons with spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Motivated by this, we derive and study a t J model for lattice bosons with equal Rashba-Dresselhaus SOC and strong Hubbard repulsion in a uniform Zeeman magnetic field. Using the Gutzwiller ansatz, we find strongly correlated ground states with stripe superfluid (SF) order. We formulate a finite temperature generalization of the Gutzwiller method, and show that thermal fluctuations in the doped Mott insulator drive a two-step melting of the stripe SF, revealing a wide regime of a stripe normal fluid.

  6. Quantum correlations responsible for remote state creation: strong and weak control parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, S. I.; Zenchuk, A. I.

    2017-03-01

    We study the quantum correlations between the two remote qubits (sender and receiver) connected by the transmission line (homogeneous spin-1/2 chain) depending on the parameters of the sender's and receiver's initial states (control parameters). We consider two different measures of quantum correlations: the entanglement (a traditional measure) and the informational correlation (based on the parameter exchange between the sender and receiver). We find the domain in the control parameter space yielding (i) zero entanglement between the sender and receiver during the whole evolution period and (ii) non-vanishing informational correlation between the sender and receiver, thus showing that the informational correlation is responsible for the remote state creation. Among the control parameters, there are the strong parameters (which strongly effect the values of studied measures) and the weak ones (whose effect is negligible), therewith the eigenvalues of the initial state are given a privileged role. We also show that the problem of small entanglement (concurrence) in quantum information processing is similar (in certain sense) to the problem of small determinants in linear algebra. A particular model of 40-node spin-1/2 communication line is presented.

  7. Probing spin correlations with phonons in the strongly frustrated magnet ZnCr2O4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushkov, A B; Tchernyshyov, O; Ratcliff, W; Cheong, S W; Drew, H D

    2005-04-08

    The spin-lattice coupling plays an important role in strongly frustrated magnets. In ZnCr2O4, an excellent realization of the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the pyrochlore network, a lattice distortion relieves the geometrical frustration through a spin-Peierls-like phase transition at T(c)=12.5 K. Conversely, spin correlations strongly influence the elastic properties of a frustrated magnet. By using infrared spectroscopy and published data on magnetic specific heat, we demonstrate that the frequency of an optical phonon triplet in ZnCr2O4 tracks the nearest-neighbor spin correlations above T(c). The splitting of the phonon triplet below T(c) provides a way to measure the spin-Peierls order parameter.

  8. Effects of Strong Correlations on the Disorder-Induced Zero Bias Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, William; Song, Yun; Bulut, Sinan; Wortis, Rachel

    2009-03-01

    In conventional metals and semiconductors, density of states anomalies result from the interplay between disorder and interactions. Motivated by a number of experiments that find zero bias anomalies (ZBA) in transition metal oxides, we have performed calculations to determine the effect of strong correlations on the ZBA in disordered interacting systems. We use a self-consistent mean-field theory that incorporates strong correlations and treats spatial fluctuations of the disorder potential exactly. We discuss both the Anderson-Hubbard model and the extended Anderson-Hubbard model. We find that, even for a zero-range interaction, nonlocal self-energy corrections lead to the formation of an Altshuler-Aronov-like ZBA. In the extended Anderson-Hubbard model, Efros-Shklovskii-like physics dominates at large disorder.

  9. Extended Aharonov-Bohm period analysis of strongly correlated electron systems

    OpenAIRE

    Arita, Ryotaro; Kusakabe, Koichi; Kuroki, Kazuhiko; Aoki, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    The `extended Aharonov-Bohm (AB) period' recently proposed by Kusakabe and Aoki [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn (65), 2772 (1996)] is extensively studied numerically for finite size systems of strongly correlated electrons. While the extended AB period is the system length times the flux quantum for noninteracting systems, we have found the existence of the boundary across which the period is halved or another boundary into an even shorter period on the phase diagram for these models. If we compare this r...

  10. Quantum Femtosecond Magnetism: Phase Transition in Step with Light in a Strongly Correlated Manganese Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jigang

    2014-03-01

    Research of non-equilibrium phase transitions of strongly correlated electrons is built around addressing an outstanding challenge: how to achieve ultrafast manipulation of competing magnetic/electronic phases and reveal thermodynamically hidden orders at highly non-thermal, femtosecond timescales? Recently we reveal a new paradigm called quantum femtosecond magnetism-photoinduced femtosecond magnetic phase transitions driven by quantum spin flip fluctuations correlated with laser-excited inter-atomic coherent bonding. We demonstrate an antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) switching during about 100 fs laser pulses in a colossal magneto-resistive manganese oxide. Our results show a huge photoinduced femtosecond spin generation, measured by magnetic circular dichroism, with photo-excitation threshold behavior absent in the picosecond dynamics. This reveals an initial quantum coherent regime of magnetism, while the optical polarization/coherence still interacts with the spins to initiate local FM correlations that compete with the surrounding AFM matrix. Our results thus provide a framework that explores quantum non-equilibrium kinetics to drive phase transitions between exotic ground states in strongly correlated elecrons, and raise fundamental questions regarding some accepted rules, such as free energy and adiabatic potential surface. This work is in collaboration with Tianqi Li, Aaron Patz, Leonidas Mouchliadis, Jiaqiang Yan, Thomas A. Lograsso, Ilias E. Perakis. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (contract no. DMR-1055352). Material synthesis at the Ames Laboratory was supported by the US Department of Energy-Basic Energy Sciences (contract no. DE-AC02-7CH11358).

  11. High plasma triglyceride levels strongly correlate with low kisspeptin in the arcuate nucleus of male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, A; Axel, A M; Lie, M E

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: It is well known that reproductive capacity is lower in obese individuals, but what mediators and signals are involved is unclear. Kisspeptin is a potent stimulator of GnRH release, and it has been suggested that kisspeptin neurons located in the arcuate nucleus transmit metabolic...... signals to the GnRH neurons. METHODS: In this study, we measured body weight and plasma concentrations of leptin, insulin, testosterone, and triglycerides after high fat diet exposure and correlated these parameters with the number of kisspeptin-immunoreactive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of male rats...... with increased fat in the diet. Kisspeptin-immunoreactive cells are not correlated with body weight, testosterone, leptin or insulin. However, we find that the number of kisspeptin-immunoreactive cells is strongly and negatively correlated with the level of plasma triglycerides (R2=0.49, p=0.004). CONCLUSION: We...

  12. Mott Transition In Strongly Correlated Materials: Many-Body Methods And Realistic Materials Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tsung-Han

    Strongly correlated materials are a class of materials that cannot be properly described by the Density Functional Theory (DFT), which is a single-particle approximation to the original many-body electronic Hamiltonian. These systems contain d or f orbital electrons, i.e., transition metals, actinides, and lanthanides compounds, for which the electron-electron interaction (correlation) effects are too strong to be described by the single-particle approximation of DFT. Therefore, complementary many-body methods have been developed, at the model Hamiltonians level, to describe these strong correlation effects. Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT) and Rotationally Invariant Slave-Boson (RISB) approaches are two successful methods that can capture the correlation effects for a broad interaction strength. However, these many-body methods, as applied to model Hamiltonians, treat the electronic structure of realistic materials in a phenomenological fashion, which only allow to describe their properties qualitatively. Consequently, the combination of DFT and many body methods, e.g., Local Density Approximation augmented by RISB and DMFT (LDA+RISB and LDA+DMFT), have been recently proposed to combine the advantages of both methods into a quantitative tool to analyze strongly correlated systems. In this dissertation, we studied the possible improvements of these approaches, and tested their accuracy on realistic materials. This dissertation is separated into two parts. In the first part, we studied the extension of DMFT and RISB in three directions. First, we extended DMFT framework to investigate the behavior of the domain wall structure in metal-Mott insulator coexistence regime by studying the unstable solution describing the domain wall. We found that this solution, differing qualitatively from both the metallic and the insulating solutions, displays an insulating-like behavior in resistivity while carrying a weak metallic character in its electronic structure. Second, we

  13. Mitochondrial respiratory efficiency is positively correlated with human sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Provenzano, Sara Pinto; Coppola, Lamberto; Zara, Vincenzo

    2012-04-01

    To correlate sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency with variations in sperm motility and with sperm morphologic anomalies. Sperm mitochondrial respiratory activity was evaluated with a polarographic assay of oxygen consumption carried out in hypotonically-treated sperm cells. A possible relationship among sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency, sperm motility, and morphologic anomalies was investigated. Mitochondrial respiratory efficiency was positively correlated with sperm motility and negatively correlated with the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. Moreover, midpiece defects impaired mitochondrial functionality. Our data indicate that an increase in sperm motility requires a parallel increase in mitochondrial respiratory capacity, thereby supporting the fundamental role played by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in sperm motility of normozoospermic subjects. These results are of physiopathological relevance because they suggest that disturbances of sperm mitochondrial function and of energy production could be responsible for asthenozoospermia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Selective Mottness as a key to iron superconductors: weak and strong correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medici, Luca

    2014-03-01

    I will discuss the strength of electronic correlations in the normal phase of Fe-superconductors and trace a comparison with cuprates. The phase diagram of the high-Tc cuprates is dominated by the Mott insulating phase of the parent compounds. Approaching it from large doping, a standard Fermi-liquid is seen to gradually turn into a bad non-Fermi liquid metal in which quasiparticles have heavily differentiated coherence depending on momentum, a process which culminates in the pseudogap regime, in which the antinodal region in momentum space acquires a gap before the material reaches a fully gapped Mott state. I will show that experiments for electron- and hole-doped BaFe2As2 support an analogous scenario. The doping evolution is dominated by the influence of a Mott insulator that would be realized for half-filled conduction bands, while the stoichiometric compound does not play a special role. Weakly and strongly correlated conduction electrons coexist in much of the phase diagram, a differentiation that increases with hole-doping. We identify the reason for this ``selective Mottness'' in a simple emergent mechanism, an ``orbital decoupling,'' triggered by the strong Hund's coupling. When this mechanism is active charge excitations in the different orbitals are decoupled and each orbital behaves as a single band Hubbard model, where the correlation degree almost only depends on how doped is each orbital from half-filling. This scenario reconciles contrasting evidences on the electronic correlation strength, implies a strong asymmetry between hole- and electron-doping and establishes a deep connection with the cuprates. L. de' Medici, G. Giovannetti and M. Capone, ArXiv:1212.3966 Work supported by CNRS - ESPCI ParisTech, France

  15. Theoretical development and first-principles analysis of strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chen [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    A variety of quantum many-body methods have been developed for studying the strongly correlated electron systems. We have also proposed a computationally efficient and accurate approach, named the correlation matrix renormalization (CMR) method, to address the challenges. The initial implementation of the CMR method is designed for molecules which have theoretical advantages, including small size of system, manifest mechanism and strongly correlation effect such as bond breaking process. The theoretic development and benchmark tests of the CMR method are included in this thesis. Meanwhile, ground state total energy is the most important property of electronic calculations. We also investigated an alternative approach to calculate the total energy, and extended this method for magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of ferromagnetic materials. In addition, another theoretical tool, dynamical mean- field theory (DMFT) on top of the DFT , has also been used in electronic structure calculations for an Iridium oxide to study the phase transition, which results from an interplay of the d electrons' internal degrees of freedom.

  16. On the phase-correlation and phase-fluctuation dynamics of a strongly excited Bose gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhel, Roger R., E-mail: rogersakhel@yahoo.com [Department of Basic Sciences, Faculty of Information Technology, Isra University, Amman 11622 (Jordan); The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy); Sakhel, Asaad R. [Department of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Engineering Technology, Balqa Applied University, Amman 11134 (Jordan); The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34151 (Italy); Ghassib, Humam B. [Department of Physics, The University of Jordan, Amman 11942 (Jordan)

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) is explored in the wake of a violent excitation caused by a strong time-dependent deformation of a trapping potential under the action of an intense stirring laser. The system is a two-dimensional BEC confined to a power-law trap with hard-wall boundaries. The stirring agent is a moving red-detuned laser potential. The time-dependent Gross–Pitaevskii equation is solved numerically by the split-step Crank–Nicolson method in real time. The phase correlations and phase fluctuations are examined as functions of time to demonstrate the evolving properties of a strongly-excited BEC. Of special significance is the occurrence of spatial fluctuations while the condensate is being excited. These oscillations arise from stirrer-induced density fluctuations. While the stirrer is inside the trap, a reduction in phase coherence occurs, which is attributed to phase fluctuations.

  17. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Wehler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P=.039, tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005, and low hemoglobin (P = .039. In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma.

  18. Fermionic Statistics in the Strongly Correlated Limit of Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Exact pieces of information on the adiabatic connection integrand, Wλ[ρ], which allows evaluation of the exchange-correlation energy of Kohn–Sham density functional theory, can be extracted from the leading terms in the strong coupling limit (λ → ∞, where λ is the strength of the electron–electron interaction). In this work, we first compare the theoretical prediction for the two leading terms in the strong coupling limit with data obtained via numerical implementation of the exact Levy functional in the simple case of two electrons confined in one dimension, confirming the asymptotic exactness of these two terms. We then carry out a first study on the incorporation of the Fermionic statistics at large coupling λ, both numerical and theoretical, confirming that spin effects enter at orders ∼e–√λ. PMID:29111724

  19. Microscopic origin of marginal Fermi-liquid in strongly correlated spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protogenov, A.P.; Ryndyk, D.A.

    1992-08-01

    We consider the consequences of separation of spin and charge degrees of freedom in 2+1D strongly correlated spin systems. Self-consistent spin and charge motions induced by doping in sites of ground and dual lattices form such a spectrum of quasiparticles which together with the dispersionless character of the collective excitation spectrum and the chemical potential pinning in the band centre yield the necessary behavior of charge and spin polarizability to support the theory of marginal liquid formulated by C.M. Varma et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 1996 (1989)). (author). 28 refs, 4 figs

  20. Entanglement-enhanced information transfer through strongly correlated systems and its application to optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Song [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230026 (China); Bayat, Abolfazl; Bose, Sougato [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    We show that the inherent entanglement of the ground state of strongly correlated systems can be exploited for both classical and quantum communications. Our strategy is based on a single-qubit rotation that encodes information in the entangled nature of the ground state. In classical communication, our mechanism conveys more than one bit of information in each shot, just as dense coding does, without demanding long-range entanglement. In our scheme for quantum communication, the quality is higher than the widely studied attaching scenarios. Moreover, we propose to implement this way of communication in optical lattices.

  1. Magnetic and resonant X-ray scattering investigations of strongly correlated electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paolasini, L.; Bergevin, F. de

    2008-01-01

    Resonant X-ray scattering is a method which combines high-Q resolution X-ray elastic diffraction and atomic core-hole spectroscopy for investigating electronic and magnetic long-range ordered structures in condensed matter. During recent years the development of theoretical models to describe resonant X-ray scattering amplitudes and the evolution of experimental techniques, which include the control and analysis of linear photon polarization and the introduction of extreme environment conditions such as low temperatures, high magnetic field and high pressures, have opened a new field of investigation in the domain of strongly correlated electron systems. (authors)

  2. Strong correlation between early stage atherosclerosis and electromechanical coupling of aorta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X. Y.; Yan, F.; Niu, L. L.; Chen, Q. N.; Zheng, H. R.; Li, J. Y.

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of cardiovascular diseases that are responsible for many deaths in the world, and the early diagnosis of atherosclerosis is highly desirable. The existing imaging methods, however, are not capable of detecting the early stage of atherosclerosis development due to their limited spatial resolution. Using piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM), we show that the piezoelectric response of an aortic wall increases as atherosclerosis advances, while the stiffness of the aorta shows a less evident correlation with atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we show that there is strong correlation between the coercive electric field necessary to switch the polarity of the artery and the development of atherosclerosis. Thus by measuring the electromechanical coupling of the aortic wall, it is possible to probe atherosclerosis at the early stage of its development, not only improving the spatial resolution by orders of magnitude, but also providing comprehensive quantitative information on the biomechanical properties of the artery.

  3. Lattice anharmonicity and thermal properties of strongly correlated Fe1- x Co x Si alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povzner, A. A.; Nogovitsyna, T. A.; Filanovich, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    The temperature dependences of the thermal and elastic properties of strongly correlated metal alloys Fe1- x Co x Si ( x = 0.1, 0.3, 0.5) with different atomic chiralities have been calculated in the framework of the self-consistent thermodynamic model taking into account the influence of lattice anharmonicity. The lattice contributions to the heat capacity and thermal expansion coefficient of the alloys have been determined using the experimental data. It has been demonstrated that the invar effect in the thermal expansion of the lattice observed in the magnetically ordered region of Fe0.7Co0.3Si and Fe0.5Co0.5Si is not related to the lattice anharmonicity, even though its appearance correlates with variations in the atomic chirality.

  4. A systematic review of the neural correlates of positive emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Leonardo; Cantilino, Amaury

    2017-01-01

    To conduct a systematic literature review of human studies reporting neural correlates of positive emotions. The PubMed and Web of Science databases were searched in January 2016 for scientific papers written in English. No restrictions were placed on year of publication. Twenty-two articles were identified and 12 met the established criteria. Five had been published during the last 4 years. Formation and regulation of positive emotions, including happiness, are associated with significant reductions in activity in the right prefrontal cortex and bilaterally in the temporoparietal cortex, as well as with increased activity in the left prefrontal regions. They are also associated with increased activity in the cingulate gyrus, inferior and middle temporal gyri, amygdalae, and ventral striatum. It is too early to claim that there is an established understanding of the neuroscience of positive emotions and happiness. However, despite overlap in the brain regions involved in the formation and regulation of positive and negative emotions, we can conclude that positive emotions such as happiness activate specific brain regions.

  5. Strongdeco: Expansion of analytical, strongly correlated quantum states into a many-body basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliá-Díaz, Bruno; Graß, Tobias

    2012-03-01

    We provide a Mathematica code for decomposing strongly correlated quantum states described by a first-quantized, analytical wave function into many-body Fock states. Within them, the single-particle occupations refer to the subset of Fock-Darwin functions with no nodes. Such states, commonly appearing in two-dimensional systems subjected to gauge fields, were first discussed in the context of quantum Hall physics and are nowadays very relevant in the field of ultracold quantum gases. As important examples, we explicitly apply our decomposition scheme to the prominent Laughlin and Pfaffian states. This allows for easily calculating the overlap between arbitrary states with these highly correlated test states, and thus provides a useful tool to classify correlated quantum systems. Furthermore, we can directly read off the angular momentum distribution of a state from its decomposition. Finally we make use of our code to calculate the normalization factors for Laughlin's famous quasi-particle/quasi-hole excitations, from which we gain insight into the intriguing fractional behavior of these excitations. Program summaryProgram title: Strongdeco Catalogue identifier: AELA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AELA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5475 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31 071 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Any computer on which Mathematica can be installed Operating system: Linux, Windows, Mac Classification: 2.9 Nature of problem: Analysis of strongly correlated quantum states. Solution method: The program makes use of the tools developed in Mathematica to deal with multivariate polynomials to decompose analytical strongly correlated states of bosons

  6. Density functional theory and dynamical mean-field theory. A way to model strongly correlated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backes, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    The study of the electronic properties of correlated systems is a very diverse field and has lead to valuable insight into the physics of real materials. In these systems, the decisive factor that governs the physical properties is the ratio between the electronic kinetic energy, which promotes delocalization over the lattice, and the Coulomb interaction, which instead favours localized electronic states. Due to this competition, correlated electronic systems can show unique and interesting properties like the Metal-Insulator transition, diverse phase diagrams, strong temperature dependence and in general a high sensitivity to the environmental conditions. A theoretical description of these systems is not an easy task, since perturbative approaches that do not preserve the competition between the kinetic and interaction terms can only be applied in special limiting cases. One of the most famous approaches to obtain the electronic properties of a real material is the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method. It allows one to obtain the ground state density of the system under investigation by mapping onto an effective non-interacting system that has to be found self-consistently. While being an exact theory, in practical implementations certain approximations have to be made to the exchange-correlation potential. The local density approximation (LDA), which approximates the exchange-correlation contribution to the total energy by that of a homogeneous electron gas with the corresponding density, has proven quite successful in many cases. Though, this approximation in general leads to an underestimation of electronic correlations and is not able to describe a metal-insulator transition due to electronic localization in the presence of strong Coulomb interaction. A different approach to the interacting electronic problem is the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), which is non-perturbative in the kinetic and interaction term but neglects all non

  7. Density functional theory and dynamical mean-field theory. A way to model strongly correlated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backes, Steffen

    2017-04-15

    The study of the electronic properties of correlated systems is a very diverse field and has lead to valuable insight into the physics of real materials. In these systems, the decisive factor that governs the physical properties is the ratio between the electronic kinetic energy, which promotes delocalization over the lattice, and the Coulomb interaction, which instead favours localized electronic states. Due to this competition, correlated electronic systems can show unique and interesting properties like the Metal-Insulator transition, diverse phase diagrams, strong temperature dependence and in general a high sensitivity to the environmental conditions. A theoretical description of these systems is not an easy task, since perturbative approaches that do not preserve the competition between the kinetic and interaction terms can only be applied in special limiting cases. One of the most famous approaches to obtain the electronic properties of a real material is the ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method. It allows one to obtain the ground state density of the system under investigation by mapping onto an effective non-interacting system that has to be found self-consistently. While being an exact theory, in practical implementations certain approximations have to be made to the exchange-correlation potential. The local density approximation (LDA), which approximates the exchange-correlation contribution to the total energy by that of a homogeneous electron gas with the corresponding density, has proven quite successful in many cases. Though, this approximation in general leads to an underestimation of electronic correlations and is not able to describe a metal-insulator transition due to electronic localization in the presence of strong Coulomb interaction. A different approach to the interacting electronic problem is the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT), which is non-perturbative in the kinetic and interaction term but neglects all non

  8. The ALPS project release 2.0: open source software for strongly correlated systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, B; Gamper, L; Gukelberger, J; Hehn, A; Isakov, S V; Ma, P N; Mates, P; Carr, L D; Evertz, H G; Feiguin, A; Freire, J; Koop, D; Fuchs, S; Gull, E; Guertler, S; Igarashi, R; Matsuo, H; Parcollet, O; Pawłowski, G; Picon, J D

    2011-01-01

    We present release 2.0 of the ALPS (Algorithms and Libraries for Physics Simulations) project, an open source software project to develop libraries and application programs for the simulation of strongly correlated quantum lattice models such as quantum magnets, lattice bosons, and strongly correlated fermion systems. The code development is centered on common XML and HDF5 data formats, libraries to simplify and speed up code development, common evaluation and plotting tools, and simulation programs. The programs enable non-experts to start carrying out serial or parallel numerical simulations by providing basic implementations of the important algorithms for quantum lattice models: classical and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) using non-local updates, extended ensemble simulations, exact and full diagonalization (ED), the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) both in a static version and a dynamic time-evolving block decimation (TEBD) code, and quantum Monte Carlo solvers for dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). The ALPS libraries provide a powerful framework for programmers to develop their own applications, which, for instance, greatly simplify the steps of porting a serial code onto a parallel, distributed memory machine. Major changes in release 2.0 include the use of HDF5 for binary data, evaluation tools in Python, support for the Windows operating system, the use of CMake as build system and binary installation packages for Mac OS X and Windows, and integration with the VisTrails workflow provenance tool. The software is available from our web server at http://alps.comp-phys.org/

  9. Numerical path integral solution to strong Coulomb correlation in one dimensional Hooke's atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruokosenmäki, Ilkka; Gholizade, Hossein; Kylänpää, Ilkka; Rantala, Tapio T.

    2017-01-01

    We present a new approach based on real time domain Feynman path integrals (RTPI) for electronic structure calculations and quantum dynamics, which includes correlations between particles exactly but within the numerical accuracy. We demonstrate that incoherent propagation by keeping the wave function real is a novel method for finding and simulation of the ground state, similar to Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) method, but introducing new useful tools lacking in DMC. We use 1D Hooke's atom, a two-electron system with very strong correlation, as our test case, which we solve with incoherent RTPI (iRTPI) and compare against DMC. This system provides an excellent test case due to exact solutions for some confinements and because in 1D the Coulomb singularity is stronger than in two or three dimensional space. The use of Monte Carlo grid is shown to be efficient for which we determine useful numerical parameters. Furthermore, we discuss another novel approach achieved by combining the strengths of iRTPI and DMC. We also show usefulness of the perturbation theory for analytical approximates in case of strong confinements.

  10. Describing nonequilibrium behavior in strongly correlated materials via dynamical mean-field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freericks, James

    2010-03-01

    Dynamical mean-field theory was introduced in 1989 and has become one of the most successful methods for solving models of strongly correlated electrons in equilibrium (it becomes exact in the infinite-dimensional limit). In this talk, I show how to generalize dynamical mean-field theory to nonequilibrium situations. For transient response, one discretizes the Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh contour then solves the discrete problem directly. For steady-state response, one can formulate a theory directly in the long-time limit for the retarded Green's functions. These techniques are applied to the problem of the quenching of Bloch oscillations due to electron-electron interactions and to the problem of time-resolved pump/probe photoemission spectroscopy of strongly correlated electrons when a system is driven to a nonequilibrium steady state and cannot be described by the quasiequilibrium approximation with an effective temperature. This work was completed in collaboration with Tom Devereaux, Sasha Joura, Hulikal Krishnamurthy, Brian Moritz, Thomas Pruschke, Volodomyr Turkowski, and Velko Zlati'c. Recent references include: J. K. Freericks, V. M. Turkowski, and V. Zlati'c, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 266408 (2006); J. K. Freericks, Phys. Rev. B 77, 075109 (2008); A. V.Joura, J. K. Freericks, and Th. Pruschke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 196401 (2008); J. K. Freericks, H. R. Krishnamurthy and Th. Pruschke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 136401 (2009); and B. Moritz, T. P. Devereaux, and J. K. Freericks, arXiv:0908.1807.

  11. Femtosecond switching of magnetism via strongly correlated spin-charge quantum excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianqi; Patz, Aaron; Mouchliadis, Leonidas; Yan, Jiaqiang; Lograsso, Thomas A; Perakis, Ilias E; Wang, Jigang

    2013-04-04

    The technological demand to push the gigahertz (10(9) hertz) switching speed limit of today's magnetic memory and logic devices into the terahertz (10(12) hertz) regime underlies the entire field of spin-electronics and integrated multi-functional devices. This challenge is met by all-optical magnetic switching based on coherent spin manipulation. By analogy to femtosecond chemistry and photosynthetic dynamics--in which photoproducts of chemical and biochemical reactions can be influenced by creating suitable superpositions of molecular states--femtosecond-laser-excited coherence between electronic states can switch magnetic order by 'suddenly' breaking the delicate balance between competing phases of correlated materials: for example, manganites exhibiting colossal magneto-resistance suitable for applications. Here we show femtosecond (10(-15) seconds) photo-induced switching from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic ordering in Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3, by observing the establishment (within about 120 femtoseconds) of a huge temperature-dependent magnetization with photo-excitation threshold behaviour absent in the optical reflectivity. The development of ferromagnetic correlations during the femtosecond laser pulse reveals an initial quantum coherent regime of magnetism, distinguished from the picosecond (10(-12) seconds) lattice-heating regime characterized by phase separation without threshold behaviour. Our simulations reproduce the nonlinear femtosecond spin generation and underpin fast quantum spin-flip fluctuations correlated with coherent superpositions of electronic states to initiate local ferromagnetic correlations. These results merge two fields, femtosecond magnetism in metals and band insulators, and non-equilibrium phase transitions of strongly correlated electrons, in which local interactions exceeding the kinetic energy produce a complex balance of competing orders.

  12. Dramatic reduction of dimensionality in large biochemical networks owing to strong pair correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Michael; Mukherjee, Sayak; Jayaprakash, Ciriyam; Das, Jayajit

    2012-01-01

    Large multi-dimensionality of high-throughput datasets pertaining to cell signalling and gene regulation renders it difficult to extract mechanisms underlying the complex kinetics involving various biochemical compounds (e.g. proteins and lipids). Data-driven models often circumvent this difficulty by using pair correlations of the protein expression levels to produce a small number (fewer than 10) of principal components, each a linear combination of the concentrations, to successfully model how cells respond to different stimuli. However, it is not understood if this reduction is specific to a particular biological system or to nature of the stimuli used in these experiments. We study temporal changes in pair correlations, described by the covariance matrix, between concentrations of different molecular species that evolve following deterministic mass-action kinetics in large biologically relevant reaction networks and show that this dramatic reduction of dimensions (from hundreds to less than five) arises from the strong correlations between different species at any time and is insensitive to the form of the nonlinear interactions, network architecture, and to a wide range of values of rate constants and concentrations. We relate temporal changes in the eigenvalue spectrum of the covariance matrix to low-dimensional, local changes in directions of the system trajectory embedded in much larger dimensions using elementary differential geometry. We illustrate how to extract biologically relevant insights such as identifying significant timescales and groups of correlated chemical species from our analysis. Our work provides for the first time, to our knowledge, a theoretical underpinning for the successful experimental analysis and points to a way to extract mechanisms from large-scale high-throughput datasets. PMID:22378749

  13. Dramatic reduction of dimensionality in large biochemical networks owing to strong pair correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Michael; Mukherjee, Sayak; Jayaprakash, Ciriyam; Das, Jayajit

    2012-08-07

    Large multi-dimensionality of high-throughput datasets pertaining to cell signalling and gene regulation renders it difficult to extract mechanisms underlying the complex kinetics involving various biochemical compounds (e.g. proteins and lipids). Data-driven models often circumvent this difficulty by using pair correlations of the protein expression levels to produce a small number (fewer than 10) of principal components, each a linear combination of the concentrations, to successfully model how cells respond to different stimuli. However, it is not understood if this reduction is specific to a particular biological system or to nature of the stimuli used in these experiments. We study temporal changes in pair correlations, described by the covariance matrix, between concentrations of different molecular species that evolve following deterministic mass-action kinetics in large biologically relevant reaction networks and show that this dramatic reduction of dimensions (from hundreds to less than five) arises from the strong correlations between different species at any time and is insensitive to the form of the nonlinear interactions, network architecture, and to a wide range of values of rate constants and concentrations. We relate temporal changes in the eigenvalue spectrum of the covariance matrix to low-dimensional, local changes in directions of the system trajectory embedded in much larger dimensions using elementary differential geometry. We illustrate how to extract biologically relevant insights such as identifying significant timescales and groups of correlated chemical species from our analysis. Our work provides for the first time, to our knowledge, a theoretical underpinning for the successful experimental analysis and points to a way to extract mechanisms from large-scale high-throughput datasets.

  14. Positive Correlation Between Academic Library Services and High-Impact Practices for

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saori Wendy Herman, MLIS, AHIP

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To investigate the perceived alignment between academic library services and high-impact practices (HIPs that affect student retention. Design – Survey questionnaire. Setting – Public comprehensive universities in the United States of America with a Carnegie classification of master’s level as of January 2013. Subjects – 68 library deans or directors out of the 271 who were originally contacted. Methods – The author used Qualtrics software to create a survey based on the HIPs, tested the survey for reliability, and then distributed it to 271 universities. Library services were grouped into 1 of 3 library scales: library collection, library instruction, or library facilities. The survey consisted of a matrix of 10 Likert-style questions addressing the perceived level of alignment between the library scales and the HIPs. Each question provided an opportunity for the respondent to enter a “brief description of support practices” (p 477. Additional demographic questions addressed the years of experience of the respondent, undergraduate student enrollment of the university, and whether librarians held faculty rank. Main Results – The author measured Pearson correlation coefficients and found a positive correlation between the library scales and the HIPs. All three library scales displayed a moderately strong positive correlation between first-year seminars and experiences (HIP 1, common intellectual experiences (HIP 2, writing-intensive courses (HIP 4, undergraduate research (HIP 6, diversity and global learning (HIP 7, service learning and community-based learning (HIP 8, internships (HIP 9, and capstone courses and projects (HIP 10. The library collections scale and library facilities scale displayed a moderately strong correlation with learning communities (HIP 3 and collaborative assignments and projects (HIP 5. The library instruction scale displayed a strong positive correlation with HIP 3 and a very strong

  15. Strong electron correlation in the decomposition reaction of dioxetanone with implications for firefly bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Loren; Mazziotti, David A

    2010-10-28

    Dioxetanone, a key component of the bioluminescence of firefly luciferin, is itself a chemiluminescent molecule due to two conical intersections on its decomposition reaction surface. While recent calculations of firefly luciferin have employed four electrons in four active orbitals [(4,4)] for the dioxetanone moiety, a study of dioxetanone [F. Liu et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 6181 (2009)] indicates that a much larger active space is required. Using a variational calculation of the two-electron reduced-density-matrix (2-RDM) [D. A. Mazziotti, Acc. Chem. Res. 39, 207 (2006)], we present the ground-state potential energy surface as a function of active spaces from (4,4) to (20,17) to determine the number of molecular orbitals required for a correct treatment of the strong electron correlation near the conical intersections. Because the 2-RDM method replaces exponentially scaling diagonalizations with polynomially scaling semidefinite optimizations, we readily computed large (18,15) and (20,17) active spaces that are inaccessible to traditional wave function methods. Convergence of the electron correlation with active-space size was measured with complementary RDM-based metrics, the von Neumann entropy of the one-electron RDM as well as the Frobenius and infinity norms of the cumulant 2-RDM. Results show that the electron correlation is not correctly described until the (14,12) active space with small variations present through the (20,17) space. Specifically, for active spaces smaller than (14,12), we demonstrate that at the first conical intersection, the electron in the σ(∗) orbital of the oxygen-oxygen bond is substantially undercorrelated with the electron of the σ orbital and overcorrelated with the electron of the carbonyl oxygen's p orbital. Based on these results, we estimate that in contrast to previous treatments, an accurate calculation of the strong electron correlation in firefly luciferin requires an active space of 28 electrons in 25 orbitals

  16. Holstein-Primakoff representation and supercoherent states for strongly correlated electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azakov, S.

    1999-09-01

    First we show that the algebra of operators entering the Hamiltonian of the t-J model describing the strongly correlated electron system is graded spl(2.1) algebra. Then after a brief discussion of its atypical representations we construct the Holstein-Primakoff nonlinear realization of these operators which allows to carry out the systematic semiclassical approximation, similarly to the spin-wave theory of localized magnetism. The fact that the t-J model describes the itinerant magnetism is reflected in the presence of the spinless fermions. For the supersymmetric spl(2.1) algebra the supercoherent states are proposed and the partition function of the t-J model is represented as a path integral with the help of these states. (author)

  17. Strongly correlated quasi-one-dimensional bands: Ground states, optical absorption, and phonons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.K.; Gammel, J.T.; Loh, E.Y. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Using the Lanczos method for exact diagonalization on systems up to 14 sites, combined with a novel ''phase randomization'' technique for extracting more information from these small systems, we investigate several aspects of the one-dimensional Peierls-Hubbard Hamiltonian, in the context of trans-polyacetylene: the dependence of the ground state dimerization on the strength of the electron-electron interactions, including the effects of ''off-diagonal'' Coulomb terms generally ignored in the Hubbard model; the phonon vibrational frequencies and dispersion relations, and the optical absorption properties, including the spectrum of absorptions as a function of photon energy. These three different observables provide considerable insight into the effects of electron-electron interactions on the properties of real materials and thus into the nature of strongly correlated electron systems. 29 refs., 11 figs

  18. Hard X-ray PhotoEmission Spectroscopy of strongly correlated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaccione, Giancarlo; Offi, Francesco; Sacchi, Maurizio; Torelli, Piero

    2008-06-01

    Hard X-ray PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a new tool for the study of bulk electronic properties of solids using synchrotron radiation. We review recent achievements of HAXPES, with particular reference to the VOLPE project, showing that high energy resolution and bulk sensitivity can be obtained at kinetic energies of 6-8 keV. We present also the results of recent studies on strongly correlated materials, such as vanadium sesquioxide and bilayered manganites, revealing the presence of different screening properties in the bulk with respect to the surface. We discuss the relevant experimental features of the metal-insulator transition in these materials. To cite this article: G. Panaccione et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  19. Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations of Strongly-Correlated Systems, the Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-07

    In this final report, we present preliminary results of ground state phases of interacting spinless Dirac fermions. The name "Dirac fermion" originates from the fact that low-energy excitations of electrons hopping on the honeycomb lattice are described by a relativistic Dirac equation. Dirac fermions have received much attention particularly after the seminal work of Haldale1 which shows that the quantum Hall physics can be realized on the honeycomb lattice without magnetic fields. Haldane's work later becomes the foundation of topological insulators (TIs). While the physics of TIs is based largely on spin-orbit coupled non-interacting electrons, it was conjectured that topological insulators can be induced by strong correlations alone.

  20. Quantum physics of light and matter photons, atoms, and strongly correlated systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salasnich, Luca

    2017-01-01

    This compact but exhaustive textbook, now in its significantly revised and expanded second edition, provides an essential introduction to the field quantization of light and matter with applications to atomic physics and strongly correlated systems. Following an initial review of the origins of special relativity and quantum mechanics, individual chapters are devoted to the second quantization of the electromagnetic field and the consequences of light field quantization for the description of electromagnetic transitions. The spin of the electron is then analyzed, with particular attention to its derivation from the Dirac equation. Subsequent topics include the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the atomic spectra and the properties of systems composed of many interacting identical particles. The book also provides a detailed explanation of the second quantization of the non-relativistic matter field, i.e., the Schrödinger field, which offers a powerful tool for the investigation of many-body...

  1. Long Range Order and Spin-Fluctuations in Strongly Correlated Electron System with Valence Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, P. A.; Menushenkov, A. P.; Mignot, J.-M.; Nemkovski, K. S.; Yaroslavtsev, A. A.; Kozlenko, D. P.

    Rare-earth based strongly correlated electron systems (SCES) exhibit a large variety of different ground states, ranging from the simple paramagnetism of crystal-field-split f-electron multiplets to highly unconventional Kondo-insulator states with a combination of charge gap, spin gap and valence instability, in which long-range magnetic order can eventually arise from an initially singlet state. The physical background for these properties of the electron subsystem may be clarified by performing detailed neutron scattering experiments, namely magnetic neutron scattering spectroscopy and diffraction. This report reviews the results of the previous and new experimental studies on a number of rare-earth intermetallic compounds, which shed light on peculiar features of those unusual ground states.

  2. Quantum criticality and emergence of the T/B scaling in strongly correlated metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shinji; Miyake, Kazumasa

    2016-01-01

    A new type of scaling observed in heavy-electron metal β-YbAlB 4 , where the magnetic susceptibility is expressed as a single scaling function of the ratio of temperature T and magnetic field B over four decades, is examined theoretically. We develop the mode-coupling theory for critical Yb-valence fluctuations under a magnetic field, verifying that the T/B scaling behavior appears near the QCP of the valence transition. Emergence of the T/B scaling indicates the presence of the small characteristic temperature of the critical Yb-valence fluctuation due to the strong local correlation effect. It is discussed that the T/B scaling as well as the unconventional criticality is explained from the viewpoint of the quantum valence criticality in a unified way.

  3. Strongly correlated impurity band superconductivity in diamond: X-ray spectroscopic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baskaran

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent X-ray absorption study in boron doped diamond, Nakamura et al. have seen a well isolated narrow boron impurity band in non-superconducting samples and an additional narrow band at the chemical potential in a superconducting sample. We interpret the beautiful spectra as evidence for upper Hubbard band of a Mott insulating impurity band and an additional metallic 'mid-gap band' of a conducting 'self-doped' Mott insulator. This supports the basic framework of a recent theory of the present author of strongly correlated impurity band superconductivity (impurity band resonating valence bond, IBRVB theory in a template of a wide-gap insulator, with no direct involvement of valence band states.

  4. Collective oscillations of strongly correlated one-dimensional bosons on a lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, M; Rousseau, V; Scalettar, R T; Singh, R R P

    2005-09-09

    We study the dipole oscillations of strongly correlated 1D bosons, in the hard-core limit, on a lattice, by an exact numerical approach. We show that far from the regime where a Mott insulator appears in the system, damping is always present and increases for larger initial displacements of the trap, causing dramatic changes in the momentum distribution, n(k). When a Mott insulator sets in the middle of the trap, the center of mass barely moves after an initial displacement, and n(k) remains very similar to the one in the ground state. We also study changes introduced by the damping in the natural orbital occupations, and the revival of the center-of-mass oscillations after long times.

  5. Strongly correlated Fermi-systems: Non-Fermi liquid behavior, quasiparticle effective mass and their interplay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaginyan, V.R. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RAS, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: vrshag@thd.pnpi.spb.ru; Amusia, M.Ya. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Popov, K.G. [Komi Science Center, Ural Division, RAS, Syktyvkar 167982 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Basing on the density functional theory of fermion condensation, we analyze the non-Fermi liquid behavior of strongly correlated Fermi-systems such as heavy-fermion metals. When deriving equations for the effective mass of quasiparticles, we consider solids with a lattice and homogeneous systems. We show that the low-temperature thermodynamic and transport properties are formed by quasiparticles, while the dependence of the effective mass on temperature, number density, magnetic fields, etc., gives rise to the non-Fermi liquid behavior. Our theoretical study of the heat capacity, magnetization, energy scales, the longitudinal magnetoresistance and magnetic entropy are in good agreement with the remarkable recent facts collected on the heavy-fermion metal YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}.

  6. Strongly correlated Fermi-systems: Non-Fermi liquid behavior, quasiparticle effective mass and their interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaginyan, V.R.; Amusia, M.Ya.; Popov, K.G.

    2009-01-01

    Basing on the density functional theory of fermion condensation, we analyze the non-Fermi liquid behavior of strongly correlated Fermi-systems such as heavy-fermion metals. When deriving equations for the effective mass of quasiparticles, we consider solids with a lattice and homogeneous systems. We show that the low-temperature thermodynamic and transport properties are formed by quasiparticles, while the dependence of the effective mass on temperature, number density, magnetic fields, etc., gives rise to the non-Fermi liquid behavior. Our theoretical study of the heat capacity, magnetization, energy scales, the longitudinal magnetoresistance and magnetic entropy are in good agreement with the remarkable recent facts collected on the heavy-fermion metal YbRh 2 Si 2 .

  7. Respiratory insufficiency correlated strongly with mortality of rodents infected with West Nile virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Morrey

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV disease can be fatal for high-risk patients. Since WNV or its antigens have been identified in multiple anatomical locations of the central nervous system of persons or rodent models, one cannot know where to investigate the actual mechanism of mortality without careful studies in animal models. In this study, depressed respiratory functions measured by plethysmography correlated strongly with mortality. This respiratory distress, as well as reduced oxygen saturation, occurred beginning as early as 4 days before mortality. Affected medullary respiratory control cells may have contributed to the animals' respiratory insufficiency, because WNV antigen staining was present in neurons located in the ventrolateral medulla. Starvation or dehydration would be irrelevant in people, but could cause death in rodents due to lethargy or loss of appetite. Animal experiments were performed to exclude this possibility. Plasma ketones were increased in moribund infected hamsters, but late-stage starvation markers were not apparent. Moreover, daily subcutaneous administration of 5% dextrose in physiological saline solution did not improve survival or other disease signs. Therefore, infected hamsters did not die from starvation or dehydration. No cerebral edema was apparent in WNV- or sham-infected hamsters as determined by comparing wet-to-total weight ratios of brains, or by evaluating blood-brain-barrier permeability using Evans blue dye penetration into brains. Limited vasculitis was present in the right atrium of the heart of infected hamsters, but abnormal electrocardiograms for several days leading up to mortality did not occur. Since respiratory insufficiency was strongly correlated with mortality more than any other pathological parameter, it is the likely cause of death in rodents. These animal data and a poor prognosis for persons with respiratory insufficiency support the hypothesis that neurological lesions affecting respiratory

  8. The shot noise of a strongly correlated quantum dot coupled to the Luttinger liquid leads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kai-Hua; He, Xian; Wang, Huai-Yu; Liu, Kai-Di; Liu, Bei-Yun

    2014-01-01

    We study the shot noise of a strongly correlated quantum dot weakly coupled to Luttinger liquid leads in the Kondo regime by means of the extended equation of motion method. A general zero-frequency shot noise formula with good convergence is derived. The shot noise exhibits a non-monotonic dependence on voltage for weak intralead interaction. There is a peak around the Kondo temperature at low voltage when the interaction is very weak, and its height decreases rapidly with the intralead interaction increasing. When the interaction is moderately strong the peak disappears and the shot noise scales as a power law in bias voltage, indicating that the intralead electron interaction suppresses the shot noise. It is possible that the measurements of the shot noise spectrum can extract the information of the intralead interaction. - Highlights: • The shot noise of a dot coupled to Luttinger liquid leads in the Kondo regime. • A shot noise formula is derived. • Intralead interaction suppresses the shot noise. • The noise shows different voltage-dependence for different intralead interaction

  9. Nocturnal activity positively correlated with auditory sensitivity in noctuoid moths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Hofstede, Hannah M; Ratcliffe, John M; Fullard, James H

    2008-06-23

    We investigated the relationship between predator detection threshold and antipredator behaviour in noctuoid moths. Moths with ears sensitive to the echolocation calls of insectivorous bats use avoidance manoeuvres in flight to evade these predators. Earless moths generally fly less than eared species as a primary defence against predation by bats. For eared moths, however, there is interspecific variation in auditory sensitivity. At the species level, and when controlling for shared evolutionary history, nocturnal flight time and auditory sensitivity were positively correlated in moths, a relationship that most likely reflects selection pressure from aerial-hawking bats. We suggest that species-specific differences in the detection of predator cues are important but often overlooked factors in the evolution and maintenance of antipredator behaviour.

  10. Variation in Rural African Gut Microbiota Is Strongly Correlated with Colonization by Entamoeba and Subsistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Elise R.; Lynch, Joshua; Froment, Alain; Lafosse, Sophie; Heyer, Evelyne; Przeworski, Molly; Blekhman, Ran; Ségurel, Laure

    2015-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is impacted by host nutrition and health status and therefore represents a potentially adaptive phenotype influenced by metabolic and immune constraints. Previous studies contrasting rural populations in developing countries to urban industrialized ones have shown that industrialization is strongly correlated with patterns in human gut microbiota; however, we know little about the relative contribution of factors such as climate, diet, medicine, hygiene practices, host genetics, and parasitism. Here, we focus on fine-scale comparisons of African rural populations in order to (i) contrast the gut microbiota of populations inhabiting similar environments but having different traditional subsistence modes and either shared or distinct genetic ancestry, and (ii) examine the relationship between gut parasites and bacterial communities. Characterizing the fecal microbiota of Pygmy hunter-gatherers as well as Bantu individuals from both farming and fishing populations in Southwest Cameroon, we found that the gut parasite Entamoeba is significantly correlated with microbiome composition and diversity. We show that across populations, colonization by this protozoa can be predicted with 79% accuracy based on the composition of an individual's gut microbiota, and that several of the taxa most important for distinguishing Entamoeba absence or presence are signature taxa for autoimmune disorders. We also found gut communities to vary significantly with subsistence mode, notably with some taxa previously shown to be enriched in other hunter-gatherers groups (in Tanzania and Peru) also discriminating hunter-gatherers from neighboring farming or fishing populations in Cameroon. PMID:26619199

  11. Electronic structure calculations of atomic transport properties in uranium dioxide: influence of strong correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorado, B.

    2010-09-01

    Uranium dioxide UO 2 is the standard nuclear fuel used in pressurized water reactors. During in-reactor operation, the fission of uranium atoms yields a wide variety of fission products (FP) which create numerous point defects while slowing down in the material. Point defects and FP govern in turn the evolution of the fuel physical properties under irradiation. In this study, we use electronic structure calculations in order to better understand the fuel behavior under irradiation. In particular, we investigate point defect behavior, as well as the stability of three volatile FP: iodine, krypton and xenon. In order to take into account the strong correlations of uranium 5f electrons in UO 2 , we use the DFT+U approximation, based on the density functional theory. This approximation, however, creates numerous metastable states which trap the system and induce discrepancies in the results reported in the literature. To solve this issue and to ensure the ground state is systematically approached as much as possible, we use a method based on electronic occupancy control of the correlated orbitals. We show that the DFT+U approximation, when used with electronic occupancy control, can describe accurately point defect and fission product behavior in UO 2 and provide quantitative information regarding point defect transport properties in the oxide fuel. (author)

  12. Concepts relating magnetic interactions, intertwined electronic orders, and strongly correlated superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. C. Séamus; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional superconductivity (SC) is said to occur when Cooper pair formation is dominated by repulsive electron–electron interactions, so that the symmetry of the pair wave function is other than an isotropic s-wave. The strong, on-site, repulsive electron–electron interactions that are the proximate cause of such SC are more typically drivers of commensurate magnetism. Indeed, it is the suppression of commensurate antiferromagnetism (AF) that usually allows this type of unconventional superconductivity to emerge. Importantly, however, intervening between these AF and SC phases, intertwined electronic ordered phases (IP) of an unexpected nature are frequently discovered. For this reason, it has been extremely difficult to distinguish the microscopic essence of the correlated superconductivity from the often spectacular phenomenology of the IPs. Here we introduce a model conceptual framework within which to understand the relationship between AF electron–electron interactions, IPs, and correlated SC. We demonstrate its effectiveness in simultaneously explaining the consequences of AF interactions for the copper-based, iron-based, and heavy-fermion superconductors, as well as for their quite distinct IPs. PMID:24114268

  13. Variation in Rural African Gut Microbiota Is Strongly Correlated with Colonization by Entamoeba and Subsistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Elise R; Lynch, Joshua; Froment, Alain; Lafosse, Sophie; Heyer, Evelyne; Przeworski, Molly; Blekhman, Ran; Ségurel, Laure

    2015-11-01

    The human gut microbiota is impacted by host nutrition and health status and therefore represents a potentially adaptive phenotype influenced by metabolic and immune constraints. Previous studies contrasting rural populations in developing countries to urban industrialized ones have shown that industrialization is strongly correlated with patterns in human gut microbiota; however, we know little about the relative contribution of factors such as climate, diet, medicine, hygiene practices, host genetics, and parasitism. Here, we focus on fine-scale comparisons of African rural populations in order to (i) contrast the gut microbiota of populations inhabiting similar environments but having different traditional subsistence modes and either shared or distinct genetic ancestry, and (ii) examine the relationship between gut parasites and bacterial communities. Characterizing the fecal microbiota of Pygmy hunter-gatherers as well as Bantu individuals from both farming and fishing populations in Southwest Cameroon, we found that the gut parasite Entamoeba is significantly correlated with microbiome composition and diversity. We show that across populations, colonization by this protozoa can be predicted with 79% accuracy based on the composition of an individual's gut microbiota, and that several of the taxa most important for distinguishing Entamoeba absence or presence are signature taxa for autoimmune disorders. We also found gut communities to vary significantly with subsistence mode, notably with some taxa previously shown to be enriched in other hunter-gatherers groups (in Tanzania and Peru) also discriminating hunter-gatherers from neighboring farming or fishing populations in Cameroon.

  14. Serum uric acid levels correlate with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikbilek, A; Gencer, Z K; Saydam, L; Zararsiz, G; Tanik, N; Ozkiris, M

    2014-01-01

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a frequently encountered condition that can severely affect the quality of life. In this study, we aimed to assess the possible relations between serum uric acid (SUA) levels and BPPV. Fifty patients with BPPV, and 40 age- and sex-matched control subjects were enrolled in the study. All the patients and controls underwent a complete audio-vestibular test battery including the Dix-Hallpike maneuver and supine roll test for posterior semicircular canal (PSC) and horizontal semicircular canal, respectively. Routine hematological and biochemical analyses were performed in both groups. In the BPPV group, measurements of SUA levels were repeated 1 month after the vertigo attack. The lipid profiles and SUA levels were higher in patients with BPPV than detected in controls (P vertigo attack compared with the values obtained during the attack (P 0.05). Elevated SUA is positively correlated with BPPV, requiring further efforts to clarify the exact mechanism. © 2013 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2013 EFNS.

