WorldWideScience

Sample records for strobed laser light

  1. Experimenting with a Household Strobe Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, John M.

    1991-01-01

    Activities that use a common fluorescent light as a strobe light to make things appear to slow down, speed up, or stand still are presented. Background information on strobe lights and directions for the activities are provided. (KR)

  2. Avoidance of strobe lights by zooplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Martin J.; Richards, Nathan S.; Brown, Michael L.; Chipps, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Underwater strobe lights can influence the behavior and distribution of fishes and are increasingly used as a technique to divert fish away from water intake structures on dams. However, few studies examine how strobe lights may affect organisms other than targeted species. To gain insight on strobe lighting effects on nontarget invertebrates, we investigated whether underwater strobe lights influence zooplankton distributions and abundance in Lake Oahe, South Dakota. Zooplankton were collected using vertical tows at 3 discrete distances from an underwater strobe light to quantify the influence of light intensity on zooplankton density. Samples were collected from 3 different depth ranges (0–10 m, 10–20 m and 20–30 m) at strobe light. Copepods represented 67.2% and Daphnia spp. represented 23.3% of all zooplankton sampled from 17 August to 15 September 2004. Night time zooplankton densities significantly decreased in surface waters when strobe lights were activated. Copepods exhibited the greatest avoidance patterns, while Daphnia avoidance varied throughout sampling depths. These results indicate that zooplankton display negative phototaxic behavior to strobe lights and that researchers must be cognizant of potential effects to the ecosystem such as altering predator–prey interactions or affecting zooplankton distribution and growth.

  3. Measurement of aircraft xenon strobe light characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-08-01

    This report provides data on the characteristics of aircraft xenon strobe lights related to their potential for use as the cooperative element in Optical IR (Infrared) Airborne Proximity Warning Indicator (APWI) systems. It includes a description of ...

  4. A demonstration of strobe lights to repel fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.; Downing, J.; Taft, N.; Sullivan, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports is an EPRI review of fish protection systems for hydroelectric facilities which identified strobe lights as a potential behavioral system to minimize fish entrainment. In 1988, EPRI initiated an evaluation of juvenile American shad response to strobe lights at Metropolitan Edison's York Haven Power Station on the Susquehanna River. During their fall migration, juvenile shad accumulate in the forebay. In 1988, using a raft mounted with four strobe lights, it was clearly demonstrated that shad could be excluded from the area in front of the trash racks, and bypassed through a sluiceway into the tailrace. Hydroacoustics were used to monitor the effectiveness of the strobe lights. In 1989, six rafts supporting 22 strobe light were moored in front of the trash racks. Unit outages and river flooding limited a full evaluation of the strobe system. Under limited test conditions, it was possible to confirm shad avoidance of strobe lights similar to that observed in 1988. In 1990, testing was performed with a fully operational strobe system under normal flow conditions and hydraulics. Testing showed that shad could be effectively passed around the York Haven Station. The results of the 1990 studies were more extensive than those of 1989, however, flood waters again limited complete testing of the system

  5. Strobe Traffic Lights Warn of Approaching Emergency Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelder, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    Strobe-enhanced traffic signals have been developed to aid in the preemption of road intersections for emergency vehicles. The strobe-enhanced traffic signals can be incorporated into both new and pre-existing traffic-control systems in which the traffic-signal heads are of a relatively new type based on arrays of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The strobe-enhanced traffic signals offer a less expensive, less complex alternative to a recently developed system of LED-based warning signs placed next to traffic signals. Because of its visual complexity, the combination of traffic signals and warning signs is potentially confusing to motorists. The strobe-enhanced traffic signals present less visual clutter. In a given traffic-signal head, the strobe-enhanced traffic signal is embedded in the red LED array of the stop signal. Two strobe LED strips one horizontal and one vertical are made capable of operating separately from the rest of the red LED matrix. When no emergency vehicle is approaching, the red LED array functions as a normal stop signal: all the red LEDs are turned on and off together. When the intersection is to be preempted for an approaching emergency vehicle, only the LEDs in one of the strobe strips are lit, and are turned on in a sequence that indicates the direction of approach. For example (see figure), if an emergency vehicle approaches from the right, the strobe LEDs are lit in a sequence moving from right to left. Important to the success of strobe-enhanced traffic signals is conformance to city ordinances and close relation to pre-existing traffic standards. For instance, one key restriction is that new icons must not include arrows, so that motorists will not confuse new icons with conventional arrows that indicate allowed directions of movement. It is also critical that new displays like strobe-enhanced traffic signals be similar to displays used in traffic-control systems in large cities. For example, Charleston, South Carolina uses horizontal

  6. Effects of strobe light stimulation on postnatal developing rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-A; Jeong, Eojin; Kim, In-Beom; Lee, Hwa-Young

    2014-03-01

    The nature and intensity of visual stimuli have changed in recent years because of television and other dynamic light sources. Although light stimuli accompanied by contrast and strength changes are thought to have an influence on visual system development, little information is available on the effects of dynamic light stimuli such as a strobe light on visual system development. Thus, this study was designed to evaluate changes caused by dynamic light stimuli during retinal development. This study used 80 Sprague-Dawley rats. From eye opening (postnatal day 14), half of the rats were maintained on a daily 12-h light/dark cycle (control group) and the remaining animals were raised under a 12-h strobe light (2 Hz)/dark cycle (strobe light-reared group). Morphological analyses and electroretinogram (ERG) were performed at postnatal weeks 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10. Among retinal neurons, tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-IR, dopaminergic amacrine cells) cells showed marked plastic changes, such as variations in numbers and soma sizes. In whole-mount preparations at 6, 8, and 10 weeks, type I TH-IR cells showed a decreased number and larger somata, while type II TH-IR cells showed an increased number in strobe-reared animals. Functional assessment by scotopic ERG showed that a-wave and b-wave amplitudes increased at 6 and 8 weeks in strobe-reared animals. These results show that exposure to a strobe light during development causes changes in TH-IR cell number and morphology, leading to a disturbance in normal visual functions.

  7. Some curious phenomena when observing strobe-lights.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Visual perception is suppressed during saccadic eye movements. Intense light flashes may still be observed but are difficult to localize. Two possible causes are suggested on the basis of observations made with police patrol- car strobe lights. See also B 24963 T.

  8. Changes in retinal neurons in the guinea pig retina stimulated by strobe lights during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-A; Kim, In-Beom; Lee, Hwa-Young

    2012-11-30

    The modern-day population is overexposed to visual stimuli accompanied by contrast and strength changes, such as the television or videogames, beginning early in life. These light stimuli may have an influence on the development of the visual system. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of light stimuli on retinal development. We reared guinea pigs under a daily 12-h strobe light (2Hz)/dark cycle from birth, while control animals were reared under a 12-h light/dark cycle. The animals were sacrificed 1, 2, and 4 weeks after birth. The thickness of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness decreased by 14.8% in the strobe-reared animals compared to the control group at 4 weeks, but not at 1 and 2 weeks. The Müller cells of the strobe-reared animals showed a stouter branch compared to that of the control animals at 2 and 4 weeks. In the strobe-reared model, axon-like processes emerging from the rod bipolar cell bodies were observed in the outer plexiform layer (OPL). These findings show that strobe-light stimuli induce morphological changes in retinal neurons, which may lead to the disturbance of normal visual processing during development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of the use of strobe lights in the red lens of traffic signals : technical assistance report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using strobe lights in the red lens of traffic signals and, if appropriate, to recommend guidelines for their use. Strobe lights are used as a supplement to the red lens to draw the att...

  10. Evaluation of Infrasound and Strobe Lights to Elicit Avoidance Behavior in Juvenile Salmon and Char.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Robert, P.; Neitzel, Duane A.; Amidan, Brett G.

    1999-02-01

    Experimental tests were conducted using hatchery reared and wild juvenile chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, eastern brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis, and rainbow trout O. mykiss to determine specific behavior responses to infrasound (<20 Hz) and flashing strobe lights. Caged fish were acclimated in a static test tank and their behavior was recorded using low light cameras. Species specific behavior was characterized by measuring movements of the fish within the cage as well as observing startle and habituation responses. Wild chinook salmon (40-45 mm) and hatchery reared chinook salmon (45-50mm) exhibited avoidance responses when initially exposed to a 10 Hz volume displacement source. Rainbow and eastern brook trout (25-100 mm) did not respond with avoidance or other behaviors to infrasound. Habituation to the infrasound source was evident for chinook salmon during repeated exposures. Wild and hatchery chinook displayed a higher proportion of movement during the initial exposures to infrasound when the acclimation period in the test tank was 2-3 h as compared to a 12-15 h acclimation period. A flashing strobe light produced higher and more consistent movement rates in wild chinook (60% of the tests); hatchery reared chinook salmon (50%) and rainbow trout (80%). No measurable movement or other responses was observed for eastern brook trout. Little if any habituation was observed during repeated exposures to strobe lights. Results from this study indicate that consistent repeatable responses can be elicited from some fish using high intensity strobe lights under a controlled laboratory testing. The specific behaviors observed in these experiments might be used to predict how fish might react to low frequency sound and strobe lights in a screening facility. Because sub-yearling salmonids and resident species are susceptible from becoming entrained at water diversion structures we conducted tests in conjunction with our evaluation of juvenile fish screening

  11. A Behavior of Strobe Light in Non-Visibility (Dense Fog) Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a strobe light was used to understand the behavior of light in an aerosol-like non-visibility environment. Fog was injected into a vinyl pleated cylindrical fog box that is 1 m in diameter and 5.5 m in length. After the fog concentration became saturated in the fog box, the strobe light was set off at regular time intervals until the fog particles almost dissipated in the box. Images of the behavior of the light from the strobe were taken from outside of the fog box with a digital camera in line with the strobe light sync signal. In the case of a DBA (or severe accident) of the nuclear power plant accident, coolant should be injected over the reactor pressure vessel to cool the reactor core. Cold coolant that has been poured into the reactor pressure vessel would be discharged through the nozzles of the core spray system or through pipelines in the fire protection system. The discharging cold coolant would impact high temperature structures with surface temperatures of around 250 .deg. C or higher, such as the reactor pressure vessel that surrounds the reactor core, and then evaporate and turn into steam. The steam cools while forming mist (aerosol including radioactivity), which can cause a sharp drop in visibility. Assuming that a robot has been deployed to manage and mitigate the DBA (or severe accident) at the nuclear power plant, the robot must perform its task in a non-visibility environment. A color CCD/CMOS camera corresponding to visible wavelength (400 - 700 nm) can be attached to the robot for observation and navigation. The camera needs lights in order to secure a clear field of view. Generally, the aperture of a lens is correlated to the intensity of illumination. The brighter the light, the smaller the aperture can be. If the aperture becomes narrower to the size of a pin hole, a clearer image in deep focus can be obtained. As the aperture decreases in the half, the required amount of light doubles. The observed behavior of the strobe

  12. A Behavior of Strobe Light in Non-Visibility (Dense Fog) Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jai Wan; Choi, Young Soo; Jeong, Kyung Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, a strobe light was used to understand the behavior of light in an aerosol-like non-visibility environment. Fog was injected into a vinyl pleated cylindrical fog box that is 1 m in diameter and 5.5 m in length. After the fog concentration became saturated in the fog box, the strobe light was set off at regular time intervals until the fog particles almost dissipated in the box. Images of the behavior of the light from the strobe were taken from outside of the fog box with a digital camera in line with the strobe light sync signal. In the case of a DBA (or severe accident) of the nuclear power plant accident, coolant should be injected over the reactor pressure vessel to cool the reactor core. Cold coolant that has been poured into the reactor pressure vessel would be discharged through the nozzles of the core spray system or through pipelines in the fire protection system. The discharging cold coolant would impact high temperature structures with surface temperatures of around 250 .deg. C or higher, such as the reactor pressure vessel that surrounds the reactor core, and then evaporate and turn into steam. The steam cools while forming mist (aerosol including radioactivity), which can cause a sharp drop in visibility. Assuming that a robot has been deployed to manage and mitigate the DBA (or severe accident) at the nuclear power plant, the robot must perform its task in a non-visibility environment. A color CCD/CMOS camera corresponding to visible wavelength (400 - 700 nm) can be attached to the robot for observation and navigation. The camera needs lights in order to secure a clear field of view. Generally, the aperture of a lens is correlated to the intensity of illumination. The brighter the light, the smaller the aperture can be. If the aperture becomes narrower to the size of a pin hole, a clearer image in deep focus can be obtained. As the aperture decreases in the half, the required amount of light doubles. The observed behavior of the strobe

  13. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes)

  14. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

  15. Evaluation of strobe lights to reduce turbine entrainment of juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Tobias J.; Evans, Scott D.; Liedtke, Theresa L.; Rondorf, Dennis W.; Kohn, Mike

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a radiotelemetry evaluation to determine if strobe lights could be used to decrease turbine entrainment of juvenile steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. We found that radio-tagged juvenile steelhead approached and entered two spillbays (one lighted, one unlighted) in equal proportions. However, the presence of strobe lights was associated with decreased spillbay residence time of juvenile steelhead and increased passage through induction slots (secondary turbine intakes located upstream of the ogee on the spillway). Mean residence time of tagged fish inside the lighted spillbay was 14 min compared to 62 min inside the unlighted spillbay. Radio-tagged steelhead passed through induction slots at a higher proportion in the lighted spillbay (55%) than in the unlighted spillbay (26%). Recent studies have suggested that strobe lights can induce torpor in juvenile salmonids. We believe that strobe light exposure affected fish in our study at a location where they were susceptible to high flows thereby reducing mean residence time and increasing the proportion of tagged fish entering induction slots in the lighted spillbay. Our results suggest that factors such as deployment location, exposure, and flow are important variables that should be considered when evaluating strobe lights as a potential fish-deterring management tool.

  16. Strobed integrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnokutskij, R.N.; Kurchaninov, L.L.; Fedyakin, N.N.; Shuvalov, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Two measuring techniques for signal amplitude of particle detector without the in-side amplification: with peak detector and with strobed integrator are compared. Simple formulae to calculate noise value at the output of strobed integrator are derived. Usage of strobed integrator is shown to enable to increase essentially counting rate as compared to peak detector at the same noise level. Optimal positioning strobe-pulse with regard to the input signal is determined. Equivalent noise charge ar signal shaping sifferent schemes is calculated

  17. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2004-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly

  18. The STROBE statement and neuropsychology: lighting the way toward evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, David W; Bowden, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Reporting appropriate research detail across clinical disciplines is often inconsistent or incomplete. Insufficient report detail reduces confidence in findings, makes study replication more difficult, and decreases the precision of data available for critical review including meta-analysis. In response to these concerns, cooperative attempts across multiple specialties have developed explicit research reporting standards to guide publication detail. These recommendations have been widely adopted by high impact medical journals, but have not yet been widely embraced by neuropsychology. The STROBE Statement (STrengthening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology) is particularly relevant to neuropsychology since clinical research is often based on non-funded studies of patient samples. In this paper we describe the STROBE Statement and demonstrate how STROBE criteria, applied to reporting of neuropsychological findings, will maintain neuropsychology's position as a leader in quantifying brain-behavior relationships. We also provide specific recommendations for data reporting and disclosure of perceived conflicts of interest that will further enhance reporting transparency for possible perceived sources of bias. In an era in which evidence-based practice assumes an increasingly prominent role, improved reporting standards will promote better patient care, assist in developing quality practice guidelines, and ensure that neuropsychology remains a vigorous discipline in the clinical neurosciences that consciously aspires to high methodological rigor.

  19. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  20. Strobes: An Oscillatory Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; van Lingen, J.N.J.; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  1. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven

  2. [Characteristics of laser light].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takac, S; Stojanović, S

    1999-01-01

    Laser is one of the greatest technical discoveries of the 20th century. It is important in basic sciences, but particularly in diagnosis and therapy of various pathologic conditions of human organism. It is electromagnetic radiation, not X-irradiation and, as such, it is not expected to produce new generation of iatrogenic malignancies. Laser falls between infrared and ultraviolet on the spectrum mainly in the visible light spectrum. Properties of laser light are: monochromacity (the same color), coherence (all of the light waves are in phase both spatially and temporally), collimation (all rays are parallel to each other and do not diverge significantly even over long distances). Lasers were first conceived by Einstein in 1917 when he wrote his "Zur Quantum Theorie der Strahlung" (the quantum theory of radiation) which enumerated concepts of stimulated and spontaneous emission and absorption. Drs. Arthur Schawlow and Charles Townes, in 1956, extended lasers into the optical frequency range and Maiman, in 1960, operated the first laser using ruby as the active medium (ruby laser). Laser is an acronym for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. To understand the acronym, it is necessary to understand the basic physics of the atom. However, if the atom that is in the excited state is struck by another photon of energy before it returns to the ground state, two photons of equal frequency and energy, travelling in the same direction and in perfect spatial and temporal harmony, are produced. This phenomenon is termed stimulated emission of radiation. An external power source hyperexcites the atoms in the laser medium so that the number of atoms possessing upper energy levels exceeds the number of atoms in a power energy level, a condition termed a population inversion. This "pumping system" which imparts additional energy to the atoms may be optical, mechanical, or chemical. These atoms in a hyperexcited state spontaneously emit photons of light. The

  3. Optics, light and lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Meschede, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the concepts of classical optics, Optics, Light and Lasers introduces in detail the phenomena of linear and nonlinear light matter interaction, the properties of modern laser sources, and the concepts of quantum optics. Several examples taken from the scope of modern research are provided to emphasize the relevance of optics in current developments within science and technology. The text has been written for newcomers to the topic and benefits from the author's ability to explain difficult sequences and effects in a straightforward and easily comprehensible way. To this second, c

  4. Strobe Light Testing and Kokanee Population Monitoring : Dworshak Dam Impacts Assessment and Fisheries Investigation Project, 97-99 : annual Progress Report for 1998.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiolie, Melo A.; Harryman, Bill; Ament, William J.

    1999-12-01

    We tested the response of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka to strobe lights. Testing was conducted on wild, free-ranging fish in their natural environment (i.e., the pelagic region of two large Idaho lakes). Split-beam hydroacoustics were used to record the distance kokanee moved away from the lights as well as the density of kokanee in the area near the lights. In control tests, where the strobe lights were lowered into the lake but kept turned off, kokanee remained within a few meters of the lights. Once the lights began flashing, kokanee quickly moved away from the light source. Kokanee were found to move an average of 30 to 136 m away from the lights in waters with Secchi transparencies from 2.8 to 17.5 m (p=0.00 to p=0.04). Kokanee densities near the lights were significantly lower (p=0.00 to p=0.07) when the lights were turned on than in control samples with no lights flashing. Flash rates of 300, 360, and 450 flashes/min elicited strong avoidance responses from the fish. Kokanee remained at least 24 m away from the lights during our longest test that lasted for 5 h 50 min. Kokanee appeared to be responding to flashes that were well less than 0.00016 lux above background lighting.

  5. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, M.; Johnson, Robert; McKinstry, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-03-01

    The construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River resulted in the complete extirpation of the anadromous fishery upstream of these structures. Today, this area is totally dependent upon resident fish resources to support local fisheries. The resident fishing is enhanced by an extensive stocking program for target species in the existing fishery, including kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss). The kokanee fishery in Lake Roosevelt has not been meeting the return goals set by fisheries managers despite the stocking program. Investigations of physical and biological factors that could affect the kokanee population found predation and entrainment had a significant impact on the fish population. In 1999 and 2000, walleye (Sander vitreum) consumed between 15% and 9%, respectively, of the hatchery kokanee within 41 days of their release, while results from a study in the late 1990s estimated that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam could account for up to 30% of the total mortality of the stocked fish. To address the entrainment loss, the Bonneville Power Administration commissioned a study to determine if fish would avoid areas illuminated by strobe lights in the forebay of the third powerplant. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). From 2002 through 2004, six strobe lights were suspended in the center of the opening to the third powerplant forebay during summer months. Results from those studies indicated that fish appeared to be attracted to the illuminated area but only at night and when flow conditions within the third powerplant forebay were minimal. However, small but consistent results from these studies indicated that under high flow conditions, fish might be avoiding the lights. The 2005 study was designed to examine whether, under high flow conditions near the penstock

  6. Using 3D Acoustic Telemetry to Assess the Response of Resident Salmonids to Strobe Lights in Lake Roosevelt, Washington; Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Feasibility Study, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Russlee; Farley, M.; Hansen, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    In 1995, the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was established to mitigate the loss of anadromous fish due to the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams. The objectives of the Chief Joseph Enhancement Project are to determine the status of resident kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams and to enhance kokanee and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations. Studies conducted at Grand Coulee Dam documented substantial entrainment of kokanee through turbines at the third powerhouse. In response to finding high entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam, the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) recommended investigating the use of strobe lights to repel fish from the forebay of the third powerhouse. Therefore, our study focused on the third powerhouse and how strobe lights affected fish behavior in this area. The primary objective of our study was to assess the behavioral response of kokanee and rainbow trout to strobe lights using 3D acoustic telemetry, which yields explicit spatial locations of fish in three dimensions. Our secondary objectives were to (1) use a 3D acoustic system to mobile track tagged fish in the forebay and upriver of Grand Coulee Dam and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting fish using a hydrophone mounted in the tailrace of the third powerhouse. Within the fixed hydrophone array located in the third powerhouse cul-de-sac, we detected 50 kokanee and 30 rainbow trout, accounting for 47% and 45% respectively, of the fish released. Kokanee had a median residence time of 0.20 h and rainbow trout had a median residence time of 1.07 h. We detected more kokanee in the array at night compared to the day, and we detected more rainbow trout during the day compared to the night. In general, kokanee and rainbow trout approached along the eastern shore and the relative frequency of kokanee and rainbow trout detections was highest along the eastern shoreline of the 3D array. However, because we

  7. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted

  8. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2005-02-01

    This report documents a four-year study(a) to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) at the entrance to the forebay of the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. The work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes). In this report, emphasis is placed on the methodology and results associated with the fourth project year and compared with findings from the previous years to provide an overall project summary. Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph dams on the Columbia River (Figure S.1). A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish, including kokanee and rainbow trout, were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. Because these entrainment rates represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam, they have been judged unacceptable to fishery managers responsible for perpetuating the fishery in Lake Roosevelt. In an effort to reduce fish entrainment rates, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was modified in 2001 to include a multiyear study of the efficacy of using strobe lights to deter fish from entering the third powerplant forebay. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory initiated the four-year study in collaboration with Colville

  9. Laser light scattering basic principles and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Benjamin

    1994-01-01

    Geared toward upper-level undergraduate and graduate students, this text introduces the interdisciplinary area of laser light scattering, focusing chiefly on theoretical concepts of quasielastic laser scattering.

  10. Laser/Light Therapy for Birthmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products In This Section Dermatologic Surgery What is dermatologic ... for Every Season How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Laser/Light Therapy for Birthmarks In laser/light ...

  11. Plasmas and intense laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    The present article begins with a description of the laser technology required to reach the high irradiances of interest and provides a brief outline of the more important diagnostic techniques used in investigating the plasmas. An introduction to plasma waves is given and the linear and nonlinear excitation of waves is discussed. The remainder of the article describes some of the experimental evidence supporting the interpretation of the plasma behaviour at high laser-light intensities in terms of the excitation of plasma waves and the subsequent heating of plasma by these waves. (author)

  12. Lasers, light-atom interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cagnac, B.; Faroux, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This book has a double purpose: first to explain in a way as simple as possible the interaction processes occurring between atoms and light waves, and secondly to help any scientist that needs further information to improve his knowledge of lasers. The content of this book has been parted into 3 more or less independent sections: 1) effect of an electromagnetic field on a 2-quantum state system, 2) operating mode of lasers in the framework of transition probabilities, and 3) calculation of the emitted wave. Einstein's phenomenological hypothesis has led to probability equations called rate equations, these equations do not give a true representation of the interaction process at the scale of the atom but this representation appears to be true on an average over a large population of atoms. Only quantum mechanics can describe accurately the light-atom interaction but at the cost of a far higher complexity. In the first part of the book quantum mechanics is introduced and applied under 2 simplifying hypothesis: -) the atom system has only 2 non-degenerate states and -) the intensity of the light wave is high enough to involve a large population of photons. Under these hypothesis, Rabi oscillations, Ramsey pattern and the splitting of Autler-Townes levels are explained. The second part is dedicated to the phenomenological model of Einstein that gives good results collectively. In the third part of the book, Maxwell equations are used to compute field spatial distribution that are currently found in experiments involving lasers. (A.C.)

  13. Investigation of the interaction dynamics of a pair of laser-induced bubbles generated at the same time through double-exposure strobe method and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Liu, Liu; Ni, Xiao-Wu

    2017-08-01

    In order to understand the interaction dynamics of a pair of laser-induced bubbles, a double-exposure strobe photography experimental setup is build up to study the temporal evolution of the bubble pairs and to measure the transient bubble-interface moving speed. The interaction mechanisms of the bubble pairs are discussed together with the numerical results obtained through OpenFOAM. It is shown that the direction and the velocity of the jetting could be controlled by the relative size and the relative initiation distance of the bubble pair, when the bubbles are generated at the same time, i.e., in-phase. The liquid jet is considered to be a penetrating jet. The jet is originated from the smaller bubble and clearly protruding outside of the bigger bubble. The parameter space of the relative size and the initiation distance of the bubble pair allowing the formation of the penetrating jet are very narrow. It is concluded that the liquid jet induced by the bubble interactions resulted from the collapse and the rebound of the smaller bubble nearby the bigger bubble. This is defined as the "catapult effect." Such a directional liquid transportation is a promising tool as a micro-injector or a micro-pump. The investigation results could be also supplementary to the understandings of the bubble dynamics.

