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Sample records for strong isotope effect

  1. Strong isotope effects on melting dynamics and ice crystallisation processes in cryo vitrification solutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Kirichek

    Full Text Available The nucleation and growth of crystalline ice during cooling, and further crystallization processes during re-warming are considered to be key processes determining the success of low temperature storage of biological objects, as used in medical, agricultural and nature conservation applications. To avoid these problems a method, termed vitrification, is being developed to inhibit ice formation by use of high concentration of cryoprotectants and ultra-rapid cooling, but this is only successful across a limited number of biological objects and in small volume applications. This study explores physical processes of ice crystal formation in a model cryoprotective solution used previously in trials on vitrification of complex biological systems, to improve our understanding of the process and identify limiting biophysical factors. Here we present results of neutron scattering experiments which show that even if ice crystal formation has been suppressed during quench cooling, the water molecules, mobilised during warming, can crystallise as detectable ice. The crystallisation happens right after melting of the glass phase formed during quench cooling, whilst the sample is still transiting deep cryogenic temperatures. We also observe strong water isotope effects on ice crystallisation processes in the cryoprotectant mixture. In the neutron scattering experiment with a fully protiated water component, we observe ready crystallisation occurring just after the glass melting transition. On the contrary with a fully deuteriated water component, the process of crystallisation is either completely or substantially supressed. This behaviour might be explained by nuclear quantum effects in water. The strong isotope effect, observed here, may play an important role in development of new cryopreservation strategies.

  2. NMR studies of solid pentachlorophenol-4-methylpyridine complexes exhibiting strong OHN hydrogen bonds: geometric H/D isotope effects and hydrogen bond coupling cause isotopic polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Brenda C K; Shenderovich, Ilya G; Tolstoy, Peter M; Frydel, Jaroslaw; Denisov, Gleb S; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich

    2012-11-26

    We have studied the hydrogen bond interactions of (15)N labeled 4-methylpyridine (4-MP) with pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the solid state and in polar solution using various NMR techniques. Previous spectroscopic, X-ray, and neutron crystallographic studies showed that the triclinic 1:1 complex (4-MPPCP) exhibits the strongest known intermolecular OHN hydrogen bond in the solid state. By contrast, deuteration of the hydrogen bond gives rise to the formation of a monoclinic structure exhibiting a weaker hydrogen bond. By performing NMR experiments at different deuterium fractions and taking advantage of dipolar (1)H-(15)N recoupling under combined fast MAS and (1)H decoupling, we provide an explanation of the origin of the isotopic polymorphism of 4-MPPCP and improve previous chemical shift correlations for OHN hydrogen bonds. Because of anharmonic ground state vibrations, an ODN hydrogen bond in the triclinic form exhibits a shorter oxygen-hydron and a longer oxygen-nitrogen distance as compared to surrounding OHN hydrogen bonds, which also implies a reduction of the local dipole moment. The dipole-dipole interaction between adjacent coupled OHN hydrogen bonds which determines the structure of triclinic 4-MPPCP is then reduced by deuteration, and other interactions become dominant, leading to the monoclinic form. Finally, the observation of stronger OHN hydrogen bonds by (1)H NMR in polar solution as compared to the solid state is discussed.

  3. Secondary hydrogen isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melander, L.; Sonders, U.

    1983-01-01

    Secondary isotope effects can be produced by isotopes of elements heavier than hydrogen, but secondary isotope effects of hydrogen are of greater interest, because they are larger and can be measured easier. Such aspects of the problem as solvolytic reactions (in the case of α-position and β-position in organic compounds), reactions of compounds with deuterium remoted from reaction centre, with deuterium in nonsaturated compounds, participation of neighbouring groups in the reaction, are considered. Besides, steric isotope effects and inductive isotope effects are considered

  4. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  5. Isotope effects on nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    This review concentrates upon empirical trends and practical uses of mostly secondary isotope effects, both of the intrinsic and equilibrium types. The text and the tables are arranged in the following fashion. The most 'popular' isotope effect is treated first, deuterium isotope effects on 13 C nuclear shielding, followed by deuterium on 1 H nuclear shieldings, etc. Focus is thus on the isotopes producing the effect rather than on the nuclei suffering the effect. After a brief treatment of each type of isotope effect, general trends are dealt with. Basic trends of intrinsic isotope effects such as additivity, solvent effects, temperature effects, steric effects, substituent effects and hyperconjugation are discussed. Uses of isotope effects for assignment purposes, in stereochemical studies, in hydrogen bonding and in isotopic tracer studies are dealt with. Kinetic studies, especially of phosphates, are frequently performed by utilizing isotope effects. In addition, equilibrium isotope effects are treated in great detail as these are felt to be new and very important and may lead to new uses of isotope effects. Techniques used to obtain isotope effects are briefly surveyed at the end of the chapter. (author)

  6. Isotope effects on chemical equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golding, P.D.

    1974-01-01

    The thermodynamic equilibrium constants of three deuterated substituted acetic acids are reported. The calculation of secondary isotope effects of the second kind for the three isotopic acid pairs has been accomplished by the appropriate comparison of thermodynamic equilibrium constants, and by the comparison of isotopic slopes. The effect of substituent variation on the isotope effects reported here disqualifies the simple inductive model as a legitimate description of secondary isotope effects of the second kind. The correlation of diminishing isotope effect per deuterium atom with increasing acidity is also invalidated by the present results. The syntheses of 9-thia-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene-9-oxide and thioxanthene-10-oxide are described. These compounds have been partially deuterated at their respective methylene positions. Spectral evidence indicates stereoselectivity of the methylene protons in the exchange reactions of both compounds. (author)

  7. Mass-independent isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L

    2013-02-28

    Three fundamental properties of atomic nuclei-mass, spin (and related magnetic moment), and volume-are the source of isotope effects. The mostly deserved and popular, with almost hundred-year history, is the mass-dependent isotope effect. The first mass-independent isotope effect which chemically discriminates isotopes by their nuclear spins and nuclear magnetic moments rather than by their masses was detected in 1976. It was named as the magnetic isotope effect because it is controlled by magnetic interaction, i.e., electron-nuclear hyperfine coupling in the paramagnetic species, the reaction intermediates. The effect follows from the universal physical property of chemical reactions to conserve angular momentum (spin) of electrons and nuclei. It is now detected for oxygen, silicon, sulfur, germanium, tin, mercury, magnesium, calcium, zinc, and uranium in a great variety of chemical and biochemical reactions including those of medical and ecological importance. Another mass-independent isotope effect was detected in 1983 as a deviation of isotopic distribution in reaction products from that which would be expected from the mass-dependent isotope effect. On the physical basis, it is in fact a mass-dependent effect, but it surprisingly results in isotope fractionation which is incompatible with that predicted by traditional mass-dependent effects. It is supposed to be a function of dynamic parameters of reaction and energy relaxation in excited states of products. The third, nuclear volume mass-independent isotope effect is detected in the high-resolution atomic and molecular spectra and in the extraction processes, but there are no unambiguous indications of its importance as an isotope fractionation factor in chemical reactions.

  8. The effect of dipolar interaction on the magnetic isotope effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden; Lukzen, Nikita

    2010-01-01

    A multi-channel kinetic description is used to study the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) in zero magnetic field. The maximal isotope effect is equal to the number of channels, two for the hyperfine interaction but four for the electron spin dipole–dipole interaction of the intermediate radical pair....... Quantum mechanical calculations agree with these conclusion and show that large MIE may be obtained even in the presence of a strong exchange interaction. The observed magnesium isotope effect on the rate of enzymatic synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is approximately 3 implying that the dipolar...... interaction is responsible for the effect. Our calculations provide support for the proposed mechanism....

  9. Isotope effects in photochemical rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, F.

    1983-01-01

    Taking anthracene resp. 9-deuteroanthracene as the initial substance, different substitution products have been prepared. The products originating by direct photolysis have been characterized and their structure has been determined. By comparing the measured kinetic isotope effect and the quantum yield of the nondeuterated and the monodeuterated fluorenes formed it could been demonstrated that the isotope effect mainly is due to the reaction rates and the influence of the deuterium substitution upon the radiationless desactivation against that is small. (HBR) [de

  10. Isotope effects in gas-phase chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various aspects of isotope effects in chemical reactions and photochemical reactions are presented. Most studies consider kinetic isotope effects with emphasis on hydrogen, deuterium, and muonium containing molecules and atoms. Theoretical origins of kinetic isotope effects are considered in several papers. A few of the latter papers consider atmospheric chemistry with respect to isotope effects

  11. Isotope effect and isotope separation. A chemist's view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Takanobu

    2002-01-01

    What causes the isotope effects (IE)? This presentation will be centered around the equilibrium isotope effects due to the differences in the nuclear masses. The occurrence of the equilibrium constant, K, of isotope exchange reactions which differ from the values predicted by the classical theory of statistical mechanics, K cl , is explored. The non-classical K corresponds to the unit-stage separation factor, α, that is different from unity and forms a basis of an isotope separation process involving the chemical exchange reaction. Here, the word 'chemical exchange' includes not only the isotope exchange chemical reactions between two or more chemical species but also the isotope exchanges involving the equilibria between liquid and vapor phases and liquid-gas, liquid solution-gas, liquid-liquid, and solid-liquid phases. In Section I, origins of the isotope effect phenomena will be explored and, in the process, various quantities used in discussions of isotope effect that have often caused confusions will be unambiguously defined. This Section will also correlate equilibrium constant with separation factor. In Section II, various forms of temperature-dependence of IE and separation factor will be discussed. (author)

  12. Non-linear Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    The isotopic fractionation associated with photodissociation of N2O, OCS and CO2, at different altitudes in Earth’s atmosphere, is investigated theoretically using constructed quantum mechanical models of the dissociation processes (i.e. potential energy surfaces and relevant coupling elements......’s stratosphere is nearly mass dependent, and only a small fraction of the observed anomalous oxygen-17 excess can be attributed to N2O photolysis. In contrast, stratospheric photolysis produces a significant inverse clumped isotope effect.(ii) Stratospheric OCS photolysis significantly enrich the remaining OCS...... in heavy carbon. The sulfur fractionation is weak and photolysis of OCS in the stratosphere produces only a small and mass dependent enrichment of heavy sulfur isotopes in the remaining OCS. Sulfur fractionation from the two remaining chemical sinks (oxidation by O(3P) and OH, respectively) is weak...

  13. Non-linear Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    ’s stratosphere is nearly mass dependent, and only a small fraction of the observed anomalous oxygen-17 excess can be attributed to N2O photolysis. In contrast, stratospheric photolysis produces a significant inverse clumped isotope effect.(ii) Stratospheric OCS photolysis significantly enrich the remaining OCS...

  14. The Vlasov equation with strong magnetic field and oscillating electric field as a model for isotop resonant separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Frenod

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the qualitative behavior of solutions to the Vlasov equation with strong external magnetic field and oscillating electric field. This model is relevant to the understanding of isotop resonant separation. We show that the effective equation is a kinetic equation with a memory term. This memory term involves a pseudo-differential operator whose kernel is characterized by an integral equation involving Bessel functions. The kernel is explicitly given in some particular cases.

  15. A new scheme to calculate isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiderek, Katarzyna; Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka; Rohr, Daniel R

    2011-09-01

    We present a new scheme to calculate isotope effects. Only selected frequencies at the target level of theory are calculated. The frequencies are selected by an analysis of the Hessian from a lower level of theory. We obtain accurate isotope effects without calculating the full Hessian at the target level of theory. The calculated frequencies are very accurate. The scheme converges to the correct isotope effect.

  16. Reaction kinetics: mechanisms and isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    This chapter emphasized how the isotope effects are obtained, and the factors that govern their magnitude. Most of the discussion concerned hydrogen isotope effects. Of the other isotopes much work has been done on carbon. Less extensive studies were reported using the isotopes of chlorine ( 35 Cl, 37 Cl), sulfur ( 32 S, 34 S), nitrogen ( 14 N, 15 N), and oxygen ( 16 O, 17 O). The customary way of altering the symmetry of the transition state is to vary the strength of the base B. Very large primary kinetic hydrogen isotope effects have also been observed for nitrocompounds. Some hydrogen alien reactions which may also be characterized by small solvation changes exhibit extremely large K/sup H//K/sup D/ values. Recently the main application of secondary hydrogen isotope effects has been in the study of the ability of neighboring groups to alter the energetics of organic reactions. 1 figure, 5 tables

  17. Finding quantum effects in strong classical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegelich, B. Manuel; Labun, Lance; Labun, Ou Z.

    2017-06-01

    The long-standing challenge to describing charged particle dynamics in strong classical electromagnetic fields is how to incorporate classical radiation, classical radiation reaction and quantized photon emission into a consistent unified framework. The current, semiclassical methods to describe the dynamics of quantum particles in strong classical fields also provide the theoretical framework for fundamental questions in gravity and hadron-hadron collisions, including Hawking radiation, cosmological particle production and thermalization of particles created in heavy-ion collisions. However, as we show, these methods break down for highly relativistic particles propagating in strong fields. They must therefore be improved and adapted for the description of laser-plasma experiments that typically involve the acceleration of electrons. Theory developed from quantum electrodynamics, together with dedicated experimental efforts, offer the best controllable context to establish a robust, experimentally validated foundation for the fundamental theory of quantum effects in strong classical potentials.

  18. The application of a high pulse repetition rate CO2 laser with high average power for isotope separation by molecular dissociation in a strong IR field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagratashvili, V.N.; Kolomisky, Y.R.; Letokhov, V.S.; Ryabov, E.A.; Baranov, V.Y.; Kazakov, S.A.; Nizjev, V.G.; Pismenny, V.D.; Starodubtsev, A.I.; Velikhov, E.P.

    1977-01-01

    Considering a SF 6 molecule we demonstrate feasibility of using high pulse repetition rate CO 2 laser for isotope separation by selective molecular dissociation in a strong IR field. Dependences of dissociation efficiency as well as separation selectivity on pulse repetition rate up to 150 Hz are investigated. The inherent thermal effects are discussed. (orig.) [de

  19. Strong Water Isotopic Anomalies in the Martian Atmosphere: Probing Current and Ancient Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, G. L.; Mumma, M. J.; Novak, R. E.; Käufl, H. U.; Hartogh, P.; Encrenaz, T.; Tokunaga, A.; Khayat, A.; Smith, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    We measured maps of atmospheric water (H2O) and its deuterated form (HDO) across the martian globe, showing strong isotopic anomalies and a significant high deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) enrichment indicative of great water loss. The maps sample the evolution of sublimation from the north polar cap, revealing that the released water has a representative D/H value enriched by a factor of about 7 relative to Earth's ocean [Vienna standard mean ocean water (VSMOW)]. Certain basins and orographic depressions show even higher enrichment, whereas high-altitude regions show much lower values (1 to 3 VSMOW). Our atmospheric maps indicate that water ice in the polar reservoirs is enriched in deuterium to at least 8 VSMOW, which would mean that early Mars (4.5 billion years ago) had a global equivalent water layer at least 137 meters deep.

  20. H/D Isotope Effects in Hydrogen Bonded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Filarowski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely strong H/D isotope effect observed in hydrogen bonded A-H…B systems is connected with a reach diversity of the potential shape for the proton/deuteron motion. It is connected with the anharmonicity of the proton/deuteron vibrations and of the tunneling effect, particularly in cases of short bridges with low barrier for protonic and deuteronic jumping. Six extreme shapes of the proton motion are presented starting from the state without possibility of the proton transfer up to the state with a full ionization. The manifestations of the H/D isotope effect are best reflected in the infra-red absorption spectra. A most characteristic is the run of the relationship between the isotopic ratio nH/nD and position of the absorption band shown by using the example of NHN hydrogen bonds. One can distinguish a critical range of correlation when the isotopic ratio reaches the value of ca. 1 and then increases up to unusual values higher than . The critical range of the isotope effect is also visible in NQR and NMR spectra. In the critical region one observes a stepwise change of the NQR frequency reaching 1.1 MHz. In the case of NMR, the maximal isotope effect is reflected on the curve presenting the dependence of Δd (1H,2H on d (1H. This effect corresponds to the range of maximum on the correlation curve between dH and ΔpKa that is observed in various systems. There is a lack in the literature of quantitative information about the influence of isotopic substitution on the dielectric properties of hydrogen bond except the isotope effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in some hydrogen bonded crystals.

  1. Wormhole effect in a strong topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, G.; Guo, H.-M.; Franz, M.

    2010-07-01

    An infinitely thin solenoid carrying magnetic flux Φ (a “Dirac string”) inserted into an ordinary band insulator has no significant effect on the spectrum of electrons. In a strong topological insulator, remarkably, such a solenoid carries protected gapless one-dimensional fermionic modes when Φ=hc/2e . These modes are spin-filtered and represent a distinct bulk manifestation of the topologically nontrivial insulator. We establish this “wormhole” effect by both general qualitative considerations and by numerical calculations within a minimal lattice model. We also discuss the possibility of experimental observation of a closely related effect in artificially engineered nanostructures.

  2. Medium Effects in Reactions with Rare Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertulani, C A; Karakoç, M

    2012-01-01

    We discuss medium effects in knockout reactions with rare isotopes of weakly-bound nuclei at intermediate energies. We show that the poorly known corrections may lead to sizable modifications of knockout cross sections and momentum dsitributions.

  3. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Pors, A.; Gravesen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Waveguide phenomena play a major role in basic sciences and engineering. The Helmholtz equation is the governing equation for the electric field in electromagnetic wave propagation and the acoustic pressure in the study of pressure dynamics. The Schro¨dinger equation simplifies to the Helmholtz...... equation for a quantum-mechanical particle confined by infinite barriers relevant in semiconductor physics. With this in mind and the interest to tailor waveguides towards a desired spectrum and modal pattern structure in classical structures and nanostructures, it becomes increasingly important...... to understand the influence of curvature effects in waveguides. In this work, we demonstrate analytically strong curvature effects for the eigenvalue spectrum of the Helmholtz equation with Neumann boundary conditions in cases where the waveguide cross section is a circular sector. It is found that the linear...

  4. Bibliography on vapour pressure isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illy, H.; Jancso, G.

    1976-03-01

    The bibliography of research on vapour pressure isotope effects from 1919 to December 1975 is presented in chronological order. Within each year the references are listed alphabetically according to the name of the first author of each work. The bibliography is followed by a Compound Index containing the names o compounds, but the type of isotopic substituation is not shown. The Author Index includes all authors of the papers. (Sz.N.Z.)

  5. Variation of kinetic isotope effect in multiple proton transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proton transfer; promoter modes; kinetic isotope effect. 1. Introduction. Kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is the dependence of the rate constant on the mass of the isotope of the atom in a chemical reaction. The primary kinetic isotope effect is the KIE when the bonds connecting that atom to the rest of the molecular frame are broken ...

  6. Strong curvature effects in Neumann wave problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willatzen, M.; Pors, A.; Gravesen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Waveguide phenomena play a major role in basic sciences and engineering. The Helmholtz equation is the governing equation for the electric field in electromagnetic wave propagation and the acoustic pressure in the study of pressure dynamics. The Schrödinger equation simplifies to the Helmholtz equation for a quantum-mechanical particle confined by infinite barriers relevant in semiconductor physics. With this in mind and the interest to tailor waveguides towards a desired spectrum and modal pattern structure in classical structures and nanostructures, it becomes increasingly important to understand the influence of curvature effects in waveguides. In this work, we demonstrate analytically strong curvature effects for the eigenvalue spectrum of the Helmholtz equation with Neumann boundary conditions in cases where the waveguide cross section is a circular sector. It is found that the linear-in-curvature contribution originates from parity symmetry breaking of eigenstates in circular-sector tori and hence vanishes in a torus with a complete circular cross section. The same strong curvature effect is not present in waveguides subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions where curvature contributions contribute to second-order in the curvature only. We demonstrate this finding by considering wave propagation in a circular-sector torus corresponding to Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions, respectively. Results for relative eigenfrequency shifts and modes are determined and compared with three-dimensional finite element method results. Good agreement is found between the present analytical method using a combination of differential geometry with perturbation theory and finite element results for a large range of curvature ratios.

  7. Isotopic effect in high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    It is well-known that it essentially contributed to construct the BCB theory that a mechanism on formation of the Cooper pairs was dependent upon a lattice oscillation to change a critical temperature, T(sub c) of a superconductor with isotopic displacement. In this paper, here was, at first, described on an isotopic index actually measured to high temperature superconductors, and was introduced on a study on selective displacement of oxygen position. And then, a detailed measurement of 63-Cu(2) nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) at a plane position of YBa2Cu4O8 (Y1248) displaced with 18-O and 16-O, discussion of the isotopic effect on a base of 63-Cu(2) nuclear spin-lattice relaxation ratio, and consideration on the isotopic index according to the isotopic effect were described. As a result of the considerations, it could be concluded that the isotopic effect in a high temperature superconductor proved that antiferromagnetic spin fluctuation was an origin of Cooper pairs cohesive strength. (G.K.)

  8. Isotope dependent, temperature regulated, energy repartitioning in a low-barrier, short-strong hydrogen bonded cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X. H.; Oomens, J.; Eyler, J. R.; Moore, D. T.; Iyengar, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate and analyze the vibrational properties, including hydrogen/deuterium isotope effects, in a fundamental organic hydrogen bonded system using multiple experimental (infrared multiple photon dissociation and argon-tagged action spectroscopy) and computational techniques. We note a

  9. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac–Hartree–Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor–crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium

  10. Stable isotope 'vital effects' in coccolith calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ziveri, P.; Stoll, H.; Probert, I.; Klaas, C.; Geisen, M.; Ganssen, G.M.; Young, J.

    2003-01-01

    Uncertainties about the origin of the many disequilibrium or 'vital effects' in a variety of calcifying organisms, and whether these effects are constant or variable, have hampered paleoceanographic application of carbon and oxygen isotopic ratios. Unraveling the source of these effects will improve

  11. Combining Solvent Isotope Effects with Substrate Isotope Effects in Mechanistic Studies of Alcohol and Amine Oxidation by Enzymes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin-and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. PMID:25448013

  12. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju

    2010-01-01

    find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal7, 8, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation...... plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium’s ideal strength9, 10. We develop a ‘stimulated slip’ model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning....... The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 relevant for applications....

  13. H/D isotope effects in high temperature proton conductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonanos, N.; Huijser, Jannetje Maria; Poulsen, F.W.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic mass ratio of ca. 2 between deuterium and hydrogen is the highest for any pair of stable isotopes and results in significant and measurable H/D isotope effects in high temperature proton conductors containing these species. This paper discusses H/D isotope effects manifested in O–H/O–D

  14. Isotopic effects on the phonon modes in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Kuhlmann, U; Rotter, H W; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-10-06

    The effect of isotopes ((10)B-(11)B; (12)C-(13)C) on the infrared- and Raman-active phonons of boron carbide has been investigated. For B isotopes, the contributions of the virtual crystal approximation, polarization vector and isotopical disorder are separated. Boron and carbon isotope effects are largely opposite to one another and indicate the share of the particular atoms in the atomic assemblies vibrating in specific phonon modes. Some infrared-active phonons behave as expected for monatomic boron crystals.

  15. Strong coupling effects in hybrid plexitonic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikau, Dzmitry; Esteban, Ruben; Govyadinov, Alexander A.; Savateeva, Diana; Simon, Thomas; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Grzelczak, Marek; Schmidt, Mikolaj K.; Urban, Alexander S.; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.; Feldmann, Jochen; Aizpurua, Javier; Rakovich, Yury P.

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the interactions between localized plasmons in gold nanorods and excitons in J-aggregates and were able to track an anticrossing behavior of the hybridized modes both in the extinction and in the photoluminescence spectra of this hybrid system. We identified the nonlinear optical behavior of this system by transient absorption spectroscopy. Finally using magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy we showed that nonmagnetic organic molecules exhibit magnetooptical response due to binding to a plasmonic nanoparticles. In our experiments we also studied the effect of detuning as well as the effect of off- and on resonance excitation on the hybrid states

  16. Disorder effects in strongly correlated uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suellow, S.; Maple, M.B.; Tomuta, D.; Nieuwenhuys, G.J.; Menovsky, A.A.; Mydosh, J.A.; Chau, R.

    2001-01-01

    Moderate levels of crystallographic disorder can dramatically affect the ground-state properties of heavy fermion compounds. In particular, the role of disorder close to a quantum critical point has been investigated in detail. However, crystallographic disorder is equally effective in altering the properties of magnetically ordered heavy fermion compounds like URh 2 Ge 2 , where disorder-induced spin-glass behavior has been observed. In this system, moreover, the magnetic ground state can be tuned from a spin-glass to a long-range ordered antiferromagnetic one by means of an annealing treatment. The transformation of the magnetic state is accompanied by a transition in the transport properties from 'quasi-insulating' (dρ/dT 2 Ge 2 will be discussed. Of particular interest is the resistivity of as-grown URh 2 Ge 2 , which resembles the Non-Fermi-liquid system UCu 4 Pd, suggesting that a common mechanism - the crystallographic disorder - controls the transport properties of these materials

  17. The effects of inhomogeneous isotope distribution on the vibrational properties of isotope enriched double walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolyomi, V.; Simon, F.; Rusznyak, A.; Kuerti, J.; Pfeiffer, R.; Peterlik, H.; Kuzmany, H.

    2007-01-01

    The radial breathing mode in the Raman spectrum of 13 C isotope enriched single walled carbon nanotubes is inhomogeneously broadened due to the random distribution of isotopes. We study this effect theoretically using density functional theory within the local density approximation and compare the result with experiments on isotope engineered double walled carbon nanotubes in which the inner tubes were grown from a mixture of 13 C enriched fullerenes and natural fullerenes. As explained by the calculations, this synthesis procedure leads to an increased inhomogeneity compared to a case when only enriched fullerenes are used. The good agreement between the measurements and calculations shows the absence of carbon diffusion along the tube axis during inner tube growth, and presents a strong support of the theory that inner tube growth is governed by Stone-Wales transformations following the interconnection of fullerenes. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Isotope effects on desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into stainless steel by glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, M.; Kondo, M.; Noda, N.; Tanaka, M.; Nishimura, K.

    2015-01-01

    In a fusion device the control of fuel particles implies to know the desorption rate of hydrogen isotopes by the plasma-facing materials. In this paper desorption kinetics of hydrogen isotopes implanted into type 316L stainless steel by glow discharge have been studied by experiment and numerical calculation. The temperature of a maximum desorption rate depends on glow discharge time and heating rate. Desorption spectra observed under various experimental conditions have been successfully reproduced by numerical simulations that are based on a diffusion-limited process. It is suggested, therefore, that desorption rate of a hydrogen isotope implanted into the stainless steel is limited by a diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms in bulk. Furthermore, small isotope effects were observed for the diffusion process of hydrogen isotope atoms. (authors)

  19. Combining solvent isotope effects with substrate isotope effects in mechanistic studies of alcohol and amine oxidation by enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin- and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISCHER, W.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; CAMERON, P.; CONNOLLY, R.; MONTAG, C.; PEGGS, S.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; TEPIKIAN, S.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VAN ZEIJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far

  1. Isotopic effect on thermal physical properties of isotopically modified boron single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Quanli [Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama (Japan); Noda, Tetsuji; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Araki, Hiroshi; Numazawa, Takenori; Hirano, Toshiyuki [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nogi, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Satoru [University of Tokyo, Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    The measurement of specific heat and thermal conductivity at low temperature for isotopically modified boron single crystals was performed between 0.5 and 100K using relaxation method and steady heat flow method, respectively. The results indicate that the specific heat has obvious divergences at T<5K. At 40K, the thermal conductivity of {sup 10}B-enriched crystal is about 570 W/m{center_dot}K, which is 40% larger than that of natural boron crystal. The influence of lattice vibration modes and the isotopic effect on specific heat and thermal conductivity for isotopically modified boron are discussed. (author)

  2. Isotopically sensitive branching and its effect on the observed intramolecular isotope effects in cytochrome P-450 catalyzed reactions: a new method for the estimation of intrinsic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.P.; Korzekwa, K.R.; Rettie, A.E.; Trager, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    Two selectively deuterated n-octanes (octane-1- 2 H 3 and octane-1,2,3- 2 H 7 ) were synthesized and subjected to hydroxylation by phenobarbital-induced rat liver microsomes and purified cytochrome P-450b. The results of these experiments provide evidence which clarifies the interplay between a branched reaction pathway and the equilibration of an enzyme-substrate complex, in determining the magnitude of an observed isotope effect. An equation is derived that allows limits to placed on the intrinsic isotope effect. The equation is based on the observed isotope effect and the regioselectivity of a branch reaction pathway, catalyzed by an enzyme that forms two products via a single enzyme-substrate complex. The intrinsic isotope effect for the formation of 1-octanol was determined by this equation to lie between 9.5 and 9.8

  3. Uses of isotope effects in the study of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, D B

    2001-06-01

    There have been few recent additions to the technical methods employed in the study of isotope effects, notable exceptions being the use of high pressure as an experimental variable and the measurement of heavy-atom isotope effects on maximal velocities using continuous-flow techniques. Most of the innovations are in the realm of new experimental designs that allow the asking of new questions. These designs include the use of isotope effects to: determine kinetic mechanisms, distinguish between changes in enzymatic activity and loss of active enzyme, distinguish between reactant-state origins and transition-state origins and quantify hydrogen tunneling, separate and quantify multiple origins of solvent isotope effects, distinguish between concerted and stepwise chemical mechanisms, characterize bond order changes in ligand binding, distinguish different pathways of inhibitor binding, and estimate intrinsic isotope effects. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  4. Bromine and carbon isotope effects during photolysis of brominated phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakon, Yevgeni; Halicz, Ludwik; Gelman, Faina

    2013-12-17

    In the present study, carbon and bromine isotope effects during UV-photodegradation of bromophenols in aqueous and ethanolic solutions were determined. An anomalous relatively high inverse bromine isotope fractionation (εreactive position up to +5.1‰) along with normal carbon isotope effect (εreactive position of -12.6‰ to -23.4‰) observed in our study may be attributed to coexistence of both mass-dependent and mass-independent isotope fractionation of C-Br bond cleavage. Isotope effects of a similar scale were observed for all the studied reactions in ethanol, and for 4-bromophenol in aqueous solution. This may point out related radical mechanism for these processes. The lack of any carbon and bromine isotope effects during photodegradation of 2-bromophenol in aqueous solution possibly indicates that C-Br bond cleavage is not a rate-limiting step in the reaction. The bromine isotope fractionation, without any detectable carbon isotope effect, that was observed for 3-bromophenol photolysis in aqueous solution probably originates from mass-independent fractionation.

  5. Great isotope effects in compounding of sodium isotopes by macrocyclic polyether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoechel, A.; Wilken, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Isotope effects appear in the compounding of the two sodium isotopes 24 Na + and 22 Na + with macrocyclic polyethers, whose value was determined for the 13 best known polyethers. A radiometric process was used for determining the different half life periods of the nuclides used. To separate the compound and non-compound types, these were distributed between water and chloroform. The isotope ratio in the chloroform phase was compared with the output isotope ratio and the separation facfor determined from this. When using crown ethers, there was enrichment of 24 Na + by a significant amount (large crown ether) up to 3.1 +- 0.4% for 18 crown 6. The remarkably high results can be correlated by Biegeleisen's theory with other chemical conditions. There is a report on the first results of transferring these conditions to the H + /T + system. (orig.) [de

  6. Isotope effect in the Knight shift of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahm, W.; Schwenk, A.

    1975-01-01

    The Knight shifts of the potassium isotopes 39 K and 41 K were determined with high accuracy: Ksup((39)) = 0.274 35(10)% and Ksup((41)) = 0.274 93(12)%. The relative isotope effect ΔK/K = -0.210 (20)% is in agreement with the hyperfine structure anomaly 39 Δ 41 . (orig.) [de

  7. Variation of kinetic isotope effect in multiple proton transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 124; Issue 1. Variation of kinetic isotope ... An extension of this to the concerted multiple proton transfer reactions implies that the kinetic isotope effect in such reaction depends exponentially on the number of protons that are being transferred. Computational evidence ...

  8. Biosynthetic effects on the stable carbon isotopic compositions of agal lipids: Implications for deciphering the carbon isotopic biomarker record

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Schouten, S.; Klein Breteler, W.C.M.; Blokker, P.; Schogt, N.; Rijpstra, W.I.C.; Grice, K.; Baas, M.

    1998-01-01

    Thirteen species of algae covering an extensive range of classes were cultured and stable carbon isotopic compositions of their lipids were analysed in order to assess carbon isotopic fractionation effects during their biosynthesis. The fatty acids were found to have similar stable carbon isotopic

  9. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Medical applications of Cu, Zn, and S isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarede, Francis; Télouk, Philippe; Balter, Vincent; Bondanese, Victor P; Albalat, Emmanuelle; Oger, Philippe; Bonaventura, Paola; Miossec, Pierre; Fujii, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-01

    This review examines recent applications of stable copper, zinc and sulfur isotopes to medical cases and notably cancer. The distribution of the natural stable isotopes of a particular element among coexisting molecular species varies as a function of the bond strength, the ionic charge, and the coordination, and it also changes with kinetics. Ab initio calculations show that compounds in which a metal binds to oxygen- (sulfate, phosphate, lactate) and nitrogen-bearing moieties (histidine) favor heavy isotopes, whereas bonds with sulfur (cysteine, methionine) favor light isotopes. Oxidized cations (e.g., Cu(ii)) and low coordination numbers are expected to favor heavy isotopes relative to their reduced counterparts (Cu(i)) and high coordination numbers. Here we discuss the first observations of Cu, Zn, and S isotopic variations, three elements closely related along multiple biological pathways, with emphasis on serum samples of healthy volunteers and of cancer patients. It was found that heavy isotopes of Zn and to an even greater extent Cu are enriched in erythrocytes relative to serum, while the difference is small for sulfur. Isotopic variations related to age and sex are relatively small. The 65 Cu/ 63 Cu ratio in the serum of patients with colon, breast, and liver cancer is conspicuously low relative to healthy subjects. The characteristic time over which Cu isotopes may change with disease progression (a few weeks) is consistent with both the turnover time of the element and albumin half-life. A parallel effect on sulfur isotopes is detected in a few un-medicated patients. Copper in liver tumor tissue is isotopically heavy. In contrast, Zn in breast cancer tumors is isotopically lighter than in healthy breast tissue. 66 Zn/ 64 Zn is very similar in the serum of cancer patients and in controls. Possible reasons for Cu isotope variations may be related to the cytosolic storage of Cu lactate (Warburg effect), release of intracellular copper from cysteine

  11. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies.

  12. Entering chloride kinetic isotope effects in protic and aprotic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cromartie, T.H.; Swain, C.G.

    1976-01-01

    Chlorine kinetic isotope effects for the reaction of ethylene oxide and chloride ion are normal ( 35 Cl/ 37 Cl greater than unity) in protic solvents and in acetone and dimethylformamide (DMF) in the presence of 1 equiv of 2,6-lutidinium ion. In the presence of 0.1 equiv of this cation (and 0.9 of Li + ) the isotope effect in DMF is inverse (0.9922). This is the first observation of an inverse entering-group heavy-atom isotope effect. The reaction of chloride ion with dimethyl sulfate is normal in water but inverse in DMF. The ''normal'' isotope effects are shown to be due in large measure to the dominance of changes in hydrogen bonding to chlorine over changes in carbon--chlorine bonding

  13. Clumped isotope effects during OH and Cl oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitehill, Andrew R.; Joelsson, Lars Magnus T.; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to determine the clumped (13CH3D) methane kinetic isotope effects during oxidation of methane by OH and Cl radicals, the major sink reactions for atmospheric methane. Experiments were performed in a 100 L quartz photochemical reactor, in which OH...... was produced from the reaction of O(1D) (from O3 photolysis) with H2O, and Cl was from photolysis of Cl2. Samples were taken from the reaction cell and analyzed for methane (12CH4, 12CH3D, 13CH4, 13CH3D) isotopologue ratios using tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy. Measured kinetic isotope...... effects for singly substituted species were consistent with previous experimental studies. For doubly substituted methane, 13CH3D, the observed kinetic isotope effects closely follow the product of the kinetic isotope effects for the 13C and deuterium substituted species (i.e., 13,2KIE = 13KIE × 2KIE...

  14. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylations of lactic acid containing 13C at the natural abundance level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Czarnota, G.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.

    1992-01-01

    The 13 C kinetic isotope fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition by sulfuric acid has been studied in the temperature range of 20-80 deg C. The 13 C (1) isotope separation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated sulfuric acid depends strongly on the temperature above 40 deg C. Below this temperature the 13 C isotope effect in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated sulfuric acid is normal similarly as has been found in the decarbonylation of lactic [1- 14 C] acid. The experimental values of k (12C) /k (13C) ratios of isotopic rate constants for 12 C and 13 C are close to, but slightly higher than theoretical 13 C-kinetic isotope effects calculated (neglecting tunneling) under the asumption that the C (1) -OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of the dehydration reaction. Dilution of concentrated sulfuric acid with water up to 1.4 molar (H 2 O)/(H 2 SO 4 ) ratio caused the increase of the 13 C isotope fractionation from 1.0273 found in concentrated sulfuric acid at 80.5 deg C to 1.0536±0.0008 (at 80.6 deg C). A discussion of the abnormally high temperature dependence of 14 C and 13 C isotope fractionation in this reaction and the discussion of the problem of relative 14 C/ 13 C kinetic isotope effects is given. (author) 18 refs.; 2 tabs

  15. Solvent isotope effects in the complex formation of beryllium sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boojj, M.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics of complex formation and dissociation of BeSO 4 in D 2 O has been studied. The association constant and the inner sphere/outer sphere equilibrium constant were obtained. By comparing with the corresponding results in H 2 O(1) the solvent isotope effect could be evaluated for some of the involved thermodynamic and kinetic constants. The isotope effects can be understood in terms of Swain and Bader's statistical thermodynamical calculations (2). (orig.) [de

  16. Absence of isotope effect of diffusion in a metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heesemann, A.; Raetzke, K.; Faupel, F.; Hoffmann, J.; Heinemann, K.

    1995-01-01

    The isotope effect E = d ln(D)/d ln (1/√m) of Co diffusion in structurally relaxed Co 86 Zr 14 and Co 81 Zr 19 glasses has been measured by means of a radiotracer technique. Within experimental accuracy no isotope effect was detected (E < 0.04). This suggests a highly cooperative diffusion mechanism. The connection between diffusion and collective low-frequency relaxations in glasses is discussed. (orig.)

  17. Strong expectations cancel locality effects: evidence from Hindi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Husain

    Full Text Available Expectation-driven facilitation (Hale, 2001; Levy, 2008 and locality-driven retrieval difficulty (Gibson, 1998, 2000; Lewis & Vasishth, 2005 are widely recognized to be two critical factors in incremental sentence processing; there is accumulating evidence that both can influence processing difficulty. However, it is unclear whether and how expectations and memory interact. We first confirm a key prediction of the expectation account: a Hindi self-paced reading study shows that when an expectation for an upcoming part of speech is dashed, building a rarer structure consumes more processing time than building a less rare structure. This is a strong validation of the expectation-based account. In a second study, we show that when expectation is strong, i.e., when a particular verb is predicted, strong facilitation effects are seen when the appearance of the verb is delayed; however, when expectation is weak, i.e., when only the part of speech "verb" is predicted but a particular verb is not predicted, the facilitation disappears and a tendency towards a locality effect is seen. The interaction seen between expectation strength and distance shows that strong expectations cancel locality effects, and that weak expectations allow locality effects to emerge.

  18. Platinum isotopes in iron meteorites: Galactic cosmic ray effects and nucleosynthetic homogeneity in the p-process isotope 190Pt and the other platinum isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Alison C.; Ek, Mattias; Schönbächler, Maria

    2017-11-01

    Platinum isotopes are sensitive to the effects of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), which can alter isotope ratios and mask nucleosynthetic isotope variations. Platinum also features one p-process isotope, 190Pt, which is very low abundance and therefore challenging to analyse. Platinum-190 is relevant for early solar-system chronology because of its decay to 186Os. Here, we present new Pt isotope data for five iron meteorite groups (IAB, IIAB, IID, IIIAB and IVA), including high-precision measurements of 190Pt for the IAB, IIAB and IIIAB irons, determined by multi-collector ICPMS. New data are in good agreement with previous studies and display correlations between different Pt isotopes. The slopes of these correlations are well-reproduced by the available GCR models. We report Pt isotope ratios for the IID meteorite Carbo that are consistently higher than the predicted effects from the GCR model. This suggests that the model predictions do not fully account for all the GCR effects on Pt isotopes, but also that the pre-atmospheric radii and exposure times calculated for Carbo may be incorrect. Despite this, the good agreement of relative effects in Pt isotopes with the predicted GCR trends confirms that Pt isotopes are a useful in-situ neutron dosimeter. Once GCR effects are accounted for, our new dataset reveals s- and r-process homogeneity between the iron meteorite groups studied here and the Earth. New 190Pt data for the IAB, IIAB and IIIAB iron meteorites indicate the absence of GCR effects and homogeneity in the p-process isotope between these groups and the Earth. This corresponds well with results from other heavy p-process isotopes and suggests their homogenous distribution in the inner solar system, although it does not exclude that potential p-process isotope variations are too diluted to be currently detectable.

  19. Isotope separation factor and kinetic isotope effect of the hydrogen evolution reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishtalik, L.I.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of junified approach the experimentally observed dependences of kinetic isotopic effects (KIE) of the reaction of hydrogen electrolytic evolution on the value of potential on electrode were explained. It is shown that hydrogen isotope separation factor depends on KIE for two stages of the reaction, i.e. discharge on the electrode and electrochemical desorption, moreover, decrease in KIE with potential for the desorption stage overbalances its growth for the discharge stage. The reason for KIE decrease is non-activation character of the process, therefore, there is no dependence on potential of relative contribution of the product vibration-excited states [ru

  20. Bibliography on vapor pressure isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jancso, G.

    1980-04-01

    The first Bibliography on Vapour Pressure Isotope and covered the literature of the period from 1919 through December 1975. The present Supplement reviews the literature from January 1976 through December 1979. The bibliography is arranged in chronological order; within each year the references are listed alphabetically according to the name of the first author of each work. (author)

  1. Multiple-sulfur isotope effects during photolysis of carbonyl sulfide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Lin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine sulfur isotope effects during ultraviolet photolysis of carbonyl sulfide (OCS to carbon monoxide (CO and elemental sulfur (S0. The OCS gas at 3.7 to 501 mbar was irradiated with or without a N2 bath gas using a 150 W Xe arc lamp. Sulfur isotope ratios for the product S0 and residual OCS were analyzed by an isotope ratio mass-spectrometer with SF6 as the analyte gas. The isotope fractionation after correction for the reservoir effects is −6.8‰ for the ratio 34S/32S, where product S0 is depleted in heavy isotopes. The magnitude of the overall isotope effect is not sensitive to the addition of N2 but increases to −9.5‰ when radiation of λ > 285 nm is used. The measured isotope effect reflects that of photolysis as well as the subsequent sulfur abstraction (from OCS reaction. The magnitude of isotope effects for the abstraction reaction is estimated by transition state theory to be between −18.9 and −3.1‰ for 34S which gives the photolysis isotope effect as −10.5 to +5.3‰. The observed triple isotope coefficients are ln(δ34S + 1/ln(δ34S + 1 = 0.534 ± 0.005 and ln(δ36S + 1/ln(δ34S + 1 = 1.980 ± 0.021. These values differ from canonical values for mass-dependent fractionation of 0.515 and 1.90, respectively. The result demonstrates that the OCS photolysis does not produce large isotope effects of more than about 10‰ for 34S/32S, and can be the major source of background stratospheric sulfate aerosol (SSA during volcanic quiescence.

  2. Dynamical barrier and isotope effects in the simplest substitution reaction via Walden inversion mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Zhaojun; Liu, Shu; Zhang, Dong H.

    2017-02-01

    Reactions occurring at a carbon atom through the Walden inversion mechanism are one of the most important and useful classes of reactions in chemistry. Here we report an accurate theoretical study of the simplest reaction of that type: the H+CH4 substitution reaction and its isotope analogues. It is found that the reaction threshold versus collision energy is considerably higher than the barrier height. The reaction exhibits a strong normal secondary isotope effect on the cross-sections measured above the reaction threshold, and a small but reverse secondary kinetic isotope effect at room temperature. Detailed analysis reveals that the reaction proceeds along a path with a higher barrier height instead of the minimum-energy path because the umbrella angle of the non-reacting methyl group cannot change synchronously with the other reaction coordinates during the reaction due to insufficient energy transfer from the translational motion to the umbrella mode.

  3. Isotope effects upon translational diffusion as a probe for translation-rotation coupling in molecular liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holz, M.; Weingaertner, H.; Sacco, A.

    1990-01-01

    Mass changes of molecules caused by isotopic substitution (e.g. H-D substitution) can change the dynamic properties of a molecular liquid. Up to now, these dynamic isotope effects have been investigated only for a very small number of liquids. In the present paper we report on isotope effects upon self-diffusion coefficients, upon limiting tracer diffusion coefficients and upon viscosities of methanol, dimithylsulphoxide, dimethylformamide and nitromethane at 25deg C. It is shown that the square-root of mass dependence, which follows from a first theoretical approach, cannot predict the observed dynamic isotope effects. The experimental data correlate much better with the square root of the moments of inertia. Thus we establish a strong coupling between translational and rotational motion in these liquids. These results demonstrate that the dynamic isotope effects may serve as a sensitive probe for translation-rotation coupling in molecular liquids. The experimental finding of translation-rotation coupling is in agreement with recent computer simulations and has far consequences for the correct interpretation of liquid-state spectra as e.g. far-infrared absorption spectra. (orig.)

  4. Strong Gravity Effects of Rotating Black Holes: Quasiperiodic Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Aliev, Alikram N.; Esmer, Göksel Daylan; Talazan, Pamir

    2012-01-01

    We explore strong gravity effects of the geodesic motion in the spacetime of rotating black holes in general relativity and braneworld gravity. We focus on the description of the motion in terms of three fundamental frequencies: The orbital frequency, the radial and vertical epicyclic frequencies. For a Kerr black hole, we perform a detailed numerical analysis of these frequencies at the innermost stable circular orbits and beyond them as well as at the characteristic stable orbits, at which ...

  5. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Gotta, D; Augsburger, M A; Borchert, G L; Castelli, C M; Chatellard, D; El-Khoury, P; Egger, J P; Gorke, H; Hauser, P R; Indelicato, P J; Kirch, K; Lenz, S; Nelms, N; Rashid, K; Schult, O W B; Siems, T; Simons, L M

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the low-energy antiproton ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction. (33 refs).

  6. New results on strong-interaction effects in antiprotonic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anagnostopoulos, D. F.; Augsburger, M.; Borchert, G.; Castelli, C.; Chatellard, D.; El-Khoury, P.; Egger, J.-P.; Gorke, H.; Gotta, D.; Hauser, P.; Indelicato, P.; Kirch, K.; Lenz, S.; Nelms, N.; Rashid, K.; Schult, O. W. B.; Siems, Th.; Simons, L. M.

    1999-01-01

    Lyman and Balmer transitions of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at the Low-Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR at CERN in order to determine the strong interaction effects. The X-rays were detected using Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) and a reflection type crystal spectrometer. The results of the measurements support the meson-exchange models describing the medium and long range part of the nucleon-antinucleon interaction

  7. Isotopic phonon effects in β-rhombohedral boron--non-statistical isotope distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Kuhlmann, U; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Antadze, M

    2012-05-02

    On the basis of the spectra of IR- and Raman-active phonons, the isotopic phonon effects in β-rhombohedral boron are analysed for polycrystalline (10)B- and (11)B-enriched samples of different origin and high-purity (nat)B single crystals. Intra- and inter-icosahedral B-B vibrations are harmonic, hence meeting the virtual crystal approximation (VCA) requirements. Deviations from the phonon shift expected according to the VCA are attributed to the anharmonic share of the lattice vibrations. In the case of icosahedral vibrations, the agreement with calculations on α-rhombohedral boron by Shirai and Katayama-Yoshida is quite satisfactory. Phonon shifts due to isotopic disorder in (nat)B are separated and determined. Some phonon frequencies are sensitive to impurities. The isotopic phonon effects yield valuable specific information on the nature of the different phonon modes. The occupation of regular boron sites by isotopes deviates significantly from the random distribution. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd

  8. Isotope effects in hydrogen atom transfers. 9. Neighboring group participation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, E.S.; Shen, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    The tritium isotope effects in hydrogen abstraction by bromine atoms from HC(Me) 2 CH 2 X have been measured in the photobromination reaction by a technique which measures the specific activity of the HBr product. At 1 0 C and with the reverse reaction suppressed or irrelevant the values for k/sub H//k/sub T/ are 3.9, 8.2, and 11.6 for X = CH 3 , Cl, and Br, respectively. An isotope effect of 3.5 for X = H was also measured, but the contribution of the reverse reaction was not established. The relatively large isotope effect for X = Br is interpreted in terms of a weakening of the CH bond by neighboring bromine participation. The smaller effect of chlorine may correspond to a minor participation, but the unfavorable inductive effect of the chlorine is also a factor. The case of X = Br is the microscopic reverse of the addition of HBr to 2-methylpropene, and the results are compared with isotope effects in the addition to HBr to olefins. The measurement of isotope effect is, within some described limitations, a convenient and general method for detecting neighboring group participation in hydrogen atom abstractions

  9. Strong matrix effect in low-energy He+ ion scattering from carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhailov, S.N.; Van den Oetelaar, L.C.A.; Brongersma, H.H.

    1994-01-01

    In low-energy ion scattering the contribution of neutralization processes to the scattered ion yield is very important in quantification. Neutralization of low-energy (1-3.5 keV) He + ions by carbon is found to be much stronger for graphitic than for carbidic carbon. The ion fraction for graphitic carbon for 2.5 keV 3 He + scattering over 136 is about 60 times lower than that for carbidic carbon. For the 4 He + isotope the effect is even larger. Such a strong matrix effect for one element has not been measured before in low-energy (1-3.5 keV) inert-gas ion scattering. The neutralization behaviour is discussed in terms of a special quasi-resonant neutralization process for graphite. ((orig.))

  10. An experimental investigation of the isotope effect in the CVD growth of diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakil, H.B.; Banholzer, W.F.; Kehl, R.J.; Spiro, C.L.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effect of isotopic substitution of hydrogen by deuterium was carried out for the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamond films to determine whether the rate determining step involves a C-H or a C-C bond. Results show that if such a comparison is carried out in a proper manner the growth rate with deuterium is slower by the expected isotopic factor of the square root of 2, indicating that most likely a C-H bond is involved in the rate limiting step. Additionally, it is found that the kinetics of the atomic species generation were equally affected by the isotopic switch, strongly suggesting that the rate limiting step for that process involves the metal-H bond

  11. Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the DNA synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L.; Orlov, Alexei P.; Kuznetsov, Dmitry A.; Breslavskaya, Natalia N.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the rate of DNA synthesis catalysed by polymerases β with isotopic ions 24Mg2+, 25Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ in the catalytic sites were detected. No difference in enzymatic activity was found between polymerases β carrying 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions with spinless, non-magnetic nuclei 24Mg and 26Mg. However, 25Mg2+ ions with magnetic nucleus 25Mg were shown to suppress enzymatic activity by two to three times with respect to the enzymatic activity of polymerases β with 24Mg2+ and 26Mg2+ ions. Such an isotopic dependence directly indicates that in the DNA synthesis magnetic mass-independent isotope effect functions. Similar effect is exhibited by polymerases β with Zn2+ ions carrying magnetic 67Zn and non-magnetic 64Zn nuclei, respectively. A new, ion–radical mechanism of the DNA synthesis is suggested to explain these effects. Magnetic field dependence of the magnesium-catalysed DNA synthesis is in a perfect agreement with the proposed ion–radical mechanism. It is pointed out that the magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects may be used for medicinal purposes (trans-cranial magnetic treatment of cognitive deceases, cell proliferation, control of the cancer cells, etc). PMID:23851636

  12. Mass independent isotope effects and their observations in nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiemens, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    In 1983, Thiemens and Heidenreich reported the first chemically produced mass independent isotope effect. A significant feature of the fractionation was that it identically produced the isotopic relation observed in the calcium-aluminum inclusions in the Allende meteorite. This δ 17 O=δ 18 O composition had previously been thought to represent a nucleosynthetic component as no chemical process was capable of producing a mass independent isotopic composition. It now appears nearly certain that the meteoritic oxygen isotopic anomalies were produced by chemical, rather than nuclear, processes. Since oxygen is the major element in stony planets this represents a major event in the formation of the solar system. In a recent review (Thiemens, 1999), it has been shown that mass independent isotopic compositions are pervasive in the Earth's atmosphere. Molecules which have been demonstrated to possess mass independent isotopic compositions include: O 2 , O 3 , CO 2 , CO, and N 2 O. In each case, the specific nature of the mass independent isotopic composition has provided details of their atmospheric chemistry that could not have been obtained by any other measurement technique. Most recently, solid materials have been observed to possess mass independent isotopic composition. In this paper, these observations are briefly discussed. These solid reservoirs include: 1) carbonates and sulphates from Mars, 2) terrestrial aerosol sulphate, 3) sulphides and sulphates from the Earth, ranging in time from 3.8 to 2.2 billion years before present, 4) sulphates from the Namibian desert and 5) the Antartic Dry Valleys. The information obtained from these measurements is extraordinarily wide ranging, extending from understanding the history of Martian atmosphereregolith interaction to the evolution of the oxygen in the Earth's earliest atmosphere. As was the case for gas phase species, this information and insight could not have been obtained by any other measurement technique

  13. Transport hysteresis and hydrogen isotope effect on confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2018-03-01

    A Gedankenexperiment on hydrogen isotope effect is developed, using the transport model with transport hysteresis. The transport model with hysteresis is applied to case where the modulational electron cyclotron heating is imposed near the mid-radius of the toroidal plasmas. The perturbation propagates either outward or inward, being associated with the clockwise (CW) hysteresis or counter-clockwise (CCW) hysteresis, respectively. The hydrogen isotope effects on the CW and CCW hysteresis are investigated. The local component of turbulence-driven transport is assumed to be the gyro-Bohm diffusion. While the effect of hydrogen mass number is screened in the response of CW hysteresis, it is amplified in CCW hysteresis. This result motivates the experimental studies to compare CW and CCW cases in order to obtain further insight into the physics of hydrogen isotope effects.

  14. Isotope and mixture effects on neoclassical transport in the pedestal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztai, Istvan; Buller, Stefan; Omotani, John T.; Newton, Sarah L.

    2017-10-01

    The isotope mass scaling of the energy confinement time in tokamak plasmas differs from gyro-Bohm estimates, with implications for the extrapolation from current experiments to D-T reactors. Differences in mass scaling in L-mode and various H-mode regimes suggest that the isotope effect may originate from the pedestal. In the pedestal, sharp gradients render local diffusive estimates invalid, and global effects due to orbit-width scale profile variations have to be taken into account. We calculate neoclassical cross-field fluxes from a radially global drift-kinetic equation using the PERFECT code, to study isotope composition effects in density pedestals. The relative reduction to the peak heat flux due to global effects as a function of the density scale length is found to saturate at an isotope-dependent value that is larger for heavier ions. We also consider D-T and H-D mixtures with a focus on isotope separation. The ability to reproduce the mixture results via single-species simulations with artificial ``DT'' and ``HD'' species has been considered. These computationally convenient single ion simulations give a good estimate of the total ion heat flux in corresponding mixtures. Funding received from the International Career Grant of Vetenskapsradet (VR) (330-2014-6313) with Marie Sklodowska Curie Actions, Cofund, Project INCA 600398, and Framework Grant for Strategic Energy Research of VR (2014-5392).

  15. Superconducting proximity effect in the strong-coupling limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilvert, W.

    1975-01-01

    A generalization of the theory of the superconducting proximity effect is presented which takes into account strong-coupling in the superconductors. The results are found to agree with a model of weak-coupled superconductors with differing Debye frequencies which are in proximity. It is found that logarithmic averaging of phonon frequencies is an improvement on the original McMillan theory (1968). Comparison of the theory with data on thin films and on eutectic alloys is found to give good agreement. 19 references

  16. Strong dynamical effects during stick-slip adhesive peeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbe, Marie-Julie; Santucci, Stéphane; Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Vanel, Loïc

    2014-01-07

    We consider the classical problem of the stick-slip dynamics observed when peeling a roller adhesive tape at a constant velocity. From fast imaging recordings, we extract the dependence of the stick and slip phase durations on the imposed peeling velocity and peeled ribbon length. Predictions of Maugis and Barquins [in Adhesion 12, edited by K. W. Allen, Elsevier ASP, London, 1988, pp. 205-222] based on a quasistatic assumption succeed to describe quantitatively our measurements of the stick phase duration. Such a model however fails to predict the full stick-slip cycle duration, revealing strong dynamical effects during the slip phase.

  17. HPLC isotope effects and macrocycles: the case of Echinocandin B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.N.; Simpson, R.E.; Jenkins, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    Echinocandin B was catalytically reduced with hydrogen, deuterium, or tritium. HPLC analysis of the products showed that the labeled analogs exhibited a significant isotope effect relative to the unlabeled parent, with the elution order tritiated < deuterated < hydrogenated. Mass spectral data and specific activity measurements indicated label incorporation exceeded saturation of the double bonds. Proton nmr of the deuterated compound indicated labeling was confined to the aliphatic side chain. A model compound, anilonosteareamide, prepared from the linoleic precursor by reduction with hydrogen or deuterium, incorporated the label only in the aliphatic chain, and also exhibited an isotope effect. This helped confirm that label incorporation in only the fatty acid portion of tetrahydroechinocandin B was sufficient to cause the observed isotope effect. (Author)

  18. Quantum instanton evaluation of the kinetic isotope effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanicek, Jiri; Miller, William H.; Castillo, Jesus F.; Aoiz, F.Javier

    2005-04-19

    A general quantum-mechanical method for computing kinetic isotope effects is presented. The method is based on the quantum instanton approximation for the rate constant and on the path integral Metropolis Monte-Carlo evaluation of the Boltzmann operator matrix elements. It computes the kinetic isotope effect directly, using a thermodynamic integration with respect to the mass of the isotope, thus avoiding the more computationally expensive process of computing the individual rate constants. The method is more accurate than variational transition-state theories or the semiclassical instanton method since it does not assume a single reaction path and does not use a semiclassical approximation of the Boltzmann operator. While the general Monte-Carlo implementation makes the method accessible to systems with a large number of atoms, we present numerical results for the Eckart barrier and for the collinear and full three-dimensional isotope variants of the hydrogen exchange reaction H+H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2}+H. In all seven test cases, for temperatures between 250 K and 600 K, the error of the quantum instanton approximation for the kinetic isotope effects is less than {approx}10%.

  19. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects of Ammonia Oxidation by Thermophilic Thaumarchaeota from a Geothermal Water Stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Manabu; Sakai, Sanae; Konno, Uta; Nakahara, Nozomi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Saito, Yumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Tasumi, Eiji; Makabe, Akiko; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Ammonia oxidation regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature. Although ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been recently recognized to often outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in various environments, the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea is still uncertain due to difficulties in the in situ quantification of ammonia oxidation activity. Nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrite (δ(15)NNO2- and δ(18)ONO2-, respectively) are geochemical tracers for evaluating the sources and the in situ rate of nitrite turnover determined from the activities of nitrification and denitrification; however, the isotope ratios of nitrite from archaeal ammonia oxidation have been characterized only for a few marine species. We first report the isotope effects of ammonia oxidation at 70°C by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota populations composed almost entirely of "Candidatus Nitrosocaldus." The nitrogen isotope effect of ammonia oxidation varied with ambient pH (25‰ to 32‰) and strongly suggests the oxidation of ammonia, not ammonium. The δ(18)O value of nitrite produced from ammonia oxidation varied with the δ(18)O value of water in the medium but was lower than the isotopic equilibrium value in water. Because experiments have shown that the half-life of abiotic oxygen isotope exchange between nitrite and water is longer than 33 h at 70°C and pH ≥6.6, the rate of ammonia oxidation by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota could be estimated using δ(18)ONO2- in geothermal environments, where the biological nitrite turnover is likely faster than 33 h. This study extended the range of application of nitrite isotopes as a geochemical clock of the ammonia oxidation activity to high-temperature environments. Because ammonia oxidation is generally the rate-limiting step in nitrification that regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature, it is important to understand the biological and environmental factors underlying the regulation of

  20. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects of Ammonia Oxidation by Thermophilic Thaumarchaeota from a Geothermal Water Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Sanae; Konno, Uta; Nakahara, Nozomi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Saito, Yumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Tasumi, Eiji; Makabe, Akiko; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ammonia oxidation regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature. Although ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been recently recognized to often outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in various environments, the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea is still uncertain due to difficulties in the in situ quantification of ammonia oxidation activity. Nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrite (δ15NNO2− and δ18ONO2−, respectively) are geochemical tracers for evaluating the sources and the in situ rate of nitrite turnover determined from the activities of nitrification and denitrification; however, the isotope ratios of nitrite from archaeal ammonia oxidation have been characterized only for a few marine species. We first report the isotope effects of ammonia oxidation at 70°C by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota populations composed almost entirely of “Candidatus Nitrosocaldus.” The nitrogen isotope effect of ammonia oxidation varied with ambient pH (25‰ to 32‰) and strongly suggests the oxidation of ammonia, not ammonium. The δ18O value of nitrite produced from ammonia oxidation varied with the δ18O value of water in the medium but was lower than the isotopic equilibrium value in water. Because experiments have shown that the half-life of abiotic oxygen isotope exchange between nitrite and water is longer than 33 h at 70°C and pH ≥6.6, the rate of ammonia oxidation by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota could be estimated using δ18ONO2− in geothermal environments, where the biological nitrite turnover is likely faster than 33 h. This study extended the range of application of nitrite isotopes as a geochemical clock of the ammonia oxidation activity to high-temperature environments. IMPORTANCE Because ammonia oxidation is generally the rate-limiting step in nitrification that regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature, it is important to understand the biological and environmental factors underlying

  1. Isotopic effects on non-linearity, molecular radius and intermolecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    study the isotopic effects on the non-linearity parameter and the physicochemical proper- ties of the liquids, which in turn has been used to study their effect on the intermolecular interactions produced thereof. Keywords. Non-linearity parameter; molecular radius; free length; intermolecular inter- actions. PACS Nos 43.25.