  15. Computational time-resolved and resonant x-ray scattering of strongly correlated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansil, Arun [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-11-09

    Basic-Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy (BES/DOE) has made large investments in x-ray sources in the U.S. (NSLS-II, LCLS, NGLS, ALS, APS) as powerful enabling tools for opening up unprecedented new opportunities for exploring properties of matter at various length and time scales. The coming online of the pulsed photon source, literally allows us to see and follow the dynamics of processes in materials at their natural timescales. There is an urgent need therefore to develop theoretical methodologies and computational models for understanding how x-rays interact with matter and the related spectroscopies of materials. The present project addressed aspects of this grand challenge of x-ray science. In particular, our Collaborative Research Team (CRT) focused on developing viable computational schemes for modeling x-ray scattering and photoemission spectra of strongly correlated materials in the time-domain. The vast arsenal of formal/numerical techniques and approaches encompassed by the members of our CRT were brought to bear through appropriate generalizations and extensions to model the pumped state and the dynamics of this non-equilibrium state, and how it can be probed via x-ray absorption (XAS), emission (XES), resonant and non-resonant x-ray scattering, and photoemission processes. We explored the conceptual connections between the time-domain problems and other second-order spectroscopies, such as resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) because RIXS may be effectively thought of as a pump-probe experiment in which the incoming photon acts as the pump, and the fluorescent decay is the probe. Alternatively, when the core-valence interactions are strong, one can view K-edge RIXS for example, as the dynamic response of the material to the transient presence of a strong core-hole potential. Unlike an actual pump-probe experiment, here there is no mechanism for adjusting the time-delay between the pump and the probe. However, the core hole

  16. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory: A New Way To Treat Strongly Correlated Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G; Li Manni, Giovanni; Carlson, Rebecca K; Hoyer, Chad E; Bao, Junwei Lucas

    2017-01-17

    The electronic energy of a system provides the Born-Oppenheimer potential energy for internuclear motion and thus determines molecular structure and spectra, bond energies, conformational energies, reaction barrier heights, and vibrational frequencies. The development of more efficient and more accurate ways to calculate the electronic energy of systems with inherently multiconfigurational electronic structure is essential for many applications, including transition metal and actinide chemistry, systems with partially broken bonds, many transition states, and most electronically excited states. Inherently multiconfigurational systems are called strongly correlated systems or multireference systems, where the latter name refers to the need for using more than one ("multiple") configuration state function to provide a good zero-order reference wave function. This Account describes multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which was developed as a way to combine the advantages of wave function theory (WFT) and density functional theory (DFT) to provide a better treatment of strongly correlated systems. First we review background material: the widely used Kohn-Sham DFT (which uses only a single Slater determinant as reference wave function), multiconfiguration WFT methods that treat inherently multiconfigurational systems based on an active space, and previous attempts to combine multiconfiguration WFT with DFT. Then we review the formulation of MC-PDFT. It is a generalization of Kohn-Sham DFT in that the electron kinetic energy and classical electrostatic energy are calculated from a reference wave function, while the rest of the energy is obtained from a density functional. However, there are two main differences with respent to Kohn-Sham DFT: (i) The reference wave function is multiconfigurational rather than being a single Slater determinant. (ii) The density functional is a function of the total density and the on-top pair density rather than

  17. Exchange and spin-fluctuation superconducting pairing in the strong correlation limit of the Hubbard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plakida, N. M.; Anton, L.; Adam, S. . Department of Theoretical Physics, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, PO Box MG-6, RO-76900 Bucharest - Magurele; RO); Adam, Gh. . Department of Theoretical Physics, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, PO Box MG-6, RO-76900 Bucharest - Magurele; RO)

    2001-01-01

    A microscopical theory of superconductivity in the two-band singlet-hole Hubbard model, in the strong coupling limit in a paramagnetic state, is developed. The model Hamiltonian is obtained by projecting the p-d model to an asymmetric Hubbard model with the lower Hubbard subband occupied by one-hole Cu d-like states and the upper Hubbard subband occupied by two-hole p-d singlet states. The model requires two microscopical parameters only, the p-d hybridization parameter t and the charge-transfer gap Δ. It was previously shown to secure an appropriate description of the normal state properties of the high -T c cuprates. To treat rigorously the strong correlations, the Hubbard operator technique within the projection method for the Green function is used. The Dyson equation is derived. In the molecular field approximation, d-wave superconducting pairing of conventional hole (electron) pairs in one Hubbard subband is found, which is mediated by the exchange interaction given by the interband hopping, J ij = 4 (t ij ) 2 / Δ. The normal and anomalous components of the self-energy matrix are calculated in the self-consistent Born approximation for the electron-spin-fluctuation scattering mediated by kinematic interaction of the second order of the intraband hopping. The derived numerical and analytical solutions predict the occurrence of singlet d x 2 -y 2 -wave pairing both in the d-hole and singlet Hubbard subbands. The gap functions and T c are calculated for different hole concentrations. The exchange interaction is shown to be the most important pairing interaction in the Hubbard model in the strong correlation limit, while the spin-fluctuation coupling results only in a moderate enhancement of T c . The smaller weight of the latter comes from two specific features: its vanishing inside the Brillouin zone (BZ) along the lines, |k x | + |k y |=π pointing towards the hot spots and the existence of a small energy shell within which the pairing is effective. By

  18. GONOME: measuring correlations between GO terms and genomic positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Timothy L

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Current methods to find significantly under- and over-represented gene ontology (GO terms in a set of genes consider the genes as equally probable "balls in a bag", as may be appropriate for transcripts in micro-array data. However, due to the varying length of genes and intergenic regions, that approach is inappropriate for deciding if any GO terms are correlated with a set of genomic positions. Results: We present an algorithm – GONOME – that can determine which GO terms are significantly associated with a set of genomic positions given a genome annotated with (at least the starts and ends of genes. We show that certain GO terms may appear to be significantly associated with a set of randomly chosen positions in the human genome if gene lengths are not considered, and that these same terms have been reported as significantly over-represented in a number of recent papers. This apparent over-representation disappears when gene lengths are considered, as GONOME does. For example, we show that, when gene length is taken into account, the term "development" is not significantly enriched in genes associated with human CpG islands, in contradiction to a previous report. We further demonstrate the efficacy of GONOME by showing that occurrences of the proteosome-associated control element (PACE upstream activating sequence in the S. cerevisiae genome associate significantly to appropriate GO terms. An extension of this approach yields a whole-genome motif discovery algorithm that allows identification of many other promoter sequences linked to different types of genes, including a large group of previously unknown motifs significantly associated with the terms 'translation' and 'translational elongation'. Conclusion: GONOME is an algorithm that correctly extracts over-represented GO terms from a set of genomic positions. By explicitly considering gene size, GONOME avoids a systematic bias toward GO terms linked to large genes

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and strongly correlated electrons on honeycomb structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Thomas C.

    2010-12-16

    In this thesis we apply recently developed, as well as sophisticated quantum Monte Carlo methods to numerically investigate models of strongly correlated electron systems on honeycomb structures. The latter are of particular interest owing to their unique properties when simulating electrons on them, like the relativistic dispersion, strong quantum fluctuations and their resistance against instabilities. This work covers several projects including the advancement of the weak-coupling continuous time quantum Monte Carlo and its application to zero temperature and phonons, quantum phase transitions of valence bond solids in spin-1/2 Heisenberg systems using projector quantum Monte Carlo in the valence bond basis, and the magnetic field induced transition to a canted antiferromagnet of the Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice. The emphasis lies on two projects investigating the phase diagram of the SU(2) and the SU(N)-symmetric Hubbard model on the hexagonal lattice. At sufficiently low temperatures, condensed-matter systems tend to develop order. An exception are quantum spin-liquids, where fluctuations prevent a transition to an ordered state down to the lowest temperatures. Previously elusive in experimentally relevant microscopic two-dimensional models, we show by means of large-scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the SU(2) Hubbard model on the honeycomb lattice, that a quantum spin-liquid emerges between the state described by massless Dirac fermions and an antiferromagnetically ordered Mott insulator. This unexpected quantum-disordered state is found to be a short-range resonating valence bond liquid, akin to the one proposed for high temperature superconductors. Inspired by the rich phase diagrams of SU(N) models we study the SU(N)-symmetric Hubbard Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet on the honeycomb lattice to investigate the reliability of 1/N corrections to large-N results by means of numerically exact QMC simulations. We study the melting of phases

  20. ZFX Overexpression in Breast Cancer Positively Correlates with Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboube Ganji-Arjenaki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: As the third most frequent cause of cancer death, breast cancer is a common disease worldwide. Most of the patients are being diagnosed in the stage that conventional treatments are not effective, and invasion and metastases lead to death. Therefore, identification of novel molecular markers to improve early diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the breast cancer is a necessity. Zinc finger X-linked (ZFX gene is a member of ZFY family, which they upregulation has been demonstrated in several types of cancer. The aim of this study was to assess ZFX gene expression in Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues of the breast cancer invasive ductal carcinoma and to investigate its correlation with clinicopathological parameters. Materials and Methods: A total of 52 tumor and non-tumor breast specimens were evaluated for ZFX gene expression using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Total RNA extraction was performed using RNeasy FFPE kit (Qiagene. complementary DNA (cDNA synthesis was performed using PrimeScript-RT Master Mix (Takara. The PCR mixture containing SYBR® Premix Ex Taq ™ II (Takara Bio Inc., Otsu, Japan, was run on the Rotor-gene 3000 (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany Results: The ZFX expression increased significantly in breast tumor tissues compared with non-tumor breast tissues. We further showed that there was a positive correlation between the ZFX gene expression level and lymphatic invasion. Conclusion: ZFX might be used as a potential biomarker to monitor breast carcinoma progression. Further studies to determine the mechanism of action of ZFX is needed to unravel the role of this gene in breast cancer pathogenesis.

  1. Designing, Probing, and Stabilizing Exotic Fabry-Perot Cavities for Studying Strongly Correlated Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryou, Albert

    Synthetic materials made of engineered quasiparticles are a powerful platform for studying manybody physics and strongly correlated systems due to their bottom-up approach to Hamiltonian modeling. Photonic quasiparticles called polaritons are particularly appealing since they inherit fast dynamics from light and strong interaction from matter. This thesis describes the experimental demonstration of cavity Rydberg polaritons, which are composite particles arising from the hybridization of an optical cavity with Rydberg EIT, as well as the tools for probing and stabilizing the cavity. We first describe the design, construction, and testing of a four-mirror Fabry-Perot cavity, whose small waist size on the order of 10 microns is comparable to the Rydberg blockade radius. By achieving strong coupling between the cavity photon and an atomic ensemble undergoing electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we observe the emergence of the dark-state polariton and characterize its single-body properties as well as the single-quantum nonlinearity. We then describe the implementation of a holographic spatial light modulator for exciting different transverse modes of the cavity, an essential tool for studying polariton-polariton scattering. For compensating optical aberrations, we employ a digital micromirror device (DMD), combining beam shaping with adaptive optics to produce diffraction-limited light. We quantitatively measure the purity of the DMD-produced Hermite-Gauss modes and confirm up to 99.2% efficiency. One application of the technique is to create Laguerre-Gauss modes, which have been used to probe synthetic Landau levels for photons in a twisted, nonplanar cavity. Finally, we describe the implementation of an FPGA-based FIR filter for stabilizing the cavity. We digitally cancel the acoustical resonances of the feedback-controlled mechanical system, thereby demonstrating an order-of-magnitude enhancement in the feedback bandwidth from 200 Hz to more than 2 k

  2. Intricacies of modern supercomputing illustrated with recent advances in simulations of strongly correlated electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulthess, Thomas C.

    2013-03-01

    The continued thousand-fold improvement in sustained application performance per decade on modern supercomputers keeps opening new opportunities for scientific simulations. But supercomputers have become very complex machines, built with thousands or tens of thousands of complex nodes consisting of multiple CPU cores or, most recently, a combination of CPU and GPU processors. Efficient simulations on such high-end computing systems require tailored algorithms that optimally map numerical methods to particular architectures. These intricacies will be illustrated with simulations of strongly correlated electron systems, where the development of quantum cluster methods, Monte Carlo techniques, as well as their optimal implementation by means of algorithms with improved data locality and high arithmetic density have gone hand in hand with evolving computer architectures. The present work would not have been possible without continued access to computing resources at the National Center for Computational Science of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is funded by the Facilities Division of the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, and the Swiss National Supercomputing Center (CSCS) that is funded by ETH Zurich.

  3. Supersolidity of lattice bosons immersed in strongly correlated Rydberg dressed atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongqiang; Geißler, Andreas; Hofstetter, Walter; Li, Weibin

    2018-02-01

    Recent experiments have illustrated that long-range two-body interactions can be induced by laser coupling atoms to highly excited Rydberg states. Stimulated by this achievement, we study the supersolidity of lattice bosons in an experimentally relevant situation. In our setup, we consider two-component atoms on a square lattice, where one species is weakly dressed to an electronically high-lying (Rydberg) state, generating a tunable, soft-core shape long-range interaction. Interactions between atoms of the second species and between the two species are characterized by local inter- and intraspecies interactions. Using a dynamical mean-field calculation, we find that interspecies on-site interactions can stabilize a pronounced region of supersolid phases. This is characterized by two distinctive types of supersolids, where the bare species forms supersolid phases that are immersed in strongly correlated quantum phases, i.e., a crystalline solid or supersolid of the dressed atoms. We show that the interspecies interaction leads to a rotonlike instability in the bare species and therefore is crucially important to the supersolid formation. We provide a detailed calculation of the interaction potential to show how our results can be explored under current experimental conditions.

  4. Strong Tracking Filter for Nonlinear Systems with Randomly Delayed Measurements and Correlated Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel strong tracking filter (STF, which is suitable for dealing with the filtering problem of nonlinear systems when the following cases occur: that is, the constructed model does not match the actual system, the measurements have the one-step random delay, and the process and measurement noises are correlated at the same epoch. Firstly, a framework of decoupling filter (DF based on equivalent model transformation is derived. Further, according to the framework of DF, a new extended Kalman filtering (EKF algorithm via using first-order linearization approximation is developed. Secondly, the computational process of the suboptimal fading factor is derived on the basis of the extended orthogonality principle (EOP. Thirdly, the ultimate form of the proposed STF is obtained by introducing the suboptimal fading factor into the above EKF algorithm. The proposed STF can automatically tune the suboptimal fading factor on the basis of the residuals between available and predicted measurements and further the gain matrices of the proposed STF tune online to improve the filtering performance. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed STF has been proved through numerical simulation experiments.

  5. Finite-Temperature Variational Monte Carlo Method for Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Kensaku; Ido, Kota; Misawa, Takahiro; Yamaji, Youhei; Imada, Masatoshi

    2016-03-01

    A new computational method for finite-temperature properties of strongly correlated electrons is proposed by extending the variational Monte Carlo method originally developed for the ground state. The method is based on the path integral in the imaginary-time formulation, starting from the infinite-temperature state that is well approximated by a small number of certain random initial states. Lower temperatures are progressively reached by the imaginary-time evolution. The algorithm follows the framework of the quantum transfer matrix and finite-temperature Lanczos methods, but we extend them to treat much larger system sizes without the negative sign problem by optimizing the truncated Hilbert space on the basis of the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). This optimization algorithm is equivalent to the stochastic reconfiguration (SR) method that has been frequently used for the ground state to optimally truncate the Hilbert space. The obtained finite-temperature states allow an interpretation based on the thermal pure quantum (TPQ) state instead of the conventional canonical-ensemble average. Our method is tested for the one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models and its accuracy and efficiency are demonstrated.

  6. Electronic structure and superconductivity in strongly correlated systems in the pseudogap regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puig-Puig, L.; Lopez-Aguilar, F. [Grup d`Electromagnetisme, Departament de Fisica, Edifici Cn, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Ballaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    1995-12-15

    We propose effective potentials from a screened Coulomb interaction which arises from spin-fluctuation effects within a three-dimensional Hubbard single-band model for systems with strongly correlated electrons within the pseudogap regime. This regime is characterized by the existence in the normal state of at least two structures located at both sides of the Fermi level and split by a gap or pseudogap. This is the most crucial assumption in the analysis performed in this work. We consider the proposed effective interactions between fermions, analyzing the possibility of obtaining superconductivity by means of the formulation of the corresponding Dyson-like equations for the normal and anomalous one-body propagators in the state with bosonic condensation. We also include vertex effects within these effective fermion-fermion interactions and discuss their influence in this formalism in order to consider a Migdal-like theory appropriate to Hubbard systems. In cases where superconductivity is found, the critical temperature is obtained and the influence of the band and potential parameters is analyzed.

  7. Deterministic alternatives to the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo method for strongly correlated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubman, Norm; Whaley, Birgitta

    The development of exponential scaling methods has seen great progress in tackling larger systems than previously thought possible. One such technique, full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo, allows exact diagonalization through stochastically sampling of determinants. The method derives its utility from the information in the matrix elements of the Hamiltonian, together with a stochastic projected wave function, which are used to explore the important parts of Hilbert space. However, a stochastic representation of the wave function is not required to search Hilbert space efficiently and new deterministic approaches have recently been shown to efficiently find the important parts of determinant space. We shall discuss the technique of Adaptive Sampling Configuration Interaction (ASCI) and the related heat-bath Configuration Interaction approach for ground state and excited state simulations. We will present several applications for strongly correlated Hamiltonians. This work was supported through the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Basic Energy Sciences.

  8. PREFACE: International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems 2014 (SCES2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES) was held in Grenoble from the 7th to 11th of July on the campus of the University of Grenoble. It was a great privilege to have the conference in Grenoble after the series of meetings in Sendai (1992), San Diego (1993), Amsterdam (1994), Goa (1995), Zürich (1996), Paris (1998), Nagano (1999), Ann Arbor (2001), Krakow (2002), Karlsruhe (2004), Vienna (2005), Houston (2007), Buzios (2008), Santa Fe (2010), Cambridge (2011) and Tokyo (2013). Every three years, SCES joins the triennial conference on magnetism ICM. In 2015, ICM will take place in Barcelona. The meeting gathered an audience of 875 participants who actively interacted inside and outside of conference rooms. A large number of posters (530) was balanced with four parallel oral sessions which included 86 invited speakers and 141 short oral contributions. A useful arrangement was the possibility to put poster presentations on the website so participants could see them all through the conference week. Each morning two plenary sessions were held, ending on Friday with experimental and theoretical summaries delivered by Philipp Gegenwart (Augsburg) and Andrew Millis (Columbia). The plenary sessions were given by Gabriel Kotliar (Rutgers), Masashi Kawasaki (Tokyo), Jennifer Hoffman (Harvard), Mathias Vojta (Dresden), Ashvin Vishwanath (Berkeley), Andrea Cavalleri (Hamburg), Marc-Henri Julien (Grenoble), Neil Mathur (Cambridge), Giniyat Khaliullin (Stuttgart), and Toshiro Sakakibara (Tokyo). The parallel oral sessions were prepared by 40 symposium organizers selected by the chairman (Antoine Georges) and co-chairman (Kamran Behnia) of the Program Committee with the supplementary rule that speakers had not delivered an invited talk at the previous SCES conference held in 2013 in Tokyo. Special attention was given to help young researchers via grants to 40 overseas students. Perhaps due to the additional possibility of cheap

  9. Parallel Large-scale Semidefinite Programming for Strong Electron Correlation: Using Correlation and Entanglement in the Design of Efficient Energy-Transfer Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-24

    which nature uses strong electron correlation for efficient energy transfer, particularly in photosynthesis and bioluminescence, (ii) providing an...strong electron correlation for efficient energy transfer, particularly in photosynthesis and bioluminescence, (ii) providing an innovative paradigm...published in peer-reviewed journals (N/A for none) Enter List of papers submitted or published that acknowledge ARO support from the start of the project

  10. Serum obestatin level strongly correlates with lipoprotein subfractions in non-diabetic obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentpéteri, Anita; Lőrincz, Hajnalka; Somodi, Sándor; Varga, Viktória Evelin; Paragh, György; Seres, Ildikó; Paragh, György; Harangi, Mariann

    2018-03-05

    Obestatin is a ghrelin-associated peptide, derived from preproghrelin. Although many of its effects are unclear, accumulating evidence supports positive actions on both metabolism and cardiovascular function. To date, level of obestatin and its correlations to the lipid subfractions in non-diabetic obese (NDO) patients have not been investigated. Fifty NDO patients (BMI: 41.96 ± 8.6 kg/m 2 ) and thirty-two normal-weight, age- and gender-matched healthy controls (BMI: 24.16 ± 3.3 kg/m 2 ) were enrolled into our study. Obestatin level was measured by ELISA. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subfractions, intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) levels and mean LDL size were detected by nongradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Lipoprint). Serum level of obestatin was significantly lower in NDO patients compared to controls (3.01 ± 0.5 vs. 3.29 ± 0.6 μg/ml, p level of obestatin and BMI (r = - 0.33; p level of serum glucose (r = - 0.27, p level and the levels of ApoA1 (r = 0.25; p level (r = 0.23; p level negatively correlated with obestatin (r = - 0.32; p level. Based on our data, measurement of obestatin level in obesity may contribute to understand the interplay between gastrointestinal hormone secretion and metabolic alterations in obesity.

  11. The CN–CH Positive Correlation in the Globular Cluster NGC 5286

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Dongwook; Hong, Seungsoo; Lee, Young-Wook, E-mail: dwlim@yonsei.ac.kr, E-mail: ywlee2@yonsei.ac.kr [Center for Galaxy Evolution Research and Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, Seoul 03722 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-20

    We performed low-resolution spectroscopy of the red giant stars in the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 5286, which is known to show intrinsic heavy element abundance variations. We found that the observed stars in this GC are clearly divided into three subpopulations by CN index (CN-weak, CN-intermediate, and CN-strong). The CN-strong stars are also enhanced in the calcium HK′ (7.4 σ ) and CH (5.1 σ ) indices, while the CN-intermediate stars show no significant difference in the strength of the HK′ index from the CN-weak stars. From the comparison with high-resolution spectroscopic data, we found that the CN- and HK′-strong stars are also enhanced in the abundances of Fe and s -process elements. It appears, therefore, that these stars are later-generation stars affected by some supernova enrichment in addition to the asymptotic giant branch ejecta. In addition, unlike normal GCs, sample stars in NGC 5286 show the CN–CH positive correlation, strengthening our previous suggestion that this positive correlation is only discovered in GCs with heavy element abundance variations, such as M22 and NGC 6273.

  12. Strong asymmetry of hemispheric climates during MIS-13 inferred from correlating China loess and Antarctica ice records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. T. Guo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We correlate the China loess and Antarctica ice records to address the inter-hemispheric climate link over the past 800 ka. The results show a broad coupling between Asian and Antarctic climates at the glacial-interglacial scale. However, a number of decoupled aspects are revealed, among which marine isotope stage (MIS 13 exhibits a strong anomaly compared with the other interglacials. It is characterized by unusually positive benthic oxygen (δ18O and carbon isotope (δ13C values in the world oceans, cooler Antarctic temperature, lower summer sea surface temperature in the South Atlantic, lower CO2 and CH4 concentrations, but by extremely strong Asian, Indian and African summer monsoons, weakest Asian winter monsoon, and lowest Asian dust and iron fluxes. Pervasive warm conditions were also evidenced by the records from northern high-latitude regions. These consistently indicate a warmer Northern Hemisphere and a cooler Southern Hemisphere, and hence a strong asymmetry of hemispheric climates during MIS-13. Similar anomalies of lesser extents also occurred during MIS-11 and MIS-5e. Thus, MIS-13 provides a case that the Northern Hemisphere experienced a substantial warming under relatively low concentrations of greenhouse gases. It suggests that the global climate system possesses a natural variability that is not predictable from the simple response of northern summer insolation and atmospheric CO2 changes. During MIS-13, both hemispheres responded in different ways leading to anomalous continental, marine and atmospheric conditions at the global scale. The correlations also suggest that the marine δ18O record is not always a reliable indicator of the northern ice-volume changes, and that the asymmetry of hemispheric climates is one of the prominent factors controlling the strength of Asian, Indian and African monsoon circulations, most likely through modulating the position of

  13. Establishing a Consistent Theory of Transport in Strongly Correlated Fermi Superfluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyack, Rufus M.

    A diagrammatic method of obtaining exact gauge-invariant response functions in strongly correlated Fermi superfluids is implemented for several example condensed matter systems of current interest. These include: topological superfluids, high temperature superconductors, and superfluids with finite center-of-mass momentum pairing known as Fulde-Ferrell superfluids. Much of the literature on these systems has focused on single-particle properties or alternatively has invoked simple approximations to treat response functions. The goal is to show that, for this wide class of topical problems, one can compute exact response functions. This enables assessment of the validity of different physical scenarios and allows a very broad class of experiments to be addressed. The method developed is based on deriving the full electromagnetic vertex, which satisfies the Ward-Takahashi identity, and determining the collective modes in a manner compatible with the self-consistent gap equation. In the condensed phase of a superfluid and a superconductor, where gauge invariance is spontaneously broken, it is crucial to determine the collective modes from the gap equation in a manner which restores gauge invariance. Our diagrammatic framework provides a very general and powerful method for obtaining these collective modes in a variety of strongly correlated Fermi superfluids. We show that a full electromagnetic vertex satisfying the Ward-Takahashi identity ensures the f-sum rule is satisfied and thus charge is conserved. This diagrammatic method is implemented for both normal and superfluid phases. While there are no collective modes in the normal phase, the Ward-Takahashi identity plays a similarly important role. In particular, for the normal phase we study Rashba spin-orbit coupled Fermi gases with intrinsic pairing in the absence and presence of a magnetic field. Exact density and spin response functions are obtained, even in the absence of a spin conservation law, providing

  14. Local Magnetism in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems with Orbital Degrees of Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducatman, Samuel Charles

    The central aim of my research is to explain the connection between the macroscopic behavior and the microscopic physics of strongly correlated electron systems with orbital degrees of freedom through the use of effective models. My dissertation focuses on the sub-class of these materials where electrons appear to be localized by interactions, and magnetic ions have well measured magnetic moments. This suggests that we can capture the low-energy physics of the material by employing a minimal model featuring localized spins which interact with each other through exchange couplings. I describe Fe1+y Te and beta-Li2IrO3 with effective models primarily focusing on the spins of the magnetic ions, in this case Fe and Ir, respectively. The goal with both materials is to gain insight and make predictions for experimentalists. In chapter 2, I focus on Fe1+yTe. I describe why we believe the magnetic ground state of this material, with an observed Bragg peak at Q +/- pi/2, pi/2), can be described by a Heisenberg model with 1st, 2nd, and 3rd neighbor interactions. I present two possible ground states of this model in the small J1 limit, the bicollinear and plaquette states. In order to predict which ground state the model prefers, I calculate the spin wave spectrum with 1/S corrections, and I find the model naturally selects the "plaquette state." I give a brief description of the ways this result could be tested using experimental techniques such as polarized neutron scattering. In chapter 3, I extend the model used in chapter 2. This is necessary because the Heisenberg model we employed cannot explain why Fe1+yTe undergoes a phase transition as y is increased. We add an additional elements to our calculation; we assume that electrons in some of the Fe 3D orbitals have selectively localized while others remain itinerant. We write a new Hamiltonian, where localized moments acquire a new long-range RKKY-like interaction from interactions with the itinerant electrons. We are

  15. Electronic properties of Pu19Os simulating β-Pu: the strongly correlated Pu phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havela, L.; Mašková, S.; Kolorenč, J.; Colineau, E.; Griveau, J.-C.; Eloirdi, R.

    2018-02-01

    We established the basic electronic properties of ζ-Pu19Os, which is a close analogue to β-Pu, and its low-temperature variety, η-Pu19Os. Their magnetic susceptibility is 15% higher than for δ-Pu. A specific heat study of ζ-Pu19Os shows a soft lattice similar to δ-Pu, leading to a low Debye temperature Θ D  =  101 K. The linear electronic coefficient γ related to the quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi level points to a higher value, 55  ±  2 mJ (mol Pu K2)–1, compared to 40 mJ (mol K2)–1 for δ-Pu. The results confirm that β-Pu is probably the most strongly correlated Pu phase, as had been indicated by resistivity measurements. The volume and related Pu–Pu spacing is clearly not the primary tuning parameter for Pu metal, as the β-Pu density stands close to the ground-state α-phase and is much higher than that for δ-Pu. The η-Pu19Os phase has a record γ-value of 74  ±  2 mJ (mol Pu K2)–1. The enhancement is not reproduced by LDA+DMFT calculations in the fcc structure, which suggests that multiple diverse sites can be the key to the understanding of β-Pu.

  16. Electronic properties of Pu19Os simulating β-Pu: the strongly correlated Pu phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havela, Ladislav; Maskova, Silvie; Kolorenc, Jindrich; Colineau, E; Griveau, Jean-Christophe; Eloirdi, Rachel

    2018-01-04

    We established basic electronic properties of ζ-Pu19Os, which is a close analogue to β-Pu, and its low-temperature variety, η-Pu19Os. Their magnetic susceptibility is by 15% higher than for δ-Pu. Specific heat study of ζ-Pu19Os shows a soft lattice similar to δ-Pu, leading to a low Debye temperature ΘD = 101 K. The linear electronic coefficient γ related to the quasiparticle density of states at the Fermi level points to a higher value, 55±2 mJ/mol Pu K2, compared to 40 mJ/mol K2 for δ-Pu. The results confirm that β-Pu is probably the most strongly correlated Pu phase, as had been indicated by resistivity measurements. The volume and related Pu-Pu spacing is clearly not the primary tuning parameter for Pu metal, as the β-Pu density stands close to the ground-state α-phase and is much higher than that for δ-Pu. The η-Pu19Os phase has a record γ-value of 74±2 mJ/mol Pu K2. The enhancement is not reproduced by LDA+DMFT calculations in the fcc structure, which suggests that the multiple diverse sites can be the key to the understanding of β-Pu. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. Microchimerism is strongly correlated with tolerance to noninherited maternal antigens in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Partha; Molitor-Dart, Melanie; Bobadilla, Joseph L; Roenneburg, Drew A; Yan, Zhen; Torrealba, Jose R; Burlingham, William J

    2009-10-22

    In mice and humans, the immunologic effects of developmental exposure to noninherited maternal antigens (NIMAs) are quite variable. This heterogeneity likely reflects differences in the relative levels of NIMA-specific T regulatory (T(R)) versus T effector (T(E)) cells. We hypothesized that maintenance of NIMA-specific T(R) cells in the adult requires continuous exposure to maternal cells and antigens (eg, maternal microchimerism [MMc]). To test this idea, we used 2 sensitive quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tests to detect MMc in different organs of NIMA(d)-exposed H2(b) mice. MMc was detected in 100% of neonates and a majority (61%) of adults; nursing by a NIMA+ mother was essential for preserving MMc into adulthood. MMc was most prevalent in heart, lungs, liver, and blood, but was rarely detected in unfractionated lymphoid tissues. However, MMc was detectable in isolated CD4+, CD11b+, and CD11c+ cell subsets of spleen, and in lineage-positive cells in heart. Suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and in vivo lymphoproliferation correlated with MMc levels, suggesting a link between T(R) and maternal cell engraftment. In the absence of neonatal exposure to NIMA via breastfeeding, MMc was lost, which was accompanied by sensitization to NIMA in some offspring, indicating a role of oral exposure in maintaining a favorable T(R) > T(E) balance.

  18. Investigating short-range magnetism in strongly correlated materials via magnetic pair distribution function analysis and ab initio theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Benjamin; Page, Katharine; Brunelli, Michela; Staunton, Julie; Billinge, Simon

    Short-range magnetic correlations are known to exist in a variety of strongly correlated electron systems, but our understanding of the role they play is challenged by the difficulty of experimentally probing such correlations. Magnetic pair distribution function (mPDF) analysis is a newly developed neutron total scattering method that can reveal short-range magnetic correlations directly in real space, and may therefore help ameliorate this difficulty. We present temperature-dependent mPDF measurements of the short-range magnetic correlations in the paramagnetic phase of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. We observe significant correlations on a ~1 nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range-ordered spin arrangement. With no free parameters, ab initio calculations using the self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory quantitatively reproduce the magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. These results yield valuable insight into the magnetic exchange in MnO and showcase the utility of the mPDF technique for studying magnetic properties of strongly correlated electron systems.

  19. Matrix-product states for strongly correlated systems and quantum information processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saberi, Hamed

    2008-12-12

    This thesis offers new developments in matrix-product state theory for studying the strongly correlated systems and quantum information processing through three major projects: In the first project, we perform a systematic comparison between Wilson's numerical renormalization group (NRG) and White's density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG). The NRG method for solving quantum impurity models yields a set of energy eigenstates that have the form of matrix-product states (MPS). White's DMRG for treating quantum lattice problems can likewise be reformulated in terms of MPS. Thus, the latter constitute a common algebraic structure for both approaches. We exploit this fact to compare the NRG approach for the single-impurity Anderson model to a variational matrix-product state approach (VMPS), equivalent to single-site DMRG. For the latter, we use an ''unfolded'' Wilson chain, which brings about a significant reduction in numerical costs compared to those of NRG. We show that all NRG eigenstates (kept and discarded) can be reproduced using VMPS, and compare the difference in truncation criteria, sharp vs. smooth in energy space, of the two approaches. Finally, we demonstrate that NRG results can be improved upon systematically by performing a variational optimization in the space of variational matrix-product states, using the states produced by NRG as input. In the second project we demonstrate how the matrix-product state formalism provides a flexible structure to solve the constrained optimization problem associated with the sequential generation of entangled multiqubit states under experimental restrictions. We consider a realistic scenario in which an ancillary system with a limited number of levels performs restricted sequential interactions with qubits in a row. The proposed method relies on a suitable local optimization procedure, yielding an efficient recipe for the realistic and approximate sequential generation of any

  20. Matrix-product states for strongly correlated systems and quantum information processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saberi, Hamed

    2008-01-01

    This thesis offers new developments in matrix-product state theory for studying the strongly correlated systems and quantum information processing through three major projects: In the first project, we perform a systematic comparison between Wilson's numerical renormalization group (NRG) and White's density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG). The NRG method for solving quantum impurity models yields a set of energy eigenstates that have the form of matrix-product states (MPS). White's DMRG for treating quantum lattice problems can likewise be reformulated in terms of MPS. Thus, the latter constitute a common algebraic structure for both approaches. We exploit this fact to compare the NRG approach for the single-impurity Anderson model to a variational matrix-product state approach (VMPS), equivalent to single-site DMRG. For the latter, we use an ''unfolded'' Wilson chain, which brings about a significant reduction in numerical costs compared to those of NRG. We show that all NRG eigenstates (kept and discarded) can be reproduced using VMPS, and compare the difference in truncation criteria, sharp vs. smooth in energy space, of the two approaches. Finally, we demonstrate that NRG results can be improved upon systematically by performing a variational optimization in the space of variational matrix-product states, using the states produced by NRG as input. In the second project we demonstrate how the matrix-product state formalism provides a flexible structure to solve the constrained optimization problem associated with the sequential generation of entangled multiqubit states under experimental restrictions. We consider a realistic scenario in which an ancillary system with a limited number of levels performs restricted sequential interactions with qubits in a row. The proposed method relies on a suitable local optimization procedure, yielding an efficient recipe for the realistic and approximate sequential generation of any entangled multiqubit state. We give

  1. Population genomics of the honey bee reveals strong signatures of positive selection on worker traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harpur, Brock A; Kent, Clement F; Molodtsova, Daria; Lebon, Jonathan M D; Alqarni, Abdulaziz S; Owayss, Ayman A; Zayed, Amro

    2014-02-18

    Most theories used to explain the evolution of eusociality rest upon two key assumptions: mutations affecting the phenotype of sterile workers evolve by positive selection if the resulting traits benefit fertile kin, and that worker traits provide the primary mechanism allowing social insects to adapt to their environment. Despite the common view that positive selection drives phenotypic evolution of workers, we know very little about the prevalence of positive selection acting on the genomes of eusocial insects. We mapped the footprints of positive selection in Apis mellifera through analysis of 40 individual genomes, allowing us to identify thousands of genes and regulatory sequences with signatures of adaptive evolution over multiple timescales. We found Apoidea- and Apis-specific genes to be enriched for signatures of positive selection, indicating that novel genes play a disproportionately large role in adaptive evolution of eusocial insects. Worker-biased proteins have higher signatures of adaptive evolution relative to queen-biased proteins, supporting the view that worker traits are key to adaptation. We also found genes regulating worker division of labor to be enriched for signs of positive selection. Finally, genes associated with worker behavior based on analysis of brain gene expression were highly enriched for adaptive protein and cis-regulatory evolution. Our study highlights the significant contribution of worker phenotypes to adaptive evolution in social insects, and provides a wealth of knowledge on the loci that influence fitness in honey bees.

  2. Method of correlation operators in the theory of a system of particles with strong interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'min, Y.M.

    1985-01-01

    A similarity transformation of the density matrix is performed with the help of the correlation operator. This does not change the value of the partition function. A method of calculating the transformed partition function with the help of a finite translation operator is given. A general system of coupled equations is obtained from which the matrix elements of correlation operators of increasing order can be found

  3. Genetic signature of strong recent positive selection at interleukin-32 gene in goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Rasool Asif

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Identification of the candidate genes that play key roles in phenotypic variations can provide new information about evolution and positive selection. Interleukin (IL-32 is involved in many biological processes, however, its role for the immune response against various diseases in mammals is poorly understood. Therefore, the current investigation was performed for the better understanding of the molecular evolution and the positive selection of single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-32 gene. Methods By using fixation index (FST based method, IL-32 (9375 gene was found to be outlier and under significant positive selection with the provisional combined allocation of mean heterozygosity and FST. Using nucleotide sequences of 11 mammalian species from National Center for Biotechnology Information database, the evolutionary selection of IL-32 gene was determined using Maximum likelihood model method, through four models (M1a, M2a, M7, and M8 in Codeml program of phylogenetic analysis by maximum liklihood. Results IL-32 is detected under positive selection using the FST simulations method. The phylogenetic tree revealed that goat IL-32 was in close resemblance with sheep IL-32. The coding nucleotide sequences were compared among 11 species and it was found that the goat IL-32 gene shared identity with sheep (96.54%, bison (91.97%, camel (58.39%, cat (56.59%, buffalo (56.50%, human (56.13%, dog (50.97%, horse (54.04%, and rabbit (53.41% respectively. Conclusion This study provides evidence for IL-32 gene as under significant positive selection in goat.

  4. Genetic signature of strong recent positive selection at interleukin-32 gene in goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Akhtar Rasool; Qadri, Sumayyah; Ijaz, Nabeel; Javed, Ruheena; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Awais, Muhammd; Younus, Muhammad; Riaz, Hasan; Du, Xiaoyong

    2017-07-01

    Identification of the candidate genes that play key roles in phenotypic variations can provide new information about evolution and positive selection. Interleukin (IL)-32 is involved in many biological processes, however, its role for the immune response against various diseases in mammals is poorly understood. Therefore, the current investigation was performed for the better understanding of the molecular evolution and the positive selection of single nucleotide polymorphisms in IL-32 gene. By using fixation index ( F ST ) based method, IL-32 (9375) gene was found to be outlier and under significant positive selection with the provisional combined allocation of mean heterozygosity and F ST . Using nucleotide sequences of 11 mammalian species from National Center for Biotechnology Information database, the evolutionary selection of IL-32 gene was determined using Maximum likelihood model method, through four models (M1a, M2a, M7, and M8) in Codeml program of phylogenetic analysis by maximum liklihood. IL-32 is detected under positive selection using the F ST simulations method. The phylogenetic tree revealed that goat IL-32 was in close resemblance with sheep IL-32. The coding nucleotide sequences were compared among 11 species and it was found that the goat IL-32 gene shared identity with sheep (96.54%), bison (91.97%), camel (58.39%), cat (56.59%), buffalo (56.50%), human (56.13%), dog (50.97%), horse (54.04%), and rabbit (53.41%) respectively. This study provides evidence for IL-32 gene as under significant positive selection in goat.

  5. Algorithmic implementation of particle-particle ladder diagram approximation to study strongly-correlated metals and semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayogi, A.; Majidi, M. A.

    2017-07-01

    In condensed-matter physics, strongly-correlated systems refer to materials that exhibit variety of fascinating properties and ordered phases, depending on temperature, doping, and other factors. Such unique properties most notably arise due to strong electron-electron interactions, and in some cases due to interactions involving other quasiparticles as well. Electronic correlation effects are non-trivial that one may need a sufficiently accurate approximation technique with quite heavy computation, such as Quantum Monte-Carlo, in order to capture particular material properties arising from such effects. Meanwhile, less accurate techniques may come with lower numerical cost, but the ability to capture particular properties may highly depend on the choice of approximation. Among the many-body techniques derivable from Feynman diagrams, we aim to formulate algorithmic implementation of the Ladder Diagram approximation to capture the effects of electron-electron interactions. We wish to investigate how these correlation effects influence the temperature-dependent properties of strongly-correlated metals and semiconductors. As we are interested to study the temperature-dependent properties of the system, the Ladder diagram method needs to be applied in Matsubara frequency domain to obtain the self-consistent self-energy. However, at the end we would also need to compute the dynamical properties like density of states (DOS) and optical conductivity that are defined in the real frequency domain. For this purpose, we need to perform the analytic continuation procedure. At the end of this study, we will test the technique by observing the occurrence of metal-insulator transition in strongly-correlated metals, and renormalization of the band gap in strongly-correlated semiconductors.

  6. Positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia as correlates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) has been widely recognised in recent years as a potentially important predictor of illness outcome, and the manifestations of schizophrenia have been known to influence its early recognition as a mental illness. Objective. To assess the association between the positive ...

  7. Family correlates of depression among hiv positive patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background information: HIV infection may impact negatively on family relationship and vice versa. Members of the family of HIV positive patients may become frustrated because of the stigma of having a family member with HIV infection, and the burden of having to care for the patient. This can result into the family ...

  8. Good Health, Strong Families, and Positive Early Learning Experiences: Promoting Better Public Policies for America's Infants and Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, J. Ronald; Lurie-Hurvitz, Erica; Cohen, Julie

    2006-01-01

    The ZERO TO THREE Policy Center has three areas of focus: good health, strong families, and positive early learning experiences. Effective policies must promote healthy functioning in all domains, including cognitive, physical, and social and emotional development. Comprehensive services are essential to meeting the needs of very young children…

  9. Ferromagnetic instabilities in disordered systems in the limit of strong correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, A.N.; Troper, A.; Gomes, A.A.

    1976-05-01

    One derives the criterion for ferromagnetic instabilities in hybridized disordered systems, e.g. transition metal like systems and actinides, within the Coherent Potential Approximation (CPA), the electron-electron correlations being described by Hubbard' approximation. In the case of actinides, one treats approximately the motion of d electrons while the diagonal disorder within the f band is fully taken into account. In the case of a trnsition metal like system, except for Hubbard's approximation in dealing with d-d electron correlations, our procedure is exact within the spirit of CPA

  10. Various scenarios of metal-insulator transition in strongly correlated materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuneš, Jan; Anisimov, V.I.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 523, 8-9 (2011), 682-688 ISSN 0003-3804 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0284 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : electronic correlations * metal-insulator transition * dynamical mean-field theory Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.841, year: 2011

  11. Dynamical mean-field approach to materials with strong electronic correlations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuneš, Jan; Leonov, I.; Kollar, M.; Byczuk, K.; Anisimov, V.I.; Vollhardt, D.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 180, - (2010), s. 5-28 ISSN 1951-6355 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : dynamical mean-field * electronic correlations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.838, year: 2010

  12. On strongly correlated N-electron systems | Enaibe | Journal of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt is made in this work to extend the correlated variational approach of Chen and Mei [1], which was developed for two-electron systems, to N-electron systems (N>2). Preliminary results are reported here for four electrons interacting under a Hubbard-type potential in a one-dimensional lattice with only four sites

  13. Corporate Culture: A positive correlate with marketing effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Norburn, David; Birley, Sue; Dunn, Mark G.

    1984-01-01

    Presented at Strategic Management Conference, Barcelona, Spain, October 1985 This study tests the relationship between the Peters and Waterman cultural criteria of customers closeness and corporate values, to scales of marketing effectiveness as developed by Kotler. Analysis of data collected from 54 mid-American companies suggests a positive association. Marketing effective companies appear to have distinguishing cultural profiles when compared to marketing ineffective companies.

  14. The thermodynamic spin magnetization of strongly correlated 2d electrons in a silicon inversion layer

    OpenAIRE

    Prus, O.; Yaish, Y.; Reznikov, M.; Sivan, U.; Pudalov, V.

    2002-01-01

    A novel method invented to measure the minute thermodynamic spin magnetization of dilute two dimensional fermions is applied to electrons in a silicon inversion layer. Interplay between the ferromagnetic interaction and disorder enhances the low temperature susceptibility up to 7.5 folds compared with the Pauli susceptibility of non-interacting electrons. The magnetization peaks in the vicinity of the density where transition to strong localization takes place. At the same density, the suscep...

  15. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D.R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M.J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielčík, Jaroslav; Bielčíková, Jana; Biritz, B.; Bland, L.C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bysterský, Michal; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M.C.D.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M.C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, Petr; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K.E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R.F.; Codrington, M.J.M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T.M.; Coserea, R. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, L.C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; de Souza, R.D.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dunlop, J.C.; Mazumdar, M.R.D.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Gangaharan, D.R.; Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y.N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Hofman, D.J.; Hollis, R.S.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, Pavel; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C.L.; Jones, P.G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitán, Jan; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kikola, D.P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.R.; Knospe, A.G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kopytine, M.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kushpil, Vasilij; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, Richard; Lee, Ch.; Lee, J.H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, N.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O.I.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H.S.; Matulenko, Yu.A.; McShane, T.S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N.G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D.A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B.K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J.M.; Netrakanti, P.K.; Ng, M.J.; Nogach, L.V.; Nurushev, S.B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B.S.; Pal, S.K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S.Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S.C.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Potukuchi, B.V.K.S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N.K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R.L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H.G.; Roberts, J.B.; Rogachevskiy, O.V.; Romero, J.L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M.J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S.S.; Shi, X.H.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R.N.; Skoby, M.J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H.M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A.A.P.; Suarez, M.C.; Subba, N.L.; Šumbera, Michal; Sun, X.M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T.J.M.; de Toledo, A. S.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A.H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J.H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A.R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M. V.; Trainor, T.A.; Tram, V.N.; Trattner, A.L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O.D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D.G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vander Molen, A.M.; Vanfossen, J.A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G.S.M.; Vasilevski, I.M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S.E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S.A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J.S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J.C.; Westfall, G.D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S.W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q.H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, X.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J.X.; Tlustý, David

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 25 (2009), 251601/1-251601/7 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0079; GA MŠk LC07048; GA MŠk LA09013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : heavy-ion collisions * local parity violation * strong interaction Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 7.328, year: 2009

  16. Quantum Glassiness in Strongly Correlated Clean Systems: An Example of Topological Overprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamon, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    This Letter presents solvable examples of quantum many-body Hamiltonians of systems that are unable to reach their ground states as the environment temperature is lowered to absolute zero. These examples, three-dimensional generalizations of quantum Hamiltonians proposed for topological quantum computing, (1)have no quenched disorder, (2)have solely local interactions, (3)have an exactly solvable spectrum, (4)have topologically ordered ground states, and (5)have slow dynamical relaxation rates akin to those of strong structural glasses.

  17. Sharp correlations in the ARPES spectra of strongly disordered topological boundary modes

    OpenAIRE

    Ringel, Zohar

    2015-01-01

    Data from angle resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) often serves as a smoking-gun evidence for the existence of topological materials. It provides the energy dispersion curves of the topological boundary modes which characterize these phases. Unfortunately this method requires a sufficiently regular boundary such that these boundary modes remain sharp in momentum space. Here the seemingly random data obtained from performing ARPES on strongly disordered topological insulators and Wey...

  18. Perturbation theory of strongly correlated electrons with and without slave boson technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Hieu; Ha Vinh Tan; Nguyen Toan Thang; Nguyen Ai Viet.

    1988-10-01

    The Green functions of the electrons in the two-band Hubbard model with the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion were calculated by means of the perturbation theory with respect to the hopping term of the Hamiltonian. It was shown that in the slave boson technique we obtain the expressions different from the results of the calculations involving directly electron operators without using slave bosons. The physical meaning of this discrepancy was discussed. (author)

  19. Investigation of a strong positive ionospheric storm during geomagnetic disturbances occurred in the Brazilian sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, A. J.; Sahai, Y.; Fagundes, P. R.; de Jesus, R.; Bittencourt, J. A.; Pillat, V. G.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the responses of the ionospheric F region at equatorial and low latitude regions in the Brazilian sector during the super geomagnetic storm on 15-16 May 2005. The geomagnetic storm reached a minimum Dst of -263 nT at 0900 UT on 15 May. In this paper, we present vertical total electron content (vTEC) and phase fluctuations (in TECU/min) from Global Positioning System (GPS) observations obtained at Belém (BELE), Brasília (BRAZ), Presidente Prudente (UEPP), and Porto Alegre (POAL), Brazil, during the period 14-17 May 2005. Also, we present ionospheric parameters h'F, hpF2, and foF2, using the Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI) obtained at Palmas (PAL) and São José dos Campos (SJC), Brazil, for the same period. The super geomagnetic storm has fast decrease in the Dst index soon after SSC at 0239 UT on 15 May. It is a good possibility of prompt penetration of electric field of magnetospheric origin resulting in uplifting of the F region. The vTEC observations show a trough at BELE and a crest above UEPP, soon after SSC, indicating strengthening of nighttime equatorial anomaly. During the daytime on 15 and 16 May, in the recovery phase, the variations in foF2 at SJC and the vTEC observations, particularly at BRAZ, UEPP, and POAL, show large positive ionospheric storm. There is ESF on the all nights at PAL, in the post-midnight (UT) sector, and phase fluctuations only on the night of 14-15 May at BRAZ, after the SSC. No phase fluctuations are observed at the equatorial station BELE and low latitude stations (BRAZ, UEPP, and POAL) at all other times. This indicates that the plasma bubbles are generated and confined on this magnetically disturbed night only up to the low magnetic latitude and drifted possibly to west.

  20. Amygdala reactivity to fearful faces correlates positively with impulsive aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Fisher, Patrick M; Hjordt, Liv V

    2018-01-01

    Facial expressions robustly activate the amygdala, a brain structure playing a critical role in aggression. Whereas previous studies suggest that amygdala reactivity is related to various measures of impulsive aggression, we here estimate a composite measure of impulsive aggression and evaluate...... whether it is associated with amygdala reactivity to angry and fearful faces. We estimated amygdala reactivity with functional magnetic resonance imaging in 47 men with varying degree of aggressive traits (19 incarcerated violent offenders and 28 healthy controls). We modeled a composite "impulsive...... aggression" trait construct (LVagg) using a linear structural equation model, with a single latent variable capturing the shared correlation between five self-report measures of trait aggression, anger and impulsivity. We tested for associations between amygdala reactivity and the LVagg, adjusting for age...

  1. Histologically Measured Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy Correlates with Body Height as Strongly as with Body Mass Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac myocytes are presumed to enlarge with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH. This study correlates histologically measured myocytes with lean and fat body mass. Cases of LVH without coronary heart disease and normal controls came from forensic autopsies. The cross-sectional widths of myocytes in H&E-stained paraffin sections followed log normal distributions almost to perfection in all 104 specimens, with constant coefficient of variation across the full range of ventricular weight, as expected if myocytes of all sizes contribute proportionately to hypertrophy. Myocyte sizes increased with height. By regression analysis, height2.7 as a proxy for lean body mass and body mass index (BMI as a proxy for fat body mass, exerted equal effects in the multiple correlation with myocyte volume, and the equation rejected race and sex. In summary, myocyte sizes, as indexes of LVH, suggest that lean and fat body mass may contribute equally.

  2. Reply to ``Comment on `Cluster methods for strongly correlated electron systems' ''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biroli, G.; Kotliar, G.

    2005-01-01

    We reply to the Comment by Aryanpour, Maier, and Jarrell [Phys. Rev. B 71, 037101 (2005)] on our paper [Phys. Rev. B 65, 155112 (2002)]. We demonstrate, using general arguments and explicit examples, that whenever the correlation length is finite, local observables converge exponentially fast in the cluster size Lc within cellular dynamical mean field theory. This is a faster rate of convergence than the 1/ L2c behavior of the dynamical cluster approximation, thus refuting the central assertion of their Comment.

  3. Strong temperature dependence of extraordinary magnetoresistance correlated to mobility in a two-contact device

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Jian

    2012-02-21

    A two-contact extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) device has been fabricated and characterized at various temperatures under magnetic fields applied in different directions. Large performance variations across the temperature range have been found, which are due to the strong dependence of the EMR effect on the mobility. The device shows the highest sensitivity of 562ω/T at 75 K with the field applied perpendicularly. Due to the overlap between the semiconductor and the metal shunt, the device is also sensitive to planar fields but with a lower sensitivity of about 20 to 25% of the one to perpendicular fields. © 2012 The Japan Society of Applied Physics.

  4. On Strong Positive Frequency Dependencies of Quality Factors in Local-Earthquake Seismic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Igor B.; Jhajhria, Atul; Deng, Wubing

    2018-03-01

    Many observations of seismic waves from local earthquakes are interpreted in terms of the frequency-dependent quality factor Q( f ) = Q0 f^{η } , where η is often close to or exceeds one. However, such steep positive frequency dependencies of Q require careful analysis with regard to their physical consistency. In particular, the case of η = 1 corresponds to frequency-independent (elastic) amplitude decays with time and consequently requires no Q-type attenuation mechanisms. For η > 1, several problems with physical meanings of such Q-factors occur. First, contrary to the key premise of seismic attenuation, high-frequency parts of the wavefield are enhanced with increasing propagation times relative to the low-frequency ones. Second, such attenuation cannot be implemented by mechanical models of wave-propagating media. Third, with η > 1, the velocity dispersion associated with such Q(f) occurs over unrealistically short frequency range and has an unexpected oscillatory shape. Cases η = 1 and η > 1 are usually attributed to scattering; however, this scattering must exhibit fortuitous tuning into the observation frequency band, which appears unlikely. The reason for the above problems is that the inferred Q values are affected by the conventional single-station measurement procedure. Both parameters Q 0 and are apparent, i.e., dependent on the selected parameterization and inversion method, and they should not be directly attributed to the subsurface. For η ≈ 1, parameter Q 0 actually describes the frequency-independent amplitude decay in access of some assumed geometric spreading t -α , where α is usually taken equal one. The case η > 1 is not allowed physically and could serve as an indicator of problematic interpretations. Although the case 0 < η < 1 is possible, its parameters Q 0 and may also be biased by the measurement procedure. To avoid such difficulties of Q-based approaches, we recommend measuring and interpreting the amplitude-decay rates

  5. Start Position Strongly Influences Fixation Patterns during Face Processing: Difficulties with Eye Movements as a Measure of Information Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizpe, Joseph; Kravitz, Dwight J.; Yovel, Galit; Baker, Chris I.