  14. Multichannel strobed photon counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganichev, V.A.; Elkin, O.K.; Zajdel', I.N.; Kozlov, V.A.; Lyapunov, G.M.; Malinovskij, A.L.; Ryabov, E.A.; Sil'kis, Eh.G.

    1987-01-01

    A multichannel strobed photon counter operating in the visible spectrum range is developed on the basis of luminescence amplifier with a microchannel plate and LI-706 supervidicon. The pulses overvoltaged supply mode of a microchannel plate has brought about amplification necessary for input into plateau of the counting characteristics and photoacceptor strobing in the nanosecond (140 ns) range. Device noises are practically completely determined by noises in luminescence amplifier photocathode. the above multichannel counter has a durable stability of parameters, electronic system simplicity and small dimensions of the photoacceptor

  15. Flare or strobe: a tunable chlorine-free pyrotechnic system based on lithium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glück, Johann; Klapötke, Thomas M; Sabatini, Jesse J

    2018-01-18

    The development of a red, chlorine-/strontium-free pyrotechnic composition which serves as either a strobe or a flare is reported. The observed strobing behaviour of a red-light emitting composition of Mg/LiNO 3 /hexamine/binder was investigated. Additives like 5-amino-1H-tetrazole and nitrocellulose were used to increase the strobing frequency and achieve constant burning.

  16. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, M.S.

    1993-05-18

    A improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  17. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  18. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G.; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2009-01-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric analysis. The white light lasers used in this study were integrated into a commercial flow cytometry platform, and a series of high-transmission bandpass filters used to select wavelength ranges from the blue (~480 nm) to the long red (>700 nm). Cells labeled with a variety of fluorescent probes or expressing fluorescent proteins were then analyzed, in comparison with traditional lasers emitting at wavelengths similar to the filtered SC source. Based on a standard sensitivity metric, the white light laser bandwidths produced similar excitation levels to traditional lasers for a wide variety of fluorescent probes and expressible proteins. Sensitivity assessment using fluorescent bead arrays confirmed that the SC laser and traditional sources resulted in similar levels of detection sensitivity. Supercontinuum white light laser sources therefore have the potential to remove a significant barrier in flow cytometric analysis, namely the limitation of excitation wavelengths. Almost any visible wavelength range can be made available for excitation, allowing access to virtually any fluorescent probe, and permitting “fine-tuning” of excitation wavelength to particular probes. PMID:19072836

  19. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Telford, William G.; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2009-01-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric a...

  20. Explosive laser light initiation of propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piltch, M.S.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an improved initiator for artillery shell using an explosively generated laser light to uniformly initiate the propellent. A small quantity of a high explosive, when detonated, creates a high pressure and temperature, causing the surrounding noble gas to fluoresce. This fluorescence is directed into a lasing material, which lases, and directs laser light into a cavity in the propellant, uniformly initiating the propellant.

  1. 49 CFR 229.133 - Interim locomotive conspicuity measures-auxiliary external lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... within 45 degrees of the longitudinal centerline of the locomotive. (2) Strobe lights. (i) Strobe lights... (November 1964), of at least 500 candela. (ii) The flash rate of strobe lights shall be at least 40 flashes per minute and at most 180 flashes per minute. (iii) Strobe lights shall be placed at the front of the...

  2. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G; Subach, Fedor V; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2009-05-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric analysis. The white light lasers used in this study were integrated into a commercial flow cytometry platform, and a series of high-transmission bandpass filters used to select wavelength ranges from the blue (approximately 480 nm) to the long red (>700 nm). Cells labeled with a variety of fluorescent probes or expressing fluorescent proteins were then analyzed, in comparison with traditional lasers emitting at wavelengths similar to the filtered SC source. Based on a standard sensitivity metric, the white light laser bandwidths produced similar excitation levels to traditional lasers for a wide variety of fluorescent probes and expressible proteins. Sensitivity assessment using fluorescent bead arrays confirmed that the SC laser and traditional sources resulted in similar levels of detection sensitivity. Supercontinuum white light laser sources therefore have the potential to remove a significant barrier in flow cytometric analysis, namely the limitation of excitation wavelengths. Almost any visible wavelength range can be made available for excitation, allowing access to virtually any fluorescent probe, and permitting "fine-tuning" of excitation wavelength to particular probes. (c) 2008 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  3. Theoretical interpretations of enhanced laser light absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruer, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    Intense laser light is not efficiently absorbed classically but can be absorbed by its conversion to electron plasma waves near the critical density. The physical mechanisms for this conversion are discussed, and some simple estimates for heating by plasma waves are applied to some recent experiments. Several effects which strongly influence the absorption of high intensity light are emphasized, including a nonlinear steepening of the plasma density profile which is demonstrated in computer simulations. Finally the possibility of an induced reflection of laser light due to instabilities in the underdense plasma before the critical density is also discussed. Such stimulated reflection can be particularly important in plasmas with very long density gradients. (U.S.)

  4. Laser light absorption and reflection in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruer, W.; Valeo, E.; Estabrook, K.; Thomson, J.; Langdon, B.; Lasinski, B.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanisms by which intense laser light energy is absorbed or reflected by a hot, dense plasma are of central concern in laser fusion studies. Extensive computer simulations show that the plasma waves responsible for absorption near the critical density are produced by instabilities, resonant excitation and, more generally, by off-resonant coupling by non-linearly produced ion density fluctuations. Non-linear modifications in the plasma density profile are found to play a key role in the light absorption. DC magnetic fields large enough to affect electron transport are observed in computer simulations of intense obliquely incident light, even in the absence of irradiation asymmetry. Finally, plasma heating near one-fourth the critical density and the role of bandwidth as a means to control Brillouin reflection are discussed. (author)

  5. Laser and intense pulsed light hair removal technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, M; Beerwerth, F; Nash, J F

    2011-01-01

    Light-based hair removal (LHR) is one of the fastest growing, nonsurgical aesthetic cosmetic procedures in the United States and Europe. A variety of light sources including lasers, e.g. alexandrite laser (755 nm), pulsed diode lasers (800, 810 nm), Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) and broad-spectrum intense...

  6. Inexpensive Strobe-Like Photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Emil L.; Tavares, Odilon A. P.; Duarte, Sergio B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a technique the authors have developed to produce and analyze, at very low cost, good quality strobe-like photographs. While the concept is similar to the one described by Graney and DiNoto, the strategy described here benefits from recent advances in the fields of digital photography and related software to significantly…

  7. Future Solid State Lighting using LEDs and Diode Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Paul Michael

    2014-01-01

    significant savings. Solid state lighting (SSL) based on LEDs is today the most efficient light source for generation of high quality white light. Diode lasers, however, have the potential of being more efficient than LEDs for the generation of white light. A major advantage using diode lasers for solid state......Lighting accounts for 20% of all electrical energy usage. Household lighting and commercial lighting such as public and street lighting are responsible for significant greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, currently many research initiatives focus on the development of new light sources which shows...... lighting is that the high efficiency can be obtained at high light lumen levels in a single element emitter and thus less light sources are required to achieve a desired light level. Furthermore, the high directionality of the generated light from laser diodes increases the energy savings in many...

  8. Strobe imaging of electric fields by depolarization of Rydberg states of

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Jayasinghe, Lalith; Oelke, Lance; Ferber, Ruvin; Shafer-Ray, Neil

    2001-01-01

    We present a new technique for imaging electric fields that takes advantage of the large field-dependent coupling of the Rydberg states of Hg. Specifically we demonstrate an optical scheme that takes advantage of the field-induced mixing of the 6s( 2 S)nd D and 6s( 2 S)(n+1)p P states of Hg. With the appropriate laser probe of this mixing, 579.2 nm light is produced that is directly related to the strength of the local electric field. This allows strobe images to be made of the electric field surrounding an object on a 50 ps timescale. We demonstrate the utility of this technique by probing the electric field surrounding pads on a digital integrated circuit package. (author)

  9. STROBE initiative: guidelines on reporting observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Monica; Cardoso, Leticia Oliveira; Bastos, Francisco Inacio; Magnanini, Monica Maria Ferreira; Silva, Cosme Marcelo Furtado Passos da

    2010-06-01

    Reporting of observational studies is often inadequate, hampering the assessment of their strengths and weaknesses and, consequently, the generalization of study results. The initiative named Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) developed a checklist of 22 items, the STROBE Statement, with recommendations about what should be included in a more accurate and complete description of observational studies. Between June and December 2008, a group of Brazilian researchers was dedicated to the translation and adaptation of the STROBE Statement into Portuguese. The present study aimed to show the translation into Portuguese, introduce the discussion on the context of use, the potential and limitations of the STROBE initiative.

  10. Laser-Based Lighting: Experimental Analysis and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivellin, Nicola; Yushchenko, Maksym; Buffolo, Matteo; De Santi, Carlo; Meneghini, Matteo; Meneghesso, Gaudenzio; Zanoni, Enrico

    2017-10-11

    This paper presents an extensive analysis of the operating principles, theoretical background, advantages and limitations of laser-based lighting systems. In the first part of the paper we discuss the main advantages and issues of laser-based lighting, and present a comparison with conventional LED-lighting technology. In the second part of the paper, we present original experimental data on the stability and reliability of phosphor layers for laser lighting, based on high light-intensity and high-temperature degradation tests. In the third part of the paper (for the first time) we present a detailed comparison between three different solutions for laser lighting, based on (i) transmissive phosphor layers; (ii) a reflective/angled phosphor layer; and (iii) a parabolic reflector, by discussing the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. The results presented within this paper can be used as a guideline for the development of advanced lighting systems based on laser diodes.

  11. Laser-Based Lighting: Experimental Analysis and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Trivellin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an extensive analysis of the operating principles, theoretical background, advantages and limitations of laser-based lighting systems. In the first part of the paper we discuss the main advantages and issues of laser-based lighting, and present a comparison with conventional LED-lighting technology. In the second part of the paper, we present original experimental data on the stability and reliability of phosphor layers for laser lighting, based on high light-intensity and high-temperature degradation tests. In the third part of the paper (for the first time we present a detailed comparison between three different solutions for laser lighting, based on (i transmissive phosphor layers; (ii a reflective/angled phosphor layer; and (iii a parabolic reflector, by discussing the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. The results presented within this paper can be used as a guideline for the development of advanced lighting systems based on laser diodes.

  12. Threshold Characteristics of Slow-Light Photonic Crystal Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The threshold properties of photonic crystal quantum dot lasers operating in the slow-light regime are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements show that, in contrast to conventional lasers, the threshold gain attains a minimum value for a specific cavity length. The experimental...... results are explained by an analytical theory for the laser threshold that takes into account the effects of slow light and random disorder due to unavoidable fabrication imperfections. Longer lasers are found to operate deeper into the slow-light region, leading to a trade-off between slow-light induced...

  13. Violet Laser Diode Enables Lighting Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yu-Chieh; Huang, Yu-Fang; Wu, Tsai-Chen; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Li-Yin; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2017-09-05

    Violet laser diode (VLD) based white-light source with high color rendering index (CRI) for lighting communication is implemented by covering with Y 3 Al 5 O 12 :Ce 3+ (YAG:Ce) or Lu 3 Al 5 O 12 :Ce 3+ /CaAlSiN 3 :Eu 2+ (LuAG:Ce/CASN:Eu) phosphorous diffuser plates. After passing the beam of VLD biased at 70 mA (~2I th ) through the YAG:Ce phosphorous diffuser, a daylight with a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5068 K and a CRI of 65 is acquired to provide a forward error correction (FEC) certified data rate of 4.4 Gbit/s. By using the VLD biased at 122 mA (~3.5I th ) to excite the LuAG:Ce/CASN:Eu phosphorous diffuser with 0.85-mm thickness, a warm white-light source with a CCT of 2700 K and a CRI of 87.9 is obtained at a cost of decreasing transmission capacity to 2.4 Gbit/s. Thinning the phosphor thickness to 0.75 mm effectively reduces the required bias current by 32 mA to achieve the same CCT for the delivered white light, which offers an enlarged CRI of 89.1 and an increased data rate of 4.4 Gbit/s. Further enlarging the bias current to 105 mA remains the white-light transmission capacity at 4.4 Gbit/s but reveals an increased CCT of 3023 K and an upgraded CRI of 91.5.

  14. Slow-light effects in photonic crystal membrane lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted.......In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted....

  15. Metallic surfaces decontamination by using laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, Fabrice; Lecardonnel, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Metal surface cleaning appears to be one of the major priorities for industries especially for nuclear industries. The research and the development of a new technology that is able to meet the actual requirements (i.e. waste volume minimization, liquid effluents and chemicals free process...) seems to be the main commitment. Currently, a wide panel of technologies already exists (e.g. blasting, disk sander, electro-decontamination...) but for some of them, the efficiency is limited (e.g, Dry Ice blasting) and for others, the wastes production (liquid and/or solid) remains an important issue. One answer could be the use of a LASER light process. Since a couple of years, the Clean- Up Business Unit of the AREVA group investigates this decontamination technology. Many tests have been already performed in inactive (i.e. on simulants such as paints, inks, resins, metallic oxides) or active conditions (i.e. pieces covered with a thick metallic oxide layer and metallic pieces covered with grease). The paper will describe the results obtained in term of decontamination efficiency during all our validation process. Metallographic characterizations (i.e. SEM, X-ray scattering) and radiological analysis will be provided. We will also focus our paper on the future deployment of the LASER technology and its commercial use at La Hague reprocessing facility in 2013. (authors)

  16. Diffuse Reflection of Laser Light From Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Davis, A.; McGill, M.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light reflected from an aqueous suspension of particles or "cloud" with known thickness and particle size distribution defines the "cloud radiative Green's function", G. G is sensitive to cloud thickness, allowing retrieval of that important quantity. We describe a laboratory simulation of G, useful in design of an offbeam Lidar instrument for remote sensing of cloud thickness. Clouds of polystyrene microspheres suspended in water are analogous to real clouds of water droplets suspended in air. The size distribution extends from 0.5 microns to 25 microns, roughly lognormal, similar to real clouds. Density of suspended spheres is adjusted so photon mean-free-path is about 10 cm, 1000 times smaller than in real clouds. The light source is a Nd:YAG laser at 530 nm. Detectors are flux and photon-counting PMTs, with a glass probe for precise positioning. A Labview 5 VI controls position and data acquisition, via an NI Motion Control board connected to a stepper motor driving an Edmund linear slider,and a 16-channel 16-bit NI-DAQ board. The stepper motor is accurate to 10 microns. Step size is selectable. Far from the beam, the rate of exponential increase in the beam direction scales as expected from diffusion theory, linearly with cloud thickness, and inversely as the square root of the reduced optical thickness, independent of particle size. Nearer the beam the signal increases faster than exponential and depends on particle size. Results verify 3D Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate detectability of remotely sensed offbeam returns, without filters at night, with narrow bandpass filter in day.

  17. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; Milathianaki, Despina; Polzin, Wayne; Ratner, Daniel; Tavella, Franz; Vetter, Sharon; Welch, Marc; White, William E.; Fry, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript serves as a reference to describe the optical laser sources and capabilities at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS

  18. Optical laser systems at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minitti, Michael P.; Robinson, Joseph S.; Coffee, Ryan N.; Edstrom, Steve; Gilevich, Sasha; Glownia, James M.; Granados, Eduardo; Hering, Philippe; Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Miahnahri, Alan; Milathianaki, Despina; Polzin, Wayne; Ratner, Daniel; Tavella, Franz; Vetter, Sharon; Welch, Marc; White, William E.; Fry, Alan R., E-mail: alanfry@slac.stanford.edu [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2015-04-22

    This manuscript serves as a reference to describe the optical laser sources and capabilities at the Linac Coherent Light Source. Ultrafast optical lasers play an essential role in exploiting the unique capabilities of recently commissioned X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Pump–probe experimental techniques reveal ultrafast dynamics in atomic and molecular processes and reveal new insights in chemistry, biology, material science and high-energy-density physics. This manuscript describes the laser systems and experimental methods that enable cutting-edge optical laser/X-ray pump–probe experiments to be performed at LCLS.

  19. New lasers and light sources - old and new risks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Schwandt, Antje; Seeber, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    Recent developments (new wavelengths, treatment concepts, and combinations) in the field of lasers, intense pulsed light (IPL), LED, as well as new energy and light sources have opened up new therapeutic options that extend beyond mere aesthetic indications. Thus, while fractional lasers used to ...

  20. Structural variation analysis with strobe reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Anna; Bashir, Ali; Raphael, Benjamin J

    2010-05-15

    Structural variation including deletions, duplications and rearrangements of DNA sequence are an important contributor to genome variation in many organisms. In human, many structural variants are found in complex and highly repetitive regions of the genome making their identification difficult. A new sequencing technology called strobe sequencing generates strobe reads containing multiple subreads from a single contiguous fragment of DNA. Strobe reads thus generalize the concept of paired reads, or mate pairs, that have been routinely used for structural variant detection. Strobe sequencing holds promise for unraveling complex variants that have been difficult to characterize with current sequencing technologies. We introduce an algorithm for identification of structural variants using strobe sequencing data. We consider strobe reads from a test genome that have multiple possible alignments to a reference genome due to sequencing errors and/or repetitive sequences in the reference. We formulate the combinatorial optimization problem of finding the minimum number of structural variants in the test genome that are consistent with these alignments. We solve this problem using an integer linear program. Using simulated strobe sequencing data, we show that our algorithm has better sensitivity and specificity than paired read approaches for structural variation identification. braphael@brown.edu

  1. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). NIF and Photon Sciences; Thomas, A. G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences; Mangles, S. P.D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Corde, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Flacco, A. [ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Litos, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Neely, D. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL). Central Laser Facility; Viera, J. [Univ. of Lisbon (Portugal). GoLP-Inst. de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Lab. Associado; Najmudin, Z. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Bingham, R. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL). Central Laser Facility; Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Katsouleas, T. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Platt School of Engineering

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  2. Investigation of saturation effects in ceramic phosphors for laser lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krasnoshchoka, Anastasiia; Thorseth, Anders; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    We report observation of saturation effects in a Ce:LuAG and Eu-doped nitride ceramic phosphor for conversion of blue laser light for white light generation. The luminous flux from the phosphors material increases linearly with the input power until saturation effects limit the conversion...... of the illumination. A phosphor conversion efficiency up to 140.8 lm/W with CRI of 89.4 was achieved. The saturation in a ceramic phosphor, when illuminated by high intensity laser diodes, is estimated to play the main role in limiting the available luminance from laser based lighting systems....

  3. Phosphor converted laser diode light source for endoscopic diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krasnoshchoka, Anastasiia; Thorseth, Anders; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    In order to provide light sources for endourology and on-site testing of the light source, we are developing a portable endoscope light source prototype based on a phosphor converted laser diode. A small emitting area from the phosphor material excited by a laser diode enables coupling...... of the generated white light into thin optical fibres. The development involves designing optics for optimizing the light extraction efficiency and guiding of light to the area of interest. In this paper we compared the developed light source to the current standard in endoscopy – xenon arc lamps. Detailed...... spectral analysis of illuminance, CRI and CCT at two power levels and two distances for both the PC-LD and the xenon light source was performed. The obtained results verified that the developed light source is suitable for endoscopy illumination and the first pre-clinical trials will be performed shortly....

  4. Diffusion filter eliminates fringe effects of coherent laser light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsasky, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Diffusion filter comprised of small particles in colloidal suspension reduces the coherence of a laser beam used as a photographic light source. Interference patterns which obscure details in photographic film are eliminated, the intensity and collimation are moderately affected.

  5. Laser entertainment and light shows in education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaratnam, Andrew T.; Symons, Charles

    2002-05-01

    Laser shows and beam effects have been a source of entertainment since its first public performance May 9, 1969, at Mills College in Oakland, California. Since 1997, the Photonics Center, NgeeAnn Polytechnic, Singapore, has been using laser shows as a teaching tool. Students are able to exhibit their creative skills and learn at the same time how lasers are used in the entertainment industry. Students will acquire a number of skills including handling three- phase power supply, operation of cooling system, and laser alignment. Students also acquire an appreciation of the arts, learning about shapes and contours as they develop graphics for the shows. After holography, laser show animation provides a combination of the arts and technology. This paper aims to briefly describe how a krypton-argon laser, galvanometer scanners, a polychromatic acousto-optic modulator and related electronics are put together to develop a laser projector. The paper also describes how students are trained to make their own laser animation and beam effects with music, and at the same time have an appreciation of the operation of a Class IV laser and the handling of optical components.

  6. Lasers the power and precision of light

    CERN Document Server

    Diels, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    ""Lasers"" are active ingredients of our modern life, but they are inconspicuous as they often go unnoticed. This intuitive introductory guide will tell you all you want to know about laser technologies in very diverse fields from nuclear and particle physics to medicine, astronomy and ultra-precise metrology. The book is coherently focused on fundamentals, and is aimed to stimulate intuition about present and future applications, while unveiling the halo of myths around lasers. Written by reputable laser experts who think that science should be entertaining, this useful reference relies on si

  7. Observational research and the STROBE statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Bravo-Peña

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Observational research is the source of the largest amount of evidence in health care. Their proper use depends on several factors, among them a complete reporting. This article presents the STROBE Statement (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology and its influence on complete research reporting. We recommended the use of the STROBE Statement and their checklist in order to improve the completeness of reporting of observational research and increase its usability.

  8. Laser Light: Using Laser Refractometry to Determine Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Laser refractometry is a science-technology-based activity that requires students to manipulate a variety of equipment, tools, materials, and critical-thinking skills. Students use a laser to measure the percent of glucose in a solution by calibrating the system, taking measurements, and computing the concentration. (MKR)

  9. Lasers light the way for the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longenecker, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The US Department of Energy in 1985 made a fundamental change in strategy by choosing lasers as its next generation enrichment technology, rather than centrifuges. Lasers hold immense promise and development is well in hand, but the need remains to integrate effectively private and federal resources. (author)

  10. Visible and ultraviolet light sources based nonlinear interaction of lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Thalbitzer; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Jain, Mayank

    Different light sources can be used for optically stimulated luminescence measurements and usually a halogen lamp in combination with filters or light emitting diodes (LED’s) are used to provide the desired stimulation wavelength. However lasers can provide a much more well-defined beam, very nar...... for synthesizing any wavelength in the visible and ultraviolet light based sum frequency generation between two lasers is presented.......Different light sources can be used for optically stimulated luminescence measurements and usually a halogen lamp in combination with filters or light emitting diodes (LED’s) are used to provide the desired stimulation wavelength. However lasers can provide a much more well-defined beam, very...

  11. Light/laser therapy in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Keyvan; Villafradez-Diaz, L Magaly

    2005-12-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most prevalent skin diseases known. As common as this condition is, the social and psychological consequences are limitless. Although current treatments are available and include topical or oral antibiotics, it is crucial to develop a less risky and more effective therapy such as light/laser therapy. This article focuses specifically on the benefits of the light/laser treatment on acne vulgaris. Porphyrins accumulated in the bacteria, Propionibacterium acnes, one of the etiologic factors involved in the pathogenesis, allows phototherapy to be a successful modality. They have specific absorption peaks at which lasers have optimal effects. The longer the wavelength of the light is, the deeper its penetration and thus the greater its damage to the sebaceous glands. Although blue light is best for the activation of porphyrins, red light is best for deeper penetration and an anti-inflammatory effect. Ultraviolet (UV) light, although it may have initial an anti-inflammatory effects, has been proven to be potentially carcinogenic and have adverse effects such as aging (by UV-A) and burning (by UV-B). Previous studies indicate successful long-term intervention and selective damage of the sebaceous glands by using a diode laser with indocyanine green (ICG) dye. Mid-infrared lasers have been found to decrease lesion counts while also reducing the oiliness of skin and the scarring process. Nonablative laser treatment of acne scars using the Er:YAG laser with a short-pulsed mode has been successful in reducing the appearance of scars by stimulating neocollagenesis. The light/laser therapy has started to be explored with promising results in highly selected patients that require further investigation in greater populations and well-designed protocols.

  12. Visible Lasers and Emerging Color Converters for Lighting and Visible Light Communications

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2017-10-30

    GaN-based lasers are promising for white lighting and visible-light communication (VLC). The advances of III-nitride photonic integration, and the application of YAG crystal and perovskite-based phosphors to lighting and VLC will be discussed.

  13. Laser warning receiver to identify the wavelength and angle of arrival of incident laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair; Michael B.; Sweatt, William C.