  2. Effectiveness of Advanced Stay Strong, Stay Healthy in Community Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M. Crowe MS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of the 10-week, University of Missouri (MU Extension strength training program Advanced Stay Strong, Stay Healthy (ASSSH. It was hypothesized that the program can improve strength, balance, agility, and flexibility—all physical measures of falling among seniors. Matched pair t tests were used to compare differences in five physical measures of health, body composition, and percent body fat (%BF. Two-way ANOVA was conducted to examine the age effects on changes in physical health from the start and finish of the exercise program. Following programming, participants significantly improved strength, flexibility, and balance, and significantly reduced %BF ( p < .05. Our data indicate that ASSSH can improve the physical health of senior citizens and can successfully be translated into community practice by MU Extension professionals.

  3. Stable isotope methods: The effect of gut contents on isotopic ratios of zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J. M.; McQuaid, C. D.

    2011-05-01

    In the past decade there has been an increased awareness of the potential for methodological bias resulting from multiple pre-analytical procedures in foodweb interpretations based on stable isotope techniques. In the case of small organisms, this includes the effect of gut contents on whole body signatures. Although gut contents may not reflect actual assimilation, their carbon and nitrogen values will be isotopically lighter than after the same material has been assimilated. The potential skewing of isotopic ratios in whole organism samples is especially important for aquatic environments as many studies involve trophic relationships among small zooplankton. This is particularly important in pelagic waters, where herbivorous zooplankton comprise small taxa. Hence this study investigated the effect of gut contents on the δ13C and δ15N ratios of three size classes of zooplankton (1.0-2.0, 2.0-4.0 and >4.0 mm) collected using bongo net tows in the tropical waters of the south-west Indian Ocean. Animals were collected at night, when they were likely to be feeding, sieved into size classes and separated into genera. We focused on Euphausia spp which dominated zooplankton biomass. Three treatment types were processed: bulk animals, bulk animals without guts and tail muscle from each size class at 10 bongo stations. The δ15N ratios were influenced by zooplankton size class, presumably reflecting ontogenetic changes in diet. ANOVA post hoc results and correlations in δ15N signatures among treatments suggest that gut contents may not affect overall nitrogen signatures of Euphausia spp., but that δ13C signatures may be significantly altered by their presence. Carbon interpretations however, were complicated by potential effects of variation in chitin, lipids and metabolism among tissues and the possibility of opportunistic omnivory. Consequently we advocate gut evacuation before sacrifice in euphausiids if specific tissue dissection is impractical and recommend

  4. Low temperature isotope effects of hydrogen diffusion in metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.; Kronmueller, H.

    1989-01-01

    Snoek-like relaxation peaks of Hydrogen and Deuterium in amorphous Fe 80 B 20 , Fe 40 Ni 40 P 14 B 6 and Fe 91 Zr 9 are detected. At low H, D concentrations the peaks are near 200 K and show small isotope effects of the average activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.6 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≤ 10 meV). For higher H, D-contents the peaks shift to lower temperatures around to 120 K and show distinct isotope effects in the activation energies (anti Q H ≅ 0.3 eV, anti Q D - anti Q H ≅ 30 meV) and in the amplitude of the low temperature tails of the relaxation peaks. This points to isotope mass dependent deviations from the Arrhenius law due to nonthermal tunneling processes. (orig.)

  5. Carbon-13 and oxygen-18 isotope effects in the decarboxylation of nicotinic acid of natural isotopic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Zielinska, A.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.; McKenzie, J.A.; Bernasconi, S.; Paul, H.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon-13 and oxygen-18 isotope effects in the decarboxylation of nicotinic acid of natural isotopic composition above and below its melting temperature have been studied and compared with the primary (PKIE) and secondary kinetic isotope effects (SKIE) of 13 C and 18 O, respectively, in the decarboxylation of other heterocyclic acids. The temperature dependence of the secondary oxygen-18 isotope effects is negative in the total 221-255 deg C temperature interval investigated initially. The 13 C KIE measured above melting point of N.A. (temperature interval 235-270 deg C) are located in the range 1.007-1.009. Below melting point of nicotinic acid the 13 C KIE are larger and reveal the negative temperature dependence ( 13 C KIE decreases with decreasing the reaction temperature from 1.013/at 230 deg C to 1.0114/at 221 deg C). A discussion of the above isotopic results is presented. (author)

  6. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of negatively charged NH.N systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Grech, Eugeniusz

    2013-01-01

    ” and equilibrium cases. NMR assignments of the former have been revised. The NH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are rather unusual in these strongly hydrogen bonded systems between a NH and a negatively charged nitrogen atom. The formal four-bond effects are found to be negative......Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are investigated in anions of 1,8-bis(4-toluenesulphonamido)naphthalenes together with N,N-(naphthalene-1,8-diyl)bis(2,2,2-trifluoracetamide) all with bis(1,8-dimethylamino)napthaleneH+ as counter ion. These compounds represent both “static...... indicating transmission via the hydrogen bond. In addition, unusual long range effects are seen. Structures, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts and changes in nuclear shieldings upon deuteriation are calculated using density functional theory methods...

  7. Identifying vital effects in Halimeda algae with Ca isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Blättler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical records of biogenic carbonates provide some of the most valuable records of the geological past, but are often difficult to interpret without a mechanistic understanding of growth processes. In this experimental study, Halimeda algae are used as a test organism to untangle some of the specific factors that influence their skeletal composition, in particular their Ca-isotope composition. Algae were stimulated to precipitate both calcite and aragonite by growth in artificial Cretaceous seawater, resulting in experimental samples with somewhat malformed skeletons. The Ca-isotope fractionation of the algal calcite (−0.6‰ appears to be much smaller than that for the algal aragonite (−1.4‰, similar to the behaviour observed in inorganic precipitates. However, the carbonate from Halimeda has higher Ca-isotope ratios than inorganic forms by approximately 0.25‰, likely because of Rayleigh distillation within the algal intercellular space. In identifying specific vital effects and the magnitude of their influence on Ca-isotope ratios, this study suggests that mineralogy has a first-order control on the marine Ca-isotope cycle.

  8. Magic numbers and isotopic effect of ion clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guanghou

    1989-04-01

    The magic numbers and isotopic effect as well as stable configurations in relation to the charge state of the clusters are discussed. Ionic (atomic) clusters are small atomic aggregates, a physical state between gas and solid states, and have many interesting properties, some of them are more or less similar to those in nuclei

  9. Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Reduction of Methyl Iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1999-01-01

    a-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE's) have been determined for the reaction of methyl iodide with a series of reducing agents. Reagents which transfer hydride ion in an SN2 reaction show small inverse or small normal KIE's. Reagents which transfer an electron to methyl iodide to produce...

  10. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains nonsteady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Riley, William J.

    2009-12-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic isotope fractionation often assumes first-order or Michaelis-Menten kinetics, the latter solved under the quasi-steady state assumption. Both formulations lead to a constant isotope fractionation factor, therefore they may return incorrect estimations of isotopic effects and misleading interpretations of isotopic signatures when fractionation is not a steady process. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitrification in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate (2006) in which high and variable 15N-N2O enrichment during N2O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N2O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with Michaelis-Menten kinetics. When Michaelis-Menten kinetics were coupled to Monod kinetics to describe biomass and enzyme dynamics, and the quasi-steady state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observed concentrations, and variable and inverse isotope fractionations. These results imply a substantial revision in modeling isotopic effects, suggesting that steady state kinetics such as first-order, Rayleigh, and classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics should be superseded by transient kinetics in conjunction with biomass and enzyme dynamics.

  11. Menopause effect on blood Fe and Cu isotope compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Balter, Vincent

    2014-02-01

    Iron (δ(56) Fe) and copper (δ(65) Cu) stable isotope compositions in blood of adult human include a sex effect, which still awaits a biological explanation. Here, we investigate the effect of menopause by measuring blood δ(56) Fe and δ(65) Cu values of aging men and women. The results show that, while the Fe and Cu isotope compositions of blood of men are steady throughout their lifetime, postmenopausal women exhibit blood δ(65) Cu values similar to men, and δ(56) Fe values intermediate between men and premenopausal women. The residence time of Cu and Fe in the body likely explains why the blood δ(65) Cu values, but not the δ(56) Fe values, of postmenopausal women resemble that of men. We suggest that the Cu and Fe isotopic fractionation between blood and liver resides in the redox reaction occurring during hepatic solicitation of Fe stores. This reaction affects the Cu speciation, which explains why blood Cu isotope composition is impacted by the cessation of menstruations. Considering that Fe and Cu sex differences are recorded in bones, we believe this work has important implications for their use as a proxy of sex or age at menopause in past populations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Tritium conductivity and isotope effect in proton-conducting perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukundan, R.; Brosha, E.L.; Birdsell, S.A.; Costello, A.L.; Garzon, F.H.; Willms, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    The tritium ion conductivities of SrZr 0.9 Yb 0.1 O 2.95 and BaCe 0.9 Yb 0.1 O 2.95 have been measured by ac impedance analysis. The high tritium conductivity of these perovskites could potentially lead to their application as an electrochemical membrane for the recovery of tritium from tritiated gas streams. The conductivities of these perovskites, along with SrCe 0.95 Yb 0.05 O 2.975 , were also measured in hydrogen- and deuterium-containing atmospheres to illustrate the isotope effect. For the strontium zirconate and barium cerate samples, the impedance plot consists of two clearly resolved arcs, a bulk and a grain boundary arc, in the temperature range 50--350 C. However, for the strontium cerate sample, the clear resolution of the bulk conductivity was not possible and only the total conductivity was measurable. Thus, the isotope effect was clearly established only for the strontium zirconate and barium cerate samples. The decrease in bulk conductivity with increasing isotope mass was found to be a result of an increase in the activation energy for conduction accompanied by a decrease in the pre-exponential factor. Since the concentration of the mobile species (H+, D+, or T+) should remain relatively constant at T < 350 C, this increase in activation energy is directly attributable to the increased activation energy for the isotope mobility

  13. Effect of random charge fluctuation on strongly coupled dusty Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issaad, M.; Rouiguia, L.; Djebli, M.

    2008-09-01

    Modeling the interaction between particles is an open issue in dusty plasma. We dealt with strongly coupled dust particles in two dimensional confined system. For small number of clusters, we investigate the effect of random charge fluctuation on background configuration. The study is conducted for a short rang as well as a long rang potential interaction. Numerical simulation is performed using Monte-Carlo simulation in the presence of parabolic confinement and at low temperature. We have studied the background configurations for a dust particles with constant charge and in the presence of random charge fluctuation due to the discrete nature of charge carriers. The latter is studied for a positively charged dust when the dominant charging process is due to photo-emission from the dust surface. It is found, for small classical cluster consisting of small number of particles, short rang potential gives the same result as long rang one. It is also found that the random charge fluctuation affect the background configurations.

  14. Isotope effect in quasi-two-dimensional metal-organic antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, P. A.; Singleton, J.; Maitland, C.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Baker, P. J.; McDonald, R. D.; Cox, S.; Sengupta, P.; Manson, J. L.; Funk, K. A.; Schlueter, J. A.

    2008-08-01

    Although the isotope effect in superconducting materials is well documented, changes in the magnetic properties of antiferromagnets due to isotopic substitution are seldom discussed and remain poorly understood. This is perhaps surprising given the possible link between the quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) antiferromagnetic and superconducting phases of the layered cuprates. Here we report the experimental observation of shifts in the Néel temperature and critical magnetic fields (ΔTN/TN≈4%;ΔBc/Bc≈4%) in a Q2D organic molecular antiferromagnet on substitution of hydrogen for deuterium. These compounds are characterized by strong hydrogen bonds through which the dominant superexchange is mediated. We evaluate how the in-plane and interplane exchange energies evolve as the atoms of hydrogen on different ligands are substituted, and suggest a possible mechanism for this effect in terms of the relative exchange efficiency of hydrogen and deuterium bonds.

  15. Isotope effects in photo dissociation of ozone with visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früchtl, Marion; Janssen, Christof; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ozone (O3) plays a key role for many chemical oxidation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. In these chemical reactions, ozone can transfer oxygen to other trace gases. This is particularly interesting, since O3 has a very peculiar isotope composition. Following the mass dependent fractionation equation δ17O = 0.52 * δ18O, most fractionation processes depend directly on mass. However, O3 shows an offset to the mass dependent fractionation line. Processes, which show such anomalies, are termed mass independent fractionations (MIF). A very well studied example for a chemical reaction that leads to mass independent fractionation is the O3 formation reaction. To what degree O3 destruction reactions need to be considered in order to understand the isotope composition of atmospheric O3 is still not fully understood and an open question within scientific community. We set up new experiments to investigate the isotope effect resulting from photo dissociation of O3 in the Chappuis band (R1). Initial O3 is produced by an electric discharge. After photolysis O3 is collected in a cold trap at the triple point temperature of nitrogen (63K). O3 is then converted to O2 in order to measure the oxygen isotopes of O3 using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. To isolate O3 photo dissociation (R1) from O3 decomposition (R2) and secondary O3 formation (R3), we use varying amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) as O atom quencher (R4). In this way we suppress the O + O3 reaction (R3) and determine the isotope fractionation in R1 and R2 separately. We present first results on the isotope effects in O3 photo dissociation with visible light in the presence of different bath gases. Results are interpreted based on chemical kinetics modeling. (R1) O3 + hυ → O (3P) + O2 (R2) O3 + O (3P) → 2 O2 (R3) O + O2 + M → O3 + M (R4) O (3P) + CO + M → CO2 + M

  16. Strong evidence for terrestrial support of zooplankton in small lakes based on stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J.J.; Carpenter, S.R.; Kitchell, J.; Pace, M.L.; Solomon, C.T.; Weidel, B.

    2011-01-01

    Cross-ecosystem subsidies to food webs can alter metabolic balances in the receiving (subsidized) system and free the food web, or particular consumers, from the energetic constraints of local primary production. Although cross-ecosystem subsidies between terrestrial and aquatic systems have been well recognized for benthic organisms in streams, rivers, and the littoral zones of lakes, terrestrial subsidies to pelagic consumers are more difficult to demonstrate and remain controversial. Here, we adopt a unique approach by using stable isotopes of H, C, and N to estimate terrestrial support to zooplankton in two contrasting lakes. Zooplankton (Holopedium, Daphnia, and Leptodiaptomus) are comprised of ???20-40% of organic material of terrestrial origin. These estimates are as high as, or higher than, prior measures obtained by experimentally manipulating the inorganic 13C content of these lakes to augment the small, natural contrast in 13C between terrestrial and algal photosynthesis. Our study gives credence to a growing literature, which we review here, suggesting that significant terrestrial support of pelagic crustaceans (zooplankton) is widespread.

  17. Strong evidence for terrestrial support of zooplankton in small lakes based on stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jonathan J.; Carpenter, Stephen R.; Kitchell, Jim; Pace, Michael L.; Solomon, Christopher T.; Weidel, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Cross-ecosystem subsidies to food webs can alter metabolic balances in the receiving (subsidized) system and free the food web, or particular consumers, from the energetic constraints of local primary production. Although cross-ecosystem subsidies between terrestrial and aquatic systems have been well recognized for benthic organisms in streams, rivers, and the littoral zones of lakes, terrestrial subsidies to pelagic consumers are more difficult to demonstrate and remain controversial. Here, we adopt a unique approach by using stable isotopes of H, C, and N to estimate terrestrial support to zooplankton in two contrasting lakes. Zooplankton (Holopedium, Daphnia, and Leptodiaptomus) are comprised of ≈20–40% of organic material of terrestrial origin. These estimates are as high as, or higher than, prior measures obtained by experimentally manipulating the inorganic 13C content of these lakes to augment the small, natural contrast in 13C between terrestrial and algal photosynthesis. Our study gives credence to a growing literature, which we review here, suggesting that significant terrestrial support of pelagic crustaceans (zooplankton) is widespread. PMID:21245299

  18. Stable isotope analysis as an early monitoring tool for community-scale effects of rat eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Katherine M.; Hathaway, Stacie A.; Wegmann, Alex; Miller-ter Kuile, Ana; Fisher, Robert N.; Young, Hillary S.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive rats have colonized most of the islands of the world, resulting in strong negative impacts on native biodiversity and on ecosystem functions. As prolific omnivores, invasive rats can cause local extirpation of a wide range of native species, with cascading consequences that can reshape communities and ecosystems. Eradication of rats on islands is now becoming a widespread approach to restore ecosystems, and many native island species show strong numerical responses to rat eradication. However, the effect of rat eradication on other consumers can extend beyond direct numerical effects, to changes in behavior, dietary composition, and other ecological parameters. These behavioral and trophic effects may have strong cascading impacts on the ecology of restored ecosystems, but they have rarely been examined. In this study, we explore how rat eradication has affected the trophic ecology of native land crab communities. Using stable isotope analysis of rats and crabs, we demonstrate that the diet or trophic position of most crabs changed subsequent to rat eradication. Combined with the numerical recovery of two carnivorous land crab species (Geograpsus spp.), this led to a dramatic widening of the crab trophic niche following rat eradication. Given the established importance of land crabs in structuring island communities, particularly plants, this suggests an unappreciated mechanism by which rat eradication may alter island ecology. This study also demonstrates the potential for stable isotope analysis as a complementary monitoring tool to traditional techniques, with the potential to provide more nuanced assessments of the community- and ecosystem-wide effects of restoration.

  19. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition in phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.; Czarnota, G.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.; Kasprzyk, G.; Gumolka, L.; Staedter, W.

    1993-01-01

    The 13 C kinetic isotope effect fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid (LA) of natural isotopic composition by concentrated phosphoric acids (PA) and by 85% H 3 PO 4 has been studied in the temperature interval of 60-150 deg C. The values of the 13 C (1) isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid in 100% H 3 PO 4 , in pyrophosphoric acid and in more concentrated phosphoric acids are intermediate between the values calculated assuming that the C (1)- OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of dehydration and those calculated for rupture of the carbon-carbon bond in the transition state. In the temperature interval of 90-130 deg C the experimental 13 C fractionation factors determined in concentrated PA approach quite closely the 13 C fractionation corresponding to C (2)- C (1) bond scission. The 13 C (1) kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of LA in 85% orthophosphoric acid in the temperature range of 110-150 deg C coincide with the 13 C isotope effects calculated assuming that the frequency corresponding to the C (1) -OH vibration is lost in the transition state of decarbonylation. A change of the mechanism of decarbonylation of LA in going from concentrated PA medium to 85% H 3 PO 4 has been suggested. A possible secondary 18 O and a primary 18 O kinetic isotope effect in decarbonylation of lactic acid in phosphoric acids media have been discussed, too. (author) 21 refs.; 3 tabs

  20. The effect of natural weathering on the chemical and isotopic composition of biotites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauer, N.; Bonnot-Courtois, C.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of progressive natural weathering on the isotopic (Rb-Sr, K-Ar, deltaD, delta 18 O) and chemical (REE, H 2 O + ) compositions of biotite has been studied on a suite of migmatitic biotites from the Chad Republic. During the early stages of weathering the Rb-Sr system is strongly affected, the hydrogen and oxygen isotope compositions change markedly, the minerals are depleted in light REE, the water content increases by a factor of two, and the K-Ar system is relatively little disturbed. During intensive weathering the K-Ar system is more strongly disturbed than the Rb-Sr system. Most of the isotopic and chemical modifications take place under nonequilibrium conditions and occur before newly formed kaolinite and/or smectite can be detected. These observations suggest that (a) 'protominerals' may form within the biotite structure during the initial period of weathering, and (b) only when chemical equilibrium is approached in the weathering profile are new minerals able to form. (author)

  1. Aerodynamic effects in isotope separation by gaseous diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bert, L.A.; Prosperetti, A.; Fiocchi, R.

    1978-01-01

    The turbulent flow of an isotopic mixture in a porous-walled pipe is considered in the presence of suction through the wall. A simple model is formulated for the evaluation of aerodynamic effects on the separation efficiency. The predictions of the model are found to compare very favourably with experiment. In the limit of small suction velocities, results obtained by other investigators for diffusion in a turbulent steam are recovered. (author)

  2. Isotope effect in thermodynamic parameters of styrene polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, B.V.; Lebedev, N.K.; Smirnova, N.N.

    1985-01-01

    Isotope effects in the enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs energy of the styrene polymerization process are detected by adiabatic- and isothermal calorimetry methods. Thermodynamic parameters of styrene- and deuterostyrene polymerization are calculated in the range from 0 to 350 K. Differences in thermodynamic quantities of these processes are explained by the influence of hydrogen substitution by deuterium and constitute: for enthalpy and Gibbs energy 2-3 kJ/mol, for entropy - 2-3 J/(mol x k)

  3. Is the isotope effect a consequence of magnetic transport?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurro, B.; Rodriguez-Rodrigo, L.; Castejon, F.

    1994-01-01

    The isotope effect, i.e. the improved confinement of deuterium fuelling compared with hydrogen fuelling, shows up in nearly all tokamaks with various type of wall conditioning and in various confinement regimes. Many empirical scalings for energy confinement include a dependence of the energy replacement time τ E ∝ A i α where α ∼ 1/2, and A i is the atomic mass of the plasma ion species. However, no convincing theoretical justification has so far been found for such a dependence; classical transport would lead us to expect α 1/2, as would some theories for anomalous transport (e.g. those based on drift wave turbulence). This empirical scaling effect has been reviewed along with other relevant theories in a recent paper. The main conclusion drawn therein was that this effect was an unsolved fundamental problem in tokamak transport theory. In this paper, we put forward the hypothesis that the isotope effect is a consequence of magnetic transport in the plasma which we can support by observed reductions in the magnetic turbulence level in deuterium operated plasmas. The proposition is supported by data which we claim give some information about the level of stochastic magnetic turbulence within the plasma. These data show a reduction for the deuterium in the difference between the apparent temperature of a central ion (C V) and that of the main ion, hydrogen or deuterium. This can account for the isotope enhancement factors. In addition, preliminary results from sawtooth propagation in both hard and soft X-ray monitors supports the former proposition. To outline this, firstly the isotope documentation in the TJ-I tokamak is reported and then a plausible interpretation within a magnetic transport model is discussed. (author) 6 refs., 4 figs

  4. Certain relativistic effects due to strong electromagnetic fields in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsintsadze, N.L.

    1974-01-01

    It is shown that the propagation of a strong electromagnetic wave in an electron plasma can lead to a generation of a constant electron current along the direction of propagation and to a large increase in the average electron density. (Auth.)

  5. Strong linkage of polar cod (Boreogadus saida) to sea ice algae-produced carbon: Evidence from stomach content, fatty acid and stable isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlbach, Doreen; Schaafsma, Fokje L.; Graeve, Martin; Lebreton, Benoit; Lange, Benjamin Allen; David, Carmen; Vortkamp, Martina; Flores, Hauke

    2017-03-01

    The polar cod (Boreogadus saida) is considered an ecological key species, because it reaches high stock biomasses and constitutes an important carbon source for seabirds and marine mammals in high-Arctic ecosystems. Young polar cod (1-2 years) are often associated with the underside of sea ice. To evaluate the impact of changing Arctic sea ice habitats on polar cod, we examined the diet composition and quantified the contribution of ice algae-produced carbon (αIce) to the carbon budget of polar cod. Young polar cod were sampled in the ice-water interface layer in the central Arctic Ocean during late summer 2012. Diets and carbon sources of these fish were examined using 4 approaches: (1) stomach content analysis, (2) fatty acid (FA) analysis, (3) bulk nitrogen and carbon stable isotope analysis (BSIA) and (4) compound-specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) of FAs. The ice-associated (sympagic) amphipod Apherusa glacialis dominated the stomach contents by mass, indicating a high importance of sympagic fauna in young polar cod diets. The biomass of food measured in stomachs implied constant feeding at daily rates of ∼1.2% body mass per fish, indicating the potential for positive growth. FA profiles of polar cod indicated that diatoms were the primary carbon source, indirectly obtained via amphipods and copepods. The αIce using bulk isotope data from muscle was estimated to be >90%. In comparison, αIce based on CSIA ranged from 34 to 65%, with the highest estimates from muscle and the lowest from liver tissue. Overall, our results indicate a strong dependency of polar cod on ice-algae produced carbon. This suggests that young polar cod may be particularly vulnerable to changes in the distribution and structure of sea ice habitats. Due to the ecological key role of polar cod, changes at the base of the sea ice-associated food web are likely to affect the higher trophic levels of high-Arctic ecosystems.

  6. Electronic isotope effects in the palladium-hydrogen system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oppeneer, P.M.

    1987-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is the determination of the physical origin of the isotope effects measured in the de Haas-van Alphen quantities of dilute Pd(H), Pd(D) and Pd(T) alloys. A computational method for the numerical evaluation of interstitial Green functions, which are indispensable for the descriptions of interactions of conducting electrons with interstitial atoms, is presented. The Green functions are tested in ab initio calculations of the dHvA quantities for the frozen interstitial impurities H, B and C in Pd using a KKR-Green function formulation for interstitial effects. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data and it is concluded that the interstitial Green functions, in combination with the KKR-Green function approach, are applicable for the description of electron scattering by interstitial defects. The influence of zero-point motion of a light interstitial on the electron scattering is evaluated in a computational model. Computations show that the influence on the dHvA quantities is quite small. The anharmonicity of the octahedral potential well in a Pd lattice is considered because it can cause differences in the vibrational properties of hydrogen isotopes. The influence of resonant vibrations on the electron-defect scattering is investigated. It is shown that the occurrence of a resonant mode depends sensitively on the isotope's mass and force constants. It is concluded that the isotope effect in dHvA quantities can be explained by the occurrence of a low-frequency resonant vibration in the Pd(D) system. 264 refs.; 9 figs.; 10 tabs

  7. Effective Field Theories and Strong Interactions. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Sean

    2011-01-01

    The framework of Effective Field Theories (EFTs) allows us to describe strong interactions in terms of degrees of freedom relevant to the energy regimes of interest, in the most general way consistent with the symmetries of QCD. Observables are expanded systematically in powers of M lo /M hi , where M lo (M hi ) denotes a low-(high-)energy scale. This organizational principle is referred to as 'power counting'. Terms of increasing powers in the expansion parameter are referred to as leading order (LO), next-to-leading order (NLO), etc. Details of the QCD dynamics not included explicitly are encoded in interaction parameters, or 'low-energy constants' (LECs), which can in principle be calculated from an explicit solution of QCD - for example via lattice simulations- but can also be determined directly from experimental data. QCD has an intrinsic scale M QCD ≅ 1 GeV, at which the QCD coupling constant α s (M QCD ) becomes large and the dynamics becomes non-perturbative. As a consequence M QCD sets the scale for the masses of most hadrons, such as the nucleon mass m N ≅ 940 MeV. EFTs can roughly be divided into two categories: those that can be matched onto QCD in perturbation theory, which we call high-energy EFTs, and those that cannot be matched perturbatively, which we call low-energy EFTs. In high-energy EFTs, M QCD typically sets the low-energy scale, and all the dynamics associated with this scale reside in matrix elements of EFT operators. These non-perturbative matrix elements are the LECs and are also referred to as long-distance contributions. Each matrix element is multiplied by a short-distance coefficient, which contains the dynamics from the high scale M hi . Since M hi >> M QCD , α s (M hi ) hi ∼ M Q , the heavy-quark mass, and in addition to M QCD there are low scales associated with the typical relative momentum ∼ M Q v and energy ∼ M Q v 2 of the heavy quarks. Depending on the sizes of M Q and the heavy-quark velocity v these scales can

  8. Carbon-13 isotope effects on 199Hg nuclear shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebald, Angelika; Wrackmeyer, Bernd

    1985-01-01

    Secondary 13 C/ 12 C isotope effects on 199 Hg nuclear shielding (Δdeltasup(i)( 199 Hg)) are of interest because of the unusual shift to high frequency which has been observed for a few alkyl mercury compounds. Continuing interest in the NMR parameters of mercury compounds prompted a search for the values Δdeltasup(i)( 199 Hg) in a greater variety of organomercurials. This should help to find out about the range of Δdeltasup(i)( 199 Hg) and to obtain a firmer basis for the discussion of the high-frequency shifts. The data and experimental conditions are given for chemical shifts delta 199 Hg, coupling constants sup(n)J( 199 Hg 13 C) and 13 C/ 12 C isotope shifts Δdeltasup(i)( 199 Hg) of fourteen 199 Hg organomercury compounds. The results are discussed. (author)

  9. How strong and generalisable is the Generation Y effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Simone; Remaud, Hervé; Chabin, Yann

    2011-01-01

    alcoholic beverage consumption. A number of noticeable differences appeared between countries: wine involvement and consumption increases with age in traditional European wine markets, while they decrease in North America; environmental concerns and purchase channel usage hardly differ between generations......Purpose – This study aims to investigate how strongly Generation Y consumers differ in their values, attitudes and wine and alcoholic beverage consumption behaviour from older generations. The comparison spans seven culturally different markets. Design/methodology/approach – Large representative...

  10. Selected bibliography on deuterium isotope effects and heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dave, S.M.; Donde, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in using deuterium and heavy water not only in nuclear industry but also in various fields of basic as well as applied research in physics, chemistry and biology. As a result, the literature is being enriched with a large number of research papers and technical reports published each year. Thus, to enable the scientists to have an easy reference to these works, an endeavour has been made in this selected bibliography, to enlist the publications related to these fields. Since the interest is concerned mainly with heavy water production processes, deuterium isotope effects etc., several aspects (e.g. nuclear) of deuterium have not been covered here. The material in this bibliography which cites 2388 references has been classified under six broad headings, viz. (1) Production of heavy water, (2) Study of deuterium isotope effects, (3) Analysis and Properties of heavy water, (4) Laser Separation of deuterium, (5) Isotopic exchange reactions, and (6) Miscellaneous. The sources of information used for this compilation are chemical abstracts, nuclear science abstracts, INIS Atomindex and also some scattered search through journals and reports available in the B.A.R.C. library. However, in spite of sincere attempts for a wide coverage, no claim is being made towards the exhaustiveness of this bibliography. (author)

  11. Kinetic isotope effects and how to describe them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Karandashev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We review several methods for computing kinetic isotope effects in chemical reactions including semiclassical and quantum instanton theory. These methods describe both the quantization of vibrational modes as well as tunneling and are applied to the ⋅H + H2 and ⋅H + CH4 reactions. The absolute rate constants computed with the semiclassical instanton method both using on-the-fly electronic structure calculations and fitted potential-energy surfaces are also compared directly with exact quantum dynamics results. The error inherent in the instanton approximation is found to be relatively small and similar in magnitude to that introduced by using fitted surfaces. The kinetic isotope effect computed by the quantum instanton is even more accurate, and although it is computationally more expensive, the efficiency can be improved by path-integral acceleration techniques. We also test a simple approach for designing potential-energy surfaces for the example of proton transfer in malonaldehyde. The tunneling splittings are computed, and although they are found to deviate from experimental results, the ratio of the splitting to that of an isotopically substituted form is in much better agreement. We discuss the strengths and limitations of the potential-energy surface and based on our findings suggest ways in which it can be improved.

  12. Neutron skin effect of some Mo isotopes in pre-equilibrium reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The neutron skin effect has been investigated for even isotopes of molybdenum at 25.6. MeV 94−100Mo(p,xn) ... exciton numbers from different radii of even Mo isotopes were used to obtain the corresponding neutron ..... nical applications such as the isotope production alternatives (for producing medical ra- dioisotopes ...

  13. Detuning effect in multistep photo-ionization of atomic isotope of heavy element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakaida, Ikuo; Akaoka, Katsuaki; Miyabe, Masabumi; Oba, Masaki; Arisawa, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    Detuning effect on the excitation wavelength in 3-step photoionization of atomic isotope of heavy element was experimentally obtained and the role of the isotope shift and hyperfine structure in each transition level was discussed. To achieve high selectivity, the combination of the HFS and isotope sift of upper and lower energy level including the autoionizing level was important. (author)

  14. Isotope effects in visible light photolysis and chemical destruction of ozone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Früchtl, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372648096

    2015-01-01

    Ozone (O3) plays a key role for the radiative balance of the earth and for chemical processes in the atmosphere. In addition, it has a very peculiar isotopic composition: The heavy stable isotopes of oxygen, 17O and 18O are strongly enriched in O3 and the enrichments are of almost equal magnitude,

  15. Magnetic field and magnetic isotope effects on photochemical reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasa, Masanobu

    1999-01-01

    By at present exact experiments and the theoretical analysis, it was clear that the magnetic field less than 2 T affected a radical pair reaction and biradical reaction. The radical pair life and the dissipative radical yield showed the magnetic field effects on chemical reactions. The radical pair mechanism and the triplet mechanism were known as the mechanism of magnetic field effects. The radical pair mechanism consists of four mechanisms such as the homogeneous hyperfine interaction (HFC), the delta-g mechanism, the relaxation mechanism and the level cross mechanism. In order to observe the magnetic effects of the radical pair mechanism, two conditions need, namely, the recombination rate of singlet radical pair > the dissipation rate and the spin exchange rate > the dissipation rate. A nanosecond laser photo-decomposition equipment can observe the magnetic field effects. The inversion phenomena of magnetic field effect, isolation of the relaxation mechanism and the delta-g mechanism, the magnetic field effect of heavy metal radical reaction, the magnetic field effect in homogeneous solvent, saturation of delta-g mechanism are explained. The succeeded examples of isotope concentration by the magnetic isotope effect are 17 O, 19 Si, 33 S, 73 Ge and 235 U. (S.Y.)

  16. Isotope enrichment effect of gaseous mixtures in standing sound vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knesebeck, R.L.

    1984-01-01

    When standing acoustic waves are excited in a tube containing a mixture of two gases, a partial zonal fractioning of the components arises as consequence of mass transport by diffusion, driven by the thermal and pressure gradients which are associeted with the standing waves. This effect is present in each zone corresponding to a quarter wavelength, with the heavier component becoming enriched at the nodes fo the standing waves and deplected at the crests. The magnitude of the enrichment in one of the components of a binary gas mixture is given by Δω=ap 2 /lambda [b + (1-bω)] 2 . Where ω is the mass concentration of the component in the mixture, a and b are parameters which are related to molecular proprieties of the gases, p is the relative pressure amplitude of the standing wave and lambda is its wavelength. For a natural mixture of uranium hexafluorate, with 0.715% of the uranium isotope 340 an enrichment of about 2 x 10 -6 % in the concentration of this isotope is theorecticaly attainable per stage consisting of a quarter wavelenght, when a standing acoustical wave of relative pressure amplitude of 0,2 and wavelenght of 20 cm is used. Since standing acoustical waves are easely excited in gas columns, an isotope enrichment plant made of a cascade of tubes in which standing waves are excited, is presumably feasible with relatively low investment and operation costs. (Author) [pt

  17. On the Effect of Planetary Stable Isotope Compositions on Growth and Survival of Terrestrial Organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueshu Xie

    Full Text Available Isotopic compositions of reactants affect the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. Usually it is assumed that heavy stable isotope enrichment leads to progressively slower reactions. Yet the effect of stable isotopes may be nonlinear, as exemplified by the "isotopic resonance" phenomenon. Since the isotopic compositions of other planets of Solar system, including Mars and Venus, are markedly different from terrestrial (e.g., deuterium content is ≈5 and ≈100 times higher, respectively, it is far from certain that terrestrial life will thrive in these isotopic conditions. Here we found that Martian deuterium content negatively affected survival of shrimp in semi-closed biosphere on a year-long time scale. Moreover, the bacterium Escherichia coli grows slower at Martian isotopic compositions and even slower at Venus's compositions. Thus, the biological impact of varying stable isotope compositions needs to be taken into account when planning interplanetary missions.

  18. Effect of ecological conditions on migration of thorium isotopes isotopes in the soil-plant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuktomova, I.I.; Titaeva, N.A.; Kochan, I.G.

    1994-01-01

    Two territories (zones of central taiga and mountainous tundra) with a high natural content of thorium in soil forming rock and soil were examined in comparative analysis of fixed state and behavior of thorium isotopes ( 232 Th, 230 Th, 228 Th, 227 Th) in the soil layer and rock including evaluation and nature of distribution and forms of presence of isotopes in soil profiles; the extent of participance of isotopes in soil-forming processes is discussed and several conclusions are made regarding the role of genesis of isotopes and parameters of the migration medium for the direction and rate of migration processes. It was found that both climatic zones are characterized by the inclusion of all thorium isotopes in the biological cycle in the soil--plant systems. Characterizing as a whole the build up up thorium isotopes in all examined vegetation of the tundra, it may be noted that it is characterized by a slightly different dependence of mobility of these isotopes in comparison with the vegetation of the taiga zone. In addition, the intensity of inclusion of these thorium isotopes in the biological cycles of migration in the taiga zones is higher than in the tundra zone. 3 refs., 4 tabs

  19. Spin effects in strong-field laser-electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, S; Bauke, H; Müller, T-O; Villalba-Chávez, S; Müller, C

    2013-01-01

    The electron spin degree of freedom can play a significant role in relativistic scattering processes involving intense laser fields. In this contribution we discuss the influence of the electron spin on (i) Kapitza-Dirac scattering in an x-ray laser field of high intensity, (ii) photo-induced electron-positron pair production in a strong laser wave and (iii) multiphoton electron-positron pair production on an atomic nucleus. We show that in all cases under consideration the electron spin can have a characteristic impact on the process properties and their total probabilities. To this end, spin-resolved calculations based on the Dirac equation in the presence of an intense laser field are performed. The predictions from Dirac theory are also compared with the corresponding results from the Klein-Gordon equation.

  20. Isotope effects in ice Ih: A path-integral simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Carlos P.; Ramírez, Rafael

    2011-03-01

    Ice Ih has been studied by path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, using the effective q-TIP4P/F potential model for flexible water. This has allowed us to analyze finite-temperature quantum effects in this solid phase from 25 to 300 K at ambient pressure. Among these effects we find a negative thermal expansion of ice at low temperatures, which does not appear in classical molecular dynamics simulations. The compressibility derived from volume fluctuations gives results in line with experimental data. We have analyzed isotope effects in ice Ih by considering normal, heavy, and tritiated water. In particular, we studied the effect of changing the isotopic mass of hydrogen on the kinetic energy and atomic delocalization in the crystal as well as on structural properties such as interatomic distances and molar volume. For D2O ice Ih at 100 K we obtained a decrease in molar volume and intramolecular O-H distance of 0.6% and 0.4%, respectively, as compared to H2O ice.

  1. Isotope effects in ice Ih: a path-integral simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Carlos P; Ramírez, Rafael

    2011-03-07

    Ice Ih has been studied by path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, using the effective q-TIP4P/F potential model for flexible water. This has allowed us to analyze finite-temperature quantum effects in this solid phase from 25 to 300 K at ambient pressure. Among these effects we find a negative thermal expansion of ice at low temperatures, which does not appear in classical molecular dynamics simulations. The compressibility derived from volume fluctuations gives results in line with experimental data. We have analyzed isotope effects in ice Ih by considering normal, heavy, and tritiated water. In particular, we studied the effect of changing the isotopic mass of hydrogen on the kinetic energy and atomic delocalization in the crystal as well as on structural properties such as interatomic distances and molar volume. For D(2)O ice Ih at 100 K we obtained a decrease in molar volume and intramolecular O-H distance of 0.6% and 0.4%, respectively, as compared to H(2)O ice. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Radiation effects on relativistic electrons in strong external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The effects of radiation of high energy electron beams are a major issue in almost all types of charged particle accelerators. The objective of this thesis is both the analytical and numerical study of radiation effects. Due to its many applications the study of the self force has become a very active and productive field of research. The main part of this thesis is devoted to the study of radiation effects in laser-based plasma accelerators. Analytical models predict the existence of radiation effects. The investigation of radiation reaction show that in laser-based plasma accelerators, the self force effects lower the energy gain and emittance for moderate energies electron beams and increase the relative energy spread. However, for relatively high energy electron beams, the self radiation and retardation (radiation effects of one electron on the other electron of the system) effects increase the transverse emittance of the beam. The energy gain decreases to even lower value and relative energy spread increases to even higher value due to high radiation losses. The second part of this thesis investigates with radiation reaction in focused laser beams. Radiation effects are very weak even for high energy electrons. The radiation-free acceleration and the simple practical setup make direct acceleration in a focused laser beam very attractive. The results presented in this thesis can be helpful for the optimization of future electron acceleration experiments, in particular in the case of laser-plasma accelerators.

  3. Effective magnetic moment of neutrinos in strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez, A; Masood, S S; Gaitan, R; Rodríguez, S

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we compute the effective magnetic moment of neutrinos propagating in dense high magnetized medium. Taking typical values of magnetic field and densities of astrophysical objects (such as the cores of supernovae and neutron stars) we obtain an effective type of dipole magnetic moment in agreement with astrophysical and cosmological bounds. (Author)

  4. Malic enzyme: Tritium isotope effects with alternative dinucleotide substrates and divalent metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsten, W.E.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F. (Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum catalyzes the divalent metal ion dependent oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate to yield pyruvate, carbon dioxide and NADH. Multiple isotope effect studies suggest a stepwise chemical mechanism with hydride transfer from L-malate to NAD occurring first to form oxalacetate, followed by decarboxylation. Utilizing L-malate-2-T, tritium V/K isotope effects have been determined for the hydride transfer step using a variety of alternative dinucleotide substrates and divalent metal ions. Combination of these data with deuterium isotope effects data and previously determined [sup 13]C isotope effects has allowed the calculation of intrinsic isotope effects for the malic enzyme catalyzed reaction. The identity of both the dinucleotide substrate and divalent metal ion has an effect of the size of the intrinsic isotope effect for hydride transfer.

  5. Malic enzyme: Tritium isotope effects with alternative dinucleotide substrates and divalent metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsten, W.E.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1992-01-01

    The NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum catalyzes the divalent metal ion dependent oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate to yield pyruvate, carbon dioxide and NADH. Multiple isotope effect studies suggest a stepwise chemical mechanism with hydride transfer from L-malate to NAD occurring first to form oxalacetate, followed by decarboxylation. Utilizing L-malate-2-T, tritium V/K isotope effects have been determined for the hydride transfer step using a variety of alternative dinucleotide substrates and divalent metal ions. Combination of these data with deuterium isotope effects data and previously determined 13 C isotope effects has allowed the calculation of intrinsic isotope effects for the malic enzyme catalyzed reaction. The identity of both the dinucleotide substrate and divalent metal ion has an effect of the size of the intrinsic isotope effect for hydride transfer

  6. The Connect Effect Building Strong Personal, Professional, and Virtual Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dulworth, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Entrepreneur and executive development expert Mike Dulworth's THE CONNECT EFFECT provides readers with a simple framework and practical tools for developing that crucial competitive advantage: a high-quality personal, professional/organizational and virtual network.

  7. Effective bounds on strong unicity in L1-approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich; Oliva, Paulo B.

    In this paper we present another case study in the general project of Proof Mining which means the logical analysis of prima facie non-effective proofs with the aim of extracting new computationally relevant data. We use techniques based on monotone functional interpretation (developed in [17]) t...

  8. Relative extents of hydrogen-deuterium exchange of nitrosamines: relevance to biological isotope effect studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, G.M.; Lijinsky, W.

    1979-01-01

    Relative extents of base-catalyzed, hydrogen-deuterium exchange have been determined for a number of nitrosamines. Observed trends in the exchanges are discussed in terms of substitution, ring size and conformation. The relevance of the exchanges to deuterium isotope effects in carcinogenesis tests is discussed. Those compounds which give pronounced biological isotope effects undergo exchange only to a small extent. No biological isotope effect is found for compounds which undergo extensive exchange. (author)

  9. Strong delayed interactive effects of metal exposure and warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debecker, Sara; Dinh, Khuong Van; Stoks, Robby

    2017-01-01

    As contaminants are often more toxic at higher temperatures, predicting their impact under global warming remains a key challenge for ecological risk assessment. Ignoring delayed effects, synergistic interactions between contaminants and warming, and differences in sensitivity across species......’ ranges could lead to an important underestimation of the risks. We addressed all three mechanisms by studying effects of larval exposure to zinc and warming before, during, and after metamorphosis in Ischnura elegans damselflies from high- and lowlatitude populations. By integrating these mechanisms...... was especially remarkable in high-latitude animals, as they appeared almost insensitive to zinc during the larval stage. Second, the well-known synergism between metals and warming was manifested not only during the larval stage but also after metamorphosis, yet notably only in low-latitude damselflies...

  10. Effect of strong fragrance on olfactory detection threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasunla, Ayotunde James; Douglas, David Dayo; Adeosun, Aderemi Adeleke; Steinbach, Silke; Nwaorgu, Onyekwere George Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    To assess the olfactory threshold of healthy volunteers at the University College Hospital, Ibadan and to investigate the effect of perfume on their olfactory detection thresholds. A quasi-experimental study on olfactory detection thresholds of healthy volunteers from September 2013 to November 2013. Tertiary health institution. A structured questionniare was administered to the participants in order to obtain information on sociodemographics, occupation, ability to perceive smell, use of perfume, effects of perfume on appetite and self-confidence, history of allergy, and previous nasal surgery. Participants subjectively rated their olfactory performance. Subsequently, they had olfactory detection threshold testing done at baseline and after exposure to perfume with varied concentrations of n-butanol in a forced triple response and staircase fashion. Healthy volunteers, 37 males and 63 females, were evaluated. Their ages ranged from 19 to 59 years with a mean of 31 years ± 8. Subjectively, 94% of the participants had excellent olfactory function. In the pre-exposure forced triple response, 88% were able to detect the odor at ≤.25 mmol/l concentration while in the post-exposure forced triple response, only 66% were able to detect the odor at ≤.25 mmol/l concentration. There is also a statistical significant difference in the olfactory detection threshold score between the pre-exposure and post-exposure period in the participants (P fragrances affects the olfactory detection threshold. Therefore patients and clinicians should be aware of this and its effects on the outcome of test of olfaction. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  11. Isotope effects in gas-phase chemical reactions and photodissociation processes: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    The origins of isotope effects in equilibrium and non-equilibrium chemical processes are reviewed. In non-equilibrium processes, attention is given to isotope effects in simple bimolecular reactions, symmetry-related reactions, and photodissociation processes. Recent examples of isotope effects in these areas are reviewed. Some indication of other scientific areas for which measurements and/or calculations of isotope effects are used is also given. Examples presented focus on neutral molecule chemistry and in many cases complement examples considered in greater detail in the other chapters of this volume

  12. Stirling engines using working fluids with strong real gas effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Invernizzi, Costante M.

    2010-01-01

    Real gas effects typical of the critical region of working fluids are a powerful tool to increase the energy performances of Stirling cycles, mainly at low top temperatures. To carry out the compression near the critical region the working fluids must have a critical temperature near environmental conditions and the use of organic working substances (pure or in suitable mixtures) as a matter of fact begins compulsory. The moderate thermal stability of the organic working fluids limits the maximum temperatures to 300-400 deg. C and as a consequence, the achievable cycles efficiencies result rather low. Carbon dioxide, with a critical temperature of 31 deg. C, is, among the traditionally inorganic gases, an exception and is considered here in comparison with organic substances. But the good thermodynamics of the cycles allows, in the considered cases, conversion efficiencies of about 20%, with good specific powers. The good energy performance of real gas Stirling cycles is obtained at the cost of high maximum cycle pressure, in the range of at least 100-300 bar. These high pressures nevertheless have large positive effects on the heat power transferred per unit of pumping mechanical power, and the low top temperatures have a positive influence on the material problems for the hottest engine parts.

  13. Strong surface effect on direct bulk flexoelectric response in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurkov, A. S.; Tagantsev, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of a continuum theory, it is shown that the direct bulk flexoelectric response of a finite sample essentially depends on the surface polarization energy, even in the thermodynamic limit where the body size tends to infinity. It is found that a modification of the surface energy can lead to a change in the polarization response by a factor of two. The origin of the effect is an electric field produced by surface dipoles induced by the strain gradient. The unexpected sensitivity of the polarization response to the surface energy in the thermodynamic limit is conditioned by the fact that the moments of the surface dipoles may scale as the body size

  14. Effects of isotope selection on solution convergence in HZE transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Wilson, John W.; Kiefer, Richard L.; Thibeault, Sheila A.

    1994-01-01

    A fragmenting iron ion produces hundreds of isotopes during nuclear reactions. These isotopes are represented in the solution of the transport problem. A reduced set of isotopes is selected to minimize the computational burden but introduces error in the final result. A minimum list of 122 isotopes is required for adequate representation of the mass and charge distributions of the secondary radiation fields. A reduced set of 80 isotopes is sufficient to represent the charge distribution alone and represents reasonably well the linear energy transfer properties of the iron beam. Because iron fragmentation produces nearly every isotope lighter than iron, the resulting 122-isotope list should be adequate for ion beams with charges equal to or less than 26.

  15. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found to be nega...

  16. Charge exchange effect on laser isotope separation of atomic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Hideaki; Izawa, Yasukazu; Otani, Hiroyasu; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1982-01-01

    Uranium isotope separating experiment was performed using the two-step photoionization technique with dye laser and nitrogen laser by heating uranium metal with electron beam and producing atomic beam using generated vapour. The experimental results are described after explaining the two-step photoionization by laser, experimental apparatus, the selection of exciting wavelength and others. Enrichment factor depends largely on the spectrum purity of dye laser which is the exciting source. A large enrichment factor of 48.3 times was obtained for spectrum width 0.03A. To put the uranium isotope separation with laser into practice, the increase of uranium atomic density is considered to be necessary for improving the yield. Experimental investigation was first carried out on the charge exchange effect that seems most likely to affect the decrease of enrichment factor, and the charge exchange cross-section was determined. The charge exchange cross-section depends on the relative kinetic energy between ions and atoms. The experimental result showed that the cross-section was about 5 x 10 -13 cm 2 at 1 eV and 10 -13 cm 2 at 90 eV. These values are roughly ten times as great as those calculated in Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, and it is expected that they become the greatest factor for giving the upper limit of uranium atomic density in a process of practical application. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Ionic conductivity in aqueous solutions: deuterium isotope effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, Alok; Ghosh, Swapan K.

    1997-01-01

    A simple theoretical investigation of the calculation of ionic conductivity in aqueous solution is presented. The dipolar hard sphere model for the solvent which has been successful elsewhere has been employed here and it has been possible to reproduce the experimental results quite accurately for both water and heavy water using only two parameters. In a more detailed theoretical approach one should employ better models for water with proper account of its vibrations, liberations and also hydrogen bonding. It is also of interest to study the temperature effect and the concentration dependence of the conductivity. The time-dependent friction can also be calculated from the present formalism and be used for the study of isotope effect in proton transfer reactions or other aspects of chemical dynamics

  18. Investigating the Direct Meltwater Effect in Terrestrial Oxygen-Isotope Paleoclimate Records Using an Isotope-Enabled Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Liu, Zhengyu; Brady, Esther C.; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L.; Marcott, Shaun A.; Zhang, Jiaxu; Wang, Xianfeng; Nusbaumer, Jesse; Wong, Tony E.; Jahn, Alexandra; Noone, David

    2017-12-01

    Variations in terrestrial oxygen-isotope reconstructions from ice cores and speleothems have been primarily attributed to climatic changes of surface air temperature, precipitation amount, or atmospheric circulation. Here we demonstrate with the fully coupled isotope-enabled Community Earth System Model an additional process contributing to the oxygen-isotope variations during glacial meltwater events. This process, termed "the direct meltwater effect," involves propagating large amounts of isotopically depleted meltwater throughout the hydrological cycle and is independent of climatic changes. We find that the direct meltwater effect can make up 15-35% of the δ18O signals in precipitation over Greenland and eastern Brazil for large freshwater forcings (0.25-0.50 sverdrup (106 m3/s)). Model simulations further demonstrate that the direct meltwater effect increases with the magnitude and duration of the freshwater forcing and is sensitive to both the location and shape of the meltwater. These new modeling results have important implications for past climate interpretations of δ18O.

  19. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravoire, Jean

    1978-11-01

    Separation of isotopes is treated in a general way, with special reference to the production of enriched uranium. Uses of separated isotopes are presented quickly. Then basic definitions and theoretical concepts are explained: isotopic effects, non statistical and statistical processes, reversible and irreversible processes, separation factor, enrichment, cascades, isotopic separative work, thermodynamics. Afterwards the main processes and productions are reviewed. Finally the economical and industrial aspects of uranium enrichment are resumed [fr

  20. The isotope altitude effect reflected in groundwater: a case study from Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezga, Kim; Urbanc, Janko; Cerar, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the stable isotope data of oxygen (δ(18)O) and hydrogen (δ(2)H) in groundwater from 83 sampling locations in Slovenia and their interpretation. The isotopic composition of water was monitored over 3 years (2009-2011), and each location was sampled twice. New findings on the isotopic composition of sampled groundwater are presented, and the data are also compared to past studies regarding the isotopic composition of precipitation, surface water, and groundwater in Slovenia. This study comprises: (1) the general characteristics of the isotopic composition of oxygen and hydrogen in groundwater in Slovenia, (2) the spatial distribution of oxygen isotope composition (δ(18)O) and d-excess in groundwater, (3) the groundwater isotope altitude effect, (4) the correlation between groundwater d-excess and the recharge area altitude of the sampling location, (5) the relation between hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in groundwater in comparison to the global precipitation isotope data, (6) the groundwater isotope effect of distance from the sea, and (7) the estimated relation between the mean temperature of recharge area and δ(18)O in groundwater.

  1. Enrichment and separation of isotopes utilizing a novel magnetic isotope effect. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C.J.; Turro, N.J.; Ruderman, W.

    1983-04-01

    Results are presented of a study undertaken to find a suitable isotope separation process for the 13 C- 12 C system that could be adapted to a multi-stage process for the commercial enrichment and separation of isotopes. Experiments reveal that solid porous silica provides an appropriate medium for the efficient enrichment of 13 C via the photolysis of dibenzyl ketones (and related ketones). It is concluded that a system can be designed for the practical separation of 13 C from 12 C based on the photolysis in a magnetic field of ketones absorbed on solid porous silica

  2. Use of isotope effects in the elucidation of aliphatic oxidation as catalyzed by cytochrome P-450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Two selectively deuterated n-octanes (octane-1- 2 H 3 and octane-1, 2, 3- 2 H 7 ) were synthesized and subjected to hydroxylation by phenobarbital-induced rat liver microsomes and purified cytochrome P-450b. The results of these experiments provide evidence which clarifies the interplay between a branched reaction pathway and the equilibration of an enzyme-substrate complex, in determining the magnitude of an observed isotope effect. An equation is derived that allows limits to be placed on the intrinsic isotope effect. The intrinsic isotope effect for the formation of 1-octanol was determined by this equation to lie between 9.5 and 9.8. The intramolecular isotope effect for octane-1- 2 H 3 was separated into its primary and secondary components using the method of Hanzlik. The primary effect was found to lie between 7.3 and 7.9 while the secondary effect was found to lie between 1.09-1.14. These data are consistent with a symmetrical reaction coordinate with 15% of the observed isotope effect being due to the secondary effects. A slight deviation from the rule of the geometric means was observed. An identical analysis was performed for ortho, meta and para-xylenes that contained deuterium in one methyl group. The secondary isotope effects varied dramatically, from between 0.93 to 1.19, due to violation of the rule of the geometric mean. The observed isotope effects appeared to vary as a function of the distance between the methyl groups in the various methyl groups of xylene with ortho having the largest isotope effect, meta a median isotope effect or an isotope effect similar in magnitude to ortho, and para the smallest effect

  3. Isotopic modeling of the sub-cloud evaporation effect in precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamalikis, V; Argiriou, A A; Dotsika, E

    2016-02-15

    In dry and warm environments sub-cloud evaporation influences the falling raindrops modifying their final stable isotopic content. During their descent from the cloud base towards the ground surface, through the unsaturated atmosphere, hydrometeors are subjected to evaporation whereas the kinetic fractionation results to less depleted or enriched isotopic signatures compared to the initial isotopic composition of the raindrops at cloud base. Nowadays the development of Generalized Climate Models (GCMs) that include isotopic content calculation modules are of great interest for the isotopic tracing of the global hydrological cycle. Therefore the accurate description of the underlying processes affecting stable isotopic content can improve the performance of iso-GCMs. The aim of this study is to model the sub-cloud evaporation effect using a) mixing and b) numerical isotope evaporation models. The isotope-mixing evaporation model simulates the isotopic enrichment (difference between the ground and the cloud base isotopic composition of raindrops) in terms of raindrop size, ambient temperature and relative humidity (RH) at ground level. The isotopic enrichment (Δδ) varies linearly with the evaporated raindrops mass fraction of the raindrop resulting to higher values at drier atmospheres and for smaller raindrops. The relationship between Δδ and RH is described by a 'heat capacity' model providing high correlation coefficients for both isotopes (R(2)>80%) indicating that RH is an ideal indicator of the sub-cloud evaporation effect. Vertical distribution of stable isotopes in falling raindrops is also investigated using a numerical isotope-evaporation model. Temperature and humidity dependence of the vertical isotopic variation is clearly described by the numerical isotopic model showing an increase in the isotopic values with increasing temperature and decreasing RH. At an almost saturated atmosphere (RH=95%) sub-cloud evaporation is negligible and the isotopic

  4. Magnetic isotope effect of magnesium in phosphoglycerate kinase phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchachenko, Anatoly L; Kouznetsov, Dmitri A; Orlova, Marina A; Markarian, Artyom A

    2005-08-02

    Phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) is found to be controlled by a (25)Mg(2+)-related magnetic isotope effect. Mg(2+) nuclear spin selectivity manifests itself in PGK-directed ADP phosphorylation, which has been clearly proven by comparison of ATP synthesis rates estimated in reaction mixtures with different Mg isotopy parameters. Both pure (25)Mg(2+) (nuclear spin 5/2, magnetic moment +0.85) and (24)Mg(2+) (spinless, nonmagnetic nucleus) species as well as their mixtures were used in experiments. In the presence of (25)Mg(2+), ATP production is 2.6 times higher compared with the yield of ATP reached in (24)Mg(2+)-containing PGK-based catalytic systems. The chemical mechanism of this phenomenon is discussed. A key element of the mechanism proposed is a nonradical pair formation in which (25)Mg(+) radical cation and phosphate oxyradical are involved.

  5. Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Reduction of Methyl Iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1999-01-01

    a Grignard reagent to methyl iodide, and for reduction of methyl iodide with tributyltin hydride or with gaseous hydrogen iodide. Very small KIE's were found for electron transfer to methyl iodide from magnesium in ether or from sodium in ammonia. The reason may be that these reactions are transport......a-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE's) have been determined for the reaction of methyl iodide with a series of reducing agents. Reagents which transfer hydride ion in an SN2 reaction show small inverse or small normal KIE's. Reagents which transfer an electron to methyl iodide to produce...... methyl radical show large normal KIE's up to 20 % per a-D. Large KIE's were found for the reaction of methyl iodide with sodium, for Pd-catalyzed reaction of methyl iodide with hydrogen, for ET at a platinum cathode, for ET from benzophenone ketyl or from sodium naphthalenide, for iron catalyzed ET from...