    2012-01-01

    Fixation patterns are thought to reflect cognitive processing and, thus, index the most informative stimulus features for task performance. During face recognition, initial fixations to the center of the nose have been taken to indicate this location is optimal for information extraction. However, the use of fixations as a marker for information use rests on the assumption that fixation patterns are predominantly determined by stimulus and task, despite the fact that fixations are also influenced by visuo-motor factors. Here, we tested the effect of starting position on fixation patterns during a face recognition task with upright and inverted faces. While we observed differences in fixations between upright and inverted faces, likely reflecting differences in cognitive processing, there was also a strong effect of start position. Over the first five saccades, fixation patterns across start positions were only coarsely similar, with most fixations around the eyes. Importantly, however, the precise fixation pattern was highly dependent on start position with a strong tendency toward facial features furthest from the start position. For example, the often-reported tendency toward the left over right eye was reversed for the left starting position. Further, delayed initial saccades for central versus peripheral start positions suggest greater information processing prior to the initial saccade, highlighting the experimental bias introduced by the commonly used center start position. Finally, the precise effect of face inversion on fixation patterns was also dependent on start position. These results demonstrate the importance of a non-stimulus, non-task factor in determining fixation patterns. The patterns observed likely reflect a complex combination of visuo-motor effects and simple sampling strategies as well as cognitive factors. These different factors are very difficult to tease apart and therefore great caution must be applied when interpreting absolute

  6. Communication: An adaptive configuration interaction approach for strongly correlated electrons with tunable accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schriber, Jeffrey B.; Evangelista, Francesco A. [Department of Chemistry and Cherry L. Emerson Center for Scientific Computation, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    We introduce a new procedure for iterative selection of determinant spaces capable of describing highly correlated systems. This adaptive configuration interaction (ACI) determines an optimal basis by an iterative procedure in which the determinant space is expanded and coarse grained until self-consistency. Two importance criteria control the selection process and tune the ACI to a user-defined level of accuracy. The ACI is shown to yield potential energy curves of N{sub 2} with nearly constant errors, and it predicts singlet-triplet splittings of acenes up to decacene that are in good agreement with the density matrix renormalization group.

  7. Energy diffusion in strongly driven quantum chaotic systems: the role of correlations of the matrix elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elyutin, P V; Rubtsov, A N

    2008-01-01

    The energy evolution of a quantum chaotic system under the perturbation that harmonically depends on time is studied for the case of large perturbation, in which the rate of transition calculated from the Fermi golden rule (FGR) is about or exceeds the frequency of perturbation. For this case, the models of the Hamiltonian with random non-correlated matrix elements demonstrate that the energy evolution retains its diffusive character, but the rate of diffusion increases slower than the square of the magnitude of perturbation, thus destroying the quantum-classical correspondence for the energy diffusion and the energy absorption in the classical limit ℎ → 0. The numerical calculation carried out for a model built from the first principles (the quantum analog of the Pullen-Edmonds oscillator) demonstrates that the evolving energy distribution, apart from the diffusive component, contains a ballistic one with the energy dispersion that is proportional to the square of time. This component originates from the chains of matrix elements with correlated signs and vanishes if the signs of matrix elements are randomized. The presence of the ballistic component formally extends the applicability of the FGR to the non-perturbative domain and restores the quantum-classical correspondence

  8. Signatures of pairing in the magnetic excitation spectrum of strongly correlated two-leg ladders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, A.; Patel, N. D.; Dagotto, E.; Alvarez, G.

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic interactions are widely believed to play a crucial role in the microscopic mechanism leading to high critical temperature superconductivity. It is therefore important to study the signatures of pairing in the magnetic excitation spectrum of simple models known to show unconventional superconducting tendencies. Using the density matrix renormalization group technique, we calculate the dynamical spin structure factor S (k ,ω ) of a generalized t -U -J Hubbard model away from half filling in a two-leg ladder geometry. The addition of J enhances pairing tendencies. We analyze quantitatively the signatures of pairing in the magnetic excitation spectra. We found that the superconducting pair-correlation strength, that can be estimated independently from ground state properties, is closely correlated with the integrated low-energy magnetic spectral weight in the vicinity of (π ,π ) . In this wave-vector region, robust spin incommensurate features develop with increasing doping. The branch of the spectrum with rung direction wave vector krung=0 does not change substantially with doping where pairing dominates and thus plays a minor role. We discuss the implications of our results for neutron scattering experiments, where the spin excitation dynamics of hole-doped quasi-one-dimensional magnetic materials can be measured and also address implications for recent resonant inelastic x-ray scattering experiments.

  9. Positive Correlation of PTH-Related Peptide with Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Legakis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from insulin resistance in the setting of inadequate beta-cell compensation. Recent studies indicate that for attaining a well-functioning ß-cell mass, parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP is a very promising candidate among several insulinotropic peptides. In order to elucidate its role, we determine the levels of PTHrP, insulin and c-peptide in type 2 diabetics and in normal subjects in the fasting state. We enrolled 28 patients (16 men and 12 postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes and twenty eight aged-matched healthy individuals as control subjects (15 men and 13 women. PTHrP was statistically significant correlated with glucose in type 2 diabetes and in normal subjects in the fasting state. Additionally, PTHrP serum levels exhibited a significant increase in type 2 diabetes compared to control subjects. Interestingly, PTHrP showed a positive correlation with insulin levels only among healthy individuals presumably due to defective glucose stimulated insulin secretion known to occur in type 2 diabetics. In conclusion ,the strong positive relation of PTHrP with glucose in the fasting state in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus raises several questions for further experimentation concerning its exact role and physiological significance.

  10. Assessing the importance of frustration in a narrow-band strongly correlated electronic chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Siddhartha; Laad, Mukul S.

    2007-08-01

    We study a one-dimensional extended Hubbard model with longer-range Coulomb interactions at quarter-filling in the strong coupling limit. In this limit, we find the one dimensional transverse field Ising model (TFIM) to be the effective Hamiltonian governing the dynamics of the charge degrees of freedom. We find two different charge-ordered (CO) ground states as the strength of the longer range interactions is varied. At lower energies, these CO states drive two different spin-ordered ground states. A variety of response functions computed here bear a remarkable resemblance to recent experimental observations for organic TMTSF systems, and so we propose that these systems are proximate to a QCP associated with T = 0 charge order. (author)

  11. Quantum glassiness in clean strongly correlated systems: an example of topological overprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamon, Claudio

    2005-03-01

    Describing matter at near absolute zero temperature requires understanding a system's quantum ground state and the low energy excitations around it, the quasiparticles, which are thermally populated by the system's contact to a heat bath. However, this paradigm breaks down if thermal equilibration is obstructed. I present solvable examples of quantum many-body Hamiltonians of systems that are unable to reach their ground states as the environment temperature is lowered to absolute zero. These examples, three dimensional generalizations of quantum Hamiltonians proposed for topological quantum computing, 1) have no quenched disorder, 2) have solely local interactions, 3) have an exactly solvable spectrum, 4) have topologically ordered ground states, and 5) have slow dynamical relaxation rates akin to those of strong structural glasses.

  12. Quantum distillation: Dynamical generation of low-entropy states of strongly correlated fermions in an optical lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidrich-Meisner, F. [Institut fur Physikalische Chemie der RWTH; Manmana, S. R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, Switzerland; Rigol, M. [Georgetown University; Muramatsu, A. [Universitat Stuttgart, Institute fur Plasmaforschung, Germany; Feiguin, A. E. [University of Maryland; Dagotto, Elbio R [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Correlations between particles can lead to subtle and sometimes counterintuitive phenomena. We analyze one such case, occurring during the sudden expansion of fermions in a lattice when the initial state has a strong admixture of double occupancies. We promote the notion of quantum distillation: during the expansion and in the case of strongly repulsive interactions, doublons group together, forming a nearly ideal band insulator, which is metastable with low entropy. We propose that this effect could be used for cooling purposes in experiments with two-component Fermi gases.

  13. Personality correlates of adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Alicia M; Everhart, Daniel Erik; Davis, Claude Ervin; Wuensch, Karl L; Lee, Daniel O; Demaree, Heath A

    2011-12-01

    Adherence with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been problematic. Understanding the factors associated with nonadherence may assist with psychosocial interventions. The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between adherence and three measures of personality and coping strategies. Ratings on the behavioral inhibition system/behavioral activation system (BIS/BAS) scales, the ways of coping inventory, and a broad personality measure (mini-IPIP) were analyzed with a binary logistic regression among 63 subjects, adult men (31) and women (32), diagnosed with OSA. Data from the CPAP device was obtained following initial 30 days at minimum, with adherence defined as >4 h/night on 70% of nights. Elevated BIS was the strongest predictor of nonadherence (r = -.452, p < .01), followed by neuroticism. The regression correctly classified 73% of participants as adherent or nonadherent. Nonadherence is associated with elevated BIS scores and neuroticism, which indicates that personality factors play a role in determining adherence to CPAP. Although more research is needed to draw firm conclusions, the differences noted in BIS may also point toward differences in neurophysiological function. The BIS scale may be a useful tool for predicting nonadherence and assist with the development of intervention strategies that will increase adherence.

  14. Spin excitations in systems with hopping electron transport and strong position disorder in a large magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumilin, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the spin excitations in systems with hopping electron conduction and strong position disorder. We focus on the problem in a strong magnetic field when the spin Hamiltonian can be reduced to the effective single-particle Hamiltonian and treated with conventional numerical technics. It is shown that in a 3D system with Heisenberg exchange interaction the spin excitations have a delocalized part of the spectrum even in the limit of strong disorder, thus leading to the possibility of the coherent spin transport. The spin transport provided by the delocalized excitations can be described by a diffusion coefficient. Non-homogenous magnetic fields lead to the Anderson localization of spin excitations while anisotropy of the exchange interaction results in the Lifshitz localization of excitations. We discuss the possible effect of the additional exchange-driven spin diffusion on the organic spin-valve devices.

  15. Generalized-active-space pair-density functional theory: an efficient method to study large, strongly correlated, conjugated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2017-04-01

    Predicting ground- and excited-state properties of open-shell organic molecules by electronic structure theory can be challenging because an accurate treatment has to correctly describe both static and dynamic electron correlation. Strongly correlated systems, i.e. , systems with near-degeneracy correlation effects, are particularly troublesome. Multiconfigurational wave function methods based on an active space are adequate in principle, but it is impractical to capture most of the dynamic correlation in these methods for systems characterized by many active electrons. We recently developed a new method called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), that combines the advantages of wave function theory and density functional theory to provide a more practical treatment of strongly correlated systems. Here we present calculations of the singlet-triplet gaps in oligoacenes ranging from naphthalene to dodecacene. Calculations were performed for unprecedently large orbitally optimized active spaces of 50 electrons in 50 orbitals, and we test a range of active spaces and active space partitions, including four kinds of frontier orbital partitions. We show that MC-PDFT can predict the singlet-triplet splittings for oligoacenes consistent with the best available and much more expensive methods, and indeed MC-PDFT may constitute the benchmark against which those other models should be compared, given the absence of experimental data.

  16. Phase separation in strongly correlated electron systems with two types of charge carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, K.I.; Rakhmanov, A.L.; Sboychakov, A.O.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: A competition between the localization of the charge carriers due to Jahn-Teller distortions and the energy gain due to their delocalization in doped manganite and related magnetic oxides is analyzed based on a Kondo-lattice type model. The resulting effective Hamiltonian is, in fact, a generalization of the Falicov-Kimball model. We find that the number of itinerant charge carriers can be significantly lower than that implied by the doping level x. The phase diagram of the model in the T plane is constructed. The system exhibits magnetic ordered (antiferromagnetic, ferromagnetic, or canted) states as well the paramagnetic states with zero and nonzero density of the itinerant electrons. It is shown that a phase-separation is favorable in energy for a wide doping range. The characteristic size of inhomogeneities in a phase-separated state is of the order of several lattice constants. We also analyzed the two-band Hubbard model in the limit of strong on-site Coulomb repulsion. It was shown that such a system has a tendency to phase separation into the regions with different charge densities even in the absence of magnetic or any other ordering, if the ratio of the bandwidths is large enough. The work was supported by the European project CoMePhS and by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, project no. 05-02-17600. (authors)

  17. Calculations of the one-body electronic structure of the strongly correlated systems including self-energy effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Quintana, J.; Sanchez-Lopez, M.M.; Lopez-Aguilar, F. [Grup d`Electromagnetisme, Edifici Cn, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona 08193, Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    1996-10-01

    We give a method to obtain the quasiparticle band structure and renormalized density of states by diagonalizing the interacting system Green function. This method operates for any self-energy approximation appropriated to strongly correlated systems. Application to CeSi{sub 2} and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} is analyzed as a probe for this band calculation method. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  18. Inelastic light scattering to probe strongly correlated bosons in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fort, Chiara; Fabbri, Nicole; Fallani, Leonardo; Clement, David; Inguscio, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    We have used inelastic light scattering to study correlated phases of an array of one-dimensional interacting Bose gases. In the linear response regime, the observed spectra are proportional to the dynamic structure factor. In particular we have investigated the superfluid to Mott insulator crossover loading the one-dimensional gases in an optical lattice and monitoring the appearance of an energy gap due to finite particle-hole excitation energy. We attribute the low frequency side of the spectra to the presence of some superfluid and normal phase fraction between the Mott insulator regions with different fillings produced in the inhomogeneous systems. In the Mott phase we also investigated excitations to higher excited bands of the optical lattice, the spectra obtained in this case being connected to the single particle spectral function. In one-dimensional systems the effect of thermal fluctuations and interactions is enhanced by the reduced dimensionality showing up in the dynamic structure factor. We measured the dynamic structure factor of an array of one-dimensional bosonic gases pointing out the effect of temperature-induced phase fluctuations in reducing the coherence length of the system.

  19. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-01

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  20. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-15

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  1. FLASH and NPAT positive but not Coilin positive Cajal Bodies correlate with cell ploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorno-Borbone, Lucilla; De Cola, Antonella; Vernole, Patrizia; Finos, Livio; Barcaroli, Daniela; Knight, Richard A; Melino, Gerry; De Laurenzi, Vincenzo

    2008-08-01

    Cajal Bodies are one of many specialised organelles contained in the eukaryotic cell nucleus, and are involved in a number of functions, including regulation of replication-dependent histone gene transcription. In normal diploid cells their number varies between 0 and 4 depending on the cell cycle phase, although in cancer cell lines their number is extremely variable and it has been suggested that it correlates with cell ploidy. Here we show that in mammalian cells, as in Drosophila, two distinct though functionally related bodies exist: a histone gene locus body and a Cajal Body. The first one can be detected using FLASH or NPAT as markers while the second is labelled using antibodies against Coilin. Only the number of FLASH/NPAT histone gene locus bodies correlates with ploidy and only these organelles appear to be regulated during the cell cycle. Finally, we show that the two organelles completely co-localize during the S phase of the cell cycle.

  2. Development of high-brightness ultrafast electron microscope for studying nanoscale dynamics associated with strongly correlated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhensheng

    Strongly correlated-electron materials are a class of materials that exhibit numerous intriguing emergent phenomena, including metal-to-insulator transition, colossal magnetoresistance, high-temperature superconductivity, etc. These phenomena are beyond the reach of the conventional solid state physics, which is based on the band theory. Instead, strong electron-electron correlations are found to play important roles, which leads to complicated interplay between different degrees of freedoms (charge, lattice, spins...). In this thesis, ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) is used to investigate the photo-induced ultrafast structural dynamics of strongly correlated materials, among which VO2 is taken as an exemplar system, one that reveals the fundamental physics behind photo-induced phase transitions, electron-electron correlation on nanometer scales, and the electron-phonon coupling in this exotic class of materials. The phenomena presented here are expected to have more general significance as they may reflect the physics to which other strongly correlated materials also conform. In polycrystalline VO2 thin films, the structural changes resulting from photoexcitation with femtosecond laser pulses with different wavelengths are observed to lead to non-thermal phase transitions, which require less energy compared to the phase transitions induced by thermal excitation. The details of the structural change are extracted from the UED results revealing stepwise atomic movements after photoexcitation, which suggests the phase transition starts with a dilation of the correlated d electrons. On the other hand, the structural phase transition is found to be decoupled from the metal-to-insulator transition when the sample dimension is reduced to the sub-micrometer scale, which is attributed to the interface charge doping effects from different substrates. A new phase (M3, monoclinic metallic phase) is distinguished, which has not been discussed by the existing theoretical

  3. The contribution of Diamond Light Source to the study of strongly correlated electron systems and complex magnetic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaelli, P G; Dhesi, S S

    2015-03-06

    We review some of the significant contributions to the field of strongly correlated materials and complex magnets, arising from experiments performed at the Diamond Light Source (Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, UK) during the first few years of operation (2007-2014). We provide a comprehensive overview of Diamond research on topological insulators, multiferroics, complex oxides and magnetic nanostructures. Several experiments on ultrafast dynamics, magnetic imaging, photoemission electron microscopy, soft X-ray holography and resonant magnetic hard and soft X-ray scattering are described. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Magnetic and resonant X-ray scattering investigations of strongly correlated electron systems; Etude de systemes electroniques fortement correles par diffusion magnetique et resonnante des rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paolasini, L.; Bergevin, F. de [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2008-06-15

    Resonant X-ray scattering is a method which combines high-Q resolution X-ray elastic diffraction and atomic core-hole spectroscopy for investigating electronic and magnetic long-range ordered structures in condensed matter. During recent years the development of theoretical models to describe resonant X-ray scattering amplitudes and the evolution of experimental techniques, which include the control and analysis of linear photon polarization and the introduction of extreme environment conditions such as low temperatures, high magnetic field and high pressures, have opened a new field of investigation in the domain of strongly correlated electron systems. (authors)

  5. Thermodynamics of nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI: a positive heat capacity change accompanies strong ADP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robblee, James P; Cao, Wenxiang; Henn, Arnon; Hannemann, Diane E; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2005-08-02

    We have measured the energetics of ATP and ADP binding to single-headed actomyosin V and VI from the temperature dependence of the rate and equilibrium binding constants. Nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI can be modeled as two-step binding mechanisms involving the formation of collision complexes followed by isomerization to states with high nucleotide affinity. Formation of the actomyosin VI-ATP collision complex is much weaker and slower than for actomyosin V. A three-step binding mechanism where actomyosin VI isomerizes between two conformations, one competent to bind ATP and one not, followed by rapid ATP binding best accounts for the data. ADP binds to actomyosin V more tightly than actomyosin VI. At 25 degrees C, the strong ADP-binding equilibria are comparable for actomyosin V and VI, and the different overall ADP affinities arise from differences in the ADP collision complex affinity. The actomyosin-ADP isomerization leading to strong ADP binding is entropy driven at >15 degrees C and occurs with a large, positive change in heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) for both actomyosin V and VI. Sucrose slows ADP binding and dissociation from actomyosin V and VI but not the overall equilibrium constants for strong ADP binding, indicating that solvent viscosity dampens ADP-dependent kinetic transitions, presumably a tail swing that occurs with ADP binding and release. We favor a mechanism where strong ADP binding increases the dynamics and flexibility of the actomyosin complex. The heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) changes are greater for actomyosin VI than actomyosin V, suggesting different extents of ADP-induced structural rearrangement.

  6. A strong response to selection on mass-independent maximal metabolic rate without a correlated response in basal metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wone, B W M; Madsen, P; Donovan, E R; Labocha, M K; Sears, M W; Downs, C J; Sorensen, D A; Hayes, J P

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic rates are correlated with many aspects of ecology, but how selection on different aspects of metabolic rates affects their mutual evolution is poorly understood. Using laboratory mice, we artificially selected for high maximal mass-independent metabolic rate (MMR) without direct selection on mass-independent basal metabolic rate (BMR). Then we tested for responses to selection in MMR and correlated responses to selection in BMR. In other lines, we antagonistically selected for mice with a combination of high mass-independent MMR and low mass-independent BMR. All selection protocols and data analyses included body mass as a covariate, so effects of selection on the metabolic rates are mass adjusted (that is, independent of effects of body mass). The selection lasted eight generations. Compared with controls, MMR was significantly higher (11.2%) in lines selected for increased MMR, and BMR was slightly, but not significantly, higher (2.5%). Compared with controls, MMR was significantly higher (5.3%) in antagonistically selected lines, and BMR was slightly, but not significantly, lower (4.2%). Analysis of breeding values revealed no positive genetic trend for elevated BMR in high-MMR lines. A weak positive genetic correlation was detected between MMR and BMR. That weak positive genetic correlation supports the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy in the sense that it fails to falsify a key model assumption. Overall, the results suggest that at least in these mice there is significant capacity for independent evolution of metabolic traits. Whether that is true in the ancestral animals that evolved endothermy remains an important but unanswered question.

  7. Communication: The description of strong correlation within self-consistent Green's function second-order perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Jordan J.; Zgid, Dominika

    2014-01-01

    We report an implementation of self-consistent Green's function many-body theory within a second-order approximation (GF2) for application with molecular systems. This is done by iterative solution of the Dyson equation expressed in matrix form in an atomic orbital basis, where the Green's function and self-energy are built on the imaginary frequency and imaginary time domain, respectively, and fast Fourier transform is used to efficiently transform these quantities as needed. We apply this method to several archetypical examples of strong correlation, such as a H 32 finite lattice that displays a highly multireference electronic ground state even at equilibrium lattice spacing. In all cases, GF2 gives a physically meaningful description of the metal to insulator transition in these systems, without resorting to spin-symmetry breaking. Our results show that self-consistent Green's function many-body theory offers a viable route to describing strong correlations while remaining within a computationally tractable single-particle formalism

  8. 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, Andreas; Schöll, Michael; Ohlsson, Tomas; van Swieten, John; Honer, Michael; Englund, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tau positron emission tomography ligands provide the novel possibility to image tau pathology in vivo. However, little is known about how in vivo brain uptake of tau positron emission tomography ligands relates to tau aggregates observed post-mortem. We performed tau positron emission tomography imaging with 18F-AV-1451 in three patients harbouring a p.R406W mutation in the MAPT gene, encoding tau. This mutation results in 3- and 4-repeat tau aggregates similar to those in Alzheimer’s disease, and many of the mutation carriers initially suffer from memory impairment and temporal lobe atrophy. Two patients with short disease duration and isolated memory impairment exhibited 18F-AV-1451 uptake mainly in the hippocampus and adjacent temporal lobe regions, correlating with glucose hypometabolism in corresponding regions. One patient died after 26 years of disease duration with dementia and behavioural deficits. Pre-mortem, there was 18F-AV-1451 uptake in the temporal and frontal lobes, as well as in the basal ganglia, which strongly correlated with the regional extent and amount of tau pathology in post-mortem brain sections. Amyloid-β (18F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography scans were negative in all cases, as were stainings of brain sections for amyloid. This provides strong evidence that 18F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography can be used to accurately quantify in vivo the regional distribution of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. PMID:27357347

  9. Importance of strong-correlation on the lattice dynamics of light-actinides Th-Pa alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de La Peã+/-A Seaman, Omar; Heid, Rolf; Bohnen, Klaus-Peter

    We have studied the structural, electronic, and lattice dynamics of the Th1-xPax actinide alloy. This system have been analyzed within the framework of density functional perturbation theory, using a mixed-basis pseudopotential method and the virtual crystal approximation (VCA) for modeling the alloy. In particular, the energetics is analyzed as the ground-state crystal structure is changed form fcc to bct, as well as the electronic density of states (DOS), and the phonon frequencies. Such properties have been calculated with and without strong correlations effects through the LDA+U formalism. Although the strong-correlation does not influence on a great manner the Th properties, such effects are more important as the content increases towards Pa, affecting even the definition of the ground-state crystal structure for Pa (experimentally determined as bct). The evolution of the density of states at the Fermi level (N (EF)) and the phonon frequencies as a function of Pa-content are presented and discussed in detail, aiming to understand their influence on the electron-phonon coupling for the Th-Pa alloy. This research was supported by Conacyt-México under project No. CB2013-221807-F.

  10. Effects of position and phonation on oropharyngeal view and correlation with laryngoscpic view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadasun, F E; Adudu, O P; Sadiq, A

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of phonation and various head and body positions on oropharyngeal view (Mallampati score), and the correlation of these with laryngoscopic view, using the Cormack and Lehane score. Four hundred (390) consecutive patients were evaluated in the wards during preoperative anaesthetic review. During airway assessment, the patients were placed in various head and body positions to determine oropharyngeal structures visualized, with and without phonation, according to the Mallampati test score. In the operating theatre, laryngoscopic view scores (according to Cormack and Lehane) were recorded, and the various scores analyzed. Phonation consistently improved the Mallampati scores in all the head and body positions. The scores were better in the supine position compared to the sitting position. The best correlation of the Mallampati score with the Cormack and Lehane score was in the sitting, head maximally extended position, without phonation. Extention of the head improved the score in the sitting position, but not in the supine position. Phonation reduced the correlation of the scores in all the positions. We conclude that the best position to conduct the Mallampati test is sitting, head maximally extended, without phonation. This correlated best with laryngoscopic view score in our study.

  11. Positive aspects of caregiving and its correlates in caregivers of schizophrenia: a study from north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kate, N; Grover, S; Kulhara, P; Nehra, R

    2013-06-01

    OBJECTIVE. To study the positive aspects of caregiving and its correlates in primary caregivers of patients with schizophrenia. METHODS. A total of 100 patients with schizophrenia and their primary caregivers were evaluated. Regarding the caregivers, their positive aspects of caregiving were assessed on the Scale for Positive Aspects of Caregiving Experience (SPACE). To examine the correlates of positive aspects of caregiving, they were also assessed on the Family Burden Interview (FBI) Schedule, the Involvement Evaluation Questionnaire (IEQ), coping checklist, the Social Support Questionnaire, the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (Hindi version), the WHO Quality of Life-Spirituality, Religiousness and Personal Beliefs Scale, as well as the General Health Questionnaire-12. The patients were assessed on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. RESULTS. On the SPACE, the highest mean score was seen in the domain of motivation for the caregiving role (2.7), followed by that of caregiver satisfaction (2.4) and caregiver gains (2.3). The mean score was least for the domain of self-esteem and social aspect of caring (1.9). The SPACE domain of caregiver satisfaction correlated negatively with many aspects of burden as assessed by FBI Schedule and coping as assessed by the coping checklist; whereas the self-esteem and social aspect of caring domain correlated positively with worrying-urging II domain and the total IEQ score. No significant correlations between the SPACE and socio-demographics as well as most of the clinical variables were noted. Motivation for the caregiving had a positive correlation with the PANSS negative symptom scale. Multiple correlations were found between the SPACE and quality of life, suggesting that higher positive caregiving experience was associated with better quality of life in caregivers. CONCLUSION. Caregivers of patients with schizophrenia do enjoy positive aspects of

  12. Strongly correlated electrons at high pressure: an approach by inelastic X-Ray scattering; Electrons correles sous haute pression: une approche par diffusion inelastique des rayons X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rueff, J.P

    2007-06-15

    Inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS) and associated methods has turn out to be a powerful alternative for high-pressure physics. It is an all-photon technique fully compatible with high-pressure environments and applicable to a vast range of materials. Standard focalization of X-ray in the range of 100 microns is typical of the sample size in the pressure cell. Our main aim is to provide an overview of experimental results obtained by IXS under high pressure in 2 classes of materials which have been at the origin of the renewal of condensed matter physics: strongly correlated transition metal oxides and rare-earth compounds. Under pressure, d and f-electron materials show behaviors far more complex that what would be expected from a simplistic band picture of electron delocalization. These spectroscopic studies have revealed unusual phenomena in the electronic degrees of freedom, brought up by the increased density, the changes in the charge-carrier concentration, the over-lapping between orbitals, and hybridization under high pressure conditions. Particularly we discuss about pressure induced magnetic collapse and metal-insulator transitions in 3d compounds and valence fluctuations phenomena in 4f and 5f compounds. Thanks to its superior penetration depth, chemical selectivity and resonant enhancement, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering has appeared extremely well suited to high pressure physics in strongly correlated materials. (A.C.)

  13. Spin-flip configuration interaction singles with exact spin-projection: Theory and applications to strongly correlated systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi

    2015-10-14

    Spin-flip approaches capture static correlation with the same computational scaling as the ordinary single reference methods. Here, we extend spin-flip configuration interaction singles (SFCIS) by projecting out intrinsic spin-contamination to make it spin-complete, rather than by explicitly complementing it with spin-coupled configurations. We give a general formalism of spin-projection for SFCIS, applicable to any spin states. The proposed method is viewed as a natural unification of SFCIS and spin-projected CIS to achieve a better qualitative accuracy at a low computational cost. While our wave function ansatz is more compact than previously proposed spin-complete SF approaches, it successfully offers more general static correlation beyond biradicals without sacrificing good quantum numbers. It is also shown that our method is invariant with respect to open-shell orbital rotations, due to the uniqueness of spin-projection. We will report benchmark calculations to demonstrate its qualitative performance on strongly correlated systems, including conical intersections that appear both in ground-excited and excited-excited degeneracies.

  14. Correlation of Radiographic Mental Foramen Position and Occulusion in Three Different Indian Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, P; Bansal, N; Khosa, R; Verma, K G; Sachdev, S K; Patwardhan, N; Garg, S

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge of the position of the mental foramen (MF) is important for administering local anaesthesia for diagnostic, surgical or operative procedures. To determine the shape, position, symmetry of MF and its continuity with the inferior dental canal (IDC) on a digital panoramic view and to find its correlation with Angle's molar relations in three Indian subpopulations. The study also determines the correlation of inter-foramen distance in both genders of three Indian subpopulations. One hundred and twenty digital panoramic radiographs were evaluated from three Indian subpopulations (Punjab, Rajasthan and Northeast [NE]). The assessment of occlusion was based on Angle's molar relationships. The data obtained were statistically analysed. The commonest position of the MF in the Rajasthan and NE populations was position 4 bilaterally, while in the Punjab population, it was position 3 on the right and position 4 on the left side. The majority of the MF was round in shape followed by oval. The mean distance between two MF was highest among the Punjab male population and least among the NE female population. The most frequent pattern of MF continuity with IDC was diffuse in Rajasthan population, separated in NE and continuous in Punjab. Correlation between Angle's molar relation with MF position was significant for Classes I and II but not for Class III. Correlation of inter-foramen distance between genders was highly significant in the NE and Punjab populations. The commonest MF position was aligned with the 1st premolar and between the 1st and 2nd premolar.

  15. Onset of magnetic order in strongly-correlated systems from ab initio electronic structure calculations: application to transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, I. D.; Däne, M.; Ernst, A.; Hergert, W.; Lüders, M.; Staunton, J. B.; Szotek, Z.; Temmerman, W. M.

    2008-06-01

    We describe an ab initio theory of finite temperature magnetism in strongly-correlated electron systems. The formalism is based on spin density functional theory, with a self-interaction corrected local spin density approximation (SIC-LSDA). The self-interaction correction is implemented locally, within the Kohn-Korringa-Rostoker (KKR) multiple-scattering method. Thermally induced magnetic fluctuations are treated using a mean-field 'disordered local moment' (DLM) approach and at no stage is there a fitting to an effective Heisenberg model. We apply the theory to the 3d transition metal oxides, where our calculations reproduce the experimental ordering tendencies, as well as the qualitative trend in ordering temperatures. We find a large insulating gap in the paramagnetic state which hardly changes with the onset of magnetic order.

  16. Lipid-rich carcinoma of the breast that is strongly positive for estrogen receptor: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oba T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Takaaki Oba,1 Mayu Ono,1 Asumi Iesato,1 Toru Hanamura,1 Takayuki Watanabe,1 Tokiko Ito,1 Toshiharu Kanai,1 Kazuma Maeno,1 Ken-ichi Ito,1 Ayako Tateishi,2 Akihiko Yoshizawa,2 Fumiyoshi Takayama31Division of Breast, Endocrine and Respiratory Surgery, Department of Surgery, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Nagano, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Shinshu University Hospital, 3Imaging Center, Ichinose Neurosurgical Hospital, Matsumoto, JapanAbstract: Lipid-rich carcinoma (LRC of the breast is a rare breast cancer variant that accounts for <1% of all breast malignancies. It has been reported that LRCs are negative for estrogen receptor. Here, we report a case of LRC of the breast that was strongly positive for estrogen receptor and treated with endocrine adjuvant therapy. A 52-year-old postmenopausal female noticed a lump in her right breast by self-examination and presented to our hospital. Physical examination revealed an elastic 30 mm ×20 mm hard mass in the upper medial part of her right breast. The findings obtained using ultrasonography, mammography, and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging suggested breast cancer. Core needle biopsy resulted in the diagnosis of invasive carcinoma. The patient underwent mastectomy and sentinel lymph node biopsy. Histopathologically, the tumor cells were abundant in foamy cytoplasm. Because the presence of marked cytoplasmic lipid droplets was confirmed by Sudan IV staining and electron microscopic examination of the tumor and the lipid droplets were negative for periodic acid–Schiff staining, the tumor was diagnosed as an LRC. Immunohistochemically, estrogen and progesterone receptors of the tumor were strongly positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 was negative, and the ratio of Ki-67-positive cells was ~30%. After surgery, the patient underwent combination chemotherapy with anthracycline, cyclophosphamide, and 5-fluorouracil, followed by docetaxel. Thereafter

  17. A chloroplast DNA phylogeny of lilacs (Syringa, Oleaceae): plastome groups show a strong correlation with crossing groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K J; Jansen, R K

    1998-09-01

    Phylogenetic relationships and genomic compatibility were compared for 60 accessions of Syringa using chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) markers. A total of 669 cpDNA variants, 653 of which were potentially phylogenetically informative, was detected using 22 restriction enzymes. Phylogenetic analyses reveal four strongly supported plastome groups that correspond to four genetically incompatible crossing groups. Relationships of the four plastome groups (I(II(III,IV))) correlate well with the infrageneric classification except for ser. Syringa and Pinnatifoliae. Group I, which includes subg. Ligustrina, forms a basal lineage within Syringa. Group II includes ser. Syringa and Pinnatifoliae and the two series have high compatibility and low sequence divergence. Group III consists of three well-defined species groups of ser. Pubescentes. Group IV comprises all members of ser. Villosae and has the lowest interspecific cpDNA sequence divergences. Comparison of cpDNA sequence divergence with crossability data indicates that hybrids have not been successfully generated between species with divergence greater than 0.7%. Hybrid barriers are strong among the four major plastome groups, which have sequence divergence estimates ranging from 1.096 to 1.962%. In contrast, fully fertile hybrids occur between species pairs with sequence divergence below 0.4%. Three regions of the plastome have length variants of greater than 100 bp, and these indels identify 12 different plastome types that correlate with phylogenetic trees produced from cpDNA restriction site data. Biparentally inherited nuclear rDNA and maternally inherited cpDNA length variants enable the identification of the specific parentage of several lilac hybrids.

  18. Strong correlations between empathy, emotional intelligence, and personality traits among podiatric medical students: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Kurtis; Randazzo, John; Alabi, Nathaniel; Levenson, Jack; Doucette, John T; Barbosa, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability of health-care providers to demonstrate empathy toward their patients results in a number of positive outcomes improving the quality of care. In addition, a provider's level of emotional intelligence (EI) can further the doctor-patient relationship, stimulating a more personalized and comprehensive manner of treating patients. Furthermore, personality traits of a clinician may positively or negatively influence that relationship, as well as clinical outcomes. This study was designed to evaluate empathy levels in podiatric medical students in a 4-year doctoral program. Moreover, this study aimed to determine whether EI, personality traits, and demographic variables exhibit correlations with the observed empathy patterns. This cross-sectional study collected data using an anonymous web-based survey completed by 150 students registered at the New York College of Podiatric Medicine. There were four survey sections: (1) demographics, (2) empathy (measured by the Jefferson Scale of Physicians' Empathy), (3) EI (measured by the Assessing Emotions Scale), and (4) personality traits (measured by the NEO-Five-Factor Inventory-3). Empathy levels were significantly correlated with EI scores (r = 0.62, n = 150, Pmedical students. Given the suggested importance and effect of such qualities on patient care, these findings may serve as guidance for possible amendments and warranted curriculum initiatives in medical education.

  19. Colpocystoproctography in the upright and supine positions correlated with dynamic MRI of the pelvic floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gufler, Hubert E-mail: hubert.gufler@radiol.med.uni-giessen.de; Ohde, Angelika; Grau, Gabriele; Grossmann, Anette

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: To test whether there are statistically significant differences between measurement results on colpocystoproctography in the upright and the supine positions, and to correlate these results with dynamic MRI. Patients and Methods: Seven patients with pelvic floor descent had received colpocystoproctography in the upright and supine positions and, additionally, dynamic MRI of the pelvic floor. Bladder neck position, angle of urethral inclination, posterior vesicourethral angle, and vaginal vault position were measured at relaxed pelvic floor and at pelvic strain. Differences between the measurement results of each parameter in the upright and supine position on colpocystoproctography were calculated and correlated with the measurement results from the dynamic MRI. Results: At pelvic strain, bladder neck position, angle of urethral inclination, posterior vesicourethral angle and vaginal vault position measurements showed no statistically significant differences between colpocystoproctography in the upright and supine positions or dynamic MRI. For the bladder neck height at pelvic floor relaxation, significant differences were found between colpocystoproctography in the upright and supine positions, and colpocystoproctography in the upright position versus dynamic MRI. Conclusion: At pelvic strain, measurement data from dynamic MRI are not statistically different from data from colpocystoproctography either in supine and upright positions.

  20. Time-resolved THz studies of carrier dynamics in semiconductors, superconductors, and strongly-correlated electron materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaindl, Robert A.; Averitt, Richard D.

    2006-11-14

    Perhaps the most important aspect of contemporary condensed matter physics involves understanding strong Coulomb interactions between the large number of electrons in a solid. Electronic correlations lead to the emergence of new system properties, such as metal-insulator transitions, superconductivity, magneto-resistance, Bose-Einstein condensation, the formation of excitonic gases, or the integer and fractional Quantum Hall effects. The discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in particular was a watershed event, leading to dramatic experimental and theoretical advances in the field of correlated-electron systems. Such materials often exhibit competition between the charge, lattice, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom, whose cause-effect relationships are difficult to ascertain. Experimental insight into the properties of solids is traditionally obtained by time-averaged probes, which measure e.g., linear optical spectra, electrical conduction properties, or the occupied band structure in thermal equilibrium. Many novel physical properties arise from excitations out of the ground state into energetically higher states by thermal, optical, or electrical means. This leads to fundamental interactions between the system's constituents, such as electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, which occur on ultrafast timescales. While these interactions underlie the physical properties of solids, they are often only indirectly inferred from time-averaged measurements. Time-resolved spectroscopy, consequently, is playing an ever increasing role to provide insight into light-matter interaction, microscopic processes, or cause-effect relationships that determine the physics of complex materials. In the past, experiments using visible and near-infrared femtosecond pulses have been extensively employed, e.g. to follow relaxation and dephasing processes in metals and semiconductors. However, many basic excitations in strongly-correlated electron systems and nanoscale

  1. Simple anthropometric measures correlate with metabolic risk indicators as strongly as magnetic resonance imaging-measured adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Bacchetti, Peter; Kotler, Donald; Lewis, Cora E; Shlipak, Michael G; Heymsfield, Steven B; Grunfeld, Carl

    2008-06-01

    Studies in persons without HIV infection have compared percentage body fat (%BF) and waist circumference as markers of risk for the complications of excess adiposity, but only limited study has been conducted in HIV-infected subjects. We compared anthropometric and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based adiposity measures as correlates of metabolic complications of adiposity in HIV-infected and control subjects. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 666 HIV-positive and 242 control subjects in the Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) study assessing body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumferences, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), %BF, and MRI-measured regional adipose tissue. Study outcomes were 3 metabolic risk variables [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol]. Analyses were stratified by sex and HIV status and adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and HIV-related factors. In HIV-infected and control subjects, univariate associations with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL were strongest for WC, MRI-measured visceral adipose tissue, and WHR; in all cases, differences in correlation between the strongest measures for each outcome were small (r HDL, WC appeared to be the best anthropometric correlate of metabolic complications, whereas, for triglycerides, the best was WHR. Relations of simple anthropometric measures with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol are approximately as strong as MRI-measured whole-body adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects.

  2. Correlated electron-ion collisions in a strong laser field; Korrelierte Elektron-Ion-Stoesse in starken Laserfeldern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristow, T.

    2007-12-17

    Electron-ion-collisions in plasmas in the presence of an ultra-short intensive laser pulse can cause high energy transfers to the electrons. During the collision the oscillation energy of the electron in the laser field is changed into drift energy. In this regime, multi-photon processes, known from the ionization of neutral atoms (Above-Threshold Ionization), and successive, so called correlated collisions, are important. The subject of the thesis is a study of binary Coulomb collisions in strong laser fields. The collisions are treated both in the context of classical Newtonian mechanics and in the quantum-mechanical framework by the Schroedinger equation. In the classical case a simplified instantaneous collision model and a complete dynamical treatment are discussed. Collisions can be treated instantaneously, if the ratio of the impact parameter to the quiver amplitude is small. The energy distributions calculated in this approximation show an elastic peak and a broad plateau due to rescattered electrons. At incident velocities smaller than the quiver velocity, correlated collisions are observed in the electron trajectories of the dynamical model. This effect leads to characteristic momentum distributions of the electrons, that are explicitly calculated and compared with the results of the instantaneous model. In addition, the time-dependence of the collisions is discussed in the framework of a singular perturbation theory. The complete description of the Coulomb scattering requires a quantum-mechanical description. A time-dependent method of wave-packet scattering is used and the corresponding time-dependent three-dimensional Schroedinger equation is solved by an implicit ADImethod on a spatial grid. The momentum and the energy distributions of the scattered electrons are calculated by the Fourier transformation of the wavefunction. A comparison of the scattering from a repulsive and an attractive potential is used to distinguish between simple collisions and

  3. The StrongWomen Change Clubs: Engaging Residents to Catalyze Positive Change in Food and Physical Activity Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Seguin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The epidemic of obesity is a multifaceted public health issue. Positive policy and environmental changes are needed to support healthier eating and increased physical activity. Methods. StrongWomen Change Clubs (SWCCs were developed through an academic-community research partnership between researchers at Cornell University and Tufts University and community partners (cooperative extension educators in rural towns in seven U.S. states. Extension educators served as the local leader and each recruited 10–15 residents to undertake a project to improve some aspect of the nutrition or physical activity environment. Most residents had limited (or no experience in civic engagement. At 6 and 12 months after implementation, the research team conducted key informant interviews with SWCC leaders to capture their perceptions of program process, benchmark achievement, and self-efficacy. Results. At 12 months, each SWCC had accomplished one benchmark; the majority had completed three or more benchmarks. They described common processes for achieving benchmarks such as building relationships and leveraging stakeholder partnerships. Barriers to benchmark achievement included busy schedules and resistance to and slow pace of change. Conclusion. Findings suggest that community change initiatives that involve stakeholders, build upon existing activities and organizational resources, and establish feasible timelines and goals can successfully catalyze environmental change.

  4. Correlation between oro and hypopharynx shape and position with endotracheal intubation difficulty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daher Rabadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Prediction of intubation difficulty can save patients from major preoperative morbidity or mortality. The purpose of this paper is to assess the correlation between oro-hypo pharynx position, neck size, and length with endotracheal intubation difficulty. The study also explored the diagnostic value of Friedman Staging System in prediction cases with difficult intubation. Method: The consecutive 500 ASA (I, II adult patients undergoing elective surgery were evaluated for oro and hypopharynx shape and position by modified Mallampati, Cormack and Lehane score as well as Friedman obstructive sleep apnea classification systems. Neck circumference and length were also measured. All cases were intubated by a single anesthesiologist who was uninformed of the above evaluation and graded intubation difficulty in visual analog score. Correlation between these findings and difficulty of intubation was assessed. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive and Negative Predictive Values were also reported. Results: Cormack-Lehane grade had the strongest correlation with difficulty of intubation followed by Friedman palate position. Friedman palate position was the most sensitive and had higher positive and negative predictive values than modified Mallampati classification. Cormack-Lehane grade was found to be the most specific with the highest negative predictive value among the four studied classifications. Conclusion: Friedman palate position is a more useful, valuable and sensitive test compared to the modified Mallampati screening test for pre-anesthetic prediction of difficult intubation where its involvement in Multivariate model may raise the accuracy and diagnostic value of preoperative assessment of difficult airway.

  5. Modification of heparanase gene expression in response to conditioning and LPS treatment: strong correlation to rs4693608 SNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrovsky, Olga; Shimoni, Avichai; Baryakh, Polina; Morgulis, Yan; Mayorov, Margarita; Beider, Katia; Shteingauz, Anna; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel; Nagler, Arnon

    2014-04-01

    Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that specifically cleaves the saccharide chains of HSPGs, important structural and functional components of the ECM. Cleavage of HS leads to loss of the structural integrity of the ECM and release of HS-bound cytokines, chemokines, and bioactive angiogenic- and growth-promoting factors. Our previous study revealed a highly significant correlation of HPSE gene SNPs rs4693608 and rs4364254 and their combination with the risk of developing GVHD. We now demonstrate that HPSE is up-regulated in response to pretransplantation conditioning, followed by a gradual decrease thereafter. Expression of heparanase correlated with the rs4693608 HPSE SNP before and after conditioning. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between recipient and donor rs4693608 SNP discrepancy and the time of neutrophil and platelet recovery. Similarly, the discrepancy in rs4693608 HPSE SNP between recipients and donors was found to be a more significant factor for the risk of aGVHD than patient genotype. The rs4693608 SNP also affected HPSE gene expression in LPS-treated MNCs from PB and CB. Possessors of the AA genotype exhibited up-regulation of heparanase with a high ratio in the LPS-treated MNCs, whereas individuals with genotype GG showed down-regulation or no effect on HPSE gene expression. HPSE up-regulation was mediated by TLR4. The study emphasizes the importance of rs4693608 SNP for HPSE gene expression in activated MNCs, indicating a role in allogeneic stem cell transplantation, including postconditioning, engraftment, and GVHD.

  6. Correlation between working positions and lactic acid levels with musculoskeletal complaints among dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiory Dioptis Putriwijaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal complaints have been common for dentists since their body is unknowingly often in inappropriate positions when caring for patients. For example, they bend towards patients, suddenly move, and then rotate from one side to another. The repetitive movements are done in long term. High activities and sufficient recovery time can cause a buildup of lactic acid in their blood leading to obstruction of the energy intake from the aerobic system in their muscle cells, resulting in fatigue. As a result, such conditions trigger decreased muscle performances. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the correlation between working positions and lactic acid levels with the risk of musculoskeletal disorders among dentists at Public Health Centers in Surabaya. Method: This research was an analytical observational research using cross sectional approach. Sampling technique used in this research was cluster random sampling with nineteen samples. To evaluate the working positions of those samples, a rapid entire body assessment (REBA method was used. Meanwhile, to observe the musculoskeletal disorders of those samples, a Nordic body map was used. Data obtained then were analyzed using Pearson correlation test with a significance level (p<0.05. Result: Results of data analysis using the Pearson correlation test showed that the significance value obtained was 0.036. It indicates that there was a correlation between the working positions and the lactic acid levels with the musculoskeletal disorders in those dentists. The results of the Pearson correlation test also revealed that there was a correlation between the working positions and the lactic acid levels among those dentists with a significance value of 0.025. Conclusion: It may be concluded that the wrong body positions during working can increase lactic acid level in the body of dentists. The increased level of lactic acid then can affect their muscles, leading to the high risk of

  7. Nonequilibrium self-energy functional theory. Accessing the real-time dynamics of strongly correlated fermionic lattice systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Felix

    2016-07-05

    The self-energy functional theory (SFT) is extended to the nonequilibrium case and applied to the real-time dynamics of strongly correlated lattice-fermions. Exploiting the basic structure of the well established equilibrium theory the entire formalism is reformulated in the language of Keldysh-Matsubara Green's functions. To this end, a functional of general nonequilibrium self-energies is constructed which is stationary at the physical point where it moreover yields the physical grand potential of the initial thermal state. Nonperturbative approximations to the full self-energy can be constructed by reducing the original lattice problem to smaller reference systems and varying the functional on the space of the respective trial self-energies, which are parametrized by the reference system's one-particle parameters. Approximations constructed in this way can be shown to respect the macroscopic conservation laws related to the underlying symmetries of the original lattice model. Assuming thermal equilibrium, the original SFT is recovered from the extended formalism. However, in the general case, the nonequilibrium variational principle comprises functional derivatives off the physical parameter space. These can be carried out analytically to derive inherently causal conditional equations for the optimal physical parameters of the reference system and a computationally realizable propagation scheme is set up. As a benchmark for the numerical implementation the variational cluster approach is applied to the dynamics of a dimerized Hubbard model after fast ramps of its hopping parameters. Finally, the time-evolution of a homogeneous Hubbard model after sudden quenches and ramps of the interaction parameter is studied by means of a dynamical impurity approximation with a single bath site. Sharply separated by a critical interaction at which fast relaxation to a thermal final state is observed, two differing response regimes can be distinguished, where the

  8. Neural correlates of lower limbs proprioception: An fMRI study of foot position matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iandolo, Riccardo; Bellini, Alessandro; Saiote, Catarina; Marre, Ilaria; Bommarito, Giulia; Oesingmann, Niels; Fleysher, Lazar; Mancardi, Giovanni Luigi; Casadio, Maura; Inglese, Matilde

    2018-05-01

    Little is known about the neural correlates of lower limbs position sense, despite the impact that proprioceptive deficits have on everyday life activities, such as posture and gait control. We used fMRI to investigate in 30 healthy right-handed and right-footed subjects the regional distribution of brain activity during position matching tasks performed with the right dominant and the left nondominant foot. Along with the brain activation, we assessed the performance during both ipsilateral and contralateral matching tasks. Subjects had lower errors when matching was performed by the left nondominant foot. The fMRI analysis suggested that the significant regions responsible for position sense are in the right parietal and frontal cortex, providing a first characterization of the neural correlates of foot position matching. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Female users of internet-based screening for rectal STIs: descriptive statistics and correlates of positivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Jessica; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Barnes, Mathilda; Quinn, Nicole; Jett-Goheen, Mary; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2014-09-01

    Internet-based screening for vaginal sexually transmitted infections (STI) has been shown to reach high-risk populations. Published studies of internet-based screening for rectal STIs in women are needed. Our objectives were to describe the female users of a rectal internet-based screening intervention and assess what factors correlated with rectal positivity for STIs. The website http://www.iwantthekit.org offers free STI testing via home self-sampling kits. Women could order vaginal and rectal kits, both containing questionnaires. Rectal and vaginal swabs were tested for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Trichomonas vaginalis using nucleic acid amplification tests. Data were analysed from 205 rectal kits from January 2009 through February 2011. Self-reported characteristics of participants were examined, and correlates of rectal STI positivity were analysed. Of the 205 rectal samples returned and eligible for testing, 38 (18.5%) were positive for at least one STI. The women were young (mean age 25.8 years), mostly African-American (50.0%), and only 14.0% always used condoms. After adjusting for age and race, Black race (AOR=3.06) and vaginal STI positivity (AOR=40.6) were significantly correlated with rectal STI positivity. Of women testing positive for rectal STIs who also submitted vaginal swabs, 29.4% were negative in the vaginal sample. Internet-based rectal screening can reach populations that appear to be at high risk for rectal STIs (18.5% prevalence) and led to the diagnosis of STIs in women who would not have been diagnosed vaginally. Black race and vaginal STI positivity were highly correlated with rectal STI positivity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Correlation of Radiographic Mental Foramen Position and Occlusion in Three Different Indian Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, P; Bansal, N; Khosa, R; Verma, KG; Sachdev, SK; Patwardhan, N; Garg, S

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The knowledge of the position of the mental foramen (MF) is important for administering local anaesthesia for diagnostic, surgical or operative procedures. Aims: To determine the shape, position, symmetry of MF and its continuity with the inferior dental canal (IDC) on a digital panoramic view and to find its correlation with Angle's molar relations in three Indian subpopulations. The study also determines the correlation of inter-foramen distance in both genders of three Indian subpopulations. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and twenty digital panoramic radiographs were evaluated from three Indian subpopulations (Punjab, Rajasthan and Northeast [NE]). The assessment of occlusion was based on Angle's molar relationships. The data obtained were statistically analysed. Results: The commonest position of MF in Rajasthan and NE populations was position 4 bilaterally, while in the Punjab population, it was position 3 on the right and position 4 on the left side. The majority of the MF was round in shape, followed by oval. The mean distance between two MF was highest among the Punjab male population and least among the NE female population. The most frequent pattern of MF continuity with IDC was diffuse in Rajasthan population, separated in NE and continuous in Punjab. Correlation between Angle's molar relation with the MF position was significant for Classes I and II but not for Class III. Correlation of inter-foramen distance between genders was highly significant in the NE and Punjab populations. Conclusion: The commonest MF position was aligned with the 1st premolar and between the 1st and 2nd-premolar. PMID:26426182

  11. Strong Correlation Between Isoprene Emission and Gross Photosynthetic Capacity During Leaf Phenology of the Tropical Tree Species Hymenaea courbaril

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, U.; Rottenberger, S.; Biesenthal, T.; Wolf, A.; Schebeske, G.; Ciccioli, P.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2004-12-01

    Composition and amount of volatile organic compound (VOC) emission of the tropical tree species Hymenaea courbaril was studied under different developmental stages at a remote Amazonian rainforest site. The different stages covered young leaves (= grown full in size, but not fully turgescent) in the end of the dry season, mature leaves in the end of dry and wet season, and senescent leaves in the end of dry season. Though the diel isoprene emissions pattern could adequately be modelled by a current isoprene algorithm, the basal emission capacity of isoprene changed considerably over the course of leaf development. The inadequacy of using one single standard emission factor to represent the VOC emission capacity of tropical vegetation for an entire seasonal cycle is obvious. A strong linear correlation between the isoprene emission capacity and the gross photosynthetic capacity (GPmax) covering all developmental stages and seasons was observed. Hence, basic leaf photosynthetic activity may offer a valuable basis to model the seasonal variation of isoprene emission, especially in tropical regions where the environmental conditions vary less than in temperate regions. Of special interest was the light dependent monoterpene emission found exclusively in the period between bud break and leave maturity. The finding of this temporary emergence of monoterpene emission may be of general interest in understanding both the ecological functions of isoprenoid production and the regulatory processes involved.