    2010-03-23

    A laser warning receiver is disclosed which has up to hundreds of individual optical channels each optically oriented to receive laser light from a different angle of arrival. Each optical channel has an optical wedge to define the angle of arrival, and a lens to focus the laser light onto a multi-wavelength photodetector for that channel. Each multi-wavelength photodetector has a number of semiconductor layers which are located in a multi-dielectric stack that concentrates the laser light into one of the semiconductor layers according to wavelength. An electrical signal from the multi-wavelength photodetector can be processed to determine both the angle of arrival and the wavelength of the laser light.

  14. ERL R&D: Laser and Laser Light Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehy, B.

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the photocathode gun in the ERL requires that a tightly controlled optical pulse train, consisting of temporally and spatially shaped pulses, be delivered at the photocathode in synchrony with the RF field in the gun cavity. The pulse train must also be dynamically variable, in order to tune or ramp up the current in the ERL. A laser was developed especially for this task by Lumera Laser GmbH, of Kaiserslautern Germany, under design supervision and review of the ERL project. Following the final design review, the laser was delivered in August 2009. Preliminary tests certifying its compliance with design specifications have been performed, with further tests planned following the final certification of the ERL laser room in January 2010. The development of the necessary spatial and temporal shaping techniques is an ongoing project: proof of principle experiments have been successfully carried out with a laser of similar pulse width, operating at 532 nm and 81.5 MHz. The next stage is to evaluate the application of these techniques and alternatives, using the operations laser. A transport line has been designed and the propagation of a shaped pulse through it to the photocathode simulated and tested experimentally. As the performance of the complete photocathode drive system is critical for ERL operation, an extensive set of diagnostics will be in place to monitor and maintain its performance. The block diagram in Fig. 1 breaks the optical system down into its basic components, which are discussed.

  15. Final Report: Cooling Molecules with Laser Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Certain diatomic molecules are disposed to laser cooling in the way successfully applied to certain atoms and that ushered in a revolution in ultracold atomic physics, an identification first made at Los Alamos and which took root during this program. Despite their manipulation into numerous achievements, atoms are nonetheless mundane denizens of the quantum world. Molecules, on the other hand, with their internal degrees of freedom and rich dynamical interplay, provide considerably more complexity. Two main goals of this program were to demonstrate the feasibility of laser-cooling molecules to the same temperatures as laser-cooled atoms and introduce a means for collecting laser-cooled molecules into dense ensembles, a foundational start of studies and applications of ultracold matter without equivalence in atomic systems.

  16. Laterally injected light-emitting diode and laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mary A.; Crawford, Mary H.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    2015-06-16

    A p-type superlattice is used to laterally inject holes into an III-nitride multiple quantum well active layer, enabling efficient light extraction from the active area. Laterally-injected light-emitting diodes and laser diodes can enable brighter, more efficient devices that impact a wide range of wavelengths and applications. For UV wavelengths, applications include fluorescence-based biological sensing, epoxy curing, and water purification. For visible devices, applications include solid state lighting and projection systems.

  17. A Compiler And Loader For C-STROBE Knowledge Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Richard

    1988-03-01

    This paper presents a compiler and loader for C-STROBE Knowledge Bases (KBs). C-STROBE is an object-oriented programming language which supports tangled generalization hierarchies, inheritance of properties, procedural attachment and event-driven procedure invocation. The compiler writes out C-STROBE KBs in relocatable binary object modules. Symbol tables created by the compiler allow the loading of KBs quickly and without knowledge of the structure of C-STROBE KBs.

  18. The 'Magic Light': A Discussion on Laser Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianou, Andreas; Talias, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Innovations in technology and science form novel fields that, although beneficial, introduce new bio-ethical issues. In their short history, lasers have greatly influenced our everyday lives, especially in medicine. This paper focuses particularly on medical and para-medical laser ethics and their origins, and presents the complex relationships within laser ethics through a three-dimensional matrix model. The term 'laser' and the myth of the 'magic light' can be identified as landmarks for laser related ethical issues. These ethical issues are divided into five major groups: (1) media, marketing, and advertising; (2) economic outcomes; (3) user training; (4) the user-patient/client relationship; and (5) other issues. In addition, issues arising from two of the most common applications of lasers, laser eye surgery and laser tattoo removal, are discussed. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate that the use of medical and para-medical lasers has so greatly influenced our lives that the scientific community must initiate an earnest discussion of medical laser ethics.

  19. Laser-Cooling for Light Ion Accumulation

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, N

    2000-01-01

    The ALICE Experiment to be installed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will initially look at Pb82+-Pb82+ collisions. In a later stage, collisions of lighter ions are also foreseen. For lead ions, fast electron cooling will be used in the accumulation process at low energy to reach the beam brightness necessary for the experiment. For lighter ions, electron cooling becomes less efficient as the ratio Q2/A decreases (Q and A are respectively charge state and mass number of the ion). For this reason, a study has been made of the possibility to use the maturing technology of laser-cooling of fast ion beams to reach the desired emittances for lighter ions. The main problems encountered are the availability of useful ion species, the availability of corresponding laser systems, and the efficiency with which the transverse emittance can be reduced by the laser-cooling mechanism (which works mainly in the longitudinal plane).

  20. Strobes: Pyrotechnic Compositions That Show a Curious Oscillatory Combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341356034; van Lingen, J.N.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311441769; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073464708; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986

    2013-01-01

    Strobes are pyrotechnic compositions which show an oscillatory combustion; a dark phase and a flash phase alternate periodically. The strobe effect has applications in various fields, most notably in the fireworks industry and in the military area. All strobe compositions mentioned in the literature

  1. Laser hypersensitisation using 266nm light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Canning, J.; Kristensen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    UV hypersensitisation using CW 266 nm light on hydrogenated Ge-doped fibre is reported. The optimum sensitisation fluence is found to be in the range of 5 to 10 kJ/cm2, coinciding with previous results obtained using 355 nm light, indicating the same end-process used in the photochemical reaction...

  2. Control over high peak-power laser light and laser-driven X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baozhen; Banerjee, Sudeep; Yan, Wenchao; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Jun; Golovin, Grigory; Liu, Cheng; Fruhling, Colton; Haden, Daniel; Chen, Shouyuan; Umstadter, Donald

    2018-04-01

    An optical system was demonstrated that enables continuous control over the peak power level of ultrashort duration laser light. The optical characteristics of amplified and compressed femtosecond-duration light from a chirped-pulse amplification laser are shown to remain invariant and maintain high-fidelity using this system. When the peak power was varied by an order-of-magnitude, up to its maximum attainable value, the phase, spectral bandwidth, polarization state, and focusability of the light remained constant. This capability led to precise control of the focused laser intensity and enabled a correspondingly high level of control over the power of an all-laser-driven Thomson X-ray light source.

  3. A survey of some ideas for accelerators using laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.D.

    1980-10-01

    Many suggestions have been made for accelerating particles in the intense fields associated with laser light. Those which rely on direct interaction with the laser field in vacuo (as opposed to acceleration in a plasma medium) are examined and their fundamental limitations discussed. Three schemes are considered, the first of these utilizes slow electromagnetic waves near a surface, the second relies on a fast electromagnetic wave with 'phase jumps' and the third uses parametric interaction with particles moving on a modulated orbit. (author)

  4. Investigation of ferrofluid nanostructure by laser light scattering: medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomnyashchaya, E. K.; Velichko, E. N.; Pleshakov, I. V.; Aksenov, E. T.; Savchenko, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    Investigation of ferrofluids nanostructure by the laser light scattering technique is presented. Experimental studies involved measurements of the intensity of the laser radiation scattered by ferrofluid particles in interaction with albumin and under the influence of magnetic field. The effects of the magnitude and duration of the applied magnetic field on the formation of aggregates of magnetic nanoparticles and also the influence of magnetic fluids of different concentrations on blood proteins are considered. The findings may be useful for medical applications.

  5. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, Felicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. Here, we first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  6. Lasers and intense pulsed light (IPL) association with cancerous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Caerwyn; Town, Godfrey; Whittall, Rebecca; Tooze, Louise; Phillips, Jaymie

    2017-11-01

    The development and use of light and lasers for medical and cosmetic procedures has increased exponentially over the past decade. This review article focuses on the incidence of reported cases of skin cancer post laser or IPL treatment. The existing evidence base of over 25 years of laser and IPL use to date has not raised any concerns regarding its long-term safety with only a few anecdotal cases of melanoma post treatment over two decades of use; therefore, there is no evidence to suggest that there is a credible cancer risk. Although laser and IPL technology has not been known to cause skin cancer, this does not mean that laser and IPL therapies are without long-term risks. Light therapies and lasers to treat existing lesions and CO 2 laser resurfacing can be a preventative measure against BCC and SCC tumour formation by removing photo-damaged keratinocytes and encouraged re-epithelisation from stem cells located deeper in the epidermis. A review of the relevant literature has been performed to address the issue of long-term IPL safety, focussing on DNA damage, oxidative stress induction and the impact of adverse events.

  7. AGN Science with STROBE-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, David; Balokovic, Mislav; Garcia, Javier; Koss, Michael; STROBE-X

    2018-01-01

    The probe concept STROBE-X, with its combination of large collecting area, wide-field monitor, broad bandpass, and rapid timing capability, is a powerful tool for studying many aspects of AGN astrophysics. This unique combination of features opens up the possibility for studying AGNs in ways current and other future missions are unable to accomplish. Here, we show a few of the novel new investigations made possible by STROBE-X: probing the structure of the BLR and torus with reverberation of the narrow Fe Kα line and line-of-sight column density, tracking changes in coronal parameters, investigating the origin of the soft excess, Fe Kα emission line surveys, and efficient Compton-thick characterization. Additional ideas and suggestions are always welcome and can be communicated to any member of the STROBE-X team.

  8. Designing Light Beam Transmittance Measuring Tool Using a Laser Pointer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuroso, H.; Kurniawan, W.; Marwoto, P.

    2016-08-01

    A simple instrument used for measuring light beam transmittance percentage made of window film has been developed. The instrument uses a laser pointer of 405 nm and 650 nm ±10% as a light source. Its accuracy approaches 80%. Transmittance data was found by comparing the light beam before and after passing the window film. The light intensity measuring unit was deleted by splitting the light source into two beams through a beam splitter. The light beam was changed into resistance by a NORP12 LDR sensor designed at a circuit of voltage divider rule of Khirchoff's laws. This conversion system will produce light beam intensity received by the sensor to become an equal voltage. This voltage will, then, be presented on the computer screen in the form of a real time graph via a 2.0 USB data transfer.

  9. Dye laser light for high-resolution classical photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissler, K.K.

    1982-01-01

    The test run with the bubble chamber HOLEBC in October 1981 offered the opportunity of checking the usefulness of de-speckled dye laser light for illumination purposes in high-resolution classical dark field photography of small bubble chambers. (orig./HSI)

  10. Laser light passage through restored and carious posterior teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, N P; Pitt Ford, T R; Monteith, B D

    2014-08-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) has been used to investigate pulpal blood flow as a means of pulp vitality testing. Transmission of laser light from the tooth surface to the pulp space may be influenced by caries and restorations. One hundred and twenty-two first and second molars that had caries into dentine, restorations or significant loss of coronal tissue were sectioned in half axio-bucco-lingually. The two sections were illuminated with a laser from their buccal and lingual aspects 2 mm coronal to the amelocemental junction. Light reaching the pulp space was recorded. Buccal and lingual illumination sites were equally effective for 67 teeth (55%). Buccal sites alone were effective for 35 teeth (29%), despite over one-third of these surfaces being restored or featuring enamel or dentine caries. A lingual position alone was effective for 20 teeth (16%). Caries affected light transmission, but for over half the teeth, the pulp could be illuminated from all four probe positions. No effect was found when the influence of mesial and distal restorations on transmission into the corresponding tooth section was examined. The pulp spaces of most (84%) restored, and carious posterior teeth could be illuminated by laser light from their buccal aspect and these teeth could potentially be vitality tested using LDF. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Quasi-elastic laser light scattering study of polyacrylamide hydrogel ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quasi-elastic laser light scattering study of polyacrylamide hydrogel immersed in water and salt solutions. M Sivanantham B V R Tata. Conributed Papers Volume 75 Issue 6 December 2010 pp 1209-1214 ... The value of the plateau was found to depend on NaCl concentration and was higher than that of water. Collective ...

  12. Lasers or light sources for treating port-wine stains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Annesofie; Olesen, Anne Braae; Leonardi-Bee, Jo

    2011-01-01

    Port-wine stains are birthmarks caused by malformations of blood vessels in the skin. Port-wine stains manifest themselves in infancy as a flat, red mark and do not regress spontaneously but may, if untreated, become darker and thicker in adult life. The profusion of various lasers and light...

  13. HeNe-laser light scattering by human dental enamel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijp, [No Value; tenBosch, JJ; Groenhuis, RAJ

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of tooth enamel and an understanding of the origin of these properties are necessary for the development of new optical methods for caries diagnosis and the measurement of tooth color. We measured the scattering intensity functions for HeNe-laser light of 80- to

  14. Laser experiments in light cloudiness with the geostationary satellite ARTEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzkov, V.; Kuzkov, S.; Sodnik, Z.

    2016-08-01

    The geostationary satellite ARTEMIS was launched in July 2001. The satellite is equipped with a laser communication terminal, which was used for the world's first inter-satellite laser communication link between ARTEMIS and the low earth orbit satellite SPOT-4. Ground-to-space laser communication experiments were also conducted under various atmospheric conditions involving ESA's optical ground station. With a rapidly increasing volume of information transferred by geostationary satellites, there is a rising demand for high-speed data links between ground stations and satellites. For ground-to-space laser communications there are a number of important design parameters that need to be addressed, among them, the influence of atmospheric turbulence in different atmospheric conditions and link geometries. The Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine developed a precise computer tracking system for its 0.7 m AZT-2 telescope and a compact laser communication package LACES (Laser Atmosphere and Communication experiments with Satellites) for laser communication experiments with geostationary satellites. The specially developed software allows computerized tracking of the satellites using their orbital data. A number of laser experiments between MAO and ARTEMIS were conducted in partial cloudiness with some amount of laser light observed through clouds. Such conditions caused high break-up (splitting) of images from the laser beacon of ARTEMIS. One possible explanation is Raman scattering of photons on molecules of a water vapor in the atmosphere. Raman scattering causes a shift in a wavelength of the photons.In addition, a different value for the refraction index appears in the direction of the meridian for the wavelength-shifted photons. This is similar to the anomalous atmospheric refraction that appears at low angular altitudes above the horizon. We have also estimated the atmospheric attenuation and the influence of atmospheric turbulence on observed results

  15. Study of a classical strobe composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2013-01-01

    Many strobe compositions were discovered in the past but only a few have been studied and none of them were fully understood. This article aimed at introducing the ternary composition of ammonium perchlorate as oxidizer, magnalium as fuel, and barium sulfate as metal salt. Parameters that influence

  16. Blue laser diode (LD) and light emitting diode (LED) applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, Arpad A.

    2004-01-01

    The family of blue LEDs, edge emitting and surface emitting lasers, enable a number of applications. Blue lasers are used in digital applications such as optical storage in high density DVDs. The resolution of the spot size and hence the storage density is diffraction limited and is inversely proportional to the square of the wavelength of the laser. Other applications include printing, optical scanners, and high-resolution photo-lithography. As light emitters, blue LEDs are used for signaling and in direct view large area emissive displays. They are also making inroads into signage and LCD back-lighting, mobile platforms, and decorative accent lighting in curtains, furniture, etc. Blue LEDs produce white light either with phosphor wavelength converters or in combination with red and green LEDs. The full potential of LED light sources will require three devices to enable complete control over color and intensity. Sensing and medical/bio applications have a major impact on home security, on monitoring the environment, and on health care. New emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications will improve the quality and reduce the cost of health care. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Laser trapping and spatial light modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    INVITED: Robotics at the macro-scale typically uses light for carrying information in machine vision for monitoring and feedback in intelligent robotic guidance systems. With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robots down to the micro-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical...... designed different three-dimensional micro-structures and fabricated them by two-photon polymerization. These micro-structures are then handled using our BioPhotonics Workstation to show proof-of-principle demonstrations illustrating the 6DOF optical actuation of these two-photon fabricated three...

  18. Modeling of photoluminescence in laser-based lighting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzizyrli, Elisavet; Tinne, Nadine; Lachmayer, Roland; Neumann, Jörg; Kracht, Dietmar

    2017-12-01

    The development of laser-based lighting systems has been the latest step towards a revolution in illumination technology brought about by solid-state lighting. Laser-activated remote phosphor systems produce white light sources with significantly higher luminance than LEDs. The weak point of such systems is often considered to be the conversion element. The high-intensity exciting laser beam in combination with the limited thermal conductivity of ceramic phosphor materials leads to thermal quenching, the phenomenon in which the emission efficiency decreases as temperature rises. For this reason, the aim of the presented study is the modeling of remote phosphor systems in order to investigate their thermal limitations and to calculate the parameters for optimizing the efficiency of such systems. The common approach to simulate remote phosphor systems utilizes a combination of different tools such as ray tracing algorithms and wave optics tools for describing the incident and converted light, whereas the modeling of the conversion process itself, i.e. photoluminescence, in most cases is circumvented by using the absorption and emission spectra of the phosphor material. In this study, we describe the processes involved in luminescence quantum-mechanically using the single-configurational-coordinate diagram as well as the Franck-Condon principle and propose a simulation model that incorporates the temperature dependence of these processes. Following an increasing awareness of climate change and environmental issues, the development of ecologically friendly lighting systems featuring low power consumption and high luminous efficiency is imperative more than ever. The better understanding of laser-based lighting systems is an important step towards that aim as they may improve on LEDs in the near future.

  19. Modes in light wave propagating in semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manko, Margarita A.

    1994-01-01

    The study of semiconductor laser based on an analogy of the Schrodinger equation and an equation describing light wave propagation in nonhomogeneous medium is developed. The active region of semiconductor laser is considered as optical waveguide confining the electromagnetic field in the cross-section (x,y) and allowing waveguide propagation along the laser resonator (z). The mode structure is investigated taking into account the transversal and what is the important part of the suggested consideration longitudinal nonhomogeneity of the optical waveguide. It is shown that the Gaussian modes in the case correspond to spatial squeezing and correlation. Spatially squeezed two-mode structure of nonhomogeneous optical waveguide is given explicitly. Distribution of light among the laser discrete modes is presented. Properties of the spatially squeezed two-mode field are described. The analog of Franck-Condon principle for finding the maxima of the distribution function and the analog of Ramsauer effect for control of spatial distribution of laser emission are discussed.

  20. Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) From Space - Laser Altimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Light detection and ranging, or lidar, is like radar but atoptical wavelengths. The principle of operation and theirapplications in remote sensing are similar. Lidars havemany advantages over radars in instrument designs andapplications because of the much shorter laser wavelengthsand narrower beams. The lidar transmitters and receiveroptics are much smaller than radar antenna dishes. Thespatial resolution of lidar measurement is much finer thanthat of radar because of the much smaller footprint size onground. Lidar measurements usually give a better temporalresolution because the laser pulses can be much narrowerthan radio frequency (RF) signals. The major limitation oflidar is the ability to penetrate clouds and ground surfaces.

  1. Laser, light, and energy devices for cellulite and lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer D; Goldman, Mitchel P

    2011-07-01

    Cellulite affects all races, and it is estimated that 85% of women older than 20 years have some degree of cellulite. Many currently accepted cellulite therapies target deficiencies in lymphatic drainage and microvascular circulation. Devices using radiofrequency, laser, and light-based energies, alone or in combination and coupled frequently with tissue manipulation, are available for improving cellulite. Laser assisted liposuction may improve cellulite appearance. Although improvement using these devices is temporary, it may last several months. Patients who want smoother skin with less visible cellulite can undergo a series of treatments and then return for additional treatments as necessary. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Solid state luminescent light filters for neodymium lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenik, V. N.; Koptev, V. G.; Razvina, T. M.; Rzhevskiy, M. B.; Stavrov, A. A.; Starostina, G. P.

    1985-01-01

    The spectral luminescent properties of a number of optical filters made of doped quartz glasses are compared; their influence on the lasing characteristics of a YAG:Nd sup 3+ laser are investigated. The studies employed KlZh5 glass, as well as quartz glass made of synthetic amorphous and crystalline silicon dioxide and containing Sm sup 2+. Luminescence kinetics were investigated by using an Sl-70 oscillograph. It is found that the use of quartz glasses doped with Sm sup 2+ ions and KlZh5 glass for light figures can increase the optical pumping efficiency of pulsed lasers in certain cases.

  3. The high frequency characteristics of laser reflection and visible light during solid state disk laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Xiangdong; You, Deyong; Katayama, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Optical properties are related to weld quality during laser welding. Visible light radiation generated from optical-induced plasma and laser reflection is considered a key element reflecting weld quality. An in-depth analysis of the high-frequency component of optical signals is conducted. A combination of a photoelectric sensor and an optical filter helped to obtain visible light reflection and laser reflection in the welding process. Two groups of optical signals were sampled at a high sampling rate (250 kHz) using an oscilloscope. Frequencies in the ranges 1–10 kHz and 10–125 kHz were investigated respectively. Experimental results showed that there was an obvious correlation between the high-frequency signal and the laser power, while the high-frequency signal was not sensitive to changes in welding speed. In particular, when the defocus position was changed, only a high frequency of the visible light signal was observed, while the high frequency of the laser reflection signal remained unchanged. The basic correlation between optical features and welding status during the laser welding process is specified, which helps to provide a new research focus for investigating the stability of welding status. (letter)

  4. Inverse free electron laser accelerator for advanced light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Duris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the inverse free electron laser (IFEL scheme as a compact high gradient accelerator solution for driving advanced light sources such as a soft x-ray free electron laser amplifier or an inverse Compton scattering based gamma-ray source. In particular, we present a series of new developments aimed at improving the design of future IFEL accelerators. These include a new procedure to optimize the choice of the undulator tapering, a new concept for prebunching which greatly improves the fraction of trapped particles and the final energy spread, and a self-consistent study of beam loading effects which leads to an energy-efficient high laser-to-beam power conversion.

  5. Characterization of thermal plasmas by laser light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, S.C.; Lassahn, G.D.; Reynolds, L.D.; Fincke, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Characterization of an atmospheric pressure free-burning arc discharge and a plasma jet by lineshape analysis of scattered laser light is described. Unlike emission spectroscopy, this technique provides direct measurement of plasma gas temperature, electron temperature and electron density without the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). Plasma gas velocity can also be determined from the Doppler shift of the scattered laser light. Radial gas temperature, electron temperature and electron density profiles are presented for an atmospheric pressure argon free-burning arc discharge. These results show a significant departure from LTE in the arc column, contradicting results obtained from emission spectroscopy. Radial gas temperature and gas velocity profiles in the exit plane of a subsonic atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet are also presented. In this case, the results show the plasma jet is close to LTE in the center, but not in the fringes. The velocity profile is parabolic

  6. Dynamic light scattering on bioconjugated laser generated gold nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Zimbone

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs conjugated to DNA are widely used for biomedical targeting and sensing applications. DNA functionalization is easily reached on laser generated gold nanoparticles because of their unique surface chemistry, not reproducible by other methods. In this context, we present an extensive investigation concerning the attachment of DNA to the surface of laser generated nanoparticles using Dynamic Light Scattering and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The DNA conjugation is highlighted by the increase of the hydrodynamic radius and by the UV-Vis spectra behavior. Our investigation indicates that Dynamic Light Scattering is a suitable analytical tool to evidence, directly and qualitatively, the binding between a DNA molecule and a gold nanoparticle, therefore it is ideal to monitor changes in the conjugation process when experimental conditions are varied.