  6. Research of biological isotope effect of deuterium in Anabaena azollae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongbo; Wang Wenqing; Shi Dingji; Luo Shanggeng

    1996-01-01

    Anabaena azollae is cultured in BG-11 medium whose mass fraction of heavy water is 0%, 10%, 30%, 60% and 90%, respectively. During different time, activities of photosynthesis, respiration and nitrogenase are measured. In addition, growth-curve, absorption spectrum and low temperature fluorescence spectrum are given. The change of cellular morphology is observed with scanning electron microscope. The results show that the addition of heavy water causes lagging of the exponential period of growth, and inhibits the activities of photosynthesis respiration and nitrogenase markedly. Absorption spectrum shows that the ratio of phycobilins to carotenoid decreases with increasing percentage of heavy water. Low temperature fluorescence spectrum indicates that the ratio of F 733 /F 695 decreases and photo-energy distributed to system II is more than to system I. According to the maximum of net photosynthesis, the isotope effect is also discussed

  7. F-rich strongly peraluminous A-type magmatism in the pre-Andean foreland Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina: Geochemical, geochronological, isotopic constraints and petrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Cámera, Matías M.; Dahlquist, Juan A.; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Galindo, Carmen; da Costa Campos Neto, Mario; Facetti, Nicolás

    2017-04-01

    -rich peraluminous parental magma, dominant of plagioclase, K-feldspar, biotite, and accessory minerals such as zircon, monazite, xenotime, and oxides. The peraluminous composition and isotope data (εHf,355 and εNd,355 ranging from - 9.5 to - 1.5 and - 6.1 to - 7.8, respectively), together with abundant inherited Ordovician and Cambrian zircon, strongly suggest a dominantly metasedimentary source. The whole-rock and biotite compositions indicate that the Vinquis batholith crystallized under mainly oxidizing conditions, whereas Early Carboniferous metaluminous to weakly peraluminous A-type granites of the Sierras Pampeanas crystallized under dominantly reduced conditions.

  8. Effect of density of state on isotope effect exponent of two-band superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udomsamuthirun, P.; Kumvongsa, C.; Burakorn, A.; Changkanarth, P.; Yoksan, S.

    2005-01-01

    The exact formula of T c 's equation and the isotope effect exponent of two-band s-wave superconductors in weak-coupling limit are derived by considering the influence of two kinds of density of state: constant and van Hove singularity. The paring interaction in each band consisted of two parts: the electron-phonon interaction and non-electron-phonon interaction are included in our model. We find that the interband interaction of electron-phonon show more effect on isotope exponent than the intraband interaction and the isotope effect exponent with constant density of state can fit to experimental data, MgB 2 and high-T c superconductor, better than van Hove singularity density of state

  9. Effect of Nutrient-limitation on the Microbial S-isotope Fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, M.; Bosak, T.; Ono, S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction (MSR) utilizes sulfate as an electron acceptor and produces sulfide that is depleted in heavy isotopes of sulfur relative to sulfate. This process controls much of the distribution of sulfur isotopes in sedimentary sulfides and sulfates, but the magnitude of S-isotope fractionations in natural environments often exceeds those in laboratory cultures. This difference may be due to many factors and environmental stresses, including the limitation by essential nutrients. However, none of the studies to date investigated the effect of nutrients such as nitrogen, iron, or phosphate, on sulfur isotope fractionation by sulfate reducing microbes. Here, we examine the influence of N and Fe limitation on multiple-S isotope fractionation by a marine sulfate reducing bacterium by reducing the concentrations of N and Fe in a defined medium by 10 to 1000 times. Nitrogen limitation reduces the growth rate and the cellular yield, but increases the respiration rate without altering the magnitude of isotope fractionation. In contrast, S-isotope fractionation was up to 40% larger in iron-limited than in iron-replete cultures. This increase in sulfur isotope fractionation is accompanied by a decrease in the growth rate, the cellular yield, the respiration rate, and the cytochrome c content. Thus, iron limitation increases the reversibility of microbial sulfate reduction pathway, possibly by affecting iron-containing respiratory complexes such as cytochromes and iron-sulfur proteins. The apparent influence of iron limitation on S-isotope fractionation is relevant to the interpretations of sulfur isotope data in modern and ancient environments. Some areas where iron limitation may lead to large observed S-isotope effects include iron-limited deep open ocean sediments, whereas smaller S-isotope effects would be expected where Fe is more bioavailable (e.g., in anoxic basins, where Fe enrichment occurs due to Fe shuttling).

  10. Strong Isotopic Effect in Phase II of Dense Solid Hydrogen and Deuterium

    OpenAIRE

    Geneste, Grégory; Torrent, Marc; Bottin, François; Loubeyre, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Quantum nuclear zero-point motions in solid H$_2$ and D$_2$ under pressure are investigated at 80 K up to 160 GPa by first-principles path-integral molecular dynamics calculations. Molecular orientations are well-defined in phase II of D$_2$, while solid H$_2$ exhibits large and very asymmetric angular quantum fluctuations in this phase, with possible rotation in the (bc) plane, making it difficult to associate a well-identified single classical structure. The mechanism for the transition to ...

  11. Strong Isotope Effect in Phase II of Dense Solid Hydrogen and Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneste, Grégory; Torrent, Marc; Bottin, François; Loubeyre, Paul

    2012-10-01

    Quantum nuclear zero-point motions in solid H2 and D2 under pressure are investigated at 80 K up to 160 GPa by first-principles path-integral molecular dynamics calculations. Molecular orientations are well defined in phase II of D2, while solid H2 exhibits large and very asymmetric angular quantum fluctuations in this phase, with possible rotation in the (bc) plane, making it difficult to associate a well-identified single classical structure. The mechanism for the transition to phase III is also described. Existing structural data support this microscopic interpretation.

  12. Isotope effect and deuterium excess parameter revolution in ice and snow melt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Guan; Ni Shijun; Fan Xiao; Wu Hao

    2003-01-01

    The change of water isotope composition actually is a integrated reaction depending on the change of environment. The ice and snow melt of different seasons in high mountain can obviously influence the change of isotope composition and deuterium excess parameter of surface flow and shallow groundwater. To know the isotopic fractionation caused by this special natural background, explore its forming and evolvement, is unusually important for estimating, the relationship between the environment, climate and water resources in an area. Taking the example of isotope composition of surface flow and shallow groundwater in Daocheng, Sichuan, this paper mainly introduced the changing law of isotope composition and deuterium excess parameter of surface flow and hot-spring on conditions of ice and snow melt with different seasons in high mountain; emphatically discussed the isotope effect and deuterium excess parameter revolution in the process of ice and snow melting and its reason. (authors)

  13. Non-linear isotope and fast ions effects: routes for low turbulence in DT plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jeronimo

    2017-10-01

    The isotope effect, i.e. the fact that heat and particle fluxes do not follow the expected Gyro-Bohm estimate for turbulent transport when the plasma mass is changed, is one of the main challenges in plasma theory. Of particular interest is the isotope exchange between the fusion of deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclei as there are no clear indications of what kind of transport difference can be expected in burning plasmas. The GENE code is therefore used for computing DD vs DT linear and nonlinear microturbulence characteristics in the core plasma region of a previously ITER hybrid scenario at high beta obtained in the framework of simplified integrated modelling. Scans on common turbulence related quantitates as external ExB flow shear, Parallel Velocity Gradient (PVG), plasma beta, colisionality or the number of ion species have been performed. Additionally, the role of energetic particles, known to reduce Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) turbulence has been also addressed. It is obtained that the ITER operational point will be close to threshold and in these conditions turbulence is dominated by ITG modes. A purely weak non-linear isotope effect, absent in linear scans, can be found when separately adding moderate ExB flow shear or electromagnetic effects, whereas collisionality just modulates the intensity. The isotope effect, on the other hand, becomes very strong in conditions with simultaneously moderate ExB flow shear, beta and low q profile with significant reductions of ion heat transport from DD to DT. By analyzing the radial structure of the two point electrostatic potential correlation function it has been found that the inherent Gyro-Bohm scaling for plasma microturbulence, which increases the radial correlation length at short scales form DD to DT, is counteracted by the concomitant appearance of a complex nonlinear multiscale space interaction involving external ExB flow shear, zonal flow activity, magnetic geometry and electromagnetic

  14. Effects of preservation methods of muscle tissue from upper-trophic level reef fishes on stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Stallings

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Research that uses stable isotope analysis often involves a delay between sample collection in the field and laboratory processing, therefore requiring preservation to prevent or reduce tissue degradation and associated isotopic compositions. Although there is a growing literature describing the effects of various preservation techniques, the results are often contextual, unpredictable and vary among taxa, suggesting the need to treat each species individually. We conducted a controlled experiment to test the effects of four preservation methods of muscle tissue from four species of upper trophic-level reef fish collected from the eastern Gulf of Mexico (Red Grouper Epinephelus morio, Gag Mycteroperca microlepis, Scamp Mycteroperca phenax, and Red Snapper Lutjanus campechanus. We used a paired design to measure the effects on isotopic values for carbon and nitrogen after storage using ice, 95% ethanol, and sodium chloride (table salt, against that in a liquid nitrogen control. Mean offsets for both δ13C and δ15N values from controls were lowest for samples preserved on ice, intermediate for those preserved with salt, and highest with ethanol. Within species, both salt and ethanol significantly enriched the δ15N values in nearly all comparisons. Ethanol also had strong effects on the δ13C values in all three groupers. Conversely, for samples preserved on ice, we did not detect a significant offset in either isotopic ratio for any of the focal species. Previous studies have addressed preservation-induced offsets in isotope values using a mass balance correction that accounts for changes in the isotope value to that in the C/N ratio. We tested the application of standard mass balance corrections for isotope values that were significantly affected by the preservation methods and found generally poor agreement between corrected and control values. The poor performance by the correction may have been due to preferential loss of lighter isotopes

  15. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  16. Magnetic field and magnetic isotope effects in organic photochemical reactions. A novel probe of reaction mechanisms and a method for enrichment of magnetic isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turro, N.J.; Kraeutler, B.

    1980-01-01

    A brief qualitative description of the theory of intersystem crossing (ISC) in radical pairs is presented. It provides a simple unified theoretical basis for understanding chemically induced nuclear polarization (CIDNP), the magnetic spin isotope effect, and magnetic field effects on chemical reactions. Examples are given in which the magnetic spin isotope effect is employed to separate 13 C (a magnetic isotope) from 12 C (a nonmagnetic isotope) more efficiently than any mechanism involving a conventional mass isotope effect, and to separate selectively 17 O (a magnetic isotope) from 16 O and 18 O (nonmagnetic isotope), which is impossible via a conventional mass isotope effect. Examples are also provided for which the magnetic field effect is utilized to control the efficiency of cage reactions of radical pairs. The observation of magnetic isotope and magnetic field effects on the photolysis of dibenzyl ketone in micellar solution is not an isolated finding. Numerous other ketones (phenyl adamantyl ketone, phenyl benzyl ketone, etc.) have been found to exhibit analogous behavior. The ideas discussed may be employed in principle, to design chemical reactions that will separate magnetic isotopes from their nonmagnetic colleagues. The key features are the requirement of a singlet-triplet crossing along the reaction coordinate, the availability of a hyperfine hole at the molecular geometry corresponding to the hole, and sufficient time for the representative point to find the hole when it arrives in the region of phase space corresponding to the hole. Magnetic field and magnetic isotope effects provide a complement to CIDNP for probing mechanisms of radical reactions

  17. Silver diffusion and isotope effect in silver rubidium iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzigian, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    The diffusion coefficient of silver in RbAg 4 I 5 was measured in both superionic phases using radiotracer Ag-110m and serial sectioning with a low temperature sectioning apparatus. The activation energies for diffusion in alpha-RbAg 4 I 5 and beta-RbAg 4 I 5 , respectively, are 0.11 +- 0.01 eV and 0.20 +- 0.04 eV. An isotope effect for diffusion was also measured in both superionic phases. Ag-105 and Ag-110m radioisotopes were used with gamma spectroscopy and energy discrimination. The effect is small, with no significant temperature variation, with the value at 333 0 K being 0.12 +- 0.01. The second-order phase transition at 208 0 K has a small effect, if any, on the magnitude of the effect. The data suggest that a highly cooperative transport mechanism is responsible for the unusually high values of both the conductivity and diffusion coefficient. Although it is not possible to deduce the particular mechanism involved, theories inolving ionic polarons, or cooperative motion, such as crowdions or solitons, seem consistent with the observed results

  18. Is there a stable isotope evidence for the CO 2 fertiliser effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of cellulose extracted from annual growth rings (covering the time period 1980-1993) in an oak tree from Kalamazoo, SW Michigan provide a basis to investigate at a physiological level how the fertilization effect may operate. The carbon isotope ratios show that the intercellular ...

  19. Determination of the variation of mercury isotope concentration based on spectral-phase effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeev, A.A.; Man', D.D.; Turkin, Yu.I.

    1988-01-01

    A method of isotopic atomic-absorption analysis, based on spectral-phase effects in which there is no need to use several sources of radiation with pure isotopes of the analyte element, was developed. The method made it possible to simplify the analysis and to determine the variation of the concentration of mercury isotopes from one deposit to another with an accuracy several times higher that of traditional methods of spectral isotopic analysis. The method was tested on mercury 198 and mercury 202. The isotopic analyzer is diagramed and described. The mechanism of spectral-phase effects was determined by the difference in effective photon lifetimes, corresponding to different components of the hyperfine structure of the resonance line of mercury at 254 nm

  20. The role of symmetry in the mass independent isotope effect in ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Greg; Bhattacharya, S. K.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the internal distribution of “anomalous” isotope enrichments has important implications for validating theoretical postulates on the origin of these enrichments in molecules such as ozone and for understanding the transfer of these enrichments to other compounds in the atmosphere via mass transfer. Here, we present an approach, using the reaction NO2− + O3, for assessing the internal distribution of the Δ17O anomaly and the δ18O enrichment in ozone produced by electric discharge. The Δ17O results strongly support the symmetry mechanism for generating mass independent fractionations, and the δ18O results are consistent with published data. Positional Δ17O and δ18O enrichments in ozone can now be more effectively used in photochemical models that use mass balance oxygen atom transfer mechanisms to infer atmospheric oxidation chemistry. PMID:19307571

  1. Biological isotopy. Introduction to the isotopic effects and to their applications in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tcherkez, G.

    2010-01-01

    Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20. century, the study of stable isotopes has considerably developed. This domain, which remained limited in its applications until the 1990's, has become particularly important thereafter thanks to its practical applications and in particular to its economical impacts. Many techniques used in fraud control, in drugs use control, in selection of high-yield plants etc are based on isotopic abundance measurements. This reference book gives a synthesis of our actual knowledge on the use of stable isotopes and of isotope fractionation in biology. It presents the basic notions of isotopic biochemistry and explains the origin of the isotopic effects. The application principles of these effects to metabolism, to organisms physiology, to environmental biology etc are explained and detailed using examples and exercises. The first chapters present the basic knowledge which defines, from a mathematical point-of-view, the isotopic effects of chemical reactions or of physical processes taking place in biology. The measurements principle of natural isotopes abundance is then synthesised. Finally, all these notions are applied at different scales: enzymes, physiology, metabolism, environment, ecosystems and fraud crackdown. (J.S.)

  2. Kinetic isotope effects significantly influence intracellular metabolite (13) C labeling patterns and flux determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylenko, Thomas M; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2013-09-01

    Rigorous mathematical modeling of carbon-labeling experiments allows estimation of fluxes through the pathways of central carbon metabolism, yielding powerful information for basic scientific studies as well as for a wide range of applications. However, the mathematical models that have been developed for flux determination from (13) C labeling data have commonly neglected the influence of kinetic isotope effects on the distribution of (13) C label in intracellular metabolites, as these effects have often been assumed to be inconsequential. We have used measurements of the (13) C isotope effects on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme from the literature to model isotopic fractionation at the pyruvate node and quantify the modeling errors expected to result from the assumption that isotope effects are negligible. We show that under some conditions kinetic isotope effects have a significant impact on the (13) C labeling patterns of intracellular metabolites, and the errors associated with neglecting isotope effects in (13) C-metabolic flux analysis models can be comparable in size to measurement errors associated with GC-MS. Thus, kinetic isotope effects must be considered in any rigorous assessment of errors in (13) C labeling data, goodness-of-fit between model and data, confidence intervals of estimated metabolic fluxes, and statistical significance of differences between estimated metabolic flux distributions. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Kinetic isotope effects significantly influence intracellular metabolite 13C labeling patterns and flux determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylenko, Thomas M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous mathematical modeling of carbon-labeling experiments allows estimation of fluxes through the pathways of central carbon metabolism, yielding powerful information for basic scientific studies as well as for a wide range of applications. However, the mathematical models that have been developed for flux determination from 13C labeling data have commonly neglected the influence of kinetic isotope effects on the distribution of 13C label in intracellular metabolites, as these effects have often been assumed to be inconsequential. We have used measurements of the 13C isotope effects on the pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme from the literature to model isotopic fractionation at the pyruvate node and quantify the modeling errors expected to result from the assumption that isotope effects are negligible. We show that under some conditions kinetic isotope effects have a significant impact on the 13C labeling patterns of intracellular metabolites, and the errors associated with neglecting isotope effects in 13C-metabolic flux analysis models can be comparable in size to measurement errors associated with GC–MS. Thus, kinetic isotope effects must be considered in any rigorous assessment of errors in 13C labeling data, goodness-of-fit between model and data, confidence intervals of estimated metabolic fluxes, and statistical significance of differences between estimated metabolic flux distributions. PMID:23828762

  4. Isotope effect of impurity diffusion of cadmium in silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockosch, H.J.; Herzig, C.

    1984-01-01

    The isotope effect of impurity diffusion of cadmium in silver single crystals was measured with the radioisotopes 115 Cd/ 109 Cd by gamma spectrometry. As a mean value E = 0.37 at T = 1060 K was obtained. The correlation factor f /SUB Cd/ = 0.41 is in disagreement with previous results of other investigators due to their unfavourable experimental approach. The present value of f /SUB Cd/ , however, is consistent with those of In and Sn in Ag. A comparison with the corresponding correlation factors in the copper solvent reveals a distinct influence of lattice perturbations because of the different atomic volumes of the solvents. Since the size effect is neglected in the electrostatic diffusion model, the agreement with this model is only qualitative. The frequency ratios for vacancy jumps were calculated. The free binding enthalpy of the vacancy-impurity complex was estimated to be Δg /SUB Cd/ = -0.064 eV. This value is smaller than those for In and Sn in Ag and complies with the relative diffusivities of these impurities in Ag

  5. Isotope effects of neodymium in different ligands exchange systems studied by ion exchange displacement chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Ismail

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The isotope effects of neodymium in Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were studied by using ion exchange chromatography. The separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε’s, were calculated from the observed isotopic ratios at the front and rear boundaries of the neodymium adsorption band. The values of separation coefficients of neodymium isotopes, ε’s, for the Nd-glycolate ligand exchange system were compared with those of Nd-malate and Nd-citrate, which indicated that the isotope effects of neodymium as studied by the three ligands takes the following direction Malate > Citrate > Glycolate. This order agrees with the number of available sites for complexation of each ligand. The values of the plate height, HETP of Nd in Nd-ligand exchange systems were also calculated.

  6. Isotope effects in lithium hydride and lithium deuteride crystals by molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammak, Hichem; Antoshchenkova, Ekaterina; Hayoun, Marc; Finocchi, Fabio

    2012-10-31

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been carried out to study isotope effects in lithium hydride and lithium deuteride crystals. Quantum effects on nuclear motion have been included through a quantum thermal bath (QTB). The interatomic forces were described either within the density functional theory (DFT) in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) or by the phenomenological approach using the shell model. For both models, the isotopic shift in the lattice parameter can be successfully predicted by QTB-MD simulations. The slope of the experimental isotopic shift in pressure is satisfactorily reproduced by QTB-MD within DFT-GGA, in contrast to both density functional perturbation theory and QTB-MD with the shell model. We have analyzed the reasons for these discrepancies through the vibrational densities of states and the isotopic shifts in bulk modulus. The results illustrate the importance of anharmonic contributions to vibrations and to the isotopic pressure shift between LiH and LiD.

  7. Secondary. cap alpha. -deuterium kinetic isotope effects in solvolyses of ferrocenylmethyl acetate and benzoate in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutic, D. (Univ. of Zagreb, Yugoslavia); Asperger, S.; Borcic, S.

    1982-12-17

    Secondary ..cap alpha..-deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE) in solvolyses of ferrocenyldideuteriomethyl acetate and benzoate were determined in 96% (v/v) ethanol, at 25/sup 0/C, as k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.24 and 1.26, respectively. The KIEs were also determined in the presence of 0.1 mol dm/sup -3/ lithium perchlorate: the k/sub H//k/ sub D/ values were 1.23 and 1.22 for acetate and benzoate complexes, respectively. The maximum KIE for the C-O bond cleavage of a primary substrate is as large as, or larger than, that of secondary derivatives, which is estimated to be 1.23 per deuterium. The measured KIE of about 12% per D therefore represents a strongly reduced effect relative to its maximum. The solvolyses exhibit ''a special salt effect''. This effect indicates the presence of solvent-separated ion pairs and the return to tight pairs. As the maximum KIE is expected in solvolyses involving transformation of one type of ion pair into another, the strongly reduced ..cap alpha..-D KIE supports the structure involving direct participation of electrons that in the ground state are localized at the iron atom. The alkyl-oxygen cleavage is accompanied by 10-15% acyl-oxygen cleavage.

  8. Effect of interband interaction on isotope effect exponent of MgB2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The exact formula of Tc's equation and the isotope effect exponent of two- band s-wave superconductors in the weak-coupling limit are derived by considering the influence of interband interaction. In each band, our model consists of two pairing inter- actions: the electron–phonon interaction and ...

  9. Explaining the isotope effect on heat transport in L-mode with the collisional electron-ion energy exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, P. A.; Bustos, A.; Hennequin, P.; Ryter, F.; Bernert, M.; Cavedon, M.; Dunne, M. G.; Fischer, R.; Görler, T.; Happel, T.; Igochine, V.; Kurzan, B.; Lebschy, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Morel, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-06-01

    In ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), the normalised gyroradius {ρ\\star} was varied via a hydrogen isotope scan while keeping other dimensionless parameters constant. This was done in L-mode, to minimise the impact of pedestal stability on confinement. Power balance and perturbative transport analyses reveal that the electron heat transport is unaffected by the differences in isotope mass. Nonlinear simulations with the Gene code suggest that these L-mode discharges are ion temperature gradient (ITG) dominated. The different gyroradii due to the isotope mass do not necessarily result in a change of the predicted heat fluxes. This result is used in simulations with the Astra transport code to match the experimental profiles. In these simulations the experimental profiles and confinement times are reproduced with the same transport coefficients for hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. The mass only enters in the energy exchange term between electrons and ions. These numerical observations are supported by additional experiments which show a lower ion energy confinement compared to that of the electrons. Additionally, hydrogen and deuterium plasmas have a similar confinement when the energy exchange time between electrons and ions is matched. This strongly suggests that the observed isotope dependence in L-mode is not dominated by a gyroradius effect, but a consequence of the mass dependence in the collisional energy exchange between electrons and ions.

  10. Effect of 10B isotope and vacancy defects on the phonon modes of two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherajul Islam, Md.; Anindya, Khalid N.; Bhuiyan, Ashraful G.; Tanaka, Satoru; Makino, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Akihiro

    2018-02-01

    We report the details of the effects of the 10B isotope and those of B and N vacancies combined with the isotope on the phonon modes of two-dimensional hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The phonon density of states and localization problems are solved using the forced vibrational method, which is suitable for an intricate and disordered system. We observe an upward shift of Raman-active E2g-mode optical phonons (32 cm‑1) for a 100% 10B isotope, which matches well with the experiment and simple harmonic oscillator model. However, a downward shift of E2g-mode phonons is observed for B or N vacancies and the combination of the isotope and vacancy-type disordered BN. Strong localized eigenmodes are found for all types of defects, and a typical localization length is on the order of ∼7 nm for naturally occurring BN samples. These results are very important for understanding the heat dissipation and electron transport properties of BN-based nanoelectronics.

  11. Thermal Conductivity of Nanotubes: Effects of Chirality and Isotope Impurity

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, Zhang; Li, Baowen

    2005-01-01

    We study the dependence of thermal conductivity of single walled nanotubes (SWNT) on chirality and isotope impurity by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with accurate potentials. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the chirality. The isotope impurity, however, can reduce the thermal conductivity up to 60% and change the temperature dependence behavior. We also study the dependence of thermal conductivity on tube length for t...

  12. Investigation of the feeding effect on the 13C/12C isotope ratio of the hormones in bovine urine using gas chromatography/combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balizs, Gabor; Jainz, Annett; Horvatovich, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the feeding on the 13C/12C isotope ratio of four endogenous steroid hormones testosterone (T), epi-testosterone (epi-T), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and etiocholanolone (ETIO) in bovine urine was investigated. An analytical method to determine the accurate isotope ratio was developed

  13. Transient competitive complexation in biological kinetic isotope fractionation explains non-steady isotopic effects: Theory and application to denitrification in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggi, F.M.; Riley, W.J.

    2009-06-01

    The theoretical formulation of biological kinetic reactions in isotopic applications often assume first-order or Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics under the quasi-steady-state assumption to simplify the system kinetics. However, isotopic e ects have the same order of magnitude as the potential error introduced by these simpli cations. Both formulations lead to a constant fractionation factor which may yield incorrect estimations of the isotopic effect and a misleading interpretation of the isotopic signature of a reaction. We have analyzed the isotopic signature of denitri cation in biogeochemical soil systems by Menyailo and Hungate [2006], where high {sup 15}N{sub 2}O enrichment during N{sub 2}O production and inverse isotope fractionation during N{sub 2}O consumption could not be explained with first-order kinetics and the Rayleigh equation, or with the quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics. When the quasi-steady-state assumption was relaxed, transient Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics accurately reproduced the observations and aided in interpretation of experimental isotopic signatures. These results may imply a substantial revision in using the Rayleigh equation for interpretation of isotopic signatures and in modeling biological kinetic isotope fractionation with first-order kinetics or quasi-steady-state Michaelis-Menten-Monod kinetics.

  14. Heavy Atom Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effect on H-Tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, André K; Gerbig, Dennis; Schreiner, Peter R

    2018-02-08

    Although frequently employed, heavy atom kinetic isotope effects (KIE) have not been reported for quantum mechanical tunneling reactions. Here we examine the secondary KIE through 13 C-substitution of the carbene atom in methylhydroxycarbene (H 3 C-C̈-OH) in its [1,2]H-tunneling shift reaction to acetaldehyde (H 3 C-CHO). Our study employs matrix-isolation IR spectroscopy in various inert gases and quantum chemical computations. Depending on the choice of the matrix host gas, the KIE varies within a range of 1.0 in xenon to 1.4 in neon. A KIE of 1.1 was computed using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) CVT/SCT, and instanton approaches for the gas phase at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Computations with explicit consideration of the noble gas environment indicate that the surrounding atoms influence the tunneling reaction barrier height and width. The tunneling half-lives computed with the WKB approach are in good agreement with the experimental results in the different noble gases.

  15. Effect of strong electrolytes on edible oils part III: viscosity of canola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of strong electrolytes on the viscosity of canola oil in 1,4 dioxane was undertaken. The viscosity of oil in 1,4 dioxane was found to increase with the concentration of oil and decrease with rise in temperature. Strong electrolytes reduce the rate of flow of oil in 1,4 dioxane. It was noted that amongst these electrolytes, ...

  16. The kinetics and mechanism of bromide ion isotope exchange reaction in strongly basic anion-exchange resin duolite A-162 determined by the radioactive tracer technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhande, R. S.; Singare, P. U.; Karthikeyan, P.

    2007-11-01

    In the present investigation, 82Br radioactive isotope was used as a tracer to study the kinetics and mechanism of exchange reaction between an ion exchange resin and an external bromide ion solution. In an attempt to study the reversible bromide ion isotopic exchange reaction kinetics, it was expected that whether the initial step was the exchange of radioactive bromide ions from the solution into the ion exchange resin (forward reaction) or from the ion exchange resin into the solution (reverse reaction), two ion isotopic exchange reactions should occur simultaneously, which was further confirmed by the experimental specific reaction rates of 0.130 and 0.131 min-1, respectively. The results can be used to standardize process parameters so as to optimize the utilization of ion exchange resins in various industrial applications.

  17. Anomalous Josephson effect in semiconductor nanowire with strong spin-orbit interaction and Zeeman effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Tomohiro; Eto, Mikio; Nazarov, Yuli

    2014-03-01

    We theoretically investigate the Josephson junction using quasi-one dimensional semiconductor nanowires with strong spin-orbit (SO) interaction, e.g., InSb. First, we examine a simple model using a single scatterer to describe the elastic scattering due to impurities and SO interaction in the normal region.[1] The Zeeman effect is taken into account by the spin-dependent phase shift of electron and hole through the system. The interplay between SO interaction and Zeeman effect results in a finite supercurrent even when the phase difference between two superconductors is zero. Moreover, the critical current depends on its current direction if more than one conduction channel is present in the nanowire. Next, we perform a numerical simulation by the tight-binding model for the nanowire to confirm our simple model. Then, we show that a spin-dependent Fermi velocity due to the SO interaction causes the anomalous Josephson effect.

  18. Studies of isotopic effects in the excited electronic states of molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Rare gas halogen (RGH) lasers serve as convenient tools for a range of photophysical processes which exhibit isotope effects. This document summarizes progress in the production of molecular systems in their electronic excited states with the aid of RGH lasers, and the various isotopic effects one can study under these conditions. We conclude that the basic physical mechanisms involved in the isotopically sensitive characteristics of excited molecular electronic states are sufficiently selective to be useful in both the detection and separation of many atomic materials

  19. Heavy-atom isotope effects on binding of reactants to lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawlita, E.

    1993-04-01

    18 O and 13 C kinetic isotope effects have been measured on the reaction of pyruvate kinase with phospho-enol-pyruvate and ADP using a remote label technique. The magnitude of both investigated isotope effects showed a dependence on the concentration of ADP. However, while the carbon effect was simply 'washed out' to unity at high ATP concentration, the oxygen effect becomes inverse and reached 0.9928 at the highest used concentration of ADP. Such a result testifies that the assumption of the negligible effect of isotopic substitution on enzyme-substrate associations remains correct only for carbon effects. An equilibrium 18 O isotope effect on association of oxalate with lactate dehydrogenase in the presence of NADHP has been evaluated by both experimental and theoretical means. Experimental methods, which involved equilibrium dialysis and gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric measurement of isotopic ration, yielded an inverse value of 0.9840. Semiempirical methods involved vibrational analysis of oxalate in two different environments. The comparison of calculated values with the experimentally determined isotope effect indicated that the AM 1 Hamiltonian proved superior to its PM 3 counterpart in this modelling. 160 refs, 8 figs, 18 tabs

  20. Effects of different water storage procedures on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically contrasted waters from the Amazon River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Daniel S; Poitrasson, Franck; Boaventura, Geraldo R

    2015-11-15

    Although recent studies have investigated the Fe isotopic composition of dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases from continental and oceanic natural waters, few efforts have been made to evaluate whether water sample storage and the separation of different pore-size fractions through filtration can cause any change to the Fe isotopic compositions. The present study investigates the possible biases introduced by different water storage conditions on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically different waters. Water samples were collected from an organic-rich river and from mineral particulate-rich rivers. Filtered and unfiltered water samples were stored either at room temperature or frozen at -18°C in order to assess possible biases due to (i) different water storage temperature, and (ii) storage of bulk (unfiltered) vs filtered water. Iron isotope measurements were performed by Multicollector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry with a Thermo Electron Neptune instrument, after Fe purification using anion-exchange resins. Our data reveal that bulk water storage at room temperature without filtration produces minor changes in the dissolved Fe isotopic composition of mineral particulate-rich waters, but significant isotopic composition changes in organic-rich waters. In both cases, however, the impact of the different procedures on the Fe concentrations was strong. On the other hand, the bulk water stored frozen without filtration produced more limited changes in the dissolved Fe concentrations, and also on isotopic compositions, relative to the samples filtered in the field. The largest effect was again observed for the organic-rich waters. These findings suggest that a time lag between water collection and filtration may cause isotopic exchanges between the dissolved and particulate Fe fractions. When it is not possible to filter the samples in the field immediately after collection, the less detrimental approach is to

  1. Strong Effect of Azodye Layer Thickness on RM-Stabilized Photoalignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-21

    Strong Effect of Azodye Layer Thickness on RM-Stabilized Photoalignment Colin McGinty*, Valerie Finnemeyer**, Robert Reich**, Harry Clark...vertical alignment on these substrates. For the thinner BY layers, we do not see this strong evidence of out of plane reorientation. The out of...In this report we show the surprising effect that thin azodye layers demonstrate improved stability over those that are thicker. Figure 6

  2. Isotope effects associated with the anaerobic oxidation of sulfide by the purple photosynthetic bacterium, Chromatium vinosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, B.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Small inverse isotope effects of 1-3 per thousand were consistently observed for the oxidation of sulfide to elemental sulfur during anaerobic photometabolism by Chromatium vinosum. The inverse fractionation can be accounted for by an equilibrium isotope effect between H 2 S and HS - , and may indicate that C. vinosum (and other photosynthetic bacteria) utilizes H 2 S rather than HS - as the substrate during sulfide oxidation. (Auth.)

  3. Use of intermediate partitioning to calculate intrinsic isotope effects for the reaction catalyzed by malic enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grissom, C.B.; Cleland, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    For those enzymes that proceed via a stepwise reaction mechanism with a discrete chemical intermediate and where deuterium and 13 C isotope effects are on separate steps, a new method has been developed to solve for the intrinsic deuterium and 13 C kinetic isotope effects that relies on directly observing the partitioning of the intermediate between the forward and reverse directions. This observed partitioning ratio, along with the values of the primary deuterium, tritium, and 13 C kinetic isotope effects on V/K for the substrate with the label being followed, allows an exact solution for the intrinsic deuterium and 13 C isotope effects, the forward commitment for the deuterium-sensitive step, and the partition ratio for the intermediate in the reaction. This method allows portions of the reaction coordinate diagram to be defined precisely and the relative energy levels of certain activation barriers to be assigned exactly. With chicken liver triphosphopyridine nucleotide (TPN) malic enzyme activated by Mg 2+ , the partitioning of oxalacetate to pyruvate vs. malate in the presence of TPNH, 0.47, plus previously determined isotope effects gives an intrinsic deuterium isotope effect of 5.7 on hydride transfer and a 13 C isotope effect of 1.044 on decarboxylation. Reverse hydride transfer is 10 times faster than decarboxylation, and the forward commitment for hydride transfer is 3.3. The 13 C isotope effect is not significantly different with reduced acetylpyridine adenine dinucleotide phosphate replacing TPNH (although the pyruvate/malate partitioning ratio for oxalactate is now 9.9), but replacement of Mg 2+ by Mn 2+ raises the value to 1.065 (partition ratio 0.99)

  4. Tightly bound soil water introduces isotopic memory effects on mobile and extractable soil water pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Sarah L; Prechsl, Ulrich E; Pace, Matthew; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2017-08-01

    Cryogenic vacuum extraction is the well-established method of extracting water from soil for isotopic analyses of waters moving through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. We investigate if soils can alter the isotopic composition of water through isotope memory effects, and determined which mechanisms are responsible for it. Soils with differing physicochemical properties were re-wetted with reference water and subsequently extracted by cryogenic water distillation. Results suggest some reference waters bind tightly to the soil and not all of this tightly bound water is removed during cryogenic vacuum extraction. Kinetic isotopic fractionation occurring when reference water binds to the soil is likely responsible for the 18 O-depletion of re-extracted reference water, suggesting an enrichment of the tightly bound soil water pool. Further re-wetting of cryogenically extracted soils indicates an isotopic memory effect of tightly bound soil water on water added to the soil. The data suggest tightly bound soil water can influence the isotopic composition of mobile soil water. Findings show that soils influence the isotope composition of soil water by (i) kinetic fractionation when water is bound to the soil and (ii) equilibrium fractionation between different soil water pools. These findings could be relevant for plant water uptake investigations and complicate ecohydrological and paleohydrological studies.

  5. Effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunde [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Laboratory of Basin Hydrology and Wetland Eco-restoration, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhou, Aiguo, E-mail: aiguozhou@cug.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Gan, Yiqun; Li, Xiaoqian [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-05-05

    Highlights: • The effect of inorganic anions on carbon isotope fractionation was evaluated. • The enrichment factors was independent concentration of NO{sub 3}{sup −}, or SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}. • Cl{sup −} significantly influenced the carbon isotope fractionation. - Abstract: Understanding the magnitude and variability in isotope fractionation with respect to specific processes is crucial to the application of stable isotopic analysis as a tool to infer and quantify transformation processes. The variability of carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) in the presence of different inorganic ions (nitrate, sulfate, and chloride), was investigated to evaluate the potential effects of inorganic anions on carbon isotope enrichment factor (ε value). A comparison of ε values obtained in deionized water, nitrate solution, and sulfate solution demonstrated that the ε values were identical and not affected by the presence of nitrate and sulfate. In the presence of chloride, however, the ε values (ranging from −6.3 ± 0.8 to 10 ± 1.3‰) were variable and depended on the chloride concentration, indicating that chloride could significantly affect carbon isotope fractionation during Fenton-like degradation of TCE. Thus, caution should be exercised in selecting appropriate ε values for the field application of stable isotope analysis, as various chloride concentrations may be present due to naturally present or introduced with pH adjustment and iron salts during Fenton-like remediation. Furthermore, the effects of chloride on carbon isotope fractionation may be able to provide new insights about reaction mechanisms of Fenton-like processes.

  6. Ab Initio Calculation of the Zn Isotope Effect in Phosphates, Citrates, and Malates and Applications to Plants and Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Albar?de, Francis

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Stable Zn isotopes are fractionated in roots and leaves of plants. Analyses demonstrate that the heavy Zn isotopes are enriched in the root system of plants with respect to shoots and leaves as well as the host soil, but the fractionation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the origin of this isotope fractionation is due to a chemical isotope effect upon complexation by Zn malates and citrates in the aerial parts and by phosphates in the roots. We calculated t...

  7. Radioactive isotope and isomer separation with using light induced drift effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hradecny, C.; Slovak, J.; Tethal, T.; Ermolaev, I.M.; Shalagin, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The isotope separation with using light induced drift (LID) is discussed. The basic theoretical characteristics of the method are deduced: separation simultaneously with an arbitrary high enrichment and without significant losses; separation productivity up to 100 μg/h. These characteristics are sufficient and very convenient for separation of expensive radioactive isotopes and isomers which are applied in medicine and science. The first experimental separation of the radioactive isotopes ( 22,24 Na) by using the LID effect is reported. 13 refs.; 5 figs

  8. Stable isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs

  9. Nontrivial effects of high-frequency excitation for strongly damped mechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, Alexander; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    Some nontrivial effects are investigated, which can occur if strongly damped mechanical systems are subjected to strong high-frequency (HF) excitation. The main result is a theoretical prediction, supported by numerical simulation, that for such systems the (quasi-)equilibrium states can change...... that can be substantial (depending on the strength of the HF excitation) for finite values of the damping. The analysis is focused on the differences between the classic results for weakly damped systems, and new effects for which the strong damping terms are responsible. The analysis is based...... on a slightly modified averaging technique, and includes an elementary example of an elliptically excited pendulum for illustration, alongside with a generalization to a broader class of strongly damped dynamical systems with HF excitation. As an application example, the nontrivial behavior of a classical...

  10. Nontrivial effects of high-frequency excitation for strongly damped mechanical systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, Alexander; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2008-01-01

    Some non-trivial effects are investigated, which can occur if strongly damped mechanical systems are subjected to strong high-frequency (HF) excitation. The main result is a theoretical prediction, supported by numerical simulation, that for such systems the (quasi-)equilibrium states can change...... that can be substantial depending on the strength of the HF excitation) for finite values of the damping. The analysis is focused on the differences between the classic results for weakly damped systems, and new effects for which the strong damping terms are responsible. The analysis is based on a slightly...... modified averaging technique, and includes an elementary example of an elliptically excited pendulum for illustration, alongside with a generalization to a broader class of strongly damped dynamical systems with HF excitation. As an application example, the nontrivial behavior of a classical optimally...

  11. Isotope effect on band gap and radiative transitions properties of boron nitride nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei-Qiang; Yu, Hua-Gen; Zhi, Chunyi; Wang, Jianbin; Liu, Zhenxian; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Bando, Yoshio

    2008-02-01

    We have carried out an isotope study on the band gap and radiative transition spectra of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) using both experimental and theoretical approaches. The direct band gap of BNNTs was determined at 5.38 eV, independent of the nanotube size and isotope substitution, by cathodoluminescences (CL) spectra. At lower energies, several radiative transitions were observed, and an isotope effect was revealed. In particular, we confirmed that the rich CL spectra between 3.0 and 4.2 eV reflect a phonon-electron coupling mechanism, which is characterized by a radiative transition at 4.09 eV. The frequency red shift and peak broadening due to isotopic effect have been observed. Our Fourier transform infrared spectra and density functional theory calculations suggest that those radiative transitions in BNNTs could be generated by a replacement of some nitrogen atoms with oxygen.

  12. Electrochemical H-D isotope effect at metal-perovskite proton conductor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kek, D.; Bonanos, N.

    1999-01-01

    The H-D isotope effect on the electrode kinetics of a metal-proton conductor interface has been investigated. The current-voltage behaviour depends on the nature of the electrode (Ni, Ag), the atmosphere (H(2), D(2)), the partial pressures of the gases, and the temperature. The isotope effect...... was manifested by a reduction in anodic current densities when H(2) was replaced by D(2). For both nickel and silver, the anodic part of the polarisation curves displayed limiting current behaviour, due to concentration polarisation. The empirical reaction order was not influenced by isotope replacement....... The empirical activation energy of the limiting current was affected by both the isotope used and the nature of the electrode. For both metals, a higher activation energy was observed with deuterium than with hydrogen. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. <strong>Effectiveness of Orthoses and Foot Training in patients with Patellofemoral Pain and hyperpronationstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Carsten; Kaalund, Søren; Christensen, Marianne

    of treatment with functional foot orthoses, exercises, or orthoses with exercises. The intrinsic pedal muscles play an important role in support of the medial longitudinal arch. (2) There are however very little information of the effect from specific foot exercise as an imperative part of exercise program...... adolescent females (3). Soft foot orhtoses in addition to an exercise program resulted in significantly greater improvements in pain than treatment with flat insoles and exercises over eight weeks. A study from 2004 by Wiener-Ogilvie & Jones (4) found however no difference in outcome between 8 weeks...... to PFPS patients. The purpose of this prospective single blinded randomised study was to determine the effectiveness of a standardized foot training program combined with foot orthoses in patients with patellofemoral pain. This treatment was additional to a regular conservative patellofemoral regime...

  14. Gyrokinetic characterization of the isotope effect in turbulent transport at the FT-2 tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskala, P.; Gurchenko, A. D.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Altukhov, A. B.; Esipov, L. A.; Kantor, M. Yu; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Kouprienko, D.; Korpilo, T.; Lashkul, S. I.; Leerink, S.; Perevalov, A. A.; Rochford, R.

    2017-04-01

    Isotope effect allows fusion devices to perform better when heavier hydrogen isotopes are used as fuel, but the reason for this improvement is not yet understood. We present the first direct evidence of the isotope effect on particle confinement in the FT-2 tokamak and investigate it via gyrokinetic simulations. Experimental measurements for comparable hydrogen and deuterium discharges show that the particle confinement time increases by 40% for the heavier isotope species. The isotope effect on particle flux is reproduced in global and local gyrokinetic simulations. Global ELMFIRE simulations demonstrate a systemic reduction in particle fluxes across the radial range, showing a ratio of fluxes {{{Γ }}}{{H}}/{{{Γ }}}{{D}}=1.3 at the edge and {{{Γ }}}{{H}}/{{{Γ }}}{{D}}=1.4 at r/a=0.6. Local GENE simulations agree qualitatively with the result. Besides the fluctuation level, smaller scales and a favorable shift in the cross-phase between the turbulent fluctuations are found to contribute to the isotope effect in the simulations.

  15. Measurements of Volatile Circumstellar Isotopes: Effects of Fractionation vs. Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Stefanie

    The origin, evolution, and fate of our Universe and/or Galaxy have puzzled humankind for centuries. One approach to answering this question is to gain further understanding of stellar evolution, since stars are fundamental in galaxy development and evolution. A compilation of stellar composition can reveal the age, dynamics, and possibly the evolutionary state of a galaxy. In particular the volatile isotope ratios carry an imprint of stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis. Primitive materials, such as meteorites and IDPs, have revealed a component of ``atypical" isotopic signatures of these fundamental elements denoting a possible stellar origin. Understanding the processes by which these elements derive is essential for astrophysics on cosmochemical, galactic, stellar, and planetary scales. We propose to analyze data obtained from the Herschel Space Observatory of circumstellar envelopes to definitively measure C, N, and O isotope ratios and test current models of photo-selective isotope fractionation vs. nucleosynthetically determined values. This proposal augments data from the Herschel Space Observatory, primarily from the HIFISTARS program and MESS, though the entire Herschel archive will be searched for relevant data. The broader implications for this study include fundamental data necessary for furthering our current understanding of stellar nucleosynthesis, circumstellar chemistry, Galactic chemical evolution, and the origin of presolar grains found in primitive materials. We will focus on isotopologues of species formed in thermochemical equilibrium and trace their natal, nucleosynthetic isotope ratios. We will analyze Herschel data obtained for a survey of evolved stars with varying degrees of nuclear processing, evolutionary states, and envelope chemistry (e.g. oxygen-rich vs. carbon-rich). A full circumstellar model will be developed for each source to address specific affects that may influence either the ratios or chemistry. The isotope ratios of 12C

  16. Effectiveness of different pre-treatments in recovering pre-burial isotopic ratios of charred plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkkemper, O; Braadbaart, F; van Os, B; van Hoesel, A; van Brussel, A A N; Fernandes, R

    2018-02-15

    Isotopic analysis of archaeological charred plant remains offers useful archaeological information. However, adequate sample pre-treatment protocols may be necessary to provide a contamination-free isotopic signal while limiting sample loss and achieving a high throughput. Under these constraints, research was undertaken to compare the performance of different pre-treatment protocols. Charred archaeological plant material was selected for isotopic analysis (δ 13 C and δ 15 N values) by isotope ratio mass spectrometry from a variety of plant species, time periods and soil conditions. Preservation conditions and the effectiveness of cleaning protocols were assessed through Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry. An acid-base-acid protocol, successfully employed in radiocarbon dating, was used to define a contamination-free isotopic reference. Acid-base-acid isotopic measurements were compared with those obtained from untreated material and an acid-only protocol. The isotopic signals of untreated material and the acid-only protocol typically did not differ more than 1‰ from those of the acid-base-acid reference. There were no significant isotopic offsets between acid-base-acid and acid-only or untreated samples. Sample losses in the acid-base-acid protocol were on average 50 ± 17% (maximum = 98.4%). Elemental XRF measurements showed promising results in the detection of more contaminated samples albeit with a high rate of false positives. For the large range of preservation conditions described in the study, untreated charred plant samples, water cleaned of sediments, provide reliable stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen. The use of pre-treatments may be necessary under different preservation conditions or more conservative measurement uncertainties should be reported. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Computing effective properties of nonlinear structures exposed to strong high-frequency loading at multiple frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2006-01-01

    Effects of strong high-frequency excitation at multiple frequencies (multi-HFE) are analyzed for a class of generally nonlinear systems. The effects are illustrated for a simple pendulum system with a vibrating support, and for a parametrically excited flexible beam. For the latter, theoretical...

  18. Lithium isotope effect in the extraction systems of polyethers: effect of salt concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Shengqiang; Fu Lian

    1991-01-01

    Separation factors of lithium isotopes at 20 deg C were determined in the extraction systems of B15C5-CHCl 3 /LiBr-H 2 O. The initial concentration of LiBr was controlled in the extent of more than 2 mol/l. It may be established that the increase of LiBr concentration causes a remarkable increase of the separation factor. The essence of this effect due to the change in salt concentration was discussed in connection with examination of relevant phenomena in literature. It can be concluded that the relationship between α and Cm, the concentration of lithium salt, is dependent on K Q and K P express respectively, lithium isotope exchange equilibrium constants between Li-crownether complex and hydrated lithium ion for lithium concentration less than 1-2 mol/l, and between lithium salt ion pair and hydrated lithium ion for lithium concentration more than 2 mol/l in aqueous phase

  19. Direct determination of equilibrium deuterium isotope effects at natural abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, B.; Martin, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    A great variety of techniques has been used to study deuterium-protium partitioning in exchanging systems at equilibrium. In this context it is shown that the determination of site-specific isotope contents by 2 H-NMR at natural abundance provides simple and direct access to thermodynamic isotope fractionation factors. This method avoids the recourse to deuterated species and therefore the approximations inherent in the analysis of complex isotopomeric mixtures. A number of slowly exchanging systems involving OH, NH, or SH groups and water offer suitable conditions (large chemical shift differences, moderate line widths,hor-ellipsis) for the relatively accurate determination of thermodynamic fractionation factors. Moreover multiple fractionations can be observed and compared in ternary mixtures. 25 refs., 2 tabs

  20. Constraints on the vital effect in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite by oxygen isotopic modification of seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, Michaël; Horner, Tristan J.; Minoletti, Fabrice; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we show that there are independent controls of 18O/16O and 13C/12C fractionation in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite due to the contrasting kinetics of each isotope system. We demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the oxygen isotope fractionation with respect to equilibrium is related to the balance between calcification rate and the replenishment of the internal pool of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). As such, in fast growing cells, such as those of Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica (forming the so-called ;heavy group;), calcification of the internal carbon pool occurs faster than complete isotopic re-adjustment of the internal DIC pool with H2O molecules. Hence, coccoliths reflect the heavy oxygen isotope signature of the CO2 overprinting the whole DIC pool. Conversely, in large and slow growing cells, such as Coccolithus pelagicus ssp. braarudii, complete re-equilibration is achieved due to limited influx of CO2 leading to coccoliths that are precipitated in conditions close to isotopic equilibrium (;equilibrium group;). Species exhibiting the most negative oxygen isotope composition, such as Calcidiscus leptoporus (;light group;), precipitate coccolith under increased pH in the coccolith vesicle, as previously documented by the ;carbonate ion effect;. We suggest that, for the carbon isotope system, any observed deviation from isotopic equilibrium is only ;apparent;, as the carbon isotopic composition in coccolith calcite is controlled by a Rayleigh fractionation originating from preferential incorporation of 12C into organic matter. Therefore, species with low PIC/POC ratios as E. huxleyi and G. oceanica are shifted towards positive carbon isotope values as a result of predominant carbon fixation into the organic matter. By contrast, cells with higher PIC/POC as C. braarudii and C. leptoporus maintain, to some extent, the original negative isotopic composition of the CO2. The calcareous dinoflagellate

  1. SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT OBSERVATIONS OF STRONG LENSING GALAXY CLUSTERS: PROBING THE OVERCONCENTRATION PROBLEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gralla, Megan B.; Gladders, Michael D.; Marrone, Daniel P.; Bayliss, Matthew; Carlstrom, John E.; Greer, Christopher; Hennessy, Ryan; Koester, Benjamin; Leitch, Erik; Sharon, Keren; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Bonamente, Massimiliano; Bulbul, Esra; Hasler, Nicole; Culverhouse, Thomas; Hawkins, David; Lamb, James; Gilbank, David G.; Joy, Marshall; Miller, Amber

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect for a sample of 10 strong lensing selected galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array (SZA). The SZA is sensitive to structures on spatial scales of a few arcminutes, while the strong lensing mass modeling constrains the mass at small scales (typically <30''). Combining the two provides information about the projected concentrations of the strong lensing clusters. The Einstein radii we measure are twice as large as expected given the masses inferred from SZ scaling relations. A Monte Carlo simulation indicates that a sample randomly drawn from the expected distribution would have a larger median Einstein radius than the observed clusters about 3% of the time. The implied overconcentration has been noted in previous studies and persists for this sample, even when we take into account that we are selecting large Einstein radius systems, suggesting that the theoretical models still do not fully describe the observed properties of strong lensing clusters.

  2. Multiple isotope effects with alternative dinucleotide substrates as a probe of the malic enzyme reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, P.M.; Urbauer, J.L.; Cleland, W.W.; Gavva, S.R.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F.

    1991-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects and 13 C isotope effects with deuterium- and protium-labeled malate have been obtained for both NAD- and NADP-malic enzymes by using a variety of alternative dinucleotide substrates. With nicotinamide-containing dinucleotides as the oxidizing substrate, the 13 C effect decreases when deuterated malate is the substrate compared to the value obtained with protium-labeled malate. These data are consistent with a stepwise chemical mechanism in which hydride transfer precedes decarboxylation of the oxalacetate intermediate as previously proposed. When dinucleotide substrates such as thio-NAD, 3-nicotinamide rings are used, the 13 C effect increases when deuterated malate is the substrate compared to the value obtained with protium-labeled malate. These data, at face value, are consistent with a change in mechanism from stepwise to concerted for the oxidative decarboxylation portion of the mechanism. However, the increase in the deuterium isotope effect from 1.5 to 3 with a concomitant decrease in the 13 C isotope effect from 1.034 to 1.003 as the dinucleotide substrate is changed suggests that the reaction may still be stepwise with the non-nicotinamide dinucleotides. A more likely explanation is that a β-secondary 13 C isotope effect accompanies hydride transfer as a result of hyperconjugation of the β-carboxyl of malate as the transition state for the hydride transfer step is approached

  3. Radioactive Emissions from Fission-Based Medical Isotope Production and Their Effect on Global Nuclear Explosion Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, T.; Saey, P.

    2015-01-01

    The use of medical isotopes, such as Tc-99m, is widespread with over 30 million procedures being performed every year, but the fission-based production of isotopes used for medical procedures causes emissions into the environment. This paper will show that gaseous radioactive isotopes of xenon, such as Xe-133, are released in high quantities, because they have a high fission cross section and they are difficult to scrub from the processes used to produce the medical isotopes due to their largely unreactive nature. Unfortunately, the reasons that large amounts of radioactive xenon isotopes are emitted from isotope production are the same as those that make these isotopes the most useful isotopes for the detection of underground nuclear explosions. Relatively recently, the nuclear explosion monitoring community has established a provisional monitoring network for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) that includes radioactive xenon monitoring as a major component. This community has discovered that emissions from medical isotope production present a more serious problem to nuclear explosion monitoring than thought when the network was first conceived. To address the growing problem, a group of scientists in both the monitoring and the isotope production communities have come together to attempt to find scientific and pragmatic ways to address the emissions problems, recognizing that medical isotope production should not be adversely affected, while monitoring for nuclear explosions should remain effective as isotope production grows, changes, and spreads globally. (author)

  4. Isotope effect study of κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu(NCS)2: Labeling in the anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kini, A.M.; Wang, H.H.; Schlueter, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Since the initial discovery of organic superconductivity in 1979, a large number of organic superconductors have now been synthesized. However, the mechanism of electron-pairing in these novel superconductors has remained largely unresolved. Isotope effect studies constitute an important experimental tool for the investigation of whether or not the electron-pairing mechanism in organic superconductors is phonon-mediated, as in conventional superconductors. Recent isotope effect studies in the authors' laboratory, involving seven different isotopically labeled BEDT-TTF (or ET) derivatives, have demonstrated the following: (1) intramolecular phonon modes involving C double-bond C and Csingle bondS stretching vibrations in the ET donor molecule are not the dominant mediators of electron-pairing, and (2) in κ-(ET) 2 Cu(NCS) 2 , there exist two competing isotope effects--a normal mass effect, i.e., lowering of T c upon isotopic labeling, when the ET molecular mass is increased by concurrent 13 C and 34 S labeling, in addition to an inverse isotope effect upon deuterium labeling in ET. It is of great interest to investigate if there is an isotope effect when the charge-compensating anions, which are also located within the non-conducting layer in the superconducting cation-radical salts, are isotopically labeled. The existence of an isotope effect when the anions are labeled would be indicative of electron-pairing with the mediation of vibrational frequencies associated with the anions. In this paper, the authors present the results of the first isotope effect study in which isotopic labeling in the anion portion of κ-(ET) 2 Cu(NCS) 2 is carried out. The authors find no isotope effect when the carbon and nitrogen atoms of the thiocyanate groups in the anion are replaced with 13 C and 15 N isotopes

  5. Chemical Ligation and Isotope Labeling to Locate Dynamic Effects during Catalysis by Dihydrofolate Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Louis Y P; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Adesina, Aduragbemi S; Loveridge, E Joel; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vincent; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2015-07-27

    Chemical ligation has been used to alter motions in specific regions of dihydrofolate reductase from E. coli and to investigate the effects of localized motional changes on enzyme catalysis. Two isotopic hybrids were prepared; one with the mobile N-terminal segment containing heavy isotopes ((2) H, (13) C, (15) N) and the remainder of the protein with natural isotopic abundance, and the other one with only the C-terminal segment isotopically labeled. Kinetic investigations indicated that isotopic substitution of the N-terminal segment affected only a physical step of catalysis, whereas the enzyme chemistry was affected by protein motions from the C-terminal segment. QM/MM studies support the idea that dynamic effects on catalysis mostly originate from the C-terminal segment. The use of isotope hybrids provides insights into the microscopic mechanism of dynamic coupling, which is difficult to obtain with other studies, and helps define the dynamic networks of intramolecular interactions central to enzyme catalysis. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  6. Isotope effects in the evaporation of water: a status report of the Craig-Gordon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Juske; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Cohen, Shabtai

    2008-03-01

    The Craig-Gordon model (C-G model) [H. Craig, L.I. Gordon. Deuterium and oxygen 18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. In Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperatures, E. Tongiorgi (Ed.), pp. 9-130, Laboratorio di Geologia Nucleare, Pisa (1965).] has been synonymous with the isotope effects associated with the evaporation of water from surface waters, soils, and vegetations, which in turn constitutes a critical component of the global water cycle. On the occasion of the four decades of its successful applications to isotope geochemistry and hydrology, an attempt is made to: (a) examine its physical background within the framework of modern evaporation models, (b) evaluate our current knowledge of the environmental parameters of the C-G model, and (c) comment on a general strategy for the use of these parameters in field applications. Despite its simplistic representation of evaporation processes at the water-air interface, the C-G model appears to be adequate to provide the isotopic composition of the evaporation flux. This is largely due to its nature for representing isotopic compositions (a ratio of two fluxes of different isotopic water molecules) under the same environmental conditions. Among many environmental parameters that are included in the C-G model, accurate description and calculations are still problematic of the kinetic isotope effects that occur in a diffusion-dominated thin layer of air next to the water-air interface. In field applications, it is of importance to accurately evaluate several environmental parameters, particularly the relative humidity and isotopic compositions of the 'free-atmosphere', for a system under investigation over a given time-scale of interest (e.g., hourly to daily to seasonally). With a growing interest in the studies of water cycles of different spatial and temporal scales, including paleoclimate and water resource studies, the importance and utility of the C-G model is also likely to

  7. Compound-specific Isotope Analysis of Cyanobacterial Pure cultures and Microbial Mats: Effects of Photorespiration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, L. L.; Summons, R. E.

    2006-01-01

    Microbial mats are considered modern homologs of Precambrian stromatolites. The carbon isotopic compositions of organic matter and biomarker lipids provide clues to the depositional environments of ancient mat ecosystems. As the source of primary carbon fixation for over two billion years, an understanding of cyanobacterial lipid biosynthesis, associated isotopic discriminations, and the influence of physiological factors on growth and isotope expression is essential to help us compare modern microbial ecosystems to their ancient counterparts. Here, we report on the effects of photorespiration (PR) on the isotopic composition of cyanobacteria and biomarker lipids, and on potential PR effects associated with the composition of various microbial mats. The high light, high O2 and limiting CO2 conditions often present at the surface of microbial mats are known to support PR in cyanobacteria. The oxygenase function of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase can result in photoexcretion of glycolate and subsequent degration by heterotrophic bacteria. We have found evidence which supports an isotopic depletion (increased apparent E) scaled to O2 level associated with growth of Phormidium luridum at low CO2 concentrations (less than 0.04%). Similar to previous studies, isotopic differences between biomass and lipid biomarkers, and between lipid classes were positively correlated with overall fractionation, and should provide a means of estimating the influence of PR on overall isotopic composition of microbial mats. Several examples of microbial mats growing in the hydrothermal waters of Yellowstone National Park and the hypersaline marine evaporation ponds at Guerrero Negro, Baja Sur Mexico will be compared with a view to PR as a possible explanation of the relatively heavy C-isotope composition of hypersaline mats.