  12. Predictive Modeling for Strongly Correlated f-electron Systems: A first-principles and database driven machine learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Towfiq; Khair, Adnan; Abdullah, Mueen; Harper, Heike; Eriksson, Olle; Wills, John; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Balatsky, Alexander

    Data driven computational tools are being developed for theoretical understanding of electronic properties in f-electron based materials, e.g., Lanthanides and Actnides compounds. Here we show our preliminary work on Ce compounds. Due to a complex interplay among the hybridization of f-electrons to non-interacting conduction band, spin-orbit coupling, and strong coulomb repulsion of f-electrons, no model or first-principles based theory can fully explain all the structural and functional phases of f-electron systems. Motivated by the large need in predictive modeling of actinide compounds, we adopted a data-driven approach. We found negative correlation between the hybridization and atomic volume. Mutual information between these two features were also investigated. In order to extend our search space with more features and predictability of new compounds, we are currently developing electronic structure database. Our f-electron database will be potentially aided by machine learning (ML) algorithm to extract complex electronic, magnetic and structural properties in f-electron system, and thus, will open up new pathways for predictive capabilities and design principles of complex materials. NSEC, IMS at LANL.

  13. Strong correlation between the 6-minute walk test and accelerometry functional outcomes in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Zoe E; Ryan, Monique M; Kornberg, Andrew J; Walker, Karen Z; Truby, Helen

    2015-03-01

    Accelerometry provides information on habitual physical capability that may be of value in the assessment of function in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This preliminary investigation describes the relationship between community ambulation measured by the StepWatch activity monitor and the current standard of functional assessment, the 6-minute walk test, in ambulatory boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (n = 16) and healthy controls (n = 13). All participants completed a 6-minute walk test and wore the StepWatch™ monitor for 5 consecutive days. Both the 6-minute walk test and StepWatch accelerometry identified a decreased capacity for ambulation in boys with Duchenne compared to healthy controls. There were strong, significant correlations between 6-minute walk distance and all StepWatch parameters in affected boys only (r = 0.701-0.804). These data proffer intriguing observations that warrant further exploration. Specifically, accelerometry outcomes may compliment the 6-minute walk test in assessment of therapeutic interventions for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Physical properties of naked DNA influence nucleosome positioning and correlate with transcription start and termination sites in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soler-López Montserrat

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic organisms, DNA is packaged into chromatin structure, where most of DNA is wrapped into nucleosomes. DNA compaction and nucleosome positioning have clear functional implications, since they modulate the accessibility of genomic regions to regulatory proteins. Despite the intensive research effort focused in this area, the rules defining nucleosome positioning and the location of DNA regulatory regions still remain elusive. Results Naked (histone-free and nucleosomal DNA from yeast were digested by microccocal nuclease (MNase and sequenced genome-wide. MNase cutting preferences were determined for both naked and nucleosomal DNAs. Integration of their sequencing profiles with DNA conformational descriptors derived from atomistic molecular dynamic simulations enabled us to extract the physical properties of DNA on a genomic scale and to correlate them with chromatin structure and gene regulation. The local structure of DNA around regulatory regions was found to be unusually flexible and to display a unique pattern of nucleosome positioning. Ab initio physical descriptors derived from molecular dynamics were used to develop a computational method that accurately predicts nucleosome enriched and depleted regions. Conclusions Our experimental and computational analyses jointly demonstrate a clear correlation between sequence-dependent physical properties of naked DNA and regulatory signals in the chromatin structure. These results demonstrate that nucleosome positioning around TSS (Transcription Start Site and TTS (Transcription Termination Site (at least in yeast is strongly dependent on DNA physical properties, which can define a basal regulatory mechanism of gene expression.

  15. On bounded rank positive semidefinite matrix completions of extreme partial correlation matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Eisenberg-Nagy (Marianna); M. Laurent (Monique); A. Varvitsiotis (Antonios)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractWe study a new geometric graph parameter egd(G), defined as the smallest integer r ≥ 1 for which any partial symmetric matrix which is completable to a correlation matrix and whose entries are specified at the positions of the edges of G, can be completed to a matrix in the convex hull

  16. On bounded rank positive semidefinite matrix completions of extreme partial correlation matrices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Eisenberg-Nagy (Marianna); M. Laurent (Monique); A. Varvitsiotis (Antonios)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe study a new geometric graph parameter $egd(G)$, defined as the smallest integer $r\\ge 1$ for which any partial symmetric matrix which is completable to a correlation matrix and whose entries are specified at the positions of the edges of $G$, can be completed to a matrix in the convex

  17. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation of model calculations to experimentally determined data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, O. [Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)

    1998-01-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed. This report discusses a number of models which possibly can be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved model predicts a substantial bentonite swelling pressure also in a saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is sufficiently high. This means in practice that the buffer in a KBS-3 repository will give rise to an acceptable swelling pressure, but that the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost if the system is exposed to brines. (orig.). 14 refs.

  18. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation between model calculations and experimentally determined data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnland, O. [Clay Technology, Lund (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed by different researchers over the years. The present report examines some of the models which possibly may be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved thermodynamic model predicts substantial bentonite swelling pressures also in saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is high enough. In practice, the model predicts a substantial swelling pressure for the buffer in a KBS-3 repository if the system is exposed to brines, but the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost, since the available compaction technique does not give a sufficiently high bentonite density 37 refs, 15 figs

  19. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation between model calculations and experimentally determined data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnland, O.

    1997-12-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed by different researchers over the years. The present report examines some of the models which possibly may be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved thermodynamic model predicts substantial bentonite swelling pressures also in saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is high enough. In practice, the model predicts a substantial swelling pressure for the buffer in a KBS-3 repository if the system is exposed to brines, but the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost, since the available compaction technique does not give a sufficiently high bentonite density

  20. Bentonite swelling pressure in strong NaCl solutions. Correlation of model calculations to experimentally determined data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnland, O.

    1998-01-01

    A number of quite different quantitative models concerning swelling pressure in bentonite clay have been proposed. This report discusses a number of models which possibly can be used also for saline conditions. A discrepancy between calculated and measured values was noticed for all models at brine conditions. In general the models predicted a too low swelling pressure compared to what was experimentally found. An osmotic component in the clay/water system is proposed in order to improve the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. Calculations of this osmotic component is proposed to be made by use of the clay cation exchange capacity and Donnan equilibrium. Calculations made by this approach showed considerably better correlation to literature laboratory data, compared to calculations made by the previous conservative use of the thermodynamic model. A few verifying laboratory tests were made and are briefly described in the report. The improved model predicts a substantial bentonite swelling pressure also in a saturated sodium chloride solution if the density of the system is sufficiently high. This means in practice that the buffer in a KBS-3 repository will give rise to an acceptable swelling pressure, but that the positive effects of mixing bentonite into a backfill material will be lost if the system is exposed to brines. (orig.)

  1. [Correlation between oro and hypopharynx shape and position with endotracheal intubation difficulty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadi, Daher; Baker, Ahmad Abu; Al-Qudah, Mohannad

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of intubation difficulty can save patients from major preoperative morbidity or mortality. The purpose of this paper is to assess the correlation between oro-hypo pharynx position, neck size, and length with endotracheal intubation difficulty. The study also explored the diagnostic value of Friedman Staging System in prediction cases with difficult intubation. The consecutive 500 ASA (I, II) adult patients undergoing elective surgery were evaluated for oro and hypopharynx shape and position by modified Mallampati, Cormack and Lehane score as well as Friedman obstructive sleep apnea classification systems. Neck circumference and length were also measured. All cases were intubated by a single anesthesiologist who was uninformed of the above evaluation and graded intubation difficulty in visual analog score. Correlation between these findings and difficulty of intubation was assessed. Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive and Negative Predictive Values were also reported. Cormack-Lehane grade had the strongest correlation with difficulty of intubation followed by Friedman palate position. Friedman palate position was the most sensitive and had higher positive and negative predictive values than modified Mallampati classification. Cormack-Lehane grade was found to be the most specific with the highest negative predictive value among the four studied classifications. Friedman palate position is a more useful, valuable and sensitive test compared to the modified Mallampati screening test for pre-anesthetic prediction of difficult intubation where its involvement in Multivariate model may raise the accuracy and diagnostic value of preoperative assessment of difficult airway. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Simple anthropometric measures correlate with metabolic risk indicators as strongly as magnetic resonance imaging–measured adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Rebecca; Shen, Wei; Bacchetti, Peter; Kotler, Donald; Lewis, Cora E; Shlipak, Michael G; Heymsfield, Steven B

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies in persons without HIV infection have compared percentage body fat (%BF) and waist circumference as markers of risk for the complications of excess adiposity, but only limited study has been conducted in HIV-infected subjects. Objective We compared anthropometric and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)–based adiposity measures as correlates of metabolic complications of adiposity in HIV-infected and control subjects. Design The study was a cross-sectional analysis of 666 HIV-positive and 242 control subjects in the Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) study assessing body mass index (BMI), waist (WC) and hip (HC) circumferences, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), %BF, and MRI-measured regional adipose tissue. Study outcomes were 3 metabolic risk variables [homeostatic model assessment (HOMA), triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol]. Analyses were stratified by sex and HIV status and adjusted for demographic, lifestyle, and HIV-related factors. Results In HIV-infected and control subjects, univariate associations with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL were strongest for WC, MRI-measured visceral adipose tissue, and WHR; in all cases, differences in correlation between the strongest measures for each outcome were small (r ≤ 0.07). Multivariate adjustment found no significant difference for optimally fitting models between the use of anthropometric and MRI measures, and the magnitudes of differences were small (adjusted R2 ≤ 0.06). For HOMA and HDL, WC appeared to be the best anthropometric correlate of metabolic complications, whereas, for triglycerides, the best was WHR. Conclusion Relations of simple anthropometric measures with HOMA, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol are approximately as strong as MRI-measured whole-body adipose tissue depots in both HIV-infected and control subjects. PMID:18541572

  3. Correlational study of impacted and non-functional lower third molar position with occurrence of pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Batista Camargo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lower third molar (M3 eruption is unpredictable. The purpose of this study was to correlate radiographic position of M3 on a preexistent film with the current clinical, histopathological, and radiographic findings. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed. The sample was collected from a database of patients covered by Medical Fund of Brazilian Army. Radiographs were obtained a minimum of 5 years prior to the presurgical visit and after their clinical exam. The primary outcome variables were the teeth positions using Pell and Gregory/Winter classifications on panoramic X-rays. Those variables were analyzed at both the beginning (T0 and end of the study (T1. Clinical assessments and histopathological study of the thirds that were extracted were performed only at T1. Correlation between the teeth positions were related to the clinical, histopathological, and radiographic parameters using statistical analysis tests with significance set at p < 0.05. Results Twenty-six patients with 49 M3 were assessed over 10 months. Mean age was 14.92 years at T0 and 21.87 years at T1. The average time between T0 and T1 was 6.77 years. A significant relationship (p = 0.024 was found between the presences of root resorption on the second molar if M3 presented in an IB horizontal position at T1. There was also a significant correlation (p = 0.039 between dental crowding of the anterior lower teeth with IIIB position at T0 and if the patient finished orthodontic treatment without lingual retainers. Conclusions Lower M3 in position IIIB seen in a teenager and IB seen in an adult is more likely to have negative consequences and should be followed closely.

  4. Correlative Studies in Clinical Trials: A Position Statement From the International Thyroid Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Cote, Gilbert J; Demeure, Michael J; Elisei, Rossella; Jhiang, Sissy; Ringel, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    Patients with progressive thyroid cancer in distant metastatic sites represent a population with a need for new therapeutic options. Aspiring to improve the treatment of such patients, the objective of this position statement from the International Thyroid Oncology Group (ITOG) is to clarify the importance of incorporating high-quality correlative studies into clinical trials. ITOG was formed to develop and support high-quality multicenter and multidisciplinary clinical trials for patients with aggressive forms of thyroid cancer. The Correlative Sciences Committee of the ITOG focuses on the quality and types of correlative studies included in ITOG-associated clinical trials. This document represents expert consensus from ITOG regarding this issue based on extensive collective experience in clinical and translational trials informed by basic science. The Correlative Studies Committee identified an international writing group representative of diverse specialties, including basic sciences. Drafts were reviewed by all members of the writing group, the larger committee, and the ITOG board. After consideration of all comments by the writing group and modification of the document, the final document was then approved by the authors and the ITOG board. High-quality correlative studies, which include variety in the types of correlates, should be intrinsic to the design of thyroid cancer clinical trials to offer the best opportunity for each study to advance treatment for patients with advanced and progressive thyroid cancer.

  5. What Can We Learn From The Shape Of A Correlation Peak For Position Estimation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awwal, A S

    2009-08-25

    Matched filtering is a robust technique to identify and locate objects in the presence of noise. Traditionally, the amplitude of the correlation peak is used for detection of a match. However, when distinguishing objects that are not significantly different or detecting objects under high noise imaging conditions, the normalized peak amplitude alone may not provide sufficient discrimination. In this paper, we demonstrate that measurements derived from the shape of the correlation peak offer not only higher levels of discrimination but also accurate position estimation. To our knowledge, this is the first time such features have been used in a real-time system, like the National Ignition Facility, where such techniques enable real-time, accurate position estimation and alignment under challenging imaging conditions. It is envisioned that systems utilizing matched filtering will greatly benefit from incorporating additional shape based information.

  6. Correlational study of impacted and non-functional lower third molar position with occurrence of pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Batista Camargo; João Batista Sobrinho; Emanuel Sávio de Souza Andrade; Joseph E. Van Sickels

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Lower third molar (M3) eruption is unpredictable. The purpose of this study was to correlate radiographic position of M3 on a preexistent film with the current clinical, histopathological, and radiographic findings. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed. The sample was collected from a database of patients covered by Medical Fund of Brazilian Army. Radiographs were obtained a minimum of 5 years prior to the presurgical visit and after their clinical exam. The ...

  7. Robust correlation analyses: false positive and power validation using a new open source matlab toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Cyril R; Wilcox, Rand; Rousselet, Guillaume A

    2012-01-01

    Pearson's correlation measures the strength of the association between two variables. The technique is, however, restricted to linear associations and is overly sensitive to outliers. Indeed, a single outlier can result in a highly inaccurate summary of the data. Yet, it remains the most commonly used measure of association in psychology research. Here we describe a free Matlab((R)) based toolbox (http://sourceforge.net/projects/robustcorrtool/) that computes robust measures of association between two or more random variables: the percentage-bend correlation and skipped-correlations. After illustrating how to use the toolbox, we show that robust methods, where outliers are down weighted or removed and accounted for in significance testing, provide better estimates of the true association with accurate false positive control and without loss of power. The different correlation methods were tested with normal data and normal data contaminated with marginal or bivariate outliers. We report estimates of effect size, false positive rate and power, and advise on which technique to use depending on the data at hand.

  8. Positive correlation between retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) and triglyceride level in central obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktaria, S.; Sari, D. K.; Dalimunthe, D.; Eyanoer, P. C.

    2018-03-01

    Obesity has become an epidemic in both developed and developing countries. Central obesity considered a risk factor that is closely related to several chronic diseases. Central obesity is associated with elevated triglyceride levels and associated with RBP4 which can lead to insulin resistance. Increased level of RBP4 can cause lipid metabolism disorders and can become a marker for insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. This study aims to find the correlation of RBP4 with triglycerides and Apo B100 in central obesity. It was a cross- sectional study on 46 subjects with central obesity, aged 20-50 years old. Blood samples were taken in cubital vein and examined for RBP4 and triglyceride levels. Data analysis was performed using Spearman correlation test. The results showed that gender frequency distribution showed little difference between men and women, i. e., men 43.5% and women 56.5%. RBP4 level was positively correlated with triglyceride (r = 0.48) and statistically significant (p = 0.001). The rbp4 level was positively correlated with triglyceride, indicating the role of RBP4 on high triglyceride level in central obesity.

  9. Growth of solid domains in model membranes: quantitative image analysis reveals a strong correlation between domain shape and spatial position

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Ipsen, John Hjort; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2009-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of solid domains in supported bilayers composed of a binary mixture of equimolar 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) have been studied using combined fluorescence microscopy and AFM. We have found that th...

  10. Characterization of nonlymphoid cells in rat spleen, with special reference to strongly Ia-positive branched cells in T-cell areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkstra, C.D.

    1982-01-01

    By use of a monoclonal antibody against Ia antigen in an immunoperoxidase method, strongly Ia-positive branched cells are found in the T-cell areas of the splenic white pulp of the rat. In order to further characterize these cells, enzyme histochemical characteristics, phagocytic capacity, and irradiation sensitivity have been studied. Evidence is presented that these strongly Ia-positive branched cells represent interdigitating cells. The influence of whole-body irradiation on interdigitating cells is discussed. Comparison with data from the literature on the in vitro dendritic cell isolated from spleen cell suspensions reveals many similarities between the described interdigitating cell in vivo and the dendritic cell in vitro

  11. Interpretation of positive social events in social phobia: an examination of cognitive correlates and diagnostic distinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laposa, Judith M; Cassin, Stephanie E; Rector, Neil A

    2010-03-01

    Research suggests that individuals with social phobia fear positive social events and interpret them in a negative fashion that serves to maintain anxiety. To better elucidate the nature and role of interpretation of positive events in social phobia, two studies were conducted. Study 1 examined symptom and cognitive correlates of negative interpretation of positive social events. Participants with DSM-IV diagnosed generalized social phobia (GSP) completed a measure of interpretation of positive social events (IPES) in relation to a range of symptom and cognition measures of social anxiety. Results indicated that perfectionism and a measure tapping interpersonal fears associated with social anxiety were significantly predictive of IPES scores. Study 2 examined IPES scores in clinical participants with GSP, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and non-anxious controls. Results indicated that individuals with GSP scored higher on the IPES than those with PD/A, GAD and controls, but did not differ from OCD. These findings suggest that negative interpretation of positive events is a distinct and characteristic feature of social phobia with significant associations with other cognitive risk factors for the disorder. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. No Correlation between Distorted Body Representations Underlying Tactile Distance Perception and Position Sense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Longo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Both tactile distance perception and position sense are believed to require that immediate afferent signals be referenced to a stored representation of body size and shape (the body model. For both of these abilities, recent studies have reported that the stored body representations involved are highly distorted, at least in the case of the hand, with the hand dorsum represented as wider and squatter than it actually is. Here, we investigated whether individual differences in the magnitude of these distortions are shared between tactile distance perception and position sense, as would be predicted by the hypothesis that a single distorted body model underlies both tasks. We used established task to measure distortions of the represented shape of the hand dorsum. Consistent with previous results, in both cases there were clear biases to overestimate distances oriented along the medio-lateral axis of the hand compared to the proximo-distal axis. Moreover, within each task there were clear split-half correlations, demonstrating that both tasks show consistent individual differences. Critically, however, there was no correlation between the magnitudes of distortion in the two tasks. This casts doubt on the proposal that a common body model underlies both tactile distance perception and position sense.

  13. Strong correlation in acene sheets from the active-space variational two-electron reduced density matrix method: effects of symmetry and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelzer, Kenley; Greenman, Loren; Gidofalvi, Gergely; Mazziotti, David A

    2011-06-09

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a class of organic molecules with importance in several branches of science, including medicine, combustion chemistry, and materials science. The delocalized π-orbital systems in PAHs require highly accurate electronic structure methods to capture strong electron correlation. Treating correlation in PAHs has been challenging because (i) traditional wave function methods for strong correlation have not been applicable since they scale exponentially in the number of strongly correlated orbitals, and (ii) alternative methods such as the density-matrix renormalization group and variational two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) methods have not been applied beyond linear acene chains. In this paper we extend the earlier results from active-space variational 2-RDM theory [Gidofalvi, G.; Mazziotti, D. A. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 129, 134108] to the more general two-dimensional arrangement of rings--acene sheets--to study the relationship between geometry and electron correlation in PAHs. The acene-sheet calculations, if performed with conventional wave function methods, would require wave function expansions with as many as 1.5 × 10(17) configuration state functions. To measure electron correlation, we employ several RDM-based metrics: (i) natural-orbital occupation numbers, (ii) the 1-RDM von Neumann entropy, (iii) the correlation energy per carbon atom, and (iv) the squared Frobenius norm of the cumulant 2-RDM. The results confirm a trend of increasing polyradical character with increasing molecular size previously observed in linear PAHs and reveal a corresponding trend in two-dimensional (arch-shaped) PAHs. Furthermore, in PAHs of similar size they show significant variations in correlation with geometry. PAHs with the strictly linear geometry (chains) exhibit more electron correlation than PAHs with nonlinear geometries (sheets).

  14. Positive correlation between serum and peritoneal fluid CA-125 levels in women with pelvic endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Ferreira do Amaral

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: One of the diagnostic markers of endometriosis is CA-125, and elevated levels of this are caused by high concentrations in the ectopic endometrium. The objective of this study was to correlate CA-125 levels in serum and peritoneal fluid from women with and without pelvic endometriosis. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a prospective, cross-sectional, controlled study of consecutive pa-tients undergoing laparoscopy for infertility, pelvic pain or tubal ligation, during early follicular phase, at the university hospital of Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto. METHODS: Fifty-two patients were divided into two groups: endometriosis group, consisting of 35 patients with biopsy-confirmed pelvic endometriosis, and control group, consisting of 17 patients without endometriosis. CA-125 levels in serum samples and peritoneal fluid were determined by chemiluminescence. RESULTS: CA-125 levels in serum and peritoneal fluid were higher in patients with advanced pelvic endometriosis (means of 39.1 ± 45.8 U/ml versus 10.5 ± 5.9 U/ml in serum, p < 0.005; 1,469.4 ± 1,350.4 U/ml versus 888.7 ± 784.3 U/ml in peritoneal fluid, p < 0.05, and showed a positive correlation between each other (correlation coefficient (r = 0.4880. Women with more advanced degrees of endometriosis showed higher CA-125 levels in both serum and peritoneal fluid (p = 0.0001. CONCLUSION: There is a positive correlation between serum and peritoneal fluid values of CA-125 in women with and without endometriosis, and their levels are higher in peritoneal fluid. Advanced endometriosis is related to higher levels in both serum and peritoneal fluid.

  15. Strong subjective recovery as a protective factor against the effects of positive symptoms on quality of life outcomes in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukla, Marina; Lysaker, Paul H; Roe, David

    2014-08-01

    Interest in recovery from schizophrenia has been growing steadily, with much of the focus on remission from psychotic symptoms and a return to functioning. Less is known about the experience of subjective recovery and its relationships with other important outcomes, such as quality of life and the formation and sustenance of social connections. This study sought to address this gap in knowledge by examining the links between self perceived recovery, symptoms, and the social components of quality of life. Sixty eight veterans with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders who were participating in a study of cognitive remediation and work were concurrently administered the Recovery Assessment Scale, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, and the Heinrichs-Carpenter Quality of Life Scale (QLS). Linear regression analyses demonstrated that subjective recovery moderated the relationship between positive symptoms and both QLS intrapsychic foundations scores and QLS instrumental role functioning after controlling for negative symptoms. Further examination of this interaction revealed that for individuals with substantial positive symptoms, higher levels of subjective recovery were associated with better instrumental role functioning and intrapsychic foundational abilities. Greater self perceived recovery is linked with stronger quality of life, both in regards to the cognitive and affective bases for socialization and active community involvement, even in the presence of substantial psychotic symptoms. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Superconducting states in strongly correlated systems with nonstandard quasiparticles and real space pairing: an unconventional Fermi-liquid limit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Spałek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We use the concept of generalized (almost localized Fermi Liquid composed of nonstandard quasiparticles with spin-dependence effective masses and the effective field induced by electron correlations. This Fermi liquid is obtained within the so-called statistically-consistent Gutzwiller approximation (SGA proposed recently [cf. J. Jędrak et al., arXiv: 1008.0021] and describes electronic states of the correlated quantum liquid. Particular emphasis is put on real space pairing driven by the electronic correlations, the Fulde-Ferrell state of the heavy-fermion liquid, and the d-wave superconducting state of high temperature curate superconductors in the overdoped limit. The appropriate phase diagrams are discussed showing in particular the limits of stability of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS type of state.

  17. Morphological variation and habitat modification are strongly correlated for the autogenic ecosystem engineer Spartina anglica (common cordgrass)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulzen, J.B.; Van Soelen, J.; Bouma, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    We explored to what extent morphological variation and habitat modification are correlated for an autogenic ecosystem engineer, which is an organism that modifies its habitat via its own physical structures. The intertidal salt marsh species Spartina anglica is well known for its capacity to enhance

  18. A strong response to selection on mass-independent maximal metabolic rate without a correlated response in basal metabolic rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wone, B W M; Madsen, Per; Donovan, E R

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic rates are correlated with many aspects of ecology, but how selection on different aspects of metabolic rates affects their mutual evolution is poorly understood. Using laboratory mice, we artificially selected for high maximal mass-independent metabolic rate (MMR) without direct selecti...

  19. Hand-Held Dynamometer Measurements Obtained in a Home Environment Are Reliable but Not Correlated Strongly with Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohannon, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    This research report describes the reliability and validity of hand-held dynamometer measurements of knee extension force obtained from 13 patients referred for physical therapy. Results found that hand-held dynamometry can be used to obtain reliable measures of muscle strength; however, correlation between strength measures and function was not…

  20. Students’ delinquency and correlates with strong and weaker ties : A study of students’ networks in Dutch high schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baerveldt, Chris; Rossem, Ronan van; Vermande, Marjolein; Weerman, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate three issues in the current debate on youth delinquency: (1) Whether the level of delinquency of adolescents is negatively correlated with the quality of her/his personal networks (as stated by the social inability model) or not (as stated by the

  1. Boson-Jet Correlations in a Hybrid Strong/Weak Coupling Model for Jet Quenching in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Milhano, Jose Guilherme; Pablos, Daniel; Rajagopal, Krishna

    2016-06-11

    We confront a hybrid strong/weak coupling model for jet quenching to data from LHC heavy ion collisions. The model combines the perturbative QCD physics at high momentum transfer and the strongly coupled dynamics of non- abelian gauge theories plasmas in a phenomenological way. By performing a full Monte Carlo simulation, and after fitting one single parameter, we successfully describe several jet observables at the LHC, including dijet and photon jet measurements. Within current theoretical and experimental uncertainties, we find that such observables show little sensitivity to the specifics of the microscopic energy loss mechanism. We also present a new observable, the ratio of the fragmentation function of inclusive jets to that of the associated jets in dijet pairs, which can discriminate among different medium models. Finally, we discuss the importance of plasma response to jet passage in jet shapes.

  2. The neural correlates of regulating positive and negative emotions in medication-free major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, Steven G; Osuch, Elizabeth A; Williamson, Peter C; Mitchell, Derek G V

    2014-05-01

    Depressive cognitive schemas play an important role in the emergence and persistence of major depressive disorder (MDD). The current study adapted emotion regulation techniques to reflect elements of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and related psychotherapies to delineate neurocognitive abnormalities associated with modulating the negative cognitive style in MDD. Nineteen non-medicated patients with MDD and 19 matched controls reduced negative or enhanced positive feelings elicited by emotional scenes while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Although both groups showed significant emotion regulation success as measured by subjective ratings of affect, the controls were significantly better at modulating both negative and positive emotion. Both groups recruited regions of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when regulating negative emotions. Only in controls was this accompanied by reduced activity in sensory cortices and amygdala. Similarly, both groups showed enhanced activity in VLPFC and ventral striatum when enhancing positive affect; however, only in controls was ventral striatum activity correlated with regulation efficacy. The results suggest that depression is associated with both a reduced capacity to achieve relief from negative affect despite recruitment of ventral and dorsal prefrontal cortical regions implicated in emotion regulation, coupled with a disconnect between activity in reward-related regions and subjective positive affect.

  3. The neural correlates of regulating positive and negative emotions in medication-free major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greening, Steven G.; Osuch, Elizabeth A.; Williamson, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Depressive cognitive schemas play an important role in the emergence and persistence of major depressive disorder (MDD). The current study adapted emotion regulation techniques to reflect elements of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and related psychotherapies to delineate neurocognitive abnormalities associated with modulating the negative cognitive style in MDD. Nineteen non-medicated patients with MDD and 19 matched controls reduced negative or enhanced positive feelings elicited by emotional scenes while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. Although both groups showed significant emotion regulation success as measured by subjective ratings of affect, the controls were significantly better at modulating both negative and positive emotion. Both groups recruited regions of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) when regulating negative emotions. Only in controls was this accompanied by reduced activity in sensory cortices and amygdala. Similarly, both groups showed enhanced activity in VLPFC and ventral striatum when enhancing positive affect; however, only in controls was ventral striatum activity correlated with regulation efficacy. The results suggest that depression is associated with both a reduced capacity to achieve relief from negative affect despite recruitment of ventral and dorsal prefrontal cortical regions implicated in emotion regulation, coupled with a disconnect between activity in reward-related regions and subjective positive affect. PMID:23482626

  4. Exclusive breastfeeding prenatal intentions among HIV-positive mothers in Blantyre, Malawi: a correlation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafulafula, Ursula K; Hutchinson, Mary K; Gennaro, Susan; Guttmacher, Sally; Kumitawa, Andrew

    2013-11-07

    Exclusive breastfeeding is an important component of child survival and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in resource-poor settings like Malawi. In Malawi, children under the age of six months are exclusively breastfed for an average duration of 3.7 months. This falls short of the recommendations by the World Health Organization as well as the Malawi Ministry of Health that mothers exclusively breastfeed for the first six months of the child's life. Understanding factors that influence exclusive breastfeeding duration among HIV-positive mothers is important in promoting exclusive breastfeeding among these mothers. An exploratory study was therefore conducted to determine factors that influence HIV-positive mothers' prenatal intended duration of exclusive breastfeeding and their likelihood to exclusively breastfeed for six months. This paper is based on data from a longitudinal, descriptive and correlation study that was conducted at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi between May 12, 2009 and March 22, 2010. Theory of Planned Behavior guided the study. A face-to-face survey was utilized to collect data from a convenience sample of 110 HIV-positive mothers who were at least 36 weeks pregnant at baseline. A modified and pre-tested breastfeeding attrition prediction tool was used to measure exclusive breastfeeding beliefs, intentions and external influences at baseline. Data were analyzed using descriptive and association statistics. Additionally, multiple regressions were run to determine significant predictors of HIV-positive mothers' prenatal intended duration of exclusive breastfeeding and their likelihood to exclusively breastfeed for six months. Results revealed high exclusive breastfeeding prenatal intentions among HIV-positive mothers. Prenatal intended duration of exclusive breastfeeding was positively associated with normative, control beliefs and negatively associated with positive beliefs, maternal education and

  5. Experience of Early Childhood Caries May Positively Correlate with Psychomotor Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chen-Yi; Liu, Yen-Chun; Shieh, Tien-Yu; Lin, Jia-Rong; Tseng, Yi-Chun; Teng, Andy Yen-Tung

    2015-01-01

    To examine the as yet unknown relationship between dental caries and the child's psychomotor development. A cross-sectional study was designed by screening the kindergartens from urban areas of two cities in southern Taiwan. Besides the personal, demographic and dietary information, the common measures for caries (dmft) and the amended comprehensive scales (CCDI) for psychomotor development were used to assess their relationship(s). A power analysis showed that 334 subjects would be required. One-way ANOVA vs multiple linear regression analysis were used to compare the differences of variables between gender, age and dmft scales, vs the relationship among all variables tested, respectively. A total of 433 children completed the study. The results demonstrated that there was a positive relationship between higher (i.e. dmft≥4 and 5) but not lower or extremely high caries experience and aspects of psychomotor development (i.e. personal-social and expressive language) in children aged 4 to 6 years. The present results are important for paediatric dentists, as they suggest a positive correlation between caries experience (dmft 3 to 6) and psychomotor development in pre-school children and that such a correlation may occur more significantly as an attribute of the most affected teeth (incisors and molars) during the critical stage of personal-social and expressive language development (speech-communication).

  6. Correlation between sperm DNA fragmentation index and CMA3 positive spermatozoa in globozoospermic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinifar, H; Yazdanikhah, S; Modarresi, T; Totonchi, M; Sadighi Gilani, M A; Sabbaghian, M

    2015-05-01

    The absence of the acrosome causes the situation which is called globozoospermia. There are a few studies, mostly as case reports, about correlation between levels of sperm DNA damage in patients with total round-headed spermatozoa. We investigated this correlation as well as CMA3 positive spermatozoa in 20 globozoospermic men (with more than 90% round-headed spermatozoa) attending to Royan Institute. Semen samples divided into three parts to semen analysis, to measure DNA fragmentation index (DFI) using sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA) and to detect CMA3(+) sperm cells by chromomycin A3 staining and fluorescent microscopy. Our results showed that there were significant differences in sperm concentration, total sperm motility, and normal morphology between patients and controls group (p spermatozoa in patients group significantly increases compared with control group (p spermatozoa with round head sperm cells in total globozoospermic men. It seems that the increase in DNA damage may be because of defective sperm DNA compaction, as we detected CMA3 positive sperm cells in these patients. © 2015 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  7. Quantum correlations in a system of nuclear s = 1/2 spins in a strong magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fel’dman, E B; Kuznetsova, E I; Yurishchev, M A

    2012-01-01

    Entanglement and quantum discord for a pair of nuclear spins s = 1/2 in a nanopore filled with a gas of spin-carrying molecules (atoms) are studied. The correlation functions describing dynamics of dipolar-coupled spins in a nanopore are found. The dependence of spin-pair entanglement on the temperature and the number of spins is obtained from the reduced density matrix, which is centrosymmetric (CS). An analytic expression for the concurrence is obtained for an arbitrary CS density matrix. It is shown that the quantum discord as a measure of quantum correlations attains a significant value at low temperatures. It is also shown that the discord in the considered model has ‘flickering’ character and disappears periodically in the course of time evolution of the system. The geometric discord is studied for arbitrary 4 × 4 CS density matrices. (paper)

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Saliva in HIV-positive Heroin Addicts Reveals Proteins Correlated with Cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominy, Stephen; Brown, Joseph N.; Ryder, Mark I.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remains high despite effective antiretroviral therapies. Multiple etiologies have been proposed over the last few years to account for this phenomenon, including the neurotoxic effects of antiretrovirals and co-morbid substance abuse. However, no underlying molecular mechanism has been identified. Emerging evidence in several fields has linked the gut to brain diseases, but the effect of the gut on the brain during HIV infection has not been explored. Saliva is the most accessible gut biofluid, and is therefore of great scientific interest for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. This study presents a longitudinal, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics study investigating saliva samples taken from 8 HIV-positive (HIV+) and 11 -negative (HIV-) heroin addicts. In the HIV+ group, 58 proteins were identified that show significant correlations with cognitive scores and that implicate disruption of protein quality control pathways by HIV. Notably, no proteins from the HIV- heroin addict cohort showed significant correlations with cognitive scores. In addition, the majority of correlated proteins have been shown to be associated with exosomes, allowing us to propose that the salivary glands and/or oral epithelium may modulate brain function during HIV infection through the release of discrete packets of proteins in the form of exosomes.

  9. Epidemiology of paroxysmal positioning vertigo: correlation with seasons, climate, and pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Paolo; Pelagatti, Matteo; Hahn, Ales; Alpini, Dario

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article was to evaluate the time course of paroxysmal positioning vertigo (PPV) and to investigate correlations with environmental and seasonal factors through a retrospective statistical analysis spanning 4 years (2001-2004). Applying rigorous diagnostic criteria, we selected 575 patients (429 women and 146 men; age range, 17-94 years; mean age, 55 years for men and 56 years for women). Statistical analysis included events per month and per year. We conducted a descriptive statistical analysis to investigate the correlation between vertigo events and main environmental factors: air pollution as expressed by daily concentration of nitric monoxide and ultrafine particles; air pressure; mean temperature and sun radiation; and humidity. We referred the environmental data, collected by Regione Lombardia (the regional government of Lombardy), to the greater Milan homogeneous area. We performed an analysis of variance test and observed that PPV is more frequent in middle-aged women (in or around their fifties) and on the right side. PPV is clearly negatively correlated with temperature, and frequency of attacks depends on temperature variations. The role of air pollution, especially particles, is suspected, but it is not yet clearly identified. Factors that link climate and otoconia metabolism require further investigation.

  10. Evaluation of DNA typing as a positive identification method for soft and hard tissues immersed in strong acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robino, C; Pazzi, M; Di Vella, G; Martinelli, D; Mazzola, L; Ricci, U; Testi, R; Vincenti, M

    2015-11-01

    Identification of human remains can be hindered by several factors (e.g., traumatic mutilation, carbonization or decomposition). Moreover, in some criminal cases, offenders may purposely adopt various expedients to thwart the victim's identification, including the dissolution of body tissues by the use of corrosive reagents, as repeatedly reported in the past for Mafia-related murders. By means of an animal model, namely porcine samples, we evaluated standard DNA typing as a method for identifying soft (muscle) and hard (bone and teeth) tissues immersed in strong acids (hydrochloric, nitric and sulfuric acid) or in mixtures of acids (aqua regia). Samples were tested at different time intervals, ranging between 2 and 6h (soft tissues) and 2-28 days (hard tissues). It was shown that, in every type of acid, complete degradation of the DNA extracted from soft tissues preceded tissue dissolution and could be observed within 4h of immersion. Conversely, high molecular weight DNA amenable to STR analysis could be isolated from hard tissues as long as cortical bone fragments were still present (28 days for sulfuric acid, 7 days for nitric acid, 2 days for hydrochloric acid and aqua regia), or the integrity of the dental pulp chamber was preserved (7 days, in sulfuric acid only). The results indicate that DNA profiling of acid-treated body parts (in particular, cortical bone) is still feasible at advanced stages of corrosion, even when the morphological methods used in forensic anthropology and odontology can no longer be applied for identification purposes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sociotropic personality traits positively correlate with the severity of social anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhan Fistikci

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate sociotropic-autonomic personality characteristics and their clinical implications in social anxiety disorder (SAD.  Methods. The study included 68 consecutive patients who were either being followed up on an outpatient basis or presented for the first time to the psychiatric clinics of Bakirkoy Research and Training Hospital for Psychiatry, Neurology and Neurosurgery or Trakya University School of Medicine between May 2012 and May 2013, and were diagnosed primarily with generalised SAD according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Sociotropy-Autonomy Scale (SAS, Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R, Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS and a sociodemographic data collection form designed by the authors were used as primary assessment instruments.  Results. The mean age (standard deviation (SD of the sample group was 23.73 (8.85 years; 37 (54.4% were female and 31 (45.6% were male. LSAS mean (SD total fear score was 63.51 (13.74, mean total avoidance score was 61.24 (14.26, BDI mean score was 16.99 (9.58, SAS mean sociotropy score was 71.06 (16.79, and mean autonomy score was 63.22 (16.04. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between SAS sociotropy scores and LSAS fear and avoidance total scores, BDI scores and all subscales of SCL-90-R (p0.05.  Conclusion. Sociotropic personality characteristics in patients with SAD have been found to positively correlate with depression and social anxiety levels. Addressing this finding during treatment sessions and helping the patient increase flexibility in appraisal of social life events may have a positive impact on treatment outcome.

  12. Death attitudes and positive coping in Spanish nursing undergraduates: a cross-sectional and correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edo-Gual, Montserrat; Monforte-Royo, Cristina; Aradilla-Herrero, Amor; Tomás-Sábado, Joaquín

    2015-09-01

    To analyse the relationship between death attitudes, emotional intelligence, resilience and self-esteem in a sample of nursing undergraduates. The death attitudes held by nursing students may influence the care they offer to end-of-life patients and their families. Emotional intelligence, resilience and self-esteem are important social and emotional competencies for coping positively with death and dying. Cross-sectional and correlational study. Participants were 760 nursing undergraduates from four nursing schools in Spain. Data were collected in 2013-2014. The students responded anonymously to a self-report questionnaire that gathered socio-demographic data and which assessed the following aspects: fear of death (Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale), death anxiety (Death Anxiety Inventory-Revised), perceived emotional intelligence (Trait Meta-Mood Scale, with its three dimensions: attention, clarity and repair), resilience (Brief Resilient Coping Scale) and self-esteem (Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale). In addition to descriptive statistics, analyses of variance, mean differences, correlations and regression analyses were computed. Linear regression analysis indicated that attention to feelings, resilience and self-esteem are the significant predictors of death anxiety. The results show that death anxiety and fear of death are modulated by social and emotional competencies associated with positive coping. The training offered to future nurses should include not only scientific knowledge and technical skills but also strategies for developing social and emotional competencies. In this way, they will be better equipped to cope positively and constructively with the suffering and death they encounter at work, thus helping them to offer compassionate patient-centred care and minimising the distress they experience in the process. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Vegetation heterogeneity and landscape position exert strong controls on soil CO2 efflux in a moist, Appalachian watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, J. W.; Epstein, H. E.; Welsch, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    In topographically complex watersheds, landscape position and vegetation heterogeneity can alter the soil water regime through both lateral and vertical redistribution, respectively. These alterations of soil moisture may have significant impacts on the spatial heterogeneity of biogeochemical cycles throughout the watershed. To evaluate how landscape position and vegetation heterogeneity affect soil CO2 efflux (FSOIL) we conducted observations across the Weimer Run watershed (373 ha), located near Davis, West Virginia, for three growing seasons with varying precipitation (2010 - 1042 mm; 2011 - 1739 mm; 2012 - 1244 mm; precipitation data from BDKW2 station, MesoWest, University of Utah). An apparent soil temperature threshold of 11 °C at 12 cm depth on FSOIL was observed in our data - where FSOIL rates greatly increase in variance above this threshold. For analysis, FSOIL values above this threshold were isolated and examined. Differences in FSOIL among years were apparent by elevation (F4,633 = 3.17; p = 0.013) and by vegetation cover (F4, 633 = 2.96; p = 0.019). For the Weimer Run watershed, vegetation exerts the major control on soil CO2 efflux (FSOIL), with the plots beneath shrubs at all elevations for all years showing the greatest mean rates of FSOIL (6.07 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) compared to plots beneath closed-forest canopy (4.69 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) and plots located in open, forest gaps (4.09 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) plots. During periods of high soil moisture, we find that CO2 efflux rates are constrained and that maximum efflux rates in this system occur during periods of average to below average soil water availability. These findings offer valuable insight into the processes occurring within these topographically complex, temperate and humid systems, and the interactions of abiotic and biotic factors mediating biogeochemical cycles. With possible changing rainfall patterns as predicted by climate models, it is important to understand the couplings between water

  14. Cognitive ability correlates positively with son birth and predicts cross-cultural variation of the offspring sex ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dama, Madhukar Shivajirao

    2013-06-01

    Human populations show remarkable variation in the sex ratio at birth which is believed to be related to the parental condition. In the present study, the global variation of sex ratio at birth (SRB, proportion of male offspring born) was analyzed with respect to indirect measure of condition, the intelligence quotient (IQ). IQ correlates strongly with lifespan across nations, which makes it a good indicator of health of the large populations. Relation between three standard measures of average national IQ and SRB was studied using multiple linear regression models. Average national IQ was positively correlated with SRB ( r = 0.54 to 0.57, p < 0.001). Further, IQ emerged as a powerful predictor of SRB after controlling for the effects of all the known covariates like fertility, maternal age, polygyny prevalence, wealth, son preference, latitude, low birth weight, and neonatal mortality in the regression models. These results suggest that the striking variation of offspring sex ratio across nations could be caused in part by the difference in general condition of populations.

  15. Waist Circumference was Positively Correlated with Chemerin, Retinol-Binding Protein 4 and hsCRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Herminawati

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Central obesity is associated with various chronic metabolic disorders characterized by abnormal cytokine production, increased acute phase reactants, and activation of inflammatory signaling pathways. This study was aimed to investigate the association of waist circumference, chemerin, and retinol binding protein (RBP-4 with inflammation in men with central obesity. METHODS: The research was conducted with a crosssectional design involving 68 centrally obese male subjects aged 30 to 60 years old, with waist circumference (WC >90 cm. All subjects fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Anthropometric parameters, fasting glucose, creatinine, SGOT, SGPT, and hsCRP were measured. Serum concentrations of chemerin and RBP4 were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: The trend lines showed that chemerin, RBP4 and hsCRP increased with WC. Pearson correlation test showed a positively significant correlation between WC and hsCRP (r=0.242, p<0.05; and also between chemerin and hsCRP (r=0.244, p<0.05 and RBP4 (r=0.321, p<0.01. Subjects were stratified into four groups based on their chemerin and RBP4 levels (high chemerin/high RBP4, high chemerin/low RBP4, low chemerin/high RBP4, or low chemerin/low RBP4. Subjects who were in the high chemerin/low RBP4 group were more likely to have high level of inflammation (47.6%, but subjects with high chemerin/high RBP4 showed low level of inflammation (42.9% as compared with the other three groups. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that increased WC was correlated with elevated levels of chemerin, RBP4 and hsCRP. High chemerin was correlated with increased level of RBP4 as well as with high level of inflammation. KEYWORDS: waist circumference, chemerin, RBP4, hsCRP, inflammation.

  16. Strong positive effects of termites on savanna bird abundance and diversity are amplified by large herbivore exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Stein R; Eldegard, Katrine; Rannestad, Ole Tobias; Okullo, Paul; Lindtjørn, Ommund; Støen, Ole Gunnar; Dale, Svein

    2017-12-01

    Vast areas of the African savanna landscapes are characterized by tree-covered Macrotermes termite mounds embedded within a relatively open savanna matrix. In concert with termites, large herbivores are important determinants of savanna woody vegetation cover. The relative cover of woody species has considerable effects on savanna function. Despite the potentially important ecological relationships between termite mounds, woody plants, large herbivores, and birds, these associations have previously received surprisingly little attention. We experimentally studied the effects of termites and large herbivores on the avian community in Lake Mburo National Park, Uganda, where woody vegetation is essentially limited to termite mounds. Our experiment comprised of four treatments in nine replicates; unfenced termite mounds, fenced mounds (excluding large mammals), unfenced adjacent savanna, and fenced savanna. We recorded species identity, abundance, and behavior of all birds observed on these plots over a two-month period, from late dry until wet season. Birds used termite mounds almost exclusively, with only 3.5% of observations occurring in the treeless intermound savanna matrix. Mean abundance and species richness of birds doubled on fenced (large herbivores excluded) compared to unfenced mounds. Feeding behavior increased when large mammals were excluded from mounds, both in absolute number of observed individuals, and relative to other behaviors. This study documents the fundamental positive impact of Macrotermes termites on bird abundance and diversity in an African savanna. Birds play crucial functional roles in savanna ecosystems, for example, by dispersing fruits or regulating herbivorous insect populations. Thus, the role of birds in savanna dynamics depends on the distribution and abundance of termite mounds.

  17. Charge- and parity-projected Hartree-Fock method for the strong tensor correlation and its application to the alpha particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Satoru; Ikeda, Kiyomi; Toki, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new mean-field-type framework which can treat the strong correlation induced by the tensor force. To treat the tensor correlation we break the charge and parity symmetries of a single-particle state and restore these symmetries of the total system by the projection method. We perform the charge and parity projections before variation and obtain a Hartree-Fock-like equation, which is solved self-consistently. We apply the Hartree-Fock-like equation to the alpha particle and find that by breaking the parity and charge symmetries, the correlation induced by the tensor force is obtained in the projected mean-field framework. We emphasize that the projection before the variation is important to pick up the tensor correlation in the present framework

  18. Enhanced crystal-field splitting and orbital-selective coherence induced by strong correlations in V2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteryaev, Alexander I.; Tomczak, Jan M.; Biermann, Silke; Georges, Antoine; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.; Rubtsov, Alexey N.; Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri; Andersen, Ole K.

    2007-08-01

    We present a study of the paramagnetic metallic and insulating phases of vanadium sesquioxide by means of the Nth order muffin-tin orbital implementation of density functional theory combined with dynamical mean-field theory. The transition is shown to be driven by a correlation-induced enhancement of the crystal-field splitting within the t2g manifold, which results in a suppression of the hybridization between the a1g and egπ bands. We discuss the changes in the effective quasiparticle band structure caused by the correlations and the corresponding self-energies. At temperatures of about 400K , we find the a1g orbital displays coherent quasiparticle behavior, while a large imaginary part of the self-energy and broad features in the spectral function indicate that the egπ orbitals are still far above their coherence temperature. The local spectral functions are in excellent agreement with recent bulk sensitive photoemission data. Finally, we also make a prediction for angle-resolved photoemission experiments by calculating momentum-resolved spectral functions.

  19. Updating the (supermassive black hole mass)-(spiral arm pitch angle) relation: a strong correlation for galaxies with pseudobulges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Graham, Alister W.; Seigar, Marc S.

    2017-10-01

    We have conducted an image analysis of the (current) full sample of 44 spiral galaxies with directly measured supermassive black hole (SMBH) masses, MBH, to determine each galaxy's logarithmic spiral arm pitch angle, ϕ. For predicting black hole masses, we have derived the relation: log (MBH/M⊙) = (7.01 ± 0.07) - (0.171 ± 0.017)[|ϕ| - 15°]. The total root mean square scatter associated with this relation is 0.43 dex in the log MBH direction, with an intrinsic scatter of 0.30 ± 0.08 dex. The MBH-ϕ relation is therefore at least as accurate at predicting SMBH masses in spiral galaxies as the other known relations. By definition, the existence of an MBH-ϕ relation demands that the SMBH mass must correlate with the galaxy discs in some manner. Moreover, with the majority of our sample (37 of 44) classified in the literature as having a pseudobulge morphology, we additionally reveal that the SMBH mass correlates with the large-scale spiral pattern and thus the discs of galaxies hosting pseudobulges. Furthermore, given that the MBH-ϕ relation is capable of estimating black hole masses in bulge-less spiral galaxies, it therefore has great promise for predicting which galaxies may harbour intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs, MBH < 105 M⊙). Extrapolating from the current relation, we predict that galaxies with |ϕ| ≥ 26.7° should possess IMBHs.

  20. Strong low-pass filtering effects on water vapour flux measurements with closed-path eddy correlation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrom, Andreas; Dellwik, Ebba; Flyvbjerg, Henrik K.

    2007-01-01

    forest in Soro, Zealand, Denmark, amounted on average to 42% of the measured flux, while it was only 4% for the CO2 flux, which was measured with the same EC system. We recommend using the described method to correct water vapour fluxes measured in any closed-path EC system for unintended low......Turbulent water vapour fluxes measured with closed-path eddy correlation (EC) systems are unintentionally low-pass filtered by the system in a manner that varies with environmental conditions. Why and how is described here. So is the practical method that systematically corrects long-term flux...... datasets for this substantial measurement error. In contrast to earlier studies, a large number of spectra and raw data have been used in the analysis to define the low-pass filtering characteristic of the EC system. This revealed that the cut-off frequency of the closed-path EC system for water vapour...