  7. Uses and misuses of the STROBE statement: bibliographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Bruno R; Cevallos, Myriam; Altman, Douglas G; Rutjes, Anne W S; Egger, Matthias

    2011-02-26

    Objectives Appropriate reporting is central to the application of findings from research to clinical practice. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) recommendations consist of a checklist of 22 items that provide guidance on the reporting of cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies, in order to facilitate critical appraisal and interpretation of results. STROBE was published in October 2007 in several journals including The Lancet, BMJ, Annals of Internal Medicine and PLoS Medicine. Within the framework of the revision of the STROBE recommendations, the authors examined the context and circumstances in which the STROBE statement was used in the past. Design The authors searched the Web of Science database in August 2010 for articles which cited STROBE and examined a random sample of 100 articles using a standardised, piloted data extraction form. The use of STROBE in observational studies and systematic reviews (including meta-analyses) was classified as appropriate or inappropriate. The use of STROBE to guide the reporting of observational studies was considered appropriate. Inappropriate uses included the use of STROBE as a tool to assess the methodological quality of studies or as a guideline on how to design and conduct studies. Results The authors identified 640 articles that cited STROBE. In the random sample of 100 articles, about half were observational studies (32%) or systematic reviews (19%). Comments, editorials and letters accounted for 15%, methodological articles for 8%, and recommendations and narrative reviews for 26% of articles. Of the 32 observational studies, 26 (81%) made appropriate use of STROBE, and three uses (10%) were considered inappropriate. Among 19 systematic reviews, 10 (53%) used STROBE inappropriately as a tool to assess study quality. Conclusions The STROBE reporting recommendations are frequently used inappropriately in systematic reviews and meta-analyses as an instrument to

  8. Uses and misuses of the STROBE statement: bibliographic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevallos, Myriam; Altman, Douglas G; Rutjes, Anne W S; Egger, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Appropriate reporting is central to the application of findings from research to clinical practice. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) recommendations consist of a checklist of 22 items that provide guidance on the reporting of cohort, case–control and cross-sectional studies, in order to facilitate critical appraisal and interpretation of results. STROBE was published in October 2007 in several journals including The Lancet, BMJ, Annals of Internal Medicine and PLoS Medicine. Within the framework of the revision of the STROBE recommendations, the authors examined the context and circumstances in which the STROBE statement was used in the past. Design The authors searched the Web of Science database in August 2010 for articles which cited STROBE and examined a random sample of 100 articles using a standardised, piloted data extraction form. The use of STROBE in observational studies and systematic reviews (including meta-analyses) was classified as appropriate or inappropriate. The use of STROBE to guide the reporting of observational studies was considered appropriate. Inappropriate uses included the use of STROBE as a tool to assess the methodological quality of studies or as a guideline on how to design and conduct studies. Results The authors identified 640 articles that cited STROBE. In the random sample of 100 articles, about half were observational studies (32%) or systematic reviews (19%). Comments, editorials and letters accounted for 15%, methodological articles for 8%, and recommendations and narrative reviews for 26% of articles. Of the 32 observational studies, 26 (81%) made appropriate use of STROBE, and three uses (10%) were considered inappropriate. Among 19 systematic reviews, 10 (53%) used STROBE inappropriately as a tool to assess study quality. Conclusions The STROBE reporting recommendations are frequently used inappropriately in systematic reviews and meta-analyses as an instrument to

  9. LIGHT - from laser ion acceleration to future applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Markus; Light Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Creation of high intensity multi-MeV ion bunches by high power lasers became a reliable tool during the last 15 years. The laser plasma source provides for TV/m accelerating field gradients and initially sub-ps bunch lengths. However, the large envelope divergence and the continuous exponential energy spectrum are substential drawbacks for many possible applications. To face this problem, the LIGHT collaboration was founded (Laser Ion Generation, Handling and Transport). The collaboration consists of several university groups and research centers, namely TU Darmstadt, JWGU Frankfurt, HI Jena, HZDR Dresden and GSI Darmstadt. The central goal is building a test beamline for merging laser ion acceleration with conventional accelerator infrastructure at the GSI facility. In the latest experiments, low divergent proton bunches with a central energy of up to 10 MeV and containing >109 particles could be provided at up to 2.2 m behind the plasma source, using a pulsed solenoid. In a next step, a radiofrequency cavity will be added to the beamline for phase rotation of these bunches, giving access to sub-ns bunch lengths and reaching highest intensities. An overview of the LIGHT objectives and the recent experimental results will be given. This work was supported by HIC4FAIR.

  10. New insights into strobe reactions: An intriguing oscillatory combustion phenomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Strobes are self-sustained oscillatory combustions that have various applications in the fireworks industry and also in the military area (signaling, missile decoys and crowd control). However, most of the strobe compositions were discovered using trial and error methods. The fundamentals mechanisms

  11. Spectrum of reflected light by self-focusing of light in a laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, L.M.

    1983-01-01

    The spectrum of the radiation reflected by a laser-produced plasma is considered. In this situation, self-focusing occurs and a region of low density (caviton) is formed. It is shown that the process leads to a considerable broadening of the spectrum on the ''red'' side, and to the appearance of a line structure in the spectrum. The results can explain data for the reflected light spectrum [L. M. Gorbunov et al., FIAN Preprint No. 126 (1979)] as being due to the nonstationary self-focusing of light in a laser-produced plasma that has recently been observed [V. L. Artsimovich et al., FIAN Preprint No. 252 (1981); Sov. Phys. Doklady 27, 618 (1982)

  12. Ultrabright Laser-based MeV-class Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F; Anderson, G; Anderson, S; Bayramian, A; Berry, B; Betts, S; Dawson, J; Ebbers, C; Gibson, D; Hagmann, C; Hall, J; Hartemann, F; Hartouni, E; Heebner, J; Hernandez, J; Johnson, M; Messerly, M; McNabb, D; Phan, H; Pruet, J; Semenov, V; Shverdin, M; Sridharan, A; Tremaine, A; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2008-04-02

    We report first light from a novel, new source of 10-ps 0.776-MeV gamma-ray pulses known as T-REX (Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays). The MeV-class radiation produced by TREX is unique in the world with respect to its brightness, spectral purity, tunability, pulse duration and laser-like beam character. With T-REX, one can use photons to efficiently probe and excite the isotope-dependent resonant structure of atomic nucleus. This ability will be enabling to an entirely new class of isotope-specific, high resolution imaging and detection capabilities.

  13. Stability of a Light Sail Riding on a Laser Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchester, Zachary [John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, 60 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Loeb, Abraham, E-mail: zmanchester@seas.harvard.edu [Astronomy Department, Harvard University, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    The stability of a light sail riding on a laser beam is analyzed both analytically and numerically. Conical sails on Gaussian beams, which have been studied in the past, are shown to be unstable without active control or additional mechanical modifications. A new architecture for a passively stable sail-and-beam configuration is proposed. The novel spherical shell design for the sail is capable of “beam riding” without the need for active feedback control. Full three-dimensional ray-tracing simulations are performed to verify our analytical results.

  14. STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology: Molecular Epidemiology STROBE-ME. An extension of the STROBE statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Valentina; Egger, Matthias; McCormack, Valerie; Farmer, Peter B; Ioannidis, John P A; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Matullo, Giuseppe; Phillips, David H; Schoket, Bernadette; Stromberg, Ulf; Vermeulen, Roel; Wild, Christopher; Porta, Miquel; Vineis, Paolo

    2012-09-01

    Advances in laboratory techniques have led to a rapidly increasing use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies. Biomarkers of internal dose, early biological change, susceptibility, and clinical outcomes are used as proxies for investigating the interactions between external and/or endogenous agents and the body components or processes. The need for improved reporting of scientific research led to influential statements of recommendations such as STrengthening Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement. The STROBE initiative established in 2004 aimed to provide guidance on how to report observational research. Its guidelines provide a user-friendly checklist of 22 items to be reported in epidemiological studies, with items specific to the three main study designs: cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies. The present STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology - Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME) initiative builds on the STROBE Statement implementing 9 existing items of STROBE and providing 17 additional items to the 22 items of STROBE checklist. The additions relate to the use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies, concerning collection, handling and storage of biological samples; laboratory methods, validity and reliability of biomarkers; specificities of study design; and ethical considerations. The STROBE-ME recommendations are intended to complement the STROBE recommendations.

  15. STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology--Molecular Epidemiology STROBE-ME: an extension of the STROBE statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Valentina; Egger, Matthias; McCormack, Valerie; Farmer, Peter B; Ioannidis, John P A; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Matullo, Giuseppe; Phillips, David H; Schoket, Bernadette; Stromberg, Ulf; Vermeulen, Roel; Wild, Christopher; Porta, Miquel; Vineis, Paolo

    2011-12-01

    Advances in laboratory techniques have led to a rapidly increasing use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies. Biomarkers of internal dose, early biological change susceptibility and clinical outcomes are used as proxies for investigating the interactions between external and/or endogenous agents and body components or processes. The need for improved reporting of scientific research led to influential statements of recommendations such as the STrengthening Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement. The STROBE initiative established in 2004 aimed to provide guidance on how to report observational research. Its guidelines provide a user-friendly checklist of 22 items to be reported in epidemiological studies, with items specific to the three main study designs: cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies. The present STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology -Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME) initiative builds on the STROBE statement implementing 9 existing items of STROBE and providing 17 additional items to the 22 items of STROBE checklist. The additions relate to the use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies, concerning collection, handling and storage of biological samples; laboratory methods, validity and reliability of biomarkers; specificities of study design; and ethical considerations. The STROBE-ME recommendations are intended to complement the STROBE recommendations. Copyright © 2011 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. New insights into strobe reactions: An intriguing oscillatory combustion phenomenon (Nieuwe inzichten in strobe reactions: Een intrigerend oscillerend verbrandingsfenomeen)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Strobes are self-sustained oscillatory combustions that have various applications in the fireworks industry and also in the military area (signaling, missile decoys and crowd control). However, most of the strobe compositions were discovered using trial and error methods. The fundamentals mechanisms

  17. STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology - Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME): an extension of the STROBE statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Valentina; Egger, Matthias; McCormack, Valerie; Farmer, Peter B; Ioannidis, John P A; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Matullo, Giuseppe; Phillips, David H; Schoket, Bernadette; Stromberg, Ulf; Vermeulen, Roel; Wild, Christopher; Porta, Miquel; Vineis, Paolo

    2011-12-01

    Advances in laboratory techniques have led to a rapidly increasing use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies. Biomarkers of internal dose, early biological change, susceptibility and clinical outcomes are used as proxies for investigating the interactions between external and/or endogenous agents and the body components or processes. The need for improved reporting of scientific research led to influential statements of recommendations such as the STrenghtening Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement. The STROBE initiative established in 2004 aimed to provide guidance on how to report observational research. Its guidelines provide a user-friendly checklist of 22 items to be reported in epidemiological studies, with items specific to the three main study designs: cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies. The present STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology - Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME) initiative builds on the STROBE Statement implementing 9 existing items of STROBE and providing 17 additional items to the 22 items of STROBE checklist. The additions relate to the use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies, concerning collection, handling and storage of biological samples; laboratory methods, validity and reliability of biomarkers; specificities of study design; and ethical considerations. The STROBE-ME recommendations are intended to complement the STROBE recommendations. Copyright © 2011 The American Health Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology--Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME): an extension of the STROBE statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Valentina; Egger, Matthias; McCormack, Valerie; Farmer, Peter B; Ioannidis, John P A; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Matullo, Giuseppe; Phillips, David H; Schoket, Bernadette; Stromberg, Ulf; Vermeulen, Roel; Wild, Christopher; Porta, Miquel; Vineis, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Advances in laboratory techniques have led to a rapidly increasing use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies. Biomarkers of internal dose, early biological change, susceptibility and clinical outcomes are used as proxies for investigating interactions between external and / or endogenous agents and body components or processes. The need for improved reporting of scientific research led to influential statements of recommendations such as the STrengthening Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement. The STROBE initiative established in 2004 aimed to provide guidance on how to report observational research. Its guidelines provide a user-friendly checklist of 22 items to be reported in epidemiological studies, with items specific to the three main study designs: cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies. The present STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology - Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME) initiative builds on the STROBE statement implementing nine existing items of STROBE and providing 17 additional items to the 22 items of STROBE checklist. The additions relate to the use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies, concerning collection, handling and storage of biological samples; laboratory methods, validity and reliability of biomarkers; specificities of study design; and ethical considerations. The STROBE-ME recommendations are intended to complement the STROBE recommendations.

  19. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-nutritional epidemiology (STROBE-nut) : an extension of the STROBE statement

    OpenAIRE

    Lachat, Carl; Hawwash, Dana; Ocké, Marga C; Berg, Christina; Forsum, Elisabet; Hörnell, Agneta; Larsson, Christel I; Sonestedt, Emily; Wirfält, Elisabet; Åkesson, Agneta; Kolsteren, Patrick; Byrnes, Graham; De Keyzer, Willem; Van Camp, John; Cade, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Concerns have been raised about the quality of reporting in nutritional epidemiology. Research reporting guidelines such as the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement can improve quality of reporting in observational studies. Herein, we propose recommendations for reporting nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research by extending the STROBE statement into Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Nutrit...

  20. STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology - Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME): an extension of the STROBE statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Valentina; Egger, Matthias; McCormack, Valerie; Farmer, Peter B; Ioannidis, John P A; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Matullo, Giuseppe; Phillips, David H; Schoket, Bernadette; Stromberg, Ulf; Vermeulen, Roel; Wild, Christopher; Porta, Miquel; Vineis, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Advances in laboratory techniques have led to a rapidly increasing use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies. Biomarkers of internal dose, early biological change, susceptibility and clinical outcomes are used as proxies for investigating interactions between external and/or endogenous agents and body components or processes. The need for improved reporting of scientific research led to influential statements of recommendations such as the STrengthening Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement. The STROBE initiative established in 2004 aimed to provide guidance on how to report observational research. Its guidelines provide a user-friendly checklist of 22 items to be reported in epidemiological studies, with items specific to the three main study designs: cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies. The present STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology -Molecular Epidemiology (STROBE-ME) initiative builds on the STROBE statement implementing nine existing items of STROBE and providing 17 additional items to the 22 items of STROBE checklist. The additions relate to the use of biomarkers in epidemiological studies, concerning collection, handling and storage of biological samples; laboratory methods, validity and reliability of biomarkers; specificities of study design; and ethical considerations. The STROBE-ME recommendations are intended to complement the STROBE recommendations. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2011 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  1. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Laser plasma at low air pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vas'kovskiĭ, Yu M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskiĭ, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic and optical characteristics of the laser plasma produced during the application of a CO2 laser pulse to a target have been studied as a function of the ambient air pressure. The changes in the surface roughness of the sample after bombardment were studied as a function of the air pressure. It is concluded from the results that a transition from an air plasma to an erosion plasma occurs at a residual air pressure on the order of 1 torr. The experiment data support the existing picture of the process by which a plasma is produced near the surface of a target in air by laser pulses.

  2. A LIGHT-WEIGHT LASER SCANNER FOR UAV APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. G. Tommaselli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV have been recognized as a tool for geospatial data acquisition due to their flexibility and favourable cost benefit ratio. The practical use of laser scanning devices on-board UAVs is also developing with new experimental and commercial systems. This paper describes a light-weight laser scanning system composed of an IbeoLux scanner, an Inertial Navigation System Span-IGM-S1, from Novatel, a Raspberry PI portable computer, which records data from both systems and an octopter UAV. The performance of this light-weight system was assessed both for accuracy and with respect to point density, using Ground Control Points (GCP as reference. Two flights were performed with the UAV octopter carrying the equipment. In the first trial, the flight height was 100 m with six strips over a parking area. The second trial was carried out over an urban park with some buildings and artificial targets serving as reference Ground Control Points. In this experiment a flight height of 70 m was chosen to improve target response. Accuracy was assessed based on control points the coordinates of which were measured in the field. Results showed that vertical accuracy with this prototype is around 30 cm, which is acceptable for forest applications but this accuracy can be improved using further refinements in direct georeferencing and in the system calibration.

  3. a Light-Weight Laser Scanner for Uav Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommaselli, A. M. G.; Torres, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have been recognized as a tool for geospatial data acquisition due to their flexibility and favourable cost benefit ratio. The practical use of laser scanning devices on-board UAVs is also developing with new experimental and commercial systems. This paper describes a light-weight laser scanning system composed of an IbeoLux scanner, an Inertial Navigation System Span-IGM-S1, from Novatel, a Raspberry PI portable computer, which records data from both systems and an octopter UAV. The performance of this light-weight system was assessed both for accuracy and with respect to point density, using Ground Control Points (GCP) as reference. Two flights were performed with the UAV octopter carrying the equipment. In the first trial, the flight height was 100 m with six strips over a parking area. The second trial was carried out over an urban park with some buildings and artificial targets serving as reference Ground Control Points. In this experiment a flight height of 70 m was chosen to improve target response. Accuracy was assessed based on control points the coordinates of which were measured in the field. Results showed that vertical accuracy with this prototype is around 30 cm, which is acceptable for forest applications but this accuracy can be improved using further refinements in direct georeferencing and in the system calibration.

  4. Singly-resonant sum frequency generation of visible light in a semiconductor disk laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin Thalbitzer; Schlosser, P.J.; Hastie, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a generic approach for visible light generation is presented. It is based on sum frequency generation between a semiconductor disk laser and a solid-state laser, where the frequency mixing is achieved within the cavity of the semiconductor disk laser using a singlepass of the solid......-state laser light. This exploits the good beam quality and high intra-cavity power present in the semiconductor disk laser to achieve high conversion efficiency. Combining sum frequency mixing and semiconductor disk lasers in this manner allows in principle for generation of any wavelength within the visible...

  5. New lasers and light sources - old and new risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paasch, Uwe; Schwandt, Antje; Seeber, Nikolaus; Kautz, Gerd; Grunewald, Sonja; Haedersdal, Merete

    2017-05-01

    Recent developments (new wavelengths, treatment concepts, and combinations) in the field of lasers, intense pulsed light (IPL), LED, as well as new energy and light sources have opened up new therapeutic options that extend beyond mere aesthetic indications. Thus, while fractional lasers used to be employed to merely treat wrinkles, the same devices - in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery - have now become important tools in the treatment of scars, field cancerization, and epithelial tumors. The requirements posed to physicians, both with respect to establishing the indication and conducting treatment, have been growing along with the increase in technological complexity as well as the rising number of comorbidities and comedications in a patient population that continues to age. At the same time, home-use devices have been introduced for a variety of indications. These devices are characterized by low power and special safety features aimed at preventing accidents, risks, and side effects. Despite the reduced efficacy of such self-treatment devices, there is an increased risk of misuse, given that the basic prerequisite for adequate treatment cannot be ensured, to wit, the exact diagnosis and therapeutic indication. Consequently, during hair removal or anti-wrinkle treatment, pigmented lesions and cutaneous neoplasms may be altered, thus giving rise to expected, unexpected and new side effects and complications. In the aforementioned setting, it is important that all potential users of these new technologies be properly trained in a manner that ensures those treated a maximum of safety and efficacy in accordance with the guiding principle "diagnosis certa - ullae therapiae fundamentum". © 2017 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The applicability of DPSS laser for light curing of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Hoon; Jang, Chang-Min; Shin, Dong-Hee; Seol, Hyo-Joung; Kim, Hyung-Il

    2008-10-01

    The applicability of diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) laser for light curing the composite resins was tested with a quartz-tungsten-halogen lamp-based unit and a light emitting diode unit. The emission spectra of the light-curing systems used match with the absorption spectrum of camphorquinone. Among the light-curing systems, DPSS laser showed the narrowest emission bandwidth. The light intensity of DPSS laser was approximately 64% of the other two light-curing units. In most specimens, DPSS laser showed the least attenuation of the number of incident photons. On the top surface, specimens cured with DPSS laser showed similar microhardness values compared to the specimens cured with the other two light-curing units. During the light curing, DPSS laser induced the lowest temperature rise (25.5-35.5 degrees C) in the specimens compared to the other two light-curing units (34.2-41.7 degrees C). In conclusion, DPSS laser has high potential to be an alternative to the other light-curing units or a new light-curing unit.

  7. Development of a versatile laser light scattering instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1990-10-01

    A versatile laser light scattering (LLS) instrument is developed for use in microgravity to measure microscopic particles of 30 A to above 3 microns. Since it is an optical technique, LLS does not affect the sample being studied. A LLS instrument built from modules allows several configurations, each optimized for a particular experiment. The multiangle LLS instrument can be mounted in the rack in the Space Shuttle and on Space Station Freedom. It is possible that a Space Shuttle glove-box and a lap-top computer containing a correlator card can be used to perform a number of experiments and to demonstrate the technology needed for more elaborate investigations. This offers simple means of flying a great number of experiments without the additional requirements of full-scale flight hardware experiments.

  8. Time-resolved spectral investigations of laser light induced microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nánai, L.; Hevesi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical and spectral properties of an optical breakdown microplasma created by pulses of different lasers on surfaces of insulators (KCI), metals (Cu) and semiconductors (V 2O 5), have been investigated. Experiments were carried out in air and vacuum using different wavelengths (λ = 0.694μm, type OGM-20,λ = 1.06μm with a home-made laser based on neodymium glass crystal, and λ = 10.6μm, similarly home-made) and pulse durations (Q-switched and free-running regimes). To follow the integral, dynamical and spectral characteristics of the luminous spot of microplasma we have used fast cameras (SFR-2M, IMACON-HADLAND), a high speed spectral camera (AGAT-2) and a spectrograph (STE-1). It has been shown that the microplasma consists of two parts: fast front (peak) with τ≈100 ns and slow front (tail) with τ≈1μs durations. The detonation front speed is of the order of ≈10 5 cm s -1 and follows the temporal dependence of to t0.4. It depends on the composition of the surrounding gas and its pressure and could be connected with quick evaporation of the material investigated (peak) and optical breakdown of the ambient gaseous atmosphere (tail). From the delay in appearance of different characteristic spectral lines of the target material and its gaseous surrounding we have shown that the evolution of the microplasma involves evaporation and ionization of the atoms of the parent material followed by optical breakdown due to the incident and absorbed laser light, together with microplasma expansion.

  9. The laser: a concentrate of light. From the creation of a beam to its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    The first lasers were developed in the 1960's. The name LASER is an acronym for 'Light Amplification by the Stimulated Emission of Radiation'. The almost magical properties of laser light soon led to their use in a variety of applications. We use lasers every day in our CD players and in the bar-code readers used in supermarkets. Laser light shows create beautiful patterns of light in the air. Lasers are also precision workers in industry. They are used to cut, weld and drill materials. They are used in medicine to repair or burn away diseased tissue without harming healthy tissue nearby. Straight and narrow laser beams are also used to align roads and tunnels. But why is it that lasers can do all these things while ordinary light from the Sun or from a light bulb cannot? 'Lasers are everywhere - in medicine, in industry, and at the heart of our daily lives'. CEA has worked on all types of lasers for many years. CEA researchers use them in their work in all the traditional ways (alignment, drilling, welding, cutting, etc.), but they also develop new types of lasers for specific applications. They use very high power lasers to study the interaction between high energies and matter. Lasers are essential tools in many applications, but we must never forget the risks that are associated with them. The CEA is studying the effects of lasers on the body. There is still much research to be done in the field of laser technology. We expect more and more applications in the next few years. (authors)

  10. Diode laser based light sources for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Marschall, Sebastian; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2013-01-01

    Diode lasers are by far the most efficient lasers currently available. With the ever-continuing improvement in diode laser technology, this type of laser has become increasingly attractive for a wide range of biomedical applications. Compared to the characteristics of competing laser systems, diode...... imaging. This review provides an overview of the latest development of diode laser technology and systems and their use within selected biomedical applications....

  11. GPC Light Shaper for energy efficient laser materials processing.

    OpenAIRE

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Aabo, Thomas; Glückstad, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The biggest use of lasers is in materials processing. In manufacturing, lasers are used for cutting, drilling, marking and other machining processes. Similarly, lasers are important in microfabrication processes such as photolithography, direct laser writing, or ablation. Lasers are advantageous because they do not wear out, have no physical contact with the processed material, avoid heating or warping effects, and are generally more precise. Since lasers are easier to adapt to different opti...

  12. Comparative effectiveness of light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Lasers in near infrared photoimmunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Rira; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Nakajima, Takahito; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-01-01

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a new cancer treatment that combines the specificity of antibodies for targeting tumors with the toxicity induced by photosensitizers after exposure to near infrared (NIR) light. Herein we compare two NIR-light sources; light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Lasers, for their effectiveness in NIR-PIT. A photosensitizer, IRDye-700DX, conjugated to panitumumab (pan-IR700), was incubated with EGFR-expressing A431 and MDA-MB-468-luc cells. NIR-light was provided by LEDs or Lasers at the same light dose. Laser-light produced more cytotoxicity and greater reductions in IR700-fluorescence intensity than LED-light. Laser-light also produced more cytotoxicity in vivo in both cell lines. Assessment of super-enhanced permeability and retention (SUPR) effects were stronger with Laser than LED. These results suggest that Laser-light produced significantly more cytotoxic effects compared to LEDs. Although LED is less expensive, Laser-light produces superior results in NIR-PIT. PMID:26885688

  13. Comparative effectiveness of light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Lasers in near infrared photoimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kazuhide; Watanabe, Rira; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Nakajima, Takahito; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2016-03-22

    Near infrared photoimmunotherapy (NIR-PIT) is a new cancer treatment that combines the specificity of antibodies for targeting tumors with the toxicity induced by photosensitizers after exposure to near infrared (NIR) light. Herein we compare two NIR-light sources; light emitting diodes (LEDs) and Lasers, for their effectiveness in NIR-PIT. A photosensitizer, IRDye-700DX, conjugated to panitumumab (pan-IR700), was incubated with EGFR-expressing A431 and MDA-MB-468-luc cells. NIR-light was provided by LEDs or Lasers at the same light dose. Laser-light produced more cytotoxicity and greater reductions in IR700-fluorescence intensity than LED-light. Laser-light also produced more cytotoxicity in vivo in both cell lines. Assessment of super-enhanced permeability and retention (SUPR) effects were stronger with Laser than LED. These results suggest that Laser-light produced significantly more cytotoxic effects compared to LEDs. Although LED is less expensive, Laser-light produces superior results in NIR-PIT.

  14. Light-emitting diode versus laser irradiation phototherapy with lutetium texaphyrin (PCI-0123)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodburn, Kathryn W.; Young, Stuart W.; Qing, Fan; Miles, Dale R.; Thiemann, Patricia A.