  8. Using strong nonlinearity and high-frequency vibrations to control effective properties of discrete elastic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Thomsen, Jon Juel; Snaeland, Sveinn Orri

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this article is to investigate how highfrequency (HF) excitation, combined with strong nonlinear elastic material behavior, influences the effective material or structural properties for low-frequency excitation and wave propagation. The HF effects are demonstrated on discrete linear...... spring-mass chains with non-linear inclusions. The presented analytical and numerical results suggest that the effective material properties can easily be altered by establishing finite amplitude HF standing waves in the non-linear regions of the chain....

  9. Effective hadronic lagrangian in the strong coupling expansion of lattice QCD with Susskind fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azakov, S.I.; Aliev, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    The effective hadronic action in lattice QCD with U(N) and SU(N) gauge groups and with Susskind fermions is constructed in the framework of the strong coupling approximation. For arbitrary finite (odd) N (in particular N=3) we find an effective potential, vacuum expectation value of the (χ-barχ) and an effective action for the physical meson field π(x). (author). 19 refs

  10. Cl and C isotope analysis to assess the effectiveness of chlorinated ethene degradation by zero-valent iron: Evidence from dual element and product isotope values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audí-Miró, Carme; Cretnik, Stefan; Otero, Neus; Palau, Jordi; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Soler, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► TCE and cis-DCE Cl isotope fractionation was investigated for the first time with ZVI. ► A C–Cl bond is broken in the rate-limiting step during ethylene ZVI dechlorination. ► Dual C/Cl isotope plot is a promising tool to discriminate abiotic degradation. ► Product-related carbon isotopic fractionation gives evidence of abiotic degradation. ► Hydrogenolysis and β-dichloroelimination pathways occur simultaneously. - Abstract: This study investigated C and, for the first time, Cl isotope fractionation of trichloroethene (TCE) and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) during reductive dechlorination by cast zero-valent iron (ZVI). Hydrogenolysis and β-dichloroelimination pathways occurred as parallel reactions, with ethene and ethane deriving from the β-dichloroelimination pathway. Carbon isotope fractionation of TCE and cis-DCE was consistent for different batches of Fe studied. Transformation of TCE and cis-DCE showed Cl isotopic enrichment factors (ε Cl ) of −2.6‰ ± 0.1‰ (TCE) and −6.2‰ ± 0.8‰ (cis-DCE), with Apparent Kinetic Isotope Effects (AKIE Cl ) for Cl of 1.008 ± 0.001 (TCE) and 1.013 ± 0.002 (cis-DCE). This indicates that a C–Cl bond breakage is rate-determining in TCE and cis-DCE transformation by ZVI. Two approaches were investigated to evaluate if isotope fractionation analysis can distinguish the effectiveness of transformation by ZVI as opposed to natural biodegradation. (i) Dual isotope plots. This study reports the first dual (C, Cl) element isotope plots for TCE and cis-DCE degradation by ZVI. The pattern for cis-DCE differs markedly from that reported for biodegradation of the same compound by KB-1, a commercially available Dehalococcoides-containing culture. The different trends suggest an expedient approach to distinguish abiotic and biotic transformation, but this needs to be confirmed in future studies. (ii) Product-related isotope fractionation. Carbon isotope ratios of the hydrogenolysis product cis

  11. Predictive Framework and Experimental Tests of the Kinetic Isotope Effect at Redox-Active Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavner, A.; John, S.; Black, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Electrochemical reactions provide a compelling framework to study kinetic isotope effects because redox-related processes are important for a wide variety of geological and environmental processes. In the laboratory, electrochemical reaction rates can be electronically controlled and measured in the laboratory using a potentiostat. This enables variation of redox reactions rates independent of changes in chemistry and, and the resulting isotope compositions of reactants and products can be separated and analyzed. In the past years, a series of experimental studies have demonstrated a large, light, and tunable kinetic isotope effect during electrodeposition of metal Fe, Zn, Li, Cu, and Mo from a variety of solutions (e.g. Black et al., 2009, 2010, 2011). A theoretical framework based on Marcus kinetic theory predicts a voltage-dependent kinetic isotope effect (Kavner et al., 2005, 2008), however while this framework was able to predict the tunable nature of the effect, it was not able to simultaneously predict absolute reaction rates and relative isotope rates. Here we present a more complete development of a statistical mechanical framework for simple interfacial redox reactions, which includes isotopic behavior. The framework is able to predict a kinetic isotope effect as a function of temperature and reaction rate, starting with three input parameters: a single reorganization energy which describes the overall kinetics of the electron transfer reaction, and the equilibrium reduced partition function ratios for heavy and light isotopes in the product and reactant phases. We show the framework, elucidate some of the predictions, and show direct comparisons against isotope fractionation data obtained during laboratory and natural environment redox processes. A. Kavner, A. Shahar, F. Bonet, J. Simon and E. Young (2005) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 69(12), 2971-2979. A. Kavner, S. G. John, S. Sass, and E. A. Boyle (2008), Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, vol 72, pp. 1731

  12. Ab Initio Calculations of Deuterium Isotope Effects on Chemical Shifts of Salt-Bridged Lysines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Saif; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Williamson, Mike P.

    2011-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation. This me......Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation...

  13. Isotope effects on product polarization and reaction mechanism in the Li + HF(v = 0, j = 0) → LiF + H reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xian-Fang; Wang, Mei-Shan

    2012-09-01

    Isotope effects on product polarization and reaction mechanism in the title reaction and its isotopic variants are investigated by employing the quasiclassical trajectory method. At a collision energy of 363 meV, the calculated differential cross sections display a strongly forward scattering in the Li + HF(v = 0, j = 0) → LiF + H reaction, but both the forward and sideways scatterings in the Li + DF(v = 0, j = 0) → LiF + D and Li + TF(v = 0, j = 0) → LiF + T reactions. Analysis of trajectories propagation along the time reveals that the Li + HF and Li + DF reactions proceed predominantly by the direct reaction mechanism. This is consistent with the experimental results of Becker et al. however, the Li + TF reaction undergoes both the direct and indirect reaction mechanisms. The product polarization shows a monotonically decreasing behavior with increasing the mass of the hydrogen isotopes.

  14. The effect of the isotopic composition of oxygen on the non-mass-dependent isotopic fractionation in the formation of ozone by discharge of O2. [from meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jongmann; Epstein, Samuel

    1987-01-01

    Isotopic fractionation processes in the formation of O3 by 20-kV 60-kHz discharge of O2 in a fused silica container at 77 K are investigated experimentally, with a focus on the effects of changes in the isotopic composition of O2, the O2 pressure, the degree of O3 formation, and the discharge geometry on the isotope abundances in the postdischarge O2 and O3. The results are presented in tables and graphs and compared with the predictions of theoretical models involving vibrational anharmonicity and symmetry effects on O3 predissociation. In experiments using O2 enriched with O-17 and O-18, the heavy isotope is enriched in the residual O2 and not in the O3, whereas the opposite is true when atmospheric isotope abundances are used. It is inferred that the predissociation rate depends on the symmetry and mass of the O3 molecules and not on self-shielding or symmetry effects in the reactant O2. The potential value of the present findings for studies of anomalous isotope abundances in meteorites is indicated.

  15. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have measured the 13 C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D 2 O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D 2 O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The 13 C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the 13 C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier

  16. Kinetic isotope effects in complex reaction networks: formic acid electro-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Xia; Heinen, Martin; Jusys, Zenonas; Behm, Rolf Jürgen

    2007-02-19

    The determination of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) for different reaction pathways and steps in a complex reaction network, where KIEs may affect the overall reaction in various different ways including dominant and minority pathways or the buildup of a reaction-inhibiting adlayer, is demonstrated for formic acid electrooxidation on a Pt film electrode by quantitative electrochemical in situ IR spectroscopic measurements under controlled mass-transport conditions. The ability to separate effects resulting from different contributions--which is not possible using purely electrochemical kinetic measurements--allows conclusions on the nature of the rate-limiting steps and their transition state in the individual reaction pathways. The potential-independent values of approximately 1.9 for the KIE of formic acid dehydration (CO(ad) formation) in the indirect pathway and approximately 3 for the CO(ad) coverage-normalized KIE of formic acid oxidation to CO2 (direct pathway) indicate that 1) C-H bond breaking is rate-limiting in both reaction steps, 2) the transition states for these reactions are different, and 3) the configurations of the transition states involve rather strong bonds to the transferred D/H species, either in the initial or in the final state, for the direct pathway and--even more pronounced--for formic acid dehydration (CO(ad) formation).

  17. Dew water effects on leaf water using a stable isotope approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Lee, X.

    2009-12-01

    The presence of dew is a common meteorological phenomenon in field conditions and takes into account for significant portion of hydrologic processes in terrestrial ecosystems. The isotope composition of leaf water plays an important role in the isotopic water and carbon fluxes between terrestrial plants and the atmosphere. However, the consequence of dew formation in the plant-atmosphere relations has been ignored in many studies. The objective of this study is to improve our understanding of environmental and biological controls on the leaf water in equilibrium with dew water through laboratory experiments. Five species of plants (soybean, corn, sorghum, wheat, cotton) were grown hydroponically with water of a known isotopic content in a greenhouse. On the day of the experiment, they were first moved to ambient environment in full sunlight for at least 6 hr and then into a dark container inside the lab for up to 48 hr in which water vapor isotope ratios, temperature, and humidity were controlled. This arrangement created a step change in the forcing on the plant isotopic exchange. Leaves were sampled prior to the transfer to the dark container and 6 more times every 4 - 12 hr over the experiment. Humidity inside the container was saturated to mimic dew events in field conditions. Water from the leaf samples was extracted by a vacuum line and was analyzed for both δD and δ18O. The dataset will allow us to evaluate leaf water isotopic theories by exploring the transitions of the isotopic ratio of leaf water in response to the step change. Specifically, we are interested in whether the stomatal opening is an effective pathway for gaseous exchange in total darkness and how the transitional behaviors of the isotopic ratio of leaf water differ between the C3 and C4 photosynthesis pathways.

  18. Alternate substrates and isotope effects as a probe of the malic enzyme reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavva, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    Dissociation constants for alternative dinucleotide substrates and competitive inhibitors suggest that the dinucleotide binding site of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme is hydrophobic in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Changes in the divalent metal ion activator from Mg{sup 2+} to Mn{sup 2+} or Cd{sup 2+} results in a decrease in the dinucleotide affinity and an increase in the affinity for malate. Primary deuterium and {sup 13}C isotope effects obtained with the different metal ions suggest either a change in the transition state structure for the hydride transfer or decarboxylation steps or both. Deuterium isotope effects are finite whether reactants are maintained at saturating or limiting concentrations with all the metal ions and dinucleotide substrates used. For the native enzyme, primary deuterium isotope effects increase with a concomitant decrease in the {sup 13}C effects when NAD is replaced by an alternate dinucleotide substrate different in redox potential.

  19. Alternate substrates and isotope effects as a probe of the malic enzyme reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavva, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    Dissociation constants for alternative dinucleotide substrates and competitive inhibitors suggest that the dinucleotide binding site of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme is hydrophobic in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Changes in the divalent metal ion activator from Mg 2+ to Mn 2+ or Cd 2+ results in a decrease in the dinucleotide affinity and an increase in the affinity for malate. Primary deuterium and 13 C isotope effects obtained with the different metal ions suggest either a change in the transition state structure for the hydride transfer or decarboxylation steps or both. Deuterium isotope effects are finite whether reactants are maintained at saturating or limiting concentrations with all the metal ions and dinucleotide substrates used. For the native enzyme, primary deuterium isotope effects increase with a concomitant decrease in the 13 C effects when NAD is replaced by an alternate dinucleotide substrate different in redox potential

  20. Planning, Instruction, and Assessment: Effective Teaching Practices. James H. Stronge Research-to-Practice Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Leslie W.; Hindman, Jennifer; Stronge, James H.

    2010-01-01

    This entry in the James H. Stronge Research-to-Practice Series focuses on specific strategies teachers can use to improve the quality of their instruction. Studies have shown teacher quality to be the top indicator of student achievement, with the effects of good teachers apparent even as students move on to successive grades. In this book, Grant,…

  1. Engineering the Dynamics of Effective Spin-Chain Models for Strongly Interacting Atomic Gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volosniev, A. G.; Petrosyan, D.; Valiente, M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider a one-dimensional gas of cold atoms with strong contact interactions and construct an effective spin-chain Hamiltonian for a two-component system. The resulting Heisenberg spin model can be engineered by manipulating the shape of the external confining potential of the atomic gas. We...

  2. Effects of interaction imbalance in a strongly repulsive one-dimensional Bose gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfknecht, Rafael Emilio; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Foerster, Angela

    2018-01-01

    We calculate the spatial distributions and the dynamics of a few-body two-component strongly interacting Bose gas confined to an effectively one-dimensional trapping potential. We describe the densities for each component in the trap for different interaction and population imbalances. We calculate...

  3. Parity violation effects in the hydrogen atom in the field of a strong electromagnetic wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labzovsky, L.N.; Mitrushchenkov, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    The parity violation effects in the hydrogen atom in a strong electromagnetic laser field are considered. It is shown that there is the possibility of hyperrate measurements of different constants of the weak interaction in the hydrogen magnetic resonance experiments. (orig.)

  4. Effects of interaction imbalance in a strongly repulsive one-dimensional Bose gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfknecht, Rafael Emilio; Zinner, Nikolaj Thomas; Foerster, Angela

    2018-01-01

    We calculate the spatial distributions and the dynamics of a few-body two-component strongly interacting Bose gas confined to an effectively one-dimensional trapping potential. We describe the densities for each component in the trap for different interaction and population imbalances. We calcula...

  5. Non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq effects in strongly turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahlers, Günter; Brown, Eric; Fontenele Araujo Junior, F.; Funfschilling, Denis; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    Non-Oberbeck–Boussinesq (NOB) effects on the Nusselt number $Nu$ and Reynolds number $\\hbox{\\it Re}$ in strongly turbulent Rayleigh–Bénard (RB) convection in liquids were investigated both experimentally and theoretically. In the experiments the heat current, the temperature difference, and the

  6. Isotope effect in impure high T_c superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Mierzynska, M.; Wysokinski, K. I.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of various kinds of impurities on the isotope shift exponent \\alpha of high temperature superconductors has been studied. In these materials the dopant impurities, like Sr in La_{2-x}Sr_xCuO_4, play different role and usually occupy different sites than impurities like Zn, Fe, Ni {\\it etc} intentionally introduced into the system to study its superconducting properties. In the paper the in-plane and out-of-plane impurities present in layered superconductors have been considered....

  7. Effect of channel coupling on the elastic scattering of lithium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, T.; Suhara, T.; Itagaki, N.

    2018-04-01

    Herein, we investigated the channel coupling (CC) effect on the elastic scatterings of lithium (Li) isotopes (A =6 -9) for 12C and 28Si targets at E /A =50 -60 MeV. The wave functions of the Li isotopes were obtained using the stochastic multi-configuration mixing method based on the microscopic-cluster model. The proton radii of the 7Li, 8Li, and 9Li nuclei became smaller as the number of valence neutrons increased. The valence neutrons in the 8Li and 9Li nuclei exhibited a glue-like behavior, thereby attracting the α and t clusters. Based on the transition densities derived from these microscopic wave functions, the elastic-scattering cross section was calculated using a microscopic coupled-channel method with a complex G -matrix interaction. The existing experimental data for the elastic scatterings of the Li isotopes and 10Be nuclei were well reproduced. The Li isotope elastic cross sections were demonstrated for the 12C and 28Si targets at E /A =53 MeV. The glue-like effect of the valence neutrons on the Li isotope was clearly demonstrated by the CC effect on elastic scattering. Finally, we realize that the valence neutrons stabilized the bindings of the core parts and the CC effect related to core excitation was indeed reduced.

  8. Heavy quark mass effects and improved tests of the flavor independence of strong interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, P.N. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); SLD Collaboration

    1998-08-01

    A review is given of latest results on tests of the flavor independence of strong interactions. Heavy quark mass effects are evident in the data and are now taken into account at next-to-leading order in QCD perturbation theory. The strong-coupling ratios {alpha}{sub s}{sup b}/{alpha}{sub s}{sup uds} and {alpha}{sub s}{sup c}/{alpha}{sub s}{sup uds} are found to be consistent with unity. Determinations of the b-quark mass m{sub b} (M{sub Z}) are discussed.

  9. Strong interaction effects in high-Z K sup minus atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batty, C.J.; Eckhause, M.; Gall, K.P.; Guss, P.P.; Hertzog, D.W.; Kane, J.R.; Kunselman, A.R.; Miller, J.P.; O' Brien, F.; Phillips, W.C.; Powers, R.J.; Roberts, B.L.; Sutton, R.B.; Vulcan, W.F.; Welsh, R.E.; Whyley, R.J.; Winter, R.G. (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX, United Kingdom (GB) College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23185 Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213)

    1989-11-01

    A systematic experimental study of strong interaction shifts, widths, and yields from high-{ital Z} kaonic atoms is reported. Strong interaction effects for the {ital K}{sup {minus}}(8{r arrow}7) transition were measured in U, Pb, and W, and the {ital K}{sup {minus}}(7{r arrow}6) transition in W was also observed. This is the first observation of two measurably broadened and shifted kaonic transitions in a single target and thus permitted the width of the upper state to be determined directly, rather than being inferred from yield data. The results are compared with optical-model calculations.

  10. Thermal Rate Coefficients and Kinetic Isotope Effects for the Reaction OH + CH4 → H2O + CH3 on an ab Initio-Based Potential Energy Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2018-03-15

    Thermal rate coefficients for the title reaction and its various isotopologues are computed using a tunneling-corrected transition-state theory on a global potential energy surface recently developed by fitting a large number of high-level ab initio points. The calculated rate coefficients are found to agree well with the measured ones in a wide temperature range, validating the accuracy of the potential energy surface. Strong non-Arrhenius effects are found at low temperatures. In addition, the calculations reproduced the primary and secondary kinetic isotope effects. These results confirm the strong influence of tunneling to this heavy-light-heavy hydrogen abstraction reaction.

  11. Deuterium isotope effect on the intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O.; Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin

    2001-01-01

    -0' is also different, yielding entropy changes of -57 J K-1 mol-l in water and -84 J K-1 mol(-1) in deuterium oxide. The driving force difference of 10 mV is in keeping with the kinetic isotope effect, but the contribution to DeltaS(double dagger) from the temperature dependence of E-0' is positive......Intramolecular electron transfer in azurin in water and deuterium oxide has been studied over a broad temperature range. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect, k(H)/k(D), is smaller than unity (0.7 at 298 K), primarily caused by the different activation entropies in water (-56.5 J K-1 mol(-1...... entropy difference and to compensate for the different temperature dependencies of E-0'. Thus, differences in driving force and thermal expansion appear as the most straightforward rationale for the observed isotope effect....

  12. Some measurements of H/D polarizability isotope effects using differential refractometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster Smith, M.; Van Hook, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    Refractive index differences between the H and D isomers of some common molecules in the liquid phase were measured between 404.7 and 690.0 nm. The data are combined with information on molar volume isotope effects to yield values for H/D isotope effects on the static polarizability, the vibrational contribution to the static and frequency dependent parts of the polarizability, and the H/D isotope effect on the second moment of the electronic charge distribution. The present results suffice to demonstrate the practicability of this technique to measure the components of the polarizability listed above. However for accurate resolution of the vibrational and second moment contributions, refractive index data of still greater precision will be required. (orig.)

  13. Auger effect in the presence of strong x-ray pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jicai; Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Aagren, Hans; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-01-01

    We study the role of propagation of strong x-ray free-electron laser pulses on the Auger effect. When the system is exposed to a strong x-ray pulse the stimulated emission starts to compete with the Auger decay. As an illustration we present numerical results for Ar gas with the frequency of the incident x-ray pulse tuned in the 2p 3/2 -4s resonance. It is shown that the pulse propagation is accompanied by two channels of amplified spontaneous emission, 4s-2p 3/2 and 3s-2p 3/2 , which reshape the pulse when the system is inverted. The population inversion is quenched for longer propagation distances where lasing without inversion enhances the Stokes component. The results of simulations show that the propagation of the strong x-ray pulses affect intensively the Auger branching ratio.

  14. A multielement isotopic study of refractory FUN and F CAIs: Mass-dependent and mass-independent isotope effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kööp, Levke; Nakashima, Daisuke; Heck, Philipp R.; Kita, Noriko T.; Tenner, Travis J.; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Park, Changkun; Davis, Andrew M.

    2018-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the oldest dated objects that formed inside the Solar System. Among these are rare, enigmatic objects with large mass-dependent fractionation effects (F CAIs), which sometimes also have large nucleosynthetic anomalies and a low initial abundance of the short-lived radionuclide 26Al (FUN CAIs). We have studied seven refractory hibonite-rich CAIs and one grossite-rich CAI from the Murchison (CM2) meteorite for their oxygen, calcium, and titanium isotopic compositions. The 26Al-26Mg system was also studied in seven of these CAIs. We found mass-dependent heavy isotope enrichment in all measured elements, but never simultaneously in the same CAI. The data are hard to reconcile with a single-stage melt evaporation origin and may require reintroduction or reequilibration for magnesium, oxygen and titanium after evaporation for some of the studied CAIs. The initial 26Al/27Al ratios inferred from model isochrons span a range from <1 × 10-6 to canonical (∼5 × 10-5). The CAIs show a mutual exclusivity relationship between inferred incorporation of live 26Al and the presence of resolvable anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti. Furthermore, a relationship exists between 26Al incorporation and Δ17O in the hibonite-rich CAIs (i.e., 26Al-free CAIs have resolved variations in Δ17O, while CAIs with resolved 26Mg excesses have Δ17O values close to -23‰). Only the grossite-rich CAI has a relatively enhanced Δ17O value (∼-17‰) in spite of a near-canonical 26Al/27Al. We interpret these data as indicating that fractionated hibonite-rich CAIs formed over an extended time period and sampled multiple stages in the isotopic evolution of the solar nebula, including: (1) an 26Al-poor nebula with large positive and negative anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti and variable Δ17O; (2) a stage of 26Al-admixture, during which anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti had been largely diluted and a Δ17O value of ∼-23‰ had been achieved in the CAI formation region; and (3

  15. The isotope effect in the thermodynamic parameters of polymerization of styrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedev, B.V.; Kirillin, A.I.; Kozyreva, N.M.; Lebedev, N.K.; Smirnova, N.N.

    1985-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of substitution of hydrogen by deuterium on the thermodynamic criteria of polymerization processes. The isotope effects in the enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy of the polymerization of styrene are studied by the methods of adiabatic and isothermal calorimetry. The heat capacity of polystyrenes and polydeuterostyrenes are shown

  16. Deuterium isotope effect on the intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O.; Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin

    2001-01-01

    rather than negative. Isotope effects are, however, also inherent in the nuclear reorganization Gibbs free energy and in the tunneling factor for the electron transfer process. A slightly larger thermal protein expansion in H2O than in D2O (0.001 nm K-1) is sufficient both to account for the activation......Intramolecular electron transfer in azurin in water and deuterium oxide has been studied over a broad temperature range. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect, k(H)/k(D), is smaller than unity (0.7 at 298 K), primarily caused by the different activation entropies in water (-56.5 J K-1 mol(-1...

  17. Solvent isotope effects on the rates of alkylation of thiolamine models of papain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wandinger, A.; Creighton, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    As a test of whether it is chemically reasonable to attribute any or all of the observed kinetic solvent deuterium isotope effects reported on papain to the fundamental properties of the tautomerization equilibrium, the magnitudes of the solvent deuterium isotope effects on the rates of alkylation of the tautomeric forms of cysteine and β-mercaptoethylamine were determined for bromo- and chloroacetate, bromo- and chloroacetamide, as well as for methylbromoacetate. These thiolamines are viewed as elementary chemical models of the sulfhydryl group tautomerization equilibrium envisioned in the active site of papain. (Auth.)

  18. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect in the thermal dehydration of boric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, H.; Ohshima, S.; Ichiba, S.; Negita, H.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetic deuterium isotope effect in the thermal dehydration process from H 3 BO 3 to HBO 2 (III) was determined using simultaneous TG and DSC. The rate constant ratio of H 3 BO 3 to D 3 BO 3 obtained by the analysis of isothermal TG and DSC curves was found to be smaller than unity. Both activation energy, E, and frequency factor, A, for the dehydration of H 3 BO 3 proved to be larger than those of D 3 BO 3 , using non-isothermal TG and DSC. The origin of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect in the thermal dehydration of boric acid is also briefly discussed. (orig.)

  19. Correlation of the vapor pressure isotope effect with molecular force fields in the liquid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollin, J.S.; Ishida, T.

    1976-07-01

    The present work is concerned with the development and application of a new model for condensed phase interactions with which the vapor pressure isotope effect (vpie) may be related to molecular forces and structure. The model considers the condensed phase as being represented by a cluster of regularly arranged molecules consisting of a central molecule and a variable number of molecules in the first coordination shell. The methods of normal coordinate analysis are used to determine the modes of vibration of the condensed phase cluster from which, in turn, the isotopic reduced partition function can be calculated. Using the medium cluster model, the observed vpie for a series of methane isotopes has been successfully reproduced with better agreement with experiment than has been possible using the simple cell model. We conclude, however, that insofar as the medium cluster model provides a reasonable picture of the liquid state, the vpie is not sufficiently sensitive to molecular orientation to permit an experimental determination of intermolecular configuration in the condensed phase through measurement of isotopic pressure ratios. The virtual independence of vapor pressure isotope effects on molecular orientation at large cluster sizes is a demonstration of the general acceptability of the cell model assumptions for vpie calculations.

  20. Effects of trace element concentration on enzyme controlled stable isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Silvia A; Hirschorn, Sarah K; Elsner, Martin; Lacrampe-Couloume, Georges; Sleep, Brent E; Edwards, Elizabeth A; Lollar, Barbara Sherwood

    2006-12-15

    The effects of iron concentration on carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of toluene by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 were investigated using a low iron medium and two different high iron media. Mean carbon enrichment factors (epsilonc) determined using a Rayleigh isotopic model were smaller in culture grown under high iron conditions (epsilonc = -1.7+/-0.1%) compared to low iron conditions (epsilonc = -2.5+/-0.3%). Mean hydrogen enrichment factors (epsilonH) were also significantly smaller for culture grown under high iron conditions (epsilonH = -77 +/-4%) versus low iron conditions (EpsilonH = -159+/-11%). A mechanistic model for enzyme kinetics was used to relate differences in the magnitude of isotopic fractionation for low iron versus high iron cultures to the efficiency of the enzymatic transformation. The increase of carbon and hydrogen enrichment factors at low iron concentrations suggests a slower enzyme-catalyzed substrate conversion step (k2) relative to the enzyme-substrate binding step (k-l) at low iron concentration. While the observed differences were subtle and, hence, do not significantly impact the ability to use stable isotope analysis in the field, these results demonstrated that resolvable differences in carbon and hydrogen isotopic fractionation were related to low and high iron conditions. This novel result highlights the need to further investigate the effects of other trace elements known to be key components of biodegradative enzymes.

  1. Isotope exchange reactions on ceramic breeder materials and their effect on tritium inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.; Baba, A.; Kawamura, Y.; Nishi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Though lithium ceramic materials such as Li 2 O, LiAlO 2 , Li 2 ZrO 3 , Li 2 TiO 3 and Li 4 SiO 4 are considered as breeding materials in the blanket of a D-T fusion reactor, the release behavior of the bred tritium in these solid breeder materials has not been fully understood. The isotope exchange reaction rate between hydrogen isotopes in the purge gas and tritium on the surface of breeding materials have not been quantified yet, although helium gas with hydrogen or deuterium is planned to be used as the blanket purge gas in the recent blanket designs. The mass transfer coefficient representing the isotope exchange reaction between H 2 and D 2 O or that between D 2 and H 2 O in the ceramic breeding materials bed is experimentally obtained in this study. Effects of isotope exchange reactions on the tritium inventory in the bleeding blanket is discussed based on data obtained in this study where effects of diffusion of tritium in the grain, absorption of water in the bulk of grain, and adsorption of water on the surface of grain, together with two types of isotope exchange reactions are considered. The way to estimate the tritium inventory in a Li 2 ZrO 3 blanket used in this study shows a good agreement with data obtained in such in-situ experiments as MOZART, EXOTIC-5, 6 and TRINE experiments. (author)

  2. Isotopic effects in the neon fixed point: uncertainty of the calibration data correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steur, Peter P. M.; Pavese, Franco; Fellmuth, Bernd; Hermier, Yves; Hill, Kenneth D.; Seog Kim, Jin; Lipinski, Leszek; Nagao, Keisuke; Nakano, Tohru; Peruzzi, Andrea; Sparasci, Fernando; Szmyrka-Grzebyk, Anna; Tamura, Osamu; Tew, Weston L.; Valkiers, Staf; van Geel, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The neon triple point is one of the defining fixed points of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). Although recognizing that natural neon is a mixture of isotopes, the ITS-90 definition only states that the neon should be of ‘natural isotopic composition’, without any further requirements. A preliminary study in 2005 indicated that most of the observed variability in the realized neon triple point temperatures within a range of about 0.5 mK can be attributed to the variability in isotopic composition among different samples of ‘natural’ neon. Based on the results of an International Project (EUROMET Project No. 770), the Consultative Committee for Thermometry decided to improve the realization of the neon fixed point by assigning the ITS-90 temperature value 24.5561 K to neon with the isotopic composition recommended by IUPAC, accompanied by a quadratic equation to take the deviations from the reference composition into account. In this paper, the uncertainties of the equation are discussed and an uncertainty budget is presented. The resulting standard uncertainty due to the isotopic effect (k = 1) after correction of the calibration data is reduced to (4 to 40) μK when using neon of ‘natural’ isotopic composition or to 30 μK when using 20Ne. For comparison, an uncertainty component of 0.15 mK should be included in the uncertainty budget for the neon triple point if the isotopic composition is unknown, i.e. whenever the correction cannot be applied.

  3. Hydrodynamic and Environmental Controls on the Nitrogen Isotope Effect of Benthic N2 Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooze, J.; Meile, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    Isotopic signatures of nitrogen (N) pools, together with knowledge on fractionation during the conversion between different forms of N, can be used to constrain marine N budgets. However, the reported extent of N isotope fractionation during benthic N2 production has differed substantially between studies, leading to uncertainty in the estimate of the global benthic N2 production rate. To assess the range and identify mechanisms underlying such observations, we developed a reactive transport model and ran simulations evaluating the impact of nitrification, denitrification, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation on the isotopic composition of in-situ N/2 production. Different hydrodynamic regimes were taken into account, including advective flow induced by bioirrigation and purely diffusive transport. The effects of the benthic mineralization rate and the composition of the overlying water were also quantified. The benthic redox conditions were found to control the N isotope effect, which under reducing conditions is driven by fractionation during nitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation and under oxidizing conditions by fractionation during denitrification. The mineralization rate, the bioirrigation intensity, and chemical composition of the overlying water affect the benthic redox zonation and therefore also the benthic N isotope effect. With increasing water-depth the mineralization rate and the advective nitrate supply to the sediment both decrease, constraining most benthic N cycling to the continental shelf. Simulations that reproduce observed trends of sediment O2 uptake and N2 fluxes with water depth, combined with ocean bathymetry yield an average benthic N isotope effect of -3‰, in line with independent estimates from global circulation models coupled to N cycle models (Somes et al., 2013. Biogeosciences 10, 5889-5910).

  4. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C.T.; Böhlke, J.K.; Bekins, B.A.; Phillips, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field-scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local-scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O 2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample-based estimates of "apparent" parameters with "true" (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non-Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2 threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport. ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Christopher T.; Böhlke, John Karl; Bekins, Barbara A.; Phillips, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field‐scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local‐scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample‐based estimates of “apparent” parameters with “true“ (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non‐Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport.

  6. Ab initio calculation of the Zn isotope effect in phosphates, citrates, and malates and applications to plants and soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Toshiyuki; Albarède, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Stable Zn isotopes are fractionated in roots and leaves of plants. Analyses demonstrate that the heavy Zn isotopes are enriched in the root system of plants with respect to shoots and leaves as well as the host soil, but the fractionation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the origin of this isotope fractionation is due to a chemical isotope effect upon complexation by Zn malates and citrates in the aerial parts and by phosphates in the roots. We calculated the Zn isotope effect in aqueous citrates, malates, and phosphates by ab initio methods. For pHphosphates, with respect to leaves, which concentrate malates and citrates, by about one permil. It is proposed that Zn isotope fractionation represents a useful tracer of Zn availability and mobility in soils.

  7. Strong coupling electrostatics for randomly charged surfaces: antifragility and effective interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrat, Malihe; Naji, Ali; Komaie-Moghaddam, Haniyeh; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-05-07

    We study the effective interaction mediated by strongly coupled Coulomb fluids between dielectric surfaces carrying quenched, random monopolar charges with equal mean and variance, both when the Coulomb fluid consists only of mobile multivalent counterions and when it consists of an asymmetric ionic mixture containing multivalent and monovalent (salt) ions in equilibrium with an aqueous bulk reservoir. We analyze the consequences that follow from the interplay between surface charge disorder, dielectric and salt image effects, and the strong electrostatic coupling that results from multivalent counterions on the distribution of these ions and the effective interaction pressure they mediate between the surfaces. In a dielectrically homogeneous system, we show that the multivalent counterions are attracted towards the surfaces with a singular, disorder-induced potential that diverges logarithmically on approach to the surfaces, creating a singular but integrable counterion density profile that exhibits an algebraic divergence at the surfaces with an exponent that depends on the surface charge (disorder) variance. This effect drives the system towards a state of lower thermal 'disorder', one that can be described by a renormalized temperature, exhibiting thus a remarkable antifragility. In the presence of an interfacial dielectric discontinuity, the singular behavior of counterion density at the surfaces is removed but multivalent counterions are still accumulated much more strongly close to randomly charged surfaces as compared with uniformly charged ones. The interaction pressure acting on the surfaces displays in general a highly non-monotonic behavior as a function of the inter-surface separation with a prominent regime of attraction at small to intermediate separations. This attraction is caused directly by the combined effects from charge disorder and strong coupling electrostatics of multivalent counterions, which dominate the surface-surface repulsion due to

  8. Empty creditors and strong shareholders: The real effects of credit risk trading. Second draft

    OpenAIRE

    Colonnello, Stefano; Efing, Matthias; Zucchi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Credit derivatives give creditors the possibility to transfer debt cash flow rights to other market participants while retaining control rights. We use the market for credit default swaps (CDSs) as a laboratory to show that the real effects of such debt unbundling crucially hinge on shareholder bargaining power. We find that creditors buy more CDS protection when facing strong shareholders to secure themselves a valuable outside option in distressed renegotiations. After the start of CDS trad...

  9. [Effects of strong reductive approach on remediation of degraded facility vegetable soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong-Bin; Meng, Tian-Zhu; Zhang, Jin-Bo; Cai, Zu-Cong

    2013-09-01

    High application rate of chemical fertilizers and unreasonable rotation in facility vegetable cultivation can easily induce the occurrence of soil acidification, salinization, and serious soil-borne diseases, while to quickly and effectively remediate the degraded facility vegetable soil can considerably increase vegetable yield and farmers' income. In this paper, a degraded facility vegetable soil was amended with 0, 3.75, 7.50, and 11.3 t C x hm(-2) of air-dried alfalfa and flooded for 31 days to establish a strong reductive environment, with the variations of soil physical and chemical properties and the cucumber yield studied. Under the reductive condition, soil Eh dropped quickly below 0 mV, accumulated soil NO3(-) was effectively eliminated, soil pH was significantly raised, and soil EC was lowered, being more evident in higher alfalfa input treatments. After treated with the strong reductive approach, the cucumber yield in the facility vegetable field reached 53.3-57.9 t x hm(-2), being significantly higher than that in un-treated facility vegetable field in last growth season (10.8 t x hm(-2)). It was suggested that strong reductive approach could effectively remediate the degraded facility vegetable soil in a short term.

  10. Unusual Atmospheric Processes: Implications for the Unusual Isotope Effect in Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, S.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.

    2016-12-01

    Several samples associated in particular with thunderstorms collected from Kalamazoo, Michigan reveal oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios that are not compatible with known thermodynamic fractionation or the so-called Raleigh Distillation Effect. Data gathered from April 2014 to February 2016 can be separated into two categories: (1) samples with expected isotopic values based on previous work, (2) samples with unusually high δ18O and δ2H values. Values as high as 42‰ and 25‰ for δ2H and δ18O respectively are obtained. Recent studies suggest that precipitation produced by deep convection can produce moderately enriched oxygen isotopic values, although no hydrogen values for those precipitations are available. Moreover, no values have been recorded that are as high as some of those presented here. The unusual isotope values cannot be attributed to air mass contributions. It is argued that changes in atmospheric chemistry, most likely induced by lightning associated with thunderstorms are responsible. This is likely since temperatures associated with lightning can reach 40000°K. Several studies have indicated that lightning can significantly impact atmospheric chemistry producing, among other species, ozone and NOx. Atmospheric ozone has enriched isotopic values and likely contributes to enriched Oxygen-18 seen in precipitation. An explanation for enrichment in hydrogen is somewhat elusive, but a likely candidate is ion molecular reactions produced by extremely high temperatures in the corona of lightning.

  11. Isotopic and spin-nuclear effects in solid hydrogens (Review Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiman, Yuri A.; Crespo, Yanier

    2017-12-01

    The multiple isotopic family of hydrogens (H2, HD, D2, HT, DT, T2) due to large differences in the de Boer quantum parameter and inertia moments displays a diversity of pronounced quantum isotopic solid-state effects. The homonuclear members of this family (H2, D2, T2) due to the permutation symmetry are subjects of the constraints of quantum mechanics which link the possible rotational states of these molecules to their total nuclear spin giving rise to the existence of two spin-nuclear modifications, ortho- and parahydrogens, possessing substantially different properties. Consequently, hydrogen solids present an unique opportunity for studying both isotope and spin-nuclear effects. The rotational spectra of heteronuclear hydrogens (HD, HT, DT) are free from limitations imposed by the permutation symmetry. As a result, the ground state of these species in solid state is virtually degenerate. The most dramatic consequence of this fact is an effect similar to the Pomeranchuk effect in 3He which in the case of the solid heteronuclear hydrogens manifests itself as the reentrant broken symmetry phase transitions. In this review article we discuss thermodynamic and kinetic effects pertaining to different isotopic and spin-nuclear species, as well as problems that still remain to be solved.

  12. Isotope effect in the carbonyl sulfide reaction with O(3P)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht; Mahler, Denise W.

    2012-01-01

    The sulfur kinetic isotope effect (KIE) in the reaction of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) with O((3)P) was studied in relative rate experiments at 298 ± 2 K and 955 ± 10 mbar. The reaction was carried out in a photochemical reactor using long path FTIR detection, and data were analyzed using a nonlinear......; at 300 K, the isotopic fractionation was found to be (34)e = -14.8‰. The OCS sink reaction with O((3)P) cannot explain the large fractionation in (34)S, over +73‰, indicated by remote sensing data. In addition, (34)e in OCS photolysis and OH oxidation are not larger than 10‰, indicating that...

  13. Note on isotopic effects in range calculations of high-energy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez-Vazquez, Javier; Perez-Martin, A.M.C.; Jimenez-Rodriguez, J.J.; Konoplev, Vladimir; Gras-Marti, Albert; Castella-Mayor, Javier

    1995-01-01

    A simple analytical model that allows the calculation of the percent-level differences of the average ranges of isotopic ion beams slowing down in solid targets is extended to energies in the MeV region and to investigate isotopic effects due to small variations in the mass of the target species. The various contributions to the range in terms of ion stopping, both nuclear and electronic, and angular scattering, can be investigated separately. The model agrees with available experimental data, and predictions are made for a range of cases of interest. (orig.)

  14. Study on the Effect of the Separating Unit Optimization on the Economy of Stable Isotope Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Kun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An economic criterion called as yearly net profit of single separating unit (YNPSSU was presented to evaluate the influence of structure optimization on the economy. Using YNPSSU as a criterion, economic analysis was carried out for the structure optimization of separating unit in the case of separating SiF4 to obtain the 28Si and 29Si isotope. YNPSSU was calculated and compared with that before optimization. The results showed that YNPSSU was increased by 12.3% by the structure optimization. Therefore, the structure optimization could increase the economy of the stable isotope separation effectively.

  15. Strong Stability Preserving Explicit Runge--Kutta Methods of Maximal Effective Order

    KAUST Repository

    Hadjimichael, Yiannis

    2013-07-23

    We apply the concept of effective order to strong stability preserving (SSP) explicit Runge--Kutta methods. Relative to classical Runge--Kutta methods, methods with an effective order of accuracy are designed to satisfy a relaxed set of order conditions but yield higher order accuracy when composed with special starting and stopping methods. We show that this allows the construction of four-stage SSP methods with effective order four (such methods cannot have classical order four). However, we also prove that effective order five methods---like classical order five methods---require the use of nonpositive weights and so cannot be SSP. By numerical optimization, we construct explicit SSP Runge--Kutta methods up to effective order four and establish the optimality of many of them. Numerical experiments demonstrate the validity of these methods in practice.

  16. Effect of Different Carbon Substrates on Nitrate Stable Isotope Fractionation During Microbial Denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderlich, Anja; Meckenstock, Rainer; Einsiedl, Florian

    2012-01-01

    -labeled water and 18O-labeled nitrite were added to the microcosm experiments to study the effect of putative backward reactions of nitrite to nitrate on the stable isotope fractionation. We found no evidence for a reverse reaction. Significant variations of the stable isotope enrichment factor ε were observed......In batch experiments, we studied the isotope fractionation in N and O of dissolved nitrate during dentrification. Denitrifying strains Thauera aromatica and “Aromatoleum aromaticum strain EbN1” were grown under strictly anaerobic conditions with acetate, benzoate, and toluene as carbon sources. 18O...... of nitrate transport across the cell wall compared to the kinetics of the intracellular nitrate reduction step of microbial denitrification....

  17. Using strong nonlinearity and high-frequency vibrations to control effective mechanical stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency excitation (HFE) can be used to change the effective stiffness of an elastic structure, and related quanti-ties such as resonance frequencies, wave speed, buckling loads, and equilibrium states. There are basically two ways to do this: By using parametrical HFE (with or without non...... the method of direct separation of motions with results of a modified multiple scales ap-proach, valid also for strong nonlinearity, the stiffening ef-fect is predicted for a generic 1-dof system, and results are tested against numerical simulation and ((it is planned)) laboratory experiments....

  18. Three-loop Standard Model effective potential at leading order in strong and top Yukawa couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Stephen P. [Santa Barbara, KITP

    2014-01-08

    I find the three-loop contribution to the effective potential for the Standard Model Higgs field, in the approximation that the strong and top Yukawa couplings are large compared to all other couplings, using dimensional regularization with modified minimal subtraction. Checks follow from gauge invariance and renormalization group invariance. I also briefly comment on the special problems posed by Goldstone boson contributions to the effective potential, and on the numerical impact of the result on the relations between the Higgs vacuum expectation value, mass, and self-interaction coupling.

  19. Attosecond counter-rotating-wave effect in xenon driven by strong fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, M.; Pabst, Stefan; Kwon, Ojoon; Kim, Dong Eon

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the subfemtosecond dynamics of a highly excited xenon atom coherently driven by a strong control field at which the Rabi frequency of the system is comparable to the frequency of a driving laser. The widely used rotating-wave approximation breaks down at such fields, resulting in features such as the counter-rotating-wave (CRW) effect. We present a time-resolved observation of the CRW effect in the highly excited 4 d-1n p xenon using attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Time-dependent many-body theory confirms the observation and explains the various features of the absorption spectrum seen in experiment.

  20. Kinetic isotope effect studies of the S-adenosylmethionine synthetase reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markham, G.D.; Parkin, D.W.; Schramm, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) synthetase catalyzes a unique substitution reaction at the 5' carbon of MgATP. Kinetic isotope effect (V/K) measurements have been used to investigate the mechanism of AdoMet synthetase from E. coli. Changes in 3 H/ 14 C ratios when AdoMet is formed from a mixture of either ([5'- 14 C]ATP and [5'- 12 C,1'- 3 H]ATP) or ([5'- 3 H]ATP and [5'- 1 H,1'- 14 C]ATP) were examined. The effects of varying the concentrations of the co-substrate methionine and the monovalent cation activator K + were investigated. Substitution of 14 C for 12 C at the 5' position of ATP yields a primary V/K kinetic isotope effect ( 12 C/ 14 C) of 1.128 +/- 0.004 at low K + and methionine concentrations. The observed isotope effect diminishes slightly to 1.107 +/- 0.003 when both K + and methionine are present at saturating concentrations, suggesting that MgATP has only a low commitment to catalysis from at conditions near Vmax. No secondary V/K 3 H isotope effect from [5'- 3 H]ATP was detected ( 1 H/ 3 H) = 0.997 +/- 0.003. The magnitude of the primary 14 C isotope effect and the small secondary 3 H effect demonstrate that AdoMet synthesis occurs with a S/sub N/ 2 transition state which is symmetric with respect to the sulfur nucleophile and the departing tripolyphosphate group

  1. Fine print in isotope effects: the glucose anomeric equilibrium and binding of glucose to human brain hexokinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.E; Schramm, V.L.

    2002-01-01

    Binding isotope effects are a sensitive measure of changes in molecular vibrational character that occur during ligand-receptor binding. In this study, we have measured isotope effects on the binding of glucose to human brain hexokinase using the ultrafiltration method, with the following results: 0.991±0.001, 0.908±0.003, 1.010±0.001, 0.974±0.002, 1.022±0.002 for [ 14 C]-glucose mixed with [1- 3 H]-, [2- 3 H]-, [3- 3 H]-, [5- 3 H]-, [6,6- 3 H]-glucose, respectively. Comparing the observed data with isotope effects on the anomeric equilibrium in glucose reported previously proves the existence of binding isotope effects in this system. Preliminary computational results are presented to explain the observed binding isotope effects in terms of hydrogen bond patterns and molecular crowding found in the binary complex of sugar and enzyme. (author)

  2. Interaction effects in a microscopic quantum wire model with strong spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, G. W.; Ganahl, M.; Schuricht, D.; Evertz, H. G.; Andergassen, S.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the effect of strong interactions on the spectral properties of quantum wires with strong Rashba spin-orbit (SO) interaction in a magnetic field, using a combination of matrix product state and bosonization techniques. Quantum wires with strong Rashba SO interaction and magnetic field exhibit a partial gap in one-half of the conducting modes. Such systems have attracted wide-spread experimental and theoretical attention due to their unusual physical properties, among which are spin-dependent transport, or a topological superconducting phase when under the proximity effect of an s-wave superconductor. As a microscopic model for the quantum wire we study an extended Hubbard model with SO interaction and Zeeman field. We obtain spin resolved spectral densities from the real-time evolution of excitations, and calculate the phase diagram. We find that interactions increase the pseudo gap at k = 0 and thus also enhance the Majorana-supporting phase and stabilize the helical spin order. Furthermore, we calculate the optical conductivity and compare it with the low energy spiral Luttinger liquid result, obtained from field theoretical calculations. With interactions, the optical conductivity is dominated by an excotic excitation of a bound soliton-antisoliton pair known as a breather state. We visualize the oscillating motion of the breather state, which could provide the route to their experimental detection in e.g. cold atom experiments.

  3. Charging-delay effect on longitudinal dust acoustic shock wave in strongly coupled dusty plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Gupta, M.R.

    2005-01-01

    Taking into account the charging-delay effect, the nonlinear propagation characteristics of longitudinal dust acoustic wave in strongly coupled collisional dusty plasma described by generalized hydrodynamic model have been investigated. In the 'hydrodynamic limit', a Korteweg-de Vries Burger (KdVB) equation with a damping term arising due to dust-neutral collision is derived in which the Burger term is proportional to the dissipation due to dust viscosity through dust-dust correlation and charging-delay-induced anomalous dissipation. On the other hand, in the 'kinetic limit', a KdVB equation with a damping term and a nonlocal nonlinear forcing term arising due to memory-dependent strong correlation effect of dust fluid is derived in which the Burger term depends only on the charging-delay-induced dissipation. Numerical solution of integrodifferential equations reveals that (i) dissipation due to dust viscosity and principally due to charging delay causes excitation of the longitudinal dust acoustic shock wave in strongly coupled dusty plasma and (ii) dust-neutral collision does not appear to play any direct role in shock formation. The condition for the generation of shock is also discussed briefly

  4. Challenges in inflationary magnetogenesis: Constraints from strong coupling, backreaction, and the Schwinger effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ramkishor; Jagannathan, Sandhya; Seshadri, T. R.; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2017-10-01

    Models of inflationary magnetogenesis with a coupling to the electromagnetic action of the form f2Fμ νFμ ν , are known to suffer from several problems. These include the strong coupling problem, the backreaction problem and also strong constraints due to the Schwinger effect. We propose a model which resolves all these issues. In our model, the coupling function, f , grows during inflation and transits to a decaying phase post-inflation. This evolutionary behavior is chosen so as to avoid the problem of strong coupling. By assuming a suitable power-law form of the coupling function, we can also neglect backreaction effects during inflation. To avoid backreaction post-inflation, we find that the reheating temperature is restricted to be below ≈1.7 ×104 GeV . The magnetic energy spectrum is predicted to be nonhelical and generically blue. The estimated present day magnetic field strength and the corresponding coherence length taking reheating at the QCD epoch (150 MeV) are 1.4 ×10-12 G and 6.1 ×10-4 Mpc , respectively. This is obtained after taking account of nonlinear processing over and above the flux-freezing evolution after reheating. If we consider also the possibility of a nonhelical inverse transfer, as indicated in direct numerical simulations, the coherence length and the magnetic field strength are even larger. In all cases mentioned above, the magnetic fields generated in our models satisfy the γ -ray bound below a certain reheating temperature.

  5. Basic study on isotope separation using light induced drift effects (Progress report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suto, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Hiromi; Suzuki, M. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works; Ishii, K.

    1999-03-01

    As a preliminary research on {sup 15}N-isotope separation on the basis of light induced drift (LID) effects in NH{sub 3}, the authors have confirmed the feasibility on {sup 13}C-isotope separation using LID effects in CH{sub 3}F for which all the necessary spectroscopic data are available and found that: (1) Concentration difference at the entrance and at the exit end of the drift tube {delta}n{sub a} (number/cm{sup 3}) was proportional to the energy density absorbed ({delta}W/cm{sup 2}), indicating the validity of theoretical LID equation. (2) Pressure dependence of {delta}n{sub a}/{delta}S was maximum at ca. 0.5 Torr. Lower {delta}n{sub a}/{delta}S values are due to power saturation effects at low pressures and due to absorption line broadening at high pressures. (3) Maximum isotopic selectivity was obtained at 0.5 Torr and to be 1.18. (4) Time needed for {delta}n{sub a} to attain the equilibrium increased with increasing pressure. They concluded that the possibility of {sup 15}N isotope separation using NH{sub 3}-LID effect was in principle confirmed. (S. Ohno)

  6. A new cascade method for studying isotope effect in chemical exchange system without valance change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xiaoning; Luo Wenzong

    1987-01-01

    A new cascade method for studying isotope effect in chemical exchange system without valance change is developed and described. This method is simple to use and consumes less extractant as compared with the commonly used Woodward method. It is also convenient for unstable systems

  7. Neutron skin effect of some Mo isotopes in pre-equilibrium reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The neutron skin effect has been investigated for even isotopes of molybdenum at 25.6 MeV 94−100Mo(, ) reaction using the geometry-dependent hybrid model of pre-equilibrium nuclear reactions. Here the initial neutron/proton exciton numbers were calculated from the neutron/proton densities obtained from an ...

  8. Kinetic Isotope Effects (KIE) and Density Functional Theory (DFT): A Match Made in Heaven?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Fristrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Determination of experimental kinetic isotope effects (KIE) is one of the most useful tools for the exploration of reaction mechanisms in organometallic chemistry. The approach has been further strengthened during the last decade with advances in modern computational chemistry. This allows for th...

  9. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static” ...

  10. Stable isotope enrichment in laboratory ant colonies: effects of colony age, metamorphosis, diet, and fat storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecologists use stable isotopes to infer diets and trophic levels of animals in food webs, yet some assumptions underlying these inferences have not been thoroughly tested. We used laboratory-reared colonies of Solenopsis invicta Buren (Formicidae: Solenopsidini) to test the effects of metamorphosis,...

  11. Absence of an effect of freshwater input on the stable isotope and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated the potential effects of freshwater input on the diets of intertidal benthic organisms in situ on the east coast of South Africa, analysing their δ13C and δ15N stable isotope and fatty acid content. Specifically, we investigated the dietary regime of three barnacle and one mussel species in relation to their ...

  12. Kinetic mechanism and isotope effects of Pseudomonas cepacia 3-hydroxybenzoate-t-hydroxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.H.; Yu, Y.; Hamzah, R.Y.; Tu, S.C.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetic mechanism of Pseudomonas cepacia 3-hydroxybenzoate-6-hydroxylase has been delineated. Double reciprocal plots of initial rate versus m-hydroxybenzoate concentration at a constant level of oxygen and several fixed concentrations of NADH yielded a set of converging lines. Similar reciprocal plots of velocity versus NADH concentration at a constant oxygen level and several fixed m-hydroxybenzoate concentrations also showed converging lines. In contrast, double reciprocal plots of initial rate versus NADH concentration at a fixed m-hydroxybenzoate level and several oxygen concentrations showed a series of parallel lines. Parallel lines were also obtained from double reciprocal plots of initial rate versus m-hydroxybenzoate concentration at a fixed NADH level and varying oxygen concentrations. These results suggest a sequential binding of m-hydroxybenzoate and NADH by the hydroxylase. The enzyme-bound FAD is reduced and NAD is released. The reduced enzyme subsequently reacts with oxygen leading to the formation of other products. This hydroxylase exhibited a primary isotope effect of /sup D/V = 3.5 for (4R)-[4- 2 H] NADH but no isotope effect was observed with (4S)-[4- 2 H]NADH. An isotope effect of /sup T/V/K = 5.0 was also observed using (4R)-[4- 3 H]NADH. This tritium isotope effect was apparently independent of m-hydroxybenzoate concentration

  13. Extended Parrondo's game and Brownian ratchets: Strong and weak Parrondo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Degang; Szeto, Kwok Yip

    2014-02-01

    Inspired by the flashing ratchet, Parrondo's game presents an apparently paradoxical situation. Parrondo's game consists of two individual games, game A and game B. Game A is a slightly losing coin-tossing game. Game B has two coins, with an integer parameter M. If the current cumulative capital (in discrete unit) is a multiple of M, an unfavorable coin pb is used, otherwise a favorable pg coin is used. Paradoxically, a combination of game A and game B could lead to a winning game, which is the Parrondo effect. We extend the original Parrondo's game to include the possibility of M being either M1 or M2. Also, we distinguish between strong Parrondo effect, i.e., two losing games combine to form a winning game, and weak Parrondo effect, i.e., two games combine to form a better-performing game. We find that when M2 is not a multiple of M1, the combination of B (M1) and B (M2) has strong and weak Parrondo effect for some subsets in the parameter space (pb,pg), while there is neither strong nor weak effect when M2 is a multiple of M1. Furthermore, when M2 is not a multiple of M1, a stochastic mixture of game A may cancel the strong and weak Parrondo effect. Following a discretization scheme in the literature of Parrondo's game, we establish a link between our extended Parrondo's game with the analysis of discrete Brownian ratchet. We find a relation between the Parrondo effect of our extended model to the macroscopic bias in a discrete ratchet. The slope of a ratchet potential can be mapped to the fair game condition in the extended model, so that under some conditions, the macroscopic bias in a discrete ratchet can provide a good predictor for the game performance of the extended model. On the other hand, our extended model suggests a design of a ratchet in which the potential is a mixture of two periodic potentials.

  14. Strong coupling effects between a meta-atom and MIM nanocavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the strong coupling effects between a meta-atom and a metal-insulator-metal (MIM nanocavity. By changing the meta-atom sizes, we achieve the meta-atomic electric dipole, quadrupole or multipole interaction with the plasmonic nanocavity, in which characteristic anticrossing behaviors demonstrate the occurrence of the strong coupling. The various interactions present obviously different splitting values and behaviors of dependence on the meta-atomic position. The largest Rabi-type splittings, about 360.0 meV and 306.1 meV, have been obtained for electric dipole and quadrupole interaction, respectively. We attribute the large splitting to the highly-confined cavity mode and the large transition dipole of the meta-atom. Also the Rabi-type oscillation in time domain is given.

  15. Realization of effective super Tonks-Girardeau gases via strongly attractive one-dimensional Fermi gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shu; Yin Xiangguo; Guan Liming; Guan Xiwen; Batchelor, M. T.

    2010-01-01

    A significant feature of the one-dimensional super Tonks-Girardeau gas is its metastable gas-like state with a stronger Fermi-like pressure than for free fermions which prevents a collapse of atoms. This naturally suggests a way to search for such strongly correlated behavior in systems of interacting fermions in one dimension. We thus show that the strongly attractive Fermi gas without polarization can be effectively described by a super Tonks-Girardeau gas composed of bosonic Fermi pairs with attractive pair-pair interaction. A natural description of such super Tonks-Girardeau gases is provided by Haldane generalized exclusion statistics. In particular, they are equivalent to ideal particles obeying more exclusive statistics than Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  16. Effects of Strong Correlations on the Disorder-Induced Zero Bias Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, William; Song, Yun; Bulut, Sinan; Wortis, Rachel

    2009-03-01

    In conventional metals and semiconductors, density of states anomalies result from the interplay between disorder and interactions. Motivated by a number of experiments that find zero bias anomalies (ZBA) in transition metal oxides, we have performed calculations to determine the effect of strong correlations on the ZBA in disordered interacting systems. We use a self-consistent mean-field theory that incorporates strong correlations and treats spatial fluctuations of the disorder potential exactly. We discuss both the Anderson-Hubbard model and the extended Anderson-Hubbard model. We find that, even for a zero-range interaction, nonlocal self-energy corrections lead to the formation of an Altshuler-Aronov-like ZBA. In the extended Anderson-Hubbard model, Efros-Shklovskii-like physics dominates at large disorder.

  17. Effect of Calcium Oxide Microstructure on the Diffusion of Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes Ramos, João Pedro; Stora, T

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxide (CaO) powder targets have been successfully used at CERN-ISOLDE to produce neutron deficient exotic argon and carbon isotopes under proton irradiation at high temperatures (>1000°C). These targets outperform the other related targets for the production of the same beams. However, they presented either slow release rates (yields) from the beginning or a rapid decrease over time. This problem was believed to come from the target microstructure degradation, justifying the material investigation. In order to do so, the synthesis, reactivity in ambient air and sintering kinetics of CaO were studied, through surface area determination by N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction for crystalline phase identification and crystallite size determination, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy to investigate the microstructure. The synthesis studies revealed that a nanometric material is obtained from the decarbonation of CaCO3 in vacuum at temperatures higher than 550°C, which is very reactive in air....

  18. Shell effect in the mean square charge radii and magnetic moments of bismuth isotopes near N =126

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzakh, A. E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Ivanov, V. S.; Molkanov, P. L.; Moroz, F. V.; Orlov, S. Yu.; Panteleev, V. N.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Volkov, Yu. M.

    2018-01-01

    Isotope shift relative to 209Bi and hyperfine splitting for Bi,213211 have been measured by in-source laser spectroscopy at the 306.77-nm atomic transition. The pronounced shell effect both in radii and magnetic moments in Bi isotopes at N =126 has been observed. The isotopic trend of magnetic moment for 9 /2- ground states of even-N Bi isotopes has been qualitatively explained by the change in the first-order core-polarization correction. The possible influence of the octupole degree of freedom on the magnetic moment behavior at N >126 has been discussed.