  1. Information Literacy Skills Are Positively Correlated with Writing Grade and Overall Course Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Elizabeth Scott

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Shao, X., & Purpur, G. (2016. Effects of information literacy skills on student writing and course performance. The Journal of Academic Librarianship, 42(6, 670-678. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acalib.2016.08.006 Abstract Objective – To measure the correlation of tested information literacy skills with individual writing scores and overall course grade. Design – Online, multiple-choice survey. Setting – Public research university in North Carolina, United States of America. Subjects – Freshmen students enrolled in either first-year seminar (UCO1200 or basic English writing course (ENG1000. Methods – A 25-question, forced-choice test was piloted with 30 students and measured for internal consistency using Cronbach’s Alphas. The survey instrument was slightly revised before being administered online via SelectSurvey, to 398 students in 19 different sections of either UCO1200 or ENG1000, during class sessions. The test measured students’ information literacy skills in four areas: research strategies, resource types, scholarly vs. popular, and evaluating websites. The preliminary questions asked for each student’s name, major (by category, number of library instruction sessions attended, and the names of library services utilized. The students’ information literacy scores were compared to their writing scores and overall course grades, both of which were obtained from course instructors. The information literacy scores were also analyzed for correlation to the number of library instruction sessions attended or the types of library services utilized. Main Results – Information literacy skills positively correlated with writing scores (n=344, r=-.153, p=0.004 and final course grades (n=345, r=0.112, p=0.037. Pearson’s Correlation Coefficients results demonstrated relationships between writing scores and the information literacy test section “Scholarly versus Popular Sources” (n=344, r=0.145, p=0.007, and final

  2. Personality correlates of positive identity and relationship involvement in gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J P; Kurdek, L A

    1987-01-01

    Six personality variables (social anxiety, trait anxiety, locus of control, sensitization, depression, and self concept) were correlated with variables relevant to a positive gay identity (degree of communication about sexual preference and degree of comfort being gay) and to relationship involvement (being in a gay relationship, number of months in a gay relationship, and living with a partner) in a volunteer, nonclinical sample of 51 gay males. Men who informed others of their sexual preference were low on trait anxiety, sensitization, and depression and high on self concept. Men comfortable with their gay identity were low on social anxiety, sensitization, and depression and high on self concept. Men involved in long-term relationships were low in trait anxiety, had an internal locus of control, and were low in depression. Men living with a partner had a higher self concept than men not living with a partner. Results are discussed in terms of previous studies of gay male relationships.

  3. Starting off on the right foot: strong right-footers respond faster with the right foot to positive words and with the left foot to negative words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, Irmgard; Graebe, Julia; Härtner, Leonie; Dudschig, Carolin; Kaup, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence for an association between valence and left/right modulated by handedness, which is predicted by the body-specificity hypothesis (Casasanto, 2009) and also reflected in response times. We investigated whether such a response facilitation can also be observed with foot responses. Right-footed participants classified positive and negative words according to their valence by pressing a key with their left or right foot. A significant interaction between valence and foot only emerged in the by-items analysis. However, when dividing participants into two groups depending on the strength of their footedness, an interaction between valence and left/right was observed for strong right-footers, who responded faster with the right foot to positive words, and with the left foot to negative words. No interaction emerged for weak right-footers. The results strongly support the assumption that fluency lies at the core of the association between valence and left/right.

  4. Concentration of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Positively Correlates with Symptoms in Functional Dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Fumio; Tominaga, Kazunari; Fujikawa, Yoshiko; Nagami, Yasuaki; Kamata, Noriko; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Toshio; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2016-12-01

    In patients with functional dyspepsia (FD), mild duodenal inflammation correlates with increased mucosal permeability. Enteric glial cells can produce glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to repair disrupted epithelial barrier function. We examined the role of duodenal GDNF in FD pathophysiology and its association with dyspeptic symptoms. Duodenal biopsies taken from FD patients and control subjects were used for analysis. GDNF protein expression and localization were examined. Cellular infiltration of eosinophils and mast cells was measured. We also examined the intercellular space between the adjacent epithelial cells at the apical junction complex using transmission electron microscopy. In FD patients, expression of GDNF protein was significantly increased compared with controls, 107.3 (95.3-136.7) versus 49.3 (38.0-72.6) pg/mg protein (median (interquartile range), p = 0.006), respectively. GDNF was localized in enteric glial cells, eosinophils, and epithelial cells. The number of eosinophils was significantly greater in FD patients than in controls, 1039 (923-1181) versus 553 (479-598) cells/mm 2 (p = 0.021), respectively. The intercellular space was dilated at the adherent junction in FD patients compared to control patients, 32.4 (29.8-34.8) versus 22.0 (19.9-26.1) nm (p = 0.002), respectively. Intercellular distance positively correlated with the frequency of postprandial fullness and early satiation (p = 0.001, r = 0.837 and p = 0.009, r = 0.693, respectively). Expression of GDNF correlated with epigastric burning (p = 0.041, r = 0.552). Increased expression of duodenal GDNF might be involved in FD pathophysiology and symptom perception.

  5. Disease quantification in dermatology: in vivo near-infrared spectroscopy measures correlate strongly with the clinical assessment of psoriasis severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Tanja Maria; Kamp, Søren; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

    2013-03-01

    Accurate documentation of disease severity is a prerequisite for clinical research and the practice of evidence-based medicine. The quantification of skin diseases such as psoriasis currently relies heavily on clinical scores. Although these clinical scoring methods are well established and very useful in quantifying disease severity, they require an extensive clinical experience and carry a risk of subjectivity. We explore the opportunity to use in vivo near-infrared (NIR) spectra as an objective and noninvasive method for local disease severity assessment in 31 psoriasis patients in whom selected plaques were scored clinically. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model was used to analyze and predict the severity scores on the NIR spectra of psoriatic and uninvolved skin. The correlation between predicted and clinically assigned scores was R=0.94 (RMSE=0.96), suggesting that in vivo NIR provides accurate clinical quantification of psoriatic plaques. Hence, NIR may be a practical solution to clinical severity assessment of psoriasis, providing a continuous, linear, numerical value of severity.

  6. Glenohumeral position during CT arthrography with arthroscopic correlation: optimization of diagnostic yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeone, F.J.; Gill, Corey M.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States); Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Hospital do Coracao (HCor) and Teleimagem, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic yield of two acquisitions of single-contrast CT arthrography (CTA) of the shoulder in internal, neutral, or external glenohumeral rotation with arthroscopic correlation. The CT study was obtained using two acquisitions (first the humerus positioned in maximum tolerated external rotation with the arm along the body and the second with the humerus in internal rotation with the palm placed flat on the table). Two independent readers blinded to the arthroscopic results evaluated the CTA images for labral tears, glenoid bone loss/fractures, and cartilage loss. For each CTA acquisition, sensitivity and specificity for detection of the aforementioned pathology were assessed. Inter-reader agreement was quantified by weighted k statistics. Sensitivity and specificity for detecting anteroinferior or posterior labral tears was highest with neutral rotation (sensitivity 91-100%, specificity 61-100%). For glenoid fracture, sensitivity (67%) was highest with external rotation and specificity (100%) was highest with internal rotation. For cartilage loss, sensitivity (64%) and specificity (89%) was highest with external rotation and neutral rotation, respectively. Neutral rotation showed high sensitivity and specificity for glenoid fractures and cartilage loss. Inter-reader agreement ranged from fair to very good. Neutral glenohumeral position in shoulder CT arthrography was adequately sensitive and specific for the detection of intra-articular pathology, avoiding the use of more than one acquisition. (orig.)

  7. Neuronal correlates of serial position performance in amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Elisabeth; Brueggen, Katharina; Grothe, Michel J; Bruno, Davide; Pomara, Nunzio; Unterauer, Elisabeth; Duering, Marco; Ewers, Michael; Teipel, Stefan; Buerger, Katharina

    2016-11-01

    Delayed recall of the first words of a list-the primacy position-is thought to be particularly dependent on intact memory consolidation. Hippocampal volume has been suggested as the primary neuronal correlate of delayed primacy recall in cognitively normal elderly individuals. Here, we studied the association of hippocampal volume with primacy recall in individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). We investigated serial position performance in 88 subjects with aMCI using a 16-word list (the California Verbal Learning Test [CVLT]). Primacy and recency performance were measured during learning and delayed recall. Hippocampal volumes were automatically determined from structural MRI scans. We conducted regression analyses with bilateral hippocampal volumes as predictors and serial position indices as outcomes. After controlling for age, gender, and total intracranial volume, bilateral hippocampal volume was not associated with primacy recall either during learning or delayed recall. Primacy performance during learning was associated with the right inferior and middle temporal gyrus as well as the right inferior parietal cortex and supramerginal gyrus. During delayed recall, primacy performance was related to the bilateral supramarginal gyri. Our findings suggest a reduced primacy effect in aMCI already during learning, contrasting previous findings in normal cognitive aging. This might indicate impaired encoding and consolidation processes at an early stage of episodic memory acquisition. Furthermore, our data indicate that hippocampal volume may not be a relevant determinant of residual primacy performance in the stage of aMCI, which may rather depend on temporal and parietal neocortical networks. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Correlates of HCV seropositivity among familial contacts of HCV positive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matera Antonio

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determinants of intrafamilial HCV transmission are still being debated. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlates of HCV seropositivity among familial contacts of HCV positive patients in Italy. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 175 HCV positive patients (index cases, recruited from Policlinico Gemelli in Rome as well as other hospitals in Central Italy between 1995 and 2000 (40% female, mean age 57 ± 15.2 years, and 259 familial contacts. Differences in proportions of qualitative variables were tested with non-parametric tests (χ2, Yates correction, Fisher exact test, and a p value Results Seropositivity for HCV was found in 8.9% of the contacts. From the univariate analysis, risk factors significantly associated to HCV positivity in the contacts were: intravenous drug addiction (p = 0.004 and intercourse with drug addicts (p = 0.005. The only variables associated significantly and independently to HCV seropositivity in patients' contacts were intercourse with drug addicts (OR = 19.28; 95% CI: 2.01 – 184.94, the retirement status from work (OR = 3.76; 95% CI: 1.17 – 11.98, the time of the relationship (OR = 1.06; 95% CI: 1.00 – 1.11 and tattoos (OR = 7.68; 95% CI: 1.00 – 60.20. Conclusion The present study confirms that having intercourse with a drug addict is the most significant risk factor for intrafamilial HCV transmission. The association with retirement status from work could be related to both a long-term relationship with an index case and past exposure to common risk factors.

  9. How strongly do word reading times and lexical decision times correlate? Combining data from eye movement corpora and megastudies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Victor; Drieghe, Denis; Keuleers, Emmanuel; Brysbaert, Marc

    2013-01-01

    We assess the amount of shared variance between three measures of visual word recognition latencies: eye movement latencies, lexical decision times, and naming times. After partialling out the effects of word frequency and word length, two well-documented predictors of word recognition latencies, we see that 7-44% of the variance is uniquely shared between lexical decision times and naming times, depending on the frequency range of the words used. A similar analysis of eye movement latencies shows that the percentage of variance they uniquely share either with lexical decision times or with naming times is much lower. It is 5-17% for gaze durations and lexical decision times in studies with target words presented in neutral sentences, but drops to 0.2% for corpus studies in which eye movements to all words are analysed. Correlations between gaze durations and naming latencies are lower still. These findings suggest that processing times in isolated word processing and continuous text reading are affected by specific task demands and presentation format, and that lexical decision times and naming times are not very informative in predicting eye movement latencies in text reading once the effect of word frequency and word length are taken into account. The difference between controlled experiments and natural reading suggests that reading strategies and stimulus materials may determine the degree to which the immediacy-of-processing assumption and the eye-mind assumption apply. Fixation times are more likely to exclusively reflect the lexical processing of the currently fixated word in controlled studies with unpredictable target words rather than in natural reading of sentences or texts.

  10. Positive selection in penicillin-binding proteins 1a, 2b, and 2x from Streptococcus pneumoniae and its correlation with amoxicillin resistance development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Michael J; Lefébure, Tristan; Walsh, Stacey L; Becker, Julie A; Lang, Ping; Pavinski Bitar, Paulina D; Miller, Linda A; Italia, Michael J; Amrine-Madsen, Heather

    2008-05-01

    The efficacy of beta-lactam antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae has been compromised because of the development of altered penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), however, this has been less so for amoxicillin than for penicillin. Recently, there have been a number of important methods developed to detect molecular adaptation in protein coding genes. The purpose of this study is to employ modern molecular selection approaches to predict sites under positive selection pressure in PBPs, derived from a large international S. pneumoniae collection of amoxicillin resistant and susceptible isolates, and encompassing a comparative data set of 354 pbp1a, 335 pbp2b, and 389 pbp2x gene sequences. A correspondence discriminant analysis (CDA) of positively selected pbp sites and amoxicillin MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values is then used to detect sites under positive selection pressure that are important in discriminating different amoxicillin MICs. Molecular adaptation was evident throughout PBP2X, with numerous positively selected sites in both the transpeptidase (TP) and C-terminal domains, strongly correlated with discriminating amoxicillin MICs. In the case of PBP1A positive selection was present in the glycosyltransfer (GT), TP and C-terminal domains. Sites within the TP domain tended to be correlated with the discrimination of low from intermediate MICs, whereas sites within the C-terminal tail, with a discrimination of intermediate from fully resistant. Most of the positively selected sites within PBP2B were in the N-terminal domain and were not correlated with amoxicillin MICs, however, several sites taken from the literature for the TP domain were strongly associated with discriminating high from intermediate level amoxicillin resistance. Many of the positively selected sites could be directly associated with functional inferences based on the crystal structures of these proteins. Our results suggest that clinical emphasis on TP domain sequences of these

  11. Nuclear localization and cytosolic overexpression of LASP-1 correlates with tumor size and nodal-positivity of human breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunewald, Thomas GP; Kammerer, Ulrike; Kapp, Michaela; Eck, Matthias; Dietl, Johannes; Butt, Elke; Honig, Arnd

    2007-01-01

    LIM and SH3 protein 1 (LASP-1), initially identified from human breast cancer, is a specific focal adhesion protein involved in cell proliferation and migration, which was reported to be overexpressed in 8–12 % of human breast cancers and thought to be exclusively located in cytoplasm. In the present work we analyzed the cellular and histological expression pattern of LASP-1 and its involvement in biological behavior of human breast cancer through correlation with standard clinicopathological parameters and expression of c-erbB2 (HER-2/neu), estrogen- (ER) and progesterone-receptors (PR). For this purpose immunohistochemical staining intensity and percentage of stained cells were semi-quantitatively rated to define a LASP-1 immunoreactive score (LASP-1-IRS). LASP-1-IRS was determined in 83 cases of invasive ductal breast carcinomas, 25 ductal carcinomas in situ (DCIS) and 18 fibroadenomas. Cellular LASP-1 distribution and expression pattern was visualized by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy and assessed through separate Western blots of nuclear and cytosol preparations of BT-20, MCF-7, MDA-MB231, and ZR-75/1 breast cancer cells. Statistical analysis revealed that the resulting LASP-1-IRS was significantly higher in invasive carcinomas compared to fibroadenomas (p = 0.0176). Strong cytoplasmatic expression of LASP-1 was detected in 55.4 % of the invasive carcinomas, which correlated significantly with nuclear LASP-1-positivity (p = 0.0014), increased tumor size (p = 0.0159) and rate of nodal-positivity (p = 0.0066). However, levels of LASP-1 expression did not correlate with average age at time point of diagnosis, histological tumor grading, c-erbB2-, ER- or PR-expression. Increased nuclear localization and cytosolic expression of LASP-1 was found in breast cancer with higher tumor stage as well as in rapidly proliferating epidermal basal cells. Confocal microscopy and separate Western blots of cytosolic and nuclear preparations confirmed nuclear

  12. Locomotor response to novelty correlates with the number of midbrain tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerzemowska, Grażyna; Plucińska, Karolina; Kulikowski, Michał; Trojniar, Weronika; Wrona, Danuta

    2012-01-04

    The present study investigated whether the higher dopaminergic system activation in rats with high (HRs) rather than low (LRs) locomotor activity in response to novelty depend on the number of cells containing the enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH(+)) and/or differences in the morphology of these cells. One week after the novelty test, brains from male Wistar rats (HRs and LRs) were collected and stained for TH expression (immunohistochemistry) and for morphological analysis (immunofluorescent staining). The morphology and total number of TH(+) cells was analyzed for each A9 (substantia nigra) and A10 (ventral tegmental area) group of the midbrain dopaminergic cells. We found that HRs had a higher total number of TH(+) cells in the whole midbrain dopaminergic region (A9-A10) and in the A9 group only than LRs. In particular midbrain dopaminergic groups of neurons, HR/LR differences were regionally specific: HRs had a higher total number of TH(+) cells in the A9, and in the anterior part of the A10. In contrast, the LRs had a higher number of TH(+) cells in the parabrachial pigmented nucleus (A10) and in the posterior part of the A9. There were no significant differences in the morphology of the midbrain dopamine neurons between HRs and LRs. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the total number of TH(+) neurons and the locomotor activity score in response to novelty in the whole A9-A10 region and in the particular A9 group only. The results obtained indicate that the higher behavioral activation in resting conditions correlates with the higher number rather than changes in the morphology of the midbrain dopaminergic TH(+) cells. It supports findings on the higher level of dopaminergic system activation in high responders to novelty that depends on the number of midbrain dopaminergic TH(+) neurons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Bose-Einstein study of position-momentum correlations of charged pions in hadronic Z.sup.0./sup. decays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Taševský, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, - (2007), s. 787-803 ISSN 1434-6044 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : OPAL * Bose -Einstein correlations * position-momentum correlations Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.255, year: 2007

  14. Correlation of regional cerebral blood flow and positive/negative symptoms in schizophrenic patients: covariate SPM analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Ki Chun; Kim, J. S.; Kim, C. Y.; Lee, H. K.; Moon, D. H.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the relations between rCBF and psychopathology in schizophrenic patients using a SPM99. Thirty-two patients(M/F:22/10, 25±5,6yr) with active symptoms of schizophrenia and 15 age matched normal controls underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT. Psychopathology of all patients were also assessed according to PANSS (positive and negative syndrome scale in schizophrenia). By covariate SPM analysis, specific areas where rCBF correlated with sum scores of positive/negative synptoms were identified. Regional CBF of schizophrenics was different in several cortical regions from normal controls. Sum scores of positive symptoms were positively correlated with rCBF of both rectal and inferior frontal gyri and right transverse temporal gyrus, and negatively correlated with rCBF of left lingual and right middle temporal gyri (p<0.01). Sum scores of negative symptoms were positively correlated with rCBF of both middle temporal gyri and negatively correlated with rCBF of right superior parietal lobule and medial frontal gyrus (p<0.01). Positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia were correlated with rCBF change in different regions of cerebral association cortex

  15. Correlation of regional cerebral blood flow and positive/negative symptoms in schizophrenic patients: covariate SPM analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Ki Chun; Kim, J. S.; Kim, C. Y.; Lee, H. K.; Moon, D. H. [Ulsan University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    We investigated the relations between rCBF and psychopathology in schizophrenic patients using a SPM99. Thirty-two patients(M/F:22/10, 25{+-}5,6yr) with active symptoms of schizophrenia and 15 age matched normal controls underwent Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT. Psychopathology of all patients were also assessed according to PANSS (positive and negative syndrome scale in schizophrenia). By covariate SPM analysis, specific areas where rCBF correlated with sum scores of positive/negative synptoms were identified. Regional CBF of schizophrenics was different in several cortical regions from normal controls. Sum scores of positive symptoms were positively correlated with rCBF of both rectal and inferior frontal gyri and right transverse temporal gyrus, and negatively correlated with rCBF of left lingual and right middle temporal gyri (p<0.01). Sum scores of negative symptoms were positively correlated with rCBF of both middle temporal gyri and negatively correlated with rCBF of right superior parietal lobule and medial frontal gyrus (p<0.01). Positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia were correlated with rCBF change in different regions of cerebral association cortex.

  16. The impact of childhood bullying among HIV-positive men: psychosocial correlates and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Charles; Bergstrom, Jessica; Vorasarun, Chaniga; Mardini, Mona; Patrick, Rudy; Lee, Susanne; Lazar, Rachael; Koopman, Cheryl; Gore-Felton, Cheryl

    2013-04-01

    While some studies have examined the deleterious effects of childhood bullying on adults, no studies to date have focused on the effects of bullying on Persons Living with HIV (PLH), a particularly at-risk population. PLH experience higher rates of childhood and adulthood physical and sexual abuse than the population at large, and experience of childhood abuse appears to be predictive of sexual and other risk behaviors in this population. Thus it remains critical to examine rates of childhood bullying and correlates of bullying in adult PLH. A sample of 171 HIV-positive men over 18 years of age were recruited from the San Francisco Bay Area. All participants reported experiencing symptoms of traumatic stress. The participants were recruited as part of a larger study assessing a group intervention for individuals with HIV and symptoms of trauma. Self-report questionnaires were administered to assess participants' exposure to bullying in childhood and trauma symptoms in adulthood. Bullying was commonly reported by men in the current sample, with 91% of the sample endorsing having experienced some level of bullying before age 18. Having been bullied in childhood was significantly (ptrauma. Results of a hierarchical regression equation found that report of bullying in childhood predicted additional, unique variance in trauma symptoms in adulthood above and beyond the effect of exposure to other forms of trauma, resulting in a better-fitting model. The current study highlights the association between rate of childhood bullying and symptoms of trauma in adulthood, accounting for the effect of exposure to other forms of trauma. Given the impact of trauma symptoms on disease progression in PLH, exposure to bullying must be considered in any intervention aiming to reduce trauma symptoms or improve mental or physical health among HIV-positive populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Impact of Childhood Bullying among HIV-Positive Men: Psychosocial Correlates and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Charles; Bergstrom, Jessica; Vorasarun, Chaniga; Mardini, Mona; Patrick, Rudy; Lee, Susanne; Lazar, Rachael; Koopman, Cheryl; Gore-Felton, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Objectives While some studies have examined the deleterious effects of childhood bullying on adults, no studies to date have focused on the effects of bullying on Persons Living with HIV (PLH), a particularly at-risk population. PLH experience higher rates of childhood and adulthood physical and sexual abuse than the population at large, and experience of childhood abuse appears to be predictive of sexual and other risk behaviors in this population. Thus it remains critical to examine rates of childhood bullying and correlates of bullying in adult PLH. Methods A sample of 171 HIV-positive men over 18 years of age were recruited from the San Francisco Bay Area. All participants reported experiencing symptoms of traumatic stress. The participants were recruited as part of a larger study assessing a group intervention for individuals with HIV and symptoms of trauma. Self-report questionnaires were administered to assess participants’ exposure to bullying in childhood and trauma symptoms in adulthood. Results Bullying was commonly reported by men in the current sample, with 91% of the sample endorsing having experienced some level of bullying before age 18. Having been bullied in childhood was significantly (p < .05) associated with methamphetamine use in adulthood, difficulties with mood, and with symptoms of trauma. Results of a hierarchical regression equation found that report of bullying in childhood predicted additional, unique variance in trauma symptoms in adulthood above and beyond the effect of exposure to other forms of trauma, resulting in a better-fitting model. Conclusions The current study highlights the association between rate of childhood bullying and symptoms of trauma in adulthood, accounting for the effect of exposure to other forms of trauma. Given the impact of trauma symptoms on disease progression in PLH, exposure to bullying must be considered in any intervention aiming to reduce trauma symptoms or improve mental or physical health among HIV-positive

  18. A positive correlation between expression of beta 1-integrin cell adhesion molecules and fertilizing ability of human spermatozoa in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klentzeris, L D; Fishel, S; McDermott, H; Dowell, K; Hall, J; Green, S

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate firstly whether beta 1-integrin cell adhesion molecules are expressed by human spermatozoa, and secondly whether there is any relationship between the expression of beta 1-integrin cell adhesion molecules and the fertilizing ability of human spermatozoa in vitro. A total of 50 semen samples were examined. The samples were obtained from the male partners of couples undergoing in-vitro fertilization (IVF) for either unexplained, tubal or male factor infertility. A panel of six monoclonal antibodies against beta 1-integrin cell adhesion molecules and immunohistochemical techniques were used to identify the presence of these molecules on the spermatozoa. The percentage of spermatozoa showing strong immunolabelling with each monoclonal antibody was assessed in each sample. The relationship between these results and the aetiology of infertility and incidence of fertilization was examined. beta 1-Integrins, and primarily the ones with alpha 4-, alpha 5- and alpha 6-chains, were expressed by human spermatozoa. Compared with semen samples from unexplained or male factor infertility patients, samples from tubal infertility patients had a significantly higher (P fertilizing ability of spermatozoa. The positive correlation between the presence of certain beta 1-integrin cell adhesion molecules and the fertilizing ability of human spermatozoa suggests that integrins may be putative determinants in egg-sperm recognition and interaction.

  19. Correlation of Positive and Negative Reciprocity Fails to Confer an Evolutionary Advantage: Phase Transitions to Elementary Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Szolnoki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Economic experiments reveal that humans value cooperation and fairness. Punishing unfair behavior is therefore common, and according to the theory of strong reciprocity, it is also directly related to rewarding cooperative behavior. However, empirical data fail to confirm that positive and negative reciprocity are correlated. Inspired by this disagreement, we determine whether the combined application of reward and punishment is evolutionarily advantageous. We study a spatial public goods game, where in addition to the three elementary strategies of defection, rewarding, and punishment, a fourth strategy that combines the latter two competes for space. We find rich dynamical behavior that gives rise to intricate phase diagrams where continuous and discontinuous phase transitions occur in succession. Indirect territorial competition, spontaneous emergence of cyclic dominance, as well as divergent fluctuations of oscillations that terminate in an absorbing phase are observed. Yet, despite the high complexity of solutions, the combined strategy can survive only in very narrow and unrealistic parameter regions. Elementary strategies, either in pure or mixed phases, are much more common and likely to prevail. Our results highlight the importance of patterns and structure in human cooperation, which should be considered in future experiments.

  20. Basal metabolic rate is positively correlated with parental investment in laboratory mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska, Julita; Gębczyński, Andrzej K.; Konarzewski, Marek

    2013-01-01

    The assimilation capacity (AC) hypothesis for the evolution of endothermy predicts that the maternal basal metabolic rate (BMR) should be positively correlated with the capacity for parental investment. In this study, we provide a unique test of the AC model based on mice from a long-term selection experiment designed to produce divergent levels of BMR. By constructing experimental families with cross-fostered litters, we were able to control for the effect of the mother as well as the type of pup based on the selected lines. We found that mothers with genetically determined high levels of BMR were characterized by higher parental investment capacity, measured as the offspring growth rate. We also found higher food consumption and heavier visceral organs in the females with high BMR. These findings suggested that the high-BMR females have higher energy acquisition abilities. When the effect of the line type of a foster mother was controlled, the pup line type significantly affected the growth rate only in the first week of life, with young from the high-BMR line type growing more rapidly. Our results support the predictions of the AC model. PMID:23282996

  1. Positive carotenoid balance correlates with greater reproductive performance in a wild bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Safran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Carotenoids can confer somatic and reproductive benefits, but most evidence is from captive animal experimentation or single time-point sampling. Another perhaps more informative means by which to assess physiological contributions to animal performance is by tracking an individual's ability to increase or sustain carotenoids or other health-related molecules over time, as these are likely to be temporally variable. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a field study of North American barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster, we analyzed within-individual changes in carotenoid concentrations by repeatedly sampling the carotenoid profiles of individuals over the course of the breeding season. Our results demonstrate that carotenoid concentrations of individuals are temporally dynamic and that season-long balance of these molecules, rather than single time-point samples, predict reproductive performance. This was true even when controlling for two important variables associated with reproductive outcomes: (1 timing of breeding and (2 sexually selected plumage coloration, which is itself positively correlated with and concomitantly changes with circulating carotenoid concentrations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While reproduction itself is purported to impose health stress on organisms, these data suggest that free-ranging, high-quality individuals can mitigate such costs, by one or several genetic, environmental (diet, or physiological mechanisms. Moreover, the temporal variations in both health-linked physiological measures and morphological traits we uncover here merit further examination in other species, especially when goals include the estimation of signal information content or the costs of trait expression.

  2. Positive correlation between Tono-Pen intraocular pressure and central corneal thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohadwala, A A; Munger, R; Damji, K F

    1998-10-01

    To examine the relationship between intraocular pressure (IOP) readings taken by the Tono-Pen tonometer (Mentor O&O, Norwell, MA) and central corneal thickness (CCT). Prospective cross-sectional population study. There were 651 eyes of 332 healthy subjects. A questionnaire was given to each subject requesting information on gender, age, race, and other factors that can influence IOP. The IOP then was measured using the Tono-Pen followed by measurements of CCT using an ultrasonic pachymeter. The IOP was found to increase by 2.9 mmHg/100 microns CCT in males and 1.2 mmHg/100 microns in females. For males, CCT was found to be statistically significant in predicting IOP (P < 0.001 in the right and left eyes) and diabetes was of borderline significance (P = 0.012 in the right eye, P = 0.089 in the left eye). For females, CCT was of borderline significance (P = 0.064 in the right eye, P = 0.019 in the left eye). In females, a family history of glaucoma (P = 0.021 in the right eye, P = 0.022 in the left eye) and hypertension (P = 0.010 in the right eye, P = < 0.001 in the left eye) were also significant in the prediction of IOP. Race was found to be a significant predictor of CCT (P < 0.001 in both right and left eyes) for both males and females. Clinicians should be aware that, as with the Goldmann applanation tonometer, the Tono-Pen has a systematic error in IOP readings caused by its dependence on CCT. Tono-Pen IOP readings are positively correlated to CCT in males and, to a lesser extent, in females as well. The CCT measurements should be considered to ensure proper interpretation of IOP measurements in the diagnosis and management of disorders in which the CCT or IOP readings are outside normal limits.

  3. Pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster reaches its maximum in Ethiopia and correlates most strongly with ultra-violet radiation in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastide, Héloïse; Yassin, Amir; Johanning, Evan J; Pool, John E

    2014-08-13

    Pigmentation has a long history of investigation in evolutionary biology. In Drosophila melanogaster, latitudinal and altitudinal clines have been found but their underlying causes remain unclear. Moreover, most studies were conducted on cosmopolitan populations which have a relatively low level of genetic structure and diversity compared to sub-Saharan African populations. We investigated: 1) the correlation between pigmentation traits within and between the thorax and the fourth abdominal segment, and 2) their associations with different geographical and ecological variables, using 710 lines belonging to 30 sub-Saharan and cosmopolitan populations. Pigmentation clines substantially differed between sub-Saharan and cosmopolitan populations. While positive correlations with latitude have previously been described in Europe, India and Australia, in agreement with Bogert's rule or the thermal melanism hypothesis, we found a significant negative correlation in Africa. This correlation persisted even after correction for altitude, which in its turn showed a positive correlation with pigmentation independently from latitude. More importantly, we found that thoracic pigmentation reaches its maximal values in this species in high-altitude populations of Ethiopia (1,600-3,100 m). Ethiopian flies have a diffuse wide thoracic trident making the mesonotum and the head almost black, a phenotype that is absent from all other sub-Saharan or cosmopolitan populations including high-altitude flies from Peru (~3,400 m). Ecological analyses indicated that the variable most predictive of pigmentation in Africa, especially for the thorax, was ultra-violet (UV) intensity, consistent with the so-called Gloger's rule invoking a role of melanin in UV protection. Our data suggest that different environmental factors may shape clinal variation in tropical and temperate regions, and may lead to the evolution of different degrees of melanism in different high altitude populations in the

  4. Measurement of angular correlations of jets at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV and determination of the strong coupling at high momentum transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Abbott, B. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Acharya, B.S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M. [University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Adams, T. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Alexeev, G.D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Alton, A. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Alverson, G. [Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Askew, A. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Atkins, S. [Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Augsten, K. [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Avila, C. [Universidad de los Andes, Bogota (Colombia); Badaud, F. [LPC, Universite Blaise Pascal, CNRS/IN2P3, Clermont (France); Bagby, L.; Baldin, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Bandurin, D.V. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Banerjee, S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Barberis, E. [Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Baringer, P. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); and others

    2012-11-15

    We present a measurement of the average value of a new observable at hadron colliders that is sensitive to QCD dynamics and to the strong coupling constant, while being only weakly sensitive to parton distribution functions. The observable measures the angular correlations of jets and is defined as the number of neighboring jets above a given transverse momentum threshold which accompany a given jet within a given distance {Delta}R in the plane of rapidity and azimuthal angle. The ensemble average over all jets in an inclusive jet sample is measured and the results are presented as a function of transverse momentum of the inclusive jets, in different regions of {Delta}R and for different transverse momentum requirements for the neighboring jets. The measurement is based on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.7 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in pp{sup Macron} collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV. The results are well described by a perturbative QCD calculation in next-to-leading order in the strong coupling constant, corrected for non-perturbative effects. From these results, we extract the strong coupling and test the QCD predictions for its running over a range of momentum transfers of 50-400 GeV.

  5. A position-sensitive scintillation detector for two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation using metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Koji; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Saito, Haruo; Nagashima, Yasuyuki; Hyodo, Toshio; Muramatsu, Shinichi; Nagai, Shota

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed and tested a prototype of a new position sensitive γ-ray detector which consists of an array of 2.6x2.6x18 mm 3 BGO scintillator blocks, a light guide, and four metal-package position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (R5900-00-C8) recently developed by Hamamatsu Photonics Co. Ltd. Scalability of the detector of this type makes it possible to construct a larger detector using many PS-PMTs, which will be useful for the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation apparatus

  6. Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone strongly correlates with intratesticular testosterone in gonadotropin-suppressed normal men receiving various dosages of human chorionic gonadotropin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, John K.; Coviello, Andrea D.; Page, Stephanie T.; Anawalt, Bradley D.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Bremner, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine if serum concentrations of testosterone precursors would correlate with intratesticular testosterone (ITT) concentration measured directly by testicular aspiration and allow for a less invasive means of inferring ITT. Design: Controlled clinical study. Setting: Healthy volunteers in an academic research environment. Patients: Twenty-nine normal men. Intervention: We determined ITT concentration by testicular aspiration before and after treatment in men receiving exogenous testosterone to block endogenous gonadotropin production and randomly assigned to one of four doses of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) (0, 125 IU, 250 IU, 500 IU every other day) for 3 weeks. Outcome measures: The association between serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione and dihydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and ITT. Results: With testosterone administration alone, serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone decreased significantly and increased significantly when 500 IU hCG was administered. End-of-treatment ITT strongly correlated with serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone. Moreover, serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone, but not androstenedione or DHEA, was independently associated with end-of-treatment ITT by multivariate linear regression. Conclusion: Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone is highly correlated with ITT in gonadotropin suppressed normal men receiving testosterone and stimulated with hCG. Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone is a surrogate biomarker of ITT and may be useful in research and in men receiving gonadotropin therapy for infertility. PMID:17462643

  7. Correlation of cancer incidence with diet, smoking and socio- economic position across 22 districts of Tehran in 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohani-Rasaf, Marzieh; Abdollahi, Morteza; Jazayeri, Shima; Kalantari, Naser; Asadi-Lari, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Variation in cancer incidence in geographical locations is due to different lifestyles and risk factors. Diet and socio-economic position (SEP) have been identified as important for the etiology of cancer but patterns are changing and inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate correlations of the incidence of common cancers with food groups, total energy, smoking, and SEP. In an ecological study, disaggregated cancer data through the National Cancer Registry in Iran (2008) and dietary intake, smoking habits and SEP obtained through a population based survey within the Urban Health Equity Assessment (Urban-HEART) project were correlated across 22 districts of Tehran. Consumption of fruit, meat and dairy products adjusted for energy were positively correlated with bladder, colorectal, prostate and breast and total cancers in men and women, while these cancers were adversely correlated with bread and fat intake. Also prostate, breast, colorectal, bladder and ovarian cancers had a positive correlation with SEP; there was no correlation between SEP and skin cancer in both genders and stomach cancer in men. The incidence of cancer was higher in some regions of Tehran which appeared to be mainly determined by SEP rather than dietary intake. Further individual data are required to investigate reasons of cancer clustering.

  8. Clinicopathologic correlations in eyes enucleated after uveal melanoma resection with positive surgical margins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalifa Yousuf

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We identified three eyes that had undergone enucleation after transscleral resection of uveal melanoma. Two enucleated eyes with microscopically positive margins of resection exhibited no evidence of residual melanoma and these patients were alive without metastasis with at least four years′ follow-up. One eye with a transected melanoma contained residual melanoma and that patient died with metastatic melanoma to the liver three years after enucleation. There appear to be at least two general types of positive surgical margins of resection of uveal melanoma: microscopically positive margins and macroscopically positive (transected margins of resection.

  9. A randomized controlled trial of strong minds: A school-based mental health program combining acceptance and commitment therapy and positive psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burckhardt, Rowan; Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Batterham, Philip J; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan

    2016-08-01

    To date, most early intervention programs have been based on emotion regulation strategies that address dysfunctional cognitive appraisals, problem-solving skills, and rumination. Another emotion regulation strategy, 'acceptance' training, has largely been overlooked. To examine the efficacy of this strategy, a school-based mental health program combining positive psychology with acceptance and commitment therapy (Strong Minds) was evaluated in a randomized controlled trial with a sample of 267 Year 10 and 11 high-school students in Sydney, Australia. Mixed models for repeated measures examined whether the program led to reductions in symptoms amongst students who commenced the program with high depression, anxiety, and stress scores, and increased wellbeing scores amongst all students. Results demonstrated that compared to controls, participants in the Strong Minds condition with elevated symptom scores (n=63) reported significant reductions in depression (p=.047), stress (p=.01), and composite depression/anxiety symptoms (p=.02) with medium to strong effect sizes (Cohen's d=0.53, 0.74, and 0.57, respectively). Increased wellbeing (p=.03) in the total sample and decreased anxiety scores (p=.048) for students with elevated symptoms were significant for Year 10 students with medium effect sizes (Cohen's d=0.43 and 0.54, respectively). This study tentatively suggests that including the emotion regulation strategy of acceptance in early intervention programs may be effective in reducing symptoms and improving wellbeing in high school students. Further research to investigate the generalizability of these findings is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [A possible correlation between "anomalous" signals in the Wheatstone bridge and positions of planets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizov, A D

    2001-01-01

    Current fluctuations in diagonal of nonbalanced Wheatstone bridge were investigated. Correlations of parameters of these fluctuations with culmination times of Moon, Sun and some planet configurations were revealed. The probably biological importance of these phenomena is discussed.

  11. Coupled cluster valence bond theory for open-shell systems with application to very long range strong correlation in a polycarbene dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, David W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2017-07-14

    The Coupled Cluster Valence Bond (CCVB) method, previously presented for closed-shell (CS) systems, is extended to open-shell (OS) systems. The theoretical development is based on embedding the basic OS CCVB wavefunction in a fictitious singlet super-system. This approach reveals that the OS CCVB amplitude equations are quite similar to those of CS CCVB, and thus that OS CCVB requires the same level of computational effort as CS CCVB, which is an inexpensive method. We present qualitatively correct CCVB potential energy curves for all low-lying spin states of P 2 and Mn 2 + . CCVB is successfully applied to the low-lying spin states of some model linear polycarbenes, systems that appear to be a hindrance to standard density functionals. We examine an octa-carbene dimer in a side-by-side orientation, which, in the monomer dissociation limit, exhibits maximal strong correlation over the length of the polycarbene.

  12. Elevation in D-dimer concentrations is positively correlated with gestation in normal uncomplicated pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah ZA

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Zaccheaus A Jeremiah,1 Teddy C Adias,2 Margaret Opiah,3 Siyeoforiye P George,4 Osaro Mgbere,5 Ekere J Essien61Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, Nigeria; 2Bayelsa State College of Health Technology, Ogbia-Town, Nigeria; 3Department of Maternal and Child Health, Faculty of Nursing, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, Nigeria; 4Postgraduate Hematology Unit, Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Port Harcourt, Nigeria; 5Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Houston, TX, USA; 6Institute of Community Health, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USABackground: D-dimer levels have been reported to increase progressively during pregnancy, but how this affects Nigerian women is not well known.Objective: This study aims to determine the D-dimer concentration and its relationship to other coagulation parameters among pregnant women in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.Method: In a cross-sectional observational study conducted in Port Harcourt, Nigeria, 120 pregnant women and 60 nonpregnant controls, drawn from a tertiary health institution in the Niger Delta, Nigeria, were assessed, using the standard procedures, for the following parameters: D-dimer concentration, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet count, hemoglobin, and packed cell volume.Results: The median D-dimer concentration of 153.1 ng/mL in the pregnant group was found to be significantly elevated when compared with the control value of 118.5 ng/mL (t = 2.348, P = 0.021. Conversely, there was a marked depression in the platelet count among pregnant women (193.5 × 109/L when compared with 229.0 × 109/L in the control group (t = 3.424; P = 0.001. There was no statistically significant difference in the values for the prothrombin time and the activated partial thromboplastin time between pregnant and nonpregnant women. D-dimer values correlated positively and significantly with gestation (r = 0

  13. Strongly positive anti-CCP antibodies in patients with sacroiliitis or reactive arthritis post-E. coli infection: A mini case-series based review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Sangha, Miljyot; Wright, Matthew Liam; Ciurtin, Coziana

    2018-01-01

    We report here on four cases of patients with strongly positive anti-citrullinated cyclic peptides (anti-CCP) antibodies and clinical features of seronegative spondyloarthritis (SpA) and reactive arthritis. The four patients had various clinical presentations: one had an initial diagnosis of seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with involvement of the sacroiliac joints (similar to previous reports of the association of two diseases); one had a clinical picture of reactive arthritis following an episode of an Escherichia coli positive urinary tract infection; and two had asymmetrical sacroiliitis (SII), but no evidence of peripheral joint involvement (never reported before). In all cases, high titers of anti-CCP antibodies were found. We present a comparison of the clinical manifestations, radiographic features and treatment regimens of these cases. Our report supports previous literature data of possible overlap existing between RA and SpA, but also presents for the first time the association of high titers of anti-CCP antibodies with SII and reactive arthritis in patients with no peripheral small joint involvement. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Effects of positive mood on probabilistic learning: behavioral and electrophysiological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakic, Jasmina; Jepma, Marieke; De Raedt, Rudi; Pourtois, Gilles

    2014-12-01

    Whether positive mood can change reinforcement learning or not remains an open question. In this study, we used a probabilistic learning task and explored whether positive mood could alter the way positive versus negative feedback was used to guide learning. This process was characterized both at the behavioral and electro-encephalographic levels. Thirty two participants were randomly allocated either to a positive or a neutral (control) mood condition. Behavioral results showed that while learning performance was balanced between the two groups, participants in the positive mood group had a higher learning rate than participants in the neutral mood group. At the electrophysiological level, we found that positive mood increased the error-related negativity when the stimulus-response associations were deterministic, selectively (as opposed to random or probabilistic). However, it did not influence the feedback-related negativity. These new findings are discussed in terms of an enhanced internal reward prediction error signal after the induction of positive mood when the probability of getting a reward is high. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach for Vehicle Positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System in Urban Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Hang; Li, Jian; Zhang, Lei; Long, Teng

    2015-08-28

    For vehicle positioning with Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in urban areas, open-loop tracking shows better performance because of its high sensitivity and superior robustness against multipath. However, no previous study has focused on the effects of the code search grid size on the code phase measurement accuracy of open-loop tracking. Traditional open-loop tracking methods are performed by the batch correlators with fixed correlation space. The code search grid size, which is the correlation space, is a constant empirical value and the code phase measuring accuracy will be largely degraded due to the improper grid size, especially when the signal carrier-to-noise density ratio (C/N₀) varies. In this study, the Adaptive Correlation Space Adjusted Open-Loop Tracking Approach (ACSA-OLTA) is proposed to improve the code phase measurement dependent pseudo range accuracy. In ACSA-OLTA, the correlation space is adjusted according to the signal C/N₀. The novel Equivalent Weighted Pseudo Range Error (EWPRE) is raised to obtain the optimal code search grid sizes for different C/N₀. The code phase measuring errors of different measurement calculation methods are analyzed for the first time. The measurement calculation strategy of ACSA-OLTA is derived from the analysis to further improve the accuracy but reduce the correlator consumption. Performance simulation and real tests confirm that the pseudo range and positioning accuracy of ASCA-OLTA are better than the traditional open-loop tracking methods in the usual scenarios of urban area.

  16. Studies on correlation of positive surgical margin with clinicopathological factors and prognoses in breast conserving surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Reiki; Nagao, Kazuharu; Miyayama, Haruhiko [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Out of 484 cases with breast conserving surgery between April 1989 and March 1999, surgical procedures of 34 cases were changed to total mastectomy due to positive surgical margins. In this study we evaluated a clinical significance of surgical margin in relation to clinicopathological factors and prognoses. Ninety-nine cases (20.5%) had positive margins that were judged when cancer cells existed within 5 mm from margin. In multivariate analysis of factors for surgical margin, EIC-comedo status, ly, located site, proliferative activity, and age were significant and independent factors. Regarding local recurrence, positive margin, age, ER and proliferative activity were significant factors in multivariate analysis, especially in cases not receiving postoperative radiation therapy. Radiation therapy may be beneficial for patients with positive surgical margin. And patients with breast recurrence alone had significantly higher survival rates. Therefore, it is suggested that surgical margin may not reflect survival, although it is a significant factor for local recurrence. (author)

  17. The Correlation of Initial Sputum Smear Positivity on Treatment Failure of Category 1 Therapy for Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puput Dyah Ayu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an infectious disease and is an important public health problem. Based on data from East Java Province Health Department reported that number of tuberculosis patient in Surabaya is the highest in East Java on year 2014. Early identification and good treatment based on the result of sputum identification are the strategy use to control tuberculosis widespread. So that why, microscopic observation to identify acid fast bacilli (AFB is the fundamental stage to determine recovery treatment. Initial sputum smear positivity is necessary to determine infectious graded. The objectives of the study were to identify of initial sputum smear positivity on treatment failure of category 1 therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis in RS Paru Surabaya year 2011-2014. This study used case control method with quantitative approach. Forty two samples were taken from secondary data. Case group is 21 samples who have treatment failure and control group is 21 successful treatment. Samples were selected by simple random sampling. The chi square correlation showed that highly positive initial smear (p = 0,045; OR = 5,4 have correlated and risk factor to treatment failure on category 1 therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis. The conclusion is patient’s high positive sputum smear initially correlated to treatment failure on category 1 therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis in RS Paru Surabaya year 2011–2014. Keywords: initial sputum smear positivity, treatment failure,, category 1 therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis

  18. Positive schizotypy scores correlate with left visual field interference for negatively valenced emotional words: A lateralized emotional Stroop study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Strien, Jan W; Van Kampen, Dirk

    2009-10-30

    Fourteen men scoring high and 14 men scoring low on a positive schizotypy scale participated in a lateralized emotional Stroop task. Vocal reaction times for color naming of neutral, positive and negative emotional words were recorded. Across participants, the color naming of neutral and emotional words was slightly faster to right than to left visual field presentations. In men with high scores on positive schizotypy, the presentation of negative words to the left visual field (right hemisphere) resulted in significant affective interference with color naming, which was significantly larger than in men with low scores. Correlational analysis also showed that positive schizotypy was significantly associated with emotional interference in response to LVF negative words. The outcome is discussed in terms of right hemispheric engagement in negative emotions in high positive schizotypic men.

  19. Identification of Commensal Species Positively Correlated with Early Stress Responses to a Compromised Mucus Barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sovran, Bruno; Lu, Peng; Loonen, Linda M. P.; Hugenholtz, Floor; Belzer, Clara; Stolte, Ellen H.; Boekschoten, Mark V.; van Baarlen, Peter; Smidt, Hauke; Kleerebezem, Michiel; de Vos, Paul; Renes, Ingrid B.; Wells, Jerry M.; Dekker, Jan

    Background: Our aims were (1) to correlate changes in the microbiota to intestinal gene expression before and during the development of colitis in Muc2(-/-) mice and (2) to investigate whether the heterozygote Muc2(+/-) mouse would reveal host markers of gut barrier stress. Methods: Colon histology,

  20. Positive correlation of serum leptin with estradiol levels in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendonça H.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS usually are obese, insulin resistant and hyperinsulinemic. The known association between leptin, obesity andinsulin action suggests that leptin may have a role in PCOS but this has only been addressed peripherally. This study was designed to assess the relationship between serum leptin and the anthropometric, metabolic and endocrine variables of obese (body mass index, BMI ³30 kg/m² and non-obese (BMI <30 kg/m² PCOS patients. Twenty-eight PCOS patients and 24 control women subdivided into obese and non-obese groups were evaluated. Leptin, androgens, lipids, gonadotrophins and insulin-glucose response to the oral glucose tolerance test were measured by radioimmunoassay in all participants. The assays were done all in one time. The areas under the insulin curve (AUC-I and the glycemia curve were calculated to identify patients with insulin resistance. Mean leptin levels were not significantly higher in patients with PCOS compared to the control group (21.2 ± 10.2 vs 27.3 ± 12.4 ng/ml. Leptin levels were found to be significantly higher in the obese subgroups both in patients with PCOS (26.9 ± 9.3 vs 14.1 ± 7.0 ng/ml and in the control group (37.3 ± 15.5 vs 12.9 ± 5.8 ng/ml. The leptin of the PCOS group was correlated with BMI (r = 0.74; P < 0.0001 and estradiol (r = 0.48; P < 0.008 and tended to be correlated with the AUC-I (r = 0.36; P = 0.05. Of the parameters which showed a correlation with leptin in PCOS, only estradiol and probably insulinemia (AUC-I did not show a significant correlation with BMI, suggesting that the other parameters were correlated with leptin due to their correlation with BMI. Estradiol correlated with leptin in PCOS patients regardless of their weight.

  1. Neural correlates of an early attentional capture by positive distractor words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, José A; Mercado, Francisco; Albert, Jacobo; Barjola, Paloma; Peláez, Irene; Villalba-García, Cristina; Carretié, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous or automatic attention to emotional distractors has been observed for emotional scenes and faces. In the language domain, however, automatic attention capture by emotional words has been scarcely investigated. In the current event-related potentials study we explored distractor effects elicited by positive, negative and neutral words in a concurrent but distinct target distractor paradigm. Specifically, participants performed a digit categorization task in which task-irrelevant words were flanked by numbers. The results of both temporo-spatial principal component and source location analyses revealed the existence of early distractor effects that were specifically triggered by positive words. At the scalp level, task-irrelevant positive compared to neutral and negative words elicited larger amplitudes in an anterior negative component that peaked around 120 ms. Also, at the voxel level, positive distractor words increased activity in orbitofrontal regions compared to negative words. These results suggest that positive distractor words quickly and automatically capture attentional resources diverting them from the task where attention was voluntarily directed.

  2. Interdisciplinary correlations regarding the clinical and paraclinical evaluations in HIV-positive pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorobăţ, Carmen Mihaela; Haliciu, Ana Maria; Bejan, Codrina

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection in pregnancy has an increasing prevalence due to the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy. The risk of HIV vertical transmission varies between 15-20 % in European women who do not breastfeed and 25-40% in African mothers who breastfeed. The most important predictive factor of the vertical transmission is maternal plasma HIV viral load. Vertical transmission can be largely prevented by prenatal screening, perigestational ART, an adapted obstetrical attitude and exclusively artificial feeding of the infant. The study included 36 HIV-positive pregnant women, between 2012-2014, at age of 25-32 years. It has been found that the birth weight was less than 2,700 grams in all newborns of HIV-positive pregnant women or those with advanced disease (AIDS) and, also, they received an APGAR score less than 7. The primordial desideratum is to decrease the rate of mother-fetus vertical transmission, thus the caesarian section has been established as the birth method in all HIV-positive pregnant women after 38 weeks of amenorrhea, on intact membranes, outside labor, resulting in halving the percentage of HIV-positive children. A very important role belongs to the interdisciplinary collaboration between the obstetrician and the infectious diseases specialist during the pregnancy, but also during the postpartum period. The role of the obstetrician is present in all the moments of pregnancy evolution. The HIV-positive pregnant woman is included in the group of high risk pregnancies.