    1997-05-01

    Lutetium texaphyrin (PCI-0123) is presently in clinical trials for the treatment of neoplasms. An argon-pumped dye laser has mostly been used to generate light for PCI-0123 photoactivation. However, lasers are expensive and produce a limited area of illumination, so the efficacy of light emitting diodes (LEDs) was investigated. An LED array was developed so that the spectral emission matched the far red absorption spectrum of PCI-0123. A preclinical PDT efficacy study comparing the laser and the LED was undertaken using EMT6-bearing animals. The LED and laser light sources were statistically comparable in eradicating the murine mammary sarcomas using PCI-0123 as the photosensitizer.

  15. Diagnostics and camera strobe timers for hydrogen pellet injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.L.; Fisher, P.W.; Qualls, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogen pellet injectors have been used to fuel fusion experimental devices for the last decade. As part of developments to improve pellet production and velocity, various diagnostic devices were implemented, ranging from witness plates to microwave mass meters to high speed photography. This paper will discuss details of the various implementations of light sources, cameras, synchronizing electronics and other diagnostic systems developed at Oak Ridge for the Tritium Proof-of-Principle (TPOP) experiment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Tritium System Test Assembly (TSTA), a system built for the Oak Ridge Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), and the Tritium Pellet Injector (TPI) built for the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Although a number of diagnostic systems were implemented on each pellet injector, the emphasis here will be on the development of a synchronization system for high-speed photography using pulsed light sources, standard video cameras, and video recorders. This system enabled near real-time visualization of the pellet shape, size and flight trajectory over a wide range of pellet speeds and at one or two positions along the flight path. Additionally, the system provides synchronization pulses to the data system for pseudo points along the flight path, such as the estimated plasma edge. This was accomplished using an electronic system that took the time measured between sets of light gates, and generated proportionally delayed triggers for light source strobes and pseudo points. Systems were built with two camera stations, one located after the end of the barrel, and a second camera located closer to the main reactor vessel wall. Two or three light gates were used to sense pellet velocity and various spacings were implemented on the three experiments. Both analog and digital schemes were examined for implementing the delay system. A digital technique was chosen

  16. Uses and misuses of the STROBE statement: bibliographic study

    OpenAIRE

    da Costa, Bruno R; Cevallos, Myriam; Altman, Douglas G; Rutjes, Anne W S; Egger, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Appropriate reporting is central to the application of findings from research to clinical practice. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) recommendations consist of a checklist of 22 items that provide guidance on the reporting of cohort, case-control and cross-sectional studies, in order to facilitate critical appraisal and interpretation of results. STROBE was published in October 2007 in several journals including The Lancet, BMJ, Anna...

  17. Strobe-margin test for plated memory systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspach, T. E.; Clarke, J. W.; Constable, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Technique measures performance of plated-wire memories. Strobe-margin test (SMT) utilizes worst-case testing and automatically gives exact strobe margin. Test is automatic; thus, memory system-level test is superior to tests at component level that use artificial test conditions. Test is significant tool in design and test of plated-wire memory systems. It can rapidly quantify memory-system margin on each production unit and impact of any design changes.

  18. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - nutritional epidemiology (STROBE-nut): An extension of the STROBE statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachat, C; Hawwash, D; Ocké, M C; Berg, C; Forsum, E; Hörnell, A; Larsson, C L; Sonestedt, E; Wirfält, E; Åkesson, A; Kolsteren, P; Byrnes, G; De Keyzer, W; Van Camp, J; Cade, J E; Slimani, N; Cevallos, M; Egger, M; Huybrechts, I

    2016-09-01

    Concerns have been raised about the quality of reporting in nutritional epidemiology. Research reporting guidelines such as the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement can improve quality of reporting in observational studies. Herein, we propose recommendations for reporting nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research by extending the STROBE statement into Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut). Recommendations for the reporting of nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research were developed following a systematic and consultative process, co-ordinated by a multidisciplinary group of 21 experts. Consensus on reporting guidelines was reached through a three-round Delphi consultation process with 53 external experts. In total, 24 recommendations for nutritional epidemiology were added to the STROBE checklist. When used appropriately, reporting guidelines for nutritional epidemiology can contribute to improve reporting of observational studies with a focus on diet and health.

  19. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut: An Extension of the STROBE Statement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Lachat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised about the quality of reporting in nutritional epidemiology. Research reporting guidelines such as the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE statement can improve quality of reporting in observational studies. Herein, we propose recommendations for reporting nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research by extending the STROBE statement into Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut.Recommendations for the reporting of nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research were developed following a systematic and consultative process, coordinated by a multidisciplinary group of 21 experts. Consensus on reporting guidelines was reached through a three-round Delphi consultation process with 53 external experts. In total, 24 recommendations for nutritional epidemiology were added to the STROBE checklist.When used appropriately, reporting guidelines for nutritional epidemiology can contribute to improve reporting of observational studies with a focus on diet and health.

  20. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology—Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut): An Extension of the STROBE Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawwash, Dana; Ocké, Marga C.; Berg, Christina; Forsum, Elisabet; Sonestedt, Emily; Wirfält, Elisabet; Åkesson, Agneta; Kolsteren, Patrick; Byrnes, Graham; De Keyzer, Willem; Van Camp, John; Slimani, Nadia; Cevallos, Myriam; Egger, Matthias; Huybrechts, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Background Concerns have been raised about the quality of reporting in nutritional epidemiology. Research reporting guidelines such as the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement can improve quality of reporting in observational studies. Herein, we propose recommendations for reporting nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research by extending the STROBE statement into Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology—Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut). Methods and Findings Recommendations for the reporting of nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research were developed following a systematic and consultative process, coordinated by a multidisciplinary group of 21 experts. Consensus on reporting guidelines was reached through a three-round Delphi consultation process with 53 external experts. In total, 24 recommendations for nutritional epidemiology were added to the STROBE checklist. Conclusion When used appropriately, reporting guidelines for nutritional epidemiology can contribute to improve reporting of observational studies with a focus on diet and health. PMID:27270749

  1. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut): An Extension of the STROBE Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachat, Carl; Hawwash, Dana; Ocké, Marga C; Berg, Christina; Forsum, Elisabet; Hörnell, Agneta; Larsson, Christel; Sonestedt, Emily; Wirfält, Elisabet; Åkesson, Agneta; Kolsteren, Patrick; Byrnes, Graham; De Keyzer, Willem; Van Camp, John; Cade, Janet E; Slimani, Nadia; Cevallos, Myriam; Egger, Matthias; Huybrechts, Inge

    2016-06-01

    Concerns have been raised about the quality of reporting in nutritional epidemiology. Research reporting guidelines such as the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement can improve quality of reporting in observational studies. Herein, we propose recommendations for reporting nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research by extending the STROBE statement into Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut). Recommendations for the reporting of nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research were developed following a systematic and consultative process, coordinated by a multidisciplinary group of 21 experts. Consensus on reporting guidelines was reached through a three-round Delphi consultation process with 53 external experts. In total, 24 recommendations for nutritional epidemiology were added to the STROBE checklist. When used appropriately, reporting guidelines for nutritional epidemiology can contribute to improve reporting of observational studies with a focus on diet and health.

  2. Perspective: An Extension of the STROBE Statement for Observational Studies in Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut): Explanation and Elaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnell, Agneta; Berg, Christina; Forsum, Elisabet; Larsson, Christel; Sonestedt, Emily; Åkesson, Agneta; Lachat, Carl; Hawwash, Dana; Kolsteren, Patrick; Byrnes, Graham; De Keyzer, Willem; Van Camp, John; Cade, Janet E; Greenwood, Darren C; Slimani, Nadia; Cevallos, Myriam; Egger, Matthias; Huybrechts, Inge; Wirfält, Elisabet

    2017-09-01

    Nutritional epidemiology is an inherently complex and multifaceted research area. Dietary intake is a complex exposure and is challenging to describe and assess, and links between diet, health, and disease are difficult to ascertain. Consequently, adequate reporting is necessary to facilitate comprehension, interpretation, and generalizability of results and conclusions. The STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement is an international and collaborative initiative aiming to enhance the quality of reporting of observational studies. We previously presented a checklist of 24 reporting recommendations for the field of nutritional epidemiology, called "the STROBE-nut." The STROBE-nut is an extension of the general STROBE statement, intended to complement the STROBE recommendations to improve and standardize the reporting in nutritional epidemiology. The aim of the present article is to explain the rationale for, and elaborate on, the STROBE-nut recommendations to enhance the clarity and to facilitate the understanding of the guidelines. Examples from the published literature are used as illustrations, and references are provided for further reading.

  3. Utility and safety of a novel surgical microscope laser light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Taku; Bakhit, Mudathir S; Suzuki, Kyouichi; Sakuma, Jun; Fujii, Masazumi; Murakami, Yuta; Ito, Yuhei; Sugano, Tetsuo; Saito, Kiyoshi

    2018-01-01

    Tissue injuries caused by the thermal effects of xenon light microscopes have previously been reported. Due to this, the development of a safe microscope light source became a necessity. A newly developed laser light source is evaluated regarding its effectiveness and safety as an alternative to conventional xenon light source. We developed and tested a new laser light source for surgical microscopes. Four experiments were conducted to compare xenon and laser lights: 1) visual luminance comparison, 2) luminous and light chromaticity measurements, 3) examination and analysis of visual fatigue, and 4) comparison of focal temperature elevation due to light source illumination using porcine muscle samples. Results revealed that the laser light could be used at a lower illumination value than the xenon light (p source is more efficient and safer than a conventional xenon light source. It lacks harmful ultraviolet waves, has a longer lifespan, a lower focal temperature than that of other light sources, a wide range of brightness and color production, and improved safety for the user's vision. Further clinical trials are necessary to validate the impact of this new light source on the patient's outcome and prognosis.

  4. The role of lasers and intense pulsed light technology in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Z

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Zain Husain,1 Tina S Alster1,2 1Department of Dermatology, Georgetown University Hospital, 2Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: The role of light-based technologies in dermatology has expanded dramatically in recent years. Lasers and intense pulsed light have been used to safely and effectively treat a diverse array of cutaneous conditions, including vascular and pigmented lesions, tattoos, scars, and undesired hair, while also providing extensive therapeutic options for cosmetic rejuvenation and other dermatologic conditions. Dermatologic laser procedures are becoming increasingly popular worldwide, and demand for them has fueled new innovations and clinical applications. These systems continue to evolve and provide enhanced therapeutic outcomes with improved safety profiles. This review highlights the important roles and varied clinical applications that lasers and intense pulsed light play in the dermatologic practice. Keywords: laser, intense pulsed light, treatment, dermatology, technology

  5. GPC Light Shaper for energy efficient laser materials processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    with steep, well defined edges that would further increase laser cutting precision or allow “single shot” laser engraving of arbitrary 2D profiles, as opposed to point scanning [3,4]. Instead of lossy approaches, GPC beam shaping is achieved with simplified, binary phase-only optics [5] that redistributes......The biggest use of lasers is in materials processing. In manufacturing, lasers are used for cutting, drilling, marking and other machining processes. Similarly, lasers are important in microfabrication processes such as photolithography, direct laser writing, or ablation. Lasers are advantageous...... because they do not wear out, have no physical contact with the processed material, avoid heating or warping effects, and are generally more precise. Since lasers are easier to adapt to different optimized shapes, they can be even more precise and energy efficient for materials processing. The cost...

  6. How many principles does it take to change a light bulb…into a laser?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Howard M.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum optics did not, and could not, flourish without the laser. The present paper is not about the principles of laser construction, still less a history of how the laser was invented. Rather, it addresses the question: what are the fundamental features that distinguish laser light from thermal light? The obvious answer, ‘laser light is coherent’, is, I argue, so vague that it must be put aside at the start, albeit to revisit later. A more specific, quantum theoretic, version, ‘laser light is in a coherent state’, is simply wrong in this context: both laser light and thermal light can equally well be described by coherent states, with amplitudes that vary stochastically in space. Instead, my answer to the titular question is that four principles are needed: high directionality, monochromaticity, high brightness, and stable intensity. Combining the first three of these principles suffices to show, in a quantitative way—involving, indeed, very large dimensionless quantities (up to ∼ {10}51)—that a laser must be constructed very differently from a light bulb. This quantitative analysis is quite simple, and is easily relatable to ‘coherence’, yet is not to be found in any textbooks on quantum optics to my knowledge. The fourth principle is the most subtle and, perhaps surprisingly, is the only one related to coherent states in the quantum optics sense: it implies that the description in terms of coherent states is the only simple description of a laser beam. Interestingly, this leads to the (not, as it turns out, entirely new) prediction that narrowly filtered laser beams are indistinguishable from similarly filtered thermal beams. I hope that other educators find this material useful; it may contain surprises even for researchers who have been in the field longer than I have.

  7. Impact of mismatched and misaligned laser light sheet profiles on PIV performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, K.; de Silva, C. M.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of mismatched or misaligned laser light sheet profiles on the quality of particle image velocimetry (PIV) results is considered in this study. Light sheet profiles with differing widths, shapes, or alignment can reduce the correlation between PIV images and increase experimental errors. Systematic PIV simulations isolate these behaviours to assess the sensitivity and implications of light sheet mismatch on measurements. The simulations in this work use flow fields from a turbulent boundary layer; however, the behaviours and impacts of laser profile mismatch are highly relevant to any fluid flow or PIV application. Experimental measurements from a turbulent boundary layer facility are incorporated, as well as additional simulations matched to experimental image characteristics, to validate the synthetic image analysis. Experimental laser profiles are captured using a modular laser profiling camera, designed to quantify the distribution of laser light sheet intensities and inform any corrective adjustments to an experimental configuration. Results suggest that an offset of just 1.35 standard deviations in the Gaussian light sheet intensity distributions can cause a 40% reduction in the average correlation coefficient and a 45% increase in spurious vectors. Errors in measured flow statistics are also amplified when two successive laser profiles are no longer well matched in alignment or intensity distribution. Consequently, an awareness of how laser light sheet overlap influences PIV results can guide faster setup of an experiment, as well as achieve superior experimental measurements.

  8. Light extraction efficiency improvement by multiple laser stealth dicing in InGaN-based blue light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyun; Xie, Haizhong; Zheng, Haiyang; Wei, Tongbo; Yang, Hua; Li, Jing; Yi, Xiaoyan; Song, Xiangyang; Wang, Guohong; Li, Jinmin

    2012-03-12

    We report a multiple laser stealth dicing (multi-LSD) method to improve the light extraction efficiency (LEE) of InGaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) using a picosecond (Ps) laser. Compared with conventional LEDs scribed by a nanosecond (Ns) laser and single stealth-diced LEDs, the light output power (LOP) of the LEDs using multi-LSD method can be improved by 26.5% and 11.2%, respectively. The enhanced LOP is due to the increased side emission from the large-area roughened sidewalls of the sapphire substrates fabricated in the multi-LSD process. Numerical simulation results show that the multi-LSD process has little thermal damages to the multiple quantum wells (MQWs) of the LEDs.

  9. Use of a white light supercontinuum laser for confocal interference-reflection microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, L-D; Su, L; Reichelt, S; Amos, W B

    2012-05-01

    Shortly after its development, the white light supercontinuum laser was applied to confocal scanning microscopy as a more versatile substitute for the multiple monochromatic lasers normally used for the excitation of fluorescence. This light source is now available coupled to commercial confocal fluorescence microscopes. We have evaluated a supercontinuum laser as a source for a different purpose: confocal interferometric imaging of living cells and artificial models by interference reflection. We used light in the range 460-700 nm where this source provides a reasonably flat spectrum, and obtained images free from fringe artefacts caused by the longer coherence length of conventional lasers. We have also obtained images of cytoskeletal detail that is difficult to see with a monochromatic laser. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. High coupling efficiency of foam spherical hohlraum driven by 2ω laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Hua; Lan, Ke; Zheng, Wanguo; Campbell, E. M.

    2018-02-01

    The majority of solid state laser facilities built for laser fusion research irradiate targets with third harmonic light (0.35 μm) up-converted from the fundamental Nd wavelength at 1.05 μm. The motivation for this choice of wavelength is improved laser-plasma coupling. Significant disadvantages to this choice of wavelength are the reduced damage threshold of optical components and the efficiency of energy conversion to third harmonic light. Both these issues are significantly improved if second harmonic (0.53 μm) radiation is used, but theory and experiments have shown lower optical to x-ray energy conversion efficiency and increased levels of laser-plasma instabilities, resulting in reduced laser-target coupling. In this letter, we propose to use a 0.53 μm laser for the laser ignition facilities and use a low density foam wall to increase the coupling efficiency from the laser to the capsule and present two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of 0.53 μm laser light irradiating an octahedral-spherical hohlraum with a low density foam wall. The simulations show that the reduced optical depth of the foam wall leads to an increased laser-light conversion into thermal x-rays and about 10% higher radiation flux on the capsule than that achieved with 0.35 μm light irradiating a solid density wall commonly used in laser indirect drive fusion research. The details of the simulations and their implications and suggestions for wavelength scaling coupled with innovative hohlraum designs will be discussed.

  11. Fabrication of versatile cladding light strippers and fiber end-caps with CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, M.; Theeg, T.; Wysmolek, M.; Ottenhues, C.; Pulzer, T.; Neumann, J.; Kracht, D.

    2018-02-01

    We report on novel fabrication schemes of versatile cladding light strippers and end-caps via CO2 laser radiation. We integrated cladding light strippers in SMA-like connectors for reliable and stable fiber-coupling of high-power laser diodes. Moreover, the application of cladding light strippers in typical fiber geometries for high-power fiber lasers was evaluated. In addition, we also developed processes to fuse end-caps to fiber end faces via CO2 laser radiation and inscribe the fibers with cladding light strippers near the end-cap. Corresponding results indicate the great potential of such devices as a monolithic and low-cost alternative to SMA connectors.

  12. Autocorrelation analysis of plasma plume light emissions in deep penetration laser welding of steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrňa, Libor; Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Jedlička, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 1 (2017), s. 1-10, č. článku 012009. ISSN 1042-346X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser welding * plasma plume * light emissions * autocorrelation analysis * weld depth Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.492, year: 2016

  13. Growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under single-wavelength red and blue laser light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Amanda; Wong, Aloysius; Ng, Tien Khee; Marondedze, Claudius; Gehring, Christoph; Ooi, Boon S

    2016-09-23

    Indoor horticulture offers a sensible solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available horticultural lighting is suboptimal, and therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. They are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Furthermore, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plant species. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that plants grown under laser illumination can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs reported previously. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteome data show that the single-wavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture.

  14. Growth and development of Arabidopsis thaliana under single-wavelength red and blue laser light

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Amanda Siok Lee

    2016-09-23

    Indoor horticulture offers a sensible solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available horticultural lighting is suboptimal, and therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. They are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Furthermore, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plant species. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that plants grown under laser illumination can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs reported previously. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteome data show that the single-wavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture.

  15. Digital control of laser modes with an intra-cavity spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ngcobo, S

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we outline a simple laser cavity which produces customised on-demand digitally controlled laser modes by replacing the end-mirror of the cavity with an electrically addressed reflective phase-only spatial light modulator as a digital...

  16. Laser Light Scattering, from an Advanced Technology Development Program to Experiments in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Tscharnuter, Walther W.; Macgregor, Andrew D.; Dautet, Henri; Deschamps, Pierre; Boucher, Francois; Zuh, Jixiang; Tin, Padetha; Rogers, Richard B.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    1994-01-01

    Recent advancements in laser light scattering hardware are described. These include intelligent single card correlators; active quench/active reset avalanche photodiodes; laser diodes; and fiber optics which were used by or developed for a NASA advanced technology development program. A space shuttle experiment which will employ aspects of these hardware developments is previewed.

  17. Cost-effective wavelength selectable light source using DFB fiber laser array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fenghai; Xueyan, Zheng; Pedersen, Rune Johan Skullerud

    2000-01-01

    A cost-effective wavelength selectable light source comprising a distributed feedback (DFB) fibre laser array is proposed. A large number of wavelengths can be selected via optical space switches using only one shared pump laser. The structure is a good candidate for use as a wavelength selectable...

  18. Strobe sequence design for haplotype assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Humans are diploid, carrying two copies of each chromosome, one from each parent. Separating the paternal and maternal chromosomes is an important component of genetic analyses such as determining genetic association, inferring evolutionary scenarios, computing recombination rates, and detecting cis-regulatory events. As the pair of chromosomes are mostly identical to each other, linking together of alleles at heterozygous sites is sufficient to phase, or separate the two chromosomes. In Haplotype Assembly, the linking is done by sequenced fragments that overlap two heterozygous sites. While there has been a lot of research on correcting errors to achieve accurate haplotypes via assembly, relatively little work has been done on designing sequencing experiments to get long haplotypes. Here, we describe the different design parameters that can be adjusted with next generation and upcoming sequencing technologies, and study the impact of design choice on the length of the haplotype. Results We show that a number of parameters influence haplotype length, with the most significant one being the advance length (distance between two fragments of a clone). Given technologies like strobe sequencing that allow for large variations in advance lengths, we design and implement a simulated annealing algorithm to sample a large space of distributions over advance-lengths. Extensive simulations on individual genomic sequences suggest that a non-trivial distribution over advance lengths results a 1-2 order of magnitude improvement in median haplotype length. Conclusions Our results suggest that haplotyping of large, biologically important genomic regions is feasible with current technologies. PMID:21342554

  19. Guidelines of care for vascular lasers and intense pulse light sources from the European Society for Laser Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamič, M; Pavlović, M D; Troilius Rubin, A; Palmetun-Ekbäck, M; Boixeda, P

    2015-09-01

    Lasers and non-coherent intense pulse light sources (IPLS) are based on the principle of selective photothermolysis and can be used for the treatment of many vascular skin lesions. A variety of lasers has been developed for the treatment of congenital and acquired vascular lesions which incorporate these concepts into their design. Although laser and light sources are very popular due to their non-invasive nature, caution should be considered by practitioners and patients to avoid permanent side-effects. The aim of these guidelines is to give evidence-based recommendations for the use of lasers and IPLS in the treatment of vascular lesions. These guidelines were produced by a Consensus Panel made up of experts in the field of vascular laser surgery under the auspices of the European Society of Laser Dermatology. Recommendations on the use of vascular lasers and IPLS were made based on the quality of evidence for efficacy, safety, tolerability, cosmetic outcome, patient satisfaction/preference and, where appropriate, on the experts' opinion. The recommendations of these guidelines are graded according to the American College of Chest Physicians Task Force recommendations on Grading Strength of Recommendations and Quality of Evidence in Clinical Guidelines. Lasers and IPLS are very useful and sometimes the only available method to treat various vascular lesions. It is of a paramount importance that the type of laser or IPLS and their specific parameters are adapted to the indication but also that the treating physician is familiar with the device to be used. The crucial issue in treating vascular lesions is to recognize the immediate end-point after laser treatment. This is the single most important factor to ensure both the efficacy of the treatment and avoidance of serious side-effects. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  20. Laser Light Scattering with Multiple Scattering Suppression Used to Measure Particle Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Tin, Padetha; Lock, James A.; Cannell, David S.; Smart, Anthony E.; Taylor, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Laser light scattering is the technique of choice for noninvasively sizing particles in a fluid. The members of the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) project in laser light scattering at the NASA Lewis Research Center have invented, tested, and recently enhanced a simple and elegant way to extend the concentration range of this standard laboratory particle-sizing technique by several orders of magnitude. With this technique, particles from 3 nm to 3 mm can be measured in a solution. Recently, laser light scattering evolved to successfully size particles in both clear solutions and concentrated milky-white solutions. The enhanced technique uses the property of light that causes it to form tall interference patterns at right angles to the scattering plane (perpendicular to the laser beam) when it is scattered from a narrow laser beam. Such multiple-scattered light forms a broad fuzzy halo around the focused beam, which, in turn, forms short interference patterns. By placing two fiber optics on top of each other and perpendicular to the laser beam (see the drawing), and then cross-correlating the signals they produce, only the tall interference patterns formed by singly scattered light are detected. To restate this, unless the two fiber optics see the same interference pattern, the scattered light is not incorporated into the signal. With this technique, only singly scattered light is seen (multiple-scattered light is rejected) because only singly scattered light has an interference pattern tall enough to span both of the fiber-optic pickups. This technique is simple to use, easy to align, and works at any angle. Placing a vertical slit in front of the signal collection fibers enhanced this approach. The slit serves as an optical mask, and it significantly shortens the time needed to collect good data by selectively masking out much of the unwanted light before cross-correlation is applied.