  19. Magnetic isotopic effect and mechanisms of chemical reactions. Photolysis of dimethylphenylsilyl phenyl ketone and of its carbon analog in micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Step, E.N.; Tarasov, V.F.; Buchachenko, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    In the photolysis of cumyl phenyl ketone in micelles, for which photodecomposition occurs with the formation of a triplet geminal radical pair (Norrish type-I breakdown), with high efficiency the separation of carbon isotopes, induced by the magnetic isotopic effect, occurs for the original ketone. The isotopic composition of dimethylphenylsilyl phenyl ketone, either with respect to carbon or with respect to silicon, does not change in photolysis, i.e., in the primary act of the photolysis the separation of isotopes does not occur. It follows that the primary act of the photolysis of the ketone is not the formation of a radical pair, but is probably isomerization into a carbene

  20. Effective action for superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, N.

    2005-01-01

    We derive the low-energy effective action for three-dimensional superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit, where superfluidity originates from Bose-Einstein condensation of composite bosons. Taking into account density and pairing fluctuations on the same footing, we show that the effective action involves only the fermion density ρ r and its conjugate variable, the phase θ r of the pairing order parameter Δ r . We recover the standard action of a Bose superfluid of density ρ r /2, where the bosons have a mass m B =2m and interact via a repulsive contact potential with amplitude g B =4πa B /m B ,a B =2a (a the s-wave scattering length associated to the fermion-fermion interaction in vacuum). For lattice models, the derivation of the effective action is based on the mapping of the attractive Hubbard model onto the Heisenberg model in a uniform magnetic field, and a coherent state path integral representation of the partition function. The effective description of the Fermi superfluid in the strong-coupling limit is a Bose-Hubbard model with an intersite hopping amplitude t B =J/2 and an on-site repulsive interaction U B =2Jz, where J=4t 2 /U (t and -U are the intersite hopping amplitude and the on-site attraction in the (fermionic) Hubbard model, z the number of nearest-neighbor sites)

  1. Effective action for superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, N.

    2005-07-01

    We derive the low-energy effective action for three-dimensional superfluid Fermi systems in the strong-coupling limit, where superfluidity originates from Bose-Einstein condensation of composite bosons. Taking into account density and pairing fluctuations on the same footing, we show that the effective action involves only the fermion density ρr and its conjugate variable, the phase θr of the pairing order parameter Δr . We recover the standard action of a Bose superfluid of density ρr/2 , where the bosons have a mass mB=2m and interact via a repulsive contact potential with amplitude gB=4πaB/mB,aB=2a ( a the s -wave scattering length associated to the fermion-fermion interaction in vacuum). For lattice models, the derivation of the effective action is based on the mapping of the attractive Hubbard model onto the Heisenberg model in a uniform magnetic field, and a coherent state path integral representation of the partition function. The effective description of the Fermi superfluid in the strong-coupling limit is a Bose-Hubbard model with an intersite hopping amplitude tB=J/2 and an on-site repulsive interaction UB=2Jz , where J=4t2/U ( t and -U are the intersite hopping amplitude and the on-site attraction in the (fermionic) Hubbard model, z the number of nearest-neighbor sites).

  2. Does Size Really Matter? The Steric Isotope Effect in a Supramolecular Host?Guest Exchange Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey; Bergman, Robert; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-01-29

    Isotope effects (IEs), which arise from differences in zero point energies (ZPEs) between a parent and isotopically substituted bond, have been used extensively by chemists to probe molecular interactions and reactivity. Due to the anharmonicity of the C-H/D vibrational potential energy function and the lower ZPE of a C-D bond, the average C-D bond length is typically {approx}0.005 {angstrom} shorter than an equivalent C-H bond. It is this difference in size that is often invoked to explain the observation of secondary, inverse kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) in chemical processes which proceed through a sterically strained transition state. This so-called 'steric isotope effect' (SIE) has been observed in processes such as the racemization of ortho-substituted biphenyls[6] and phenanthrenes, ring flipping of cyclophanes, and more recently in the deslipping of rotaxanes, where substitution of the sterically less demanding deuterium for protium results in rate accelerations for these processes. Herein, we use deuterium substitution in a cationic guest molecule to probe the sensitivity limits of the guest exchange process from a highly-charged supramolecular host.

  3. Equilibrium isotope effects on noncovalent interactions in a supramolecular host-guest system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey S; Bergman, Robert G; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2012-02-01

    The self-assembled supramolecular complex [Ga(4)L(6)](12-) (1; L = 1,5-bis[2,3-dihydroxybenzamido]naphthalene) can act as a molecular host in aqueous solution and bind cationic guest molecules to its highly charged exterior surface or within its hydrophobic interior cavity. The distinct internal cavity of host 1 modifies the physical properties and reactivity of bound guest molecules and can be used to catalyze a variety of chemical transformations. Noncovalent host-guest interactions in large part control guest binding, molecular recognition and the chemical reactivity of bound guests. Herein we examine equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) on both exterior and interior guest binding to host 1 and use these effects to probe the details of noncovalent host-guest interactions. For both interior and exterior binding of a benzylphosphonium guest in aqueous solution, protiated guests are found to bind more strongly to host 1 (K(H)/K(D) > 1) and the preferred association of protiated guests is driven by enthalpy and opposed by entropy. Deuteration of guest methyl and benzyl C-H bonds results in a larger EIE than deuteration of guest aromatic C-H bonds. The observed EIEs can be well explained by considering changes in guest vibrational force constants and zero-point energies. DFT calculations further confirm the origins of these EIEs and suggest that changes in low-frequency guest C-H/D vibrational motions (bends, wags, etc.) are primarily responsible for the observed EIEs. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Effects of strong inter-hydrogen bond dynamical couplings in the polarized IR spectra of adipic acid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flakus, Henryk T., E-mail: flakus@ich.us.edu.pl [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, 9 Szkolna Street, Pl-40-006 Katowice (Poland); Tyl, Aleksandra; Jablonska, Magdalena [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesia, 9 Szkolna Street, Pl-40-006 Katowice (Poland)

    2009-10-16

    This paper presents the results of the re-investigation of polarized IR spectra of adipic acid and of its d{sub 2}, d{sub 8} and d{sub 10} deuterium derivative crystals. The spectra were measured at 77 K by a transmission method using polarized light for two different crystalline faces. Theoretical analysis concerned linear dichroic effects and H/D isotopic effects observed in the spectra of the hydrogen and deuterium bonds in adipic acid crystals at the frequency ranges of the {nu}{sub O-H} and the {nu}{sub O-D} bands. The two-branch fine structure pattern of the {nu}{sub O-H} and {nu}{sub O-D} bands and the basic linear dichroic effects characterizing them were ascribed to the vibronic mechanism of vibrational dipole selection rule breaking for IR transitions in centrosymmetric hydrogen bond dimers. It was proved that for isotopically diluted crystalline samples of adipic acid, a non-random distribution of protons and deuterons occurs in the dimers (H/D isotopic 'self-organization' effect). This effect results from the dynamical co-operative interactions involving the dimeric hydrogen bonds.

  5. Effects of strong inter-hydrogen bond dynamical couplings in the polarized IR spectra of adipic acid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flakus, Henryk T.; Tyl, Aleksandra; Jablońska, Magdalena

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the results of the re-investigation of polarized IR spectra of adipic acid and of its d2, d8 and d10 deuterium derivative crystals. The spectra were measured at 77 K by a transmission method using polarized light for two different crystalline faces. Theoretical analysis concerned linear dichroic effects and H/D isotopic effects observed in the spectra of the hydrogen and deuterium bonds in adipic acid crystals at the frequency ranges of the νO-H and the νO-D bands. The two-branch fine structure pattern of the νO-H and νO-D bands and the basic linear dichroic effects characterizing them were ascribed to the vibronic mechanism of vibrational dipole selection rule breaking for IR transitions in centrosymmetric hydrogen bond dimers. It was proved that for isotopically diluted crystalline samples of adipic acid, a non-random distribution of protons and deuterons occurs in the dimers (H/D isotopic " self-organization" effect). This effect results from the dynamical co-operative interactions involving the dimeric hydrogen bonds.

  6. Isotope effects on L-H threshold and confinement in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, C. F.; Weisen, H.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Chankin, A.; Delabie, E.; Horvath, L.; Auriemma, F.; Carvalho, I. S.; Corrigan, G.; Flanagan, J.; Garzotti, L.; Keeling, D.; King, D.; Lerche, E.; Lorenzini, R.; Maslov, M.; Menmuir, S.; Saarelma, S.; Sips, A. C. C.; Solano, E. R.; Belonohy, E.; Casson, F. J.; Challis, C.; Giroud, C.; Parail, V.; Silva, C.; Valisa, M.; Contributors, JET

    2018-01-01

    The dependence of plasma transport and confinement on the main hydrogenic ion isotope mass is of fundamental importance for understanding turbulent transport and, therefore, for accurate extrapolations of confinement from present tokamak experiments, which typically use a single hydrogen isotope, to burning plasmas such as ITER, which will operate in deuterium–tritium mixtures. Knowledge of the dependence of plasma properties and edge transport barrier formation on main ion species is critical in view of the initial, low-activation phase of ITER operations in hydrogen or helium and of its implications on the subsequent operation in deuterium–tritium. The favourable scaling of global energy confinement time with isotope mass, which has been observed in many tokamak experiments, remains largely unexplained theoretically. Moreover, the mass scaling observed in experiments varies depending on the plasma edge conditions. In preparation for upcoming deuterium–tritium experiments in the JET tokamak with the ITER-like Be/W Wall (JET-ILW), a thorough experimental investigation of isotope effects in hydrogen, deuterium and tritium plasmas is being carried out, in order to provide stringent tests of plasma energy, particle and momentum transport models. Recent hydrogen and deuterium isotope experiments in JET-ILW on L-H power threshold, L-mode and H-mode confinement are reviewed and discussed in the context of past and more recent isotope experiments in tokamak plasmas, highlighting common elements as well as contrasting observations that have been reported. The experimental findings are discussed in the context of fundamental aspects of plasma transport models.

  7. Effects of strong radiation reaction and quantum-electrodynamics on relativistic transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Thomas, A. G. R.; Ridgers, C. P.

    2013-10-01

    Relativistic transparency is the process that optically switches the overdense plasma from opaque to transparent and enables light propagation through the otherwise opaque plasma, when light of sufficient intensity drives the electrons in the plasma to near light speeds. We study the relativistic transparency in radiation dominant and strong quantum electrodynamic (QED) regime, for the interaction of high-intensity laser pulses with a thin foil solid target. We analytically study the simplified motion of an electron in a circularly polarized plane wave to understand the physics of the transmissivity and absorption in the presence of classical and quantum-corrected, semiclassical radiation-reaction forces and the trapping of particles in nodes of laser standing wave through radiative cooling. These arguments are supported by both one dimensional and two dimensional particle-in-cell calculations including strong field QED effects. Measurement of the transmission of these pulses would be experimentally feasible and a robust test of the strong field QED particle-in-cell framework.

  8. Drag Effect of Kompsat-1 During Strong Solar and Geomagnetic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we analyze the orbital variation of the KOrea Multi-Purpose SATellite-1(KOMPSAT-1 in a strong space environment due to satellite drag by solar and geomagnetic activities. The satellite drag usually occurs slowly, but becomes serious satellite drag when the space environment suddenly changes via strong solar activity like a big flare eruption or coronal mass ejections(CMEs. Especially, KOMPSAT-1 as a low earth orbit satellite has a distinct increase of the drag acceleration by the variations of atmospheric friction. We consider factors of solar activity to have serious effects on the satellite drag from two points of view. One is an effect of high energy radiation when the flare occurs in the Sun. This radiation heats and expands the upper atmosphere of the Earth as the number of neutral particles is suddenly increased. The other is an effect of Joule and precipitating particle heating caused by current of plasma and precipitation of particles during geomagnetic storms by CMEs. It also affects the density of neutral particles by heating the upper atmosphere. We investigate the satellite drag acceleration associated with the two factors for five events selected based on solar and geomagnetic data from 2001 to 2002. The major results can be summarized as follows. First, the drag acceleration started to increase with solar EUV radiation with the best cross-correlation (r = 0.92 for 1 day delayed F10.7. Second, the drag acceleration and Dst index have similar patterns when the geomagnetic storm is dominant and the drag acceleration abruptly increases during the strong geomagnetic storm. Third, the background variation of the drag accelerations is governed by the solar radiation, while their short term (less than a day variations is governed by geomagnetic storms.

  9. Poly-ϵ-caprolactone/chitosan nanoparticles provide strong adjuvant effect for hepatitis B antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, Sandra; Soares, Edna; Borchard, Gerrit; Borges, Olga

    2017-10-01

    This work aims to investigate the adjuvant effect of poly-ϵ-caprolactone/chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and the plasmid DNA encoding HBsAg (pRC/CMV-HBs). Both antigens were adsorbed onto preformed NPs. Vaccination studies were performed in C57BL/6 mice. Transfection efficiency was investigated in A549 cell line. HBsAg-adsorbed NPs generated strong anti-HBsAg IgG titers, mainly of IgG1 isotype, and induced antigen-specific IFN-γ and IL-17 secretion by spleen cells. The addition of pRC/CMV-HBs to the HBsAg-adsorbed NPs inhibited IL-17 secretion but had minor effect on IFN-γ levels. Lastly, pRC/CMV-HBs-loaded NPs generated a weak serum antibody response. Poly-ϵ-caprolactone/chitosan NPs provide a strong humoral adjuvant effect for HBsAg and induce a Th1/Th17-mediated cellular immune responses worth explore for hepatitis B virus vaccination.

  10. Dispersion of Co/CNTs via strong electrostatic adsorption method: Thermal treatment effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbarzadeh, Omid, E-mail: omid.akbarzadeh63@gmail.com; Abdullah, Bawadi, E-mail: bawadi-abdullah@petronas.com.my; Subbarao, Duvvuri, E-mail: duvvuri-subbarao@petronas.com.my [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Zabidi, Noor Asmawati Mohd, E-mail: noorasmawati-mzabidi@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The effect of different thermal treatment temperature on the structure of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and Co particle dispersion on CNTs support is studied using Strong electrostatic adsorption (SEA) method. The samples tested by N{sub 2}-adsorption, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). N{sub 2}-adsorption results showed BET surface area increased using thermal treatment and TEM images showed that increasing the thermal treatment temperature lead to flaky CNTs and defects introduced on the outer surface and Co particle dispersion increased.

  11. Gain length fitting formula for free-electron lasers with strong space-charge effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Marcus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a power-fit formula, obtained from a variational analysis using three-dimensional free-electron laser theory, for the gain length of a high-gain free-electron laser’s fundamental mode in the presence of diffraction, uncorrelated energy spread, and longitudinal space-charge effects. The approach is inspired by the work of Xie [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 445, 59 (2000NIMAER0168-900210.1016/S0168-9002(0000114-5], and provides a useful shortcut for calculating the gain length of the fundamental Gaussian mode of a free-electron laser having strong space-charge effects in the 3D regime. The results derived from analytic theory are in good agreement with detailed numerical particle simulations that also include higher-order space-charge effects, supporting the assumptions made in the theoretical treatment and the variational solutions obtained in the single-mode limit.

  12. Preliminary Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) of the conceptual Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Flight System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, L.G.

    1976-01-01

    A failure modes, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) was made of the Brayton Isotope Power System Flight System (BIPS-FS) as presently conceived. The components analyzed include: Mini-BRU; Heat Source Assembly (HSA); Mini-Brayton Recuperator (MBR); Space Radiator; Ducts and Bellows, Insulation System; Controls; and Isotope Heat Source (IHS)

  13. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joël [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Copenhagen Center for Atmospheric Research (CCAR), Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jost, Rémy [Laboratoire de Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPHY) Univ. de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Bhattacharya, S. K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Nangang, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [“Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry,” J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 18}O, and Δ{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from −40 to −74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying

  14. Solvent effects and secondary isotope effects for probing diradical character in the thermal decarboxylation of β-peroxylactones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Cueto, O.; Guedes, L.N.; Rodriguez, L.O.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of solvent effects in the activation parameters and product distribution and the lack of secondary deuterium isotope effects at the α-carbon and β-alkyl migrant substantiates that the thermal decarboxylation of β-peroxy lactones proceeds via a 1,5-diradical

  15. STRONG FIELD EFFECTS ON EMISSION LINE PROFILES: KERR BLACK HOLES AND WARPED ACCRETION DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Li Xiangdong

    2012-01-01

    If an accretion disk around a black hole is illuminated by hard X-rays from non-thermal coronae, fluorescent iron lines will be emitted from the inner region of the accretion disk. The emission line profiles will show a variety of strong field effects, which may be used as a probe of the spin parameter of the black hole and the structure of the accretion disk. In this paper, we generalize the previous relativistic line profile models by including both the black hole spinning effects and the non-axisymmetries of warped accretion disks. Our results show different features from the conventional calculations for either a flat disk around a Kerr black hole or a warped disk around a Schwarzschild black hole by presenting, at the same time, multiple peaks, rather long red tails, and time variations of line profiles with the precession of the disk. We show disk images as seen by a distant observer, which are distorted by the strong gravity. Although we are primarily concerned with the iron K-shell lines in this paper, the calculation is general and is valid for any emission lines produced from a warped accretion disk around a black hole.

  16. Dose formation and hematologic effects with prolonged internal exposure of rats by isotope 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sova, O.A.; Drozd, Yi.P.

    2013-01-01

    Processes in single dose formation and long-term domestic revenue 131 I in rats was investigated. Original method of estimating absorbed doses in hemacyte for macro-dosemeters indicators was proposed. Dose factors for hemacyte and the dynamics of the blood-forming organs doses for prolonged two cases of prolonged exposure was calculated. Hematologic effects were studied for two variants of entry of the isotope. Peculiarities of doses formation and identified hematological effects are discussed

  17. Femtometer accuracy EXAFS measurements: Isotopic effect in the first, second and third coordination shells of germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purans, J; Timoshenko, J; Kuzmin, A [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga 8, LV-1063 Riga (Latvia); Dalba, G; Fornasini, P; Grisenti, R; Afify, N D [Dip. di Fisica dell' Universita di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Rocca, F [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie del CNR, Sezione ' FBK-CeFSA' di Trento, Povo, Trento (Italy); De Panfilis, S [Research Center Soft INFM-CNR, c/o Universita di Roma La Sapienza, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Ozhogin, I [Institute of Molecular Physics, Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Tiutiunnikov, S I, E-mail: purans@cfi.lu.l [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2009-11-15

    The analysis of the EXAFS signals from {sup 70}Ge and {sup 76}Ge has evidenced the low-temperature effect of isotopic mass difference on the amplitude of relative atomic vibrations. This effect is reflected in the difference of the Debye-Waller factors of the first three coordination shells, and on the difference of nearest-neighbour average interatomic distances, evaluated with femtometer accuracy. The experimental results are in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  18. Effect of Ca content on equilibrium Ca isotope fractionation between orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzhong; Zhou, Chen; Qin, Tian; Kang, Jin-Ting; Huang, Shichun; Wu, Zhongqing; Huang, Fang

    2017-12-01

    Concentration effect on equilibrium inter-mineral isotope fractionation is ubiquitous in solid solution systems, but it is not clear in which concentration range such effect is prominent. Using first-principles calculations, we examine the effect of Ca and Fe contents in orthopyroxene (opx) on its average Casbnd O bond length and the equilibrium Ca isotope fractionation factor (103lnα) between opx and clinopyroxene (cpx). Our results reveal that the average Casbnd O bond length in opx is much smaller than that in cpx and it does not change with variable Ca content x (x and y are mole ratios in CaxFeyMg1-x-ySiO3 thereafter here) when x ≤ 1/48. Incorporation of Fe (y ≥ 1/32) into opx with a fixed Ca content can only slightly increase the average Casbnd O bond length. 103lnαopx-cpx of 44Ca/40Ca is linearly correlated with the average Casbnd O bond length in opx, suggesting that 103lnαopx-cpx of 44Ca/40Ca is controlled by opx Casbnd O bond strength. Our calculations indicate that the Ca concentration effect on 103lnαopx-cpx is significant when x in opx ranges from 2/16 to 1/48, while Fe in natural opx only causes a slight decrease in 103lnαopx-cpx. Our results provide insights into Ca isotope fractionation in high-temperature geochemical processes. Given that Ca content x in opx from natural peridotites is usually lower than 1/32 and Fe content y is generally ∼10 mol%, Ca and Fe concentration effects on 103lnαopx-cpx in natural samples are negligible. Rather, 103lnαopx-cpx is mainly controlled by temperature. 103lnαopx-cpx of 44Ca/40Ca decreases from 0.50‰ to 0.26‰ when temperature increases from 1000 K to 1400 K if the Fe effect is taken into account. Therefore, if Ca isotope fractionation between opx and cpx (Δ44/40Caopx-cpx) in natural peridotites is greater than 0.50‰ or lower than 0.26‰, it may indicate disequilibrium of Ca isotopes. Finally, the large 103lnαopx-cpx relative to our current analytical precision suggests that Δ44/40Caopx

  19. Non trivial effect of strong high-frequency excitation on a nonlinear controlled system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, A.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2004-01-01

    due to control is usually high compared to uncontrolled systems. A standard optimal controller for a standard nonlinear system (a movable cart used to balance a pendulum vertically) is shown to exhibit pronounced bias error in presence of HF-excitation. The bias increases with increased excitation......Nontrivial effects of high-frequency excitation on mechanical uncontrolled systems have been investigated intensively in the last decade. Some of these effects are usually used in controlled systems in form of dither to smoothen out undesired friction and hysteresis. However the level of damping...... intensity, but it also increases with the increased control power. Analytic prediction for the bias shows, the interaction between fast excitation and strong damping terms in the control system to be the cause of the permanent control error. A "slow observer" ignoring fast motions is shown...

  20. Trapped in the extinction vortex? Strong genetic effects in a declining vertebrate population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larsson Mikael

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity are expected to increase the extinction risk of small populations, but detailed tests in natural populations are scarce. We combine long-term population and fitness data with those from two types of molecular markers to examine the role of genetic effects in a declining metapopulation of southern dunlins Calidris alpina schinzii, an endangered shorebird. Results The decline is associated with increased pairings between related individuals, including close inbreeding (as revealed by both field observations of parentage and molecular markers. Furthermore, reduced genetic diversity seems to affect individual fitness at several life stages. Higher genetic similarity between mates correlates negatively with the pair's hatching success. Moreover, offspring produced by related parents are more homozygous and suffer from increased mortality during embryonic development and possibly also after hatching. Conclusions Our results demonstrate strong genetic effects in a rapidly declining population, emphasizing the importance of genetic factors for the persistence of small populations.

  1. Strongly correlated Fermi-systems: Non-Fermi liquid behavior, quasiparticle effective mass and their interplay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaginyan, V.R. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, RAS, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)], E-mail: vrshag@thd.pnpi.spb.ru; Amusia, M.Ya. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Popov, K.G. [Komi Science Center, Ural Division, RAS, Syktyvkar 167982 (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Basing on the density functional theory of fermion condensation, we analyze the non-Fermi liquid behavior of strongly correlated Fermi-systems such as heavy-fermion metals. When deriving equations for the effective mass of quasiparticles, we consider solids with a lattice and homogeneous systems. We show that the low-temperature thermodynamic and transport properties are formed by quasiparticles, while the dependence of the effective mass on temperature, number density, magnetic fields, etc., gives rise to the non-Fermi liquid behavior. Our theoretical study of the heat capacity, magnetization, energy scales, the longitudinal magnetoresistance and magnetic entropy are in good agreement with the remarkable recent facts collected on the heavy-fermion metal YbRh{sub 2}Si{sub 2}.

  2. Strongly correlated Fermi-systems: Non-Fermi liquid behavior, quasiparticle effective mass and their interplay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaginyan, V.R.; Amusia, M.Ya.; Popov, K.G.

    2009-01-01

    Basing on the density functional theory of fermion condensation, we analyze the non-Fermi liquid behavior of strongly correlated Fermi-systems such as heavy-fermion metals. When deriving equations for the effective mass of quasiparticles, we consider solids with a lattice and homogeneous systems. We show that the low-temperature thermodynamic and transport properties are formed by quasiparticles, while the dependence of the effective mass on temperature, number density, magnetic fields, etc., gives rise to the non-Fermi liquid behavior. Our theoretical study of the heat capacity, magnetization, energy scales, the longitudinal magnetoresistance and magnetic entropy are in good agreement with the remarkable recent facts collected on the heavy-fermion metal YbRh 2 Si 2 .

  3. Isotope exchange reactions on ceramic breeder materials and their effect on tritium inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, M.; Baba, A. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawamura, Y.; Nishi, M.

    1998-03-01

    Though lithium ceramic materials such as Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} are considered as breeding materials in the blanket of a D-T fusion reactor, the release behavior of the bred tritium in these solid breeder materials has not been fully understood. The isotope exchange reaction rate between hydrogen isotopes in the purge gas and tritium on the surface of breeding materials have not been quantified yet, although helium gas with hydrogen or deuterium is planned to be used as the blanket purge gas in the recent blanket designs. The mass transfer coefficient representing the isotope exchange reaction between H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}O or that between D{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O in the ceramic breeding materials bed is experimentally obtained in this study. Effects of isotope exchange reactions on the tritium inventory in the bleeding blanket is discussed based on data obtained in this study where effects of diffusion of tritium in the grain, absorption of water in the bulk of grain, and adsorption of water on the surface of grain, together with two types of isotope exchange reactions are considered. The way to estimate the tritium inventory in a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} blanket used in this study shows a good agreement with data obtained in such in-situ experiments as MOZART, EXOTIC-5, 6 and TRINE experiments. (author)

  4. Who is who matters-The effects of pseudoreplication in stable isotope analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundry, Roger; Oelze, Vicky M

    2016-10-01

    Stable isotope analysis in free-ranging primates is a promising new avenue in reconstructing feeding niches and temporal dietary variation. Particularly, the large sample sizes obtained from non-invasively collected hair and fecal samples from nests of great apes offer great potential. However, analyzing repeated observations of the same individuals without controlling for potential differences among them means to "pseudoreplicate" and can lead to a greatly inflated probability of erroneous significance. We here test the effects of pseudoreplication in stable isotope data of great ape hair by means of simulations. We show that pseudoreplication can severely affect the probability of erroneous significance as well as non-significance. We suggest several strategies to avoid pseudoreplication in primate isotope ecology. First, if applicable, information on individual identity should be included in statistical analyses. Second, if samples derive from unhabituated animals, sampling at far apart locations or territories should avoid resampling of the same animal. In great apes, sampling of independent nests within nest groups can ensure that each sample derives from a different individual. Third, we encourage the combination of genetic surveys with sampling for isotope analyses to ensure the (genetic) identification of individuals. Am. J. Primatol. 78:1017-1030, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Magnitude of intrinsic isotope effects in the dopamine beta-monooxygenase reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S M; Klinman, J P

    1983-06-21

    Intrinsic primary hydrogen isotope effects (kH/kD) have been obtained for the carbon-hydrogen bond cleavage step catalyzed by dopamine beta-monooxygenase. Irreversibility of this step is inferred from the failure to observe back-exchange of tritium from TOH into substrate under conditions of dopamine turnover; this result cannot be due to solvent inaccessibility at the enzyme active site, since we will demonstrate [Ahn, N., & Klinman, J. P. (1983) Biochemistry (following paper in this issue)] that a solvent-derived proton or triton must be at the enzyme active site prior to substrate activation. As shown by Northrop [Northrop, D. B. (1975) Biochemistry 14, 2644], for enzymatic reactions in which the carbon-hydrogen bond cleavage step is irreversible, comparison of D(V/K) to T(V/K) allows an explicit solution for kH/kD. Employing a double-label tracer method, we have been able to measure deuterium isotope effects on Vmax/Km with high precision, D(V/K) = 2.756 +/- 0.054 at pH 6.0. The magnitude of the tritium isotope effect under comparable experimental conditions is T(V/K) = 6.079 +/- 0.220, yielding kH/kD = 9.4 +/- 1.3. This result was obtained in the presence of saturating concentrations of the anion activator fumarate. Elimination of fumarate from the reaction mixture leads to high observed values for isotope effects on Vmax/Km, together with an essentially invariant value for kH/kD = 10.9 +/- 1.9. Thus, the large disparity between isotope effects, plus or minus fumarate, cannot be accounted for by a change in kH/kD, and we conclude a role for fumarate in the modulation of the partitioning of enzyme-substrate complex between catalysis and substrate dissociation. On the basis of literature correlations of primary hydrogen isotope effects and the thermodynamic properties of hydrogen transfer reactions, the very large magnitude of kH/kD = 9.4-10.9 for dopamine beta-monooxygenase suggests an equilibrium constant not very far from unity for the carbon-hydrogen bond

  6. Bactericidal Effect of Strong Acid Electrolyzed Water against Flow Enterococcus faecalis Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaogang; Tian, Yu; Zhao, Chunmiao; Qu, Tiejun; Ma, Chi; Liu, Xiaohua; Yu, Qing

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the bactericidal effect of strong acid electrolyzed water (SAEW) against flow Enterococcus faecalis biofilm and its potential application as a root canal irrigant. Flow E. faecalis biofilms were generated under a constant shear flow in a microfluidic system. For comparison, static E. faecalis biofilms were generated under a static condition on coverslip surfaces. Both the flow and static E. faecalis biofilms were treated with SAEW. Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, 5.25%) and normal saline (0.9%) were included as the controls. Bacterial reductions were evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy and the cell count method. Morphological changes of bacterial cells were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The confocal laser scanning microscopic and cell count results showed that SAEW had a bactericidal effect similar to that of 5.25% NaOCl against both the flow and static E. faecalis biofilms. The scanning electron microscopic results showed that smooth, consecutive, and bright bacteria surfaces became rough, shrunken, and even lysed after treated with SAEW, similar to those in the NaOCl group. SAEW had an effective bactericidal effect against both the flow and static E. faecalis biofilms, and it might be qualified as a root canal irrigant for effective root canal disinfection. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term effects of the strong African American families program on youths' alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Gene H; Chen, Yi-Fu; Kogan, Steven M; Murry, Velma McBride; Brown, Anita C

    2010-04-01

    This report extends earlier accounts by addressing the effects of the Strong African American Families (SAAF) program across 65 months. Two hypotheses were tested: (a) Rural African American youths randomly assigned to participate in SAAF would demonstrate lower rates of alcohol use than would control youths more than 5 years later, and (b) SAAF's effects on deterring the onset of alcohol use in early adolescence would carry forward to mediate the program's long-term effects. African American youths in rural Georgia (mean age at pretest = 10.8 years) were assigned randomly to the SAAF group (n = 369) or to a control group (n = 298). Past-month alcohol use was assessed at pretest and at 9, 18, 29, 53, and 65 months after pretest. SAAF participants increased their alcohol use at a slower rate than did adolescents in the control condition across the follow-up assessments. At the 65-month assessment, SAAF participants reported having drunk alcohol half as often as did youths in the control group. Consistent with the second hypothesis, SAAF's effects on deterring initiation carried forward to account for its effects on alcohol use across time. Training in protective parenting processes and self-regulatory skills during preadolescence may contribute to a self-sustaining trajectory of disinterest in and avoidance of alcohol use during adolescence when peers begin to model and sanction it. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  8. Fitness is strongly influenced by rare mutations of large effect in a microbial mutation accumulation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbron, Karl; Toll-Riera, Macarena; Kojadinovic, Mila; MacLean, R Craig

    2014-07-01

    Our understanding of the evolutionary consequences of mutation relies heavily on estimates of the rate and fitness effect of spontaneous mutations generated by mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. We performed a classic MA experiment in which frequent sampling of MA lines was combined with whole genome resequencing to develop a high-resolution picture of the effect of spontaneous mutations in a hypermutator (ΔmutS) strain of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After ∼644 generations of mutation accumulation, MA lines had accumulated an average of 118 mutations, and we found that average fitness across all lines decayed linearly over time. Detailed analyses of the dynamics of fitness change in individual lines revealed that a large fraction of the total decay in fitness (42.3%) was attributable to the fixation of rare, highly deleterious mutations (comprising only 0.5% of fixed mutations). Furthermore, we found that at least 0.64% of mutations were beneficial and probably fixed due to positive selection. The majority of mutations that fixed (82.4%) were base substitutions and we failed to find any signatures of selection on nonsynonymous or intergenic mutations. Short indels made up a much smaller fraction of the mutations that were fixed (17.4%), but we found evidence of strong selection against indels that caused frameshift mutations in coding regions. These results help to quantify the amount of natural selection present in microbial MA experiments and demonstrate that changes in fitness are strongly influenced by rare mutations of large effect. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  9. Effect of Floodplain Inundation on River Pollution in Taiwan's Strong Monsoonal Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, E. T.; Lin, A. Y. C.

    2017-12-01

    River-floodplain interaction provides important benefits such as flood mitigation, provision of ecological habitat, and improved water quality. Human actions have historically reduced such interaction and associated benefits by diking, floodplain fill, and river regulation. In response, floodplain restoration has become popular in North America and Europe, but is less practiced in Asia. In Taiwan, unusually strong monsoons and steep terrain alter floodplain dynamics relative to elsewhere around the world, and provide a unique environment for floodplain management. We used numerical models of flow, transport, and reaction in river channels and floodplains to quantify the effect of river-floodplain interaction on water quality in Taiwan's strong monsoon and high topographic relief. We conducted sensitivity analyses of parameters such as river slope, monsoon severity, reservoir operation mode, degree of floodplain reconnection, contaminant reaction rate, and contaminant reaction type on floodplain connectivity and contaminant mitigation. We found significant differences in floodplain hydraulics and residence times in Taiwan's steep monsoonal environment relative to the shallower non-monsoonal environment typical of the eastern USA, with significant implications for water quality. For example, greater flashiness of floodplain inundation in Taiwan provides greater challenges for reconnecting sufficient floodplain volume to handle monsoonal runoff. Yet longer periods when floodplains are reliably dry means that such lands may have greater value for seasonal use such as parks or agriculture. The potential for floodplain restoration in Taiwan is thus significant, but qualitatively different than in the eastern USA.

  10. Mental health care and average happiness: strong effect in developed nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touburg, Giorgio; Veenhoven, Ruut

    2015-07-01

    Mental disorder is a main cause of unhappiness in modern society and investment in mental health care is therefore likely to add to average happiness. This prediction was checked in a comparison of 143 nations around 2005. Absolute investment in mental health care was measured using the per capita number of psychiatrists and psychologists working in mental health care. Relative investment was measured using the share of mental health care in the total health budget. Average happiness in nations was measured with responses to survey questions about life-satisfaction. Average happiness appeared to be higher in countries that invest more in mental health care, both absolutely and relative to investment in somatic medicine. A data split by level of development shows that this difference exists only among developed nations. Among these nations the link between mental health care and happiness is quite strong, both in an absolute sense and compared to other known societal determinants of happiness. The correlation between happiness and share of mental health care in the total health budget is twice as strong as the correlation between happiness and size of the health budget. A causal effect is likely, but cannot be proved in this cross-sectional analysis.

  11. Biodiversity effects in the wild are common and as strong as key drivers of productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, J. Emmett; Godwin, Casey M.; Cardinale, Bradley J.

    2017-09-01

    More than 500 controlled experiments have collectively suggested that biodiversity loss reduces ecosystem productivity and stability. Yet the importance of biodiversity in sustaining the world’s ecosystems remains controversial, largely because of the lack of validation in nature, where strong abiotic forcing and complex interactions are assumed to swamp biodiversity effects. Here we test this assumption by analysing 133 estimates reported in 67 field studies that statistically separated the effects of biodiversity on biomass production from those of abiotic forcing. Contrary to the prevailing opinion of the previous two decades that biodiversity would have rare or weak effects in nature, we show that biomass production increases with species richness in a wide range of wild taxa and ecosystems. In fact, after controlling for environmental covariates, increases in biomass with biodiversity are stronger in nature than has previously been documented in experiments and comparable to or stronger than the effects of other well-known drivers of productivity, including climate and nutrient availability. These results are consistent with the collective experimental evidence that species richness increases community biomass production, and suggest that the role of biodiversity in maintaining productive ecosystems should figure prominently in global change science and policy.

  12. Biodiversity effects in the wild are common and as strong as key drivers of productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, J Emmett; Godwin, Casey M; Cardinale, Bradley J

    2017-09-14

    More than 500 controlled experiments have collectively suggested that biodiversity loss reduces ecosystem productivity and stability. Yet the importance of biodiversity in sustaining the world's ecosystems remains controversial, largely because of the lack of validation in nature, where strong abiotic forcing and complex interactions are assumed to swamp biodiversity effects. Here we test this assumption by analysing 133 estimates reported in 67 field studies that statistically separated the effects of biodiversity on biomass production from those of abiotic forcing. Contrary to the prevailing opinion of the previous two decades that biodiversity would have rare or weak effects in nature, we show that biomass production increases with species richness in a wide range of wild taxa and ecosystems. In fact, after controlling for environmental covariates, increases in biomass with biodiversity are stronger in nature than has previously been documented in experiments and comparable to or stronger than the effects of other well-known drivers of productivity, including climate and nutrient availability. These results are consistent with the collective experimental evidence that species richness increases community biomass production, and suggest that the role of biodiversity in maintaining productive ecosystems should figure prominently in global change science and policy.

  13. The strong specific effect of coions on micellar growth from molecular-thermodynamic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, S V; Victorov, A I

    2014-09-07

    Viscoelastic solutions of ionic surfactants with an added salt exhibit a surprisingly strong dependence of their behavior on the nature of the added coion. We apply a recently proposed molecular-thermodynamic model to elucidate the effect of a coion's specificity on the aggregation of cationic and anionic surfactants. We show that micellar growth and branching are opposed by penetration of coions inside a micelle's corona leading to an increase of the aggregate's preferential curvature. These effects result from hydration/dehydration and dispersion attraction of coions and are only important at high salinity where electrostatic repulsion of coions from the micelle is screened and where branching of micelles and viscosity maxima are observed. At low and medium salinity, the coion plays a minor role; its effect on critical micelle concentration and sphere-to-rod transitions is insignificant. Our molecular-thermodynamic approach describes the specific effects of both counterions and coions and their different roles at different salinity levels based on a unified physical picture.

  14. Effects of Brine Salinity on Clumped Isotopes and Implications for Applications to Carbonate Diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, T.; John, C. M.; Jourdan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry relies on the overabundance of 13C-18O bonds in the crystal lattice compared to a stochastic distribution and was calibrated in laboratory experiments using carbonates precipitated from (mainly) de-ionized water that was supersaturated with calcium carbonate (Ghosh et al., 2006). However, the clumped isotope method has also been applied to carbonates that precipitated in the marine and subsurface environments from fluids with significant salt concentrations. These saline fluids differ markedly from the solution used for laboratory calibration. Variations in the electro-chemical potential due to changes in the ion composition and concentration of the solution could influence the physical properties of the clumped isotope bonding and lead to deviations from the commonly used temperature calibration. Consequently, calibrations at high salinities and high temperatures are needed to confidently extend the application of clumped isotopes to diagenetic processes. We investigated the effect of salinity on clumping by precipitating carbonates (mainly calcite) in the laboratory between 23 and 90 °C using a setup analogous to the experiments of Ghosh et al. (2006). A first subset of experiments was performed at low salinities, while during a second subset of experiments we saturated the solution with NaCl (about 35 g/100 ml) in order to mimic a highly saline brine. Since the same experimental procedures were used for both sub-sets (same temperatures of precipitation and rates of nitrogen gas bubbling), we can directly compare clumped isotope values in highly saline versus low-salinity solutions. The initial clumped isotope results obtained from the brine solution agree within uncertainty with results from carbonates precipitated from a NaCl-free solution at the same temperatures. This suggests that clumped isotopes can be applied to carbonates precipitated under highly saline conditions. We acknowledge the financial support of QCCSRC

  15. Experimental Evidence for Heavy-Atom Tunneling in the Ring-Opening of Cyclopropylcarbinyl Radical from Intramolecular 12C/13C Kinetic Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-James, Ollie M.; Zhang, Xue; Datta, Ayan; Hrovat, David A.; Borden, Weston Thatcher; Singleton, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    The intramolecular 13C kinetic isotope effects for the ring-opening of cyclopropylcarbinyl radical were determined over a broad temperature range. The observed isotope effects are unprecedentedly large, ranging from 1.062 at 80 °C to 1.163 at −100 °C. Semi-classical calculations employing canonical variational transition state theory drastically underpredict the observed isotope effects, but the predicted isotope effects including tunneling by a small-curvature tunneling model match well with experiment. These results and a curvature in the Arrhenius plot of the isotope effects support the recently predicted importance of heavy-atom tunneling in cyclopropylcarbinyl ring-opening. PMID:20722415

  16. Experimental investigation of nitrogen isotopic effects associated with ammonia degassing at 0-70 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuying; Li, Yingzhou; Li, Long

    2018-04-01

    Ammonia degassing is a common process in natural alkaline waters and in the atmosphere. To quantitatively assess the nitrogen cycle in these systems, the essential parameter of nitrogen isotope fractionation factors associated with ammonia degassing is required, but still not constrained yet. In this study, we carried out laboratory experiments to examine the nitrogen isotope behavior during ammonia degassing in alkaline conditions. The experiments started with ammonium sulfate solution with excess sodium hydroxide. The reaction can be described as: NH4+ + OH- (excess) → NH3·nH2O → NH3 (g)↑. Two sets of experiments, one with ammonia degassing under static conditions and the other with ammonia degassing by bubbling of N2 gas, were carried out at 2, 21, 50, and 70 °C. The results indicate that kinetic isotopic effects are dominated during efficient degassing of ammonia in the bubbling experiments, which yielded kinetic nitrogen isotope fractionation factors αNH3(g)-NH3(aq) of 0.9898 at 2 °C, 0.9918 at 21 °C, 0.9935 at 50 °C and 0.9948 at 70 °C. These values show a good relationship with temperature as 103lnαNH3(g)-NH3(aq) = 14.6 - 6.8 × 1000/T. In contrast, isotopic effects during less efficient degassing of ammonia in the static experiments are more complicated. The results do not match either kinetic isotope fractionation or equilibrium isotope fractionation but sit between these two. The most likely cause is that back dissolution of the degassed ammonia occurred in these experiments and consequently shifted kinetic isotope fractionation toward equilibrium isotope fractionation. Our experimental results highlight complicated isotopic effects may occur in natural environments, and need to be fully considered in the interpretation of field data.

  17. Room temperature strong coupling effects from single ZnO nanowire microcavity

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Ayan

    2012-05-01

    Strong coupling effects in a dielectric microcavity with a single ZnO nanowire embedded in it have been investigated at room temperature. A large Rabi splitting of ?100 meV is obtained from the polariton dispersion and a non-linearity in the polariton emission characteristics is observed at room temperature with a low threshold of 1.63 ?J/cm2, which corresponds to a polariton density an order of magnitude smaller than that for the Mott transition. The momentum distribution of the lower polaritons shows evidence of dynamic condensation and the absence of a relaxation bottleneck. The polariton relaxation dynamics were investigated by timeresolved measurements, which showed a progressive decrease in the polariton relaxation time with increase in polariton density. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  18. Global dynamics and bifurcation analysis of a host-parasitoid model with strong Allee effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Qadeer; Ma, Jiying; Xiao, Dongmei

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we study the global dynamics and bifurcations of a two-dimensional discrete time host-parasitoid model with strong Allee effect. The existence of fixed points and their stability are analysed in all allowed parametric region. The bifurcation analysis shows that the model can undergo fold bifurcation and Neimark-Sacker bifurcation. As the parameters vary in a small neighbourhood of the Neimark-Sacker bifurcation condition, the unique positive fixed point changes its stability and an invariant closed circle bifurcates from the positive fixed point. From the viewpoint of biology, the invariant closed curve corresponds to the periodic or quasi-periodic oscillations between host and parasitoid populations. Furthermore, it is proved that all solutions of this model are bounded, and there exist some values of the parameters such that the model has a global attractor. These theoretical results reveal the complex dynamics of the present model.

  19. Strong-field effects in Rabi oscillations between a single state and a superposition of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanovich, S.; Milner, V.; Hepburn, J. W.

    2011-01-01

    Rabi oscillations of quantum population are known to occur in two-level systems driven by spectrally narrow laser fields. In this work we study Rabi oscillations induced by shaped broadband femtosecond laser pulses. Due to the broad spectral width of the driving field, the oscillations are initiated between a ground state and a coherent superposition of excited states, or a ''wave packet,'' rather than a single excited state. Our experiments reveal an intricate dependence of the wave-packet phase on the intensity of the laser field. We confirm numerically that the effect is associated with the strong-field nature of the interaction and provide a qualitative picture by invoking a simple theoretical model.

  20. Enzymatic Kinetic Isotope Effects from Path-Integral Free Energy Perturbation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J

    2016-01-01

    Path-integral free energy perturbation (PI-FEP) theory is presented to directly determine the ratio of quantum mechanical partition functions of different isotopologs in a single simulation. Furthermore, a double averaging strategy is used to carry out the practical simulation, separating the quantum mechanical path integral exactly into two separate calculations, one corresponding to a classical molecular dynamics simulation of the centroid coordinates, and another involving free-particle path-integral sampling over the classical, centroid positions. An integrated centroid path-integral free energy perturbation and umbrella sampling (PI-FEP/UM, or simply, PI-FEP) method along with bisection sampling was summarized, which provides an accurate and fast convergent method for computing kinetic isotope effects for chemical reactions in solution and in enzymes. The PI-FEP method is illustrated by a number of applications, to highlight the computational precision and accuracy, the rule of geometrical mean in kinetic isotope effects, enhanced nuclear quantum effects in enzyme catalysis, and protein dynamics on temperature dependence of kinetic isotope effects. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Isotope effects in ice Ih: A path-integral simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Herrero, Carlos P.; Ramirez, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Ice Ih has been studied by path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, using the effective q-TIP4P/F potential model for flexible water. This has allowed us to analyze finite-temperature quantum effects in this solid phase from 25 to 300 K at ambient pressure. Among these effects we find a negative thermal expansion of ice at low temperatures, which does not appear in classical molecular dynamics simulations. The compressibility derived from volume fluctuations gives results in line with ex...

  2. Isotope effect studies of the chemical mechanism of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grissom, C.B.; Willeford, O.; Wedding, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    The 13 C primary kinetic isotope effect on the decarboxylation of malate by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide malic enzyme from Crassula argentea is 1.0199 +/- 0.0006 with proteo L-malate-2-H and 1.0162 +/- 0.0003 with malate-2-d. The primary deuterium isotope effect is 1.45 +/- 0.10 on V/K and 1.93 +/- 0.13 on V/sub max/. This indicates a stepwise conversion of malate to pyruvate and CO 2 with hydride transfer preceding decarboxylation, thereby suggesting a discrete oxaloacetate intermediate. This is in agreement with the stepwise nature of the chemical mechanism of other malic enzymes despite the Crassula enzyme's inability to reduce or decarboxylate oxaloacetate. Differences in morphology and allosteric regulation between enzymes suggest specialization of the Crassula malic enzyme for the physiology of crassulacean and acid metabolism while maintaining the catalytic events founds in malic enzymes from animal sources

  3. Inverse iron isotope effect on the transition temperature of the (Ba,K)Fe2As2 superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirage, Parasharam M; Kihou, Kunihiro; Miyazawa, Kiichi; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kito, Hijiri; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Yanagisawa, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasumoto; Iyo, Akira

    2009-12-18

    We report that the (Ba,K)Fe(2)As(2) superconductor (transition temperature, T(c) approximately 38 K) has an inverse iron isotope coefficient alpha(Fe) = -0.18(3) (where T(c) approximately M(-alphaFe) and M is the iron isotope mass); i.e., the sample containing the large iron isotope mass depicts a higher T(c). Systematic inverse shifts in T(c) were clearly observed between the samples using three types of Fe isotopes ((54)Fe, natural Fe, and (57)Fe). This indicates the first evidence of the inverse isotope effect in high-T(c) superconductors. This anomalous mass dependence on T(c) implies an exotic coupling mechanism in Fe-based superconductors.

  4. Evidence for H2/D2 isotope effects on Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over supported ruthenium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellner, C.S.; Bell, A.T.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of using D 2 rather than H 2 during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were investigated using alumina- and silica-supported Ru catalysts. For the alumina-supported catalysts, the rate of CD 4 formation was 1.4 to 1.6 times faster than the formation of CH 4 . A noticeable isotope effect was also observed for higher molecular weight products. The magnitude of the isotope effects observed using the silica-supported catalyst was much smaller than that found using the alumina-supported catalysts. The formation of olefins relative to paraffins was found to be higher when H 2 rather than D 2 was used, independent of the catalyst support. The observed isotope effects are explained in terms of a mechanism for CO hydrogenation and are shown to arise from a complex combination of the kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects associated with elementary processes occurring on the catalyst surface

  5. pH-Free Measurement of Relative Acidities, Including Isotope Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Charles L

    2017-01-01

    A powerful pH-free multicomponent NMR titration method can measure relative acidities, even of closely related compounds, with excellent accuracy. The history of the method is presented, along with details of its implementation and a comparison with earlier NMR titrations using a pH electrode. Many of its areas of applicability are described, especially equilibrium isotope effects. The advantages of the method, some practical considerations, and potential pitfalls are considered. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Channel-closing effects in strong-field ionization by a bicircular field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milošević, D. B.; Becker, W.

    2018-03-01

    Channel-closing effects, such as threshold anomalies and resonantlike intensity-dependent enhancements in strong-field ionization by a bicircular laser field are analyzed. A bicircular field consists of two coplanar corotating or counter-rotating circularly polarized fields having different frequencies. For the total detachment rate of a negative ion by a bicircular field we observe threshold anomalies and explain them using the Wigner threshold law and energy and angular momentum conservation. For the corotating bicircular case, these effects are negligible, while for the counter-rotating case they are pronounced and their position depends on the magnetic quantum number of the initial state. For high-order above-threshold ionization of rare-gas atoms by a counter-rotating bicircular laser field we observe very pronounced intensity-dependent enhancements. We find all four types of threshold anomalies known from collision theory. Contrary to the case of linear polarization, channel-closing effects for a bicircular field are visible also in the cutoff region of the electron energy spectrum, which is explained using quantum-orbit theory.

  7. Strong quantum-confined stark effect in germanium quantum-well structures on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Y.; Lee, Y. K.; Gei, Y.; Ren, S; Roth, J. E.; Miller, D. A.; Harris, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon is the dominant semiconductor for electronics, but there is now a growing need to integrate such component with optoelectronics for telecommunications and computer interconnections. Silicon-based optical modulators have recently been successfully demonstrated but because the light modulation mechanisms in silicon are relatively weak, long (for example, several millimeters) devices or sophisticated high-quality-factor resonators have been necessary. Thin quantum-well structures made from III-V semiconductors such as GaAs, InP and their alloys exhibit the much stronger Quantum-Confined Stark Effect (QCSE) mechanism, which allows modulator structures with only micrometers of optical path length. Such III-V materials are unfortunately difficult to integrate with silicon electronic devices. Germanium is routinely integrated with silicon in electronics, but previous silicon-germanium structures have also not shown strong modulation effects. Here we report the discovery of the QCSE, at room temperature, in thin germanium quantum-well structures grown on silicon. The QCSE here has strengths comparable to that in III-V materials. Its clarity and strength are particularly surprising because germanium is an indirect gap semiconductor, such semiconductors often display much weak optical effects than direct gap materials (such as the III-V materials typically used for optoelectronics). This discovery is very promising for small, high-speed, low-power optical output devices fully compatible with silicon electronics manufacture. (author)

  8. Strong mechanically induced effects in DC current-biased suspended Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Thomas; Deng, Hai-Yao; Isacsson, Andreas; Mariani, Eros

    2018-01-01

    Superconductivity is a result of quantum coherence at macroscopic scales. Two superconductors separated by a metallic or insulating weak link exhibit the AC Josephson effect: the conversion of a DC voltage bias into an AC supercurrent. This current may be used to activate mechanical oscillations in a suspended weak link. As the DC-voltage bias condition is remarkably difficult to achieve in experiments, here we analyze theoretically how the Josephson effect can be exploited to activate and detect mechanical oscillations in the experimentally relevant condition with purely DC current bias. We unveil how changing the strength of the electromechanical coupling results in two qualitatively different regimes showing dramatic effects of the oscillations on the DC-voltage characteristic of the device. These include the appearance of Shapiro-type plateaus for weak coupling and a sudden mechanically induced retrapping for strong coupling. Our predictions, measurable in state-of-the-art experimental setups, allow the determination of the frequency and quality factor of the resonator using DC only techniques.

  9. Solvent and solute isotope effects in the aqueous solution of gases. Progress report, July 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, B.B.; Krause, D. Jr.

    1979-10-01

    After developing a 3 He/ 4 He dual beam collection system for the mass spectrometer, the isotopic fractionation factor was determined for helium dissolved in H 2 O, D 2 O, seawater and ethanol. In all solvents the temperature dependence of the fractionation is different from that for a simple isotope vapor pressure effect. Addition of salt to H 2 O increases the fractionation, and the relative salting-out coefficient changes with temperature. A double isotopic effect occurs - the fractionations in D 2 O and H 2 O differ. In ethanol the fractionation is 25% less than in H 2 O

  10. Measurement of isotopic effects in photosynthetic fixation of CO2 by CO2 enriched in carbon 13 and oxygen 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerster, Richard

    The use of 13 C and 18 O enriched CO 2 allows to measure with accuracy isotopic effects, related to the carbon atoms, occuring during the diffusion of carbon dioxide between two phases. Photosynthesis experiments performed with algae suspensions (Euglena gracilis) or aerial leaves (Saccharum officinale, Lycopersicum esculantum, Platanus orientalis, Sinapis alba...) have led to determine an Isotopic Discrimination Factor between 12 C and 13 C very close to 1. The method can be applied to the study of isotopic effects in enzymatic reactions involving CO 2 [fr

  11. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in tautomeric systems with double proton transfer. Citronin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, P.E.; Langgard, M.; Bolvig, S.

    1998-01-01

    Primary and secondary deuterium isotope effects on 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts are measured in citrinin, a tautomeric compound with an unusual doubly intramolecularly hydrogen bonded structure. The isotope effects are to a large extent dominated by equilibrium contributions and deuteration leads to more of the deuterated enol forms rather than the deuterated acid form. 1 H 13 C and 17 O nuclear shieldings are calculated using density functional ab initio methods. A very good correlation between calculated nuclear shieldings and experimental 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts is obtained. The tautomeric equilibrium can be analyzed based on the isotope effects on B-6 and C-8 carbons and shows an increase in the o-quinone form on lowering the temperature. Furthermore, upon deuteration the largest equilibrium shift is found for deuteration at OH-8 and the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium upon deuteration at OH-8 and the shift in the tautomeric equilibrium upon deuteration is increasing at lower temperature. (author)

  12. Isotope effect on charge transfer in collisions of H with He^+ and He2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaeck, N.; Loreau, J.; Ryabchenko, S.

    2011-05-01

    Data on charge exchange mechanism between ions and neutral atoms or molecules are central to the interpretation of measurements of the chemical composition in several astrophysical environments. In this work, we study the charge transfer process in collisions of H with He^+ or He2+ ions at energies between 0.1 and 200 eV/amu. To calculate the cross section for these reactions, we use a quantal method which consists in a combination of ab initio and wave packet propagat ion methods, and compare our results with the use of the semi-classical eikonal method. We consider in particular the isotope effect that arises when hydrogen is replaced by deuterium or tritium. Indeed, it was demonstrated using semi-classical methods that the isotope effect could be important at energies as high as 100 eV/amu. This large isotopic effect would contradict the commun knowledge that hydrogen, deuterium and tritium could be interchangeable in charge exchange processes above 1 eV/amu.

  13. Isotopic Effects on Stereodynamics of the C+ + H2 → CH+ + H Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lu; Yang, Yun-Fan; Fan, Xiao-Xing; Ma, Feng-Cai; Li, Yong-Qing

    2017-05-01

    The effects of isotope substitution on stereodynamic properties for the reactions {C}++{H}2/{H D}/{H T}\\to {{C H}}++H/D/T have been studied applying a quasi classical trajectory method occurring on the new ground state {{C H}}2+ potential energy surface [J. Chem. Phys. 142 (2015) 124302]. In the center of mass coordinates applying the quasi classical trajectory method to investigate the orientation and the alignment of the product molecule. Differential cross section and three angle distribution functions P(θr), P(ϕr), P( {θ }r,{φ }r ) on the potential energy surface that fixed the collision energy with a value is 40 kcal/mol have been studied. The isotope effect becomes more and more important with the reagent molecules H 2 changing into HD and HT. P({θ }r,{φ }r) as the joint probability density function of both polar angles θ r and ϕ r , which can illustrate more detailed dynamics information. The isotope effect is obvious influence on the properties of stereodynamics in the reactions of {C}++{H}2/{H D}/{H T}\\to {{C H}}++H/D/T. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11474141, 11274149, 11544015, the Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University under Grant No. LJQ2015040, and the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry (2014-1685)

  14. Evaluation of the effects of microscale chemical and isotopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    reconstruction. Conventional Sr/Ca and δ18O paleothermometers are, however, based on the analysis of the mixture of the COC and SFS, and thus may be significantly ... the effects may yield significant or serious errors in paleotemperature reconstruction. 1. ..... tal geochemistry and paleoenvironmental reconstruction;.

  15. A Tale of Two Gases: Isotope Effects Associated with the Enzymatic Production of H2 and N2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.; Gandhi, H.; Kreuzer, H. W.; Moran, J.; Hill, E. A.; McQuarters, A.; Lehnert, N.; Ostrom, N. E.; Hegg, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    Stable isotopes can provide considerable insight into enzymatic mechanisms and fluxes in various biological processes. In our studies, we used stable isotopes to characterize both enzyme-catalyzed H2 and N2O production. H2 is a potential alternative clean energy source and also a key metabolite in many microbial communities. Biological H2 production is generally catalyzed by hydrogenases, enzymes that combine protons and electrons to produce H2 under anaerobic conditions. In our study, H isotopes and fractionation factors (α) were used to characterize two types of hydrogenases: [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases. Due to differences in the active site, the α associated with H2 production for [FeFe]- and [NiFe]-hydrogenases separated into two distinct clusters (αFeFe > αNiFe). The calculated kinetic isotope effects indicate that hydrogenase-catalyzed H2 production has a preference for light isotopes, consistent with the relative bond strengths of O-H and H-H bonds. Interestingly, the isotope effects associated with H2 consumption and H2-H2O exchange reactions were also characterized, but in this case no specific difference was observed between the different enzymes. N2O is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 300 times that of CO2, and the concentration of N2O is currently increasing at a rate of ~0.25% per year. Thus far, bacterial and fungal denitrification processes have been identified as two of the major sources of biologically generated N2O. In this study, we measured the δ15N, δ18O, δ15Nα (central N atom in N2O), and δ15Nβ (terminal N atom in N2O) of N2O generated by purified fungal P450 nitric oxide reductase (P450nor) from Histoplasma capsulatum. We observed normal isotope effects for δ18O and δ15Nα, and inverse isotope effects for bulk δ15N (the average of Nα and Nβ) and δ15Nβ. The observed isotope effects have been used in conjunction with DFT calculations to provide important insight into the mechanism of P450nor. Similar

  16. Kinetic α-deuterium isotope effect as a probe of transition state structure and reaction mechanism in nucleoside hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical equilibrium α-deuterium isotope effects were calculated for systems modeling nucleoside and glycoside hydrolyses using a computer program (Burton, G.W., Sims, L.B., Wilson, J.C., and Fry, A.J., J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 99, 3374(1977)) which computes isotope effects directly from the expression of Biegeleisen and Mayer (Biegeleisen, J. and Mayer, M.G., J. Chem. Phys., 17, 675(1949)). For nucleoside hydrolysis proceeding through an oxocarbonium ion intermediate, KH/KD = 1.21 to 1.25; while for nucleoside hydrolysis proceeding through an oxocarbonium ion intermediate KH/KD = 1.15 to 1.19. The models used in the calculations were generated systematically and involved a minimum of subjectivity in the selection of molecular parameters. The isotope effects calculated formed the basis for the interpretation of experimental kinetic α-deuterium isotope effects for nucleoside and glycoside hydrolysis

  17. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields and recently updated safety guidelines for strong static magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2011-01-01

    Humans are exposed daily to artificial and naturally occurring magnetic fields that originate from many different sources. We review recent studies that examine the biological effects of and medical applications involving electromagnetic fields, review the properties of static and pulsed electromagnetic fields that affect biological systems, describe the use of a pulsed electromagnetic field in combination with an anticancer agent as an example of a medical application that incorporates an electromagnetic field, and discuss the recently updated safety guidelines for static electromagnetic fields. The most notable modifications to the 2009 International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines are the increased exposure limits, especially for those who work with or near electromagnetic fields (occupational exposure limits). The recommended increases in exposure were determined using recent scientific evidence obtained from animal and human studies. Several studies since the 1994 publication of the guidelines have examined the effects on humans after exposure to high static electromagnetic fields (up to 9.4 tesla), but additional research is needed to ascertain further the safety of strong electromagnetic fields. (author)

  18. Biological effects of electromagnetic fields and recently updated safety guidelines for strong static magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Sekino, Masaki; Ueno, Shoogo

    2011-01-01

    Humans are exposed daily to artificial and naturally occurring magnetic fields that originate from many different sources. We review recent studies that examine the biological effects of and medical applications involving electromagnetic fields, review the properties of static and pulsed electromagnetic fields that affect biological systems, describe the use of a pulsed electromagnetic field in combination with an anticancer agent as an example of a medical application that incorporates an electromagnetic field, and discuss the recently updated safety guidelines for static electromagnetic fields. The most notable modifications to the 2009 International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection guidelines are the increased exposure limits, especially for those who work with or near electromagnetic fields (occupational exposure limits). The recommended increases in exposure were determined using recent scientific evidence obtained from animal and human studies. Several studies since the 1994 publication of the guidelines have examined the effects on humans after exposure to high static electromagnetic fields (up to 9.4 tesla), but additional research is needed to ascertain further the safety of strong electromagnetic fields.