  3. Distinct Neuropsychological Correlates in Positive and Negative Formal Thought Disorder Syndromes: The Thought and Language Disorder Scale in Endogenous Psychoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagels, Arne; Fährmann, Paul; Stratmann, Mirjam; Ghazi, Sayed; Schales, Christian; Frauenheim, Michael; Turner, Lena; Hornig, Tobias; Katzev, Michael; Müller-Isberner, Rüdiger; Grosvald, Michael; Krug, Axel; Kircher, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    The correlation of formal thought disorder (FTD) symptoms and subsyndromes with neuropsychological dimensions is as yet unclear. Evidence for a dysexecutive syndrome and semantic access impairments has been discussed in positive FTD, albeit focusing mostly on patients with schizophrenia. We investigated the correlation of the full range of positive and negative as well as subjective and objective FTD with neuropsychological domains in different patient groups. Patients with ICD-10 schizophrenia (n = 51), depression (n = 51), and bipolar mania (n = 18), as well as healthy subjects (n = 60), were interviewed with the Rating Scale for the Assessment of Objective and Subjective Formal Thought and Language Disorder (TALD) and assessed using a multidimensional neuropsychological test battery (executive function, semantic and lexical verbal fluency, attention, working memory, and abstract thinking). Partial correlation analysis, controlling for age and word knowledge, revealed significant results for the objective positive FTD dimension and executive dysfunctions. Objective negative FTD was associated with deficits in lexico-semantic retrieval, as well as attention and working memory dysfunctions. The results suggest that different neuropsychological substrates correlate with the multidimensional and phenomenologically different FTD syndromes. FTD is a complex, multidimensional syndrome with a variety of neuropsychological impairments, which should be accounted for in future studies investigating the pathogenesis of FTD. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Positive Emotion Correlates of Meditation Practice: A Comparison of Mindfulness Meditation and Loving-kindness Meditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, Barbara L; Boulton, Aaron J; Firestine, Ann M; Van Cappellen, Patty; Algoe, Sara B; Brantley, Mary M; Kim, Sumi Loundon; Brantley, Jeffrey; Salzberg, Sharon

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to uncover the day-to-day emotional profiles and dose-response relations, both within-persons and between-persons, associated with initiating one of two meditation practices, either mindfulness meditation or loving-kindness meditation. Data were pooled across two studies of midlife adults ( N = 339) who were randomized to learn either mindfulness meditation or loving-kindness meditation in a six-week workshop. The duration and frequency of meditation practice was measured daily for nine weeks, commencing with the first workshop session. Likewise, positive and negative emotions were also measured daily, using the modified Differential Emotions Scale (Fredrickson, 2013). Analysis of daily emotion reports over the targeted nine-week period showed significant gains in positive emotions and no change in negative emotions, regardless of meditation type. Multilevel models also revealed significant dose-response relations between duration of meditation practice and positive emotions, both within-persons and between-persons. Moreover, the within-person dose-response relation was stronger for loving-kindness meditation than for mindfulness meditation. Similar dose-response relations were observed for the frequency of meditation practice. In the context of prior research on the mental and physical health benefits produced by subtle increases in day-to-day experiences of positive emotions, the present research points to evidence-based practices - both mindfulness meditation and loving-kindness meditation - that can improve emotional wellbeing.

  5. Neural correlates of preparatory and regulatory control over positive and negative emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dongju; Olman, Cheryl A; Haut, Kristen M; Sinha, Rajita; MacDonald, Angus W; Patrick, Christopher J

    2014-04-01

    This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate brain activation during preparatory and regulatory control while participants (N = 24) were instructed either to simply view or decrease their emotional response to, pleasant, neutral or unpleasant pictures. A main effect of emotional valence on brain activity was found in the right precentral gyrus, with greater activation during positive than negative emotion regulation. A main effect of regulation phase was evident in the bilateral anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC), precuneus, posterior cingulate cortex, right putamen and temporal and occipital lobes, with greater activity in these regions during preparatory than regulatory control. A valence X regulation interaction was evident in regions of ventromedial PFC and anterior cingulate cortex, reflecting greater activation while regulating negative than positive emotion, but only during active emotion regulation (not preparation). Conjunction analyses revealed common brain regions involved in differing types of emotion regulation including selected areas of left lateral PFC, inferior parietal lobe, temporal lobe, right cerebellum and bilateral dorsomedial PFC. The right lateral PFC was additionally activated during the modulation of both positive and negative valence. Findings demonstrate significant modulation of brain activity during both preparation for, and active regulation of positive and negative emotional states.

  6. Preferences in Sleep Position Correlate With Nighttime Paresthesias in Healthy People Without Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth Bettlach, Carrie L; Hasak, Jessica M; Krauss, Emily M; Yu, Jenny L; Skolnick, Gary B; Bodway, Greta N; Kahn, Lorna C; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2017-10-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome has been associated with sleep position preferences. The aim of this study is to assess self-reported nocturnal paresthesias and sleeping position in participants with and without carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosis to further clinical knowledge for preventive and therapeutic interventions. A cross-sectional survey study of 396 participants was performed in young adults, healthy volunteers, and a patient population. Participants were surveyed on risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome, nocturnal paresthesias, and sleep preferences. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed comparing participants with rare and frequent nocturnal paresthesias. Subanalyses for participants without carpal tunnel syndrome under and over 21 years of age were performed on all factors significantly associated with subclinical compression neuropathy in the overall population. Thirty-three percent of the study population experienced nocturnal paresthesias at least weekly. Increased body mass index ( P < .001) and sleeping with the wrist flexed ( P = .030) were associated with a higher frequency of nocturnal paresthesias. Side sleeping was associated with less frequent nocturnal symptoms ( P = .003). In participants without carpal tunnel syndrome, subgroup analysis illustrated a relationship between nocturnal paresthesias and wrist position. In participants with carpal tunnel syndrome, sleeping on the side had a significantly reduced frequency of nocturnal paresthesias. This study illustrates nocturnal paresthesias in people without history of carpal tunnel syndrome including people younger than previously reported. In healthy patients with upper extremity subclinical compression neuropathy, sleep position modification may be a useful intervention to reduce the frequency of nocturnal symptoms prior to developing carpal tunnel syndrome.

  7. Associations between socioeconomic position and correlates of sedentary behaviour among youth: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gebremariam, M. K.; Altenburg, T. M.; Lakerveld, J.; Andersen, L. F.; Stronks, K.; Chinapaw, M. J.; Lien, N.

    2015-01-01

    Existing research evidence indicates that children and adolescents of parents with a low socioeconomic position spend more time on sedentary behaviour than their counterparts. However, the mechanisms driving these differences remain poorly understood. The main aim of this systematic review was to

  8. On the Existence and Robustness of Steady Position-Momentum Correlations for Time-Dependent Quadratic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gianfreda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss conditions giving rise to stationary position-momentum correlations among quantum states in the Fock and coherent basis associated with the natural invariant for the one-dimensional time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian operators such as the Kanai-Caldirola Hamiltonian. We also discuss some basic features such as quantum decoherence of the wave functions resulting from the corresponding quantum dynamics of these systems that exhibit no timedependence in their quantum correlations. In particular, steady statistical momentum averages are seen over well-defined time intervals in the evolution of a linear superposition of the basis states of modified exponentially damped mass systems.

  9. STUDY OF DIFFERENT POSITIONS OF APPENDIX IN OPERATED CASES OF APPENDICITIS IN RURAL HOSPITAL AND ITS CLINICAL CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunabha Sinha

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The relationship of the various positions of appendix to its clinical picture and course in the patient is a subject of controversy. The objective is to study the correlation between anatomical position of appendix and its varied clinical presentation and also to determine the frequency of different positions of appendix in operated cases of acute appendicitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted from Nov 2012 to April 2014 for a period of 16 months in MVJ Medical College and Research Hospital, Hoskote, Bangalore. There were 150 cases in the study, which were histopathologically positive for appendicitis. RESULTS There were total of 150 cases. The commonest position of the appendix is retrocaecal (67.3% followed by pelvic (16%, preileal (7.3%, post-ileal (4.6%, paracaecal (2.6%, subcaecal (1.3% and subhepatic (0.6%. Certain positions like fixed retrocaecal, pelvic and post-ileal presented more often atypically. CONCLUSION There is no increased predisposition for any of the position of the appendix to get inflamed. Complications were more common in cases fixed retrocaecal, post-ileal and pelvic appendix. The patients with the above positions presented more often atypically than typically and with subtle signs and symptoms leading to delayed diagnosis and increased complications.

  10. Correlative microscopy of radial junction nanowire solar cells using nanoindent position markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fejfar, Antonín; Hývl, Matěj; Vetushka, Aliaksi; Pikna, Peter; Hájková, Zdeňka; Ledinský, Martin; Kočka, Jan; Klapetek, P.; Marek, A.; Mašková, A.; Vyskočil, J.; Merkel, J.; Becker, Ch.; Itoh, T.; Misra, S.; Foldyna, M.; Yu, L.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 135, SI (2015), s. 106-112 ISSN 0927-0248 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E10061; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026; GA ČR GA13-12386S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 240826 - PolySiMode Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101216; AVČR(CZ) M100101217 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : radial junction solar cells * silicon nanowires * thin films * structural disorder * conductive AFM * nanoindentation * correlative microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.732, year: 2015

  11. Positive Correlation of Serum Adiponectin with Lipid Profile in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is Affected by Metabolic Syndrome Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Mohammad; Mohammadinejad, Payam; Aryan, Zahra; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr; Esteghamati, Alireza

    2016-04-01

    Type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and Metabolic syndrome (MetS) are both associated with dyslipidemia which may lead to development of vascular complications. Adiponectin is an anti-inflammatory protein synthesized by the adipose tissue. There is controversy regarding the association of adiponectin with lipid profile. To evaluate the correlation between serum adiponectin concentration and metabolic profile in patients with type-2 DM. A single center cross-sectional study was conducted on 173 patients with type-2 DM (82 males and 91 females). Plasma adiponectin concentration, lipid profile, glucose profile, and anthropometric features were investigated. Insulin resistance was determined using Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). Correlation of serum adiponectin with lipid profile of patients with type-2 DM was assessed. Adiponectin was negatively correlated with waist circumference (r = -0.16, P = 0.06) and positively with HbA1c (r = 0.19, P = 0.032), total cholesterol (r = 0.23, P = 0.017), LDL (r = 0.30, P = 0.001), SD-LDL (r = 0.41, P < 0.001), and SD-LDL/LDL (r = 0.22, P = 0.023). We found a positive correlation between adiponectin and total cholesterol (r = 0.27, P = 0.055), LDL (r = 0.34, P = 0.026) and SD-LDL (r = 0.41, P = 0.006) in patients with at least 3 components of MetS criteria. Correlation of adiponectin with LDL and SD-LDL remained positively significant with increasing the number of MetS components. In patients with 5 components of MetS, serum adiponectin was significantly correlated with serum triglyceride (r = 0.89). Significant interaction was observed between adiponectin and metabolic syndrome in relation to serum lipid profile. The results of the present study suggest that in patients with type-2 DM and MetS, lipid profile is strongly correlated with blood concentration of adiponectin. The strongest association was observed between serum adiponectin and LDL.

  12. A novel VU-MRCC formalism for the simultaneous treatment of strong relaxation and correlation effects with applications to electron affinity of neutral radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, Debasis; Datta, Dipayan; Mukherjee, Debashis

    2006-01-01

    We present and implement in this paper a novel spin-free valence-universal multi-reference coupled cluster (VU-MRCC) formalism for energy differences which can capture orbital relaxation and correlation relaxation to all orders. Unlike in the traditional normal ordered cluster Ansatz for computing energy differences, this cluster expansion formalism allows contractions between various valence excitation operators with valence spectator lines. These contractions simulate the orbital relaxation and correlation relaxation effects for the ionized/excited states via Thouless-like exponential type of operators. Generally such operators are non-commuting. To ensure that each distinct excitation generated by contracted composites formed by these operators appear only once in the wave-operators, the factors accompanying these composites have to be judiciously chosen. Hence, the combinatoric factors accompanying such contracted composites are not taken to be 1/n! for nth-power, but rather the inverse of the automorphic factor (the number of ways the n operators can be connected in various permutations generating the same composite). It is shown that this Ansatz leads to a set of VU-MRCC equations for the valence cluster amplitudes, in which all the cluster operators are attached to the hamiltonian by at least one non-spectator line (a strongly connected series). The series is thus terminating at the quartic power. Illustrative applications are presented by computing electron affinity of neutral doublet radicals (viz., NH 2 , OH, F, BO and CN), where the orbital relaxation effect attendant on the anion formation is considerable. Several basis-sets capable of describing the anions have been studied. It has been found that aug-cc-pVTZ basis gives the best overall results, while aug-cc-pVQZ overestimates the electron affinity, presumably because of an imbalance in describing the neutral radicals. The method performs consistently much better then the one with the traditional

  13. The neural correlates of regulating positive and negative emotions in medication-free major depression

    OpenAIRE

    Greening, Steven G.; Osuch, Elizabeth A.; Williamson, Peter C.; Mitchell, Derek G. V.

    2013-01-01

    Depressive cognitive schemas play an important role in the emergence and persistence of major depressive disorder (MDD). The current study adapted emotion regulation techniques to reflect elements of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and related psychotherapies to delineate neurocognitive abnormalities associated with modulating the negative cognitive style in MDD. Nineteen non-medicated patients with MDD and 19 matched controls reduced negative or enhanced positive feelings elicited by emo...

  14. Neural correlates of an early attentional capture by positive distractor words

    OpenAIRE

    Hinojosa, Jos? A.; Mercado, Francisco; Albert, Jacobo; Barjola, Paloma; Pel?ez, Irene; Villalba-Garc?a, Cristina; Carreti?, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous or automatic attention to emotional distractors has been observed for emotional scenes and faces. In the language domain, however, automatic attention capture by emotional words has been scarcely investigated. In the current event-related potentials study we explored distractor effects elicited by positive, negative and neutral words in a concurrent but distinct target distractor paradigm. Specifically, participants performed a digit categorization task in which task-irrelevant words...

  15. Neural correlates of an early attentional capture by positive distractor words

    OpenAIRE

    José Antonio Hinojosa; Francisco eMercado; Jacobo eAlbert; Jacobo eAlbert; Paloma eBarjola; Irene ePeláez; Cristina eVillalba-García; Luis eCarretié

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous or automatic attention to emotional distractors has been observed for emotional scenes and faces. In the language domain, however, automatic attention capture by emotional words has been scarcely investigated. In the current event-related potentials study we explored distractor effects elicited by positive, negative and neutral words in a concurrent but distinct target distractor paradigm. Specifically, participants performed a digit categorization task in which task-irrelevant wor...

  16. Expression Divergence Is Correlated with Sequence Evolution but Not Positive Selection in Conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, Kathryn A; Yeaman, Sam; Nurkowski, Kristin A; Rieseberg, Loren H; Aitken, Sally N

    2016-06-01

    The evolutionary and genomic determinants of sequence evolution in conifers are poorly understood, and previous studies have found only limited evidence for positive selection. Using RNAseq data, we compared gene expression profiles to patterns of divergence and polymorphism in 44 seedlings of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and 39 seedlings of interior spruce (Picea glauca × engelmannii) to elucidate the evolutionary forces that shape their genomes and their plastic responses to abiotic stress. We found that rapidly diverging genes tend to have greater expression divergence, lower expression levels, reduced levels of synonymous site diversity, and longer proteins than slowly diverging genes. Similar patterns were identified for the untranslated regions, but with some exceptions. We found evidence that genes with low expression levels had a larger fraction of nearly neutral sites, suggesting a primary role for negative selection in determining the association between evolutionary rate and expression level. There was limited evidence for differences in the rate of positive selection among genes with divergent versus conserved expression profiles and some evidence supporting relaxed selection in genes diverging in expression between the species. Finally, we identified a small number of genes that showed evidence of site-specific positive selection using divergence data alone. However, estimates of the proportion of sites fixed by positive selection (α) were in the range of other plant species with large effective population sizes suggesting relatively high rates of adaptive divergence among conifers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Cell size is positively correlated between different tissues in passerine birds and amphibians, but not necessarily in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, J; Czarnoleski, M; François-Krassowska, A; Maciak, S; Pis, T

    2010-12-23

    We examined cell size correlations between tissues, and cell size to body mass relationships in passerine birds, amphibians and mammals. The size correlated highly between all cell types in birds and amphibians; mammalian tissues clustered by size correlation in three tissue groups. Erythrocyte size correlated well with the volume of other cell types in birds and amphibians, but poorly in mammals. In birds, body mass correlated positively with the size of all cell types including erythrocytes, and in mammals only with the sizes of some cell types. Size of mammalian erythrocytes correlated with body mass only within the most taxonomically uniform group of species (rodents and lagomorphs). Cell volume increased with body mass of birds and mammals to less than 0.3 power, indicating that body size evolved mostly by changes in cell number. Our evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms determining cell size relationships in tissues are conservative in birds and amphibians, but less stringent in mammals. The patterns of cell size to body mass relationships we obtained challenge some key assumptions of fractal and cellular models used by allometric theory to explain mass-scaling of metabolism. We suggest that the assumptions in both models are not universal, and that such models need reformulation.

  18. Event-related potential correlates of serial-position effects during an elaborative memory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushby, Jacqueline A; Barry, Robert J; Johnstone, Stuart S

    2002-10-01

    Twenty undergraduate students participated in an elaborative learning test to evaluate the relationship between electrical brain activity and subsequently recalled and not-recalled words. Data collected from the midline (Fz, Cz, Pz) and lateral scalp sites (F3, F4, C3, C4, P3, P4) were analysed. The difference between event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by subsequently recalled and not-recalled words, the ERP memory effect, was evaluated for each portion (primacy, plateau and recency) of the serial-position curve (SPC). We compared peak amplitudes for the P1, N1, P2, N400, P3 and frontal positive slow wave (FPSW) components. The electrophysiological data support the hypothesis that different mechanisms underlie primacy and recency effects during free recall paradigms. There was no support for the hypothesis that an association arises between memory and the FPSW when subjects utilise elaborative learning strategies. The P2 component predicted subsequent recall at the primacy portion of the SPC, and P1 predicted recall at the primacy and plateau portions of the curve. The findings suggest that the early positive components of the ERP (i.e. P1 and P2) are useful indices of the differential stimulus processing during elaborative learning which predicts later recall. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Traditional Chinese medicine and the positive correlation with homeostatic evolution of human being: based on medical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie-Hua

    2012-08-01

    Adaptation is an eternal theme of biological evolution. The paper aims at exploring the conception of positive correlation between traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and human homeostatic evolution based on medical perspective. Discussions mainly involve TCM conforming to natural laws and natural evolution of life, spontaneous harmonization of yin and yang and operating system of human self-healing, modern human immunology and human endogenous immune function in TCM, self-homeostasis of human micro-ecological state and balance mechanism on regulating base in TCM, as well as adaptation-eternal theme of biological evolution and safeguarding adaptability-value of TCM. In perspective of medicine, theory and practice of TCM are in positive correlation with human homeostatic evolution, and what TCM tries to maintain is human intrinsic adaptive capability to disease and nature. Therefore, it is the core value of TCM, which is to be further studied, explored, realized and known to the world.

  20. Global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory from semidefinite programming with applications to strongly correlated quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeraraghavan, Srikant; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-03-28

    We present a density matrix approach for computing global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory, based on semidefinite programming (SDP), that gives upper and lower bounds on the Hartree-Fock energy of quantum systems. While wave function approaches to Hartree-Fock theory yield an upper bound to the Hartree-Fock energy, we derive a semidefinite relaxation of Hartree-Fock theory that yields a rigorous lower bound on the Hartree-Fock energy. We also develop an upper-bound algorithm in which Hartree-Fock theory is cast as a SDP with a nonconvex constraint on the rank of the matrix variable. Equality of the upper- and lower-bound energies guarantees that the computed solution is the globally optimal solution of Hartree-Fock theory. The work extends a previously presented method for closed-shell systems [S. Veeraraghavan and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 89, 010502-R (2014)]. For strongly correlated systems the SDP approach provides an alternative to the locally optimized Hartree-Fock energies and densities with a certificate of global optimality. Applications are made to the potential energy curves of C2, CN, Cr2, and NO2.

  1. Strong Electron Correlation in the High-Temperature Phase of (EDO-TTF)2PF6 as a Quasi-One-Dimensional Molecular Conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwano, Kaoru; Shimoi, Yukihiro

    2010-10-01

    We focus on the electronic property of the high-temperature phase of (EDO-TTF)2PF6. Applying a cluster-based density-functional theory (DFT) calculation augmented by a self-consistent environment, we recognize a strong electron-electron repulsion in a dimer-Mott-type ground state. On the basis of this ground state, we obtain an absorption spectrum that takes a form of a single peak in the mid-infrared (mid-IR) region. We next analyze a Hubbard model with alternate transfers, of which the values are determined by the DFT calculations. The obtained absorption peak energy is comparable to the mid-IR peak energy observed in the experiment. Finally, we also investigate other one-dimensional conductors, (TMTSF)2PF6 and (TMTTF)2PF6, which are known as correlated metals, and conclude that (EDO-TTF)2PF6 also falls in this category, in spite of its unique (0110)-type charge ordering observed in the low-temperature phase.

  2. The strongly correlated electron systems CeNi sub 2 Ge sub 2 and Sr sub 2 RuO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Diver, A J

    1996-01-01

    susceptibility and magnetoresistance on a single crystal CeNi sub 2 Ge sub 2 sample are discussed. The low temperature resistivity is found to show non-Fermi liquid behaviour both at low field and at 16 T. Chapter four is concerned with the layered perovskite superconductor Sr sub 2 RuO sub 4 which has a very similar structure to the La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 family of high-T sub c superconductors. De Haas-van Alphen oscillations were detected allowing a study in which all of the Fermi surface sheets were detected. These oscillations are analysed and shown to obey the form expected for a conventional Fermi liquid. The results are compared with the predictions of recent band structure calculations. Measurements of the Hall effect and upper critical field for superconductivity are explained in terms of the measured Fermi surface. Strongly correlated electron systems provide many challenges for condensed matter physics which attempts to find new ways to understand the behaviour of vast numbers of p...

  3. Correlation of Culture Positivity, PCR Positivity, and Burden of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato in Skin Samples of Erythema Migrans Patients with Clinical Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupica, Daša; Lusa, Lara; Maraspin, Vera; Bogovič, Petra; Vidmar, Darja; O'Rourke, Maria; Traweger, Andreas; Livey, Ian; Strle, Franc

    2015-01-01

    Limited data are available regarding the relationship of Borrelia burden in skin of patients with erythema migrans (EM) and the disease course and post-treatment outcome. We studied 121 adult patients with EM in whom skin biopsy specimens were cultured and analyzed by quantitative PCR for the presence of Borreliae. Evaluation of clinical and microbiological findings were conducted at the baseline visit, and 14 days, 2, 6, and 12 months after treatment with either amoxicillin or cefuroxime axetil. In 94/121 (77.7%) patients Borrelia was detected in skin samples by PCR testing and 65/118 (55.1%) patients had positive skin culture result (96.8% B. afzelii, 3.2% B. garinii). Borrelia culture and PCR results correlated significantly with the presence of central clearing and EM size, while Borrelia burden correlated significantly with central clearing, EM size, and presence of newly developed or worsened symptoms since EM onset, with no other known medical explanation (new or increased symptoms, NOIS). In addition, the logistic regression model for repeated measurements adjusted for time from inclusion, indicated higher Borrelia burden was a risk factor for incomplete response (defined as NOIS and/or persistence of EM beyond 14 days and/or occurrence of new objective signs of Lyme borreliosis). The estimated association between PCR positivity and unfavorable outcome was large but not statistically significant, while no corresponding relationship was observed for culture positivity. Higher Borrelia burden in EM skin samples was associated with more frequent central clearing and larger EM lesions at presentation, and with a higher chance of incomplete response.

  4. Correlation of Culture Positivity, PCR Positivity, and Burden of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato in Skin Samples of Erythema Migrans Patients with Clinical Findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daša Stupica

    Full Text Available Limited data are available regarding the relationship of Borrelia burden in skin of patients with erythema migrans (EM and the disease course and post-treatment outcome.We studied 121 adult patients with EM in whom skin biopsy specimens were cultured and analyzed by quantitative PCR for the presence of Borreliae. Evaluation of clinical and microbiological findings were conducted at the baseline visit, and 14 days, 2, 6, and 12 months after treatment with either amoxicillin or cefuroxime axetil.In 94/121 (77.7% patients Borrelia was detected in skin samples by PCR testing and 65/118 (55.1% patients had positive skin culture result (96.8% B. afzelii, 3.2% B. garinii. Borrelia culture and PCR results correlated significantly with the presence of central clearing and EM size, while Borrelia burden correlated significantly with central clearing, EM size, and presence of newly developed or worsened symptoms since EM onset, with no other known medical explanation (new or increased symptoms, NOIS. In addition, the logistic regression model for repeated measurements adjusted for time from inclusion, indicated higher Borrelia burden was a risk factor for incomplete response (defined as NOIS and/or persistence of EM beyond 14 days and/or occurrence of new objective signs of Lyme borreliosis. The estimated association between PCR positivity and unfavorable outcome was large but not statistically significant, while no corresponding relationship was observed for culture positivity.Higher Borrelia burden in EM skin samples was associated with more frequent central clearing and larger EM lesions at presentation, and with a higher chance of incomplete response.

  5. Moments of the Position of the Maximum for GUE Characteristic Polynomials and for Log-Correlated Gaussian Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyodorov, Yan V.; Doussal, Pierre Le

    2016-07-01

    We study three instances of log-correlated processes on the interval: the logarithm of the Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE) characteristic polynomial, the Gaussian log-correlated potential in presence of edge charges, and the Fractional Brownian motion with Hurst index H → 0 (fBM0). In previous collaborations we obtained the probability distribution function (PDF) of the value of the global minimum (equivalently maximum) for the first two processes, using the freezing-duality conjecture (FDC). Here we study the PDF of the position of the maximum x_m through its moments. Using replica, this requires calculating moments of the density of eigenvalues in the β -Jacobi ensemble. Using Jack polynomials we obtain an exact and explicit expression for both positive and negative integer moments for arbitrary β >0 and positive integer n in terms of sums over partitions. For positive moments, this expression agrees with a very recent independent derivation by Mezzadri and Reynolds. We check our results against a contour integral formula derived recently by Borodin and Gorin (presented in the Appendix 1 from these authors). The duality necessary for the FDC to work is proved, and on our expressions, found to correspond to exchange of partitions with their dual. Performing the limit n → 0 and to negative Dyson index β → -2, we obtain the moments of x_m and give explicit expressions for the lowest ones. Numerical checks for the GUE polynomials, performed independently by N. Simm, indicate encouraging agreement. Some results are also obtained for moments in Laguerre, Hermite-Gaussian, as well as circular and related ensembles. The correlations of the position and the value of the field at the minimum are also analyzed.

  6. ERP correlates of letter identity and letter position are modulated by lexical frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Martínez, Marta; Perea, Manuel; Gómez, Pablo; Swaab, Tamara Y.

    2013-01-01

    The encoding of letter position is a key aspect in all recently proposed models of visual-word recognition. We analyzed the impact of lexical frequency on letter position assignment by examining the temporal dynamics of lexical activation induced by pseudowords extracted from words of different frequencies. For each word (e.g., BRIDGE), we created two pseudowords: A transposed-letter (TL: BRIGDE) and a replaced-letter pseudoword (RL: BRITGE). ERPs were recorded while participants read words and pseudowords in two tasks: Semantic categorization (Experiment 1) and lexical decision (Experiment 2). For high-frequency stimuli, similar ERPs were obtained for words and TL-pseudowords, but the N400 component to words was reduced relative to RL-pseudowords, indicating less lexical/semantic activation. In contrast, TL- and RL-pseudowords created from low-frequency stimuli elicited similar ERPs. Behavioral responses in the lexical decision task paralleled this asymmetry. The present findings impose constraints on computational and neural models of visual-word recognition. PMID:23454070

  7. Octupole correlations in positive-parity states of rare-earth and actinide nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spieker M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, further evidence of the importance of multiphonon-octupole excitations to describe experimental data in the rare earths and actinides will be presented. First, new results of a (p, t experiment at the Q3D magnetic spectrograph in Munich will be discussed, which was performed to selectively excite Jπ = 0+ states in 240Pu. spdf interacting boson model (IBM calculations suggest that the previously proposed double-octupole phonon nature of the Jπ = 0+2 state is not in conflict with its strong (p, t population. Second, the framework of the IBM has been adopted for the description of experimental observables related to octupole excitations in the rare earths. Here, the IBM is able to describe the signature splitting for positiveand negative-parity states when multi-dipole and multi-octupole bosons are included. The present study might support the idea of octupole-phonon condensation at intermediate spin (Jπ = 10+ leading to the change in yrast structure observed in 146Nd.

  8. High serum coenzyme Q10, positively correlated with age, selenium and cholesterol in Inuit of Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Henning Sloth; Mortensen, S.A.; Rhode, M.

    1999-01-01

    impact. From a health survey we chose the subpopulation from the most remote area, where the traditional Greenlandic diet with high intake of sea mammals and fish predominates. The mean (SD) of S-CoQ10 in males was 1.495 (0.529) nmol/ml and 1.421 (0.629) nmol/ml in females, significantly higher (p ....001) compared to a Danish population. In a linear multiple regression model the S-CoQ10 level is significantly positively associated with age and S-selenium in males, and S-total cholesterol in females. The high level of CoQ10 in Greenlanders probably reflects diet, since no bioaccumulation takes place...

  9. Cerebral desaturation events in the beach chair position: correlation of noninvasive blood pressure and estimated temporal mean arterial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplet, Jacob J; Lonetta, Christopher M; Levy, Jonathan C; Everding, Nathan G; Moor, Molly A

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral oximetry (rSO2) has emerged as an important tool for monitoring of cerebral perfusion during surgery. High rates of cerebral desaturation events (CDEs) have been reported during surgery in the beach chair position. However, correlations have not been made with blood pressure measured at the cerebral level. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlations between brachial noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) and estimated temporal mean arterial pressure (eTMAP) during CDEs in the beach chair position. Fifty-seven patients underwent elective shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. Values for eTMAP, NIBP, and rSO2 were recorded supine (0°) after induction and when a CDE occurred in the 70° beach chair position. Twenty-six patients experienced 45 CDEs, defined as a 20% drop in rSO2 from baseline. Median reduction in NIBP, eTMAP, and rSO2 from baseline to the CDE were 48.2%, 75.5%, and 33.3%, respectively. At baseline, there was a significant weak negative correlation between rSO2 and NIBP (rs = -0.300; P = .045) and no significant association between rSO2 and eTMAP (rs = -0.202; P = .183). During CDEs, there were no significant correlations between rSO2 and NIBP (rs = -0.240; P = .112) or between rSO2 and eTMAP (rs = -0.190; P = .212). No significant correlation between the decrease in rSO2 and NIBP (rs = 0.064; P = .675) or between rSO2 and eTMAP (rs = 0.121; P = .430) from baseline to CDE was found. NIBP and eTMAP are unreliable methods for identifying a CDE in the beach chair position. Cerebral oximetry provides additional information to the values obtained from NIBP and eTMAP, and all should be considered independently and collectively. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Bose-Einstein study of position-momentum correlations of charged pions in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbiendi, G.; Braibant, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Ciocca, C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G.M.; Fabbri, F.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Marcellini, S.; Michelini, A.; Rossi, A.M. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Ainsley, C.; Batley, R.J.; Carter, J.R.; Hill, J.C.; Thomson, M.A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R. [Cavendish Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom); Aakesson, P.F.; Burckhart, H.J.; De Roeck, A.; Ferrari, P.; Frey, A.; Gruwe, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkings, R.; Meijers, F.; Oh, A.; Plane, D.E.; Rembser, C.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schroeder, M.; Smith, A.M.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T. [CERN, European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Alexander, G.; Bella, G.; Etzion, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Tsur, E. [Tel Aviv Univ., Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel); Anagnostou, G.; Bell, P.J.; Charlton, D.G.; Hawkes, C.M.; Jovanovic, P.; O' Neale, S.W.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wilson, J.A. [Univ. of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Anderson, K.J.; Gupta, A.; Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Pilcher, J.E.; Teuscher, R. [Univ. of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Inst. and Dept. of Physics, Chicago, IL (United States); Asai, S.; Ishii, K.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Komamiya, S.; Mashimo, T.; Mihara, S.; Mori, T.; Nanjo, H.; Orito, S.; Saeki, T.; Toya, D.; Ueda, I.; Yamashita, S. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan)]|[Univ. of Tokyo, International Centre for Elementary Particle Physics and Dept. of Physics, Tokyo (Japan); Axen, D.; McKenna, J. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Physics, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bailey, I.; Karlen, D.; Keeler, R.K.; McPherson, R.A.; Roney, J.M.; Sobie, R. [Univ. of Victoria, Dept. of Physics, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC (Canada); Barberio, E. [CERN, European Organisation for Nuclear Research, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)]|[Univ. of Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2007-12-15

    A study of Bose-Einstein correlations in pairs of identically charged pions produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at the Z{sup 0} peak has been performed for the first time assuming a non-static emitting source. The results are based on the high statistics data obtained with the OPAL detector at LEP. The correlation functions have been analyzed in intervals of the average pair transverse momentum and of the pair rapidity, in order to study possible correlations between the pion production points and their momenta (position-momentum correlations). The Yano-Koonin and the Bertsch-Pratt parameterizations have been fitted to the measured correlation functions to estimate the geometrical parameters of the source as well as the velocity of the source elements with respect to the overall centre-of-mass frame. The source rapidity is found to scale approximately with the pair rapidity, and both the longitudinal and transverse source dimensions are found to decrease for increasing average pair transverse momenta. (orig.)

  11. Bose-Einstein study of position-momentum correlations of charged pions in hadronic $Z^{0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay, A., Jr.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2007-01-01

    A study of Bose-Einstein correlations in pairs of identically charged pions produced in e+e- annihilations at the Z0 peak has been performed for the first time assuming a non-static emitting source. The results are based on the high statistics data obtained with the OPAL detector at LEP. The correlation functions have been analyzed in intervals of the average pair transverse momentum and of the pair rapidity, in order to study possible correlations between the pion production points and their momenta (position-momentum correlations). The Yano-Koonin and the Bertsch-Pratt parameterizations have been fitted to the measured correlation functions to estimate the geometrical parameters of the source as well as the velocity of the source elements with respect to the overall centre-of-mass frame. The source rapidity is found to scale approximately with the pair rapidity, and both the longitudinal and transverse source dimensions are found to decrease for increasing average pair transverse momenta.

  12. [Correlation between the methylation status of Runx3 gene and positive expression of estrogen receptor in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhantao; Gao, Shan; Wu, Xia; Liu, Hui

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between hypermethylation of Runx3 gene promoter and estrogen receptor (ER) and the implications of Runx3 gene promoter hypermethylation in ER positive breast cancer. Western blot and RT-PCR were used to detect the protein and mRNA expression of Runx3 gene in breast cancer cell lines (MCF7 and SKBR3) and normal breast epithelium cell line (MCF10A). Immunohistochemical SP method was used to detect the expression of ER and Runx3 proteins in 113 tissue samples of breast cancer. Moreover, methylation specific PCR was used to detect RUN3 promoter methylation in cell lines MCF7, SKBR3, MCF10A and 113 tissue samples of breast cancer. Of the 3 cell lines, Runx3 protein and mRNA were detectable in MCF10A, but were absent in MCF7 and SKBR3. MCF7 had a high methylation status at Runx3 promoter, in contrast, MCF10A and SKBR3 showed unmethylated RUN3 promoter. Among the 113 cases of breast cancer, 68 cases were ER positive and 45 were negative. The positive rates of Runx3 protein expression in ER positive and negative tumors were 26.5% (18/68) and 66.7% (30/45), respectively (P<0.05). Runx3 promoter hypermethylation was seen in 82.4% (56/68) of ER positive breast cancer cases and 22.2% (10/45) of ER negative ones (P<0.05). Among 68 cases of ER positive cases, Runx3 promoter hypermethylation was positively correlated with the clinical tumor stage (OR=5.84, P<0.05). Runx3 gene promoter hypermethylation is present mainly in the ER positive breast cancers. Testing of Runx3 promoter methylation may provide additional reference for clinical stage and prognosis of breast cancer patients, especially in those with ER positive tumors.

  13. Positive correlation between disease activity index and matrix metalloproteinases activity in a rat model of colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo de; Cunha, André Luiz da; Duarte, Amaury Caiafa; Castañon, Maria Christina Marques Nogueira; Chebli, Júlio Maria Fonseca; Aguiar, Jair Adriano Kopke de

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, comprising a broad spectrum of diseases those have in common chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, histological alterations and an increased activity levels of certain enzymes, such as, metalloproteinases. Evaluate a possible correlation of disease activity index with the severity of colonic mucosal damage and increased activity of metalloproteinases in a model of ulcerative colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium. Colitis was induced by oral administration of 5% dextran sulfate sodium for seven days in this group (n=10), whereas control group (n=16) received water. Effects were analyzed daily by disease activity index. In the seventh day, animals were euthanized and hematological measurements, histological changes (hematoxylin and eosin and Alcian Blue staining), myeloperoxidase and metalloproteinase activities (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were determined. Dextran sulfate sodium group showed elevated disease activity index and reduced hematological parameters. Induction of colitis caused tissue injury with loss of mucin and increased myeloperoxidase (Pcorrelation with the degree of histopathological changes after induction of colitis, and this result may be related mainly to the increased activity of MMP-9 and mieloperoxidase.

  14. Serum TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta3 are increased and positively correlated to pain, functionality, and radiographic staging in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stilianos; Drygiannakis, Ioannis; Kazakos, Kostantinos; Papanas, Nikolaos; Kolios, George; Kouroumalis, Elias; Verettas, Dionysios-Alexandros

    2010-08-11

    The goal of this study was to verify or reject the hypothesis that systematic differences exist in various profibrotic or antifibrotic factors between osteoarthritic patients and controls, as well as between different stages of osteoarthritis. The study group comprised 63 patients with knee osteoarthritis and 18 controls. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)1, -2, -3; tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 protein levels; and gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -3, -9 activities were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and gelatin zymography, respectively. Visual analog scale scores, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) scores, Lequesne clinical osteoarthritis scales, and Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic grading were recorded for each patient.Transforming growth factor-beta2 and -3 (in contrast to TGF-beta1 and TIMP-1) serum protein levels were significantly higher in osteoarthritic patients compared to controls (210%+/-14% [P<.001] and 232%+/-7% [P<10(-7)], respectively). Additionally, TGF-beta2 and -3 were strongly positively correlated to Kellgren-Lawrence radiographic grading of the disease (P<10(-5) and P<10(-7), respectively). Moreover, TGF-beta2 correlated positively with the WOMAC scale (P=.007). However, TIMP-1 decreased as osteoarthritis progressed clinically, but remained irrelevant to radiographic staging. Furthermore, activities of MMP-2 and -9, but not MMP-1+/-3, were lower in patients with osteoarthritis. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. COX-2 expression positively correlates with PD-L1 expression in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Gerardo; Fratangelo, Federica; Cerrone, Margherita; Liguori, Giuseppina; Cantile, Monica; Anniciello, Anna Maria; Scala, Stefania; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Trimarco, Chiara; Ianaro, Angela; Cirino, Giuseppe; Caracò, Corrado; Colombino, Maria; Palmieri, Giuseppe; Pepe, Stefano; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Sabbatino, Francesco; Scognamiglio, Giosuè

    2017-02-23

    The resistance to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors for the treatment of melanoma have prompted investigators to implement novel clinical trials which combine immunotherapy with different treatment modalities. Moreover is also important to investigate the mechanisms which regulate the dynamic expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells and PD-1 on T cells in order to identify predictive biomarkers of response. COX-2 is currently investigated as a major player of tumor progression in several type of malignancies including melanoma. In the present study we investigated the potential relationship between COX-2 and PD-L1 expression in melanoma. Tumor samples obtained from primary melanoma lesions and not matched lymph node metastases were analyzed for both PD-L1 and COX-2 expression by IHC analysis. Status of BRAF and NRAS mutations was analyzed by sequencing and PCR. Co-localization of PD-L1 and COX-2 expression was analyzed by double fluorescence staining. Lastly the BRAF V600E A375 and NRAS Q61R SK-MEL-2 melanoma cell lines were used to evaluate the effect of COX-2 inhibition by celecoxib on expression of PD-L1 in vitro. BRAF V600E/V600K and NRAS Q61R/Q61L were detected in 57.8 and 8.9% of the metastatic lesions, and in 65.9 and 6.8% of the primary tumors, respectively. PD-L1 and COX-2 expression were heterogeneously expressed in both primary melanoma lesions and not matched lymph node metastases. A significantly lower number of PD-L1 negative lesions was found in primary tumors as compared to not matched metastatic lesions (P = 0.002). COX-2 expression significantly correlated with PD-L1 expression in both primary (P = 0.001) and not matched metastatic (P = 0.048) lesions. Furthermore, in melanoma tumors, cancer cells expressing a higher levels of COX-2 also co-expressed a higher level of PD-L1. Lastly, inhibition of COX-2 activity by celecoxib down-regulated the expression of PD-L1 in both BRAF V600E A375 and NRAS Q61R SK-MEL-2 melanoma cell lines. COX-2 expression correlates

  16. Transient CD15-positive endothelial phenotype in the human placenta correlates with physiological and pathological fetoplacental immaturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidmann, L; Suhan, T; Unger, R; Gerein, V; Kirkpatrick, C J

    2014-09-01

    Placental growth and villous maturation are critical parameters of placental function at the end of pregnancy. A failure in these processes leads to the development of placental dysfunction, as well as fetal and neonatal mortality and morbidity. The aim of the study was to determine the relevant diagnostic markers associated with pathological placental development. Forty tissue samples from normal placentas of different gestational age and 68 pathological term placentas with defective villous maturation (GDM, idiopathic IUFD, preeclamsia, HELLP syndrome) comprised the comparative immunohistochemical study (CD15, CD45 and CD34). Positive immunohistochemical reactions were quantitatively assessed in the chorionic plate and vessels of the villi of different histological type. Physiologically immature placentas of the first and second trimester and pathologically immature term placentas were characterized by marked endothelial CD15-immunostaining. A significant loss of CD15-positive endothelium of the placentas was associated with a physiological and accelerated villous maturity. A spatio-temporal correlation was shown for CD15+ endothelial cells (ECs) and the number of CD45+ stromal cells (SCs). A negative temporal correlation was shown for CD15+ ECs and CD15+ myelomonocytes in the fetal blood. CD34 expression in the ECs was stable during the pregnancy. A correlation between a transient CD15-positive endothelial phenotype and a physiological and pathological fetoplacental immaturity was demonstrated. Physiological and accelerated placental maturation was accompanied by a significant disappearance of CD15-positive endothelium. We propose that "immature" CD15+ endothelium is an important diagnostic marker of the physiological and pathological fetoplacental immaturity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pelvic floor muscle strength evaluation in different body positions in nulliparous healthy women and its correlation with sexual activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Orsi Gameiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to assess pelvic floor muscle (PFM strength in different body positions in nulliparous healthy women and its correlation with sexual activity. Materials and Methods Fifty healthy nulliparous women with mean age of 23 years were prospectively studied. Subjective evaluation of PFM was assessed by transvaginal digital palpation (TDP of anterior and posterior areas regarding the vaginal introitus. A perineometer with inflatable vaginal probe was used to assess the PFM strength in four different positions: supine with extended lower limbs (P1; bent-knee supine (P2; sitting (P3; standing (P4. Results Physical activity, 3 times per week, was reported by 58% of volunteers. Sexual activity was observed in 80% of women and 82% of them presented orgasm. The average body mass index (BMI was 21.76 kg/m2, considered as normal according World Health Organization (WHO. We observed that 68% of volunteers were conscious about the PFM contraction. TDP showed concordance of 76% when anterior and posterior areas were compared (p = 0.00014. There was not correlation between PFM strength and orgasm in subjective evaluation. The PFM strength was significantly higher in standing position when compared with the other positions (p < 0.000. No statistical difference was observed between orgasm and PFM strength when objective evaluations were performed. Conclusions There was concordance between anterior and posterior areas in 76% of cases when subjective PFM strength was assessed. In objective evaluation, higher PFM strength was observed when volunteers were standing. No statistical correlation was observed between PFM strength and orgasm in nulliparous healthy women.

  18. Unconventional superconductivity in cuprates, cobaltates and graphene. What is universal and what is material-dependent in strongly versus weakly correlated materials?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesel, Maximilian Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    A general theory for all classes of unconventional superconductors is still one of the unsolved key issues in condensed-matter physics. Actually, it is not yet fully settled if there is a common underlying pairing mechanism. Instead, it might be possible that several distinct sources for unconventional (not phonon-mediated) superconductivity have to be considered, or an electron-phonon interaction is not negligible. The focus of this thesis is on the most probable mechanism for the formation of Cooper pairs in unconventional superconductors, namely a strictly electronic one where spin fluctuations are the mediators. Studying different superconductors in this thesis, the emphasis is put on material-independent features of the pairing mechanism. In addition, the investigation of the phase diagrams enables a view on the vicinity of superconductivity. Thus, it is possible to clarify which competing quantum fluctuations enhance or weaken the propensity for a superconducting state. The broad range of superconducting materials requires the use of more than one numerical technique to study an appropriate microscopic description. This is not a problem but a big advantage because this facilitates the approach-independent description of common underlying physics. For this evaluation, the strongly correlated cuprates are simulated with the variational cluster approach. Especially the question of a pairing glue is taken into consideration. Furthermore, it is possible to distinguish between retarded and non-retarded contributions to the gap function. The cuprates are confronted with the cobaltate Na x CoO 2 and graphene. These weakly correlated materials are investigated with the functional renormalization group (fRG) and reveal a comprehensive phase diagram, including a d+id-wave superconductivity, which breaks time-reversal symmetry. The corresponding gap function is nodeless, but for NaCoO, it features a doping-dependent anisotropy. In addition, some general considerations on

  19. Unconventional superconductivity in cuprates, cobaltates and graphene. What is universal and what is material-dependent in strongly versus weakly correlated materials?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiesel, Maximilian Ludwig

    2013-02-08

    A general theory for all classes of unconventional superconductors is still one of the unsolved key issues in condensed-matter physics. Actually, it is not yet fully settled if there is a common underlying pairing mechanism. Instead, it might be possible that several distinct sources for unconventional (not phonon-mediated) superconductivity have to be considered, or an electron-phonon interaction is not negligible. The focus of this thesis is on the most probable mechanism for the formation of Cooper pairs in unconventional superconductors, namely a strictly electronic one where spin fluctuations are the mediators. Studying different superconductors in this thesis, the emphasis is put on material-independent features of the pairing mechanism. In addition, the investigation of the phase diagrams enables a view on the vicinity of superconductivity. Thus, it is possible to clarify which competing quantum fluctuations enhance or weaken the propensity for a superconducting state. The broad range of superconducting materials requires the use of more than one numerical technique to study an appropriate microscopic description. This is not a problem but a big advantage because this facilitates the approach-independent description of common underlying physics. For this evaluation, the strongly correlated cuprates are simulated with the variational cluster approach. Especially the question of a pairing glue is taken into consideration. Furthermore, it is possible to distinguish between retarded and non-retarded contributions to the gap function. The cuprates are confronted with the cobaltate Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} and graphene. These weakly correlated materials are investigated with the functional renormalization group (fRG) and reveal a comprehensive phase diagram, including a d+id-wave superconductivity, which breaks time-reversal symmetry. The corresponding gap function is nodeless, but for NaCoO, it features a doping-dependent anisotropy. In addition, some general

  20. Strong correlation between cross-amplification success and genetic distance across all members of 'True Salamanders' (Amphibia: Salamandridae) revealed by Salamandra salamandra-specific microsatellite loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Ralf; Susanne Hauswaldt, J; Veith, Michael; Steinfartz, Sebastian

    2010-11-01

    The unpredictable and low cross-amplification success of microsatellite loci tested for congeneric amphibian species has mainly been explained by the size and complexity of amphibian genomes, but also by taxonomy that is inconsistent with phylogenetic relationships among taxa. Here, we tested whether the cross-amplification success of nine new and 11 published microsatellite loci cloned for an amphibian source species, the fire salamander (Salamandra salamandra), correlated with the genetic distance across all members of True Salamanders (genera Chioglossa, Lyciasalamandra, Mertensiella and Salamandra that form a monophyletic clade within the family of Salamandridae) serving as target species. Cross-amplification success varied strongly among the species and showed a highly significant negative relationship with genetic distance and amplification success. Even though lineages of S. salamandra and Lyciasalamndra have separated more than 30 Ma, a within genus amplification success rate of 65% was achieved for species of Lyciasalamandra thus demonstrating that an efficient cross-species amplification of microsatellite loci in amphibians is feasible even across large evolutionary distances. A decrease in genome size, on the other hand, paralleled also a decrease in amplified loci and therefore contradicted previous results and expectations that amplification success should increase with a decrease in genome size. However, in line with other studies, our comprehensive dataset clearly shows that cross-amplification success of microsatellite loci is well explained by phylogenetic divergence between species. As taxonomic classifications on the species and genus level do not necessarily mirror phylogenetic divergence between species, the pure belonging of species to the same taxonomic units (i.e. species or genus) might be less useful to predict cross-amplification success of microsatellite loci between such species. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Non-perturbative methodologies for low-dimensional strongly-correlated systems: From non-Abelian bosonization to truncated spectrum methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Andrew J. A.; Konik, Robert M.; Lecheminant, Philippe; Robinson, Neil J.; Tsvelik, Alexei M.

    2018-04-01

    We review two important non-perturbative approaches for extracting the physics of low-dimensional strongly correlated quantum systems. Firstly, we start by providing a comprehensive review of non-Abelian bosonization. This includes an introduction to the basic elements of conformal field theory as applied to systems with a current algebra, and we orient the reader by presenting a number of applications of non-Abelian bosonization to models with large symmetries. We then tie this technique into recent advances in the ability of cold atomic systems to realize complex symmetries. Secondly, we discuss truncated spectrum methods for the numerical study of systems in one and two dimensions. For one-dimensional systems we provide the reader with considerable insight into the methodology by reviewing canonical applications of the technique to the Ising model (and its variants) and the sine-Gordon model. Following this we review recent work on the development of renormalization groups, both numerical and analytical, that alleviate the effects of truncating the spectrum. Using these technologies, we consider a number of applications to one-dimensional systems: properties of carbon nanotubes, quenches in the Lieb–Liniger model, 1  +  1D quantum chromodynamics, as well as Landau–Ginzburg theories. In the final part we move our attention to consider truncated spectrum methods applied to two-dimensional systems. This involves combining truncated spectrum methods with matrix product state algorithms. We describe applications of this method to two-dimensional systems of free fermions and the quantum Ising model, including their non-equilibrium dynamics.

  2. Adolescent Age Moderates Genetic and Environmental Influences on Parent-Adolescent Positivity and Negativity: Implications for Genotype-Environment Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, Kristine; Knopik, Valerie S.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Spotts, Erica L.; Ganiban, Jody M.; Reiss, David

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we examined how genotype-environment correlation processes differ as a function of adolescent age. We tested whether adolescent age moderates genetic and environmental influences on positivity and negativity in mother-adolescent and father-adolescent relationships using parallel samples of twin parents from the Twin and Offspring Study in Sweden and twin/sibling adolescents from the Nonshared Environment in Adolescent Development Study. We inferred differences in the role of passive and non-passive genotype-environment correlation based on biometric moderation findings. Findings indicated that non-passive rGE played a stronger role for positivity in mother- and father- adolescent relationships in families with older adolescents than families with younger adolescents, and that passive rGE played a stronger role for positivity in the mother-adolescent relationship in families with younger adolescents than in families with older adolescents. Implications of these findings for the timing and targeting of interventions on family relationships are discussed. PMID:25924807

  3. A correlation study on position and volume variation of primary lung cancer during respiration by four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yingjie; Li Jianbin; Tian Shiyu; Li Fengxiang; Fan Tingyong; Shao Qian; Xu Min; Lu Jie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of position movement of primary tumor with interested organs and skin markers, and to investigate the correlation of volume variation of primary tumors and lungs during different respiration phases for patients with lung cancer at free breath condition scanned by four-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation. Methods: 16 patients with lung cancer were scanned at free breath condition by simulation 4DCT which connected to a respiration-monitoring system. A coordinate system was created based on image of T 5 phase,gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures of 10 phases were contoured. The three dimensional position variation of them were measured and their correlation were analyzed, and the same for the volume variation of GTV and lungs of 10 respiratory phases. Results: Movement range of lung cancer in different lobe differed extinct: 0.8 - 5.0 mm in upper lobe, 5.7 -5.9 mm in middle lobe and 10.2 - 13.7 mm in lower lobe, respectively. Movement range of lung cancer in three dimensional direction was different: z-axis 4.3 mm ± 4.3 mm > y-axis 2.2 mm ± 1.0 mm > x-axis 1.7 mm ± 1.5 mm (χ 2 =16.22, P =0.000), respectively. There was no statistical significant correlation for movement vector of GTV and interested structures (r =-0.50 - -0.01, P =0.058 - -0.961), nor for volume variation of tumor and lung (r =0.23, P =0.520). Conclusions: Based on 4DCT, statistically significant differences of GTV centroid movement are observed at different pulmonary lobes and in three dimensional directions. So individual 4DCT measurement is necessary for definition of internal target volume margin for lung cancer. (authors)

  4. K-mer Content, Correlation, and Position Analysis of Genome DNA Sequences for the Identification of Function and Evolutionary Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Sievers

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In genome analysis, k-mer-based comparison methods have become standard tools. However, even though they are able to deliver reliable results, other algorithms seem to work better in some cases. To improve k-mer-based DNA sequence analysis and comparison, we successfully checked whether adding positional resolution is beneficial for finding and/or comparing interesting organizational structures. A simple but efficient algorithm for extracting and saving local k-mer spectra (frequency distribution of k-mers was developed and used. The results were analyzed by including positional information based on visualizations as genomic maps and by applying basic vector correlation methods. This analysis was concentrated on small word lengths (1 ≤ k ≤ 4 on relatively small viral genomes of Papillomaviridae and Herpesviridae, while also checking its usability for larger sequences, namely human chromosome 2 and the homologous chromosomes (2A, 2B of a chimpanzee. Using this alignment-free analysis, several regions with specific characteristics in Papillomaviridae and Herpesviridae formerly identified by independent, mostly alignment-based methods, were confirmed. Correlations between the k-mer content and several genes in these genomes have been found, showing similarities between classified and unclassified viruses, which may be potentially useful for further taxonomic research. Furthermore, unknown k-mer correlations in the genomes of Human Herpesviruses (HHVs, which are probably of major biological function, are found and described. Using the chromosomes of a chimpanzee and human that are currently known, identities between the species on every analyzed chromosome were reproduced. This demonstrates the feasibility of our approach for large data sets of complex genomes. Based on these results, we suggest k-mer analysis with positional resolution as a method for closing a gap between the effectiveness of alignment-based methods (like NCBI BLAST and the

  5. Assessing How Water Type, Climate, and Landscape Position Correlate with Variability of Methane in Shallow Groundwater in the Marcellus Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A.; Lautz, L.; Hoke, G. D.