  1. Applications of Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (Lasers) for Restorative Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najeeb, Shariq; Khurshid, Zohaib; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Ajlal, Syed

    2016-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation (laser) has been used widely in a range of biomedical and dental applications in recent years. In the field of restorative dentistry, various kinds of lasers have been developed for diagnostic (e.g. caries detection) and operative applications (e.g. tooth ablation, cavity preparation, restorations, bleaching). The main benefits for laser applications are patient comfort, pain relief and better results for specific applications. Major concerns for using dental lasers frequently are high cost, need for specialized training and sensitivity of the technique, thereby compromising its usefulness particularly in developing countries. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate and summarize the applications of lasers in restorative dentistry, including a comparison of the applications of lasers for major restorative dental procedures and conventional clinical approaches. A remarkable increase in the use of lasers for dental application is expected in the near future. PMID:26642047

  2. [The reporting of observational studies: analysis using the STROBE statement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galera Llorca, Jordi; Lahoz Grillo, Raquel; Roig Loscertales, Francesc

    2011-12-01

    Deficiencies detected in biomedical studies publication different Guidelines to improve. The objective of the study is to assess the communication of observational studies of Cardiovascular and Metabolism therapeutic area (CVM) published in 6 Spanish journals in 2009 using the STROBE statement. Cross-sectional analysis of articles related to CVM therapeutic area, published during 2009 in 6 Spanish journals applying the 34 items of the STROBE statement. Descriptive analysis of the results for qualitative variables was performed using a frequency analysis. Quantitative variables were analyzed by sample estimates and dispersion. A comparative analysis of journals was performed using ANOVA with a statistical significance of pSTROBE recommendations. The Methods and Results sections showed more deficiencies.

  3. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenbroucke, Jan P; von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G

    2014-01-01

    Much medical research is observational. The reporting of observational studies is often of insufficient quality. Poor reporting hampers the assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of a study and the generalisability of its results. Taking into account empirical evidence and theoretical...... considerations, a group of methodologists, researchers, and editors developed the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) recommendations to improve the quality of reporting of observational studies. The STROBE Statement consists of a checklist of 22 items, which relate...... to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results and discussion sections of articles. Eighteen items are common to cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies and four are specific to each of the three study designs. The STROBE Statement provides guidance to authors about how...

  4. Surface and pulpal temperature comparison of tooth whitening using lasers and curing lights

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Joel M.; Pelino, Jose; Rodrigues, Rively; Zwhalen, Brian J.; Nguyen, Max H.; Wu, Emily

    2000-03-01

    Chemical action of bleaching agents applied to tooth surface is accelerated by increase in temperature. This in vitro study measured the temperature rises on the surface and in the pulp of teeth during whitening using a diode laser, a plasma arc curing (PAC) light and conventional curing lights. Extracted, non-carious single-rooted teeth were exposed to PAC light and laser at times ranging from 10 to 60 seconds and energy ranges of 2 W, 4 W, and 6 W, and to low-intensity curing lights from 1 to 4 minutes. Maximum temperature rises were analyzed for both pulpal and surface temperature. Diode laser exposures at 2 W for all times and at 4 watts for 10 seconds and PAC light exposures at 10 seconds all produced acceptably safe pulpal rises equivalent to conventional light-curing exposures. Exposures at these settings also attained surface temperature rises that were significantly higher than those using conventional light-curing. The diode laser demonstrated bleaching results equivalent to the PAC light, and both were achieved in significantly less times than conventional light- curing.

  5. Laser Drilling - Drilling with the Power of Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iraj A. Salehi; Brian C. Gahan; Samih Batarseh

    2007-02-28

    Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has been the leading investigator in the field of high power laser applications research for well construction and completion applications. Since 1997, GTI (then as Gas Research Institute- GRI) has investigated several military and industrial laser systems and their ability to cut and drill into reservoir type rocks. In this report, GTI continues its investigation with a 5.34 kW ytterbium-doped multi-clad high power fiber laser (HPFL). When compared to its competitors; the HPFL represents a technology that is more cost effective to operate, capable of remote operations, and requires considerably less maintenance and repair. Work performed under this contract included design and implementation of laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of high power laser energy on a variety of rock types. All previous laser/rock interaction tests were performed on samples in the lab at atmospheric pressure. To determine the effect of downhole pressure conditions, a sophisticated tri-axial cell was designed and tested. For the first time, Berea sandstone, limestone and clad core samples were lased under various combinations of confining, axial and pore pressures. Composite core samples consisted of steel cemented to rock in an effort to represent material penetrated in a cased hole. The results of this experiment will assist in the development of a downhole laser perforation or side tracking prototype tool. To determine how this promising laser would perform under high pressure in-situ conditions, GTI performed a number of experiments with results directly comparable to previous data. Experiments were designed to investigate the effect of laser input parameters on representative reservoir rock types of sandstone and limestone. The focus of the experiments was on laser/rock interaction under confining pressure as would be the case for all drilling and completion operations. As such, the results would be applicable to drilling, perforation, and

  6. Shaping laser accelerated ions for future applications – The LIGHT collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busold, S., E-mail: s.busold@gsi.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Almomani, A. [Institut für angewandte Physik, Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Max von Laue Straße 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Bagnoud, V. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07734 Jena (Germany); Barth, W. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bedacht, S. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Blažević, A. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07734 Jena (Germany); Boine-Frankenheim, O. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstraße 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Schloßgartenstraße 8, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2014-03-11

    The generation of intense ion beams from high-intensity laser-generated plasmas has been the focus of research for the last decade. In the LIGHT collaboration the expertise of heavy ion accelerator scientists and laser and plasma physicists has been combined to investigate the prospect of merging these ion beams with conventional accelerator technology and exploring the possibilities of future applications. We report about the goals and first results of the LIGHT collaboration to generate, handle and transport laser driven ion beams. This effort constitutes an important step in research for next generation accelerator technologies.

  7. GreenLight laser vs diode laser vaporization of the prostate: 3-year results of a prospective nonrandomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Sanwei; Müller, Georg; Bonkat, Gernot; Püschel, Heike; Gasser, Thomas; Bachmann, Alexander; Rieken, Malte

    2015-04-01

    Laser vaporization of the prostate is one of the alternatives to transurethral resection of the prostate. Short-term studies report a comparable outcome after laser vaporization with the 532 nm 120-W GreenLight high-performance system (HPS) laser and the 980 nm 200 W high-intensity diode (diode) laser. In this study, we analyzed the intermediate-term results of both techniques. From January 2007 to January 2008, 112 consecutive patients with symptomatic benign prostate enlargement were nonrandomly assigned to treatment with the GreenLight laser or the diode laser. Perioperative parameters, postoperative functional outcome, complications, and the reoperation rate at 3 years were analyzed. Improvement of voiding symptoms (International Prostate Symptom Score, quality-of-life) and micturition parameters (maximum flow rate, postvoid residual volume) showed no significant difference between the HPS group and the diode group. A significantly higher reoperation rate was observed in the diode group in comparison to the HPS group (37.5% vs 8.9%, p=0.0003) due to obstructive necrotic tissue (16.1% vs 0%, p=0.0018), bladder neck stricture (16.1% vs 1.8%, p=0.008), and persisting or recurrent adenoma (5.4% vs 7.1%, p=0.70), respectively. Both lasers lead to comparable improvement of voiding parameters and micturition symptoms. Treatment with the 200 W diode laser led to a significantly higher reoperation rate, which might be attributed to a higher degree of coagulation necrosis. Thus, a careful clinical application of this diode laser type is warranted.

  8. Deep modulation of second-harmonic light by wavelength detuning of a laser diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mathias; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Noordegraaf, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Power modulated visible lasers are interesting for a number of applications within areas such as laser displays and medical laser treatments. In this paper, we present a system for modulating the second-harmonic light generated by single-pass frequency doubling of a distributed feedback (DFB....... The bandwidth of the modulation is limited by the electronics. This method has the potential to decrease the size as well as cost of modulated visible lasers. The achievable optical powers will increase as DFB MOPAs are further developed. (C) 2017 Optical Society of America...

  9. Pretty Lights and Glowing Rocks: Using Lasers Pointers to Demonstrate Optical Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, A.; Bodner, G.; Zheng, C.

    2011-12-01

    Green and violet lasers have recently become both inexpensive and portable, more than 70 years after the first laser was built. Despite the technology's age, the general public is still fascinated by the exotic nature of laser light. This activity uses green and violet laser pointers to produce a veritable rainbow of colors from household items and common minerals. Our objective is to create an educational experience which uses vivid colors and appealing effects to engage the audience, while teaching basic optical concepts such as scattering, fluorescence, Snell's law, and the quantum nature of light. The activity can be adapted to a lecture demonstration or to a laboratory exercise in which students handle the lasers and test samples. Learning outcomes have not been formally measured, but this demonstration will still captivate audiences in museum settings, community outreach programs, and introductory science courses.

  10. Spatial light modulator based laser microfabrication of volume optics inside solar modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Bernhard; Satzinger, Valentin; Schmidt, Volker; Peharz, Gerhard; Wenzl, Franz P

    2018-03-19

    Ultrashort pulse laser systems enable new approaches of material processing and manufacturing with enhanced precision and productivity. Time- and cost-effectiveness in the context of the industrialization of ultrashort laser pulse processes require an improvement of processing speed, which is of key importance for strengthening industrial photonics based manufacturing and extending its field of applications. This article presents results on improving the speed of a laser process by parallelization for creating light deflecting volume optics. Diffractive optical elements are fabricated directly inside the encapsulant of solar modules by utilizing a spatial light modulator based parallel laser microfabrication method. The fabricated volume optical elements effectively deflect light away from front side electrodes and significantly reduce the corresponding optical losses.

  11. Electrically switchable organo-inorganic hybrid for a white-light laser source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jui-Chieh; Hsiao, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Yu-Ting; Lee, Chia-Rong; Lee, Wei

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a spectrally discrete white-light laser device based on a photonic bandgap hybrid, which is composed of a soft photonic crystal; i.e., a layer of dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC), sandwiched between two imperfect but identical, inorganic multilayer photonic crystals. With a sole optical pump, a mono-, bi-, or tri-chromatic laser can be obtained and, through the soft photonic crystal regulated by an applied voltage, the hybrid possesses electrical tunability in laser wavelength. The three emitted spectral peaks originate from two bandedges of the CLC reflection band as well as one of the photonic defect modes in dual-mode lasing. Thanks to the optically bistable nature of CLC, such a white-light laser device can operate in quite an energy-saving fashion. This technique has potential to fulfill the present mainstream in the coherent white-light source.

  12. Suppressed speckle contrast of blue light emission out of white lamp with phosphors excited by blue laser diodes for high-brightness lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Junichi; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Takeda, Yuji; Ueno, Misaki; Kawasaki, Yoji; Matsuba, Yoshiaki; Heike, Atsushi

    2012-11-01

    The speckle contrast of blue light emission out of high-brightness white lamps using phosphors excited by InGaN/GaN blue laser diodes is evaluated as a measure of coherence. As a result, speckle contrast of as low as 1.7%, the same level as a blue light emitting diode, is obtained. This implies that the original blue laser light can be converted into incoherent light through lamp structures without any dynamic mechanisms. This unique speckle-free performance is considered to be realized by multiple scattering inside the lamp structure, the multi-longitudinal mode operation of the blue laser diodes, and the use of multiple laser diodes. Such almost-incoherent white lamps can be applied for general lighting without any nuisance of speckle noise and should be categorized as lamps rather than lasers in terms of laser safety regulation.

  13. Laser beam propagation generation and propagation of customized light

    CERN Document Server

    Forbes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ""The text is easy to read and is accompanied by beautiful illustrations. It is an excellent book for anyone working in laser beam propagation and an asset for any library.""-Optics & Photonics News, July 2014

  14. Pulsed-laser micropatterned quantum-dot array for white light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Wen; Lin, Huang-Yu; Lin, Chien-Chung; Kao, Tsung Sheng; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Han, Hau-Vei; Li, Jie-Ru; Lee, Po-Tsung; Chen, Huang-Ming; Hong, Ming-Hui; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2016-03-01

    In this study, a novel photoluminescent quantum dots device with laser-processed microscale patterns has been demonstrated to be used as a white light emitting source. The pulsed laser ablation technique was employed to directly fabricate microscale square holes with nano-ripple structures onto the sapphire substrate of a flip-chip blue light-emitting diode, confining sprayed quantum dots into well-defined areas and eliminating the coffee ring effect. The electroluminescence characterizations showed that the white light emission from the developed photoluminescent quantum-dot light-emitting diode exhibits stable emission at different driving currents. With a flexibility of controlling the quantum dots proportions in the patterned square holes, our developed white-light emitting source not only can be employed in the display applications with color triangle enlarged by 47% compared with the NTSC standard, but also provide the great potential in future lighting industry with the correlated color temperature continuously changed in a wide range.

  15. Alignment characteristic of nematic liquid crystals on orientational patterns realized by interfering laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun-Kyu; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2008-01-01

    We have observed the alignment property and switching behaviour of nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) on orientation patterns that were realized on a photo-active alignment layer by using interferring beams of two coherent laser lights. Linearly polarized light orients the liquid crystals in a direction perpendicular to the polarization and the interferring laser light induced a one-dimensional periodic texture following the interference pattern. Using double irradiation, in which the direction of the second irradiation was rotated by 90 0 to the first irradiation, we constructed a quasi-four-fold symmetric orientation pattern. The NLCs exhibited bistability in two average directions of polarization of the laser light, and they stably switched between the two directions by the in-plane electric field. Furthermore, the NLCs indicated the capability of continuous and memorized switching with a changing electric field on the orientation pattern

  16. Efficient generation of 509 nm light by sum-frequency mixing between two tapered diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tawfieq, Mahmoud; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hansen, Anders Kragh

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a concept for visible laser sources based on sum-frequency generation of beam com- bined tapered diode lasers. In this specific case, a 1.7 W sum-frequency generated green laser at 509 nm is obtained, by frequency adding of 6.17 W from a 978 nm tapered diode laser with 8.06 W from...... a 1063 nm tapered diode laser, inside a periodically poled MgO doped lithium niobate crystal. This corresponds to an optical to optical conversion ef fi ciency of 12.1%. As an example of potential applica- tions, the generated nearly diffraction-limited green light is used for pumping a Ti:sapphire laser...

  17. Improve the material absorption of light and enhance the laser tube bending process utilizing laser softening heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhan, Khalil Ibraheem; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Zakaria, Azmi; Ismail, Mohd Idris Shah B.; Alsabti, Naseer Mahdi Hadi; Ahmad, Ahmad Kamal

    2018-02-01

    Laser forming is a flexible control process that has a wide spectrum of applications; particularly, laser tube bending. It offers the perfect solution for many industrial fields, such as aerospace, engines, heat exchangers, and air conditioners. A high power pulsed Nd-YAG laser with a maximum average power of 300 W emitting at 1064 nm and fiber-coupled is used to irradiate stainless steel 304 (SS304) tubes of 12.7 mm diameter, 0.6 mm thickness and 70 mm length. Moreover, a motorized rotation stage with a computer controller is employed to hold and rotate the tube. In this paper, an experimental investigation is carried out to improve the laser tube bending process by enhancing the absorption coefficient of the material and the mechanical formability using laser softening heat treatment. The material surface is coated with an oxidization layer; hence, the material absorption of laser light is increased and the temperature rapidly rises. The processing speed is enhanced and the output bending angle is increased to 1.9° with an increment of 70% after the laser softening heat treatment.

  18. Noise analysis of a white-light supercontinuum light source for multiple wavelength confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Gail [Centre for Biophotonics, Strathclyde Institute for Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 27 Taylor Street, Glasgow, G4 0NR (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-07

    Intensity correlations of a Ti : sapphire, Kr/Ar and a white-light supercontinuum were performed to quantify the typical signal amplitude fluctuations and hence ascertain the comparative output stability of the white-light supercontinuum source for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Intensity correlations across a two-pixel sample (n = 1000) of up to 98%, 95% and 94% were measured for the Ti : sapphire, Kr/Ar and white-light supercontinuum source, respectively. The white-light supercontinuum noise level is therefore acceptable for CLSM, with the added advantage of wider wavelength flexibility over traditional CLSM excitation sources. The relatively low-noise white-light supercontinuum was then used to perform multiple wavelength sequential CLSM of guinea pig detrusor to confirm the reliability of the system and to demonstrate system flexibility.

  19. Mechanical properties and polymerization shrinkage of composite resins light-cured using two different lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Jang-Hoon; Jeong, Seung-Hwa; Ko, Ching-Chang; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the usefulness of 457 and 473 nm lasers for the curing of composite resins during the restoration of damaged tooth cavity. Monochromaticity and coherence are attractive features of laser compared with most other light sources. Better polymerization of composite resins can be expected. Eight composite resins were light cured using these two lasers and a light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing unit (LCU). To evaluate the degrees of polymerization achieved, polymerization shrinkage and flexural and compressive properties were measured and compared. Polymerization shrinkage values by 457 and 473 nm laser, and LED ranged from 10.9 to 26.8, from 13.2 to 26.1, and from 11.5 to 26.3 μm, respectively. The values by 457 nm laser was significantly different from those by 473 and LED LCU (p0.05). For the tested LCUs, no specific LCU could consistently achieve highest strength and modulus from the specimens tested. Two lasers (457 and 473 nm) can polymerize composite resins to the level that LED LCU can achieve despite inconsistent trends of polymerization shrinkage and flexural and compressive properties of the tested specimens.

  20. StRoBe: A Classroom-on-Task Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, Gregory J.

    Researchers as well as others evaluating teachers or programs are often interested in the verbal and non-verbal behaviors related to the learning of students in classrooms. The Student Record of Behavior (StRoBe) is a classroom observation instrument designed to provide simple low inference information concerning student behaviors related to…

  1. Laser-induced periodic surface structures: fingerprints of light localization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skolski, J.Z.P.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Obona, J.V.; Ocelik, V.; Huis in 't Veld, A.J.; Hosson, J.Th.M. de

    2012-01-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to study the inhomogeneous absorption of linearly polarized laser radiation below a rough surface. The results are first analyzed in the frequency domain and compared to the efficacy factor theory of Sipe and coworkers. Both approaches show

  2. New lasers and light sources - old and new risks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paasch, Uwe; Schwandt, Antje; Seeber, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    to be employed to merely treat wrinkles, the same devices - in the context of laser-assisted drug delivery - have now become important tools in the treatment of scars, field cancerization, and epithelial tumors. The requirements posed to physicians, both with respect to establishing the indication and conducting...

  3. Supercontinuum Light Sources for Hyperspectral Subsurface Laser Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Otto Højager Attermann; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Larsen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    A materials structural and chemical composition influences its optical scattering properties. In this paper we investigate the use of subsurface laser scattering (SLS) for inferring structural and chemical information of food products. We have constructed a computer vision system based on a super...

  4. Review on recent research progress on laser power measurement based on light pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, WenChang; Zhou, Pu

    2018-03-01

    Accurate measuring the laser power is one of the most important issue to evaluate the performance of high power laser. For the time being, most of the demonstrated technique could be attributed to direct measuring route. Indirect measuring laser power based on light pressure, which has been under intensive investigation, has the advantages such as fast response, real-time measuring and high accuracy, compared with direct measuring route. In this paper, we will review several non-traditional methods based on light pressure to precisely measure the laser power proposed recently. The system setup, measuring principle and scaling methods would be introduced and analyzed in detail. We also compare the benefit and the drawback of these methods and analyze the uncertainties of the measurements.

  5. Coherent laser phase retrieval in the presence of measurement imperfections and incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Kragh

    2017-01-01

    Phase retrieval is a powerful numerical method that can be used to determine the wavefront of laser beams based only on intensity measurements, without the use of expensive, low-resolution specialized wavefront sensors such as Shack–Hartmann sensors. However, phase retrieval techniques generally...... suffer from poor convergence and fidelity when the input measurements contain electronic or optical noise and/or an incoherent intensity contribution overlapped with the otherwise spatially coherent laser beam. Here, we present an implementation of a modified version of the standard multiple......-plane Gerchberg–Saxton algorithm and demonstrate that it is highly successful at extracting the intensity profile and wavefront of the spatially coherent part of the light from various lasers, including tapered laser diodes, at a very high fidelity despite the presence of incoherent light and noise....

  6. Viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress irradiated with red laser, infrared laser, and red light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci; de Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Espinosa, Mariano Martinez; Bagnato, Vanderley Salvador; Machado, Maria A. A. M.

    2011-07-01

    Phototherapy is noninvasive, painless and has no known side effect. However, for its incorporation into clinical practice, more well-designed studies are necessary to define optimal parameters for its application. The viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress irradiated with either a red laser, an infrared laser, or a red light-emitting diode (LED) was analyzed. Irradiation parameters were: red laser (660 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2), infrared laser (780 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2), and red LED (637 +/- 15 nm, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2). All applications were punctual and performed with a spot with 0.4 mm2 of diameter for 4 or 8 s. The Kruskal-Wallis test and analysis of variance of the general linear model (p phototherapy with low-intensity laser and LED showed no toxicity at the cellular level. It even stimulated methylthiazol tetrazolium assay (MTT) conversion and neutral red uptake of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional stress, especially in the group irradiated with infrared laser (p = 0.004 for MTT conversion and p phototherapy used, it can be concluded that phototherapy stimulated the viability of fibroblasts cultured under nutritional deficit resembling those found in traumatized tissue in which cell viability is reduced.

  7. The monitoring system using laser light for the patient movement during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Naoki; Onishi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Motoshi; Kuriyama, Kengo; Akiyama, Saburou; Nakamura, Osamu; Araki, Tsutomu

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of a newly developed real-time patient movement monitoring system built into the patient positioning light from the frontal and horizontal view. Materials and Techniques: This system is composed of 4 parts. They are a laser light projector, a retro-reflected tape, a sensor of photo-diode, and an alarm devise. First, this system projects a laser light for the patient movement monitor into the center of the crossed lines of the patient positioning light. The laser light (a diameter of 1.5mm and power of 0.5mW) for the patient movement monitor has a different wave length(633nm) from the patient positioning light. Then it is reflected into the direction of incidence with a retro-reflection tape affixed on three patient positioning points. And the system has a photo-diode which can sense the reflected laser light. This retro-reflected tape is made of tiny high reflective beads of glass which is fixed on a sheet with the thickness of 0.12mm and is able to be cut into any shape. This has a maximum retro-reflection angle of 70 degrees. We can select a tolerance of the patient movement by changing its shape and size. A buzzer strikes and a lamp is turned on to alarm for the error when the retro-reflected laser light is not sensed with the photo-diode. Results: The real-time monitoring accuracy of this system is only 0.17mm in the dimension of error for a selected tolerance of the phantom examination. Conclusion: This patient positioning system can be made simply and inexpensively and has a high monitoring accuracy. We can apply this system for a high-precision irradiation such as the three dimensional irradiation and small target irradiation

  8. Comparison of particle size measurements of some aqueous suspensions by laser polarimetry and dynamic light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirikov, S N

    2016-01-01

    The results of the size distributions measurements of the particles of aqueous suspensions of ZnO, CuO, TiO 2 , and BaTiO 3 by methods of laser polarimetry and dynamic light scattering are considered. These measurements are compared with the results obtained by electron microscopy. It is shown that a laser polarimetry method gives more accurate results for size parameter values more than 1-2. (paper)

  9. Frequency chirped light at large detuning with an injection-locked diode laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, K; Disla, M; Dellatto, J; Limani, A; Kaufman, B; Wright, M J

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a laser system to generate frequency-chirped light at rapid modulation speeds (∼100 MHz) with a large frequency offset. Light from an external cavity diode laser with its frequency locked to an atomic resonance is passed through a lithium niobate electro-optical phase modulator. The phase modulator is driven by a ∼6 GHz signal whose frequency is itself modulated with a RF MHz signal (<200 MHz). A second injection locked diode laser is used to filter out all of the light except the frequency-chirped ±1 order by more than 30 dB. Using this system, it is possible to generate a 1 GHz frequency chirp in 5 ns.

  10. Frequency chirped light at large detuning with an injection-locked diode laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, K.; Disla, M.; Dellatto, J.; Limani, A.; Kaufman, B.; Wright, M. J., E-mail: mwright@adelphi.edu [Physics Department, Adelphi University, 1 South Ave., Garden City, New York 11530 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    We have developed a laser system to generate frequency-chirped light at rapid modulation speeds (∼100 MHz) with a large frequency offset. Light from an external cavity diode laser with its frequency locked to an atomic resonance is passed through a lithium niobate electro-optical phase modulator. The phase modulator is driven by a ∼6 GHz signal whose frequency is itself modulated with a RF MHz signal (<200 MHz). A second injection locked diode laser is used to filter out all of the light except the frequency-chirped ±1 order by more than 30 dB. Using this system, it is possible to generate a 1 GHz frequency chirp in 5 ns.

  11. Frequency chirped light at large detuning with an injection-locked diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, K.; Disla, M.; Dellatto, J.; Limani, A.; Kaufman, B.; Wright, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a laser system to generate frequency-chirped light at rapid modulation speeds (∼100 MHz) with a large frequency offset. Light from an external cavity diode laser with its frequency locked to an atomic resonance is passed through a lithium niobate electro-optical phase modulator. The phase modulator is driven by a ∼6 GHz signal whose frequency is itself modulated with a RF MHz signal (<200 MHz). A second injection locked diode laser is used to filter out all of the light except the frequency-chirped ±1 order by more than 30 dB. Using this system, it is possible to generate a 1 GHz frequency chirp in 5 ns

  12. Laser driven white light source for BRDF measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Thorseth, Anders; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    source (UV-VIS-NIR), spectroradiometer and sample holder stepper motor in a dark UV-protected environment. Here, we introduced a special kind of light source which has a bright, stable, broad spectral range and well collimated light output to give a very good angular resolution. The experimental results...... show how stable and reliable is our light source in terms of spectral power distribution, and in BRDF measurement. Furthermore we have shown that we are able to get a well collimated beam and higher power output using set of off-axis parabolic mirrors...