  19. Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Tomishige, Masahiko; Itoh, Yasuhiro; Fujiwara, Masao; Shibata, Naho; Kosaka, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2006-05-01

    Effect of horizontal strong static magnetic field on swimming behaviour of Paramecium caudatum was studied by using a superconducting magnet. Around a centre of a round vessel, random swimming at 0 T and aligned swimming parallel to the magnetic field (MF) of 8 T were observed. Near a wall of the vessel, however, swimming round and round along the wall at 0 T and aligned swimming of turning at right angles upon collision with the wall, which was remarkable around 1-4 T, were detected. It was experimentally revealed that the former MF-induced parallel swimming at the vessel centre was caused physicochemically by the parallel magnetic orientation of the cell itself. From magnetic field dependence of the extent of the orientation, the magnetic susceptibility anisotropy (χ ∥-χ ⊥) was first obtained to be 3.4× 10-23 emu cell-1 at 298 K for Paramecium caudatum. The orientation of the cell was considered to result from the magnetic orientation of the cell membrane. On the other hand, although mechanisms of the latter swimming near the vessel wall regardless of the absence and presence of the magnetic field are unclear at present, these experimental results indicate that whether the cell exists near the wall alters the magnetic field effect on the swimming in the horizontal magnetic field.

  20. Laser assisted aerodynamic isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H. van den

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the efficiency of conventional aerodynamic isotope seperation can be improved by two orders of magnitude with the aid of a relatively weak cw infrared laser which is used to induce isotopically selective condensation. Overall isotope enrichment factors in excess of 2 are obtained as compared to about 1.02 in the conventional seperation. Sulphur isotopes in SF 6 as well as Silicon isotopes in SiF 4 and Bromine isotopes in CF 3 Br are seperated on a laboratory scale. Infrared vibrational predissociation by itself and in combination with isotopically selective condensation are also shown to be effective new ways of isotope separation. (orig.) [de

  1. Use of isotope effects to determine the chemical mechanism of oxidative decarboxylases: NADP malic enzyme and NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisson, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical mechanism of the NADP-linked oxidative decarboxylases chicken liver malic enzyme and pig heart isocitrate dehydrogenase has been examined using carbon and deuterium isotope effects and their variation with pH, metal ions, and solution viscosity. The following 13 C isotope effects on V/K for malate are observed with the stated metal ion at pH 8.0 and 25 0 C: Mg 2+ , 1.0336; Mn 2+ , 1.0365; Cd 2+ , 1.0366; Zn 2+ , 1.03373; Co 2+ , 1.0283; and Ni 2+ , 1.025. The 13 C isotope effect on nonenzymatic decarboxylation of dibasic oxalacetate at 25 0 C and the stated metal ion is : Mg 2+ , 1.0489; Mn 2+ , 1.0505; Ni 2+ , 1.044; Cd 2+ , 1.0492; Zn 2+ , 1.0504; and Co 2+ , 1.0480. By quantitating the partitioning of the 2-ketocarboxylic acid reaction intermediate between reverse hydride transfer and decarboxylation, it is possible to solve for the intrinsic isotope effects in both reactions. With malic enzyme activated by Mg 2+ , the partitioning ratio of oxalacetate between pyruvate and malate formation is 0.47. This gives an intrinsic deuterium and 13 C isotope effect of 5.6 and 1.0493, respectively. The 13 C isotope effect for the Mg 2+ catalyzed nonenzymatic decarboxylation of oxalacetate is 1.0489, thereby suggesting a similarity of transition states between the enzymatic and nonenzymatic processes. The observed 13 C primary isotope effect for isocitrate in the isocitrate dehydrogenase reaction is obscured by the stickiness of isocitrate at neutral pH. At low pH, the external commitment is eliminated and the observed 13 C isotope effect increases to a limiting value of 1.0353. The pK of the pH dependence of 13 (V/K) is 4.7

  2. Multiple stable isotope fronts during non-isothermal fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Szandra; Weis, Philipp; Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Stable isotope signatures of oxygen, hydrogen and other elements in minerals from hydrothermal veins and metasomatized host rocks are widely used to investigate fluid sources and paths. Previous theoretical studies mostly focused on analyzing stable isotope fronts developing during single-phase, isothermal fluid flow. In this study, numerical simulations were performed to assess how temperature changes, transport phenomena, kinetic vs. equilibrium isotope exchange, and isotopic source signals determine mineral oxygen isotopic compositions during fluid-rock interaction. The simulations focus on one-dimensional scenarios, with non-isothermal single- and two-phase fluid flow, and include the effects of quartz precipitation and dissolution. If isotope exchange between fluid and mineral is fast, a previously unrecognized, significant enrichment in heavy oxygen isotopes of fluids and minerals occurs at the thermal front. The maximum enrichment depends on the initial isotopic composition of fluid and mineral, the fluid-rock ratio and the maximum change in temperature, but is independent of the isotopic composition of the incoming fluid. This thermally induced isotope front propagates faster than the signal related to the initial isotopic composition of the incoming fluid, which forms a trailing front behind the zone of transient heavy oxygen isotope enrichment. Temperature-dependent kinetic rates of isotope exchange between fluid and rock strongly influence the degree of enrichment at the thermal front. In systems where initial isotope values of fluids and rocks are far from equilibrium and isotope fractionation is controlled by kinetics, the temperature increase accelerates the approach of the fluid to equilibrium conditions with the host rock. Consequently, the increase at the thermal front can be less dominant and can even generate fluid values below the initial isotopic composition of the input fluid. As kinetics limit the degree of isotope exchange, a third front may

  3. Determination of ionization potential of atomic gadolinium and its isotope effect. Analysis of unperturbed Rydberg series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyabe, Masabumi; Ohba, Masaki; Wakaida, Ikuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-10-01

    Autoionizing Rydberg series converging to six states (0, 261.841, 633.273, 3082.011, 3427.274, 3444.235 cm{sup -1}) of Gd ion have been observed by using three-color three-step photoionization via ten different 2nd-step levels of J=0 or 1. While the perturbations with interlopers become significant in the region of n=30-35 for most of the observed series, long and well-defined series structures appeared in higher energy region. From an analysis of such unperturbed structures, the first ionization potential of Gd atom was estimated to be 49601.45 (30) cm{sup -1}. This is in good agreement with the previous value, but the accuracy is improved by about one order of magnitude. In addition, isotope effect on the ionization potential was also determined by isotope shifts of some Rydberg series. (author)

  4. Sensitized charge carrier injection into organic crystals studied by isotope effects in weak magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bube, W.; Michel-Beyerle, M.E.; Haberkorn, R.; Steffens, E.

    1977-01-01

    The magnetic field (H approximately 50 Oe) dependence of the rhodamine sensitized triplet exciton density in anthracene crystals is influenced by isotopic substitution. This confirms the hyperfine interaction as mechanism explaining the change of the spin multiplicity in the initially formed singlet state of the radical pair. The isotope effect occurs in the sensitizing dye ( 14 N/ 15 N) rather than at the molecular site of the injected charge within the crystal. This can be understood in terms of the high hopping frequency of the charge carriers as compared to the time constant of the hyperfine induced singlet-triplet transition. Since the dye molecules adsorb in an oriented fashion, the angular dependence of the magnetic field modulation of the triplet exciton density can be interpreted without assuming any additional interactions. (Auth.)

  5. Detailed site effect estimation in the presence of strong velocity reversals within a small-aperture strong-motion array in Iceland

    KAUST Repository

    Rahpeyma, Sahar

    2016-08-11

    The rock site characterization for earthquake engineering applications in Iceland is common due to the easily exposed older bedrock and more recent volcanic lava rock. The corresponding site amplification is generally assumed to be low but has not been comprehensively quantified, especially for volcanic rock. The earthquake strong-motion of the Mw6.3 Ölfus earthquake on 29 May 2008 and 1705 of its aftershocks recorded on the first small-aperture strong-motion array (ICEARRAY I) in Iceland showed consistent and significant variations in ground motion amplitudes over short distances (<2 km) in an urban area located mostly on lava rock. This study analyses the aftershock recordings to quantify the local site effects using the Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and Standard Spectral Ratio (SSR) methods. Additionally, microseismic data has been collected at array stations and analyzed using the HVSR method. The results between the methods are consistent and show that while the amplification levels remain relatively low, the predominant frequency varies systematically between stations and is found to correlate with the geological units. In particular, for stations on lava rock the underlying geologic structure is characterized by repeated lava-soil stratigraphy characterized by reversals in the shear wave velocity with depth. As a result, standard modeling of HVSR using vertically incident body waves does not apply. Instead, modeling the soil structure as a two-degree-of-freedom dynamic system is found to capture the observed predominant frequencies of site amplification. The results have important implications for earthquake resistant design of structures on rock sites characterized by velocity reversals. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  6. Communication: Isotopic effects on tunneling motions in the water trimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videla, Pablo E. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rossky, Peter J. [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Laria, D., E-mail: dhlaria@cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-02-14

    We present results of ring polymer molecular dynamics simulations that shed light on the effects of nuclear quantum fluctuations on tunneling motions in cyclic [H{sub 2}O]{sub 3} and [D{sub 2}O]{sub 3}, at the representative temperature of T = 75 K. In particular, we focus attention on free energies associated with two key isomerization processes: The first one corresponds to flipping transitions of dangling OH bonds, between up and down positions with respect to the O–O–O plane of the cluster; the second involves the interchange between connecting and dangling hydrogen bond character of the H-atoms in a tagged water molecule. Zero point energy and tunneling effects lead to sensible reductions of the free energy barriers. Due to the lighter nature of the H nuclei, these modifications are more marked in [H{sub 2}O]{sub 3} than in [D{sub 2}O]{sub 3}. Estimates of the characteristic time scales describing the flipping transitions are consistent with those predicted based on standard transition-state-approximation arguments.

  7. Diffusion related isotopic fractionation effects with one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Bruce S. [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Lollar, Barbara Sherwood [Earth Sciences Department, University of Toronto, 22 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3B1 (Canada); Passeport, Elodie [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Department, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E5 (Canada); Sleep, Brent E., E-mail: sleep@ecf.utoronto.ca [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Aqueous phase diffusion-related isotope fractionation (DRIF) for carbon isotopes was investigated for common groundwater contaminants in systems in which transport could be considered to be one-dimensional. This paper focuses not only on theoretically observable DRIF effects in these systems but introduces the important concept of constraining “observable” DRIF based on constraints imposed by the scale of measurements in the field, and on standard limits of detection and analytical uncertainty. Specifically, constraints for the detection of DRIF were determined in terms of the diffusive fractionation factor, the initial concentration of contaminants (C{sub 0}), the method detection limit (MDL) for isotopic analysis, the transport time, and the ratio of the longitudinal mechanical dispersion coefficient to effective molecular diffusion coefficient (D{sub mech}/D{sub eff}). The results allow a determination of field conditions under which DRIF may be an important factor in the use of stable carbon isotope measurements for evaluation of contaminant transport and transformation for one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport. This study demonstrates that for diffusion-dominated transport of BTEX, MTBE, and chlorinated ethenes, DRIF effects are only detectable for the smaller molar mass compounds such as vinyl chloride for C{sub 0}/MDL ratios of 50 or higher. Much larger C{sub 0}/MDL ratios, corresponding to higher source concentrations or lower detection limits, are necessary for DRIF to be detectable for the higher molar mass compounds. The distance over which DRIF is observable for VC is small (less than 1 m) for a relatively young diffusive plume (< 100 years), and DRIF will not easily be detected by using the conventional sampling approach with “typical” well spacing (at least several meters). With contaminant transport by advection, mechanical dispersion, and molecular diffusion this study suggests that in field sites where D{sub mech}/D{sub eff} is

  8. Nonlinearity and isotope effect in temporal evolution of mesoscopic structure during hydration of cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumder, S.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations of cement is still in its infancy despite the fact that cement is ubiquitous material which is indispensable in the construction industry, in nuclear energy programs for immobilization of non heat-generating low-level radioactive waste, and in the petroleum industry to line oil wells by pumping cement slurry to isolate productive zones and with global production exceeding that of any other material of technological importance. The total world consumption of cement in 2008 was about 2.5 billion metric tons almost double of that of steel. Manufacturing of cement contributes about 4% of global and 5-7% of the total man-made CO 2 emissions. The understanding of the mechanism of its hydration and evolution of cement-water mixtures into a material of high compressive strength is paramount to improve its life time and other macroscopic properties such as compressive strength, permeability, elastic modulus etc. The mechanism of hydration of cement and evolution of cement-water mixtures into gels of high compressive strength is poorly understood, despite extensive research over the past century. Recent investigations, based on neutron scattering measurements, aims at unraveling this enigma and outlines, for the first time, the evolution of the mesoscopic structure of the cement paste which exhibits temporal oscillations, strongly dependent on the scale of observation and on the medium of hydration (light or heavy water). While the formation of hydration products is synchronous for hydration with H 2 O, the process is non-synchronous for hydration with D 2 O. The reason why morphological patterns of domains at different times look dissimilar, as seen before, for different hydration media emerges as a natural consequence of this finding. Mesoscopic structure of cement paste exhibits isotope effect. The structures arise from well- characterised chemical reactions as water diffuses through the porous material to bring about the water-surface interactions within

  9. Effective potential in the strong-coupling lattice QCD with next-to-next-to-learning order effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Takashi Z.; Miura, Kohtaroh; Ohnishi, Akira

    2010-01-01

    We derive an analytic expression of the effective potential at finite temperature (T) and chemical potential (μ) in the strong-coupling lattice QCD for color SU(3) including next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) effects in the strong coupling expansion. NNLO effective action terms are systematically evaluated in the leading order of the large dimensional (1/d) expansion, and are found to come from some types of connected two-plaquette configurations. We apply the extended Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation and a gluonic-dressed fermion technique to the effective action, and obtain the effective potential as a function of T, μ, and two order parameters: chiral condensate and vector potential field. The next-to-leading order (NLO) and NNLO effects result in modifications of the wave function renormalization factor, quark mass, and chemical potential. We find that T c,μ =0 and μ c,T =0 are similar to the NLO results, whereas the position of the critical point is sensitive to NNLO corrections. (author)

  10. Measurement of the isotope effect of the diffusion of silver and gold in gold and of silver in silver-gold alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolter, D.

    1974-01-01

    The silver isotopes Ag 105 and Agsup(110m) and the gold isotopes Au 195 and Au 199 were used for isotope effect measurements. The isotope effect of the gold self-diffusion was measured on four monocrystals samples at about 850 0 C, that of silver in gold monocrystals at five different temperatures between 731 0 C and 1050 0 C. Furthermore, the isotope effect for silver at 904 0 C was measured on seven silver-gold alloys of varying silver concentration. The correlation factor was determined from the measurements. (HPOE/LH) [de

  11. Stable Isotope Signatures of Middle Palaeozoic Ahermatypic Rugose Corals – Deciphering Secondary Alteration, Vital Fractionation Effects, and Palaeoecological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowicz, Michal; Berkowski, Blazej; López Correa, Matthias; Jarochowska, Emilia; Joachimski, Michael; Belka, Zdzislaw

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates stable isotope signatures of five species of Silurian and Devonian deep-water, ahermatypic rugose corals, providing new insights into isotopic fractionation effects exhibited by Palaeozoic rugosans, and possible role of diagenetic processes in modifying their original isotopic signals. To minimize the influence of intraskeletal cements on the observed signatures, the analysed specimens included unusual species either devoid of large intraskeletal open spaces ('button corals': Microcyclus, Palaeocyclus), or typified by particularly thick corallite walls (Calceola). The corals were collected at four localities in the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland), Mader Basin (Morocco) and on Gotland (Sweden), representing distinct diagenetic histories and different styles of diagenetic alteration. To evaluate the resistance of the corallites to diagenesis, we applied various microscopic and trace element preservation tests. Distinct differences between isotopic compositions of the least-altered and most-altered skeleton portions emphasise a critical role of material selection for geochemical studies of Palaeozoic corals. The least-altered parts of the specimens show marine or near-marine stable isotope signals and lack positive correlation between δ13C and δ18O. In terms of isotopic fractionation mechanisms, Palaeozoic rugosans must have differed considerably from modern deep-water scleractinians, typified by significant depletion in both 18O and 13C, and pronounced δ13C-δ18O co-variance. The fractionation effects exhibited by rugosans seem similar rather to the minor isotopic effects typical of modern non-scleractinian corals (octocorals and hydrocorals). The results of the present study add to growing evidence for significant differences between Scleractinia and Rugosa, and agree with recent studies indicating that calcification mechanisms developed independently in these two groups of cnidarians. Consequently, particular caution is needed in using

  12. Magnetic isotope effect and theory of atomic orbital hybridization to predict a mechanism of chemical exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epov, Vladimir N

    2011-08-07

    A novel approach is suggested to investigate the mechanisms of chemical complexation reactions based on the results of Fujii with co-workers; they have experimentally observed that several metals and metalloids demonstrate mass-independent isotope fractionation during the reactions with the DC18C6 crown ether using solvent-solvent extraction. In this manuscript, the isotope fractionation caused by the magnetic isotope effect is used to understand the mechanisms of chemical exchange reactions. Due to the rule that reactions are allowed for certain electron spin states, and forbidden for others, magnetic isotopes show chemical anomalies during these reactions. Mass-independent fractionation is suggested to take place due to the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear spin with the electron spin of the intermediate product. Moreover, the sign of the mass-independent fractionation is found to be dependent on the element and its species, which is also explained by the magnetic isotope effect. For example, highly negative mass-independent isotope fractionation of magnetic isotopes was observed for reactions of DC18C6 with SnCl(2) species and with several Ru(III) chloro-species, and highly positive for reactions of this ether with TeCl(6)(2-), and with several Cd(II) and Pd(II) species. The atomic radius of an element is also a critical parameter for the reaction with crown ether, particularly the element ions with [Kr]4d(n)5s(m) electron shell fits the best with the DC18C6 crown ring. It is demonstrated that the magnetic isotope effect in combination with the theory of orbital hybridization can help to understand the mechanism of complexation reactions. The suggested approach is also applied to explain previously published mass-independent fractionation of Hg isotopes in other types of chemical exchange reactions. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  13. The isotopic contamination in electromagnetic isotope separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassignol, Ch.

    1959-01-01

    In the early years of isotope separation, and in particular electromagnetic isotope separation, needs for rapid results have conducted to empiric research. This paper describes fundamental research on the electromagnetic isotope separation to a better understanding of isotope separators as well as improving the performances. Focus has been made on the study of the principle of isotope contamination and the remedial action on the separator to improve the isotope separation ratio. In a first part, the author come back to the functioning of an electromagnetic separator and generalities on isotope contamination. Secondly, it describes the two stages separation method with two dispersive apparatus, an electromagnetic separation stage followed by an electrostatic separation stage, both separated by a diaphragm. The specifications of the electrostatic stage are given and its different settings and their consequences on isotope separation are investigated. In a third part, mechanisms and contamination factors in the isotope separation are discussed: natural isotope contamination, contamination by rebounding on the collector, contamination because of a low resolution, contamination by chromatism and diffusion effect, breakdown of condenser voltage. Analysis of experimental results shows the diffusion as the most important contamination factor in electromagnetic isotope separation. As contamination factors are dependent on geometric parameters, sector angle, radius of curvature in the magnetic field and clearance height are discussed in a fourth part. The better understanding of the mechanism of the different contamination factors and the study of influential parameters as pressure and geometric parameters lead to define a global scheme of isotope contamination and determinate optima separator design and experimental parameters. Finally, the global scheme of isotope contamination and hypothesis on optima specifications and experimental parameters has been checked during a

  14. Carbon-14 kinetic isotope effects and mechanisms of addition of 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfenyl chloride to substituted styrenes-1-14C and styrenes-2-14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanska, M.; Fry, A.

    1983-01-01

    As the first reported examples of carbon isotope effects in simple electrophilic addition reactions we have measured the carbon-14 kinetic isotope effects in the addition of 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfenyl chloride to a series of para-substituted α and β-labeled styrenes in acetic acid at 30.1 0 C: for para substituents Cl, H, and CH 3 the k/ 14 K values for α labeling are 1.027, 1.022, and 1.004, and the k/ 14 k values for β labeling are 1.035, 1.032, and 1.037, all +/-approx.0.004. The kinetics of the reaction were measured for the p-CH 3 O,p-CH 3 , unsubstituted, p-Cl, and m-NO 2 styrenes; electron-donating groups strongly accelerate the reaction, and electron-withdrawing groups retard it. The Hammett plot is curved with p + values ranging from about -4.6 at the electron-donating group (EDG) end to about -1.8 at the electron-withdrawing group (EWG) end. Both the isotope effect and kinetic data, and related data from the literature, are interpreted in terms of a changing mechanism, with the activated complexes of the rate-determining steps having much open carbenium ion (ion pair) character for EDG-substituted styrenes and much cyclic thiiranium io (ion par) character for EWG-substituted styrenes. 1 figure, 2 tables

  15. Effect of amino acids on the precipitation kinetics and Ca isotopic composition of gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harouaka, Khadouja; Kubicki, James D.; Fantle, Matthew S.

    2017-12-01

    Stirred gypsum (CaSO4 · 2H2O) precipitation experiments (initial Ωgypsum = 2.4 ± 0.14, duration ≈ 1.0-1.5 h) were conducted in the presence of the amino acids glycine (190 μM), L-alanine (190 μM), D- and L-arginine (45 μM), and L-tyrosine (200 μM) to investigate the effect of simple organic compounds on both the precipitation kinetics and Ca isotopic composition of gypsum. Relative to abiotic controls, glycine, tyrosine, and alanine inhibited precipitation rates by ∼22%, 27%, and 29%, respectively, while L- and D-arginine accelerated crystal growth by ∼8% and 48%, respectively. With the exception of tyrosine, amino acid induced inhibition resulted in fractionation factors (αs-f) associated with precipitation that were no more than 0.3‰ lower than amino acid-free controls. In contrast, the tyrosine and D- and L-arginine experiments had αs-f values associated with precipitation that were similar to the controls. Our experimental results indicate that Ca isotopic fractionation associated with gypsum precipitation is impacted by growth inhibition in the presence of amino acids. Specifically, we propose that the surface-specific binding of amino acids to gypsum can change the equilibrium fractionation factor of the bulk mineral. We investigate the hypothesis that amino acids can influence the growth of gypsum at specific crystal faces via adsorption and that different faces have distinct fractionation factors (αface-fluid). Accordingly, preferential sorption of amino acids at particular faces changes the relative, face-specific mass fluxes of Ca during growth, which influences the bulk isotopic composition of the mineral. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that the energetic favorability of glycine sorption onto gypsum crystal faces occurs in the order: (1 1 0) > (0 1 0) > (1 2 0) > (0 1 1), while glycine sorption onto the (-1 1 1) face was found to be energetically unfavorable. Face-specific fractionation factors constrained by

  16. Strong isotope effects on the charge transfer in slow collisions of He2+ with atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Oehrn, Y.; Deumens, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Sabin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Probabilities and cross sections for charge transfer by He2+ impact on atomic hydrogen (H), deuterium (D), and tritium (T) at low collision energies are calculated. The results are obtained using an ab initio theory, which solves the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. For the H target, excellent

  17. Disorder effects on helical edge transport in graphene under a strong tilted magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunli; Cazalilla, Miguel A.

    2015-10-01

    In a recent experiment, Young et al. [Nature (London) 505, 528 (2014), 10.1038/nature12800] observed a metal to insulator transition as well as transport through helical edge states in monolayer graphene under a strong, tilted magnetic field. Under such conditions, the bulk is a magnetic insulator which can exhibit metallic conduction through helical edges. It was found that the two-terminal conductance of the helical channels deviates from the expected quantized value (=e2/h per edge, at zero temperature). Motivated by this observation, we study the effect of disorder on the conduction through the edge channels. We show that, unlike for helical edges of topological insulators in semiconducting quantum wells, a disorder Rashba spin-orbit coupling does not lead to backscattering, at least to leading order. Instead, we find that the lack of perfect antialignment of the electron spins in the helical channels to be the most likely cause for backscattering arising from scalar (i.e., spin-independent) impurities. The intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and other time-reversal symmetry-breaking and/or sublattice parity-breaking potentials also lead to (subleading) corrections to the channel conductance.

  18. Effect of dipole polarizability on positron binding by strongly polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribakin, G F; Swann, A R

    2015-01-01

    A model for positron binding to polar molecules is considered by combining the dipole potential outside the molecule with a strongly repulsive core of a given radius. Using existing experimental data on binding energies leads to unphysically small core radii for all of the molecules studied. This suggests that electron–positron correlations neglected in the simple model play a large role in determining the binding energy. We account for these by including the polarization potential via perturbation theory and non-perturbatively. The perturbative model makes reliable predictions of binding energies for a range of polar organic molecules and hydrogen cyanide. The model also agrees with the linear dependence of the binding energies on the polarizability inferred from the experimental data (Danielson et al 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 235203). The effective core radii, however, remain unphysically small for most molecules. Treating molecular polarization non-perturbatively leads to physically meaningful core radii for all of the molecules studied and enables even more accurate predictions of binding energies to be made for nearly all of the molecules considered. (paper)

  19. Strong gravity effects of rotating black holes: quasi-periodic oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, Alikram N; Esmer, Göksel Daylan; Talazan, Pamir

    2013-01-01

    We explore strong gravity effects of the geodesic motion in the spacetime of rotating black holes in general relativity and braneworld gravity. We focus on the description of the motion in terms of three fundamental frequencies: the orbital frequency, the radial and vertical epicyclic frequencies. For a Kerr black hole, we perform a detailed numerical analysis of these frequencies at the innermost stable circular orbits and beyond them as well as at the characteristic stable orbits, at which the radial epicyclic frequency attains its highest value. We find that the values of the epicyclic frequencies for a class of stable orbits exhibit good qualitative agreement with the observed frequencies of the twin peaks quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in some black hole binaries. We also find that at the characteristic stable circular orbits, where the radial (or the vertical) epicyclic frequency has maxima, the vertical and radial epicyclic frequencies exhibit an approximate 2:1 ratio even in the case of near-extreme rotation of the black hole. Next, we perform a similar analysis of the fundamental frequencies for a rotating braneworld black hole and argue that the existence of such a black hole with a negative tidal charge, whose angular momentum exceeds the Kerr bound in general relativity, does not confront with the observations of high-frequency QPOs. (paper)

  20. Peak ground motions, effective duration of strong motions and frequency content of Iranian earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranizadeh, M.; Hamedi, F.

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of earthquake ground motion have great influences on the response of structures to the earthquakes. Peak ground motions, duration of strong motions and frequency content are important characteristics of earthquakes, which are studied in this paper. The relation between peak ground acceleration, velocity and displacement have been taken into account and the effects of magnitude, epicentral distance and recorded duration of earthquakes on peak ground acceleration have been presented as graphs. The frequency content of ground motion can be examined by power spectral density of accel ero grams. In this study the power spectral density of the records have been determined and normalized power spectral densities are compared. There are different formulas for the smoothed power spectral density function such as Kanai-Tajimi's model. In this study, comparing with Kanai-Tajim's formula, the extreme value model is suggested for the spectral density function. This model is evaluated for accel ero grams on different soil conditions and the smoothed mean power spectral density function are determined for each soil groups. The central frequency and predominant period of earthquakes are also estimated

  1. Strong mutagenic effects of diesel engine emissions using vegetable oil as fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bünger, Jürgen; Krahl, Jürgen; Munack, Axel; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schröder, Olaf; Emmert, Birgit; Westphal, Götz; Müller, Michael; Hallier, Ernst; Brüning, Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Diesel engine emissions (DEE) are classified as probably carcinogenic to humans. In recent years every effort was made to reduce DEE and their content of carcinogenic and mutagenic polycyclic aromatic compounds. Since 1995 we observed an appreciable reduction of mutagenicity of DEE driven by reformulated or newly designed fuels in several studies. Recently, the use of rapeseed oil as fuel for diesel engines is rapidly growing among German transportation businesses and agriculture due to economic reasons. We compared the mutagenic effects of DEE from two different batches of rapeseed oil (RSO) with rapeseed methyl ester (RME, biodiesel), natural gas derived synthetic fuel (gas-to-liquid, GTL), and a reference diesel fuel (DF). The test engine was a heavy-duty truck diesel running the European Stationary Cycle. Particulate matter from the exhaust was sampled onto PTFE-coated glass fibre filters and extracted with dichloromethane in a soxhlet apparatus. The gas phase constituents were sampled as condensates. The mutagenicity of the particle extracts and the condensates was tested using the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome assay with tester strains TA98 and TA100. Compared to DF the two RSO qualities significantly increased the mutagenic effects of the particle extracts by factors of 9.7 up to 59 in tester strain TA98 and of 5.4 up to 22.3 in tester strain TA100, respectively. The condensates of the RSO fuels caused an up to factor 13.5 stronger mutagenicity than the reference fuel. RME extracts had a moderate but significant higher mutagenic response in assays of TA98 with metabolic activation and TA100 without metabolic activation. GTL samples did not differ significantly from DF. In conclusion, the strong increase of mutagenicity using RSO as diesel fuel compared to the reference DF and other fuels causes deep concern on future usage of this biologic resource as a replacement of established diesel fuels.

  2. Autler-Townes effect in a strongly driven electromagnetically induced transparency resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lijun; Zhang Lianshui; Li Xiaoli; Han Li; Fu Guangsheng; Manson, Neil B.; Suter, Dieter; Wei Changjiang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study the nonlinear behavior of an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonance subject to a coherent driving field. The EIT is associated with a Λ three-level system where two hyperfine levels within an electronic ground state are coupled to a common excited state level by a coupling field and a probe field. In addition there is an radio-frequency (rf) field driving a hyperfine transition within the ground state. The paper contrasts two different situations. In one case the rf-driven transition shares a common level with the probed transition and in the second case it shares a common level with the coupled transition. In both cases the EIT resonance is split into a doublet and the characteristics of the EIT doublet are determined by the strength and frequency of the rf-driving field. The doublet splitting originates from the rf-field induced dynamic Stark effect and has close analogy with the Autler-Townes effect observed in three-level pump-probe spectroscopy study. The situation changes when the rf field is strong and the two cases are very different. One is analogous to two Λ three-level systems with EIT resonance associated with each. The other corresponds to a doubly driven three-level system with rf-field-induced electromagnetically induced absorption resonance. The two situations are modeled using numerical solutions of the relevant equation of motion of density matrix. In addition a physical account of their behaviors is given in terms of a dressed state picture

  3. Stable isotope canopy effects for sympatric monkeys at Tai Forest, Cote d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krigbaum, John; Berger, Michael H; Daegling, David J; McGraw, W Scott

    2013-08-23

    This study tests the hypothesis that vertical habitat preferences of different monkey species inhabiting closed canopy rainforest are reflected in oxygen isotopes. We sampled bone from seven sympatric cercopithecid species in the Taï forest, Côte d'Ivoire, where long-term study has established taxon-specific patterns of habitat use and diet. Modern rib samples (n = 34) were examined for oxygen (δ(18)Oap) and carbon (δ(13)Cap) from bone apatite ('bioapatite'), and carbon (δ(13)Cco) and nitrogen (δ(15)Nco) from bone collagen. Results are consistent for C3 feeders in a closed canopy habitat. Low irradiance and evapotranspiration, coupled with high relative humidity and recycled CO2 in forest understory, contribute to observed isotopic variability. Both δ(13)Cco and δ(13)Cap results reflect diet; however, δ(13)C values are not correlated with species preference for canopy height. By contrast, δ(18)Oap results are correlated with mean observed height and show significant vertical partitioning between taxa feeding at ground, lower and upper canopy levels. This oxygen isotope canopy effect has important palaeobiological implications for reconstructing vertical partitioning among sympatric primates and other species in tropical forests.

  4. Isotope effect in glass-transition temperature and ionic conductivity of lithium-borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaki, Takanori; Morishima, Ryuta; Matsui, Tsuneo

    2002-01-01

    The glass-transition temperature and the electrical conductivity of lithium borate (0.33Li 2 O-0.67B 2 O 3 ) glasses with various isotopic compositions were determined by differential thermal analysis and by impedance spectroscopy, respectively. The obtained glass-transition temperature as well as the vibrational frequency of B-O network structure was independent of lithium isotopic composition. This result indicates that lithium ions, which exist as network modifier, only weakly interact with B-O network structure. In addition, the glass-transition temperature increased with 10 B content although the reason has not been understood. The electrical conductivity, on the other hand, increased with 6 Li content. The ratio of the conductivity of 6 Li glass to that of 7 Li glass was found to be 2, being larger than the value (7/6) 1/2 calculated with the simple classical diffusion theory. This strong mass dependence could be explained by the dynamic structure model, which assumes local structural relaxation even far below the glass-transition temperature. Besides, the conductivity appeared to increase with the glass-transition temperature. Possible correlations between the glass-transition temperature and the electrical conductivity were discussed. (author)

  5. Covariance of oxygen and hydrogen isotopic compositions in plant water: species effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, L.W.; DeNiro, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Leaf water becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen during evapotranspiration. The magnitude of the enrichment has been shown to be influenced by temperature and humidity, but the effects of species—specific factors on leaf water enrichment of D and 18 O have not been studied for different plants growing together. Accordingly, to learn whether leaf water enrichment patterns and processes for D and 18 O are different for individual species growing under the same environmental conditions we tested the proposal that leaf waters in plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) show higher slopes (m in the leaf water equation °D = m ° 18 O + b) than in C 3 plants. We determined the relationships between the stable hydrogen (°D) and oxygen (° 18 O) isotope ratios of leaf waters collected during the diurnal cycle of evapotranspiration for Yucca schidigera, Ephedra aspera, Agave deserti, Prunus ilicifolia, Yucca whipplei, Heteromeles arbutifolia, Dyckia fosteriana, Simmondsia chinensis, and Encelia farinosa growing at two sites in southern California. Slopes (m in the above leaf water equation) ranged from 1.50 to 3.21, compared to °8 for meteoric water, but differences in slope could not be attributed to carboxylation pathway (CAM vs. C 3 ) nor climate (coastal California vs. Sonoran Desert). Higher slopes were correlated with greater overall ranges of leaf water enrichment of D and 18 O. Water in plants with higher slopes also differed most from unaltered meteoric water. Leaf water isotope ratios in plants with lower slopes were better correlated with temperature and humidity. The findings indicate that m in the aforementioned equation is related to the overall residence time for water in the leaf and proportions of water subjected to repeated evapotranspiration enrichments of heavy isotopes

  6. Effects of alkalinity and salinity at low and high light intensity on hydrogen isotope fractionation of long-chain alkenones produced by

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, G.M.; Pfannerstill, E.Y.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; van der Meer, M.T.J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, hydrogen isotopes of longchainalkenones have been shown to be a promising proxy forreconstructing paleo sea surface salinity due to a strong hydrogenisotope fractionation response to salinity across differentenvironmental conditions. However, to date, the decouplingof the

  7. Effects of the Coulomb potential in interference patterns of strong-field holography with photoelectrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvetsov-Shilovski, N. I.; Lein, M.

    2018-01-01

    Using the semiclassical two-step model for strong-field ionization we investigate the interference structures emerging in strong-field photoelectron holography, taking into account the Coulomb potential of the atomic core. For every kind of the interference pattern predicted by the three-step model, we calculate the corresponding structure in the presence of the Coulomb field, showing that the Coulomb potential modifies the interference patterns significantly.

  8. Modeling consequences of prolonged strong unpredictable stress in zebrafish: Complex effects on behavior and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Cai; Liu, Bai-Ping; Zhang, Yong-Ping; Peng, Zhilan; Wang, JiaJia; Collier, Adam D; Echevarria, David J; Savelieva, Katerina V; Lawrence, Robert F; Rex, Christopher S; Meshalkina, Darya A; Kalueff, Allan V

    2018-02-02

    Chronic stress is the major pathogenetic factor of human anxiety and depression. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have become a novel popular model species for neuroscience research and CNS drug discovery. The utility of zebrafish for mimicking human affective disorders is also rapidly growing. Here, we present a new zebrafish model of clinically relevant, prolonged unpredictable strong chronic stress (PUCS). The 5-week PUCS induced overt anxiety-like and motor retardation-like behaviors in adult zebrafish, also elevating whole-body cortisol and proinflammatory cytokines - interleukins IL-1β and IL-6. PUCS also elevated whole-body levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and increased the density of dendritic spines in zebrafish telencephalic neurons. Chronic treatment of fish with an antidepressant fluoxetine (0.1mg/L for 8days) normalized their behavioral and endocrine phenotypes, as well as corrected stress-elevated IL-1β and IL-6 levels, similar to clinical and rodent data. The CNS expression of the bdnf gene, the two genes of its receptors (trkB, p75), and the gfap gene of glia biomarker, the glial fibrillary acidic protein, was unaltered in all three groups. However, PUCS elevated whole-body BDNF levels and the telencephalic dendritic spine density (which were corrected by fluoxetine), thereby somewhat differing from the effects of chronic stress in rodents. Together, these findings support zebrafish as a useful in-vivo model of chronic stress, also calling for further cross-species studies of both shared/overlapping and distinct neurobiological responses to chronic stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of strong bite force on the facial vertical dimension of pembarong performers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Christina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A pembarong performer is a reog dancer who bites on a piece of wood inserted into his/her mouth in order to support a 60 kg Barongan or Dadak Merak mask. The teeth supporting this large and heavy mask are directly affected, as the strong bite force exerted during a dance could affect their vertical and sagital facial dimensions. Purpose: This study aimed to examine the influence of the bite force of pembarong performers due to their vertical and sagital facial dimensions. Methods: The study reported here involved fifteen pembarong performers and thirteen individuals with normal occlusion (with specific criteria. The bite force of these subjects was measured with a dental prescale sensor during its centric occlusion. A cephalometric variation measurement was subsequently performed on all subjects with its effects on their vertical and sagital facial dimensions being measured. Results: The bite force value of the pembarong performers was 394.3816 ± 7.68787 Newtons, while the normal occlusion was 371.7784 ± 4.77791 Newtons. There was no correlation between the bite force and the facial sagital dimension of these subjects. However, a significant correlation did exist between bite force and lower facial height/total facial height (LFH/TFH ratio (p = 0.013. Conversely, no significant correlation between bite force and posterior facial height/total facial height (PFH/TFH ratio (p = 0.785 was detected. There was an inverse correlation between bite force and LFH/TFH ratio (r = -.464. Conclusion: Bite force is directly related to the decrease in LFH/TFH ratio. Occlusal pressure exerted by the posterior teeth on the alveolar bone may increase bone density at the endosteal surface of cortical bone.

  10. Strong and nonlinear effects of fragmentation on ecosystem service provision at multiple scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Matthew G. E.; Bennett, Elena M.; Gonzalez, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Human actions, such as converting natural land cover to agricultural or urban land, result in the loss and fragmentation of natural habitat, with important consequences for the provision of ecosystem services. Such habitat loss is especially important for services that are supplied by fragments of natural land cover and that depend on flows of organisms, matter, or people across the landscape to produce benefits, such as pollination, pest regulation, recreation and cultural services. However, our quantitative knowledge about precisely how different patterns of landscape fragmentation might affect the provision of these types of services is limited. We used a simple, spatially explicit model to evaluate the potential impact of natural land cover loss and fragmentation on the provision of hypothetical ecosystem services. Based on current literature, we assumed that fragments of natural land cover provide ecosystem services to the area surrounding them in a distance-dependent manner such that ecosystem service flow depended on proximity to fragments. We modeled seven different patterns of natural land cover loss across landscapes that varied in the overall level of landscape fragmentation. Our model predicts that natural land cover loss will have strong and unimodal effects on ecosystem service provision, with clear thresholds indicating rapid loss of service provision beyond critical levels of natural land cover loss. It also predicts the presence of a tradeoff between maximizing ecosystem service provision and conserving natural land cover, and a mismatch between ecosystem service provision at landscape versus finer spatial scales. Importantly, the pattern of landscape fragmentation mitigated or intensified these tradeoffs and mismatches. Our model suggests that managing patterns of natural land cover loss and fragmentation could help influence the provision of multiple ecosystem services and manage tradeoffs and synergies between services across different human

  11. Limited range of interspecific vital effects in coccolith stable isotopic records during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Heather M.

    2005-03-01

    Small but significant differences exist among stable carbon and oxygen isotopic excursions measured in coccolith-dominated bulk carbonate and planktic foraminifera during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). One hypothesis suggests that the bulk carbonate isotopic record is compromised by changing nannofossil assemblages, since modern nannofossils show a large (5 permil) range of interspecific vital effects. New techniques are employed here to separate different size fractions of coccoliths from PETM sediments at ODP Site 690 for isotopic analysis, removing a major portion of the variation in nannofossil assemblages. Isotopic compositions of coarse and fine coccolith fractions dominated by coccoliths of genus Chiasmolithus and Toweius, respectively, differ by less than 0.5 permil for both oxygen and carbon. The near-monogeneric Toweius record closely parallels the main trends in the bulk carbonate isotope records, including multiple steps in the negative carbon isotopic excursion, suggesting that the trends in the bulk carbonate record are not artifacts of changing species assemblages. Because both coccolithophorids and symbiont-bearing foraminifera like Acarinina must inhabit the photic zone, it is unlikely that the 103 year lags in isotope event onset between coccoliths and Acarinina reflect true time-transgressive invasion of isotopically depleted CO2 into the water column. The small range of vital effects among Paleocene coccoliths is unlikely to result from diagenetic homogenization, and instead may reflect more similar carbon acquisition strategies of Paleocene coccolithophorid algae due to larger and/or more similar cell sizes and higher atmospheric carbon dioxide. The small range of vital effects suggests that bulk carbonate records are likely reliable for other early and pre-Cenozoic sediments where foraminifera are often scarce.

  12. Constraints on post-depositional isotope modifications in East Antarctic firn from analysing temporal changes of isotope profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Thomas; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Freitag, Johannes; Meyer, Hanno; Laepple, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    The isotopic composition of water in ice sheets is extensively used to infer past climate changes. In low-accumulation regions their interpretation is, however, challenged by poorly constrained effects that may influence the initial isotope signal during and after deposition of the snow. This is reflected in snow-pit isotope data from Kohnen Station, Antarctica, which exhibit a seasonal cycle but also strong interannual variations that contradict local temperature observations. These inconsistencies persist even after averaging many profiles and are thus not explained by local stratigraphic noise. Previous studies have suggested that post-depositional processes may significantly influence the isotopic composition of East Antarctic firn. Here, we investigate the importance of post-depositional processes within the open-porous firn (≳ 10 cm depth) at Kohnen Station by separating spatial from temporal variability. To this end, we analyse 22 isotope profiles obtained from two snow trenches and examine the temporal isotope modifications by comparing the new data with published trench data extracted 2 years earlier. The initial isotope profiles undergo changes over time due to downward advection, firn diffusion and densification in magnitudes consistent with independent estimates. Beyond that, we find further modifications of the original isotope record to be unlikely or small in magnitude (≪ 1 ‰ RMSD). These results show that the discrepancy between local temperatures and isotopes most likely originates from spatially coherent processes prior to or during deposition, such as precipitation intermittency or systematic isotope modifications acting on drifting or loose surface snow.

  13. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Scott, F.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Greenberg, Catheryn, H.; Martinez del Rio, Carlos

    2003-02-28

    Pearson, S.F., D.J. Levey, C.H. Greenberg, and C.M. del Rio. 2003. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird. Oecologia. 135:516-523. The use of stable isotopes to infer diet requires quantifying the relationship between diet and tissues and, in particular, knowing of how quickly isotopes turnover in different tissues and how isotopic concentrations of different food components change (discriminate) when incorporated into consumer tissues. We used feeding trials with wild-caught yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata) to determine d15N and d13C turnover rates for blood, d15N and d13C diet-tissue discrimination factors, and diet-tissue relationships for blood and feathers. After 3 weeks on a common diet, 36 warblers were assigned to one of four diets differing in the relative proportion of fruit and insects. Plasma half-life estimates ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 days for d13C and from 0.5 to 1.7 days for d15N. Half-life did not differ among diets. Whole blood half-life for d13C ranged from 3.9 to 6.1 days. Yellow-rumped warbler tissues were enriched relative to diet by 1.7.3.6% for nitrogen isotopes and by 1.2 to 4.3% for carbon isotopes, depending on tissue and diet. Consistent with previous studies, feathers were the most enriched and whole blood and plasma were the least enriched or, in the case of carbon, slightly depleted relative to diet. In general, tissues were more enriched relative to diet for birds with high percentages of insects. For all tissues, carbon and nitrogen isotope discrimination factors increased with carbon and nitrogen concentrations of diets. The isotopic signature of plasma increased linearly with the sum of the isotopic signature of the diet and the discrimination factor. Because the isotopic signature of tissues depends on both elemental concentration and isotopic signature of the diet, attempts to reconstruct diet from stable isotope signatures

  14. Studies on fractionation of ytterbium isotopes in Yb(III)-acetate/Yb-amalgam system. Even-odd effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dembinski, W.; Poninski, M.; Fiedler, R.

    1997-12-31

    The fractionation of ytterbium isotopes with the even and odd numbers of neutrons was investigated in a Yb(III)-acetate/Yb-amalgam exchange systems. The light isotope was preferentially fractionated to the amalgam phase. The values of the unit separation gain per mass difference,{epsilon}, were found to be -0.00054 for {sup 176/171}Yb and -0.00069 for {sup 176/174}Yb The difference which amounted to 0.00015 is an evidence for the occurrence of the so called `even-odd` effect. It was also found that the chemical isotope shift of ytterbium was monitored by optical isotope shift its atomic spectra. (author). 23 refs, 7 figs, 4 tabs.

  15. 13C Kinetic isotopic effect of polymerization on monomers with multiple bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, E.L.; Polyakov, V.B.; Makovetskij, K.L.; Golenko, T.G.; Galimov, Eh.M.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Organicheskoj Khimii; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Geokhimii i Analiticheskoj Khimii)

    1988-01-01

    13 C kinetic isotopic effect (KIE) of anionic and radical polymerization and metathesis reaction of monomers with multiple bonds are studied and correlation between the found KIE values of polymerization and the structure of transition state is established. 13 C KIE of polymerization reactions are investigated using monomers with natural content of the isotope. Polymerization was carried out using high-vacuum equipment: radical polymerization of methyl acrylate (MA) and vinyl acetate in benzene solution under the effect of benzoyl peroxide (60 deg C); anionic polymerization of MA, initiated by potassium butyl cellosolvolate, was realized in mass at 25 deg C; cyclopentene metathesis reaction was conducted in benzene under the effect of initiating system WCl 6 - (C 3 H 5 ) 2 Si(CH 3 ) 2 at -30 deg C; phenylacetylene polymers were prepared by polymerization in benzene solution at 20 deg C under the effect of WCl 6 . It is ascertained that 13 C KIE of radical and anionic polymerization of olefins and cycloolefin metathesis constitutes 2.0 -2.4%. Polymerization of compound with ternary bond is accompanied by a lower value of 13 C KIE (<1%), which is explained by double bond of reacting bond in transition state

  16. Hydrogen isotope ratios of terrestrial leaf wax n-alkanes from the Tibetan Plateau: Controls on apparent enrichment factors, effect of vapor sources and implication for altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Xu, Baiqing; Günther, Franziska; Mügler, Ines; Lange, Markus; Zhao, Huabiao; Li, Jiule; Gleixner, Gerd

    2017-08-01

    Empirical evidence suggested that the altitudinal dependence of hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes (δDwax) can be used to estimate paleoaltitudinal changes. However, the application of δDwax-based paleoaltimetry remains difficult, as the impacts of evaporative, transpirative and biosynthetic processes on hydrogen isotope fractionations in changing environments and the influence of likely changing water vapor sources are not well explored. For this study, we sampled stream waters, soils and plant leaves along two transects spanning large gradients of altitude, precipitation amount, vapor source, temperature and vegetation type on the Tibetan Plateau (TP). δD values of stream water (as an approximation for δDp), soil water (δDsw) and plant leaf water (δDlw) as well as leaf wax n-alkanes were measured in order to quantify isotopic fractionations in the formation of leaf waxes. Most interestingly, we found a strong negative correlation between the evapotranspirative enrichment of leaf water against precipitation (εlw-p), which combines the effects of soil evaporation and leaf transpiration, and the biosynthetic hydrogen isotope fractionation (εwax-lw), which describes isotopic enrichment between leaf wax and leaf water. The relationship yields a steady apparent isotopic enrichment factor (εwax-p) between leaf wax and precipitation, which is independent from climatic parameters and has an average value of -107 ± 26‰ for grasses (monocotyledons) and -77 ± 22‰ for trees (dicotyledons). Since the terrestrial n-alkanes, especially n-C27 and n-C29, in sediments are derived from trees and grasses, the likely change of the vegetation type in the uplift of mountains can change the isotopic estimates by about ±30‰, which corresponds to an altitudinal change of ∼1600 m. We, therefore, suggest that hydrogen isotope ratio of sedimentary n-C31 alkane, which is mainly derived from grasses might be better proxies to reconstruct paleoaltitudes. Our large

  17. Isotope effects associated with the preparation and methylation of fatty acids by boron trifluoride in methanol for compound-specific stable hydrogen isotope analysis via gas chromatography/thermal conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivall, David; Berstan, Robert; Bull, Ian D; Evershed, Richard P

    2012-05-30

    Compound-specific stable hydrogen isotope analysis of fatty acids is being used increasingly as a means of deriving information from a diverse range of materials of archaeological, geological and environmental interest. Preparative steps required prior to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) analysis have the potential to alter determined δD values and hence must be accounted for if accurate δD values for target compounds are to be obtained. Myristic, palmitic, stearic, arachidic and behenic saturated fatty acids were derivatised to their respective fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), using 14% (w/v) boron trifluoride in methanol then analysed by gas chromatography/thermal conversion/IRMS (GC/TC/IRMS). FAMEs generated from fatty acid sodium salts of unknown δD values were then used to test a correction factor determined for this method of derivatisation. Derivatisation was found to alter the hydrogen isotopic composition of FAMEs although this effect was reproducible and can be accounted for. The difference between the mean corrected and mean bulk δD values was always less than 6.7 ‰. Extraction of saturated fatty acids and acyl lipids from samples, subsequent hydrolysis, then separation on a solid-phase extraction cartridge, was found to alter the determined δD values by less than one standard deviation. Overall, it has been shown that for natural abundance hydrogen isotope determinations, the isolation and derivatisation of extracted fatty acids alters the determined δD values only by a numerical increment comparable with the experimental error. This supports the use of the described analytical protocol as an effective means of determining fatty acid δD values by GC/TC/IRMS. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Global nitrogen cycle: pre-Anthropocene mass and isotope fluxes and effects of human perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Y.; Li, D. D.; Lerman, A.; Mackenzie, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    The size of the largest nitrogen reservoir -- the Earth atmosphere -- and its long residence time of approximately 17 million years suggest that the global N cycle was likely to be balanced at geological time scales. After the industrial revolution, human activities, such as mining, fossil fuel burning, land use change, and artificial fertilization, have resulted in perturbations and numerous flux changes of the N cycle. The effects of human activities on the mass and isotopic composition of the N reservoirs can be predicted using a detailed N cycle model with estimated additions. For the pre-Anthropocene period, a balanced steady-state N cycle model was constructed based on the Redfield ratios and an extensive literature review. The model includes 14 N reservoirs in the domains of the atmosphere, land, and ocean. The biotic reservoirs on land and in the ocean (land plants and marine biota) interact with atmospheric N2 and dissolved inorganic N (DIN) in ocean and soil waters. DIN further interacts with dissolved organic N (DON), particulate organic matter (POM), and ocean sediments. Atmosphere supplies N to land and ocean domains mainly by N fixation, deposition, and dissolution, and these fluxes are balanced by denitrification and volatilization back to atmosphere. Riverine transport of dissolved and particulate N connects land and ocean domains. Once the cycle is mass-balanced, the isotopic composition of reservoir and the size of fractionation accompanying microbial transformations and transfers of N species between the reservoirs were estimated by numerical iteration of the flux equations based on the reported δ15N values and fractionation factors. The calculated fractionation factors tend to be smaller in magnitude than the experimentally measured ones in natural systems, which can be interpreted as an indication of N-limited conditions prevailing in pre-Anthropocene world: a smaller isotope fractionation can be interpreted as an indication of nitrogen

  19. Quantum and thermal ionic motion, oxygen isotope effect, and superexchange distribution in La2CuO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haefliger, P. S.; Gerber, S.; Pramod, R.

    2014-01-01

    We study the zero-point and thermal ionic motion in La2CuO4 by means of high-resolution neutron-diffraction experiments. Our results demonstrate anisotropic motion of O and, to a lesser extent, Cu ions, both consistent with the structure of coupled CuO6 octahedra, and quantify the relative effects...... of zero-point and thermal contributions to ionic motion. By substitution of O-18, we find that the oxygen isotope effect on the lattice dimensions is small and negative (-0.01%), while the isotope effect on the ionic displacement parameters is significant (-6 to 50%). We use our results as input...... for theoretical estimates of the distribution of magnetic interaction parameters, J, in an effective one-band model for the cuprate plane. We find that ionic motion causes only small (1%) effects on the average value , which vary with temperature and O isotope, but results in dramatic (10-20%) fluctuations...

  20. Observation of strong magnetic effects in visible-infrared sum frequency generation from magnetic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirilyuk, A.; Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Renard, S.; Rasing, T.; Heskamp, I. R.; Lodder, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    We have observed very strong magnetization-induced changes of the infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) intensity from thin magnetic films using a free electron laser as a tunable infrared source. With the help of a magnetic grating a clear resonance is observed due to the excitation of

  1. Flavor changing strong interaction effects on top quark physics at the CERN LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, P.M.; Santos, R.; Oliveira, O.

    2006-01-01

    We perform a model independent analysis of the flavor changing strong interaction vertices relevant to the LHC. In particular, the contribution of dimension six operators to single top production in various production processes is discussed, together with possible hints for identifying signals and setting bounds on physics beyond the standard model

  2. Effect of interband interaction on isotope effect exponent of MgB2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Department of Basic Science, School of Science, The University of the Thai Chamber of. Commerce, Dindaeng, Bangkok 10400, Thailand. E-mail: udomsamut55@yahoo.com. MS received 22 September 2004; revised 5 January 2006; accepted 24 January 2005. Abstract. The exact formula of Tc's equation and the isotope ...

  3. Disentangling effects of growth and nutritional status on seabird stable isotope ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, J.; Hatch, Shyla A.; O'Brien, D. M.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that an individual's physiology affects its carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures, obscuring a signal often assumed to be only a reflection of diet and foraging location. We examined effects of growth and moderate food restriction on red blood cell (RBC) and feather ??15N and ??13C in rhinoceros auklet chicks (Cerorhinca monocerata), a piscivorous seabird. Chicks were reared in captivity and fed either control (75 g/day; n = 7) or ~40% restricted (40 g/day; n = 6) amounts of high quality forage fish. We quantified effects of growth on isotopic fractionation by comparing ??15N and ??13C in control chicks to those of captive, non-growing subadult auklets (n = 11) fed the same diet. To estimate natural levels of isotopic variation, we also collected blood from a random sample of free-living rhinoceros auklet adults and chicks in the Gulf of Alaska (n = 15 for each), as well as adult feather samples (n = 13). In the captive experiment, moderate food restriction caused significant depletion in ??15N of both RBCs and feathers in treatment chicks compared to control chicks. Growth also induced depletion in RBC ??15N, with chicks exhibiting lower ??15N when they were growing the fastest. As growth slowed, ??15N increased, resulting in an overall pattern of enrichment over the course of the nestling period. Combined effects of growth and restriction depleted ??15N in chick RBCs by 0.92???. We propose that increased nitrogen-use efficiency is responsible for 15N depletion in both growing and food-restricted chicks. ??15N values in RBCs of free-ranging auklets fell within a range of only 1.03???, while feather ??15N varied widely. Together, our captive and field results suggest that both growth and moderate food restriction can affect stable isotope ratios in an ecologically meaningful way in RBCs although not feathers due to greater natural variability in this tissue. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Inverse H/D isotope effects in benzene activation by cationic and anionic cobalt clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombers, Matthias; Barzen, Lars; Niedner-Schatteburg, Gereon

    2013-02-14

    Reactions under single collision conditions with benzene C(6)H(6) and with benzene-d(6) C(6)D(6) of size selected cationic cobalt clusters Co(n)(+) and of anionic cobalt clusters Co(n)(-) in the cluster size range n = 3-28 revealed that dehydrogenation by cationic clusters is sparse, whereas it is ubiquitous in reactions by anionic clusters. Kinetic isotope effects (KIE) in total reaction rates are inverse and, in part, large. Dehydrogenation isotope effects (DIE) are normal. A multistep model of adsorption and stepwise dehydrogenation from the precursor adsorbate unravels a possible origin of the inverse KIE: Single step C-H bond activation is swift (no KIE in forward direction) and largely reversible (normal KIE backward) whereas H/D tunneling is likely to contribute (backward). DFT calculations of the structures and energetics along the reaction path in [Co(13)C(6)H(6)](+) lend support to the proposed multistep model. The observed effects on rates and KIEs of cluster charges and of cluster sizes are noted to elucidate further.

  5. Isotopic quantum effects on the structure of low density amorphous ice

    CERN Document Server

    Urquidi, J; Neuefeind, J; Tomberli, B; Tulk, C A; Guthrie, M; Egelstaff, P A; Klug, D D

    2003-01-01

    Careful neutron diffraction measurements on deuterated low density amorphous (LDA) ice confirm that at 120 K it can be considered a fully 'annealed' structure, as no significant changes are observed in the amorphous spectra until crystallization occurred over time at 130 K. On this basis, the measurement of structural differences between the hydrogenated and deuterated forms of LDA ice at 120 K, have been carried out using 98 keV electromagnetic radiation diffraction techniques. The maximum observed isotope effect in LDA ice is approx 3.4% at 40 K when compared to the magnitude of the first peak in the electronic structure factor at Q = 1.70 A sup - sup 1. This compares to a maximum effect of approx 1.6% previously measured in liquid water at room temperature (Tomberli et al 2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 12 2597). The isotope effect is shown to be similar to a temperature shift in the structure of light LDA ice. However, the existence of a first sharp diffraction peak at Q = 1.0 A sup - sup 1 in the isotopi...

  6. Cross sections for 14-eV e-H2 resonant collisions: Isotope effect in dissociative electron attachment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiberto, R.; Janev, R. K.; Wadehra, J. M.; Laricchiuta, A.

    2011-01-01

    The process of dissociative attachment of electrons to molecular hydrogen and its isotopes in the energy range at approximately 14 eV is investigated. The dissociative electron attachment cross sections for all six hydrogen isotopes are calculated over an extended range of electron energies using the local complex potential model with the excited Rydberg 2 Σ g + electronic state of H 2 - acting as the intermediate resonant state. A significant isotope effect in theoretical electron attachment cross sections is observed, in agreement with previous predictions and experimental observations. A two-parameter analytic expression for the cross section is derived from the theory that fits accurately the numerically calculated cross sections for all isotopes. Similarly, an analytic mass-scaling relation is derived from the theory that accurately reproduces the numerically calculated rate coefficients for all isotopes in the 0.1-1000 eV temperature range by using the rate coefficient for the H 2 isotope only. The latter is represented by an analytic fit expression with two parameters only.