    2017-12-01

    Prior work shows that spatial differences in naturally-occurring methane concentrations in shallow groundwater in the Marcellus Shale region are correlated with water type (e.g. Ca-HCO3 vs Na-HCO3) and landscape position (e.g. valley vs upland). However, little is known about how naturally-occurring methane in groundwater varies through time, particularly on a seasonal or monthly time scale, and how temporal variability is related to seasonal changes in climate. Extensive development of the Marcellus shale gas play in northeastern Pennsylvania limits opportunities for measuring baseline water quality through time. In contrast, a ban on hydraulic fracturing in NY affords an opportunity for characterizing baseline temporal variability in methane concentrations. The objective of this study is to characterize temporal variability of naturally-occurring methane in shallow groundwater in the Marcellus region, and how such temporal variability is correlated to other well characteristics, such as water type, landscape position, and climatic conditions. We worked with homeowners to sample 11 domestic wells monthly in the Marcellus Shale region of NY for methane concentrations and major ions for a full year. Wells were grouped according to the primary source of methane (e.g. thermogenic vs microbial) based upon δ13C-DIC, δ13C-CH4, and δD-CH4 isotopes. The full dataset and the grouped data were analyzed to assess how well climatic conditions, water type, and landscape position correlate with variability of methane concentrations through time. These data provide information on within year and between year variability of methane, as well as spatial variability between wells, which fills a data gap and can be used to inform policy regulations.

  6. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbain, X.; Bech, D.; Van Roy, J.-P.; Géléoc, M.; Weber, S. J.; Huetz, A.; Picard, Y. J.

    2015-01-01

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H 3 into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme

  7. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, X.; Bech, D.; Van Roy, J.-P.; Géléoc, M.; Weber, S. J.; Huetz, A.; Picard, Y. J.

    2015-02-01

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H3 into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme.

  8. Correlating Ki67 and other prognostic markers with Oncotype DX recurrence score in early estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aaron C; Li, Bob T; Nahar, Kazi; Danieletto, Suzanne; Fong, Eva S; Currer, Trevor; Parasyn, Andrew; Middleton, Philip; Wong, Heidi; Smart, Denis; Rutovitz, Josie J; McCloud, Philip; Hughes, T Michael; Marx, Gavin M

    2017-09-29

    Decisions regarding adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer are complex. Ki67 is increasingly used, in conjunction with conventional prognostic markers, to help decide the use of adjuvant chemotherapy for early breast cancer. Ki67 has been proposed as an economical alternative to Oncotype DX recurrence score (RS), which is a validated prognostic marker for disease recurrence and predictive marker for benefit from chemotherapy. This study aimed to determine in patients where conventional prognostic markers did not provide a clear recommendation for adjuvant chemotherapy, whether Ki67 could be a substitute for RS. We reviewed all cases of luminal-type node-negative early breast cancer (T1-2, N0-1mi, M0, estrogen receptor positive, HER2 negative) referred for Oncotype DX testing by the multidisciplinary team at an Australian tertiary private hospital from 14th December 2006 to 31st December 2013, when conventional prognostic markers did not provide a clear recommendation for adjuvant chemotherapy. RS was correlated with Ki67, along with other conventional prognostic markers including tumor size, grade, mitotic rate and lymphovascular invasion. Spearman's rank order correlation coefficient and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r) were used for ordinal and continuous variables, respectively. A total of 58 patients were analyzed, median Ki67 was 15% (range 2-50%) and the median RS was 16 (range 3-65). There was no positive correlation between Ki67 and RS (r = 0.01, P = 0.93). No single conventional prognostic marker was shown to significantly correlate with RS, including tumor size (r = -0.02, P = 0.88), grade (r = 0.10, P = 0.44), mitotic rate (r = -0.07, P = 0.69) and lymphovascular invasion (r = -0.12, P = 0.39). Ki67 and conventional prognostic markers do not correlate with Oncotype DX RS. In the setting where conventional prognostic markers do not show a clear indication for or against adjuvant chemotherapy as determined by

  9. Two strongly correlated electron systems: the Kondo mode in the strong coupling limit and a 2-D model of electrons close to an electronic topological transition; Deux systemes d'electrons fortement correles: le modele de reseau Kondo dans la limite du couplage fort et un modele bidimensionnel d'electrons au voisinage d'une transition topologique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouis, F

    1999-10-14

    Two strongly correlated electron systems are considered in this work, Kondo insulators and high Tc cuprates. Experiments and theory suggest on one hand that the Kondo screening occurs on a rather short length scale and on the other hand that the Kondo coupling is renormalized to infinity in the low energy limit. The strong coupling limit is then the logical approach although the real coupling is moderate. A systematic development is performed around this limit in the first part. The band structure of these materials is reproduced within this scheme. Magnetic fluctuations are also studied. The antiferromagnetic transition is examined in the case where fermionic excitations are shifted to high energy. In the second part, the Popov and Fedotov representation of spins is used to formulate the Kondo and the antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model in terms of a non-polynomial action of boson fields. In the third part the properties of high Tc cuprates are explained by a change of topology of the Fermi surface. This phenomenon would happen near the point of optimal doping and zero temperature. It results in the appearance of a density wave phase in the under-doped regime. The possibility that this phase has a non-conventional symmetry is considered. The phase diagram that described the interaction and coexistence of density wave and superconductivity is established in the mean-field approximation. The similarities with the experimental observations are numerous in particular those concerning the pseudo-gap and the behavior of the resistivity near optimal doping. (author)

  10. Hybrid correspondence analysis and correlation to analyze the market position from data with two qualitative and p-2 quantitative variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginanjar, Irlandia

    2015-12-01

    Analysis of the market position will be easier, efficient, and informative when based on a perceptual map, that can display objects and characteristics. With perceptual map we can identify the information about the objects similarity, the characteristics relationships, and relationship between the object and the characteristics. Characteristics of the object are usually more than two variables, those variables that sometimes are qualitative and some are quantitative. Based on that this paper introduce a method of analysis called hybrid correspondence analysis and correlation (HCAC), this method is the incorporation of correspondence analysis (CA) with biplot of correlation, where the mapped of two qualitative variables is using CA, and for quantitative variables is using correlations. HCAC produces a perceptual map that displays the object, the qualitative characteristics, and quantitative characteristics in a single map, without changing the quantitative data into qualitative data, so that the information obtained is more complete. A reference for mapping quality is counted from the first and second cumulative percent of eigenvalues where resulting from CA.

  11. Accuracy of an automatic patient-positioning system based on the correlation of two edge images in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Cheong, Minho; Kim, Jinsung; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong

    2011-04-01

    We have clinically evaluated the accuracy of an automatic patient-positioning system based on the image correlation of two edge images in radiotherapy. Ninety-six head & neck images from eight patients undergoing proton therapy were compared with a digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of planning CT. Two edge images, a reference image and a test image, were extracted by applying a Canny edge detector algorithm to a DRR and a 2D X-ray image, respectively, of each patient before positioning. In a simulation using a humanoid phantom, performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, no registration errors were observed for given ranges of rotation, pitch, and translation in the x, y, and z directions. For real patients, however, there were discrepancies between the automatic positioning method and manual positioning by physicians or technicians. Using edged head coronal- and sagittal-view images, the average differences in registration between these two methods for the x, y, and z directions were 0.11 cm, 0.09 cm and 0.11 cm, respectively, whereas the maximum discrepancies were 0.34 cm, 0.38 cm, and 0.50 cm, respectively. For rotation and pitch, the average registration errors were 0.95° and 1.00°, respectively, and the maximum errors were 3.6° and 2.3°, respectively. The proposed automatic patient-positioning system based on edge image comparison was relatively accurate for head and neck patients. However, image deformation during treatment may render the automatic method less accurate, since the test image many differ significantly from the reference image.

  12. Absence of Granzyme B Positive Tumour-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Primary Melanoma Excisional Biopsies is Strongly Associated with the Presence of Sentinel Lymph Node Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. van Houdt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sentinel Lymph Node (SLN status is strongly related to clinical outcome in melanoma patients. In this study we investigated the possible association between the presence of activated and/or suppressive Tumour Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs and SLN status in clinically stage I/II melanoma patients.

  13. Correlation between Positive Rate and Number of Biopsy Samples on Urease Test in Childhood Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji-Hyun; Park, Ji Sook; Yeom, Jung Sook; Lim, Jae-Young; Park, Chan-Hoo; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2014-01-01

    To identify the correlation between the number of gastric biopsy samples and the positive rate, we compared the results of urease test using one and three biopsy samples from each 255 children who underwent gastroduodenoscopy at Gyeongsang National University Hospital. The children were divided into three age groups: 0-4, 5-9, and 10-15 yr. The gastric endoscopic biopsies were subjected to the urease test. That is, one and three gastric antral biopsy samples were collected from the same child. The results of urease test were classified into three grades: Grade 0 (no change), 1 (6-24 hr), 2 (1-6 hr), and 3 (<1 hr). The positive rate of urease test was increased by the age with no respect to the number of gastric biopsy samples (one biopsy P = 0.001, three biopsy P < 0.001). The positive rate of the urease test was higher on three biopsy samples as compared with one biopsy sample (P < 0.001). The difference between one and three biopsy samples was higher in the children aged 0-9 yr. Our results indicate that the urease test might be a more accurate diagnostic modality when it is performed on three or more biopsy samples in children. PMID:24431913

  14. Endogenous plasma estradiol in healthy men is positively correlated with cerebral cortical serotonin 2A receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frokjaer, Vibe G; Erritzoe, David; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Finn Arup; Holst, Klaus; Svarer, Claus; Madsen, Jacob; Paulson, Olaf B; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2010-10-01

    Sex-hormones influence brain function and are likely to play a role in the gender predisposition to mood and anxiety disorders. Acute fluctuations of sex-hormone levels including hormonal replacement therapy appear to affect serotonergic neurotransmission, but it is unknown if baseline levels affect serotonergic neurotransmission. This study was undertaken to examine if baseline levels of endogenous sex hormones are associated with cerebral serotonin 2A (5-HT(2A)) receptor binding in men. In a group of 72 healthy men (mean age 37.5 years ±17.4 SD, range 19.6-81.7) we studied the effect of plasma sex hormone levels on neocortical 5-HT(2A) receptor binding as imaged with [(18)F]altanserin PET. The effect of endogenous sex-hormone levels was evaluated by multiple linear regression analysis. Mean neocortical 5-HT(2A) receptor binding was positively correlated with estradiol (p=0.0001), whereas no independent effects of testosterone could be demonstrated. Correction for other factors of importance for 5-HT(2A) receptor binding did not change the result. A voxel-based analysis suggested that there were no regional differences in the estradiol effect on cortical 5-HT(2A) receptor binding. Our data show a positive correlation between endogenous plasma estradiol levels and cortical 5-HT(2A) receptor binding in healthy men, whereas, no independent effect of testosterone was demonstrated. We speculate that this association could be mediated through effects on gene transcription. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Serum liver fatty acid binding protein levels correlate positively with obesity and insulin resistance in Chinese young adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver fatty acid-binding protein (FABP1 plays an inconclusive role in adiposity. We investigated the association of serum FABP1 levels with obesity and insulin resistance in Chinese young people under 30 years old. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cross-sectional analysis including 200 obese and 172 normal-weight subjects matched for age and sex, anthropometric measurements were performed and serum FABP1 and biochemical characteristics were measured. Insulin resistance was determined by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and by the insulin sensitivity index (S(i derived from Bergman's minimal model. FABP1 levels in obese subjects were significantly higher than those in normal-weight subjects (p<0.001 and the significance remained after adjustment for age, gender, alanine and aspartate aminotransferases (p<0.001. Serum FABP1 levels were significantly correlated with many metabolic-related parameters, with BMI and triglycerides as the independent determinants. FABP1 levels remained an independent risk factor of insulin resistance assessed by binary S(i (OR = 1.868 per SD unit, 95% CI [1.035-3.373], p = 0.038 after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, serum triacylglycerol, total cholesterol, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol,. FABP1 levels were also elevated with an increasing number of components of the metabolic syndrome (p for trend <0.001. Multiple regression modeling for the MetS and its components demonstrated that hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-cholesterol were significantly correlated to serum FABP1 levels. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Serum FABP1 correlates positively with obesity and insulin resistance in Chinese young adults. Our data supports the fact that FABP1 might be an important mediator participating in fatty acid metabolism and energy balance.

  16. Investigation of the source size and strong interaction with the femtoscopic correlations of baryons and antibaryons in heavy-ion collisions registered by ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00508100

    The strong interaction is one of the four fundamental forces of nature. It binds together quarks inside protons and neutrons (which are example of baryons - particles composed of three quarks) and assures the stability of the atomic nucleus. Parameters describing the strong potential are also crucial for the neutron stars models used in astrophysics. What is more, a precise study of strongly interacting particles may help to better understand the process of baryon annihilation. The current knowledge of the strong interactions between baryons other than nucle- ons is limited - there exist only a few measurements of the cross sections for pairs of (anti)baryons. The reason is that in many cases it is not possible to perform scattering experiments with beams of particles and antiparticles, as the exotic matter (such as Λ, Ξ or Σ baryons) is very shot-living. This issue can be solved thanks to the recent particle colliders like the Large Hadron Collider and experiments dedicated to study the heavy-ion collisio...

  17. Potential beneficial effect of some adipokines positively correlated with the adipose tissue content on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka, Magdalena; Janowska, Joanna; Chudek, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Obesity is a risk factor of cardiovascular diseases. However, in the case of heart failure, obese and overweight patients have a more favourable prognosis compared to patients who have a normal body weight. This phenomenon is referred to as the "obesity paradox," and it is explained by, among others, a positive effect of adipokines produced by adipose tissue, particularly by the tissue located in the direct vicinity of the heart and blood vessels. The favourable effect on the cardiovascular system is mostly associated with adiponectin and omentin, but the levels of these substances are reduced in obese patients. Among the adipokines which levels are positively correlated with the adipose tissue content, favourable activity is demonstrated by apelin, progranulin, chemerin, TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor-)α, CTRP-3 (C1q/tumour necrosis factor (TNF) related protein), leptin, visfatin and vaspin. This activity is associated with the promotion of regeneration processes in the damaged myocardium, formation of new blood vessels, reduction of the afterload, improvement of metabolic processes in cardiomyocytes and myocardial contractile function, inhibition of apoptosis and fibrosis of the myocardium, as well as anti-inflammatory and anti-atheromatous effects. The potential use of these properties in the treatment of heart failure and ischaemic heart disease, as well as in pulmonary hypertension, arterial hypertension and the limitation of the loss of cardiomyocytes during cardioplegia-requiring cardiosurgical procedures, is studied. The most advanced studies focus on analogues of apelin and progranulin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence and Positive Correlates of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms among Chinese Patients with Hematological Malignancies: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Liu

    Full Text Available Positive psychological constructs have been given increasing attention in research on the coping resources of cancer-related distresses. However, little research is available on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in patients with hematological malignancies. The purposes of this study were to assess the prevalence of PTSD symptoms and to explore the associations of perceived social support (PSS, hope, optimism and resilience with PTSD symptoms among Chinese patients with hematological malignancies.A cross-sectional study was conducted during the period from July 2013 through April 2014. A total of 225 inpatients with hematological malignancies, which were eligible for the study, completed the Post-traumatic Stress Checklist-Civilian Version, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Adult Hope Scale, Life Orientation Scale-Revised, and Resilience Scale. Hierarchical regression analysis was performed to explore the correlates of PTSD symptoms.Overall, the prevalence of PTSD symptoms was 10.7%. Initially, PSS was negatively associated with PTSD symptoms (β = -0.248, P < 0.01. However, when positive psychological variables were added, optimism was negatively associated with PTSD symptoms (β = -0.452, P < 0.01, and gender had a significant effect on PTSD symptoms. Women were more vulnerable to these symptoms than men (β = 0.123, P < 0.05. When the analysis was performed separately by gender, only optimism showed a significantly negative association with PTSD symptoms in both men (β = -0.389, P < 0.01 and women (β = -0.493, P < 0.01.Some patients with hematological malignancies suffer from PTSD symptoms. The positive effects of PSS and optimism on PTSD symptoms suggest that an integrated approach to psychosocial intervention from both external and internal perspectives could have practical significance. Gender difference should be considered in developing potential interventions in reducing cancer-related PTSD symptoms.

  19. Excitonic condensation of strongly correlated electrons: the case of Pr.sub.0.5./sub. Ca.sub.0.5./sub. CoO.sub.3./sub..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuneš, Jan; Augustinský, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 23 (2014), "235112-1"-"235112-5" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25251S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : excitonic condensation * strongly correlated electrons * cobaltites Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  20. Bone mineral content is positively correlated to n-3 fatty acids in the femur of growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Seifert, Mark F; Lim, Sun-Young; Salem, Norman; Watkins, Bruce A

    2010-09-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether provision of preformed dietary docosapentaenoic acid (DPAn-6) can replace DHA for normal long bone growth as assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for mineral content (BMC). A newly modified artificial rearing method was employed to generate n-3 fatty acid-deficient rats. Except the dam-reared (DR; 3.1 % alpha-linolenic acid) group, newborn pups were separated from their mothers at age 2 d and given artificial rat milk containing linoleic acid (LA), or LA supplemented with 1 % DHA (22 : 6n-3; DHA), 1 % DPAn-6 (DPA), or 1 % DHA plus 0.4 % DPAn-6 (DHA/DPA). The rats were later weaned onto similar pelleted diets. At adulthood, the rats were euthanised and bones (femur, tibia, and lumbar vertebrae) collected for tissue fatty acid analysis and bone mineral density (BMD) determination. The analyses showed that long bones such as femur and tibia in DPAn-6-treated rats contained higher DPAn-6 content and generally had the lowest BMC and BMD values. Hence, DPAn-6 did not replace DHA for normal bone growth and maximal BMC in femur, indicating an indispensible role of DHA in bone health. In conclusion, DHA accumulates in the osteoblast-rich and nerve-abundant periosteum of femur; DHA but not EPA appears to be a vital constituent of marrow and periosteum of healthy modelling bone; and both DHA and total n-3 PUFA strongly correlate to BMC.

  1. General parenting styles are not strongly associated with fruit and vegetable intake and social-environmental correlates among 11-year-old children in four countries in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bourdeaudhuij, I; Te Velde, S J; Maes, L; Pérez-Rodrigo, C; de Almeida, M D V; Brug, J

    2009-02-01

    To investigate whether fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake in 11-year-olds, and social-environmental correlates of F&V intake such as parental modelling and encouragement, family food rules and home availability, differ according to general parenting styles in Belgium, The Netherlands, Portugal and Spain. Cross-sectional study. Primary schools in four countries. Pupils and one of their parents completed questionnaires to measure F&V intake, related social-environmental correlates and general parenting styles. The sample size was 4555 (49.3 % boys); 1180 for Belgium, 883 for The Netherlands, 1515 for Portugal and 977 for Spain. Parenting styles were divided into authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent and neglectful. No differences were found in F&V intake across parenting styles and only very few significant differences in social-environmental correlates. The authoritarian (more parental encouragement and more demands to eat fruit) and the authoritative (more availability of fruit and vegetables) parenting styles resulted in more favourable correlates. Despite earlier studies suggesting that general parenting styles are associated with health behaviours in children, the present study suggests that this association is weak to non-existent for F&V intakes in four different European countries.

  2. A significant positive correlation between endogenous trans-zeatin content and total arsenic in arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris cretica var. nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuemei; Yang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hongbin; Li, Qinchun; Wang, Haijuan; Li, Yanyan

    2017-04-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to compare the content of endogenous trans-zeatin (Z), plant arsenic (As) uptake and physiological indices in the fronds of As-hyperaccumulator (Pteris cretica var. nervosa) and non-hyperaccumulator (Pteris ensiformis). Furthermore, a stepwise regression method was used to study the relationship among determined indices, and the time-course effect of main indices was also investigated under 100mg/kg As stress with time extension. In the 100-200mg/kg As treatments, plant height showed no significant difference and endogenous Z content significantly increased in P. cretica var. nervosa compared to the control, but a significant decrease of height and endogenous Z was observed in P. ensiformis. The concentrations of As (III) and As (V) increased significantly in the fronds of two plants, but this increase was much higher in P. cretica var. nervosa. Compared to the control, the contents of chlorophyll and soluble protein were significantly increased in P. cretica var. nervosa but decreased in P. ensiformis in the 200mg/kg As treatment, respectively. A significant positive correlation was found between the contents of endogenous Z and total As in P. cretica var. nervosa, but such a correlation was not found in P. ensiformis. Additionally, in the time-course effect experiment, a peak value of each index was appeared in the 43rd day in two plants, except for chlorophyll in P. ensiformis, but this value was significantly higher in P. cretica var. nervosa than that in P. ensiformis. In conclusion, a higher endogenous Z content contributed to As accumulation of P. cretica var. nervosa under As stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Developmental Associations between Short-Term Variability and Long-Term Changes: Intraindividual Correlation of Positive and Negative Affect in Daily Life and Cognitive Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülür, Gizem; Hoppmann, Christiane A.; Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Conceptual notions and empirical evidence suggest that the intraindividual correlation (iCorr) of positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) is a meaningful characteristic of affective functioning. PA and NA are typically negatively correlated within-person. Previous research has found that the iCorr of PA and NA is relatively stable over time…

  4. Genomic selection strategies in breeding programs: Strong positive interaction between application of genotypic information and intensive use of young bulls on genetic gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch, Line Hjortø; Sørensen, Morten Kargo; Berg, Peer

    2012-01-01

    ) a positive interaction exists between the use of genotypic information and a short generation interval on ΔGAG and (iii) the inclusion of an indicator trait in the selection index will only result in a negligible increase in ΔGAG if genotypic information about the breeding goal trait is known. We examined......We tested the following hypotheses: (i) breeding schemes with genomic selection are superior to breeding schemes without genomic selection regarding annual genetic gain of the aggregate genotype (ΔGAG), annual genetic gain of the functional traits and rate of inbreeding per generation (ΔF), (ii...... four breeding schemes with or without genomic selection and with or without intensive use of young bulls using pseudo-genomic stochastic simulations. The breeding goal consisted of a milk production trait and a functional trait. The two breeding schemes with genomic selection resulted in higher ΔGAG...

  5. Serum Thyrotropin Is Positively Correlated with the Metabolic Syndrome Components of Obesity and Dyslipidemia in Chinese Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingfan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is a medical disorder characterized by obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Thyroid hormone has been shown to affect many metabolic processes. This study was undertaken to explore the relationship between serum thyrotropin and components of metabolic syndrome in Chinese adolescents. Waist circumference (76.4 ± 10.7 versus 70.0 ± 10.6 cm, P = 0.006 and body mass index (23.90 ± 4.20 versus 21.51 ± 4.16 kg/m2, P = 0.011 were significantly greater among adolescents with subclinical hypothyroidism compared with euthyroid subjects. The risk of obesity in the subclinical hypothyroid group was 3.444 times that in the euthyroid group (odds ratio = 3.444, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.570–7.553. Serum TSH was significantly positively correlated with waist circumference (β = 1.512, P = 0.019, TC (β = 0.160, P = 0.003, LDL-C (β = 0.032, P = 0.008, and TG (β = 0.095, P = 0.001. The TSH level in the metabolic syndrome group was significantly higher than that in nonmetabolic syndrome group (2.65 [2.28–3.80] versus 2.53 [1.92–3.45] mIU/L, P = 0.032. Serum TSH within the reference range was positively associated with TC (β = 0.173, P = 0.013, LDL-C (β = 0.031, P = 0.043, and TG (β = 0.132, P = 0.021. Increased serum TSH in adolescents may be a potential risk factor for metabolic syndrome.

  6. Large positive correlation between the effective electron mass and the multipolar fluctuation in the heavy-fermion metal Ce1-xLaxB6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dongjin; Portnichenko, Pavlo Y.; Cameron, Alistair S.; Friemel, Gerd; Dukhnenko, Anatoliy V.; Shitsevalova, Natalya Y.; Filipov, Volodymyr B.; Schneidewind, Astrid; Ivanov, Alexandre; Inosov, Dmytro S.; Brando, Manuel

    2017-11-01

    For the last few decades, researchers have been intrigued by multipolar ordering phenomena and related quantum phase transitions in heavy-fermion Kondo systems. However, a criticality induced by substitution level (x), temperature (T), or magnetic field (B) is poorly understood even in the prototypical material, Ce1-xLaxB6, despite a large collection of experimental results is available. In this work, we present T-B, x-T, and x-B phase diagrams of Ce1-xLaxB6 (B || [110]). These are completed by investigating heat capacity, magnetocaloric effect (MCE), and elastic neutron scattering. A drastic increase of the Sommerfeld coefficient γ0, which is estimated from the heat capacity down to 0.05 K, is observed with increasing x. The precise T-B phase diagram including a high-entropy region is derived from the MCE analysis in which a knowledge beyond the equilibrium thermodynamics is involved. Finally, the x-B phase diagram at T = 0, which supports the existence of a quantum critical point at x > 0.75, is obtained by the same analysis. A detailed interpretation of phase diagrams strongly indicates positive correlation between the fluctuating multipoles and the effective electron mass.

  7. Increased gray matter volume of left pars opercularis in male orchestral musicians correlate positively with years of musical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Kareem, Ihssan A; Stancak, Andrej; Parkes, Laura M; Sluming, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    To compare manual volumetry of gray matter (GM) / white matter (WM) of Broca's area subparts: pars opercularis (POP) and pars triangularis (PTR) in both hemispheres between musicians and nonmusician, as it has been shown that these regions are crucial for musical abilities. A previous voxel-based morphometric (VBM) study conducted in our laboratory reported increased GM density in Broca's area of left hemisphere in male orchestral musicians. Functional segregation of POP/PTR justified separate volumetric analysis of these parts. We used the same cohort for the VBM study. Manual morphometry (stereology) was used to compare volumes between 26/26 right-handed orchestral musicians/nonmusicians. As expected, musicians showed significantly increased GM volume in the Broca's area, specifically in the left POP. No significant results were detected in right POP, left/right PTR GM volumes, and WM volumes for all regions. Results were positively correlated with years of musical performance (r = 0.7, P = 0.0001). This result corroborates the VBM study and is in line with the hypothesis of critical involvement of POP in hearing-action integration being an integral component of frontoparietotemporal mirror neuron network. We hypothesize that increased size of musicians' left POP represent use-dependent structural adaptation in response to intensive audiomotor skill acquisition. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Length of stay for patients undergoing invasive electrode monitoring with stereoelectroencephalography and subdural grids correlates positively with increased institutional profitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Alvin Y; Kharrat, Sohayla; Lundeen, Kelly; Mnatsakanyan, Lilit; Sazgar, Mona; Sen-Gupta, Indranil; Lin, Jack J; Hsu, Frank P K; Vadera, Sumeet

    2017-06-01

    Lowering the length of stay (LOS) is thought to potentially decrease hospital costs and is a metric commonly used to manage capacity. Patients with epilepsy undergoing intracranial electrode monitoring may have longer LOS because the time to seizure is difficult to predict or control. This study investigates the effect of economic implications of increased LOS in patients undergoing invasive electrode monitoring for epilepsy. We retrospectively collected and analyzed patient data for 76 patients who underwent invasive monitoring with either subdural grid (SDG) implantation or stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) over 2 years at our institution. Data points collected included invasive electrode type, LOS, profit margin, contribution margins, insurance type, and complication rates. LOS correlated positively with both profit and contribution margins, meaning that as LOS increased, both the profit and contribution margins rose, and there was a low rate of complications in this patient group. This relationship was seen across a variety of insurance providers. These data suggest that LOS may not be the best metric to assess invasive monitoring patients (i.e., SEEG or SDG), and increased LOS does not necessarily equate with lower or negative institutional financial gain. Further research into LOS should focus on specific specialties, as each may differ in terms of financial implications. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  9. Secondary syphilis in HIV positive individuals: correlation with histopathologic findings, CD4 counts, and quantity of treponemes in microscopic sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Gabriela; Procop, Gary W; Schold, Jesse D; Piliang, Melissa P

    2016-10-01

    Although syphilis is uncommon, infection rates are much higher in HIV-infected individuals than the general population. A proposed explanation is impaired cellular immunity with HIV infection. A search of one institution yielded 10 patients with a diagnosis of secondary syphilis on skin biopsy, positive syphilis serology and available CD4 counts. We evaluated 11 biopsies from the 10 patients. We correlated the patients' CD4 counts with the histologic findings and with the number of treponemes on skin biopsies, highlighted by immunohistochemistry (IHC). We also compared the detection of spirochetes in silver stained sections (e.g. Warthin-Starry) with T. pallidum IHC. All biopsies were assessed for various histologic features. The sensitivity of IHC to detect treponemes was 64% and of silver stain was 9% (p-value 0.04). The number of treponemes on the biopsies was determined by IHC. High numbers of spirochetes (i.e. >100 per 10 hpf) were only seen in patients with CD4 counts less than 250 cells/ml. The most consistent histologic finding was a moderate to severe lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Although the study is small, it appears that a higher number of spirochetes is associated with CD4 counts less than 250 cell/ml. The T. pallidum IHC stain was vastly superior to the Warthin-Starry stain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Positive genetic correlation between brain size and sexual traits in male guppies artificially selected for brain size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrschal, A; Corral-Lopez, A; Zajitschek, S; Immler, S; Maklakov, A A; Kolm, N

    2015-04-01

    Brain size is an energetically costly trait to develop and maintain. Investments into other costly aspects of an organism's biology may therefore place important constraints on brain size evolution. Sexual traits are often costly and could therefore be traded off against neural investment. However, brain size may itself be under sexual selection through mate choice on cognitive ability. Here, we use guppy (Poecilia reticulata) lines selected for large and small brain size relative to body size to investigate the relationship between brain size, a large suite of male primary and secondary sexual traits, and body condition index. We found no evidence for trade-offs between brain size and sexual traits. Instead, larger-brained males had higher expression of several primary and precopulatory sexual traits--they had longer genitalia, were more colourful and developed longer tails than smaller-brained males. Larger-brained males were also in better body condition when housed in single-sex groups. There was no difference in post-copulatory sexual traits between males from the large- and small-brained lines. Our data do not support the hypothesis that investment into sexual traits is an important limiting factor to brain size evolution, but instead suggest that brain size and several sexual traits are positively genetically correlated. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society for Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis reveals positive correlations between adaptations to diverse hosts in a group of pathogen-like herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Daniel A; Hardy, Nate B; Morse, Geoffrey E; Stocks, Ian C; Okusu, Akiko; Normark, Benjamin B

    2015-10-01

    A jack of all trades can be master of none-this intuitive idea underlies most theoretical models of host-use evolution in plant-feeding insects, yet empirical support for trade-offs in performance on distinct host plants is weak. Trade-offs may influence the long-term evolution of host use while being difficult to detect in extant populations, but host-use evolution may also be driven by adaptations for generalism. Here we used host-use data from insect collection records to parameterize a phylogenetic model of host-use evolution in armored scale insects, a large family of plant-feeding insects with a simple, pathogen-like life history. We found that a model incorporating positive correlations between evolutionary changes in host performance best fit the observed patterns of diaspidid presence and absence on nearly all focal host taxa, suggesting that adaptations to particular hosts also enhance performance on other hosts. In contrast to the widely invoked trade-off model, we advocate a "toolbox" model of host-use evolution in which armored scale insects accumulate a set of independent genetic tools, each of which is under selection for a single function but may be useful on multiple hosts. © 2015 The Author(s).

  12. Dinoflagellate cyst abundance is positively correlated to sediment organic carbon in Sydney Harbour and Botany Bay, NSW, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chang; Doblin, Martina A; Dafforn, Katherine A; Johnston, Emma L; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong

    2018-02-01

    There is growing public concern about the global expansion of harmful algal bloom species (HABs), with dinoflagellate microalgae comprising the major portion of the harmful taxa. These motile, unicellular organisms have a lifecycle involving sexual reproduction and resting cyst formation whereby cysts can germinate from sediments and 'seed' planktonic populations. Thus, investigation of dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) distribution in sediments can provide significant insights into HAB dynamics and contribute to indices of habitat quality. Species composition and abundance of dinocysts in relation to sediment characteristics were studied at 18 stations in two densely populated temperate Australian estuaries, Sydney Harbour (Parramatta River/Port Jackson; PS) and Botany Bay (including Georges River; GB). Eighteen dinocyst taxa were identified, dominated by Protoceratium reticulatum and Gonyaulax sp.1 in the PS estuary, together with Archaeperidinium minutum and Gonyaulax sp.1 in the GB estuary. Cysts of Alexandrium catenella, which is one of the causative species of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), were also detected in both estuaries. Out of the measured sediment characteristics (TOC, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mn, Ni, Zn and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), TOC was the parameter explaining most of the variation in dinocyst assemblages and was positively correlated to most of the heavy metals. Given the significant relationship between sediment TOC and dinocyst abundance and heavy metal concentrations, this study suggests that sediment TOC could be broadly used in risk management for potential development of algal blooms and sediment contamination in these estuaries.

  13. Failure on the American Board of Surgery Examinations of General Surgery Residency Graduates Correlates Positively with States' Malpractice Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, Daniel L; Al Fayyadh, Mohammed J; Rawlings, Jeremy A; Hassan, Ramy A; Kempenich, Jason W; Willis, Ross E; Stewart, Ronald M

    2018-03-01

    It has been suggested that in environments where there is greater fear of litigation, resident autonomy and education is compromised. Our aim was to examine failure rates on American Board of Surgery (ABS) examinations in comparison with medical malpractice payments in 47 US states/territories that have general surgery residency programs. We hypothesized higher ABS examination failure rates for general surgery residents who graduate from residencies in states with higher malpractice risk. We conducted a retrospective review of five-year (2010-2014) pass rates of first-time examinees of the ABS examinations. States' malpractice data were adjusted based on population. ABS examinations failure rates for programs in states with above and below median malpractice payments per capita were 31 and 24 per cent (P malpractice payments per capita for Qualifying Examination (P Malpractice risk correlates positively with graduates' failure rates on ABS examinations regardless of program size or type. We encourage further examination of training environments and their relationship to surgical residency graduate performance.

  14. Endogenous plasma estradiol in healthy men is positively correlated with cerebral cortical serotonin 2A receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Erritzoe, David; Juul, Anders

    2010-01-01

    levels affect serotonergic neurotransmission. This study was undertaken to examine if baseline levels of endogenous sex hormones are associated with cerebral serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor binding in men. Methods: In a group of 72 healthy men (mean age 37.5 years ±17.4 SD, range 19.6–81.7) we studied...... the effect of plasma sex hormone levels on neocortical 5-HT2A receptor binding as imaged with [18F]altanserin PET. The effect of endogenous sex-hormone levels was evaluated by multiple linear regression analysis. Results: Mean neocortical 5-HT2A receptor binding was positively correlated with estradiol (p...... = 0.0001), whereas no independent effects of testosterone could be demonstrated. Correction for other factors of importance for 5-HT2A receptor binding did not change the result. A voxel-based analysis suggested that there were no regional differences in the estradiol effect on cortical 5-HT2A...

  15. Electronic structure of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub delta/ including strong correlation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa-Quintana, J.; Lopez-Aguilar, F.; Balle, S.; Salvador, R.

    1989-05-01

    The occupied and unoccupied valence-band density of states of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-//sub delta/ is determined considering a coherent potential which includes the Coulomb intrasite d-d correlation. The p states tend to be all occupied and, as a consequence, the most localized d states with the XZ symmetry tend to be unoccupied giving rise to an upper Hubbard band. This picture is in good agreement with the direct and inverse photoemission spectroscopies.

  16. Other paradigms: growth rate constants and tumor burden determined using computed tomography data correlate strongly with the overall survival of patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Huang, Hui; Menefee, Michael; Edgerly, Maureen; Kotz, Herb; Dwyer, Andrew; Yang, James; Bates, Susan E

    2009-01-01

    In solid tumors, where curative therapies still elude oncologists, novel paradigms are needed to assess the efficacy of new therapies and those already approved. We used radiologic measurements obtained in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma enrolled in a phase II study of the epothilone B analog, ixabepilone (Ixempra), to address this issue. Using a novel 2-phase mathematical equation, we used the radiologic measurements to estimate the concomitant rates of tumor regression and growth (regression and growth rate constants). Eighty-one patients were enrolled on the ixabepilone trial at the time of this analysis. Growth rate constants were determined using computed tomography measurements obtained exclusively while a patient was enrolled on study. The growth rate constants of renal cell carcinomas treated with ixabepilone were significantly reduced compared with those of tumors in patients who received placebo in a previous trial. Furthermore, a correlation with overall survival was found for both the growth rate constant and the initial tumor burden; and this correlation was even stronger when both the growth rate constant and the initial tumor burden were combined. The readily amenable mathematical model described herein has potential applications to many tumor types that can be assessed with imaging modalities. Because the growth rate constant seems to be a surrogate for survival, assessment could aid in the evaluation of relative efficacies of different therapies and perhaps in assessing the potential individual benefit of an experimental therapy.

  17. Site-specific glycoprofiling of N-linked glycopeptides using MALDI-TOF MS: strong correlation between signal strength and glycoform quantities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Mysling, Simon; Højrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Site-specific glycoprofiling of N-linked glycopeptides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technique, but its quantitative accuracy lacks documentation. Thus, a systematic study of widely different glycopeptides was perf......Site-specific glycoprofiling of N-linked glycopeptides using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is an emerging technique, but its quantitative accuracy lacks documentation. Thus, a systematic study of widely different glycopeptides...... quantitation (correlation coefficient r = 0.9958, n = 5) when evaluated against a normal phase HPLC 2-AB glycan profile. Similarly, precise quantitation was observed for various forms of N-glycans (free, permethylated, and fluorescence-labeled) using MS. In addition, three different sialoglycopeptides from...... fetuin were site-specifically profiled, and good correlation between peak intensities and relative abundances was found with only a minor loss of sialic acids (r = 0.9664, n = 5). For glycopeptide purification, a range of hydrophilic and graphite materials packed in microcolumn format proved capable...

  18. Strong correlations between metal in mollusk soft tissue and nonresistant sediment fraction: a tool for biomonitoring intertidal zone of the Persian Gulf, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Zahra; Bakhtiari, Alireza Riyahi; Savabieasfahani, Mozhgan

    2014-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were determined in three species of mollusks and associated sediment. Samples were collected from two locations along the intertidal zone of the Persian Gulf near Bandar Abbas. The study was conducted during the spring of 2011, 10 sediment samples and 15 mollusks from each of the following species: Saccostrea cucullata, Solen brevis, and Callista umbonella, were simultaneously collected. Soft tissue, shell, and sediment were tested for metals using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Geochemical fractions of the sediment were examined for metals using a sequential extraction technique. Our results indicate that over half of Cd and Pb in the sediment had natural origins. Independent sample t test showed statistically significant (p < 0.05) inter-tissue differences in accumulation of Cd and Pb. Soft tissue of C. umbonella contained highest levels of Cd. Pb accumulation was highest in S. brevis shell. Significant correlations (p < 0.05) were found between Cd in the soft tissue of C. umbonella and its levels in the geochemical fractions of the sediment. Lead levels in the resistant geochemical fractions of the sediment and S. brevis shell were significantly correlated. Our results suggest that soft tissue of C. umbonella and shell of S. brevis are reliable biomonitoring tools for Cd and Pb, respectively.

  19. Long-periodic strong radar echoes in the summer polar D region correlated with oscillations of high-speed solar wind streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Sook; Kirkwood, Sheila; Shepherd, Gordon G.; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kim, Kyung-Chan

    2013-08-01

    We report long-periodic oscillations of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSEs) correlated with high-speed solar wind streams (HSSs) as observed between 1 June and 8 August in the solar minimum years 2006 and 2008. PMSEs (80-90 km altitudes) were observed by 52 MHz VHF radar measurements at Esrange, Sweden (67.8°N, 20.4°E). Correlations between PMSE volume reflectivity/counts, HSSs, and AE index are primarily found at 7-day, 9-day, and 13-day periodicities as well as 9-day and 13.5-day periodicities in 2006 and 2008, respectively. The observations show that the effects of HSSs appear in PMSEs. During corotating interaction region (CIR)-induced HSSs, the long-lasting enhancement of PMSEs, geomagnetic disturbances, and D-region ionization suggests that a favorable condition in generating PMSEs can be provided by the precipitating energetic electrons (>30 keV), which are frequently multiplied in the magnetosphere during HSSs.

  20. Separate Ways: The Mass–Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Heckman, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sánchez, S. F. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-264, 04510 México, D.F., México (Mexico); Blanc, G. A., E-mail: jbarrer3@jhu.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Collaboration: MaNGA Team

    2017-07-20

    We present the integrated stellar mass–metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R {sub eff}) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  1. Separate Ways: The Mass–Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Heckman, T.; Sánchez, S. F.; Blanc, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the integrated stellar mass–metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R eff ) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  2. Separate Ways: The Mass-Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Heckman, T.; Blanc, G. A.; The MaNGA Team

    2017-07-01

    We present the integrated stellar mass-metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R eff) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  3. Positive correlation of trophic level and proportion of sexual taxa of oribatid mites (Acari: Oribatida) in alpine soil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Barbara M; Meyer, Erwin; Maraun, Mark

    2014-08-01

    We investigated community structure, trophic ecology (using stable isotope ratios; (15)N/(14)N, (13)C/(12)C) and reproductive mode of oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida) along an altitudinal gradient (2,050-2,900 m) in the Central Alps (Obergurgl, Austria). We hypothesized that (1) the community structure changes with altitude, (2) oribatid mites span over four trophic levels, (3) the proportion of sexual taxa increases with altitude, and (4) the proportion of sexual taxa increases with trophic level, i.e. is positively correlated with the δ(15)N signatures. Oribatid mite community structure changed with altitude indicating that oribatid mites occupy different niches at different altitudes. Oribatid mites spanned over 12 δ(15)N units, i.e. about four trophic levels, which is similar to lowland forest ecosystems. The proportion of sexually reproducing taxa increased from 2,050 to 2,900 m suggesting that limited resource availability at high altitudes favors sexual reproduction. Sexual taxa more frequently occurred higher in the food web indicating that the reproductive mode is related to nutrition of oribatid mites. Generally, oribatid mite community structure changed from being decomposer dominated at lower altitude to being dominated by fungal and lichen feeders, and predators at higher altitude. This supports the view that resources from dead organic material become less available with increasing altitude forcing species to feed on living resources such as fungi, lichens and nematodes. Our findings support the hypothesis that limited resource accessibility (at high altitudes) favors sexually reproducing species whereas ample resource supply (at lower altitudes) favors parthenogenetic species.

  4. Prevalence and correlates of cervical HPV infection in a clinic-based sample of HIV-positive Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, A P; Tamayo, V; Scorsone, A; Soto-Salgado, M; Febo, I; Piovanetti, P; Venegas-Ríos, H L; Yamamura, Y; Zorrilla, C

    2017-12-01

    Puerto Rico (PR), is the fifth highest jurisdiction of the United States of America (US) with respect to HIV prevalence and the leading in cervical cancer incidence. This cross-sectional study describes the prevalence and correlates of cervical HPV infection among a clinic-based sample of 302 women living with HIV/AIDS in PR. Data collection included questionnaires, blood and cervical samples. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate the magnitude of association (adjusted Prevalence odds ratio [aPOR]) between HPV cervical infection and other covariates. Mean age of participants was 40.3 years (± 10.3SD). The prevalence of HPV infection was 50.3%; 41.1% for low-risk types and 29.5% for high-risk types. Having ≥ 10 lifetime sexual partners (aPOR = 2.10, 95% CI:1.02-4.29), an abnormal Pap (aPOR = 3.58, 95% CI:1.93-6.62), active genital warts (aPOR = 3.45, 95% CI:1.60-7.42), and CD4 counts ≤ 200 (aPOR = 4.24, 95% CI: 1.67-10.78) were positively associated with any cervical HPV infection. Similar results were observed for HR HPV infection. A high burden of HPV co-infection exists among women living with HIV/AIDS in this population. Given the high incidence of HIV in PR and the higher risk of cervical cancer among women living with HIV/AIDS, HPV vaccination should be promoted in this population. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Estimated amount of 24-hour urine sodium excretion is positively correlated with stomach and breast cancer prevalence in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong Chul; Koo, Ho Seok; Oh, Se Won; Kim, Suhnggwon; Chin, Ho Jun

    2014-09-01

    Stomach cancer is one of the most common cancers in Korea. The aim of this study was to identify the association between the prevalence of cancer, particularly stomach cancer, and the amount of 24-hr urine sodium excretion estimated from spot urine specimens. The study included 19,083 subjects who took part in the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey between 2009 and 2011. The total amount of urine sodium excreted in a 24-hr period was estimated by using two equations based on the values for spot urine sodium and creatinine. In subjects who had an estimated 24-hr urine sodium excretion of more than two standard deviations above the mean (group 2), the prevalence of stomach cancer was higher than in subjects with lower 24-hr sodium excretion (group 1). By using the Tanaka equation to estimate it, the prevalence of stomach cancer was 0.6% (114/18,331) in group 1, whereas it was 1.6% (9/568) in group 2 (P=0.006). By using the Korean equation, the prevalence was 0.6% (115/18,392) in group 1, and 1.6% in group 2 (8/507) (P=0.010). By using the Tanaka equation, breast cancer in women is more prevalent in group 2 (1.9%, 6/324) than group 1 (0.8%, 78/9,985, P=0.039). Higher salt intake, as defined by the estimated amount of 24-hr urine sodium excretion, is positively correlated with a higher prevalence of stomach or breast cancer in the Korean population.

  6. Thermodynamic prediction of glass formation tendency, cluster-in-jellium model for metallic glasses, ab initio tight-binding calculations, and new density functional theory development for systems with strong electron correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yongxin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    also plays an important role, as it may directly track the movement of every atom. Simulation time is a major limit for molecular dynamics, not only because of “slow” computer speed, but also because of the accumulation error in the numerical treatment of the motion equations. There is also a great concern about the reliability of the emperical potentials if using classical molecular dynamics. Ab initio methods based on density functional theory(DFT) do not have this problem, however, it suffers from small simulation cells and is more demanding computationally. When crystal phase is involved, size effect of the simulation cell is more pronounced since long-range elastic energy would be established. Simulation methods which are more efficient in computation but yet have similar reliability as the ab initio methods, like tight-binding method, are highly desirable. While the complexity of metallic glasses comes from the atomistic level, there is also a large field which deals with the complexity from electronic level. The only “ab initio” method applicable to solid state systems is density functional theory with local density approximation( LDA) or generalized gradient approximation(GGA) for the exchange-correlation energy. It is very successful for simple sp element, where it reaches an high accuracy for determining the surface reconstruction. However, there is a large class of materials with strong electron correlation, where DFT based on LDA or GGA fails in a fundamental way. An “ab initio” method which can generally apply to correlated materials, as LDA for simple sp element, is still to be developed. The thesis is prepared to address some of the above problems.

  7. Positive schizotypy scores correlate with left visual field interference for negatively valenced emotional words: A lateralized emotional stroop study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strien, J.W.; van Kampen, D.

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen men scoring high and 14 men scoring low on a positive schizotypy scale participated in a lateralized emotional Stroop task. Vocal reaction times for color naming of neutral, positive and negative emotional words were recorded. Across participants, the color naming of neutral and emotional

  8. Tackler’s head position relative to the ball carrier is highly correlated with head and neck injuries in rugby

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Shiota, Yuki; Ota, Chihiro; Yoneda, Takeshi; Tahara, Shigeyuki; Maki, Nobukazu; Matsuura, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Tateishi, Tomohiko; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To characterise the tackler’s head position during one-on-one tackling in rugby and to determine the incidence of head, neck and shoulder injuries through analysis of game videos, injury records and a questionnaire completed by the tacklers themselves. Methods We randomly selected 28 game videos featuring two university teams in competitions held in 2015 and 2016. Tackles were categorised according to tackler’s head position. The ‘pre-contact phase’ was defined; its duration and the number of steps taken by the ball carrier prior to a tackle were evaluated. Results In total, 3970 tackles, including 317 (8.0%) with the tackler’s head incorrectly positioned (ie, in front of the ball carrier) were examined. Thirty-two head, neck or shoulder injuries occurred for an injury incidence of 0.8% (32/3970). The incidence of injury in tackles with incorrect head positioning was 69.4/1000 tackles; the injury incidence with correct head positioning (ie, behind or to one side of the ball carrier) was 2.7/1000 tackles. Concussions, neck injuries, ‘stingers’ and nasal fractures occurred significantly more often during tackles with incorrect head positioning than during tackles with correct head positioning. Significantly fewer steps were taken before tackles with incorrect head positioning that resulted in injury than before tackles that did not result in injury. Conclusion Tackling with incorrect head position relative to the ball carrier resulted in a significantly higher incidence of concussions, neck injuries, stingers and nasal fractures than tackling with correct head position. Tackles with shorter duration and distance before contact resulted in more injuries. PMID:29162618

  9. Tackler's head position relative to the ball carrier is highly correlated with head and neck injuries in rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobue, Shogo; Kawasaki, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Shiota, Yuki; Ota, Chihiro; Yoneda, Takeshi; Tahara, Shigeyuki; Maki, Nobukazu; Matsuura, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Itoigawa, Yoshiaki; Tateishi, Tomohiko; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2018-03-01

    To characterise the tackler's head position during one-on-one tackling in rugby and to determine the incidence of head, neck and shoulder injuries through analysis of game videos, injury records and a questionnaire completed by the tacklers themselves. We randomly selected 28 game videos featuring two university teams in competitions held in 2015 and 2016. Tackles were categorised according to tackler's head position. The 'pre-contact phase' was defined; its duration and the number of steps taken by the ball carrier prior to a tackle were evaluated. In total, 3970 tackles, including 317 (8.0%) with the tackler's head incorrectly positioned (ie, in front of the ball carrier) were examined. Thirty-two head, neck or shoulder injuries occurred for an injury incidence of 0.8% (32/3970). The incidence of injury in tackles with incorrect head positioning was 69.4/1000 tackles; the injury incidence with correct head positioning (ie, behind or to one side of the ball carrier) was 2.7/1000 tackles. Concussions, neck injuries, 'stingers' and nasal fractures occurred significantly more often during tackles with incorrect head positioning than during tackles with correct head positioning. Significantly fewer steps were taken before tackles with incorrect head positioning that resulted in injury than before tackles that did not result in injury. Tackling with incorrect head position relative to the ball carrier resulted in a significantly higher incidence of concussions, neck injuries, stingers and nasal fractures than tackling with correct head position. Tackles with shorter duration and distance before contact resulted in more injuries. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Analysis of electron-correlation effects in strongly correlated systems (N2 and N2+ ) by applying the density-matrix renormalization-group method and quantum information theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmle, Christian; Paulus, Beate; Legeza, Örs

    2018-02-01

    The dissociation of N2 and N2 + has been studied by using the ab initio density-matrix renormalization-group (DMRG) method. Accurate potential energy surfaces (PESs) have been obtained for the electronic ground states of N2 (X1 Σg+ ) and N2+ (X2 Σg+ ) as well as for the N2+ excited state B2 Σu+ . Inherent to the DMRG approach, the eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix (ρ ) and their correlation functions are at hand. Thus we can apply quantum information theory directly and investigate how the wave function changes along the PES and depict differences between the different states. Moreover, by characterizing quantum entanglement between different pairs of orbitals and analyzing the reduced density matrix, we achieved a better understanding of the multireference character featured by these systems.