  13. Formation of titanium carbide layer by laser alloying with a light-transmitting resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takuto; Hagino, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    The weight reduction of mechanical components is becoming increasingly important, especially in the transportation industry, as fuel efficiency continues to improve. Titanium and titanium alloys are recognized for their outstanding potential as lightweight materials with high specific strength. Yet they also have poor tribological properties that preclude their use for sliding parts. Improved tribological properties of titanium would expand the application of titanium into different fields. Laser alloying is an effective process for improving surface properties such as wear resistance. The process has numerous advantages over conventional surface modification techniques. Many researchers have reported the usefulness of laser alloying as a technique to improve the wear resistance of titanium. The process has an important flaw, however, as defects such as cracks or voids tend to appear in the laser-alloyed zone. Our group performed a novel laser-alloying process using a light-transmitting resin as a source for the carbon element. We laser alloyed a surface layer of pure titanium pre-coated with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and investigated the microstructure and wear properties. A laser-alloyed zone was formed by a reaction between the molten titanium and thermal decomposition products of PMMA at the interface between the substrate and PMMA. The cracks could be eliminated from the laser-alloyed zone by optimizing the laser alloying conditions. The surface of the laser-alloyed zone was covered with a titanium carbide layer and exhibited a superior sliding property and wear resistance against WC-Co.

  14. Vacuum-Compatible Wideband White Light and Laser Combiner Source System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Alineza; Ryan, Daniel J.; Tang, Hong; Demers, Richard T.; Kadogawa, Hiroshi; An, Xin; Sun, George Y.

    2010-01-01

    For the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) Spectrum Calibration Development Unit (SCDU) testbed, wideband white light is used to simulate starlight. The white light source mount requires extremely stable pointing accuracy (interference to balance two optical paths, and to maintain close tracking. In order to coarse align the optical paths, a laser light is sent into the system to allow tracking of fringes because a narrow band laser has a great range of interference. The design requirements forced the innovators to use a new type of optical fiber, and to take a large amount of care in aligning the input sources. The testbed required better than 1% throughput, or enough output power on the lowest spectrum to be detectable by the CCD camera (6 nW at camera). The system needed to be vacuum-compatible and to have the capability for combining a visible laser light at any time for calibration purposes. The red laser is a commercially produced 635-nm laser 5-mW diode, and the white light source is a commercially produced tungsten halogen lamp that gives a broad spectrum of about 525 to 800 nm full width at half maximum (FWHM), with about 1.4 mW of power at 630 nm. A custom-made beam splitter window with special coating for broadband wavelengths is used with the white light input via a 50-mm multi-mode fiber. The large mode area PCF is an LMA-8 made by Crystal Fibre (core diameter of 8.5 mm, mode field diameter of 6 mm, and numerical aperture at 625 nm of 0.083). Any science interferometer that needs a tracking laser fringe to assist in alignment can use this system.

  15. Diode laser for endodontic treatment: investigations of light distribution and disinfection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Karl; Graser, Rainer; Udart, Martin; Kienle, Alwin; Hibst, Raimund

    2011-03-01

    Diode lasers are used in dentistry mainly for oral surgery and disinfection of root canals in endodontic treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate and to improve the laser induced bacteria inactivation in endodontic treatment. An essential prerequisite of the optimization of the irradiation process and device is the knowledge about the determinative factors of bacteria killing: light intensity? light dosis? temperature? In order to find out whether high power NIR laser bacterial killing is caused by a photochemical or a photothermal process we heated bacteria suspensions of E. coli K12 by a water bath and by a diode laser (940 nm) with the same temporal temperature course. Furthermore, bacteria suspensions were irradiated while the temperature was fixed by ice water. Killing of bacteria was measured via fluorescence labeling. In order to optimize the irradiation of the root canal, we designed special fiber tips with radial light emission characteristic by optical ray tracing simulations. Also, we calculated the resulting light distribution in dentin by voxelbased Monte Carlo simulations. Furthermore, we irradiated root canals of extracted human teeth using different fiber tip geometries and measured the resulting light and heat distribution by CCD-camera and thermography. Comparison of killing rates between laser and water based heating shows no significant differences, and irradiation of ice cooled suspensions has no substantial killing effect. Thus, the most important parameter for bacterial killing is the maximum temperature. Irradiation of root canals using fiber tips with radial light emission results in a more defined irradiated area with minor irradiation of the apex and higher intensity and therefore higher temperature increase on root canal surface. In conclusion, our experiments show that at least for E. coli bacteria inactivation by NIR laser irradiation is solely based on a thermal process and that heat distribution in root canal can be

  16. Laser-light backscattering response to water content and proteolysis in dry-cured ham

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulladosa, E.; Rubio-Celorio, M.; Skytte, Jacob Lercke

    2017-01-01

    Laser backscattering imaging (LBI) is a low-cost technology proposed to determine non-invasively composition and microstructural characteristics of agro food and dairy products. The aim of this work was to define the effect of different acquisition conditions (wavelength, object distance and angle......-cured ham was also evaluated. Results showed that a red laser (635 nm) is more convenient than a green laser (532 nm) to analyse dry-cured ham but no preferable angle or object distance to evaluate dryness or proteolysis was found. Nevertheless, light scattering parameters were modified depending...

  17. Combination treatment with excimer laser and narrowband UVB light in vitiligo patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sungsik; Hann, Seung-Kyung; Oh, Sang Ho

    2016-01-01

    For the treatment of vitiligo, narrowband UVB (NBUVB) light is considered the most effective for nonsegmental vitiligo, while excimer laser treatment is commonly used for localized vitiligo. However, treatment areas may potentially be missed with excimer laser treatment. We aimed to evaluate the effect of combinational treatment with NBUVB light and excimer laser on vitiligo. All patients were first treated with NBUVB; excimer laser was then applied in conjunction with NBUVB phototherapy due to a slow response or no further improvement with continuous NBUVB treatment alone. To minimize adverse effects, a fixed dose of NBUVB was administered, and the dose of excimer laser was increased based on patient response. Among 80 patients, 54 patients showed responses after combination with excimer laser; however, 26 patients (32.5%) showed no remarkable change after combination therapy. Of the 26 patients who showed no further response, 12 patients (46.1%) presented with vitiligo on the acral areas, which are known to the least responsive sites. Our study suggests that combined treatment of NBUVB and excimer laser in vitiligo may enhance the treatment response without remarkable side effects, therefore might also increase the compliance of the patients to the treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. On stimulated scattering of laser light in inertial fusion energy targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, Lj [National Inst. for Fusion Science, The Graduate Univ. for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Skoric, M.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Ishiguro, S. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Theory and Computer Simulation Center, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sato, T. [JAMSTEC, Earth Simulator Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Propagation of a laser light through regions of an underdense plasma is an active research topic in laser fusion. In particular, a large effort has been invested in studies of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) which can reflect laser energy and produce energetic particles to preheat a fusion energy target. Experiments, theory and simulations agree on a complex interplay between various laser-plasma instabilities. By particle-in-cell simulations of an underdense electron-plasma, we have found, apart from the standard SRS, a strong backscattering near the electron plasma frequency at densities beyond the quarter critical. This novel instability, recognized in recent experiments as stimulated laser scattering on a trapped electron-acoustic mode (SEAS), is absent from a classical theory of laser-parametric instabilities. A parametric excitation of SEAS instability, is explained by a three-wave resonant decay of the incident laser light into a standing backscattered wave and a slow trapped electron acoustic wave ({omega} < {omega}{sub p}). Large SEAS pulsations, eventually suppressed by relativistic heating of electrons, are observed in our simulations. This phenomenon seems relevant to future hohlraum target and fast ignition experiments. (author)

  19. Light and laser treatment modalities for disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Gregory A; Sitenga, Jenna L; Nguyen, Austin Huy; Vaudreuil, Adam; Huerter, Christopher J

    2017-05-01

    Treatment of disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis (DSAP) is poorly standardized. The present review seeks to comprehensively discuss the potential for laser and light modalities in the treatment of DSAP. A systematic review of light and laser treatment modalities was conducted to include 26 cases of patients with DSAP. Systematic review resulted in 14 articles to be included. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) overall was the least successful treatment modality, with clinical improvement seen in a minority of patients (MAL-PDT: N = 9 patients, 33.3% showed improvement; ALA-PDT: N = 3 patients, 0% improvement; hypericin-PDT: N = 2 patients, 0% improvement) after numerous post-procedural side effects of hyperpigmentation, inflammation, erythema, and discomfort. Overall, in the available reports, PDT demonstrates poor outcomes with greater incidence of side effects. The response rates of DSAP lesions treated with lasers were as follows: (Q-switched ruby lasers: N = 2, 100%; CO 2 laser: N = 1, 100%; PDT and CO 2 combination therapy: N = 2, 0-50%; erbium and neodymium YAG lasers: N = 2, 100%; fractional 1927-nm thulium fiber lasers: N = 2, 100%; Grenz rays: N = 1, 100%; and fractional photothermolysis: N = 2, 100%). The side effects of laser therapy were minimal and included mild erythema, slight hyperpigmentation, and moderate edema. Laser therapy is a promising treatment option for DSAP with an excellent side effect profile. However, higher power studies are required to determine optimal guidelines for laser treatment of DSAP.

  20. Analytical approach of laser beam propagation in the hollow polygonal light pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangzhi; Zhu, Xiao; Zhu, Changhong

    2013-08-10

    An analytical method of researching the light distribution properties on the output end of a hollow n-sided polygonal light pipe and a light source with a Gaussian distribution is developed. The mirror transformation matrices and a special algorithm of removing void virtual images are created to acquire the location and direction vector of each effective virtual image on the entrance plane. The analytical method is demonstrated by Monte Carlo ray tracing. At the same time, four typical cases are discussed. The analytical results indicate that the uniformity of light distribution varies with the structural and optical parameters of the hollow n-sided polygonal light pipe and light source with a Gaussian distribution. The analytical approach will be useful to design and choose the hollow n-sided polygonal light pipe, especially for high-power laser beam homogenization techniques.

  1. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA High-power EUV (13.5 nm) light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, Vladimir M.; Borisova, Galina N.; Vinokhodov, Aleksandr Yu; Zakharov, S. V.; Ivanov, Aleksandr S.; Kiryukhin, Yurii B.; Mishchenko, Valentin A.; Prokof'ev, Aleksandr V.; Khristoforov, Oleg B.

    2010-10-01

    Characteristics of a discharge-produced plasma (DPP) light source in the spectral band 13.5±0.135 nm, developed for Extreme Ultra Violet (EUV) lithography, are presented. EUV light is generated by DPP in tin vapour formed between rotating disk electrodes. The discharge is ignited by a focused laser beam. The EUV power 1000 W/(2π sr) in the spectral band 13.5±0.135 nm was achieved with input power about of ~63 kW to the plasma at a pulse repetition rate ~7 kHz . The results of numerical simulation are compared with the experimental data.

  2. Self-focusing and filamentation of laser light in high Z plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. D.; Mead, W. C.; Coggeshall, S. V.; Aldrich, C. H.; Norton, J. L.; Pollak, G. D.; Wallace, J. M.

    1988-05-01

    Self-focusing and filamentation of short wavelength laser light in high Z plasmas of interest to laser fusion are discussed. It is found that self-focusing behavior is very dependent on the details of the characteristics of the laser beam, the plasma conditions, and the energy transport processes. Laser light absorption and self-focusing are strongly competitive processes. At. 0.26 μm wavelength the collisional absorption is often so great that there is no intensity amplification of the beam despite the fact that strong self-focusing is present. Wide variations are found in laser light penetration, affected by several factors. Diverging optics reduce the likelihood of self-focusing. Large scale length density gradients have little effect on focusing behavior. The self-focusing behavior is very dependent on beam shape. Large scale hot spots can have a significant effect on whole beam self-focusing early in the pulse. The behavior of small scale hot spots can be qualitatively different than the standard picture. The calculations indicate that small scale hot spots do not achieve a steady state in some cases. Sound waves cause chaotic interactions among neighboring hot spots. It is found that sub-beam size structures are also generated when nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) radiation and atomic physics are used in the calculations. The nature of the heat flux and thermoelectric magnetic field generation are examined with a kinetic model. Stimulated Raman backscattering levels in self-focused light are significantly reduced for short wavelengths and high Z plasmas Landau damping plays an important role in determining the Raman levels. Implications for suprathermal electron production, symmetric illumination, x-ray conversion efficiency, and laser light absorption are discussed.

  3. Lasers and lights for the treatment of striae distensae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas, J A; Ledon, J A; Franca, K; Nouri, K

    2014-09-01

    Striae distensae (SD) or "stretch marks" are a common and well-recognized dermatologic entity affecting patients of all ages, genders, and ethnicities. The treatment of SD has long been plagued by disappointing outcomes and remains a frustrating entity for both physicians and patients. While striae may become less conspicuous over time, they rarely resolve without intervention. Inspired by the success of lasers for the treatment of scars and rhytides, these devices have been applied to the treatment of SD in the hopes of achieving similar efficacy.

  4. The ARGOS laser system: green light for ground layer adaptive optics at the LBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Walfried; Rabien, Sebastian; Gässler, Wolfgang; Esposito, Simone; Barl, Lothar; Borelli, Jose; Daysenroth, Matthias; Gemperlein, Hans; Kulas, Martin; Ziegleder, Julian

    2014-07-01

    We report on the development of the laser system of ARGOS, the multiple laser guide star adaptive optics system for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The system uses a total of six high powered, pulsed Nd:YAG lasers frequency-doubled to a wavelength of 532 nm to generate a set of three guide stars above each of the LBT telescopes. The position of each of the LGS constellations on sky as well as the relative position of the individual laser guide stars within this constellation is controlled by a set of steerable mirrors and a fast tip-tilt mirror within the laser system. The entire opto-mechanical system is housed in two hermetically sealed and thermally controlled enclosures on the SX and DX side of the LBT telescope. The laser beams are propagated through two refractive launch telescopes which focus the beams at an altitude of 12 km, creating a constellation of laser guide stars around a 4 arcminute diameter circle by means of Rayleigh scattering. In addition to the GLAO Rayleigh beacon system, ARGOS has also been designed for a possible future upgrade with a hybrid sodium laser - Rayleigh beacon combination, enabling diffraction limited operation. The ARGOS laser system was successfully installed at the LBT in April 2013. Extensive functional tests have been carried out and have verified the operation of the systems according to specifications. The alignment of the laser system with respect to the launch telescope was carried out during two more runs in June and October 2013, followed by the first propagation of laser light on sky in November 2013.

  5. Crossing statistics of laser light scattered through a nanofluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshadi Pirlar, M; Movahed, S M S; Razzaghi, D; Karimzadeh, R

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the crossing statistics of speckle patterns formed in the Fresnel diffraction region by a laser beam scattering through a nanofluid. We extend zero-crossing statistics to assess the dynamical properties of the nanofluid. According to the joint probability density function of laser beam fluctuation and its time derivative, the theoretical frameworks for Gaussian and non-Gaussian regimes are revisited. We count the number of crossings not only at zero level but also for all available thresholds to determine the average speed of moving particles. Using a probabilistic framework in determining crossing statistics, a priori Gaussianity is not essentially considered; therefore, even in the presence of deviation from Gaussian fluctuation, this modified approach is capable of computing relevant quantities, such as mean value of speed, more precisely. Generalized total crossing, which represents the weighted summation of crossings for all thresholds to quantify small deviation from Gaussian statistics, is introduced. This criterion can also manipulate the contribution of noises and trends to infer reliable physical quantities. The characteristic time scale for having successive crossings at a given threshold is defined. In our experimental setup, we find that increasing sample temperature leads to more consistency between Gaussian and perturbative non-Gaussian predictions. The maximum number of crossings does not necessarily occur at mean level, indicating that we should take into account other levels in addition to zero level to achieve more accurate assessments.

  6. Contribution to the study of the molecular scattering of light. Use of a laser as light source (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slama, L.

    1963-01-01

    The experiments of the molecular scattering of light have been repeated using a ruby laser as a light source. The angular distribution of the scattered light intensity has been measured when the electric vector of the incident beam is either in the plane of observation or perpendicular to that plane. In the first case a good agreement with the Rayleigh theory has been found but this is not true in the second case. The differential cross sections for scattering have been measured for various gases. The values found are two or three times larger than the ones deduced from the classical theory. The possible effect of a variation of the beam intensity upon the linearity of the scattering process has been looked for. (author) [fr

  7. ANGULAR-DEPENDENCE OF HENE-LASER LIGHT-SCATTERING BY BOVINE AND HUMAN DENTIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZIJP, [No Value; TENBOSCH, JJ

    1991-01-01

    The scattering phase functions for HeNe-laser light of dentine sections 10-20-mu-m thick were measured. The functions perpendicular to the tubules had first-order maxima at angles of 4-degrees for bovine dentine and 5-degrees for human dentine; those parallel to the tubules showed no first-order

  8. Size distribution of mineral aerosol: using light-scattering models in laser particle sizing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veihelmann, B.; Konert, M.; van der Zande, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    The size distribution of semitransparent irregularly shaped mineral dust aerosol samples is determined using a commonly used laser particle-sizing technique. The size distribution is derived from intensity measurements of singly scattered light at various scattering angles close to the

  9. Size distribution of mineral aerosol: using light-scattering models in laser particle sizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veihelmann, B.; Konert, M.; Zande, W.J. van der

    2006-01-01

    The size distribution of semitransparent irregularly shaped mineral dust aerosol,samples is determined using a commonly used laser particle-sizing technique. The size distribution is derived from intensity measurements of singly scattered light at various scattering angles close to the

  10. Improvement of light-current characteristic linearity in a quantum well laser with asymmetric barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zubov, F. I.; Zhukov, A. E.; Shernyakov, Yu M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of asymmetric barriers on the light-current characteristic (LCC) of a quantum well laser was studied theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the utilization of asymmetric barriers in a waveguide prevents the nonlinearity of LCC and, consequently, allows rising of the maximum...... output power....

  11. Automated laser guidance of neuronal growth cones using a spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnegie, David J; Cizmár, Tomás; Baumgartl, Jörg; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Dholakia, Kishan

    2009-11-01

    The growth cone of a developing neuron can be guided using a focused infra-red (IR) laser beam [1]. In previous setups this process has required a significant amount of user intervention to adjust continuously the laser beam to guide the growing neuron. Previously, a system using an acousto-optical deflector (AOD) has been developed to steer the beam [2]. However, to enhance the controllability of this system, here we demonstrate the use of a computer controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) to steer and manipulate the shape of a laser beam for use in guided neuronal growth. This new experimental setup paves the way to enable a comprehensive investigation into beam shaping effects on neuronal growth and we show neuronal growth initiated by a Bessel light mode. This is a robust platform to explore the biochemistry of this novel phenomenon. (c) 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim

  12. Manipulation of cellular light from green fluorescent protein by a femtosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Wang, Shaoyang; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2012-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is one of the most widely studied and exploited proteins in biochemistry and cell biology. It emits fluorescence following optical excitation, which is usually provided by a laser. Here, we report that fluorescence from enhanced GFP can be `turned off' by exposing cells to laser light. A short flash of femtosecond laser light is shown to deplete calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells. Calcium-release-activated calcium channels are then activated by stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1). The rise in intracellular Ca2+ depolarizes mitochondria and increases the leakage of reactive oxygen species, which then permanently bleach the GFP. This controllable optical scheme for reactive oxygen species generation can also be used to modulate the photoconversion of GFP fluorescence from green to red emission and provide a mechanism for influencing cellular molecular dynamics.

  13. Compact RGBY light sources with high luminance for laser display applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, Katrin; Blume, Gunnar; Werner, Nils; Müller, André; Sumpf, Bernd; Pohl, Johannes; Feise, David; Ressel, Peter; Sahm, Alexander; Bege, Roland; Hofmann, Julian; Jedrzejczyk, Daniel; Tränkle, Günther

    2018-02-01

    Watt-class visible laser light with a high luminance can be created with high-power GaAs-based lasers either directly in the red spectral region or using single-pass second harmonic generation (SHG) for the colors in the blue-yellow spectral region. The concepts and results of red- and near infrared-emitting distributed Bragg reflector tapered lasers and master oscillator power amplifier systems as well as their application for SHG bench-top experiments and miniaturized modules are presented. Examples of these high-luminance light sources aiming at different applications such as flying spot display or holographic 3D cinema are discussed in more detail. The semiconductor material allows an easy adaptation of the wavelength allowing techniques such as six-primary color 3D projection or color space enhancement by adding a fourth yellow color.

  14. Effect of Strontium Nitrate on Extremely Slow Strobe Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    describes the evaluation of the slow strobe’s pulse rate, based on the mesh size of the metal powder and the effect of the variation of strontium...nitrate and potassium nitrate concentration . Small test pellets of this less-toxic strobe mixture, containing only 10 g of pyrotechnic composition, had...blood and kidneys (5). The perchlorate ion is known to be stable and nonreactive in aqueous systems, which leads to a high persistency in groundwater

  15. Laser camp: shining a light on optics careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Judith; Goyette, Donna; Magnani, Nancy; Wosczyna-Birch, Karen

    2008-08-01

    Three Rivers Community College offers two associate degree programs in optics/photonics, and graduates have their choice of jobs in New England and across the United States. Nonetheless, students, their parents, teachers and guidance counselors are largely unaware of the career opportunities in the photonics industry. To promote optics/photonics career awareness, we hosted two versions of "Laser Camp" in 2007 and 2008. Hands-on activities were chosen to promote awareness of optical science and technology careers and to provide "take home" information and souvenirs to share with family and friends. In this paper, we discuss the logistics of funding, marketing, permissions, transportation and food service and share our student-tested activities.

  16. Low-cost photoacoustic imaging systems based on laser diode and light-emitting diode excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingkai Yao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging, an emerging biomedical imaging modality, holds great promise for preclinical and clinical researches. It combines the high optical contrast and high ultrasound resolution by converting laser excitation into ultrasonic emission. In order to generate photoacoustic signal efficiently, bulky Q-switched solid-state laser systems are most commonly used as excitation sources and hence limit its commercialization. As an alternative, the miniaturized semiconductor laser system has the advantages of being inexpensive, compact, and robust, which makes a significant effect on production-forming design. It is also desirable to obtain a wavelength in a wide range from visible to near-infrared spectrum for multispectral applications. Focussing on practical aspect, this paper reviews the state-of-the-art developments of low-cost photoacoustic system with laser diode and light-emitting diode excitation source and highlights a few representative installations in the past decade.

  17. Comparison of the effect of diode laser versus intense pulsed light in axillary hair removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormiga, Patricia; Ishida, Cleide Eiko; Boechat, Alvaro; Ramos-E-Silva, Marcia

    2014-10-01

    Devices such as diode laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) are in constant development aiming at permanent hair removal, but there are few comparative studies between these technologies. The objective was to comparatively assess axillary hair removal performed by diode laser and IPL and to obtain parameters of referred pain and evolution response for each method. A comparative prospective, double-blind, and randomized study of axillary hair removal performed by the diode laser and IPL was conducted in 21 females. Six sessions were held with application of the diode laser in one axilla and the IPL in the other, with intervals of 30 days and follow-up of 6 months after the last session. Clinical photographs and digital dermoscopy for hair counts in predefined and fixed fields of the treated areas were performed before, 2 weeks after the sixth session, and 6 months after the end of treatment. A questionnaire to assess the pain was applied. The number of hair shafts was significantly reduced with the diode laser and IPL. The diode laser was more effective, although more painful than the IPL. No serious, adverse, or permanent effects were observed with both technologies. Both diode laser and the IPL are effective, safe, and able to produce lasting results in axillary hair removal.

  18. Characterization of Plant Growth under Single-Wavelength Laser Light Using the Model Plant Arabidopsis Thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Ooi, Amanda

    2016-12-01

    Indoor horticulture offers a promising solution for sustainable food production and is becoming increasingly widespread. However, it incurs high energy and cost due to the use of artificial lighting such as high-pressure sodium lamps, fluorescent light or increasingly, the light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The energy efficiency and light quality of currently available lighting is suboptimal, therefore less than ideal for sustainable and cost-effective large-scale plant production. Here, we demonstrate the use of high-powered single-wavelength lasers for indoor horticulture. Lasers are highly energy-efficient and can be remotely guided to the site of plant growth, thus reducing on-site heat accumulation. Besides, laser beams can be tailored to match the absorption profiles of different plants. We have developed a prototype laser growth chamber and demonstrate that laser-grown plants can complete a full growth cycle from seed to seed with phenotypes resembling those of plants grown under LEDs. Importantly, the plants have lower expression of proteins diagnostic for light and radiation stress. The phenotypical, biochemical and proteomic data show that the singlewavelength laser light is suitable for plant growth and therefore, potentially able to unlock the advantages of this next generation lighting technology for highly energy-efficient horticulture. Furthermore, stomatal movement partly determines the plant productivity and stress management. Abscisic acid (ABA) induces stomatal closure by promoting net K+-efflux from guard cells through outwardrectifying K+ (K+ out) channels to regulate plant water homeostasis. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana guard cell outward-rectifying K+ (ATGORK) channel is a direct target for ABA in the regulation of stomatal aperture and hence gas exchange and transpiration. Addition of (±)-ABA, but not the biologically inactive (−)-isomer, increases K+ out channel activity in Vicia faba guard cell protoplast. A similar ABA

  19. A preview of a microgravity laser light scattering instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, W. V.; Ansari, R. R.