  7. Determination of underivatized amino acid delta(13)C by liquid chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry for nutritional studies: the effect of dietary non-essential amino acid profile on the isotopic signature of individual amino acids in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, James; Gaye-Siessegger, Julia; Focken, Ulfert

    2008-06-01

    This study provides data for the effect of dietary non-essential amino acid composition on the delta(13)C values of individual amino acids in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LC/IRMS). In this experiment, trout were reared either on a control diet or on three experimental diets, differing in the composition of non-essential/conditionally essential amino acids, for a period of 6 weeks. The control diet was a commercial trout starter feed with fish meal as the main protein source. The experimental diets contained no protein, only synthetic amino acids. Diet 1 resembled the composition of fish meal in both essential and non-essential amino acids, Diet 2 had all essential amino acids, but cysteine, glycine, proline and tyrosine were replaced by the corresponding amounts of their precursors, and in Diet 3 all non-essential amino acids were replaced by glutamate. LC/IRMS was used for the determination of delta(13)C values of individual amino acids from diets and tissues without derivatization. Diet affected the delta(13)C of individual amino acids in fish. For fish on Diets 1-3 amino acid delta(13)C values showed a similar trend: phenylalanine showed very little change from diet to body tissue. Arginine, lysine, tyrosine and proline showed strong depletion from diet to body tissue and glycine, alanine, aspartate and serine all showed variable but strong enrichment in (13)C. Improvements are necessary before all amino acid delta(13)C values can be determined; however, this study demonstrates that measuring amino acid isotopic signatures by LC/IRMS is a promising new technique for nutritional physiologists.

  8. Interference effects at photoionization of Rydberg atoms by a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsesyan, A.M.; Fedorov, M.V.

    1989-01-01

    The photoionization of Rydberg atoms in a strong electromagnetic field is considered. Degeneration of the levels with respect to the orbital moment, their Stark splitting and the possibility of resonant interaction with levels of lower energy are taken into account. The complex quasi-energies of the system, photoelectron spectrum in the limit of an infinite duration of interaction and the time dependence of the total ionization probability are found. It is shown that a narrowing of the quasi-energy levels occurs in a strong field. Against a background of the quasi- continuum the quasi-energy spectrum consists of more or less narrow levels. In this case the photoelectron spectrum acquires a multi-peak form. With increasing field strength the height of the peaks increases, whereas their width decreases. The ionization rate decreases with increasing field strength. The presence of a quasi-continuum is the cause of the partially non-exponential nature of the atomic disintegration

  9. Carrier envelope phase effects in molecular dissociation by few-cycle strong laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitriou, K I [Hellenic Army Academy, Department of Natural Science and Applications, Vari (Greece); Constantoudis, V [Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); Mercouris, Th [Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, National Hellenic Research Foundation, Athens (Greece); Nicolaides, C A, E-mail: dimi@eie.g [Physics Department, National Technical University, Athens (Greece)

    2009-11-01

    Multiphoton molecular dissociation produced by few-cycle strong laser fields of mid-infrared wave lengths is studied theoretically. The dependence of the carrier envelope phase (CEP) on the photodissociation dynamics is investigated using both quantum and classical nonperturbative approaches. Our results show that dissociation is affected by the changes of the CEP. A detailed analysis shows that this dependence is sensitive to the duration and to the shape of the pulse.

  10. Effects of strong cathodic polarization of the Ni-YSZ interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Chen, Ming; Jacobsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Long-term strong cathodic polarization experiments of down to -2.4 V vs. E°(O2) of the Ni-YSZ interface were performed at 900°C in 97% H2/3% H2O on model electrodes. The Ni-YSZ interface underwent extensive changes and a large affected volume with a complex microstructure and phase distribution r...

  11. Evaluation of the residual effect of P fertilizer's on plant P nutrition using isotopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fardeau, J.C.; Zapata, F.

    1994-01-01

    The residual effect of P fertilizers previously applied to a soil on plant P nutrition was examined by both the isotopic dilution method (pot experiment) and isotopic exchange method (laboratory test) using 32 p as a tracer. The fraction of P derived from a fertilizer in plant (%Pdff in plant) was compared with the fraction of P derived from fertilizer in soil solution (%Pdff in soil solution) which is a new laboratory index proposed by Morel and Fardeau to predict %Pdff in plant. Four soil samples of a Humic Andosol from long-term experimental plots, which received no fertilizer (A1 soil), a readily soluble fertilizer (A2 soil), the same readily soluble fertilizer (RSF) plus a fused magnesium phosphate (A3 soil), and combination of RSF with Florida phosphate rock (A4 soil), were tested. In the pot experiment, maize (Zea mays) was grown during 38 days and dry shoot weight, P uptake and specific radioactivity were measured. Dry shoot weight, P uptake and L-value were the highest in A3 soil, followed by A4, A2 and A1 soils. %Pdff in plant were 71,9%, 51,9% and 15,4% in A3, A4 and A2 soils respectively. A laboratory study using 32 p isotopic exchange kinetics was carried out to examine three status parameters of soil P, intensity, quantity and capacity factors. Goof agreement was obtained between quantity factor (E 1 -value), and the pot experimental data; i.e. P uptake and L-value. %Pdff in soil solution were similar to those %Pdff in plant except for A4 soil. The enhancement of P uptake by the plant from the phosphate rock obtained in A4 soil could be attributed to specific plant factors and soil moisture conditions. (authors)

  12. Evidence of a kinetic isotope effect in nanoaluminum and water combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappan, Bryce C; Dirmyer, Matthew R; Risha, Grant A

    2014-08-25

    The normally innocuous combination of aluminum and water becomes violently reactive on the nanoscale. Research in the field of the combustion of nanoparticulate aluminum has important implications in the design of molecular aluminum clusters, hydrogen storage systems, as well as energetic formulations which could use extraterrestrial water for space propulsion. However, the mechanism that controls the reaction speed is poorly understood. While current models for micron-sized aluminum water combustion reactions place heavy emphasis on diffusional limitations, as reaction scales become commensurate with diffusion lengths (approaching the nanoscale) reaction rates have long been suspected to depend on chemical kinetics, but have never been definitely measured. The combustion analysis of nanoparticulate aluminum with H2O or D2O is presented. Different reaction rates resulting from the kinetic isotope effect are observed. The current study presents the first-ever observed kinetic isotope effect in a metal combustion reaction and verifies that chemical reaction kinetics play a major role in determining the global burning rate. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Kinetic α secondary deuterium isotope effects for O-ethyl S-phenyl benzaldehyde acetal hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraz, J.P.; Cordes, E.H.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of hydrolysis of O-ethyl S-phenyl benzaldehyde acetal at 25 0 C in 20% dioxane--80% water is independent of pH over the range pH6-12; k/sub obsd/ = 1.9 x 10 -7 s -1 . Under more acidic conditions, the rate increases linearly with the activity of the hydrated proton; k 2 = 2.95 x 10 -2 M -1 s -1 . The kinetic α secondary deuterium isotope effect for acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of O-ethyl S-phenyl benzaldehyde acetal, measured at 25 0 C in 20% aqueous dioxane containing 0.05 M HCl, is k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.038 +- 0.008, a value consistent with a transition state in which the C--S bond is stretched rather little. In contrast, the corresponding isotope effect for the pH-independent hydrolysis of this substrate, measured at 42.5 0 C in 20% dioxane, is 1.13 +- 0.02, a value consistent with complete C--S bond cleavage in the transition state and rate-determining diffusion apart of the ion-pair formed as the initial intermediate, in accord with the suggestion of Jensen and Jencks. 1 figure, 4 tables

  14. Isotopic effects in the interaction of O- with D2 and H2 at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plašil, Radek; Tran, Thuy Dung; Roučka, Štěpán; Jusko, Pavol; Mulin, Dmytro; Zymak, Illia; Rednyk, Serhiy; Kovalenko, Artem; Dohnal, Petr; Glosík, Juraj; Houfek, Karel; Táborský, Jiří; Čížek, Martin

    2017-12-01

    The isotopic effects in reactions of O- ions with H2 and D2 have been studied experimentally using a cryogenic 22-pole radio-frequency ion trap. The rate coefficients for associative detachment leading to H2O +e- and to D2O +e- and for atom transfer reactions leading to formation of OH- and OD- ions were determined at temperatures ranging from 15 to 300 K. The measured temperature dependencies of the rate coefficients for both channels of reactions of O- with H2 and D2 are compared with the results of the classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation of the O-+H2 and O-+D2 collisions using the newly calculated potential energy surfaces. The measured temperature dependencies of the reaction rate coefficients for associative detachment are in very good agreement with the calculated ones. Agreement between experimental and calculated temperature dependencies of the rate coefficients of atom transfer reactions is off at most by a factor of 3 and the isotope effect is reproduced.

  15. Prediction of isotope effects for anticipated intermediate structures in the course of bacterial denitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenstern, M.A.; Schowen, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    Vibrational-analysis methods have been used to estimate the equilibrium 14 N/ 15 N isotope effects to be expected for conversion of nitrite anion to thirteen possible intermediate-state and product-state structures [HONO, NO + , NO, NO - , FeNO, ON * NO 2 , O * NNO 2 , O 2 NNO 2 , ONO * N, O * NON, ONNO, * NNO, N * NO] in the reduction of nitrite ion to nitrous oxide denitrifying bacteria. The results, taken in combination with previous experimental isotope-effect and tracer studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri and related systems, are consistent with a suggestion that a second nitrite anion enters the enzyme-catalytic cycle at the stage of a nitrosyl-ion intermediate but re-emerges after entry of the reducing electrons; the product nitrous oxide is then formed by disproportionation of enzymically generated hyponitrous acid. The calculations are consistent with contributions, under different experimental conditions, of several different transition states to limiting the rate of the enzymic reaction. These transition states (and the corresponding experimental conditions) are the transition states for N-O fission in the generation of a mononitrogen electrophilic species from nitrite anion (high reductant, high nitrite concentrations), for attack of nitrite on this electrophile (high reductant, low nitrite concentrations) and for electron transfer to a dinitrogen-trioxide-like species (low reductant concentration). (orig.)

  16. Mixing rules for and effects of other hydrogen isotopes and of isotopic swamping on tritium recovery and loss to biosphere from fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pendergrass, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Efficient recovery of bred and unburnt tritium from fusion reactors, and control of its migration within reactors and of its escape into the biosphere are essential for self-sufficient fuel cycles and for public, plant personnel, and environmental protection. Tritium in fusion reactors will be mixed with unburnt deuterium and protium introduced by (n,p) reactions and diffusion into coolant loops from steam cycles. Rational design for tritium recovery and escape prevention must acknowledge this fact. Consequences of isotopic admixture are explored, mixing rules for projected fusion reactor dilute-solution conditions are developed, and a rule of thumb regarding their effects on tritium recovery methods is formulated

  17. Effect of a strong, DC-induced magnetic field on circadian singing activity of the house cricket (orthoptera:gryllidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, K.C.; Bitzer, R.J.; Galliart, L. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effect of a strong, DC-induced electromagnetic field (EMF) on the circadian singing activity of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus (L.). Groups of 10 crickets were exposed to strong, DC-induced EMFs under two light regimes, 12:12 (L:D) h and 0:24 (L:D) h. Exposure to the strong EMF resulted in an increase in mean time per hour during which one or more crickets were singing and in number of crickets singing per hour. Correcting for phase shift during O:24 (L:D) h, the daily pattern of singing was apparently unaffected by any treatment. The greatest percentage of singing and number of crickets singing per hour occurred during actual or expected scotophase. This is the first report of an increase in insect activity during exposure to a strong DC-induced EMF.

  18. Isotope effect studies of chicken liver NADP malic enzyme: role of the metal ion and viscosity dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grissom, C.B.; Cleland, W.W.

    1988-01-01

    The role of the metal ion in the oxidative decarboxylation of malate by chicken liver NADP malic enzyme and details of the reaction mechanism have been investigated by 13 C isotope effects. With saturating NADP and the indicated metal ion at a total concentration 10-fold higher than its K/sub m/, the following primary 13 C kinetic isotope effects at C 4 of malate [ 13 (VK/sub mal/)] were observed at pH 8.0: Mg 2+ , 1.0336; Mn 2+ , 1.0365; Cd 2+ , 1.0366; Zn 2+ , 1.0337; Co 2+ , 1.0283; Ni 2+ , 1.025. Knowing the partitioning of the intermediate oxalacetate between decarboxylation to pyuvate and reduction to malate allows calculation of the intrinsic carbon isotope effect for decarboxylation to pyuvate and reduction to malate allows calculation of the intrinsic carbon isotope effect for decarboxylation. For Mg 2+ as activator, this was 1.049 with NADP and 1.046 with 3-acetylpyridine adenine dinucleotide phosphate, although the intrinsic primary deuterium isotope effects on dehydrogenation were 5.6 and 4.2, and the partition ratios of the oxalacetate intermediate for decarboxylation as opposed to hydride transfer were 0.11 and 3.96. It was not possible to calculate reasonable intrinsic carbon isotope effects with the other metal ions by use of the partitioning ratio of oxalacetate because of decarboxylation by another mechanism. The variation of 13 (VK/sub mal/) with pH was used to dissect the total forward and external components. When the authors attempted to use the variation of 13 (VK/sub mal/) with solution viscosity to determine the internal and external commitments, incorrect values were obtained because of a specific effect of the viscosogen in decreasing the K/sub m/ for malate, so that VK/sub mal/ actually increased with viscosity instead of decreasing, as theory predicts

  19. The nitrogen isotope effect of benthic remineralization-nitrification-denitrification coupling in an estuarine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhatib, M.; Lehmann, M. F.; del Giorgio, P. A.

    2012-05-01

    The nitrogen (N) stable isotopic composition of pore water nitrate and total dissolved N (TDN) was measured in sediments of the St. Lawrence Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The study area is characterized by gradients in organic matter reactivity, bottom water oxygen concentrations, as well as benthic respiration rates. N isotope effects on the water column associated with the benthic exchange of nitrate (ϵapp) and TDN (ϵsed) during benthic nitrification-denitrification coupling were investigated. The sediments were a major sink for nitrate and a source of reduced dissolved N (RDN = DON + NH4+). We observed that both the pore water nitrate and RDN pools were enriched in 15N relative to the water column, with increasing δ15N downcore in the sediments. As in other marine environments, the biological nitrate isotope fractionation of net fixed N loss was barely expressed at the scale of sediment-water exchange, with ϵapp values denitrification zone, bottom water oxygen concentrations and the organic matter reactivity can modulate ϵapp. For the first time, actual measurements of δ15N of pore water RDN were included in the calculations of ϵsed. We argue that large fractions of the sea-floor-derived DON are reactive and, hence, involved in the development of the δ15N of dissolved inorganic N (DIN) in the water column. In the St. Lawrence sediments, the combined benthic N transformations yield a flux of 15N-enriched RDN that can significantly elevate ϵsed above ϵapp. Calculated ϵsed values were within the range of 4.6 ± 2‰ and were related to organic matter reactivity and oxygen penetration depth in the sediments. ϵsed reflects the δ15N of the N2 lost from marine sediments and thus best describes the isotopic impact of fixed N loss from sediments on the oceanic fixed N pool. Our mean value for ϵsed is larger than assumed by earlier work, questioning

  20. Deduction of kinetic mechanism in multisubstrate enzyme reactions from tritium isotope effects. Application to dopamine beta-hydroxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinman, J.P.; Humphries, H.; Voet, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Primary tritium isotope effects have been measured for the hydroxylation of [2-3H] dopamine catalyzed by dopamine beta-hydroxylase. Experimental values vary from 8.8 +/- 1.4 at 0.02 mM oxygen to 4.1 +/- 0.6 at 1.0 mM oxygen. It is shown that the observed dependence of the isotope effect on oxygen concentration provides unequivocal evidence for a kinetically significant dissociation of both dopamine and oxygen from enzyme, ternary complex. This approach, which is applicable to any multisubstrate enzyme characterized by detectable kinetic isotope effects, provides an alternate to classical methods for the elucidation of kinetic order in enzyme-catalyzed reactions

  1. Molybdenum isotope variations in calc-alkaline lavas from the Banda arc, Indonesia: Assessing the effect of crystal fractionation in creating isotopically heavy continental crust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wille, Martin; Nebel, Oliver; Pettke, Thomas; Vroon, Pieter Z.; König, Stephan; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2018-01-01

    Recent studies report a large Mo isotope variability of up to 1‰ (expressed in δ98/95MoNIST3134) in convergent margin lavas. These isotopic variations have been associated with subduction zone processes and ultimately may account for heavy and variable isotope signatures in evolved continental

  2. Deformation effects in the alpha accompanied cold ternary fission of even-even {sup 244-260}Cf isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhosh, K.P.; Krishnan, Sreejith [Kannur University, School of Pure and Applied Physics, Payyanur, Kerala (India)

    2016-04-15

    Within the unified ternary fission model (UTFM), the alpha accompanied ternary fission of even-even {sup 244-260}Cf isotopes has been studied by taking the interacting barrier as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potential. For the alpha accompanied ternary fission of the {sup 244}Cf isotope, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combination {sup 108}Ru + {sup 4}He + {sup 132}Te, which contains the near doubly magic nucleus {sup 132}Te (N = 80, Z = 52). In the case of {sup 246}Cf and {sup 248}Cf isotopes, the highest yield is obtained for the fragment combinations with the near doubly magic nucleus {sup 134}Te (N = 82, Z = 52) as the heaviest fragment. The highest yield obtained for {sup 250}Cf, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 254}Cf, {sup 256}Cf, {sup 258}Cf and {sup 260}Cf isotopes is for the fragment combination with the doubly magic nucleus {sup 132}Sn (N = 82), Z = 50 as the heaviest fragment. We have included the effect of deformation and orientation of fragments and this has revealed that in addition to the closed shell effect, ground-state deformation also plays an important role in the calculation of the relative yield of favorable fragment combinations. The computed isotopic yields for the alpha accompanied ternary fission of the {sup 252}Cf isotope are found to be in agreement with the experimental data. The emission probability and kinetic energy of the long-range alpha particle is calculated for the various isotopes of Cf and are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  3. Carbonate clumped isotope variability in shallow water corals: Temperature dependence and growth-related vital effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenger, Casey; Affek, Hagit P.; Felis, Thomas; Thiagarajan, Nivedita; Lough, Janice M.; Holcomb, Michael

    2012-12-01

    Geochemical variations in shallow water corals provide a valuable archive of paleoclimatic information. However, biological effects can complicate the interpretation of these proxies, forcing their application to rely on empirical calibrations. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry (Δ47) is a novel paleotemperature proxy based on the temperature dependent "clumping" of 13C-18O bonds. Similar Δ47-temperature relationships in inorganically precipitated calcite and a suite of biogenic carbonates provide evidence that carbonate clumped isotope variability may record absolute temperature without a biological influence. However, large departures from expected values in the winter growth of a hermatypic coral provided early evidence for possible Δ47 vital effects. Here, we present the first systematic survey of Δ47 in shallow water corals. Sub-annual Red Sea Δ47 in two Porites corals shows a temperature dependence similar to inorganic precipitation experiments, but with a systematic offset toward higher Δ47 values that consistently underestimate temperature by ˜8 °C. Additional analyses of Porites, Siderastrea, Astrangia and Caryophyllia corals argue against a number of potential mechanisms as the leading cause for this apparent Δ47 vital effect including: salinity, organic matter contamination, alteration during sampling, the presence or absence of symbionts, and interlaboratory differences in analytical protocols. However, intra- and inter-coral comparisons suggest that the deviation from expected Δ47 increases with calcification rate. Theoretical calculations suggest this apparent link with calcification rate is inconsistent with pH-dependent changes in dissolved inorganic carbon speciation and with kinetic effects associated with CO2 diffusion into the calcifying space. However, the link with calcification rate may be related to fractionation during the hydration/hydroxylation of CO2 within the calcifying space. Although the vital effects we describe will

  4. The effect of regional variation of seismic wave attenuation on the strong ground motion from earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, D.H.; Bernreuter, D.L.

    1981-10-01

    Attenuation is caused by geometric spreading and absorption. Geometric spreading is almost independent of crustal geology and physiographic region, but absorption depends strongly on crustal geology and the state of the earth's upper mantle. Except for very high frequency waves, absorption does not affect ground motion at distances less than about 25 to 50 km. Thus, in the near-field zone, the attenuation in the eastern United States is similar to that in the western United States. Beyond the near field, differences in ground motion can best be accounted for by differences in attenuation caused by differences in absorption. The stress drop of eastern earthquakes may be higher than for western earthquakes of the same seismic moment, which would affect the high-frequency spectral content. But we believe this factor is of much less significance than differences in absorption in explaining the differences in ground motion between the East and the West. The characteristics of strong ground motion in the conterminous United States are discussed in light of these considerations, and estimates are made of the epicentral ground motions in the central and eastern United States. (author)

  5. Pre-steady state transients in the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase catalyzed reaction: isotope effects and stereospecificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Place, A.R.; Eccleston, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isolated from Drosophila is unique among alcohol metabolizing enzymes by not requiring metals for catalysis, by showing 4-pro-S (B-sided) hydride transfer stereospecificity, and by possessing a greater catalytic turnover rate for secondary alcohols than for primary alcohols. They have extended their studies on the kinetic mechanism for this enzyme by examining the pre-steady state transients of ternary complex interconversion using stopped-flow fluorescence methods. When enzyme and a 30-fold molar excess of NADH is mixed with excess acetadehyde, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), or cyclohexanone a rapid (> 100 s -1 ) transient is observe before the steady-state. The rates are insensitive to isotope substitution. With the substrate MEK, the rate and amplitude suggests a single turnover of the enzyme. Similar pre-steady state transients are observed when enzyme and a 50-fold molar excess of NAD + is mixed with ethanol, 2-propanol, and cyclohexanol. The rates show a hyperbolic concentration dependence and a deuterium isotope effect. With d 6 -deuteroethanol the transient no longer occurs in the pre-steady state. When the optical isomers of secondary alcohols are used as substrates, transients are observed only in the R-(-) isomers for all chain lengths. With 2-S(+)-heptanol and 2-S(+)-octanol no transients occur

  6. Seasonal baseline of nutrients and stable isotopes in a saline lake of Argentina: biogeochemical processes and river runoff effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopprio, Germán A; Kattner, Gerhard; Freije, R Hugo; de Paggi, Susana José; Lara, Rubén J

    2014-05-01

    The seasonal variability of inorganic and organic nutrients and stable isotopes and their relations with plankton and environmental conditions were monitored in Lake Chasicó. Principal component analysis evidenced the strong influence of the river runoff on several biogeochemical variables. Silicate concentrations were controlled by diatom biomass and river discharge. Higher values of nitrate and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) indicated agricultural uses in the river basin. Elevated pH values (∼ 9) inhibiting nitrification in the lake explained partially the dominance of ammonium: ∼ 83 % of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). The low DIN/SRP ratio inferred nitrogen limitation, although the hypotheses of iron and CO2 limitation are relevant in alkaline lakes. Particulate organic matter (POM) and dissolved organic matter (DOM) were mainly of autochthonous origin. The main allochthonous input was imported by the river as POM owning to the arid conditions. Dissolved organic carbon was likely top-down regulated by the bacterioplankton grazer Brachionus plicatilis. The δ(13)C signature was a good indicator of primary production and its values were influenced probably by CO2 limitation. The δ(15)N did not evidence nitrogen fixation and suggested the effects of anthropogenic activities. The preservation of a good water quality in the lake is crucial for resource management.

  7. Isotopic separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for separating isotopes in an isotopic mixture of atoms or molecules by increasing the mass differential among isotopic species. The mixture containing a particular isotope is selectively irradiated so as to selectively excite the isotope. This preferentially excited species is then reacted rapidly with an additional preselected radiation, an electron or another chemical species so as to form a product containing the specific isotope, but having a mass different than the original species initially containing the particular isotope. The product and the remaining balance of the mixture is then caused to flow through a device which separates the product from the mixture based upon the increased mass differential

  8. alfa-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects in reactions of methyllithium. Is better aggregation the cause of lower reactivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1996-01-01

    The value of kH/kD for alfa deuterium kinetic isotope effects for the reaction of methyllithium and methylmagnesium iodid with a series of substrates are consistently ca. 10-15 % higher for the lithium reagent. This may indicate a pre-equilibrium......The value of kH/kD for alfa deuterium kinetic isotope effects for the reaction of methyllithium and methylmagnesium iodid with a series of substrates are consistently ca. 10-15 % higher for the lithium reagent. This may indicate a pre-equilibrium...

  9. Isotope effects in the diffusion of hydrogen and deuterium in ferromagnetic binary alloys of the Cu3Au type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirscher, M.; Maier, C.U.; Schwendemann, B.; Kronmueller, H.

    1989-01-01

    The diffusion behaviour of hydrogen and deuterium at low temperatures was investigated in ordered and disordered alloys of Ni 3 Fe, Ni 3 Mn, and Fe 3 Pt by means of magnetic after-effect (MAE) measurements. After hydrogen charging all specimens show characteristic MAE relaxation spectra, which can be described taking into account the different octahedral positions of the hydrogen atoms in the Cu 3 Au structure. The observed isotope effect can qualitatively be explained by a thermally activated tunnelling process of the hydrogen isotopes. (orig.)

  10. Alpha heating and isotopic mass effects in JET plasmas with sawteeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Team, JET [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, UK

    2016-02-09

    The alpha heating experiment in the Joint European Torus (JET) 1997 DTE1 campaign is re-examined. Several effects correlated with tritium content and thermal hydrogenic isotopic mass < A> weaken the conclusion that alpha heating was clearly observed. These effects delayed the occurrence of significant sawtooth crashes allowing the electron and ion temperatures T e and T i to achieve higher values. Under otherwise equal circumstances T e and T i were typically higher for discharges with higher < A >, and significant scaling of T i, T e, and total stored energy with < A > were observed. The higher T i led to increased ion–electron heating rates with magnitudes comparable to those computed for alpha electron heating. Rates of other heating/loss processes also had comparable magnitudes. Simulations of T e assuming the observed scaling of T i are qualitatively consistent with the measured profiles, without invoking alpha heating

  11. Effect of 2H and 18O water isotopes in kinesin-1 gliding assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Maloney

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We show for the first time the effects of heavy-hydrogen water (2H2O and heavy-oxygen water (H218O on the gliding speed of microtubules on kinesin-1 coated surfaces. Increased fractions of isotopic waters used in the motility solution decreased the gliding speed of microtubules by a maximum of 21% for heavy-hydrogen and 5% for heavy-oxygen water. We also show that gliding microtubule speed returns to its original speed after being treated with heavy-hydrogen water. We discuss possible interpretations of these results and the importance for future studies of water effects on kinesin and microtubules. We also discuss the implication for using heavy waters in biomolecular devices incorporating molecular motors.

  12. Thermodynamic isotope effects of D2 and T2 reaction with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Gang; Long Xinggui; Liang Jianhua; Yang Benfu; Liu Wenke

    2010-01-01

    The p-c-T curves of deuterium and tritium absorption by uranium and p-t curves of desorption were measured. The balance pressure of absorption and desorption on different temperatures were got and then the thermodynamic parameters were determined according to the Van't Hoff equation. It shows that the balance pressure of deuterium absorption is lower than that of tritium absorption on the same temperature and atom ratio. It has the same phenomena for desorption but there are obvious hysteresis effect for reversible process of absorption and desorption. There are a little thermodynamic isotope effects when deuterium and tritium absorption and desorption by uranium estimating from enthalpy and entropy values. (authors)

  13. Mass-dependent and non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone photolysis: Resolving theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, Amanda S.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2006-01-01

    In addition to the anomalous 17 O and 18 O isotope effects in the three-body ozone formation reaction O+O 2 +M, isotope effects in the destruction of ozone by photolysis may also play a role in determining the isotopic composition of ozone and other trace gases in the atmosphere. While previous experiments on ozone photolysis at 254 nm were interpreted as evidence for preferential loss of light ozone that is anomalous (or 'non-mass-dependent'), recent semiempirical theoretical calculations predicted a preferential loss of heavy ozone at that wavelength that is mass dependent. Through photochemical modeling results presented here, we resolve this apparent contradiction between experiment and theory. Specifically, we show that the formation of ozone during the UV photolysis experiments is not negligible, as had been assumed, and that the well-known non-mass-dependent isotope effects in ozone formation can account for the non-mass-dependent enrichment of the heavy isotopologs of ozone observed in the experiment. Thus, no unusual non-mass-dependent fractionation in ozone photolysis must be invoked to explain the experimental results. Furthermore, we show that theoretical predictions of a mass-dependent preferential loss of the heavy isotopologs of ozone during UV photolysis are not inconsistent with the experimental data, particularly if mass-dependent isotope effects in the chemical loss reactions of ozone during the photolysis experiments or experimental artifacts enrich the remaining ozone in 17 O and 18 O. Before the calculated fractionation factors can be quantitatively evaluated, however, further investigation of possible mass-dependent isotope effects in the reactions of ozone with O( 1 D), O( 3 P), O 2 ( 1 Δ), and O 2 ( 1 Σ) is needed through experiments we suggest here

  14. Position-specific carbon isotope analysis of trichloroacetic acid by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breider, Florian; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2011-12-30

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) is an important environmental contaminant present in soils, water and plants. A method for determining the carbon isotope signature of the trichloromethyl position in TCAA using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) was developed and tested with TCAA from different origins. Position-specific isotope analysis (PSIA) can provide direct information on the kinetic isotope effect for isotope substitution at a specific position in the molecule and/or help to distinguish different sources of a compound. The method is based on the degradation of TCAA into chloroform (CF) and CO₂ by thermal decarboxylation. Since thermal decarboxylation is associated with strong carbon isotope fractionation (ε = -34.6 ± 0.2‰) the reaction conditions were optimized to ensure full conversion. The combined isotope ratio of CF and CO₂ at the end of the reaction corresponded well to the isotope ratio of TCAA, confirming the reliability of the method. A method quantification limit (MQL) for TCAA of 18.6 µg/L was determined. Samples of TCAA produced by enzymatic and non-enzymatic chlorination of natural organic matter (NOM) and some industrially produced TCAA were used as exemplary sources. Significant different PSIA isotope ratios were observed between industrial TCAA and TCAA samples produced by chlorination of NOM. This highlights the potential of the method to study the origin and the fate of TCAA in the environment.

  15. Evaluation of spurious results in the infrared measurement of CO2 isotope ratios due to spectral effects: a computer simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, C.D.; Rutt, H.N.

    1999-01-01

    The application of infrared spectroscopy to the measurement of carbon isotope ratio breath tests is a promising alternative to conventional techniques, offering relative simplicity and lower costs. However, when designing such an instrument one should be conscious of several spectral effects that may be misinterpreted as changes in the isotope concentration and which therefore lead to spurious results. Through a series of computer simulations which model the behaviour of the CO 2 absorption spectrum, the risk these effects pose to reliable measurement of 13 CO 2 / 12 CO 2 ratios and the measures required to eliminate them are evaluated. The computer model provides a flexible high-resolution spectrum of the four main isotopomer fundamental transitions and fifteen of their most significant hotband transitions. It is demonstrated that the infrared source, infrared windows and breath sample itself all exhibit strong temperature-induced errors but pressure effects do not produce significant errors. We conclude that for reliable measurement of 13 CO 2 / 12 CO 2 ratios using infrared spectroscopy no pressure controls are required, window effects are eliminated using windows wedged at a minimum angle of 0.8-2.2 mrad, depending on the material, and the temperature sensitivity of source and gas cells necessitates stabilization to an accuracy of at least 0.2 K. (author)

  16. arXiv Strong reduction of the effective radiation length in an oriented PWO scintillator crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Bandiera, L.; Romagnoni, M.; Argiolas, N.; Bagli, E.; Ballerini, G.; Berra, A.; Brizzolani, C.; Camattari, R.; De Salvador, D.; Haurylavets, V.; Mascagna, V.; Mazzolari, A.; Prest, M.; Soldani, M.; Sytov, A.; Vallazza, E.

    We measured a considerable increase of the emitted radiation by 120 GeV/c electrons in an axially oriented lead tungstate scintillator crystal, if compared to the case in which the sample was not aligned with the beam direction. This enhancement resulted from the interaction of particles with the strong crystalline field. The data collected at the external lines of CERN SPS were critically compared to Monte Carlo simulations based on the Baier Katkov quasiclassical method, highlighting a reduction of the scintillator radiation length by a factor of five in case of beam alignment with the [001] crystal axes. As a consequence, oriented scintillator crystals may be profitably exploited to reduce the amount of material in electromagnetic calorimeters/detectors for fixed-target experiments in high-energy physics, as well as for satellite-borne gamma-telescopes in astrophysics.

  17. Effects of weak and strong localization in tunnel characteristics of contacts on HTSC base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revenko, Yu.V.; Svistunov, V.M.; Grigut', O.V.; Belogolovskij, M.A.; Khachaturov, A.I.

    1992-01-01

    It is found that a phenomena governed by the electronic processes in the disordered surface normal layer of material are observed in the tunnel contatcs bases on metal oxide superconductors of 1-2-3 group. Measured characteristics σ(U)=dI/dU ore determined both by contact's barrier properties and conductivity in the disordered region of metal oxides in the vicinity of a barrier. As regards high-temperature contacts σ(U) value at high temperatures us determined by the Schottky barrier and at low temperatures - by activation processes of charge transfer over strongly localized states in near-the-barrier region of the contact. Crossing over towards logarithmic dependence in the tunnel conductuvity σ(U) of low-Ohmic transitions are attributed to the occurrence of 2D state density conditions in the tunnel surface layers of metal oxides

  18. The effect of warming on grassland evapotranspiration partitioning using laser-based isotope monitoring techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Lixin

    2013-06-01

    The proportion of transpiration (T) in total evapotranspiration (ET) is an important parameter that provides insight into the degree of biological influence on the hydrological cycles. Studies addressing the effects of climatic warming on the ecosystem total water balance are scarce, and measured warming effects on the T/ET ratio in field experiments have not been seen in the literature. In this study, we quantified T/ET ratios under ambient and warming treatments in a grassland ecosystem using a stable isotope approach. The measurements were made at a long-term grassland warming site in Oklahoma during the May-June peak growing season of 2011. Chamber-based methods were used to estimate the δ2H isotopic composition of evaporation (δE), transpiration (δT) and the aggregated evapotranspiration (δET). A modified commercial conifer leaf chamber was used for δT, a modified commercial soil chamber was used for δE and a custom built chamber was used for δET. The δE, δET and δT were quantified using both the Keeling plot approach and a mass balance method, with the Craig-Gordon model approach also used to calculate δE. Multiple methods demonstrated no significant difference between control and warming plots for both δET and δT. Though the chamber-based estimates and the Craig-Gordon results diverged by about 12‰, all methods showed that δE was more depleted in the warming plots. This decrease in δE indicates that the evaporation flux as a percentage of total water flux necessarily decreased for δET to remain constant, which was confirmed by field observations. The T/ET ratio in the control treatment was 0.65 or 0.77 and the ratio found in the warming treatment was 0.83 or 0.86, based on the chamber method and the Craig-Gordon approach. Sensitivity analysis of the Craig-Gordon model demonstrates that the warming-induced decrease in soil liquid water isotopic composition is the major factor responsible for the observed δE depletion and the temperature

  19. Strong control and squeezing effects of radiation states in a slab waveguide sandwiched between two omnidirectional mirrors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, H.M.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Stoffer, Remco; Yudistira, D.

    The effect of sandwiching a slab waveguide in air between two omnidirectional mirrors on the local density of modes is investigated theoretically. Design aspects of such a structure are considered, and it is shown that the local density of modes other than the slab-guided mode can be strongly

  20. The Effect of Parasite Infection on Stable Isotope Turnover Rates of δ15N, δ13C and δ34S in Multiple Tissues of Eurasian Perch Perca fluviatilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Yohannes

    Full Text Available Stable isotope analysis of commercially and ecologically important fish can improve understanding of life-history and trophic ecology. However, accurate interpretation of stable isotope values requires knowledge of tissue-specific isotopic turnover that will help to describe differences in the isotopic composition of tissues and diet. We performed a diet-switch experiment using captive-reared parasite-free Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis and wild caught specimens of the same species, infected with the pike tapeworm Triaenophorus nodulosus living in host liver tissue. We hypothesize that metabolic processes related to infection status play a major role in isotopic turnover and examined the influence of parasite infection on isotopic turn-over rate of carbon (δ13C, nitrogen (δ15N and sulphur (δ34S in liver, blood and muscle. The δ15N and δ13C turnovers were fastest in liver tissues, followed by blood and muscle. In infected fish, liver and blood δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were similar. However, in infected fish, liver and blood δ13C turnover was faster than that of δ15N. Moreover, in infected subjects, liver δ15N and δ13C turnover rates were three to five times faster than in livers of uninfected subjects (isotopic half-life of ca.3-4 days compared to 16 and 10 days, respectively. Blood δ34S turnover rate were about twice faster in non-infected individuals implying that parasite infection could retard the turnover rate of δ34S and sulphur containing amino acids. Slower turnover rate of essential amino acid could probably decrease individual immune function. These indicate potential hidden costs of chronic and persistent infections that may have accumulated adverse effects and might eventually impair life-history fitness. For the first time, we were able to shift the isotope values of parasites encapsulated in the liver by changing the dietary source of the host. We also report variability in isotopic turnover rates between tissues

  1. Ultrahigh thermal conductivity of isotopically enriched silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyushkin, Alexander V.; Taldenkov, Alexander N.; Ager, Joel W.; Haller, Eugene E.; Riemann, Helge; Abrosimov, Nikolay V.; Pohl, Hans-Joachim; Becker, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Most of the stable elements have two and more stable isotopes. The physical properties of materials composed of such elements depend on the isotopic abundance to some extent. A remarkably strong isotope effect is observed in the phonon thermal conductivity, the principal mechanism of heat conduction in nonmetallic crystals. An isotopic disorder due to random distribution of the isotopes in the crystal lattice sites results in a rather strong phonon scattering and, consequently, in a reduction of thermal conductivity. In this paper, we present new results of accurate and precise measurements of thermal conductivity κ(T) for silicon single crystals having three different isotopic compositions at temperatures T from 2.4 to 420 K. The highly enriched crystal containing 99.995% of 28Si, which is one of the most perfect crystals ever synthesized, demonstrates a thermal conductivity of about 450 ± 10 W cm-1 K-1 at 24 K, the highest measured value among bulk dielectrics, which is ten times greater than the one for its counterpart natSi with the natural isotopic constitution. For highly enriched crystal 28Si and crystal natSi, the measurements were performed for two orientations [001] and [011], a magnitude of the phonon focusing effect on thermal conductivity was determined accurately at low temperatures. The anisotropy of thermal conductivity disappears above 31 K. The influence of the boundary scattering on thermal conductivity persists sizable up to much higher temperatures (˜80 K). The κ(T) measured in this work gives the most accurate approximation of the intrinsic thermal conductivity of single crystal silicon which is determined solely by the anharmonic phonon processes and diffusive boundary scattering over a wide temperature range.

  2. Isotope separation of 22Na and 24Na with using light induced drift effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hradecny, C.; Tethal, T.; Ermolaev, I.M.; Zemlyanoj, S.G.; Zuzaan, P.

    1993-01-01

    The LIDIS (Light Drift Isotope Separation) separator without a gas flow is discussed. It is shown, that atomization degree of the separated isotopes limited real separation coefficient. The better buffer gas purification allowed to increase the experimental separation factor of 22 Na and 24 Na isotopes up to 25. The new experimental set up allow to increase the separation efficiency up to 50%. 12 refs.; 5 figs

  3. The nitrogen isotope effect of benthic remineralization-nitrification-denitrification coupling in an estuarine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alkhatib

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen (N stable isotopic composition of pore water nitrate and total dissolved N (TDN was measured in sediments of the St. Lawrence Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The study area is characterized by gradients in organic matter reactivity, bottom water oxygen concentrations, as well as benthic respiration rates. N isotope effects on the water column associated with the benthic exchange of nitrate (εapp and TDN (εsed during benthic nitrification-denitrification coupling were investigated. The sediments were a major sink for nitrate and a source of reduced dissolved N (RDN = DON + NH4+. We observed that both the pore water nitrate and RDN pools were enriched in 15N relative to the water column, with increasing δ15N downcore in the sediments. As in other marine environments, the biological nitrate isotope fractionation of net fixed N loss was barely expressed at the scale of sediment-water exchange, with ϵapp values <3‰. The strongest under-expression (i.e. lowest εapp of the biological N isotope fractionation was observed at the most oxygenated sites with the least reactive organic matter, indicating that, through their control on the depth of the denitrification zone, bottom water oxygen concentrations and the organic matter reactivity can modulate εapp. For the first time, actual measurements of δ15N of pore water RDN were included in the calculations of εsed. We argue that large fractions of the sea-floor-derived DON are reactive and, hence, involved in the development of the δ15N of dissolved inorganic N (DIN in the water column. In the St. Lawrence sediments, the combined benthic N transformations yield a flux of 15N-enriched RDN that can significantly elevate εsed above εapp. Calculated εsed values were within the range of 4.6 ± 2

  4. Survey of strong motion earthquake effects on thermal power plants in California with emphasis on piping systems. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Volume 2 of the ``Survey of Strong Motion Earthquake Effects on Thermal Power Plants in California with Emphasis on Piping Systems`` contains Appendices which detail the detail design and seismic response of several power plants subjected to strong motion earthquakes. The particular plants considered include the Ormond Beach, Long Beach and Seal Beach, Burbank, El Centro, Glendale, Humboldt Bay, Kem Valley, Pasadena and Valley power plants. Included is a typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical power plant piping specification and photographs of typical piping and support installations for the plants surveyed. Detailed piping support spacing data are also included.

  5. Photogeneration of neutrino and axions under stimulating effect of strong magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Skobelev, V V

    2001-01-01

    The processes of the neutrino and axions photoproduction on the gamma(Ze) -> gamma(nu nu-bar), gamma alpha nuclei, as well as the photon inelastic scattering on the gamma gamma -> gamma(nu nu-bar), gamma alpha photon are considered within the frames of the developed two-dimensional co-variant theory for calculating the matrix of the Feynman diagrams in the strong magnetic field. The contribution of the neutrino radiative photoproduction on the nuclei to the luminosity of the magnetic neutron stars on the early stages of their evolution may compete with the URCA-processes, because the matrix elements in the four-pole diagram depend linearly on the induction of B magnetic field by the B values approx 10 sup 3 -10 sup 4 B sub 0 (B sub 0 = m sub e sup 2 /|e| = 4.41 x 10 sup 1 sup 3 Gs). The evaluation of the axion mass upper boundary, compatible with other independent results, is obtained from the condition of the neutrino luminosity prevailing over the axion one at supposed temperature and magnetic field inducti...

  6. Transgenerational effects of mild heat in Arabidopsis thaliana show strong genotype specificity that is explained by climate at origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Maartje P; Kubisch, Alexander; Ouborg, N Joop; Pagel, Jörn; Schmid, Karl J; Vergeer, Philippine; Lampei, Christian

    2017-08-01

    Transgenerational environmental effects can trigger strong phenotypic variation. However, it is unclear how cues from different preceding generations interact. Also, little is known about the genetic variation for these life history traits. Here, we present the effects of grandparental and parental mild heat, and their combination, on four traits of the third-generation phenotype of 14 Arabidopsis thaliana genotypes. We tested for correlations of these effects with climate and constructed a conceptual model to identify the environmental conditions that favour the parental effect on flowering time. We observed strong evidence for genotype-specific transgenerational effects. On average, A. thaliana accustomed to mild heat produced more seeds after two generations. Parental effects overruled grandparental effects in all traits except reproductive biomass. Flowering was generally accelerated by all transgenerational effects. Notably, the parental effect triggered earliest flowering in genotypes adapted to dry summers. Accordingly, this parental effect was favoured in the model when early summer heat terminated the growing season and environments were correlated across generations. Our results suggest that A. thaliana can partly accustom to mild heat over two generations and genotype-specific parental effects show non-random evolutionary divergence across populations that may support climate change adaptation in the Mediterranean. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Theory and Application of the Relationship between Steady-State Isotope Effects on Enzyme Intermediate Concentrations and Net Rate Constants☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszczycky, Mark W.; Liu, Hung-wen

    2018-01-01

    Steady-state kinetic isotope effects on enzyme catalyzed reactions are often interpreted in terms of the microscopic rate constants associated with the elementary reactions of interest. Unfortunately, this approach can lead to confusion, especially when more than one elementary reaction is isotopically sensitive, because it forces one to consider the full catalytic cycle one step at a time rather than as a complete whole. Herein we argue that shifting focus from intrinsic effects to net rate constants and enzyme intermediate concentrations provides a more natural and holistic interpretation by which the effects of partial rate-limitation are more easily understood. In doing so, we demonstrate how the experimental determination of isotope effects on enzyme intermediate concentrations allows a direct determination of isotope effects on net rate constants. The chapter is divided into three main sections. The first outlines the basic theory and its interpretation. The second discusses an application of the theory in the study of the radical SAM enzyme DesII. The final section then provides the complete mathematical treatment. PMID:28911781

  8. The effect of whole body irradiation on the action of strong analgesics of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetkovicj, M.; Milovanovicj, A.; Tanasijevicj, D.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of whole body irradiation of male mice with single doses of 3 and 7 Gy ( 60 Co source) on analgesic action of three morphine-like drugs was studied. Over the first 6 days after irradiation, the analgesic effect of alfentanil and fentanyl was significantly less pronounced in irradiated animals than in control ones. During the subsequent period of 24 days till the end of experiment, the analgesic effect in irradiated animals gradually increased reaching and exceeding the control values. On the contrary, the analgesic effect of butorphanole was less pronounced in irradiated animals than in control ones, although the difference was not significantly. The difference between butorphanole and other two drugs are probably due to chemical structure and the metabolic fate in the body. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs

  9. Relative rate study of the kinetic isotope effect in the 13CH3D + Cl reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joelsson, Lars Magnus Torvald; Forecast, Roslyn; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    The 13CH3D/12CH4kinetic isotope effect, α13CH3D, of CH4 + Cl is determined for the first time, using the relative rate technique and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. α13CH3D is found to be 1.60 ± 0.04. In addition, a quantum chemistry/transition state theory model with tunneling...... correction is constructed and the primary cause for α13CH3D is found to be the substantially reduced reactivity of the D atom, which, in turn, can be explained by a significant increase in the reaction barrier due to changes in the vibrational zero point energy and to a lesser extent tunneling....

  10. Utilization of kinetic isotope effects for the concentration of tritium. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.M.; Meyer, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    'The objective of this research program is to develop methods for concentrating tritium in water based on large primary isotope effects in catalytic redox processes. Basic research is being conducted to develop the chemistry of a complete cyclic process. Because tritium [generally present as tritiated water (HTO)] is in a rapidly established equilibrium with water, it moves with groundwater and separation from water cannot be achieved by the usual pump-and-treat methods using sorbents. The general methodology developed in this work will be applicable to a number of US Department of Energy waste streams, and as a consequence of the process, tritium could be incorporated in an organic polymer, a form that will prevent its ready transport in groundwater.'

  11. Reaction rates and kinetic isotope effects of H2 + OH → H2O + H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Jan; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-05-07

    We calculated reaction rate constants including atom tunneling of the reaction of dihydrogen with the hydroxy radical down to a temperature of 50 K. Instanton theory and canonical variational theory with microcanonical optimized multidimensional tunneling were applied using a fitted potential energy surface [J. Chen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 154301 (2013)]. All possible protium/deuterium isotopologues were considered. Atom tunneling increases at about 250 K (200 K for deuterium transfer). Even at 50 K the rate constants of all isotopologues remain in the interval 4 ⋅ 10(-20) to 4 ⋅ 10(-17) cm(3) s(-1), demonstrating that even deuterated versions of the title reaction are possibly relevant to astrochemical processes in molecular clouds. The transferred hydrogen atom dominates the kinetic isotope effect at all temperatures.

  12. Deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shifts of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozwadowski, Z

    2006-09-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shift of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases, derivatives of amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-methionine) and various ortho-hydroxyaldehydes in CDCl3 have been measured. The results have shown that the tetrabutylammonium salts of the Schiff bases amino acids, being derivatives of 2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde and 3,5-dibromosalicylaldehyde, exist in the NH-form, while in the derivatives of salicylaldehyde and 5-bromosalicylaldehyde a proton transfer takes place. The interactions between COO- and NH groups stabilize the proton-transferred form through a bifurcated intramolecular hydrogen bond. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Autoinduced catalysis and inverse equilibrium isotope effect in the frustrated Lewis pair catalyzed hydrogenation of imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussing, Sebastian; Greb, Lutz; Tamke, Sergej; Schirmer, Birgitta; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Luy, Burkhard; Paradies, Jan

    2015-05-26

    The frustrated Lewis pair (FLP)-catalyzed hydrogenation and deuteration of N-benzylidene-tert-butylamine (2) was kinetically investigated by using the three boranes B(C6F5)3 (1), B(2,4,6-F3-C6H2)3 (4), and B(2,6-F2-C6H3)3 (5) and the free activation energies for the H2 activation by FLP were determined. Reactions catalyzed by the weaker Lewis acids 4 and 5 displayed autoinductive catalysis arising from a higher free activation energy (2 kcal mol(-1)) for the H2 activation by the imine compared to the amine. Surprisingly, the imine reduction using D2 proceeded with higher rates. This phenomenon is unprecedented for FLP and resulted from a primary inverse equilibrium isotope effect. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Strong-field ionization of xenon dimers: The effect of two-equivalent-center interference and of driving ionic transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Feng, T.; Raabe, N.; Rottke, H.

    2018-02-01

    Strong-field ionization (SFI) of the homonuclear noble gas dimer Xe2 is investigated and compared with SFI of the Xe atom and of the ArXe heteronuclear dimer by using ultrashort Ti:sapphire laser pulses and photoelectron momentum spectroscopy. The large separation of the two nuclei of the dimer allows the study of two-equivalent-center interference effects on the photoelectron momentum distribution. Comparing the experimental results with a new model calculation, which is based on the strong-field approximation, actually reveals the influence of interference. Moreover, the comparison indicates that the presence of closely spaced gerade and ungerade electronic state pairs of the Xe2 + ion at the Xe2 ionization threshold, which are strongly dipole coupled, affects the photoelectron momentum distribution.

  15. Impact of the strong electromagnetic field on the QCD effective potential for homogeneous Abelian gluon field configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galilo, Bogdan V.; Nedelko, Sergei N.

    2011-01-01

    The one-loop quark contribution to the QCD effective potential for the homogeneous Abelian gluon field in the presence of an external strong electromagnetic field is evaluated. The structure of extrema of the potential as a function of the angles between chromoelectric, chromomagnetic, and electromagnetic fields is analyzed. In this setup, the electromagnetic field is considered as an external one while the gluon field represents domain structured nonperturbative gluon configurations related to the QCD vacuum in the confinement phase. Two particularly interesting gluon configurations, (anti-)self-dual and crossed orthogonal chromomagnetic and chromoelectric fields, are discussed specifically. Within this simplified framework it is shown that the strong electromagnetic fields can play a catalyzing role for a deconfinement transition. At the qualitative level, the present consideration can be seen as a highly simplified study of an impact of the electromagnetic fields generated in relativistic heavy ion collisions on the strongly interacting hadronic matter.

  16. Study by photoelectron spectroscopy of isotopic effects in various polyatomic molecules. Comparison between experimental and calculated vibrational transitions probabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlier, J.; Botter, R.

    1978-01-01

    Isotopic substitution of polyatomic molecules shift the spectrum in photoelectron spectroscopy. This effect is easier to detect with substitution of hydrogen by deuterium than with heavier elements. Hydrogen partially or totally substituted in ethylene by deuterium is studied by photoelectron spectroscopy for frequency attribution and experimental results are compared with frequency ratio calculated by the Teller-Redlich rule. Vibrational transition probabilities are also determined with a good precision. Ionization potentials are higher for molecules with heavy isotopes but for partially substituted molecules a variation of symetry could shift slightly potential curves [fr

  17. Kinetics, isotope effects, and mechanism for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on supported nickel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.; Masuda, H.; Imai, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Baba, S.; Murakami, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Kinetics and hydrogen-deuterium isotope effects in the methanation of adsorbed CO molecules on a Ni/SiO 2 catalyst were precisely measured by using pulse surface reaction rate analysis (PSRA). When a CO pulse was injected into flowing hydrogen, it was immediately adsorbed on the catalyst and gradually hydrogenated to CH 4 and H 2 O. The amounts of CH 4 and H 2 O produced by the hydrogenation of the adsorbed CO were determined up to various times, and it was found that CH 4 and H 2 O were produced at the same rate. When O 2 instead of CO was injected, H 2 O was immediately produced. From these results, the rate-determining step of the reaction was found to be C-O bond dissociation of an adsorbed CO molecule or a partially hydrogenated CO species. By PSRA, the rate constant for the C-O bond dissocition process per adsorbed CO molecule (k/sub H/) was determined at various temperatures, and the Arrhenius parameters of the rate constant were obtained. The rate constant in flowing deuterium (k/sub D/) was also determined. it was found that k/sub D/ is considerably larger than k/sub H/, indicating an inverse isotope effect. The average value of k/sub H//k/sub D/ was 0.75. From these results, it was concluded that adsorbed CO is not directly dissociated to surface carbon and oxygen atoms but it is partially hydrogenated before C-O bond dissociation under the conditions of the PSRA experiment. 8 figures

  18. Calculations of kinetic isotope effects in the syn-eliminations of (2-phenylethyl)dimethylamine oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiei-Kermani, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    Transition state theory (TST) calculations of kinetic isotope effects (KIE) for the syn-elimination of (2-phenylethyl)dimethylamine oxides have been carried out for a series of transition state (TS) models encompassing both E1-like and E1cB-like regions of the E2 mechanistic spectrum. A large number of different reaction coordinates were explored for both unsolvated and for coordination of solvent dimethylsulfoxide in the cyclic transition state models. The models of reaction for both solvated and unsolvated models of proton transfer are presented. A simplified method for easier initial screening of reaction coordinate contributions is developed, discussed, and found to produce accurate approximations to the full model KIE values. Both unsolvated and solvated models show E1-like E2 mechanism and the calculated values from both models are in extremely good agreement with experimentally measured KIE. Both models were used to investigate para-substituted derivatives (Z = CL, OCH 3 ) of the parent compound (Z = H). The transition states are related by a shift in structure parallel to the central E2 diagonal of an O'Ferrall-Jencks-Fry reaction diagram, as predicted by Thornton, indicating that in the absence of other factors, the extent to which negative charge is accumulated at C/sub β/ in the transition state is a function primarily of the leaving group. All of the structural parameters such as bond distances and bond angles were related to independent bond orders. Beta-deuterium isotope effects produced by both solvated and nonsolvated models are temperature dependent

  19. Electron transfer in reactions of ketones with organolithium reagents. A carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamataka, H.; Fujimura, N.; Kawafuji, Y.; Hanafusa, T.

    1987-01-01

    Kinetic isotope effects have been determined for reactions of ketones labeled with carbon-14 at the carbonyl carbon with MeLi and Me 2 CuLi in diethyl ether at 0 0 C. Observed isotope effects were as follows: (C 6 H 5 ) 2 C double bonds O + MeLi, 12 k/ 14 k = 1.000 +/- 0.002; (C 6 H 5 ) 2 C double bonds O + Me 2 CuLi, 1.029 +/- 0.005; 2,4,6-Me 3 C 6 H 2 COC 6 H 5 + MeLi, 1.023 +/- 0.004. The relative reactivities of ortho-, meta-, and para-substituted benzophenones with these reagents were also determined by the competition experiments. These results are consistent with an electron-transfer step which is followed by a carbon-carbon bond-forming step that is or is not rate determining depending on the structure of ketones and reagents. The reaction of benzophenone with MeLi proceeds via rate-determining electron transfer; the change in nucleophile from MeLi to Me 2 CuLi shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination; the change in ketone from benzophenone to 2,4,6-trimethylbenzophenone also shifts the rate-determining step from electron transfer to recombination because the latter step becomes slower for the more hindered ketone. The extent of the geometrical change of the substrate at the electron-transfer transition state of the reaction of benzophenone with MeLi was estimated to be small on the basis of the magnitude of the KIE and the rho value of the Hammett correlation

  20. The application of the radioactive tracer technique to study the kinetics of bromide isotope exchange reaction with the participation of strongly basic anion exchange resin indion FF-IP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhande, R. S.; Singare, P. U.; Prabhavalkar, T. S.

    2008-09-01

    In the present investigation, the 82Br radioactive isotope was used as a tracer to study the kinetics and mechanism of the exchange reaction between an ion exchange resin and an external solution of bromide ions. In an attempt to study the reversible bromide isotope exchange reaction kinetics, it was expected that whether the initial step was the exchange of radioactive bromide ions from the solution to the ion exchange resin (forward reaction) or from the ion exchange resin to the solution (reverse reaction), the two ion-isotope exchange reactions should occur simultaneously, which was further confirmed by the experimental values of specific reaction rates, 0.142 and 0.141 min-1, respectively. The results will be useful to standardize the process parameters so as to achieve optimum use of ion exchange resins in various industrial applications.

  1. Perspective has a strong effect on the calculation of historical contributions to global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Fuglestvedt, Jan; Berntsen, Terje; Peters, Glen P.; Andrew, Robbie; Allen, Myles; Kallbekken, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    The politically contentious issue of calculating countries’ contributions to climate change is strongly dependent on methodological choices. Different principles can be applied for distributing efforts for reducing human-induced global warming. According to the ‘Brazilian Proposal’, industrialized countries would reduce emissions proportional to their historical contributions to warming. This proposal was based on the assumption that the political process would lead to a global top-down agreement. The Paris Agreement changed the role of historical responsibilities. Whereas the agreement refers to equity principles, differentiation of mitigation efforts is delegated to each country, as countries will submit new national contributions every five years without any international negotiation. It is likely that considerations of historical contributions and distributive fairness will continue to play a key role, but increasingly so in a national setting. Contributions to warming can be used as a background for negotiations to inform and justify positions, and may also be useful for countries’ own assessment of what constitutes reasonable and fair contributions to limiting warming. Despite the fact that the decision from COP21 explicitly rules out compensation in the context of loss and damage, it is likely that considerations of historical responsibility will also play a role in future discussions. However, methodological choices have substantial impacts on calculated contributions to warming, including rank-ordering of contributions, and thus support the view that there is no single correct answer to the question of how much each country has contributed. There are fundamental value-related and ethical questions that cannot be answered through a single set of calculated contributions. Thus, analyses of historical contributions should not present just one set of results, but rather present a spectrum of results showing how the calculated contributions vary with a

  2. Strong synergistic effects in PLA/PCL blends: Impact of PLA matrix viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostafinska, Aleksandra; Fortelný, Ivan; Hodan, Jiří; Krejčíková, Sabina; Nevoralová, Martina; Kredatusová, Jana; Kruliš, Zdeněk; Kotek, Jiří; Šlouf, Miroslav

    2017-05-01

    Blends of two biodegradable polymers, poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL), with strong synergistic improvement in mechanical performance were prepared by melt-mixing using the optimized composition (80/20) and the optimized preparation procedure (a melt-mixing followed by a compression molding) according to our previous study. Three different PLA polymers were employed, whose viscosity decreased in the following order: PLC ≈ PLA1 > PLA2 > PLA3. The blends with the highest viscosity matrix (PLA1/PCL) exhibited the smallest PCL particles (d∼0.6μm), an elastic-plastic stable fracture (as determined from instrumented impact testing) and the strongest synergistic improvement in toughness (>16× with respect to pure PLA, exceeding even the toughness of pure PCL). According to the available literature, this was the highest toughness improvement in non-compatiblized PLA/PCL blends ever achieved. The decrease in the matrix viscosity resulted in an increase in the average PCL particle size and a dramatic decrease in the overall toughness: the completely stable fracture (for PLA1/PCL) changed to the stable fracture followed by unstable crack propagation (for PLA2/PCL) and finally to the completely brittle fracture (for PLA3/PCL). The stiffness of all blends remained at well acceptable level, slightly above the theoretical predictions based on the equivalent box model. Despite several previous studies, the results confirmed that PLA and PCL could behave as compatible polymers, but the final PLA/PCL toughness is extremely sensitive to the PCL particle size distribution, which is influenced by both processing conditions and PLA viscosity. PLA/PCL blends with high stiffness (due to PLA) and toughness (due to PCL) are very promising materials for medical applications, namely for the bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of a parental program for preventing underage drinking - The NGO program strong and clear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriksson Charli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study is an evaluation of a 3-year parental program aiming to prevent underage drinking. The intervention was implemented by a non-governmental organization and targeted parents with children aged 13-16 years old and included recurrent activities during the entire period of secondary school. The program consisted of four different types of group and self-administered activities: parent meetings, family dialogues, friend meetings, and family meetings. Methods A quasi-experimental design was used following parents and children with questionnaires during the three years of secondary school. The analytic sample consisted of 509 dyads of parents and children. Measures of parental attitudes and behaviour concerning underage drinking and adolescents' lifetime alcohol consumption and drunkenness were used. Three socio-demographic factors were included: parental education, school, and gender of the child. A Latent Growth Modelling (LGM approach was used to examine changes in parental behaviour regarding youth drinking and in young people's drinking behaviour. To test for the pre-post test differences in parental attitudes repeated measures ANOVA were used. Results The results showed that parents in the program maintained their restrictive attitude toward underage drinking to a higher degree than non-participating parents. Adolescents of participants were on average one year older than adolescents with non-participating parents when they made their alcohol debut. They were also less likely to have ever been drunk in school year 9. Conclusion The results of the study suggested that Strong and Clear contributed to maintaining parents' restrictive attitude toward underage drinking during secondary school, postponing alcohol debut among the adolescents, and significantly reducing their drunkenness.