  11. Correlation of LMP10 expression and clinical outcome in Human Papillomavirus (HPV positive and HPV-Negative tonsillar and base of tongue cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Tertipis

    Full Text Available To examine LMP10 expression and its possible impact on clinical outcome in human papillomavirus (HPV positive and HPV-negative tonsillar and base of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC and BOTSCC.Outcome is better in HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC compared to matching HPV-negative tumours, with roughly 80% vs. 40% 5-year disease free survival (DFS with less aggressive treatment than today's chemoradiotherapy. Since current treatment often results in harmful side effects, less intensive therapy, with sustained patient survival would be an attractive alternative. However, other markers together with HPV status are necessary to select patients and for this purpose LMP10 expression is investigated here in parallel to HPV status and clinical outcome.From 385 patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 at the Karolinska University Hospital, 278 formalin fixed paraffin embedded TSCC and BOTSCC biopsies, with known HPV DNA status, were tested for LMP10 nuclear and cytoplasmic expression (fraction of positive cells and staining intensity. The data was then correlated to clinical outcome.An absent/low compared to a moderate/high LMP10 nuclear fraction of positive cells was correlated to a better 3-year DFS in the HPV-positive group of patients (log-rank p = 0.005, but not in the HPV-negative group. In the HPV-negative group of patients, in contrast to the HPV-positive group, moderate/high LMP10 cytoplasmic fraction and weak/moderate/high LMP10 cytoplasmic intensity correlated to a better 3-year DFS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001 and 3-year overall survival (p = 0.001 and 0.009.LMP10 nuclear expression in the HPV-positive group and LMP10 cytoplasmic expression in the HPV-negative group of patients correlated to better clinical outcome.

  12. Correlation of LMP10 expression and clinical outcome in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) positive and HPV-Negative tonsillar and base of tongue cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tertipis, Nikolaos; Haeggblom, Linnea; Nordfors, Cecilia; Grün, Nathalie; Näsman, Anders; Vlastos, Andrea; Dalianis, Tina; Ramqvist, Torbjörn

    2014-01-01

    To examine LMP10 expression and its possible impact on clinical outcome in human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and HPV-negative tonsillar and base of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC and BOTSCC). Outcome is better in HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC compared to matching HPV-negative tumours, with roughly 80% vs. 40% 5-year disease free survival (DFS) with less aggressive treatment than today's chemoradiotherapy. Since current treatment often results in harmful side effects, less intensive therapy, with sustained patient survival would be an attractive alternative. However, other markers together with HPV status are necessary to select patients and for this purpose LMP10 expression is investigated here in parallel to HPV status and clinical outcome. From 385 patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2007 at the Karolinska University Hospital, 278 formalin fixed paraffin embedded TSCC and BOTSCC biopsies, with known HPV DNA status, were tested for LMP10 nuclear and cytoplasmic expression (fraction of positive cells and staining intensity). The data was then correlated to clinical outcome. An absent/low compared to a moderate/high LMP10 nuclear fraction of positive cells was correlated to a better 3-year DFS in the HPV-positive group of patients (log-rank p = 0.005), but not in the HPV-negative group. In the HPV-negative group of patients, in contrast to the HPV-positive group, moderate/high LMP10 cytoplasmic fraction and weak/moderate/high LMP10 cytoplasmic intensity correlated to a better 3-year DFS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001) and 3-year overall survival (p = 0.001 and 0.009). LMP10 nuclear expression in the HPV-positive group and LMP10 cytoplasmic expression in the HPV-negative group of patients correlated to better clinical outcome.

  13. Disorder effects in strongly correlated uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suellow, S.; Maple, M.B.; Tomuta, D.; Nieuwenhuys, G.J.; Menovsky, A.A.; Mydosh, J.A.; Chau, R.

    2001-01-01

    Moderate levels of crystallographic disorder can dramatically affect the ground-state properties of heavy fermion compounds. In particular, the role of disorder close to a quantum critical point has been investigated in detail. However, crystallographic disorder is equally effective in altering the properties of magnetically ordered heavy fermion compounds like URh 2 Ge 2 , where disorder-induced spin-glass behavior has been observed. In this system, moreover, the magnetic ground state can be tuned from a spin-glass to a long-range ordered antiferromagnetic one by means of an annealing treatment. The transformation of the magnetic state is accompanied by a transition in the transport properties from 'quasi-insulating' (dρ/dT 2 Ge 2 will be discussed. Of particular interest is the resistivity of as-grown URh 2 Ge 2 , which resembles the Non-Fermi-liquid system UCu 4 Pd, suggesting that a common mechanism - the crystallographic disorder - controls the transport properties of these materials

  14. Strong electron correlations in the normal state of the iron-based FeSe0.42Te0.58 superconductor observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, A; Ganin, A Y; Rozbicki, E; Bacsa, J; Meevasana, W; King, P D C; Caffio, M; Schaub, R; Margadonna, S; Prassides, K; Rosseinsky, M J; Baumberger, F

    2010-03-05

    We investigate the normal state of the "11" iron-based superconductor FeSe0.42Te0.58 by angle-resolved photoemission. Our data reveal a highly renormalized quasiparticle dispersion characteristic of a strongly correlated metal. We find sheet dependent effective carrier masses between approximately 3 and 16m{e} corresponding to a mass enhancement over band structure values of m{*}/m{band} approximately 6-20. This is nearly an order of magnitude higher than the renormalization reported previously for iron-arsenide superconductors of the "1111" and "122" families but fully consistent with the bulk specific heat.

  15. Correlated Dirac semimetallic state with unusual positive magnetoresistance in strain-free perovskite SrIrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, J.; Okawa, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Tokura, Y.

    2017-03-01

    We investigated magnetotransport properties and charge dynamics of strain-free perovskite SrIrO3. Both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistivity (MR) are significantly enhanced with decreasing temperature, in accord with the evolution of the Dirac semimetallic state. The electron correlation effect in the Dirac state shows up as a dramatic change in charge dynamics with temperature and as an enhanced paramagnetic susceptibility. We propose that the field-induced topological transition of the Dirac node coupled to the enhanced paramagnetism causes the unique MR of correlated Dirac electrons.

  16. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN PLAYER VALUATION AND THE BARGAINING POSITION OF CLUBS IN THE ENGLISH PREMIER LEAGUE (EPL)

    OpenAIRE

    Swanepoel, M.J.; Swanepoel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Soccer is perhaps the most loved game in the world, filled with passion both on and off the field. Literature suggests that the English Premier League (EPL) is one of the most sought after championship in soccer. The study investigates the relationship between player valuation and the bargaining positions of clubs in the English Premier League (EPL). A comprehensive literature analysis illustrates that the bargaining positions of clubs should consider factors such as previous seasons’ f...

  17. The social networks of Hong Kong Chinese family caregivers of Alzheimer's disease: correlates with positive gains and burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Sheung-Tak; Lam, Linda C W; Kwok, Timothy; Ng, Natalie S S; Fung, Ada W T

    2013-12-01

    To examine the social networks of family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease and the degree to which network characteristics were associated with satisfaction with social support, burden, and positive gains. A total of 142 Chinese caregivers responded to measures of structural support, positive exchanges, and negative exchanges using the social convoy questionnaire, as well as to measures of social support satisfaction, burden, role overload, positive gains, self-rated health, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) of the care recipient. Data were analyzed using multiple regression. The caregivers had small networks (mean = 4.4 persons). They reported few negative exchanges with network members and higher emotional than instrumental support, while being rather satisfied with the social support obtained. Surprisingly, both spouse/sibling and adult child caregivers excluded many close kin, in particular ~40% of their children, from their networks. A larger network was associated with higher social support satisfaction and positive gains, and lower role overload. Controlling for network size and social support satisfaction, positive exchanges were associated with higher positive gains, whereas negative exchanges were associated with higher burden and overload. Caregivers who experienced more BPSD and poorer self-rated health also reported lower support satisfaction and positive gains, as well as higher burden and overload. Under the influence of collectivism, individuals may shoulder the responsibilities of caregiving for the collective well-being of the family and end up being isolated and disappointed when expectations of family support were not forthcoming, to the extent that even ties with close kin may be severed.

  18. No correlation between joint position sense and force sense for measuring ankle proprioception in subjects with healthy and functional ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Choi, Jong-Duk; Kim, Hyeong-Dong

    2014-11-01

    In general, ankle proprioception is most often evaluated by assessing joint position sense and force sense. However, in contrast to observational studies of joint position sense and force sense, no studies have examined the correlations between joint position sense and force sense. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the correlations between joint position sense and force sense in subjects with healthy and functional ankle instability. Of the sixty nine subjects enrolled in the cross-sectional laboratory study, 35 had functional ankle instability and 34 were healthy subjects. Angle reproduction and force matching methods were used to quantify joint position sense and force sense of the ankle proprioception. These methods were also measured by using a flexible twin axis electrogoniometer and linear force, respectively. Three trials were performed at each angle and force. And then, absolute errors were calculated. Significant differences between the functional ankle instability and healthy group were found for absolute errors of plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion (P0.05). These findings suggest that it could be explained for deficits of ankle proprioception when angle reproduction and force matching tests to quantify joint position sense and force sense were applied and presented at the same time, not individually. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Novelty-induced locomotion is positively associated with cocaine ingestion in adolescent rats; anxiety is correlated in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Q David; Schramm-Sapyta, Nicole L; Caster, Joseph M; Waller, Samuel T; Brooks, Matthew P; Kuhn, Cynthia M

    2009-01-01

    The present studies assessed the roles of sex, age, novelty-seeking and plus-maze behavior on cocaine drinking in rats. Cocaine/saccharin solution was available in three daily, 5-hour sessions then a saccharin-only solution was also available in following sessions. In the one-bottle drinking phase, early and late adolescent males, post-natal day 28 (PN28) and PN42, consumed more cocaine/saccharin solution than young adults (PN65), but females did not exhibit significant age differences. Adolescents of both sexes consumed more cocaine/saccharin than adults during choice drinking. Saccharin availability in the two-bottle trials decreased cocaine/saccharin consumption in PN28 and PN65 rats. After a drug-free period, cocaine-stimulated locomotion was lower in cocaine/saccharin drinking than saccharin-only males, indicating tolerance. We tested the hypothesis that individual differences in pre-screened behavioral traits would correlate with cocaine/saccharin consumption in PN28 and PN65 male rats. High locomotor responses to novelty were associated with greater cocaine/saccharin drinking in adults in one-bottle sessions. In the subsequent choice drinking phase, correlations were age-specific. Adolescents with high novelty-induced locomotion and adults that spent less time on open arms of the elevated plus-maze drank more cocaine/saccharin. Thus, behavioral phenotypes correlated with individual differences in cocaine/saccharin consumption in an age-related manner.

  20. Effects of correlations between particle longitudinal positions and transverse plane on bunch length measurement: a case study on GBS electron LINAC at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabato, L.; Arpaia, P.; Cianchi, A.; Liccardo, A.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Variola, A.

    2018-02-01

    In high-brightness LINear ACcelerators (LINACs), electron bunch length can be measured indirectly by a radio frequency deflector (RFD). In this paper, the accuracy loss arising from non-negligible correlations between particle longitudinal positions and the transverse plane (in particular the vertical one) at RFD entrance is analytically assessed. Theoretical predictions are compared with simulation results, obtained by means of ELEctron Generation ANd Tracking (ELEGANT) code, in the case study of the gamma beam system (GBS) at the extreme light infrastructure—nuclear physics (ELI-NP). In particular, the relative error affecting the bunch length measurement, for bunches characterized by both energy chirp and fixed correlation coefficients between longitudinal particle positions and the vertical plane, is reported. Moreover, the relative error versus the correlation coefficients is shown for fixed RFD phase 0 rad and π rad. The relationship between relative error and correlations factors can help the decision of using the bunch length measurement technique with one or two vertical spot size measurements in order to cancel the correlations contribution. In the case of the GBS electron LINAC, the misalignment of one of the quadrupoles before the RFD between  ‑2 mm and 2 mm leads to a relative error less than 5%. The misalignment of the first C-band accelerating section between  ‑2 mm and 2 mm could lead to a relative error up to 10%.

  1. Siblings of Individuals with Smith-Magenis Syndrome: An Investigation of the Correlates of Positive and Negative Behavioural Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshier, M. S.; York, T. P.; Silberg, J. L.; Elsea, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects approximately one out of 25 000 births worldwide. To date, no research has been conducted to investigate how having an individual with SMS in a family is a positive or negative influence on siblings. Methods: To investigate this question we conducted a study…

  2. Positive expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins is correlated with survival rates of NSCLC patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yujin; Wang, Liancong; Zheng, Xiao; Liu, Guan; Wang, Yuezhen; Lai, Xiaojing; Li, Jianqiang

    2013-05-01

    The incidence of lung cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality. This study aimed to investigate the prognostic and predictive importance of p53, c-erbB2 and multidrug resistance proteins (MRP) expression and its correlation with clinicopathological characteristics of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins in 152 tumor samples from resected primary NSCLCs was detected by immunohistochemical staining. The correlation of proteins, survival and clinicopathological characteristics was investigated in 152 patients undergoing potentially curative surgery. The positive rates of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP expression were 53.9 (82/152), 44.1 (67/152) and 43.4% (66/152), respectively. Overall survival rates of patients were markedly correlated with the overexpression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins. One, 2- and 3-year survival rates of patients exhibiting a positive expression of these proteins were 72.6, 54.8 and 32.2%, respectively. These rates were lower compared with those of patients with a negative expression of these proteins (92.1, 78.5 and 63.4%) (P=0.02, 0.01 or 0.00, respectively). Results of Cox's regression analysis showed that c-erbB2 expression and cell differentiation were independent prognostic factors in patients with NSCLC. These findings suggest that the positive expression of p53, c-erbB2 and MRP proteins is correlated with the survival rates of NSCLC patients. Detection of positive p53, c-erbB2 and MRP expression may be a useful predictive indicator of prognosis. Positive c-erbB2 expression is an independent prognostic factor, with a potential to be used as a predictive indicator of chemotherapy efficacy in NSCLC patients.

  3. Brain oscillatory correlates of altered executive functioning in positive and negative symptomatic schizophrenia patients and healthy controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eBerger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Working Memory and executive functioning deficits are core characteristics of patients suffering from schizophrenia. Electrophysiological research indicates that altered patterns of neural oscillatory mechanisms underpinning executive functioning are associated with the psychiatric disorder. Such brain oscillatory changes have been found in local amplitude differences at gamma and theta frequencies in task-specific cortical areas. Moreover, interregional interactions are also disrupted as signified by decreased phase coherence of fronto-posterior theta activity in schizophrenia patients. However, schizophrenia is not a one-dimensional psychiatric disorder but has various forms and expressions. A common distinction is between positive and negative symptomatology but most patients have both negative and positive symptoms to some extent. Here, we examined three groups – healthy controls, predominantly negative and predominantly positive symptomatic schizophrenia patients – when performing a working memory task with increasing cognitive demand and increasing need for executive control. We analysed brain oscillatory activity in the three groups separately and investigated how predominant symptomatology might explain differences in brain oscillatory patterns. Our results indicate that differences in task specific fronto-posterior network activity (i.e. executive control network expressed by interregional phase synchronisation are able to account for working memory dysfunctions between groups. Local changes in the theta and gamma frequency range also show differences between patients and healthy controls, and more importantly, between the two patient groups. We conclude that differences in oscillatory brain activation patterns related to executive processing can be an indicator for positive and negative symptomatology in schizophrenia. Furthermore, changes in cognitive and especially executive functioning in patients are expressed by alterations in

  4. [Correlation between insufficient methadone dosage and morphine positive urine on drop out of treatment in patients with access to methadone maintenance treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, T; Feng, D; Pan, M H; Cheng, Y P; Li, C X; Wang, J; Feng, Y L; Shi, J; Su, T; Chen, Q; Shi, S; Wang, S P

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To estimate the incidence of drop out of treatment in patients with access to methadone maintenance treatment and explore the correlation and interaction between insufficient methadone dosage and morphine positive urine on the drop out in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Methods: Face to face interview was conducted in 1 031 patients at 3 methadone maintenance treatment clinics in Guangxi. Results: The study included 1 031 participants, 40.6 % of them (419/1 031) had stopped treatment. The drop out rates in urine morphine positive group and methadone dosagemethadone dosage ≥100 mg/d group (42.3 % , 363/859, and 26.5 % , 27/102). Orderly logistic regression analysis results showed that after adjusted factors, such as gender, age, marital status, ethnic group, patients who received a dosage less than 100 mg/day ( OR =3.05, 95 %CI : 1.84-5.06) and had morphine positive urine ( OR =2.25, 95 %CI : 1.59-3.19) were more likely to drop out of the treatment. Interaction analysis showed that dosage less than 100 mg/d and morphine positive urine during treatment had additive interaction ( RERI =256.46, AP =0.87, S = 8.05) and multiplication interaction ( OR =2.45, 95 %CI : 1.71-3.49). Conclusion: Insufficient dosage and morphine positive urine were significantly correlated with drop out of treatment in patients with access to methadone maintenance treatment.

  5. Locomotor response to novelty correlates with differences in number and morphology of hypothalamic tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerzemowska, Grażyna; Plucińska, Karolina; Kuśmierczak, Magda; Myślińska, Dorota; Orzeł-Gryglewska, Jolanta

    2014-02-01

    Individual differences in the intensity of locomotor response to a new environment (exploratory reaction) are generally used as a model to study individual vulnerability to stress and drug addiction. In the present work we studied the number, distribution and morphology of the hypothalamic cells expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH+ cells) (immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent staining) in male Wistar rats divided based on high (HR), midline (MR) or low (LR) locomotor activity in response to novelty. Morphology and total number of TH+ cells were analyzed for A11-A15 dopaminergic groups. We found correlation between the total number of hypothalamic TH+ cells in the whole A11-A15 area and the locomotor activity. The differences were most pronounced in some of the hypothalamic nuclei, i.e. in the rostro-caudal extension of the A11, A12 and A14 structures, where the HR rats had a significantly higher number of TH+ cells in comparison to the MR and LR rats. Morphology analysis of TH+ cells showed HR/MR/LR differences in single cell area and perimeter and, to a lesser extent, in the other morphometric parameters such as length of the major and minor axes, or circularity factor. The results suggest that the behavioral traits which characterize the HR animals and are correlated with increased susceptibility to stress and propensity to develop drug addictions can be determined by the number, distribution, activity and perhaps the morphology of the cells in the dopaminergic systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Correlation between HBsAg, prothrombin time activity, and indocyanine green retention rate at 15 minutes in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic HBV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN Wenhai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the correlation between HBsAg, prothrombin time activity (PTA, and indocyanine green retention rate at 15 minutes (ICG R15 in patients with HBeAg-positive chronic HBV infection. MethodsA total of 92 patients with HBeAg-positive chronic HBV infection who were admitted to The First Hospital of Lanzhou University from December 2015 to April 2016 were enrolled and divided into chronic hepatitis B (CHB group (24 patients, compensated liver cirrhosis group (38 patients, and decompensated liver cirrhosis group (30 patients. Serum HBsAg quantitation, PTA test, and liver reserve function test (ICG R15 were performed for all patients. The chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between groups, an analysis of variance was used for comparison of continuous data between multiple groups, and a Pearson correlation analysis was also performed. ResultsThere were significant differences between the three groups in serum HBsAg quantitation (3.82±0.43 log10IU/ml vs 2.88±0.36 log10IU/ml vs 2.60±0.27 log10IU/ml, F=25.19, P<0.001, ICG R15 (7.51%±3.10% vs 9.57%±8.18% vs 24.13%±14.28%, F=24.00, P=0.001, and PTA (8100%±1762% vs 83.08%±9.64% vs 62.32%±16.90%, F=13.42, P=0.009. The correlation analysis showed that PTA was negatively correlated with ICG R15 in all three groups (r=-0.948, -0.602, and -0.735, all P<0.01. In the compensated liver cirrhosis group and decompensated liver cirrhosis group, HBsAg was positively correlated with PTA (r=0.410 and 0.473, both P<0.05 and negatively correlated with ICG R15 (r=-0.427 and -0.768, P<0.01. ConclusionIn HBeAg positive patients, there are certain correlations between HBsAg, PTA, and ICG R15, which, to a certain degree, reflects the liver reserve function in patients with chronic HBV infection.

  7. Prevalence, correlates, and outcomes of cryptococcal antigen positivity among patients with AIDS, United States, 1986-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Jennie; Bauman, Sean; Neary, Brandon; Detels, Roger; French, Audrey; Margolick, Joseph; Doherty, Brian; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2015-03-15

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) is one of the most common causes of AIDS-related mortality worldwide, accounting for 33%-63% of all cases of adult meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa and >500 000 deaths annually. In sub-Saharan Africa, the World Health Organization recommends routinely screening AIDS patients with a CD4 count ≤100 cells/µL for cryptococcal infection. In the United States, there are no recommendations for routine screening. We aimed to determine the prevalence of cryptococcal infection and outcomes of those infected among people living with advanced AIDS in the United States, to inform updates in the prevention and management of CM. Using stored sera from participants in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and the Women's Interagency HIV Study from 1986 to 2012, we screened 1872 specimens with CD4 T-cell counts ≤100 cells/µL for cryptococcal antigen (CrAg) using the CrAg lateral flow assay. The overall prevalence of CrAg positivity within the study population was 2.9% (95% confidence interval, .2%-3.8%). Results from multivariable analysis revealed that a previous diagnosis with CM and a CD4 count ≤50 cells/µL were significantly associated with CrAg positivity. Participants who were CrAg positive had significantly shorter survival (2.8 years) than those who were CrAg negative (3.8 years; P = .03). The prevalence of cryptococcal infection among advanced AIDS patients in the United States was high and above the published cost-effectiveness threshold for routine screening. We recommend routine CrAg screening among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with a CD4 count ≤100 cells/µL to detect and treat early infection. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. [Correlations between the presence of a mesiodens and position abnormalities, diastemas, and eruption disturbances of maxillary frontal teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, J A; Groenewegen, B T; Verloop, M A

    2009-08-01

    A mesiodens is often diagnosed coincidentally during a radiological examination. However, a mesiodens may also be diagnosed in relation to a clinically identified central diastema and an eruption disturbance, or a rotation of a central incisor. In this study of a group of 162 children and adolescents varying in age from 4 to 18 years, with a mesiodens, the frequency of position abnormalities, diastemas, and eruption disturbances of the maxillary frontal teeth was registered retrospectively. One or more of these complications was diagnosed in 72% of the patients. Usually, removal of the mesiodens in children and adolescents results in spontaneous recovery of the complications. Early diagnosis and early treatment are therefore important.

  9. Joint Replacement Volume Positively Correlates With Improved Hospital Performance on Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Quality Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Rachel A; Charubhumi, Vanessa; Hutzler, Lorraine H; Paoli, Albit R; Bosco, Joseph A

    2017-05-01

    The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is transitioning Medicare from a fee-for-service program into a value-based pay-for-performance program. In order to accomplish this goal, CMS initiated 3 programs that attempt to define quality and seek to reward high-performing hospitals and penalize poor-performing hospitals. These programs include (1) penalties for hospital-acquired conditions (HACs), (2) penalties for excess readmissions for certain conditions, and (3) performance on value-based purchasing (VBP). The objective of this study was to determine whether high-volume total joint hospitals perform better in these programs than their lower-volume counterparts. We analyzed data from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database on total New York State hospital discharges from 2013 to 2015 for total knee and total hip arthroplasty. This was compared to data from Hospital Compare on HAC's, excess readmissions, and VBP. From these databases, we identified 123 hospitals in New York, which participated in all 3 Medicare pay-for-performance programs and performed total joint replacements. Over the 3-year period spanning 2013-2015, hospitals in New York State performed an average of 1136.59 total joint replacement surgeries and achieved a mean readmission penalty of 0.005909. The correlation coefficient between surgery volume and combined performance score was 0.277. Of these correlations, surgery volume and VBP performance, and surgery volume and combined performance showed statistical significance (P quality, as well as joint replacement volumes and VBP performance, specifically. These findings are consistent with previously reported associations between patient outcomes and procedure volumes. However, a relationship between joint replacement volume and HAC scores or readmission penalties could not be demonstrated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Positive effect of dietary soy in ESRD patients with systemic inflammation--correlation between blood levels of the soy isoflavones and the acute-phase reactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanti, Paolo; Asmis, Reto; Stephenson, Tammy J; Sawaya, B Peter; Franke, Adrian A

    2006-08-01

    Inflammation is commonly associated with malnutrition and cardiovascular disease in end-stage renal failure patients. Anti-inflammatory properties of the isoflavones, a micronutrient component of soy, have been reported in several experimental models and disease conditions, but never in renal failure. We hypothesized that dietary soy isoflavones correct laboratory evidence of systemic inflammation in haemodialysis (HD) patients with underlying high blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). End-stage renal disease patients on chronic HD, with elevated CRP (>10.0 mg/l) were enrolled in this pilot study. The subjects were double-blind randomly distributed with 2 : 1 ratio to receive isoflavone-containing soy-based nutritional supplements (soy group) or isoflavone-free milk protein (control group) for 8 weeks. Serum isoflavone, inflammatory markers and nutrition markers were assessed at baseline and at the end of the treatment. Thirty-two subjects were enrolled. Fifteen subjects in the soy group and 10 in the control group completed the study; five dropouts were due to acute illness and two due to food intolerance. After intervention, blood isoflavone levels were 5- to 10-fold higher in the soy group than in the control group [e.g. median genistein (25-75th percentile): 337.9 (175.5-1007) nM in the soy group vs 41.4 (22.9-100.4) nM in the control group; P < 0.001]. However, the isoflavone levels ranged widely in the soy group (e.g. genistein: 33-1868 nM) and, depending on the individual compound, four to seven subjects had end-of-treatment levels that were not different from baseline. Variation from baseline of the individual serum isoflavone levels (Delta-isoflavone) and CRP displayed a strong inverse correlation in the soy group (R = -0.599, P < 0.02). In addition, Delta-isoflavone correlated positively with the variation of albumin (R = 0.522, P = 0.05) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (R = 0.518, P < 0.05). Group levels of CRP were not statistically different after

  11. Allocation of cytoplasm to macromeres in embryos of annelids and molluscs is positively correlated with egg size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Caleb; Stankowich, Theodore; Pernet, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Evolutionary transitions between feeding and nonfeeding larval development have occurred many times in marine invertebrates, but the developmental changes underlying these frequent and ecologically important transitions are poorly known, especially in spiralians. We use phylogenetic comparative methods to test the hypothesis that evolutionary changes in egg size and larval nutritional mode are associated with parallel changes in allocation of cytoplasm to macromere cell lineages in diverse annelids and molluscs. Our analyses show that embryos of species with large eggs and nonfeeding larvae tend to allocate relatively more embryonic cytoplasm to macromeres at 3rd cleavage than do embryos of species with small eggs and feeding larvae. The association between egg size and allocation to macromeres in these spiralians may be driven by constraints associated with mitotic spindle positioning and size, or may be a result of "adaptation in cleavage" to maintain rapid cell cycles in micromeres, position yolk in cell lineages where it can be most efficiently used, or adjust allocation to ectoderm to accommodate changes in embryonic surface area/volume ratio. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Expression of P-glycoprotein is positively correlated with p53 in human papilloma virus induced squamous intraepithelial lesions of uterine cervix: poor prognosis association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhulika; Singh, Uma; Mathur, Neeraj; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the predictive value of p-glycoprotein (p-gp) and p53 immunoexpression in human papillomavirus (HPV) infected cases of cervical dysplasia. Expression of both p-gp and p53 proteins was detected in cervical smears from 177 squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) cases along with 183 "atypical squamous cells of unknown significance" (ASCUS) and 150 normal cases. HPV 16 and 18 infection was detected by polymerase chain reaction using type-specific primers for HPV sub-types. There were no significant detectable p53 and p-gp expression in the normal cervix smears (p>0.05). In the ASCUS group 10 cases were positive for both p53 and p-gp immunoreactivity. In cervical dysplasia cases, p53 was positive in 86 (48.58%) while p-gp was positive in 93 (52.54%) and the two markers showed a highly significant correlation (r=0.92, pbiomarker for detection of HPV-associated cervical lesions. Additionally, a significant positive correlation between ascending grades of SIL and labeling indices of markers suggests that p53 and p-gp can be used as an adjunct to cytomorphological interpretation of conventional cervical Pap smears.

  13. High serum coenzyme Q10, positively correlated with age, selenium and cholesterol, in Inuit of Greenland. A pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, H S; Mortensen, S A; Rohde, M

    1999-01-01

    impact. From a health survey we chose the subpopulation from the most remote area, where the traditional Greenlandic diet with high intake of sea mammals and fish predominates. The mean (SD) of S-CoQ10 in males was 1.495 (0.529) nmol/ml and 1.421 (0.629) nmol/ml in females, significantly higher (p ....001) compared to a Danish population. In a linear multiple regression model the S-CoQ10 level is significantly positively associated with age and S-selenium in males, and S-total cholesterol in females. The high level of CoQ10 in Greenlanders probably reflects diet, since no bioaccumulation takes place...

  14. Correlation between Podoplanin-positive Lymphatic Microvessel Density 
and CT Characteristics of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui ZHOU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that ymphatic microvessel density (LMVD was closely correlated with the lymphatic metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The aim of the present study is to explore the relationship between podoplanin-LMVD and multi-slice spiral computed tomography (MSCT characteristics of NSCLC. Methods MSCT scanning was performed on 34 cases of NSCLC (squamous carcinoma, 15 cases; adenocarcinoma, 15 cases; and adenosquamous carcinoma, 4 cases prior to operation. Clinical pathology results, including lymph node metastasis, were obtained. CT characteristics, such as shape of the edge, internal structure, and adjacent structures, were described. LMVD in the central and peripheral areas examined respectively using SP immunohistochemical technique were analyzed. Results Lymph node metastasis was found to be associated with LMVD in the peripheral areas. LMVD in the peripheral areas of the resected lesions, the MSCT findings of which included spinous process, pleural indentation, and carcinomatous lymphangitis, was higher than that of the lesions without these MSCT characteristics (P<0.05. Conclusion MSCT findings of spinous process, pleural indentation, or carcinomatous lymphangitis of NSCLC may suggest a higher level of tumor lymphangiogenesis with a higher risk of lymph node metastasis.

  15. Molecular dissection of a viral quasispecies under mutagenic treatment: positive correlation between fitness loss and mutational load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Armando; Isabel de Ávila, Ana; Sanz-Ramos, Marta; Agudo, Rubén; Escarmís, Cristina; Domingo, Esteban

    2013-04-01

    Low fidelity replication and the absence of error-repair activities in RNA viruses result in complex and adaptable ensembles of related genomes in the viral population, termed quasispecies, with important implications for natural infections. Theoretical predictions suggested that elevated replication error rates in RNA viruses might be near to a maximum compatible with viral viability. This fact encouraged the use of mutagenic nucleosides as a new antiviral strategy to induce viral extinction through increased replication error rates. Despite extensive evidence of lethal mutagenesis of RNA viruses by different mutagenic compounds, a detailed picture of the infectivity of individual genomes and its relationship with the mutations accumulated is lacking. Here, we report a molecular analysis of a foot-and-mouth disease virus population previously subjected to heavy mutagenesis to determine whether a correlation between increased mutagenesis and decreased fitness existed. Plaque-purified viruses isolated from a ribavirin-treated quasispecies presented decreases of up to 200-fold in infectivity relative to clones in the reference population, associated with an overall eightfold increase in the mutation frequency. This observation suggests that individual infectious genomes of a quasispecies subjected to increased mutagenesis lose infectivity by their continuous mutagenic 'poisoning'. These results support the lethal defection model of virus extinction and the practical use of chemical mutagens as antiviral treatment. Even when extinction is not achieved, mutagenesis can decrease the infectivity of surviving virus, and facilitate their clearance by host immune responses or complementing antiviral approaches.

  16. Circulating carotenoid concentrations are positively correlated with later clutch initiation in Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Rebecca S; Cohen, Alan A; Bowman, Reed; Boughton, Raoul K; Bridge, Eli; McGraw, Kevin J; Schoech, Stephan J

    2011-02-01

    Antioxidants play key roles in preventing free radical damage to various molecules, cells, and tissues, but it is not well understood how variation in antioxidant levels may relate to the reproductive success or health of wild animals. We explored the relationship between circulating antioxidant concentrations and both body condition and timing of reproduction in male and female Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens), a cooperatively breeding passerine bird. We examined whether levels of uric acid, vitamin E, and carotenoids (all potentially important antioxidants) were linked to body condition and timing of reproduction, two measures that are directly related to reproductive success. Antioxidant concentrations were not correlated with body condition, but they were related to timing of first clutch initiation, though not always in the predicted direction. Elevated circulating levels of carotenoids were associated with delayed clutch initiation in female breeders. Relatively higher vitamin E levels in control birds were associated with earlier clutch initiation, whereas male breeders that received long-term food supplementation had elevated levels of vitamin E and delayed reproduction. Several potential explanations for the link between elevated levels of antioxidants and delayed clutch initiation are discussed. Separate explanations for each sex include, but are not limited to, oxidative stress as a result of territory defense efforts in males, different dietary regimes due to supplementation, and mobilized plasma antioxidants in females that were coping with a stressor. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Study of sub-pixel position resolution with time-correlated transient signals in 3D pixelated CdZnTe detectors with varying pixel sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo Giraldo, L.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Gul, R.; Hodges, D.; Hossain, A.; Ünlü, K.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; James, R. B.

    2018-03-01

    We evaluated the sub-pixel position resolution achievable in large-volume CdZnTe pixelated detectors with conventional pixel patterns and for several different pixel sizes: 2.8 mm, 1.72 mm, 1.4 mm and 0.8 mm. Achieving position resolution below the physical dimensions of pixels (sub-pixel resolution) is a practical path for making high-granularity position-sensitive detectors, important for improving the imaging capability of CZT gamma cameras. It also allows for making more accurate corrections of response non-uniformities caused by crystal defects, thus enabling use of standard-grade (unselected) and less expensive CZT crystals for producing large-volume position-sensitive CZT detectors feasible for many practical applications. We analyzed the digitized charge signals from a representative 9 pixels and the cathode, generated using a pulsed-laser light beam focused down to 10 μm (650 nm) to scan over a selected 3 × 3 pixel area. We applied our digital pulse processing technique to the time-correlated signals captured from adjacent pixels to achieve and evaluate the capability for sub-pixel position resolution. As an example, we also demonstrated an application of 3D corrections to improve the energy resolution and positional information of the events for the tested detectors.

  18. Evidence of circadian rhythm, oxygen regulation capacity, metabolic repeatability and positive correlations between forced and spontaneous maximal metabolic rates in lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Jon C; Genz, Janet; Anderson, W Gary; Stol, Jennifer A; Watkinson, Douglas A; Enders, Eva C

    2014-01-01

    Animal metabolic rate is variable and may be affected by endogenous and exogenous factors, but such relationships remain poorly understood in many primitive fishes, including members of the family Acipenseridae (sturgeons). Using juvenile lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), the objective of this study was to test four hypotheses: 1) A. fulvescens exhibits a circadian rhythm influencing metabolic rate and behaviour; 2) A. fulvescens has the capacity to regulate metabolic rate when exposed to environmental hypoxia; 3) measurements of forced maximum metabolic rate (MMR(F)) are repeatable in individual fish; and 4) MMR(F) correlates positively with spontaneous maximum metabolic rate (MMR(S)). Metabolic rates were measured using intermittent flow respirometry, and a standard chase protocol was employed to elicit MMR(F). Trials lasting 24 h were used to measure standard metabolic rate (SMR) and MMR(S). Repeatability and correlations between MMR(F) and MMR(S) were analyzed using residual body mass corrected values. Results revealed that A. fulvescens exhibit a circadian rhythm in metabolic rate, with metabolism peaking at dawn. SMR was unaffected by hypoxia (30% air saturation (O(2sat))), demonstrating oxygen regulation. In contrast, MMR(F) was affected by hypoxia and decreased across the range from 100% O(2sat) to 70% O(2sat). MMR(F) was repeatable in individual fish, and MMR(F) correlated positively with MMR(S), but the relationships between MMR(F) and MMR(S) were only revealed in fish exposed to hypoxia or 24 h constant light (i.e. environmental stressor). Our study provides evidence that the physiology of A. fulvescens is influenced by a circadian rhythm and suggests that A. fulvescens is an oxygen regulator, like most teleost fish. Finally, metabolic repeatability and positive correlations between MMR(F) and MMR(S) support the conjecture that MMR(F) represents a measure of organism performance that could be a target of natural selection.

  19. Evidence of circadian rhythm, oxygen regulation capacity, metabolic repeatability and positive correlations between forced and spontaneous maximal metabolic rates in lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon C Svendsen

    Full Text Available Animal metabolic rate is variable and may be affected by endogenous and exogenous factors, but such relationships remain poorly understood in many primitive fishes, including members of the family Acipenseridae (sturgeons. Using juvenile lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens, the objective of this study was to test four hypotheses: 1 A. fulvescens exhibits a circadian rhythm influencing metabolic rate and behaviour; 2 A. fulvescens has the capacity to regulate metabolic rate when exposed to environmental hypoxia; 3 measurements of forced maximum metabolic rate (MMR(F are repeatable in individual fish; and 4 MMR(F correlates positively with spontaneous maximum metabolic rate (MMR(S. Metabolic rates were measured using intermittent flow respirometry, and a standard chase protocol was employed to elicit MMR(F. Trials lasting 24 h were used to measure standard metabolic rate (SMR and MMR(S. Repeatability and correlations between MMR(F and MMR(S were analyzed using residual body mass corrected values. Results revealed that A. fulvescens exhibit a circadian rhythm in metabolic rate, with metabolism peaking at dawn. SMR was unaffected by hypoxia (30% air saturation (O(2sat, demonstrating oxygen regulation. In contrast, MMR(F was affected by hypoxia and decreased across the range from 100% O(2sat to 70% O(2sat. MMR(F was repeatable in individual fish, and MMR(F correlated positively with MMR(S, but the relationships between MMR(F and MMR(S were only revealed in fish exposed to hypoxia or 24 h constant light (i.e. environmental stressor. Our study provides evidence that the physiology of A. fulvescens is influenced by a circadian rhythm and suggests that A. fulvescens is an oxygen regulator, like most teleost fish. Finally, metabolic repeatability and positive correlations between MMR(F and MMR(S support the conjecture that MMR(F represents a measure of organism performance that could be a target of natural selection.

  20. Positive expression of LSD1 and negative expression of E-cadherin correlate with metastasis and poor prognosis of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Ding; Zhongmin, Zhang; Guoqing, Liao; Sheng, Liu; Yi, Zhang; Jing, Wen; Liang, Zeng

    2013-06-01

    The first identified lysine-specific demethylase, LSD1, plays an important role in the metastatic progression of several types of cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate LSD1, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin expression in colon cancer specimens and their clinical significance. The expression of LSD1, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin in colon cancer specimens was determined by immunohistochemistry, and the relationship between the expression of the respective molecules and clinicopathological characteristics was analyzed. The positive expression rates of LSD1, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin in colon cancer specimens were 66.7 % (72/108), 85.2 % (92/108), and 41.7 % (45/108), respectively. LSD1 was significantly more highly expressed in colon cancer specimens classified as high TNM stage lesions and with distant metastasis (P colon cancer specimens classified as high TNM stage lesions and with distant metastasis (P clinical and pathological characteristics (P > 0.05). Correlation analysis revealed that LSD1 expression was negatively correlated with E-cadherin expression (r s = -0.318, P = 0.001), but not evidently correlated with N-cadherin expression (r s = 0.182, P = 0.06). Colon cancer specimens with positive LSD1 expression and negative E-cadherin expression were correlated with significantly lower overall survival. LSD1 showed a significantly higher expression, in contrast to the significantly lower expression of E-cadherin, in colon cancer specimens classified as high TNM stage lesions and with distant metastasis. Positive expression of LSD1 and negative expression of E-cadherin may be predictors of a worse colon cancer prognosis.

  1. Determination of the strong coupling constant α{sub s} from transverse energy-energy correlations in multijet events at √(s) = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaboud, M. [Univ. Mohamed Premier et LPTPM, Oujda (Morocco). Faculte des Sciences; Aad, G. [CPPM, Aix-Marseille Univ. et CNRS/IN2P3, Marseille (France); Abbott, B. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States). Homer L. Dodge Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; and others

    2017-12-15

    Measurements of transverse energy-energy correlations and their associated asymmetries in multi-jet events using the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. The data used correspond to √(s) = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions with an integrated luminosity of 20.2 fb{sup -1}. The results are presented in bins of the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of the two leading jets, unfolded to the particle level and compared to the predictions from Monte Carlo simulations. A comparison with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD is also performed, showing excellent agreement within the uncertainties. From this comparison, the value of the strong coupling constant is extracted for different energy regimes, thus testing the running of α{sub s}(μ) predicted in QCD up to scales over 1 TeV. A global fit to the transverse energy-energy correlation distributions yields α{sub s}(m{sub Z}) = 0.1162 ± 0.0011 (exp.){sup +0.0084}{sub -0.0070} (theo.), while a global fit to the asymmetry distributions yields a value of α{sub s}(m{sub Z}) = 0.1196 ± 0.0013 (exp.){sup +0.0075}{sub -0.0045} (theo.). (orig.)

  2. Cryptococcal neuroradiological lesions correlate with severity during cryptococcal meningoencephalitis in HIV-positive patients in the HAART era.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Charlier

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis has an overall global mortality rate of 20% in AIDS patients despite antifungals. There is a need for additional means of precise assessment of disease severity. We thus studied the radiological brain images available from 62 HIV-positive patients with cryptococcocal meningoencephalitis to analyse the brain lesions associated with cryptococcosis in relationship with disease severity, and the respective diagnostic contribution of magnetic resonance (MR versus computed tomography (CT. In this retrospective multicenter analysis, two neuroradiologists blindly reviewed the brain imaging. Prospectively acquired clinical and mycological data were available at baseline and during follow-up. Baseline images were abnormal on 92% of the MR scans contrasting with 53% of the CT scans. MR/CT cryptococcosis-related lesions included mass(es (21%/9%, dilated perivascular spaces (46%/5% and pseudocysts (8%/4%. The presence compared to absence of cryptococcosis-related lesions was significantly associated with high serum (78% vs. 42%, p = 0.008 and CSF (81% vs. 50%, p = 0.024 antigen titers, independently of neurological abnormalities. MR detected significantly more cryptococcosis-related lesions than CT for 17 patients who had had both investigations (76% vs. 24%, p = 0.005. In conclusion, MR appears more effective than CT for the evaluation of AIDS-associated cerebral cryptococcosis. Furthermore, brain imaging is an effective tool to assess the initial disease severity in this setting. Given this, we suggest that investigation for cryptococcosis-related lesions is merited, even in the absence of neurological abnormality, if a high fungal burden is suspected on the basis of high serum and/or CSF antigen titers.

  3. Presence of S100A9-positive inflammatory cells in cancer tissues correlates with an early stage cancer and a better prognosis in patients with gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Biao; Li, Ying-Ai; Du, Hong; Zhao, Wei; Niu, Zhao-Jian; Lu, Ai-Ping; Li, Ji-You; Ji, Jia-Fu; Zhang, Lian-Hai; Jia, Yong-ning; Zhong, Xi-Yao; Liu, Yi-Qiang; Cheng, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Xing, Xiao-Fang; Hu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    S100A9 was originally discovered as a factor secreted by inflammatory cells. Recently, S100A9 was found to be associated with several human malignancies. The purpose of this study is to investigate S100A9 expression in gastric cancer and explore its role in cancer progression. S100A9 expression in gastric tissue samples from 177 gastric cancer patients was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The expression of its dimerization partner S100A8 and the S100A8/A9 heterodimer were also assessed by the same method. The effect of exogenous S100A9 on motility of gastric cancer cells AGS and BGC-823 was then investigated. S100A9 was specifically expressed by inflammatory cells such as macrophages and neutrophils in human gastric cancer and gastritis tissues. Statistical analysis showed that a high S100A9 cell count (> = 200) per 200x magnification microscopic field in cancer tissues was predictive of early stage gastric cancer. High S100A9-positive cell count was negatively correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.009) and tumor invasion (P = 0.011). S100A9 was identified as an independent prognostic predictor of overall survival of patients with gastric cancer (P = 0.04). Patients with high S100A9 cell count were with favorable prognosis (P = 0.021). Further investigation found that S100A8 distribution in human gastric cancer tissues was similar to S100A9. However, the number of S100A8-positive cells did not positively correlate with patient survival. The inflammatory cells infiltrating cancer were S100A8/A9 negative, while those in gastritis were positive. Furthermore, exogenous S100A9 protein inhibited migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results suggested S100A9-positive inflammatory cells in gastric cancer tissues are associated with early stage of gastric cancer and good prognosis

  4. Self-Efficacy for Sexual Risk Reduction and Partner HIV Status as Correlates of Sexual Risk Behavior Among HIV-Positive Adolescent Girls and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Melissa R.; Cherenack, Emily M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the correlates of sexual risk behavior among HIV-positive adolescent girls and women in the United States. This study investigates two potential factors related to unprotected vaginal and anal intercourse (UVAI) that have yet to be thoroughly studied in this group: self-efficacy for sexual risk reduction and partner HIV status. Data was analyzed from 331 HIV-positive adolescent girls and women between 12 and 24 years old who reported vaginal and/or anal intercourse with a male partner in the past 3 months at fifteen sites across the United States. Results show that overall self-efficacy (B = −0.15, p=0.01), self-efficacy to discuss safe sex with one's partner (B = −0.14, p=0.01), and self-efficacy to refuse unsafe sex (B = −0.21, p=0.01) are related to UVAI episodes. Participants with only HIV-positive partners or with both HIV-positive and HIV-negative partners showed a trend towards higher percentages of UVAI episodes compared to participants with only HIV-negative partners (F(2, 319)=2.80, p=0.06). These findings point to the importance of including self-efficacy and partner HIV status in risk-reduction research and interventions developed for HIV-positive adolescent girls and young women. PMID:25856632

  5. Positive Developmental Changes after Transition to High School: Is Retrospective Growth Correlated with Measured Changes in Current Status of Personal Growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iimura, Shuhei; Taku, Kanako

    2018-02-14

    The transition to high school is generally considered as a stressful turning point in adolescent development, but some students experience personal growth (i.e., positive developmental changes) through that experience. It is important to examine the mechanism behind such positive changes to understand various developmental patterns of adolescents during the transition. However, the concept of growth in this research area remains unexplored. Some researchers have questioned whether retrospective, self-reported growth reflects actual positive changes in the perception of personal growth. We elaborated on the concept of growth after high school transition by examining whether retrospective appraisal of personal growth after transition to high school is correlated with measured change in growth. Two hundred and sixty-two Japanese adolescents (aged 14-16 years, 50% girls) participated in surveys right before and right after transition. We assessed five domains of growth, including improved relating to others, identification of new possibilities, increased sense of personal strength, spiritual growth, and greater appreciation of life. The results showed that retrospective assessment of growth and measured change during transition were positively associated, provided the adolescents reported the transition as an important turning point in their lives. Adolescents who experienced salient positive changes across the transition were more likely to engage in intrusive and deliberate rumination and social support than adolescents who reported fewer changes. In summary, retrospective growth covaried with measured change only when adolescents perceived the transition as impactful in their lives.

  6. Positive correlation of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity with serum insulin level and HOMA-IR in dementia. A possible advantageous role of PON1 in dementia development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarska-Makaruk, Małgorzata; Graban, Ałła; Lipczyńska-Łojkowska, Wanda; Bochyńska, Anna; Rodo, Maria; Krzywkowski, Tomasz; Ryglewicz, Danuta; Wehr, Hanna

    2013-01-15

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity and metabolic syndrome traits were evaluated in 169 demented patients (81 recognized as AD, 32 as VaD, 56 as MD) and in 64 control individuals. Paraoxonase activity was determined spectrophotometrically using phenyloacetate as substrate. Metabolic syndrome was recognized according to AHA/NHLBI criteria. In the whole group with dementia significant positive correlation between PON1 activity/HDL cholesterol ratio (i.e. HDL corrected PON1 activity) and insulin level as well as HOMA IR index, was observed. The multivariate analysis showed that the PON1/HDL-C ratio was also significantly positively associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome (with insulin resistance as a major underlying trait) both in dementia and in control group. High insulin level and HOMA-IR are considered to be the traits of insulin resistance. It has however to be taken into account that they both could also depend on insulin production and release which, as was recently stated in cell experiments, are enhanced by PON1. The observed positive correlation suggests an advantageous role of the enzyme in metabolic syndrome influence on dementia development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of the length and position of the lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) by correlation of external measurements with combined radiographic and manometric estimations in the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, M.A.; Waterman, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fifty DSH cats were studied radiographically and a highly significant linear correlation was found between the length of the oesophagus measured to the diaphragmatic line on the radiographs and the externally measured distance from the lower jaw incisor teeth to the anterior border of the head of 10th rib. A subsequent manometric study utilizing this correlation in 40 cats suggests that the functional lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) is situated almost at the level of the diaphragm in the cat. Significant differences were found between the length of the LOS in cats anaesthetized with ketamine compared to alphaxalone-alphadolone or xylazine-ketamine-atropine. The mean lengths of the LOS was 1.42 +/- 0.3 cm. The findings of this study indicate that external measurements can be used to position catheters for accurate oesophageal manometry in the cat

  8. Low fingertip temperature rebound measured by digital thermal monitoring strongly correlates with the presence and extent of coronary artery disease diagnosed by 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Naser; Nabavi, Vahid; Nuguri, Vivek; Hajsadeghi, Fereshteh; Flores, Ferdinand; Akhtar, Mohammad; Kleis, Stanley; Hecht, Harvey; Naghavi, Morteza; Budoff, Matthew

    2009-10-01

    Previous studies showed strong correlations between low fingertip temperature rebound measured by digital thermal monitoring (DTM) during a 5 min arm-cuff induced reactive hyperemia and both the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in asymptomatic populations. This study evaluates the correlation between DTM and coronary artery disease (CAD) measured by CT angiography (CTA) in symptomatic patients. It also investigates the correlation between CTA and a new index of neurovascular reactivity measured by DTM. 129 patients, age 63 +/- 9 years, 68% male, underwent DTM, CAC and CTA. Adjusted DTM indices in the occluded arm were calculated: temperature rebound: aTR and area under the temperature curve aTMP-AUC. DTM neurovascular reactivity (NVR) index was measured based on increased fingertip temperature in the non-occluded arm. Obstructive CAD was defined as >or=50% luminal stenosis, and normal as no stenosis and CAC = 0. Baseline fingertip temperature was not different across the groups. However, all DTM indices of vascular and neurovascular reactivity significantly decreased from normal to non-obstructive to obstructive CAD [(aTR 1.77 +/- 1.18 to 1.24 +/- 1.14 to 0.94 +/- 0.92) (P = 0.009), (aTMP-AUC: 355.6 +/- 242.4 to 277.4 +/- 182.4 to 184.4 +/- 171.2) (P = 0.001), (NVR: 161.5 +/- 147.4 to 77.6 +/- 88.2 to 48.8 +/- 63.8) (P = 0.015)]. After adjusting for risk factors, the odds ratio for obstructive CAD compared to normal in the lowest versus two upper tertiles of FRS, aTR, aTMP-AUC, and NVR were 2.41 (1.02-5.93), P = 0.05, 8.67 (2.6-9.4), P = 0.001, 11.62 (5.1-28.7), P = 0.001, and 3.58 (1.09-11.69), P = 0.01, respectively. DTM indices and FRS combined resulted in a ROC curve area of 0.88 for the prediction of obstructive CAD. In patients suspected of CAD, low fingertip temperature rebound measured by DTM significantly predicted CTA-diagnosed obstructive disease.

  9. Positive correlation of serum HDL cholesterol with blood mercury concentration in metabolic syndrome Korean men (analysis of KNANES 2008-2010, 2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S J; Yeum, K J; Choi, B; Kim, Y S; Joo, N S

    2016-09-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) is anti-inflammatory in the basal state and pro-inflammatory during the acute-phase response. Blood mercury also has an inflammatory property. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between serum HDLC and blood mercury concentration in relation with metabolic syndrome (MS). The data of 7616 subjects (3713 men and 3903 women), over 20 years of age, from 2008 to 2013, Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were selected for cross-sectional analyses. Correlation and regression of serum HDLC and blood mercury were initially done. We compared serum HDLC concentration according to blood mercury quartile after adjustment for relevant variables in subjects with MS. Mean blood mercury concentrations is 5.6 and 3.9 μg/dL in men and women, respectively. Blood mercury concentration in MS subjects was positively correlated with serum HDLC concentration, especially in men. In addition, HDLC concentration was significantly higher according to the higher blood mercury quartile. Serum HDLC was positively associated with blood mercury concentration in MS Korean men. Therefore, elevated blood mercury may be a factor to increase serum HDLC concentration in MS men.

  10. Measurement of transverse energy-energy correlations in multi-jet events in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV using the ATLAS detector and determination of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_{\\mathrm{s}}(m_Z)$

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgard, Carsten Daniel; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Ku