  4. Influence of Three-square-well Interaction Potential on Isotope Effect Coefficient of High-TC Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udomsamuthirun, P.; Dokkaemklang, S.; Kumvongsa, C.; Maneeratanakul, S.

    2005-10-01

    In this research, the exact formula of the isotope effect coefficient of s wave and d-wave superconductor in weak-coupling limit are derived by using a three square- well interaction potential that pairing interaction consists of 3 parts : an attractive electron-phonon interaction, an attractive non-electron-phonon interaction , and a repulsive Coulomb interaction . op ac , w w and c w is the characteristic energy cutoff of the Debye phonon , non-phonon ,and Coulomb respectively and 2 / 1 ac M- a w , and c op , w w do not depend on isotope mass(M). We find that, in all case of consideration, the isotope coefficient converges to 0.5 at lower value of Coulomb coupling constant and larger values of phonon and non-phonon coupling constant

  5. Separation of the intramolecular isotope effect for the cytochrome P-450 catalyzed hydroxylation of n-octane into its primary and secondary components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.P.; Trager, W.F.

    1987-01-01

    The intramolecular isotope effect for the cytochrome P-450b omega-hydroxylation of [1,1,1- 2 H 3 ]-n-octane was separated into its primary and secondary components by the method of Hanzlik. The primary isotope effect was found to lie between 7.3 and 7.9 while the secondary isotope effect was found to lie between 1.09 and 1.14. These data are consistent with a highly symmetrical transition state with 15% of the observed isotope effect being due to secondary isotope effects. Although the system was found to depart from the rule of the geometric mean, the phenomenon could not be attributed to tunneling

  6. How strong is the edge effect in the adsorption of anticancer drugs on a graphene cluster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Chanajaree, Rungroj; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Hannongbua, Supot; Kungwan, Nawee; Wolschann, Peter; Karpfen, Alfred; Parasuk, Vudhichai

    2016-04-01

    The adsorption of nucleobase-analog anticancer drugs (fluorouracil, thioguanine, and mercaptopurine) on a graphene flake (C54H18) was investigated by shifting the site at which adsorption occurs from one end of the sheet to the other end. The counterpoise-corrected M06-2X/cc-pVDZ binding energies revealed that the binding stability decreases in the sequence thioguanine > mercaptopurine > fluorouracil. We found that adsorption near the middle of the sheet is more favorable than adsorption near the edge due to the edge effect. This edge effect is stronger for the adsorption of thioguanine or mercaptopurine than for fluorouracil adsorption. However, the edge effect reduces the binding energy of the drug to the flake by only a small amount, <5 kcal/mol, depending on the adsorption site and the alignment of the drug at this site.

  7. Crystal-plastic deformation of zircon : effects on microstructures, textures, microchemistry and the retention of radiogenic isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovaleva, E.

    2015-01-01

    Dating of deep-crustal deformation events potentially can be achieved by using plastically-deformed accessory minerals found in high-temperature shear zones. Deformation microstructures, such as dislocations and low-angle boundaries, form due to plastic deformation in the crystal lattice and act as fluid migration pathways and trace element (e.g. Pb, Ti, U, Th, REE) diffusion pathways through so-called “pipe diffusion”. Deformation microstructures can alter the chemical and isotopic composition of certain grain parts and may lead to complete or partial isotopic resetting of certain geochronometers (e.g. U/Th/Pb, K/Ar, Rb/Sr) in the mineral domains. This work aims to better understand the processes of crystal-plastic deformation and associated trace element redistribution and the resetting of isotopic systems in zircon. This study finds that: a) there are three general finite deformation patterns in deformed zircons; b) suggests that it is possible to reconstruct the macroscopic kinematic framework of the shear zone based on the orientation of deformed zircon grains and the operating misorientation axes; c) and demonstrates the effect of deformation microstructures on trace elements and Pb isotopes in zircon. The final goal of this project is to develop a tool for isotopic dating of high-temperature deformation events in the deep crust. In addition to these results, zircon grains with planar deformation bands have been discovered in paleo-seismic zones; these deformation features have been described in detail and a possible mechanism of their origin and formation is suggested. The effect of planar deformation bands on trace element and isotopic behavior has also been investigated. (author) [de

  8. Investigation of the enzymatic mechanism of yeast orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase using 13C kinetic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smiley, J.A.; Bell, J.B.; Jones, M.E.; Paneth, P.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays an observed 13 C kinetic isotope effect of 1.0247 ± 0.0008 at 25 C, pH 6.8. The observed isotope effect is sensitive to changes in the reaction medium, such as pH, temperature, or glycerol content. The value of 1.0494 ± 0.0006 measured at pH 4.0, 25 C, is not altered significantly by temperature or glycerol, and thus the intrinsic isotope effect for the reaction is apparently being observed under these conditions and decarboxylation is almost entirely rate-determining. These data require a catalytic mechanism with freely reversible binding and one in which a very limited contribution to the overall rate is made by chemical steps preceding decarboxylation; the zwitterion mechanism of Beak and Siegel, which involves only protonation of the pyrimidine ring, is such a mechanism. With use of an intrinsic isotope effect of 1.05, a partitioning factor of less than unity is calculated for ODCase at pH 6.0, 25 C. A quantitative kinetic analysis using this result excludes the possibility of an enzymatic mechanism involving covalent attachment of an enzyme nucleophile to C-5 of the pyrimidine ring. These data fit a kinetic model in which an enzyme proton necessary for catalysis is titrated at high pH, thus providing evidence for the catalytic mechanism of Beak and Siegal

  9. Synthetic use of the primary kinetic isotope effect in hydrogen atom transfer 2: generation of captodatively stabilised radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Mark E; Bissiriou, Sabine; Lowe, Christopher; Windeatt, Kim M

    2013-04-28

    Using C-3 di-deuterated morpholin-2-ones bearing N-2-iodobenzyl and N-3-bromobut-3-enyl radical generating groups, only products derived from the more stabilised C-3, rather than the less stabilised C-5 translocated radicals, were formed after intramolecular 1,5-hydrogen atom transfer, suggesting that any kinetic isotope effect present was not sufficient to offset captodative stabilisation.

  10. Determination of isotope fractionation effect using a double spike (242Pu+240Pu) during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitambar, S.A.; Parab, A.R.; Khodade, P.S.; Jain, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Isotope fractionation effect during the mass spectrometric analysis of plutonium has been investigated using a double spike ( 242 Pu+ 240 Pu) and the determination of concentration of plutonium in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel is reported. (author). 6 refs., 2 tables

  11. Strong excitonic effects in CuAlO2 delafossite transparent conductive oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laskowski, Robert; Christensen, Niels Egede; Blaha, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The imaginary part of the dielectric function of CuAlO2 has been calculated including the electron-hole correlation effects within Bethe-Salpeter formalism (BSE). In the initial step of the BSE solver the band structure was calculated within density-functional theory plus an orbital field (LDA/GG...

  12. Rapid Transition of the Hole Rashba Effect from Strong Field Dependence to Saturation in Semiconductor Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun-Wei; Li, Shu-Shen; Zunger, Alex

    2017-09-22

    The electric field manipulation of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling effects provides a route to electrically control spins, constituting the foundation of the field of semiconductor spintronics. In general, the strength of the Rashba effects depends linearly on the applied electric field and is significant only for heavy-atom materials with large intrinsic spin-orbit interaction under high electric fields. Here, we illustrate in 1D semiconductor nanowires an anomalous field dependence of the hole (but not electron) Rashba effect (HRE). (i) At low fields, the strength of the HRE exhibits a steep increase with the field so that even low fields can be used for device switching. (ii) At higher fields, the HRE undergoes a rapid transition to saturation with a giant strength even for light-atom materials such as Si (exceeding 100 meV Å). (iii) The nanowire-size dependence of the saturation HRE is rather weak for light-atom Si, so size fluctuations would have a limited effect; this is a key requirement for scalability of Rashba-field-based spintronic devices. These three features offer Si nanowires as a promising platform for the realization of scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible spintronic devices.

  13. Effect of strong electrolytes on edible oils part 1: viscosity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The energy of activation (ΔEv), latent heat of vapourization (ΔLv) and molar volume of oil (Vm) were also calculated. Effect of electrolytes show that, the concentration of electrolytes increases the value of (ΔEv) and (ΔLv) whereas the value of molar volume (Vm) decrease with the concentration of oil and electrolytes. In brief ...

  14. Effect of strong electrolytes on edible oils part II: vViscosity of maize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The electrolytes behave as structure breaker. The effect of temperature was also determined in terms of fluidity parameters, energy of activation, latent heat of vaporization, molar volume of oil and free energy change of activation for viscous flow. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management Vol. 10 (3) 2006: ...

  15. Faraday effect in rare-earth ferrite garnets located in strong magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valiev, U.V.; Zvezdin, A.K.; Krinchik, G.S.; Levitin, R.Z.; Mukimov, K.M.; Popov, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    The Faraday effect is investigated experimentally in single crystal specimens of rare earth iron garnets (REIG) R 3 Fe 5 O 12 (R=Y, Gd, Tb, Dy, Er, Tm, Yb, Eu, Sm and Ho) and also in mixed iron garnets Rsub(x)Ysub(3-x)Fesub(5)Osub(12) (R=Tb, Dy). The m.easurements are carried out in pulsed magnetic fields of intensity up to 200 kOe, in a temperature range from 4.2 to 300 K and at a wavelength of the light lambda=1.15 μm. The field dependence of the Faraday effect observed in the REIG cannot be explained if only the usually considered ''paramagnetic'' contribution to the Faraday effect is taken into account. A theory is developed which, besides the paramagnetic mechanism, takes into account a diamagnetic mechanism and also the mixing of the wave functions of the ground and excited multiplets. The contributions of each of these three mechanisms to the angle of rotation of the plane of polarization by the rare earth sublattice of the iron garnet are estimated theoretically. It is concluded that the mixing mechanism contributes significantly to the field and temperature dependences of the Faraday effect in REIG

  16. Effect of inter-fibre bonding on the fracture of fibrous networks with strong interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutianos, Stergios; Mao, Rui; Peijs, Ton

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The mechanical response of cellulose nanopaper composites is investigated using a three-dimensional (3D) finite element fibrous network model with focus on the effect of inter-fibre bonds. It is found that the Young’s modulus and strength, for fixed fibre properties, are mainly controlle...

  17. Fourier heat conduction as a strong kinetic effect in one-dimensional hard-core gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hanqing; Wang, Wen-ge

    2018-01-01

    For a one-dimensional (1D) momentum conserving system, intensive studies have shown that generally its heat current autocorrelation function (HCAF) tends to decay in a power-law manner and results in the breakdown of the Fourier heat conduction law in the thermodynamic limit. This has been recognized to be a dominant hydrodynamic effect. Here we show that, instead, the kinetic effect can be dominant in some cases and leads to the Fourier law for finite-size systems. Usually the HCAF undergoes a fast decaying kinetic stage followed by a long slowly decaying hydrodynamic tail. In a finite range of the system size, we find that whether the system follows the Fourier law depends on whether the kinetic stage dominates. Our Rapid Communication is illustrated by the 1D hard-core gas models with which the HCAF is derived analytically and verified numerically by molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. Uniform stable-isotope labeling in mammalian cells: formulation of a cost-effective culture medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egorova-Zachernyuk, T.A.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Grip, W.J. de

    2011-01-01

    Uniform stable-isotope labeling of mammalian cells is achieved via a novel formulation of a serum-free cell culture medium that is based on stable-isotope-labeled autolysates and lipid extracts of various microbiological origin. Yeast autolysates allow complete replacement of individual amino acids

  19. Lithium isotope effect during solvent extraction of LiCl with isoamyl alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levkin, A.V.; Zhilov, V.I.; Marokin, O.V.; Demin, S.V.

    1991-01-01

    Method of extraction chromatography was used to measure the coefficient of lithium isotope separation (α) during extraction with isoamyl alcohol from concentrated LiCl aqueous solution. The α value is equal to 1.0036±0.0009; heavy 7 Li isotope is concentrated in organic phase at that

  20. Deuterium isotope effects on drug pharmacokinetics. I. System-dependent effects of specific deuteration with aldehyde oxidase cleared drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Raman; Strelevitz, Timothy J; Gao, Hongying; Clark, Alan J; Schildknegt, Klaas; Obach, R Scott; Ripp, Sharon L; Spracklin, Douglas K; Tremaine, Larry M; Vaz, Alfin D N

    2012-03-01

    The pharmacokinetic properties of drugs may be altered by kinetic deuterium isotope effects. With specifically deuterated model substrates and drugs metabolized by aldehyde oxidase, we demonstrate how knowledge of the enzyme's reaction mechanism, species differences in the role played by other enzymes in a drug's metabolic clearance, and differences in systemic clearance mechanisms are critically important for the pharmacokinetic application of deuterium isotope effects. Ex vivo methods to project the in vivo outcome using deuterated carbazeran and zoniporide with hepatic systems demonstrate the importance of establishing the extent to which other metabolic enzymes contribute to the metabolic clearance mechanism. Differences in pharmacokinetic outcomes in guinea pig and rat, with the same metabolic clearance mechanism, show how species differences in the systemic clearance mechanism can affect the in vivo outcome. Overall, to gain from the application of deuteration as a strategy to alter drug pharmacokinetics, these studies demonstrate the importance of understanding the systemic clearance mechanism and knowing the identity of the metabolic enzymes involved, the extent to which they contribute to metabolic clearance, and the extent to which metabolism contributes to the systemic clearance.

  1. Seasonal effects on carbon isotope composition of cactus in a desert environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, B.G.; Ting, I.P.; Troughton, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    It is stated that two different enzymes are involved in the fixation of CO 2 in cactus plants under light and dark conditions and that because these enzymes discriminate against 13 C in the atmosphere to different extents the wide range of C isotope discrimination values (delta 13 C) found in these plants has been attributed to different contributions of dark and light fixation to C gain. The proportion of total C fixed at night can be altered, however, by environmental variables such as temperature, water status, and photoperiod, and predictable changes in delta 13 C have been observed when these environmental conditions have been varied. The studies, with few exceptions, have, however, been made under artificial conditions. In the studies described here the sensitivity of the delta 13 C ratios to seasonal environmental influences was examined in a natural system. It was found that the C isotope composition of the plants did not change during the experiments, indicating insensitivity to short term seasonal influences. The experimental site was at an altitude of 289 m. at the Palm Desert, California. Total titratable acidity and malic acid content were determined in addition to the delta 13 C ratio. The extent of the diurnal change in the titratable acidity varied with rainfall, particularly in the autumn. It is concluded from the data obtained that the delta 13 C ratio of the plants studied is relatively insensitive to short term seasonal changes under natural desert conditions. The data also confirm that no exogenous CO 2 is fixed in the light in this environment. The varying delta 13 C ratios observed in wild populations of cactus are a result of long term environmental differences other than seasonal effects, and hence credence is given to the use of such ratios for the reconstruction of past climates. (U.K.)

  2. Biological Maturity Status Strongly Intensifies the Relative Age Effect in Alpine Ski Racing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Müller

    Full Text Available The relative age effect (RAE is a well-documented phenomenon in youth sports. This effect exists when the relative age quarter distribution of selected athletes shows a biased distribution with an over-representation of relatively older athletes. In alpine ski racing, it exists in all age categories (national youth levels up to World Cup. Studies so far could demonstrate that selected ski racers are relatively older, taller and heavier. It could be hypothesized that relatively younger athletes nearly only have a chance for selection if they are early maturing. However, surprisingly this influence of the biological maturity status on the RAE could not be proven, yet. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the biological maturity status on the RAE in dependence of the level of competition. The study investigated 372 elite youth ski racers: 234 provincial ski racers (P-SR; high level of competition and 137 national ski racers (N-SR; very high level of competition. Anthropometric characteristics were measured to calculate the age at peak height velocity (APHV as an indicator of the biological maturity status. A significant RAE was present among both P-SR and N-SR, with a larger effect size among the latter group. The N-SR significantly differed in APHV from the P-SR. The distribution of normal, early and late maturing athletes significantly differed from the expected normal distribution among the N-SR, not among the P-SR. Hardly any late maturing N-SR were present; 41.7% of the male and 34% of the female N-SR of the last relative age quarter were early maturing. These findings clearly demonstrate the significant influence of the biological maturity status on the selection process of youth alpine ski racing in dependence of the level of competition. Relatively younger athletes seem to have a chance of selection only if they are early maturing.

  3. Biological Maturity Status Strongly Intensifies the Relative Age Effect in Alpine Ski Racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Lisa; Müller, Erich; Hildebrandt, Carolin; Raschner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The relative age effect (RAE) is a well-documented phenomenon in youth sports. This effect exists when the relative age quarter distribution of selected athletes shows a biased distribution with an over-representation of relatively older athletes. In alpine ski racing, it exists in all age categories (national youth levels up to World Cup). Studies so far could demonstrate that selected ski racers are relatively older, taller and heavier. It could be hypothesized that relatively younger athletes nearly only have a chance for selection if they are early maturing. However, surprisingly this influence of the biological maturity status on the RAE could not be proven, yet. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of the biological maturity status on the RAE in dependence of the level of competition. The study investigated 372 elite youth ski racers: 234 provincial ski racers (P-SR; high level of competition) and 137 national ski racers (N-SR; very high level of competition). Anthropometric characteristics were measured to calculate the age at peak height velocity (APHV) as an indicator of the biological maturity status. A significant RAE was present among both P-SR and N-SR, with a larger effect size among the latter group. The N-SR significantly differed in APHV from the P-SR. The distribution of normal, early and late maturing athletes significantly differed from the expected normal distribution among the N-SR, not among the P-SR. Hardly any late maturing N-SR were present; 41.7% of the male and 34% of the female N-SR of the last relative age quarter were early maturing. These findings clearly demonstrate the significant influence of the biological maturity status on the selection process of youth alpine ski racing in dependence of the level of competition. Relatively younger athletes seem to have a chance of selection only if they are early maturing.

  4. Contrasting Effects of Carbon and Sulfur on Fe-Isotope Fractionation between Metal and Silicate Melt during Planetary Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elardo, S. M.; Shahar, A.

    2015-12-01

    There are numerous studies that show well-resolved Fe isotope fractionations in igneous materials from different planetary bodies. Potential explanations for these fractionations include a non-chondritic bulk planetary Fe isotopic composition, and equilibrium fractionation between Fe-alloys or minerals and silicate melts during planetary differentiation, mantle melting, or fractional crystallization. This is further complicated by the fact that these processes are not mutually exclusive, making the interpretation of Fe isotope data a complex task. Here we present new experimental results investigating the effect of C on Fe isotope fractionation between molten peridotite and an Fe-alloy. Experiments were conducted at 1 GPa and 1850° C for 0.5 - 3 hours on a mixture of an 54Fe-spiked peridotite and Fe-metal with and without Ni metal in an end-loaded piston cylinder at the Geophysical Laboratory. Carbon saturation was achieved with a graphite capsule, and resulted in C contents of the Fe-alloy in our experiments ranging from 3.8 - 4.9 wt. %. The metal and silicate phases from half of each experiment were separated manually and dissolved in concentrated acids. Iron was separated from matrix elements by anion exchange chromatagraphy. Iron-isotopic compositions were determined with the Nu Plasma II MC-ICP-MS at GL. The other half of each experiment was used for quantitative microbeam analysis. Equilibrium was assessed with a time series and the three-isotope exchange method. The Ni-free experiments resulted in no resolvable Fe isotope fractionation between the Fe-C-alloy and molten silicate. This is in contrast to the results of Shahar et al. (2015) which showed a fractionation for Δ57Fe of ~0.18 ‰ between a peridotite and an Fe-alloy with a similar S abundance to C in these experiments. The one experiment thus far that contained Ni (~4 wt. % in the alloy) showed a resolvable fractionation between the Fe-Ni-C alloy and silicate of ~0.10 ‰. Shahar et al. found a

  5. A systematic review of drug treatment of vulvodynia: evidence of a strong placebo effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella Pereira, Glaucia Miranda; Marcolino, Milena Soriano; Nogueira Reis, Zilma Silveira; de Castro Monteiro, Marilene Vale

    2018-03-23

    Vulvodynia is the most common type of chronic pelvic pain and dyspareunia in premenopausal women. The effect of drugs for the treatment of vulvodynia remains poorly discussed. To conduct a systematic review of randomised controlled studies which assess medications used to treat vulvar pain in vulvodynia. Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EBSCO Academic, LILACS and MEDLINE were searched from 1985 to September 2016. Randomised controlled trials comparing any kind of medication for vulvodynia treatment with placebo or with another medication in adult patients were included. The two investigators independently conducted data extraction. The synthesis was provided by the pain reduction index. Study quality assessment was performed using the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Intervention and analysis of publication bias was conducted. Five studies were included in qualitative synthesis with a number of the participants varied from 30 to 133 among the eligible studies resulting 297. The pain reduction rates of patients with vulvodynia assessed by Q-tipped Cotton Test and visual analogue scale varied between studies. Placebo was shown to be as effective as any medication. There is a need for further studies evaluating topical monotherapy for the treatment of vulvodynia, since they are the main drugs used in clinical practice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. <strong>Dimensional asymptotics of effective actions on S^n, and proof of Bär-Schopka's conjecturestrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels Martin

    We study the dimensional asymptotics of the effective actions, or functional determinants, for the Dirac operator D and Laplacians \\Delta +\\beta R on round S^n. For Laplacians the behavior depends on ``the coupling strength'' \\beta, and one cannot in general expect a finite limit of \\zeta'(0), an...... spheres to unit volume, since \\lim_{k\\to\\infty}\\det(\\Delta, S_\\mathrm{rescaled}^{2k+1})=\\frac{1}{2\\pi e}....

  7. Effects of strong network modifiers on Fe3+/Fe2+ in silicate melts: an experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, Alexander; Behrens, Harald; Holtz, Francois

    2017-05-01

    The effect of CaO, Na2O, and K2O on ferric/ferrous ratio in model multicomponent silicate melts was investigated in the temperature range 1450-1550 °C at 1-atm total pressure in air. It is demonstrated that the addition of these network modifier cations results in an increase of Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio. The influence of network modifier cations on the ferric/ferrous ratio increases in the order Ca SiO2-TiO2-Al2O3-FeO-Fe2O3-MgO-CaO-Na2O-K2O-P2O5 melts at air conditions.

  8. In-medium covariant propagator of baryons under a strong magnetic field: Effect of the intrinsic magnetic moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, R.M.; Paoli, A.L. de [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, and IFLP, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    We obtain the covariant propagator at finite temperature for interacting baryons immersed in a strong magnetic field. The effect of the intrinsic magnetic moments on the Green function are fully taken into account. We make an expansion in terms of eigenfunctions of a Dirac field, which leads us to a compact form of its propagator. We present some simple applications of these propagators, where the statistical averages of nuclear currents and energy density are evaluated. (orig.)

  9. Absence of strong strain effects in behavioral analyses of Shank3-deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Drapeau

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Haploinsufficiency of SHANK3, caused by chromosomal abnormalities or mutations that disrupt one copy of the gene, leads to a neurodevelopmental syndrome called Phelan-McDermid syndrome, symptoms of which can include absent or delayed speech, intellectual disability, neurological changes and autism spectrum disorders. The SHANK3 protein forms a key structural part of the post-synaptic density. We previously generated and characterized mice with a targeted disruption of Shank3 in which exons coding for the ankyrin-repeat domain were deleted and expression of full-length Shank3 was disrupted. We documented specific deficits in synaptic function and plasticity, along with reduced reciprocal social interactions, in Shank3 heterozygous mice. Changes in phenotype owing to a mutation at a single locus are quite frequently modulated by other loci, most dramatically when the entire genetic background is changed. In mice, each strain of laboratory mouse represents a distinct genetic background and alterations in phenotype owing to gene knockout or transgenesis are frequently different across strains, which can lead to the identification of important modifier loci. We have investigated the effect of genetic background on phenotypes of Shank3 heterozygous, knockout and wild-type mice, using C57BL/6, 129SVE and FVB/Ntac strain backgrounds. We focused on observable behaviors with the goal of carrying out subsequent analyses to identify modifier loci. Surprisingly, there were very modest strain effects over a large battery of analyses. These results indicate that behavioral phenotypes associated with Shank3 haploinsufficiency are largely strain-independent.

  10. Theoretical Study of H/D Isotope Effects on Nuclear Magnetic Shieldings Using an ab initio Multi-Component Molecular Orbital Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Tachikawa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We have theoretically analyzed the nuclear quantum effect on the nuclear magnetic shieldings for the intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems of σ-hydroxy acyl aromatic species using the gauge-including atomic orbital technique combined with our multi-component density functional theory. The effect of H/D quantum nature for geometry and nuclear magnetic shielding changes are analyzed. Our study clearly demonstrated that the geometrical changes of hydrogen-bonds induced by H/D isotope effect (called geometrical isotope effect: GIE is the dominant factor of deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shift.

  11. Stable isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.

    1986-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of the world's stable isotope supply comes from one producer, Oak Ridge Nuclear Laboratory (ORNL) in the US. Canadian concern is that foreign needs will be met only after domestic needs, thus creating a shortage of stable isotopes in Canada. This article describes the present situation in Canada (availability and cost) of stable isotopes, the isotope enrichment techniques, and related research programs at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL)

  12. Effects of strong electron correlations in Ti8C12 Met-Car

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varganov, Sergey A.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    The results of multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) with single and double excitations and single reference coupled cluster (CCSD(T)) calculations on Ti 8 C 12 metallocarbohedryne (Met-Car) are reported. The distortions of the T d structure to D 2d and C 3v structures due to the Jahn-Teller effect are studied. It is shown that the Ti 8 C 12 wave function has significant multireference character. The choice of the active space for multireference self-consistent field (MCSCF) calculations is discussed. The failure of multireference perturbation theory with a small active space is attributed to multiple intruder states. A new, novel type of MCSCF calculation, ORMAS (occupation restricted multiple active spaces) with a large active space are carried out for several electronic states of Ti 8 C 12 . The Jahn-Teller distorted D 2d 1 A 1 (nearly T d ) structure is predicted to be the Ti 8 C 12 ground state. Predictions of the Ti 8 C 12 ionization potential with different ab initio methods are presented

  13. Noise-induced effects on multicellular biopacemaker spontaneous activity: Differences between weak and strong pacemaker cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghighi, Alireza; Comtois, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Self-organization of spontaneous activity of a network of active elements is important to the general theory of reaction-diffusion systems as well as for pacemaking activity to initiate beating of the heart. Monolayer cultures of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, consisting of resting and pacemaker cells, exhibit spontaneous activation of their electrical activity. Similarly, one proposed approach to the development of biopacemakers as an alternative to electronic pacemakers for cardiac therapy is based on heterogeneous cardiac cells with resting and spontaneously beating phenotypes. However, the combined effect of pacemaker characteristics, density, and spatial distribution of the pacemaker cells on spontaneous activity is unknown. Using a simple stochastic pattern formation algorithm, we previously showed a clear nonlinear dependency of spontaneous activity (occurrence and amplitude of spontaneous period) on the spatial patterns of pacemaker cells. In this study, we show that this behavior is dependent on the pacemaker cell characteristics, with weaker pacemaker cells requiring higher density and larger clusters to sustain multicellular activity. These multicellular structures also demonstrated an increased sensitivity to voltage noise that favored spontaneous activity at lower density while increasing temporal variation in the period of activity. This information will help researchers overcome the current limitations of biopacemakers.

  14. Isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eerkens, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method of isotope separation is described which involves the use of a laser photon beam to selectively induce energy level transitions of an isotope molecule containing the isotope to be separated. The use of the technique for 235 U enrichment is demonstrated. (UK)

  15. Isotope Effects Associated with N2O Production by Fungal and Bacterial Nitric Oxide Reductases: Implications for Enzyme Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegg, E. L.; Yang, H.; Gandhi, H.; McQuarters, A.; Lehnert, N.; Ostrom, N. E.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is both a powerful greenhouse gas and a key participant in ozone destruction. Microbial activity accounts for over 70% of the N2O produced annually, and the atmospheric concentration of N2O continues to rise. Because the fungal and bacterial denitrification pathways are major contributors to microbial N2O production, understanding the mechanism by which NO is reduced to N2O will contribute to both N2O source tracing and quantification. Our strategy utilizes stable isotopes to probe the enzymatic mechanism of microbial N2O production. Although the use of stable isotopes to study enzyme mechanisms is not new, our approach is distinct in that we employ both measurements of isotopic preferences of purified enzyme and DFT calculations, thereby providing a synergistic combination of experimental and computational approaches. We analyzed δ18O, δ15Nα (central N atom in N2O), and δ15Nβ (terminal N atom) of N2O produced by purified fungal cytochrome P450 nitric oxide reductase (P450nor) from Histoplasma capsulatum as well as bacterial cytochrome c dependent nitric oxide reductase (cNOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans. P450nor exhibits an inverse kinetic isotope effect for Nβ (KIE = 0.9651) but a normal isotope effect for both Nα (KIE = 1.0127) and the oxygen atom (KIE = 1.0264). These results suggest a mechanism where NO binds to the ferric heme in the P450nor active site and becomes Nβ. Analysis of the NO-binding step indicated a greater difference in zero point energy in the transition state than the ground state, resulting in the inverse KIE observed for Nβ. Following protonation and rearrangement, it is speculated that this complex forms a FeIV-NHOH- species as a key intermediate. Our data are consistent with the second NO (which becomes Nα and O in the N2O product) attacking the FeIV-NHOH- species to generate a FeIII-N2O2H2 complex that enzymatically (as opposed to abiotically) breaks down to release N2O. Conversely, our preliminary data

  16. <strong>EFFECTS OF HYALURONAN ON THREE-DIMENSIONAL MICROARCHITECTURE OF SUBCHONDRAL BONE TISSUES IN GUINEA PIG PRIMARY OSTEOARTHROSISstrong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming

    ; and the control groups received vehicle. After sacrifice, the left tibiae were harvested and micro-CT scanned, followed by mechanical testing and collagen and mineral determination. Results: The HA-treated groups had almost normal cartilage, whereas the control groups had typical osteoarthrosis (OA......-term study, these latter changes were more pronounced, with an additionally significant decrease in connectivity and bone surface density. HA groups had greater bone mineral concentration and mineral density, lower collagen to mineral ratio, and preserved the mechanical properties of cancellous bone...... level, and effectively changes the subchondral bone tissue microarchitecture, collagen and mineral content and density without altering the mechanical properties of cancellous bone. The most striking features are the microarchitectural changes in the subchondral cancellous bone that lead to lower bone...

  17. A Solar Eruption from a Weak Magnetic Field Region with Relatively Strong Geo-Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.

    2017-12-01

    A moderate flare eruption giving rise to a series of geo-effectiveness on 2015 November 4 caught our attentions, which originated from a relatively weak magnetic field region. The associated characteristics near the Earth are presented, which indicates that the southward magnetic field in the sheath and the ICME induced a geomagnetic storm sequence with a Dst global minimum of 90 nT. The ICME is indicated to have a small inclination angle by using a Grad-Shafranov technique, and corresponds to the flux rope (FR) structure horizontally lying on the solar surface. A small-scale magnetic cancelling feature was detected which is beneath the FR and is co-aligned with the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) EUV brightening prior to the eruption. Various magnetic features for space-weather forecasting are computed by using a data product from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) called Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARPs), which help us identify the changes of the photospheric magnetic fields during the magnetic cancellation process and prove that the magnetic reconnection associated with the flux cancellation is driven by the magnetic shearing motion on the photosphere. An analysis on the distributions at different heights of decay index is carried out. Combining with a filament height estimation method, the configurations of the FR is identified and a decay index critical value n = 1 is considered to be more appropriate for such a weak magnetic field region. Through a comprehensive analysis to the trigger mechanisms and conditions of the eruption, a clearer scenario of a CME from a relatively weak region is presented.

  18. Isotope separation using tunable lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snavely, B.B.

    1975-01-01

    Various processes for laser isotope separation based upon the use of the spectroscopic isotope effect in atomic and molecular vapors are discussed. Emphasis is placed upon processes which are suitable for uranium enrichment. A demonstration process for the separation of uranium isotopes using selective photoionization is described. (U.S.)

  19. Maturity Status Strongly Influences the Relative Age Effect in International Elite Under-9 Soccer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Müller, Josef Gehmaier, Christoph Gonaus, Christian Raschner, Erich Müller

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess the role of the relative age effect (RAE and to investigate the influence of the biological maturity status on the RAE in international under-9 soccer. The birth dates of 222 male participants of the U9 Eurochampionship Soccer Tournament in Vienna in 2016 were analyzed and divided into four relative age quarters (Q1-Q4 and the biological maturity status was assessed with the age at peak height velocity (APHV method. Based on the mean±standard deviation of the APHV, the athletes were divided into three groups of maturity: early, normal and late maturing. Chi-Square-tests were used to assess the difference between the observed and the expected even relative age quarter distribution and to evaluate the difference between the observed distribution of early, normal and late maturing athletes and the expected normal distribution. A univariate analysis of variance was performed to assess differences in the APHV between the relative age quarters. A RAE was present (χ2 = 23.87; p < 0.001; ω = 0.33. A significant difference was found in APHV between the four relative age quarters (F = 9.906; p < 0.001; relatively older athletes were significantly less mature. A significant difference was found between the distribution of early, normal and late maturing athletes and the expected normal distribution for athletes of Q1 (high percentage of late maturing athletes: 27%; χ2 = 17.69; p < 0.001; ω = 0.46 and of Q4 (high percentage of early maturing soccer players: 31%; χ2 = 12.08; p = 0.002; ω = 0.58. These findings demonstrated that the selection process in international soccer, with athletes younger than 9 years, seems to be associated with the biological maturity status and the relative age. Relatively younger soccer players seem to have a better chance for selection for international tournaments, if they enter puberty at an earlier age, whereas relatively older athletes seem to have an increased likelihood for

  20. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction. Mechanisms. 3. Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effect. Uday Maitra and. J Chandrasekhar are members of the Organic. Chemistry faculty in. Indian Institute of. Science at Bangalore. The previous articles of this series were: 1. Isotopes as markers, May. 1997. 2. Primary kinetic isotope effect.

  1. Intrinsic isotope effects suggest that the reaction coordinate symmetry for the cytochrome P-450 catalyzed hydroxylation of octane is isozyme independent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.P.; Rettie, A.E.; Trager, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    The mechanism of the omega-hydroxylation of octane by three catalytically distinct, purified forms of cytochrome P-450, namely, P-450b, P-450c, and P-450LM2, was investigated by using deuterium isotope effects. The deuterium isotope effects associated with the omega-hydroxylation of octane-1,1,1-2H3, octane-1,8-2H2, and octane-1,1,8,8-2H4 by all three isozymes were determined. From these data the intrinsic isotope effects were calculated and separated into their primary and secondary components. The primary intrinsic isotope effect for the reaction ranged from 7.69 to 9.18 while the secondary intrinsic isotope effect ranged from 1.13 to 1.25. Neither the primary nor secondary isotope effect values were statistically different for any of the isozymes investigated. These data are consistent with a symmetrical transition state for a mechanism involving initial hydrogen atom abstraction followed by hydroxyl radical recombination which is essentially independent of the specific isozyme catalyzing the reaction. It is concluded that (1) in general the porphyrin-[FeO]3+ complex behaves as a source of a triplet-like oxygen atom, (2) the regioselectivity for the site of oxidation is dictated by the apoprotein of the specific isozyme of cytochrome P-450 catalyzing the reaction, and (3) the maximum primary intrinsic isotope effect for any cytochrome P-450 catalyzed oxidation of a carbon center is about 9, assuming no tunneling effects

  2. Self-assembly of a novel beta-In2S3 nanostructure exhibiting strong quantum confinement effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wu; Ma, Dekun; Huang, Zhen; Tang, Qun; Xie, Qin; Qian, Yitai

    2005-05-01

    The 3D beta-In2S3 flowerlike architecture assembled from nanoflakes was prepared via a novel complex-precursor assisted (CPA) solvothermal route. The as-prepared beta-In2S3 powder was characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), transition electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectra, and photoluminescence spectrum. The novel 3D beta-In2S3 nanostructure exhibit a strong quantum confinement effect. FT-IR spectra were used to investigate the coordinative chemical effect in the complex. A possible mechanism was discussed.

  3. Modeling the oxygen-isotopic composition of the North American Ice Sheet and its effect on the isotopic composition of the ocean during the last glacial cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sima, A.; Paul, A.; Schulz, M.; Oerlemans, J.

    2006-01-01

    We used a 2.5-dimensional thermomechanical icesheet model including the oxygen-isotope ratio 18O/16O as a passive tracer to simulate the isotopic composition (d18O) of the North American Ice Sheet (NAIS) during the last glacial cycle. This model allowed us to estimate the NAIS contribution to the

  4. Hall effect in a strong magnetic field: Direct comparisons of compressible magnetohydrodynamics and the reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P.; Gomez, D. O.

    2010-01-01

    In this work we numerically test a model of Hall magnetohydrodynamics in the presence of a strong mean magnetic field: the reduced Hall magnetohydrodynamic model (RHMHD) derived by [Gomez et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 102303 (2008)] with the addition of weak compressible effects. The main advantage of this model lies in the reduction of computational cost. Nevertheless, up until now the degree of agreement with the original Hall MHD system and the range of validity in a regime of turbulence were not established. In this work direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional Hall MHD turbulence in the presence of a strong mean magnetic field are compared with simulations of the weak compressible RHMHD model. The results show that the degree of agreement is very high (when the different assumptions of RHMHD, such as spectral anisotropy, are satisfied). Nevertheless, when the initial conditions are isotropic but the mean magnetic field is maintained strong, the results differ at the beginning but asymptotically reach a good agreement at relatively short times. We also found evidence that the compressibility still plays a role in the dynamics of these systems, and the weak compressible RHMHD model is able to capture these effects. In conclusion the weak compressible RHMHD model is a valid approximation of the Hall MHD turbulence in the relevant physical context.

  5. Particulate matter from both heavy fuel oil and diesel fuel shipping emissions show strong biological effects on human lung cells at realistic and comparable in vitro exposure conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Oeder

    Full Text Available Ship engine emissions are important with regard to lung and cardiovascular diseases especially in coastal regions worldwide. Known cellular responses to combustion particles include oxidative stress and inflammatory signalling.To provide a molecular link between the chemical and physical characteristics of ship emission particles and the cellular responses they elicit and to identify potentially harmful fractions in shipping emission aerosols.Through an air-liquid interface exposure system, we exposed human lung cells under realistic in vitro conditions to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on either common heavy fuel oil (HFO or cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF. Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling including isotope labelling methods to characterise the lung cell responses.The HFO emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds such as metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and were higher in particle mass. These compounds were lower in DF emissions, which in turn had higher concentrations of elemental carbon ("soot". Common cellular reactions included cellular stress responses and endocytosis. Reactions to HFO emissions were dominated by oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, whereas DF emissions induced generally a broader biological response than HFO emissions and affected essential cellular pathways such as energy metabolism, protein synthesis, and chromatin modification.Despite a lower content of known toxic compounds, combustion particles from the clean shipping fuel DF influenced several essential pathways of lung cell metabolism more strongly than particles from the unrefined fuel HFO. This might be attributable to a higher soot content in DF. Thus the role of diesel soot, which is a known carcinogen in acute air pollution-induced health effects should be further investigated. For the use of HFO and DF we recommend a

  6. Particulate Matter from Both Heavy Fuel Oil and Diesel Fuel Shipping Emissions Show Strong Biological Effects on Human Lung Cells at Realistic and Comparable In Vitro Exposure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Marco; Paur, Hanns-Rudolf; Schlager, Christoph; Mülhopt, Sonja; Diabaté, Silvia; Weiss, Carsten; Stengel, Benjamin; Rabe, Rom; Harndorf, Horst; Torvela, Tiina; Jokiniemi, Jorma K.; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; BéruBé, Kelly A.; Wlodarczyk, Anna J.; Prytherch, Zoë; Michalke, Bernhard; Krebs, Tobias; Prévôt, André S. H.; Kelbg, Michael; Tiggesbäumker, Josef; Karg, Erwin; Jakobi, Gert; Scholtes, Sorana; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Lintelmann, Jutta; Matuschek, Georg; Sklorz, Martin; Klingbeil, Sophie; Orasche, Jürgen; Richthammer, Patrick; Müller, Laarnie; Elsasser, Michael; Reda, Ahmed; Gröger, Thomas; Weggler, Benedikt; Schwemer, Theo; Czech, Hendryk; Rüger, Christopher P.; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Radischat, Christian; Hiller, Karsten; Buters, Jeroen T. M.; Dittmar, Gunnar; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Background Ship engine emissions are important with regard to lung and cardiovascular diseases especially in coastal regions worldwide. Known cellular responses to combustion particles include oxidative stress and inflammatory signalling. Objectives To provide a molecular link between the chemical and physical characteristics of ship emission particles and the cellular responses they elicit and to identify potentially harmful fractions in shipping emission aerosols. Methods Through an air-liquid interface exposure system, we exposed human lung cells under realistic in vitro conditions to exhaust fumes from a ship engine running on either common heavy fuel oil (HFO) or cleaner-burning diesel fuel (DF). Advanced chemical analyses of the exhaust aerosols were combined with transcriptional, proteomic and metabolomic profiling including isotope labelling methods to characterise the lung cell responses. Results The HFO emissions contained high concentrations of toxic compounds such as metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, and were higher in particle mass. These compounds were lower in DF emissions, which in turn had higher concentrations of elemental carbon (“soot”). Common cellular reactions included cellular stress responses and endocytosis. Reactions to HFO emissions were dominated by oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, whereas DF emissions induced generally a broader biological response than HFO emissions and affected essential cellular pathways such as energy metabolism, protein synthesis, and chromatin modification. Conclusions Despite a lower content of known toxic compounds, combustion particles from the clean shipping fuel DF influenced several essential pathways of lung cell metabolism more strongly than particles from the unrefined fuel HFO. This might be attributable to a higher soot content in DF. Thus the role of diesel soot, which is a known carcinogen in acute air pollution-induced health effects should be further investigated. For the

  7. Biological isotopy. Introduction to the isotopic effects and to their applications in biology; Isotopie biologique. Introduction aux effets isotopiques et a leurs applications en biologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tcherkez, G.

    2010-07-01

    Since their discovery in the beginning of the 20. century, the study of stable isotopes has considerably developed. This domain, which remained limited in its applications until the 1990's, has become particularly important thereafter thanks to its practical applications and in particular to its economical impacts. Many techniques used in fraud control, in drugs use control, in selection of high-yield plants etc are based on isotopic abundance measurements. This reference book gives a synthesis of our actual knowledge on the use of stable isotopes and of isotope fractionation in biology. It presents the basic notions of isotopic biochemistry and explains the origin of the isotopic effects. The application principles of these effects to metabolism, to organisms physiology, to environmental biology etc are explained and detailed using examples and exercises. The first chapters present the basic knowledge which defines, from a mathematical point-of-view, the isotopic effects of chemical reactions or of physical processes taking place in biology. The measurements principle of natural isotopes abundance is then synthesised. Finally, all these notions are applied at different scales: enzymes, physiology, metabolism, environment, ecosystems and fraud crackdown. (J.S.)

  8. Far infrared conductivity of charge density wave materials and the oxygen isotope effect in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creager, W.N.

    1991-09-01

    The far infrared reflectance and conductivity of (Ta 1-x Nb x Se 4 ) 2 I and TaS 3 have been measured to determine the origin of a huge infrared resonance that dominates the charge density wave (CDW) dynamics along with the pinned acoustic phason mode in the related materials (TaSe 4 ) 2 I and K 0. 3 MoO 3 . The measurements cover frequencies from 3 to 700cm -1 and the temperature range from 15K to 300K. In the niobium-doped alloys (Ta 1-x Nb x Se 4 ) 2 I, the size and frequency of the giant infrared mode remain nearly constant as the impurity concentration x is increased. For TaS 3 , the pinned acoustic phason near 0.5cm -1 dominates var-epsilon(ω) and an additional small mode lies near 9cm -1 . The latter mode is much smaller than the infrared mode in other CDW materials. These results rule out several models of a ''generic infrared mode'' in CDW excitations. They are compared in detail to the predictions of a recent theory attributing the infrared mode to a bound collective mode localized at impurity sites within the crystal. The transmittance of K 0.3 MoO 3 has been measured at 1.2K with a strong dc electric field applied across the crystal. Under these conditions, the charge density wave depins abruptly and carries large currents with near-zero differential resistance. For some samples, the low-frequency transmittance is enhanced slightly when the CDW depins. The magnitude of the oxygen isotope effect in the high-T c superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 has been determined by substitution of 18 O for 16 O. A series of cross-exchanges was performed on high-quality polycrystalline specimens to eliminate uncertainties due to sample heat treatments and sample inhomogeneities

  9. Hemodynamic effects of metoprolol and nifedipine in angina pectoris measured by isotope technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostroem, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    In order to evaluate the therapeutic effects of metoprolol, nifedipine, and their combination, 11 patients with secondary angina pectoris and with thallium tomographic findings indicating coronary artery disease were studied before and after these three treatment regimes in a single-blind cross-over study. The therapeutic effect was measured by standardized working test and isotope angiocardiography, which enabled evaluation of left ventricular ejection fraction, stroke volume, and phase analysis of left ventricular contraction. Treatment with metoprolol and combination therapy increased work performance. Ejection fraction did not differentiate the treatment regimes, whereas stroke volume was significantly lower at work and heart rate higher at rest and at work during nifedipine treatment compared to either metoprolol or combination treatment (p less than 0.05). Cardiac output was significantly reduced during nifedipine and metoprolol treatment during work (p less than 0.05). Phase improved after all therapeutic regimes, but reached significance only during the metoprolol treatment period at rest (p less than 0.05).

  10. Deuterium isotope effect on the metabolism and toxicity of 1,2-dibromoethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.D.; Gandolfi, A.J.; Bowden, G.T.; Sipes, I.G.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism, hepatotoxicity, and hepatic DNA damage of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and tetradeutero-1,2-dibromoethane (d4EDB) were compared in male Swiss-Webster mice. In vitro studies that measured bromide ion released from the substrate to monitor the rate of metabolism showed that the hepatic microsomal metabolism of EDB was significantly reduced by deuterium substitution, while metabolism by the hepatic glutathione S-transferases was unaffected. Three hours after ip administration of EDB or d4EDB (50 mg/kg), there was 42% less bromide in the plasma of d4EDB-treated mice than in the plasma of EDB-treated mice. This difference demonstrates a significant deuterium isotope effect on the metabolism of EDB in vivo. Although the metabolism of d4EDB was less than that of EDB 3 hr after exposure, the DNA damage caused by both analogs was not significantly different at this time point. At later time points (8, 24, and 72 hr), d4EDB caused significantly greater DNA damage than EDB. Since the decreased metabolism of d4EDB was apparently due to a reduced rate of microsomal oxidation, these data support the hypothesis that conjugation with GSH is responsible for the genotoxic effects of EDB

  11. Deuterium isotope effect on the metabolism and toxicity of 1,2-dibromoethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R D; Gandolfi, A J; Bowden, G T; Sipes, I G

    1983-06-30

    The metabolism, hepatotoxicity, and hepatic DNA damage of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and tetradeutero-1,2-dibromoethane (d4EDB) were compared in male Swiss-Webster mice. In vitro studies that measured bromide ion released from the substrate to monitor the rate of metabolism showed that the hepatic microsomal metabolism of EDB was significantly reduced by deuterium substitution, while metabolism by the hepatic glutathione S-transferases was unaffected. Three hours after ip administration of EDB or d4EDB (50 mg/kg), there was 42% less bromide in the plasmaa of d4EDB-treated mice than in the plasm of EDB-treated mice. This difference demonstrates a significant deuterium isotope effect on the metabolism of EDB in vivo. Although the metabolism of d4EDB was less than that of EDB 3 hr after exposure, the DNA damage caused by both analogs was not significantly different at this time point. At later time points (8, 24, and 72 hr), d4EDB caused significantly greater DNA damage than EDB. Since the decreased metabolism of d4EDB was apparently due to a reduced rate of microsomal oxidation, these data support the hypothesis that conjugation with GSH is responsible for the genotoxic effects of EDB.

  12. Effect of CH4 and O2 variations on rates of CH4 oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teh, Yit Arn; Conrad, Mark; Silver, Whendee L.; Carlson, Charlotte M.

    2003-10-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria are the primary sink for CH{sub 4} in reduced soils, and account for as much as 90 percent of all CH{sub 4} produced. Methanotrophic bacteria strongly discriminate against the heavy isotopes of carbon, resulting in CH{sub 4} emissions that are significantly more enriched in {sup 13}C than the original source material. Previous studies have used an isotope mass balance approach to quantify CH{sub 4} sources and sinks in the field, based on the assumption that the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation is a constant. This study quantifies the effect of systematic variations in CH{sub 4} and O{sub 2} concentrations on rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation and stable isotope fractionation in tropical rain forest soils. Soils were collected from the 0-15 cm depth, and incubated with varying concentrations of CH{sub 4} (100 ppmv, 500 ppmv, 1000 ppmv, and 5000 ppmv) or O{sub 2} (3 percent, 5 percent, 10 percent, and 21 percent). The isotope fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was calculated for each incubation using a Rayleigh fractionation model. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 100 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the lowest rate of CH{sub 4} uptake, and the other 3 treatments showing similar rates of CH{sub 4} uptake. Rates of CH{sub 4} oxidation did not vary significantly between the different O{sub 2} treatments. The fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation varied significantly between the different CH{sub 4} treatments, with the 5000 ppmv CH{sub 4} treatment showing the largest {sup 13}C-enrichment of residual CH{sub 4}. In treatments where CH{sub 4} concentration was not rate-limiting (> 500 ppmv CH{sub 4}), the fractionation factor for CH{sub 4} oxidation was negatively correlated with CH{sub 4} oxidation rate (P < 0.003, r{sup 2} = 0.86). A multiple regression model that included initial CH{sub 4} concentration and CH{sub 4} oxidation rate as independent variables

  13. Vapor pressure isotope effect in 13CClF3/12CClF3 by cryogenic distillation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieck, H.J.; Ishida, T.

    1975-08-01

    The vapor pressure of 13 CClF 3 relative to the vapor pressure of 12 CClF 3 was measured as a function of temperature between 169 0 and 206 0 K by using a modified Bigeleisen distillation column. The transient build-up of the isotopic concentration gradient along the length of the packed column during the start-up period was monitored by taking samples from the condenser section as a function of time. The gaseous samples were completely oxidized to carbon dioxide in the presence of a platinum catalyst and a large excess of oxygen at temperatures between 1050 and 1100 0 C. The combustion products were purified by means of gas chromatography, and the purified carbon dioxide samples were analyzed in a Nier-type isotope-ratio mass spectrometer. The data of each distillation run were reduced in the light of Cohen's theory of the kinetics of square cascade of close-separation stages. The vapor pressure isotope effect for the carbon substitution in CClF 3 at temperatures between 169 0 and 206 0 K was found to be an inverse effect and to be rather insensitive to changes in temperature. The relative vapor pressure may be expressed 1n(P'/P) = [(1.5 +- 14.1)/T 2 ] - [(0.159 +- 0.076)/T], or 1n(P'/P) = [(0.173 +- 0.098)/T] - [(0.11 +- 0.53) x 10 -3 ], where P' and P are the vapor pressures of 12 CClF 3 and 13 CClF 3 , respectively. To the first-order, the presence of chlorine isotopes would not affect the fractionation of carbon isotopes by the distillation of CClF 3

  14. Vitamin B12effects on chlorinated methanes-degrading microcosms: Dual isotope and metabolically active microbial populations assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Diana; Torrentó, Clara; Guivernau, Miriam; Viñas, Marc; Hunkeler, Daniel; Soler, Albert; Domènech, Cristina; Rosell, Mònica

    2018-04-15

    Field-derived anoxic microcosms were used to characterize chloroform (CF) and carbon tetrachloride (CT) natural attenuation to compare it with biostimulation scenarios in which vitamin B 12 was added (B 12 /pollutant ratio of 0.01 and 0.1) by means of by-products, carbon and chlorine compound-specific stable-isotope analysis, and the active microbial community through 16S rRNA MiSeq high-throughput sequencing. Autoclaved slurry controls discarded abiotic degradation processes. B 12 catalyzed CF and CT biodegradation without the accumulation of dichloromethane, carbon disulphide, or CF. The carbon isotopic fractionation value of CF (ƐC CF ) with B 12 was -14±4‰, and the value for chlorine (ƐCl CF ) was -2.4±0.4‰. The carbon isotopic fractionation values of CT (ƐC CT ) were -16±6 with B 12 , and -13±2‰ without B 12 ; and the chlorine isotopic fractionation values of CT (ƐCl CT ) were -6±3 and -4±2‰, respectively. Acidovorax, Ancylobacter, and Pseudomonas were the most metabolically active genera, whereas Dehalobacter and Desulfitobacterium were below 0.1% of relative abundance. The dual C-Cl element isotope slope (Λ=Δδ 13 C/Δδ 37 Cl) for CF biodegradation (only detected with B 12 , 7±1) was similar to that reported for CF reduction by Fe(0) (8±2). Several reductive pathways might be competing in the tested CT scenarios, as evidenced by the lack of CF accumulation when B 12 was added, which might be linked to a major activity of Pseudomonas stutzeri; by different chlorine apparent kinetic isotope effect values and Λ which was statistically different with and without B 12 (5±1 vs 6.1±0.5), respectively. Thus, positive B 12 effects such as CT and CF degradation catalyst were quantified for the first time in isotopic terms, and confirmed with the major activity of species potentially capable of their degradation. Moreover, the indirect benefits of B 12 on the degradation of chlorinated ethenes were proved, creating a basis for remediation

  15. Review of computer simulations of isotope effects on biochemical reactions: From the Bigeleisen equation to Feynman's path integral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Xu, Yuqing; Xu, Liang

    2015-11-01

    Enzymatic reactions are integral components in many biological functions and malfunctions. The iconic structure of each reaction path for elucidating the reaction mechanism in details is the molecular structure of the rate-limiting transition state (RLTS). But RLTS is very hard to get caught or to get visualized by experimentalists. In spite of the lack of explicit molecular structure of the RLTS in experiment, we still can trace out the RLTS unique "fingerprints" by measuring the isotope effects on the reaction rate. This set of "fingerprints" is considered as a most direct probe of RLTS. By contrast, for computer simulations, oftentimes molecular structures of a number of TS can be precisely visualized on computer screen, however, theoreticians are not sure which TS is the actual rate-limiting one. As a result, this is an excellent stage setting for a perfect "marriage" between experiment and theory for determining the structure of RLTS, along with the reaction mechanism, i.e., experimentalists are responsible for "fingerprinting", whereas theoreticians are responsible for providing candidates that match the "fingerprints". In this Review, the origin of isotope effects on a chemical reaction is discussed from the perspectives of classical and quantum worlds, respectively (e.g., the origins of the inverse kinetic isotope effects and all the equilibrium isotope effects are purely from quantum). The conventional Bigeleisen equation for isotope effect calculations, as well as its refined version in the framework of Feynman's path integral and Kleinert's variational perturbation (KP) theory for systematically incorporating anharmonicity and (non-parabolic) quantum tunneling, are also presented. In addition, the outstanding interplay between theory and experiment for successfully deducing the RLTS structures and the reaction mechanisms is demonstrated by applications on biochemical reactions, namely models of bacterial squalene-to-hopene polycyclization and RNA 2'-O

  16. Effect of Non Submerged Vanes on Separation Zone at Strongly-curved Channel Bends, a Laboratory Scale Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Akhtari

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Bends along open channels always pose difficulties for water transfer systems. One undesirable effect of bends in such channels, i.e. separation of water from inner banks, was studied. For the purposes of this study, the literature on the subject was first reviewed, and a strongly-curved open channel was designed and constructed on the laboratory scale. Several tests were performed to evaluate the accuracy of the lab model, data homogeneity, and systematic errors. The model was then calibrated and the influence of curvature on flow pattern past the curve was investigated. Also, for the first time, the influence of separation walls on flow pattern was investigated. Experimental results on three strongly-curved open channels with a curvature radius to channel width ratio of 1.5 and curvature angles of 30°, 60°, and 90° showed that, in all the cases studied, the effect of flow separation could be observed immediately after the curve. In addition, the greatest effect of flow separation was seen at a distance equal to channel width from the bend end. In the presence of middle walls and flow separation, the effect of water separation reduced at the bend, especially for a curvature of 90°.

  17. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect (DKIE) in copper-induced LDL peroxidation: Interrelated effects of on inhibition and propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, Ilya; Lichtenberg, Dov

    2017-06-01

    LDL peroxidation plays a major role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. The mechanisms of LDL peroxidation induced by transition metal ions have therefore been studied intensively. It has been proposed that the mechanism involves free radical production that occurs via decomposition of hydroperoxides. This, in turn, requires the cleavage of O-H bonds. Cleavage of O-D bond is slower and comparison of the kinetics in D 2 O to the kinetics in H 2 O is therefore a straightforward way to test this aspect of the alleged mechanism. The kinetics of peroxidation exhibit marked deuterium kinetic isotope effects at all the stages of oxidation under all the studied conditions. We found that the rate of propagation of copper-induced peroxidation is a monotonically decreasing function of D 2 O fraction in D 2 O/H 2 O mixtures. The only elementary reaction that involves "exchangeable" hydrogen at this stage is copper-induced decomposition of conjugated hydroperoxides. Therefore, we conclude that the latter step is rate-limiting reaction including cleavage of oxygen-hydrogen bond of hydroperoxide. The lag preceding rapid peroxidation exhibits a biphasic dependence on the fraction of D 2 O. This may be understood on the basis of the effect of substituting hydrogen atoms by deuterium. Specifically, such substitution is expected to decrease both the rate of initiation of peroxidation and the potency of the antioxidant. We interpret our results in terms of the effects of isotopic substitution on the rates of the reactions that involve the abstraction of "exchangeable" hydrogen atoms of OH groups in tocopherol and hydroperoxides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Kinetic isotope effect in dehydration of ionic solids. II. The kinetics of dehydration of calcium oxalate monohydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manche, E.P.; Carroll, B.

    1977-01-01

    The kinetics of the isothermal dehydration of the protonated and deuterated monohydrate of calcium oxalate has been investigated at 120, 150, and 170 0 C. The rate of dehydration for these salts was found to be k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.025 +- 0.012. This result rules out the enormous kinetic isotope effect as given in the literature. An isotope effect of a few percent is not ruled out; this magnitude is in keeping with that found by Heinzinger in other dehydration processes. An estimated difference of about 150 cal/mol between the heat of desorption for H 2 O and D 2 O should have led to a ratio, k/sub h//k/sub D/ = 1.20. The smaller observed ratio has been explained on the basis of a compensation effect and may be considered an example of the Barclay--Butler correlation

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Nanotubes Revisited: Effects of Chirality, Isotope Impurity, Tube Length, and Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2004-01-01

    We study the dependence of thermal conductivity of single walled nanotubes (SWNT) on chirality, isotope impurity, tube length and temperature by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with accurate potentials. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the chirality. The isotope impurity, however, can reduce the thermal conductivity up to 60% and change the temperature dependence behavior. We also found that the tube length dependence o...

  20. A Stochastic Method for Estimating the Effect of Isotopic Uncertainties in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    2001-08-24

    This report describes a novel approach developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the estimation of the uncertainty in the prediction of the neutron multiplication factor for spent nuclear fuel. This technique focuses on burnup credit, where credit is taken in criticality safety analysis for the reduced reactivity of fuel irradiated in and discharged from a reactor. Validation methods for burnup credit have attempted to separate the uncertainty associated with isotopic prediction methods from that of criticality eigenvalue calculations. Biases and uncertainties obtained in each step are combined additively. This approach, while conservative, can be excessive because of a physical assumptions employed. This report describes a statistical approach based on Monte Carlo sampling to directly estimate the total uncertainty in eigenvalue calculations resulting from uncertainties in isotopic predictions. The results can also be used to demonstrate the relative conservatism and statistical confidence associated with the method of additively combining uncertainties. This report does not make definitive conclusions on the magnitude of biases and uncertainties associated with isotopic predictions in a burnup credit analysis. These terms will vary depending on system design and the set of isotopic measurements used as a basis for estimating isotopic variances. Instead, the report describes a method that can be applied with a given design and set of isotopic data for estimating design-specific biases and uncertainties.