    1991-01-01

    The development of a versatile, miniature, modular light scattering instrument to be used in microgravity is described. The instrument will measure microscopic particles in the size range of thirty angstroms to above three microns. This modular instrument permits several configurations, each optimized for a particular experiment. In particular, a multiangle instrument will probably be mounted in a rack in the Space Shuttle and on the Space Station. It is possible that a Space Shuttle glove-box and a lap-top computer containing a correlator card can be used to perform a number of experiments and to demonstrate the technology needed for more elaborate investigations.

  20. Patterning of nanoparticulate transparent conductive ITO films using UV light irradiation and UV laser beam writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solieman, A.; Moharram, A.H.; Aegerter, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film is one of the most widely used as transparent conductive electrodes in all forms of flat panel display (FPD) and microelectronic devices. Suspension of already crystalline conductive ITO nanoparticles fully dispersed in alcohol was spun, after modifying with coupling agent, on glass substrates. The low cost, simple and versatile traditional photolithography process without complication of the photoresist layer was used for patterning ITO films. Using of UV light irradiation through mask and direct UV laser beam writing resulted in an accurate linear, sharp edge and very smooth patterns. Irradiated ITO film showed a high transparency (∼85%) in the visible region. The electrical sheet resistance decrease with increasing time of exposure to UV light and UV laser. Only 5 min UV light irradiation is enough to decrease the electrical sheet resistance down to 5 kΩ□.

  1. Angle-dependent light emission from aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes under CO2 laser irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y; Gong, T; Liu, W J; Wei, J Q; Zhang, X F; Wang, K L; Zhong, M L; Wu, D H

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the light emission from aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) under continuous wave CO 2 laser (λ = 10.6 μm) irradiation. Results indicate that the light emission is dependent on the angle θ between the laser incident direction and the nanotube axis. The relative intensity of the light emission at certain wavelengths shows a Lorentzian feature when θ varies from 0 0 to 90 0 . The Lorentzian fitting curve displays a distinct tendency between shorter (λ 700 nm). A minimum intensity was observed at θ m close to 67 0 under shorter wavelength, whereas a maximum intensity was shown at θ m of about 60 0 at longer wavelength. These results show the anisotropic property of aligned MWNTs

  2. Measurement of Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Driven Light Scattering from Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Phillips, L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Serlin, V.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E. A.; Manka, C. K.

    2010-11-01

    With short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (1˜3 THz), and ISI beam smoothing, Nike KrF laser provides unique research opportunities and potential for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Previous Nike experiments observed two plasmon decay (TPD) driven signals from CH plasmas at the laser intensities above ˜2x10^15 W/cm^2 with total laser energies up to 1 kJ of ˜350 ps FWHM pulses. We have performed a further experiment with longer laser pulses (0.5˜4.0 ns FWHM) and will present combined results of the experiments focusing on light emission data in spectral ranges relevant to the Raman (SRS) and TPD instabilities. Time- or space-resolved spectral features of TPD were detected at different viewing angles and the absolute intensity calibrated spectra of thermal background were used to obtain blackbody temperatures in the plasma corona. The wave vector distribution in k-space of the participating TPD plasmons will be also discussed. These results show promise for the proposed direct-drive designs.

  3. THE STIMULATING EFFECT OF LASER RED LIGHT, FAR RED LIGHT AND SODIUM CARBONATE AT THE INITIAL STAGES OF BARLEY ONTOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Dudin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Modern ecological state of the environment and human unhealthy diet cause many diseases. A healthy diet is the one that contains adequate amounts of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, macronutrients and micronutrients. Photosynthesis i. e. the process by which plants produce organic compounds from carbon dioxide and water, is the source of life, the source of evolution and proliferation of life forms on the Earth. Thus, the juice made from sprouted barley provides physiologically active chlorophyll, macronutrients and micronutrients, vitamins А, В2 , В3 , В5 , В6 , В8 , Е and К. It is well known that light from a red laser with a wavelength of 638.2 nm has a stimulating action on the germination energy, germination ability and productivity of seeds, and on the crop yields. Therefore, this research is of primary importance today. The research result produced a sharp decline in plant vigor and germinating capacity of barley when soaking in 1n sodium carbonate solution, as well as changes in the ratio of potassium-sodium balance in plants. Thus at lower concentrations of sodium carbonate and 0.1 n sodium increasing of pigment content in barley is observed on the seventh day. The red laser light has a similar stimulating action: the chlorophyll content of barley plants increased after the red laser treatment of barley seeds. However, the chlorophyll contents were depressed when the seeds were exposed to far red light with wavelengths of 754±10 nm. Using these factors, one can manage the content of chlorophyll and sodium-potassium balance in the initial stages of barley ontogenesis in the technology of barley juice or the powder for a healthy and proper human diet.

  4. Comparative Study of Diode Laser Versus Neodymium-Yttrium Aluminum: Garnet Laser Versus Intense Pulsed Light for the Treatment of Hirsutism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Neerja

    2015-01-01

    Lasers are widely used for the treatment of hirsutism. But the choice of the right laser for the right skin type is very important. Before starting with laser therapy, it is important to assess the skin type, the fluence, the pulse duration and the type of laser to be used. To compare the efficacy and side effects of Diode laser, Neodymium-yttrium aluminum - garnet (Nd: YAG) laser and intense pulsed light (IPL) on 30 female patients of hirsutism. Thirty female patients with hirsutism were selected for a randomised controlled study. The patients were divided into three groups of 10 patients each. In group I patients diode laser was used, in group II patients long pulsed Nd: YAG laser was used and in group III, IPL was used. The patients were evaluated and result graded according to a 4-point scale as excellent, >75% reduction; good, 50-75% reduction; fair; 25-50% reduction; and poor, diode laser group, followed by 35% hair reduction in the Nd: Yag laser group and 10% hair reduction in the IPL group. The percentage of hair reduction after four sessions of treatment was maximum (64%) in the diode laser group, followed by 62% hair reduction in the Nd: Yag laser group and 48% hair reduction in the IPL group. The percentage of hair reduction after eight sessions of treatment was maximum (92%) in the diode laser group, followed by 90% hair reduction in the Nd: YAG group and 70% hair reduction in the IPL group. To conclude for the Indian skin with dark hairs, the diode laser still stands the test of time. But, since the diode laser has a narrow margin of safety, proper pre and post-procedure cooling is recommended. Although, the side effects of Nd: YAG laser are less as compared to the diode laser, it is less efficacious as compared to the diode laser.

  5. Non surgical laser and light in the treatment of chronic diseases: a review based on personal experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, L.

    2010-11-01

    Since many years some effects of non surgical laser and light on biological tissue have been demonstrated, in vitro and in vivo. This review is based on the results obtained by me and my colleagues/follower in Italy. Aim of our study is to verify the anti-inflammatory and regenerative effects of non surgical laser and light therapy on patients with chronic diseases not good treatable with traditional therapies, as diabetes, and central nervous system injuries. In addition, many clinical data have emerged from double-blind trials on laser treatment of rheumatic diseases and in sports medicine. So, we would like to do a review on the state of the art of non surgical laser treatment in medicine, included aesthetic laser and light therapy field. We discuss the indications and limitations of aesthetic laser medicine, as concluded from the data analysis of the published literature and from over thirty years of personal experiences.

  6. Non surgical laser and light in the treatment of chronic diseases: a review based on personal experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, L

    2010-01-01

    Since many years some effects of non surgical laser and light on biological tissue have been demonstrated, in vitro and in vivo. This review is based on the results obtained by me and my colleagues/follower in Italy. Aim of our study is to verify the anti-inflammatory and regenerative effects of non surgical laser and light therapy on patients with chronic diseases not good treatable with traditional therapies, as diabetes, and central nervous system injuries. In addition, many clinical data have emerged from double-blind trials on laser treatment of rheumatic diseases and in sports medicine. So, we would like to do a review on the state of the art of non surgical laser treatment in medicine, included aesthetic laser and light therapy field. We discuss the indications and limitations of aesthetic laser medicine, as concluded from the data analysis of the published literature and from over thirty years of personal experiences

  7. Silicon-photonics light source realized by III-V/Si grating-mirror laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A III–V/Si vertical-cavity in-plane-emitting laser structure is suggested and numerically investigated. This hybrid laser consists of a distributed Bragg reflector, a III–V active region, and a high-index-contrast grating HCG connected to an in-plane output waveguide. The HCG and the output...... waveguide are made in the Si layer of a silicon-on-insulator wafer by using Si-electronics-compatible processing. The HCG works as a highly-reflective mirror for vertical resonance and at the same time routes light to the in-plane output waveguide. Numerical simulations show superior performance compared...

  8. Dispersion of light and heavy pollutants in urban scale models: CO(2) laser photoacoustic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelinger, Z; Strizík, M; Kubát, P; Civis, S; Grigorová, E; Janecková, R; Zavila, O; Nevrlý, V; Herecová, L; Bailleux, S; Horká, V; Ferus, M; Skrínský, J; Kozubková, M; Drábková, S; Janour, Z

    2009-04-01

    The distribution of pollutants in two urban scale models (point emission source and street canyon with extensive transport) was investigated by means of CO(2) laser photoacoustic spectroscopy in the region of the atmospheric window (9-10 mum). The experimental results of physical modeling are in a good agreement with the numerical calculations performed in the frame of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling. Methanol, ethanol, and ozone (examples of light pollutants), as well as sulfur hexafluoride and 1,2 dichlorethane (examples of heavy pollutants), were selected on the basis of their high resolution spectra acquired by Fourier transform and laser diode spectroscopy.

  9. Efficiency and stability of a phosphor-conversion white light source using a blue laser diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ledru

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A white light source using direct phosphor-conversion excited by a blue laser diode is presented. In this preliminary study we have investigated the influence of phosphor’s thickness and operating current of the laser diode over the (x, y chromaticity coordinates, Correlated Color Temperature (CCT and Color Rendering Index (CRI. The best values found were 4000 K and 94. A 40 lm/W luminous efficacy was achieved together with a CRI close to 90 for an operating current of 0.8 A. Those values, to the best of our knowledge, were not previously reported in the literature.

  10. Illumination Effect of Laser Light in Foggy Objects Using an Active Imaging System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Park, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Yong-Jin; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Young-Soo; Jeong, Kyung-Min [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Active imaging techniques usually provide improved image information when compared to passive imaging techniques. Active vision is a direct visualization technique using an artificial illuminant. Range-gated imaging (RGI) technique is one of active vision technologies. The RGI technique extracts vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, objects are illuminated for ultra-short time by a high intensity illuminant and then the light reflected from objects is captured by a highly sensitive image sensor with the exposure of ultra-short time. The Range-gated imaging is an emerging technology in the field of surveillance for security application, especially in the visualization of darken night or foggy environment. Although RGI viewing was discovered in the 1960's, this technology is currently more applicable by virtue of the rapid development of optical and sensor technologies, such as highly sensitive imaging sensor and ultra-short pulse laser light. Especially, this system can be adopted in robot-vision system by virtue of the compact system configuration. During the past decades, several applications of this technology have been applied in target recognition and in harsh environments, such as fog, underwater vision. Also, this technology has been demonstrated range imaging based on range-gated imaging. Laser light having a short pulse width is usually used for the range-gated imaging system. In this paper, an illumination effect of laser light in foggy objects is studied using a range-gated imaging system. The used imaging system consists of an ultra-short pulse (0.35 ns) laser light and a gated imaging sensor. The experiment is carried out to monitor objects in a box filled by fog. In this paper, the effects by fog particles in range-gated imaging technique are studied. Edge blurring and range distortion are the generated by fog particles.

  11. Illumination Effect of Laser Light in Foggy Objects Using an Active Imaging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Park, Seung-Kyu; Ahn, Yong-Jin; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Young-Soo; Jeong, Kyung-Min

    2015-01-01

    Active imaging techniques usually provide improved image information when compared to passive imaging techniques. Active vision is a direct visualization technique using an artificial illuminant. Range-gated imaging (RGI) technique is one of active vision technologies. The RGI technique extracts vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, objects are illuminated for ultra-short time by a high intensity illuminant and then the light reflected from objects is captured by a highly sensitive image sensor with the exposure of ultra-short time. The Range-gated imaging is an emerging technology in the field of surveillance for security application, especially in the visualization of darken night or foggy environment. Although RGI viewing was discovered in the 1960's, this technology is currently more applicable by virtue of the rapid development of optical and sensor technologies, such as highly sensitive imaging sensor and ultra-short pulse laser light. Especially, this system can be adopted in robot-vision system by virtue of the compact system configuration. During the past decades, several applications of this technology have been applied in target recognition and in harsh environments, such as fog, underwater vision. Also, this technology has been demonstrated range imaging based on range-gated imaging. Laser light having a short pulse width is usually used for the range-gated imaging system. In this paper, an illumination effect of laser light in foggy objects is studied using a range-gated imaging system. The used imaging system consists of an ultra-short pulse (0.35 ns) laser light and a gated imaging sensor. The experiment is carried out to monitor objects in a box filled by fog. In this paper, the effects by fog particles in range-gated imaging technique are studied. Edge blurring and range distortion are the generated by fog particles

  12. Monolithic translucent BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ phosphors for laser-driven solid state lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Cozzan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With high power light emitting diodes and laser diodes being explored for white light generation and visible light communication, thermally robust encapsulation schemes for color-converting inorganic phosphors are essential. In the current work, the canonical blue-emitting phosphor, high purity Eu-doped BaMgAl10O17, has been prepared using microwave-assisted heating (25 min and densified into translucent ceramic phosphor monoliths using spark plasma sintering (30 min. The resulting translucent ceramic monoliths convert UV laser light to blue light with the same efficiency as the starting powder and provide superior thermal management in comparison with silicone encapsulation.

  13. High-power green light generation by second harmonic generation of single-frequency tapered diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.; Sumpf, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    laser emits in excess of 9 W single-frequency output power with a good beam quality. The output from the tapered diode laser is frequency doubled using periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3. We investigate the modulation potential of the green light and improve the modulation depth from 1:4 to 1:50.......We demonstrate the generation of high power (>1.5W) and single-frequency green light by single-pass second harmonic generation of a high power tapered diode laser. The tapered diode laser consists of a DBR grating for wavelength selectivity, a ridge section and a tapered section. The DBR tapered...

  14. High speed visible light communication using blue GaN laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S.; Viola, S.; Giuliano, G.; Najda, S. P.; Perlin, P.; Suski, T.; Marona, L.; Leszczyński, M.; Wisniewski, P.; Czernecki, R.; Targowski, G.; Watson, M. A.; White, H.; Rowe, D.; Laycock, L.; Kelly, A. E.

    2016-10-01

    GaN-based laser diodes have been developed over the last 20 years making them desirable for many security and defence applications, in particular, free space laser communications. Unlike their LED counterparts, laser diodes are not limited by their carrier lifetime which makes them attractive for high speed communication, whether in free space, through fiber or underwater. Gigabit data transmission can be achieved in free space by modulating the visible light from the laser with a pseudo-random bit sequence (PRBS), with recent results approaching 5 Gbit/s error free data transmission. By exploiting the low-loss in the blue part of the spectrum through water, data transmission experiments have also been conducted to show rates of 2.5 Gbit/s underwater. Different water types have been tested to monitor the effect of scattering and to see how this affects the overall transmission rate and distance. This is of great interest for communication with unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) as the current method using acoustics is much slower and vulnerable to interception. These types of laser diodes can typically reach 50-100 mW of power which increases the length at which the data can be transmitted. This distance could be further improved by making use of high power laser arrays. Highly uniform GaN substrates with low defectivity allow individually addressable laser bars to be fabricated. This could ultimately increase optical power levels to 4 W for a 20-emitter array. Overall, the development of GaN laser diodes will play an important part in free space optical communications and will be vital in the advancement of security and defence applications.

  15. True Yellow Light-Emitting Diodes as Phosphor for Tunable Color-Rendering Index Laser-Based White Light

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2016-10-11

    An urgent challenge for the lighting research community is the lack of efficient optical devices emitting in between 500 and 600 nm, resulting in the “green-yellow gap”. In particular, true green (∼555 nm) and true yellow (∼590 nm), along with blue and red, constitute four technologically important colors. The III-nitride material system, being the most promising choice of platform to bridge this gap, still suffers from high dislocation density and poor crystal quality in realizing high-power, efficient devices. Particularly, the high polarization fields in the active region of such 2D quantum confined structures prevent efficient recombination of carriers. Here we demonstrate a true yellow nanowire (NW) light emitting diode (LED) with peak emission of 588 nm at 29.5 A/cm2 (75 mA in a 0.5 × 0.5 mm2 device) and a low turn-on voltage of ∼2.5 V, while having an internal quantum efficiency of 39%, and without “efficiency droop” up to an injection current density of 29.5 A/cm2. By mixing yellow light from a NW LED in reflective configuration with that of a red, green, and blue laser diode (LD), white light with a correlated color temperature of ∼6000 K and color-rendering index of 87.7 was achieved. The nitride-NW-based device offers a robust, long-term stability for realizing yellow light emitters for tunable color-rendering index solid-state lighting, on a scalable, low-cost, foundry-compatible titanium/silicon substrate, suitable for industry uptake.

  16. Tradeoff between laser diodes and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for the common weapon control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwell, R. A.

    1982-07-01

    The use of laser diodes or light emitting diodes (LEDs) for the ground-launched cruise missile (GLCM) is comparatively evaluated. Source characteristics of interest, including radiated power output, spectral width and peak emission, modulation bandwidth, size coupling efficiency, lifetime, rise time, and price, are presented for noncoherent LED and the coherent laser diode. The advantages and disadvantages of laser diodes and LEDs are briefly discussed, and nuclear explosion effects on these instruments, including catastrophic damage, transient ionization effects, and permanent degradation, are summarized. A link analysis of the cable parameters required for the GLCM fiber optic data link is given, arriving at power levels consistent with a LED-PIN link. Two LEDs which meet these requirements are briefly discussed.

  17. Investigation of magneto-optical properties of ferrofluids by laser light scattering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomnyashchaya, E. K.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Velichko, E. N.; Pleshakov, I. V.; Kuzmin, Yu I.

    2017-06-01

    Investigation of magnetooptical characteristics of ferrofluids is an important task aimed at the development of novel optoelectronic systems. This article reports on the results obtained in the experimental studies of the factors that affect the intensity and spatial distribution of the laser radiation scattered by magnetic particles and their agglomerates in a magnetic field. Laser correlation spectroscopy and direct measurements of laser radiation scattering for studies of the interactions and magnetooptical properties of magnetic particles in solutions were employed. The objects were samples of nanodispersed magnetite (Fe3O4) suspended in kerosene and in water. Our studies revealed some new behavior of magnetic particles in external magnetic and light fields, which make ferrofluids promising candidates for optical devices.

  18. Complete elimination of nonlinear light-matter interactions with broadband ultrafast laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Dong, Daoyi; Petersen, Ian R.

    2017-01-01

    optical effects, however, the probability of pure single-photon absorption is usually very low, which is particularly pertinent in the case of strong ultrafast laser pulses with broad bandwidth. Here we demonstrate theoretically a counterintuitive coherent single-photon absorption scheme by eliminating...... nonlinear interactions of ultrafast laser pulses with quantum systems. That is, a completely linear response of the system with respect to the spectral energy density of the incident light at the transition frequency can be obtained for all transition probabilities between 0 and 100% in multilevel quantum...... systems. To that end, a multiobjective optimization algorithm is developed to find an optimal spectral phase of an ultrafast laser pulse, which is capable of eliminating all possible nonlinear optical responses while maximizing the probability of single-photon absorption between quantum states. This work...

  19. Light attenuation in rat skin following low level laser therapy on burn healing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira Silva, Daniela Fátima; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2010-04-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is commonly used to accelerate wound healing. Besides, the technique of imaging the light distribution inside biological tissues permits us to understand several effects about light-tissue interaction. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative attenuation coefficient of the light intensity in healthy and burned skin rats during cutaneous repair following LLLT or not. Two burns about 6mm in diameter were cryogenerated using liquid N2 on the back of 15 rats. Lesion L was irradiated by a He-Ne laser (λ= 632.8nm) and fluence 1.0J/cm2; Lesion C was control and received sham irradiation. A healthy skin area (H) was also analyzed. The lesions were irradiated at days 3, 7, 10 and 14 post-burning. The animals were euthanized at days 3, 10 and 31 and skin samples were carefully removed and placed between two microscope slides, spaced by z= 1mm. A laser beam irradiated the sandwiched tissue from epidermis to dermis. A CCD camera was placed orthogonal to the beam path and it photographed the distribution of the scattered light. The light decay occurred according to the Beer's Law. Significance was accepted at p Student test. Our results show that the light decay along any direction was close to an exponential. Burned skin samples presented decay significantly faster than healthy skin samples. Besides, attenuation coefficient changed during burning healing comparing treated and control lesions. These findings suggest that the relative attenuation coefficient is a suitable parameter to optimize LLLT during wound healing.

  20. Photobiological effect of Laser or LED light in a thermophilic microbial consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crugeira, Pedro Jorge Louro; Pires-Santos, Gustavo M; de Oliveira, Susana C P S; Sampaio, Fernando José Pires; Correia, Neandder Andrade; Fagnani, Sandra R C de A; Chinalia, Fabio Alexandre; de Almeida, Paulo Fernando; Pinheiro, Antônio L B

    2018-04-01

    Cellulose has a highly diversified architecture and its enzymatic complexes are studied for achieving an efficient conversion and a high level of efficiency in the deconstruction of cellulolytic biomass into sugars. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of Laser or LED light in the cellulolytic activity (CMCase) and on the proliferation of the thermophilic microbial consortium used on the degradation process of a lignocellulosic biomass of green coconut shell. The irradiation protocol consisted of six Laser irradiations (λ660 ηm, 40 mW, 270 s, 13 J/cm 2 ) or LED (λ632 ± 2 ηm, 145 mW, 44 s, 13 J/cm 2 ) with 12- h time intervals in nutrient deprivation conditions. After irradiation, the consortium was inoculated into a lignocellulosic biomass (coconut fibers). Non- irradiated consortium was also inoculated and acted as control. Cell proliferation and endoglucanase activity were quantified during the experimental time. Experiments were carried out in triplicate. The results showed an increase of 250 % of thermo-cellulolytic microorganisms for the LED group and 200% for the Laser group when compared to the control. The enzymatic index (red Congo method), showed a statistically significant difference in the process of degradation of the lignocellulosic biomass between the Laser and LED groups compared to the control group [p < 0.0029; p < 0.029, respectively] 48-hs after the inoculation of the microorganisms. At the end of 72-h, this significant difference was maintained for both irradiated groups (p < 0.0212). Based upon the protocol used on the present study, it is possible to concluded that LED light enhanced cell proliferation of the thermophilic microbial consortium while the Laser light increase the enzymatic index of the lignocellulosic biomass of green coconut shell. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A hybrid CATV/16-QAM-OFDM visible laser light communication system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Li, Chung-Yi; Lu, Hai-Han; Chen, Chia-Yi; Jhang, Tai-Wei; Ruan, Sheng-Siang; Wu, Kuan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    A visible laser light communication (VLLC) system employing a vertical cavity surface emitting laser and spatial light modulator with hybrid CATV/16-QAM-OFDM modulating signals over a 5 m free-space link is proposed and demonstrated. With the assistance of a push-pull scheme, low-noise amplifier, and equalizer, good performances of composite second-order and composite triple beat are obtained, accompanied by an acceptable carrier-to-noise ratio performance for a CATV signal, and a low bit error rate value and clear constellation map are achieved for a 16-QAM-OFDM signal. Such a hybrid CATV/16-QAM-OFDM VLLC system would be attractive for providing services including CATV, Internet and telecommunication services. (paper)

  2. Synchrotron light sources and free-electron lasers accelerator physics, instrumentation and science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shaukat; Schneider, Jochen; Hastings, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Hardly any other discovery of the nineteenth century did have such an impact on science and technology as Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen’s seminal find of the X-rays. X-ray tubes soon made their way as excellent instruments for numerous applications in medicine, biology, materials science and testing, chemistry and public security. Developing new radiation sources with higher brilliance and much extended spectral range resulted in stunning developments like the electron synchrotron and electron storage ring and the freeelectron laser. This handbook highlights these developments in fifty chapters. The reader is given not only an inside view of exciting science areas but also of design concepts for the most advanced light sources. The theory of synchrotron radiation and of the freeelectron laser, design examples and the technology basis are presented. The handbook presents advanced concepts like seeding and harmonic generation, the booming field of Terahertz radiation sources and upcoming brilliant light sources dri...

  3. Multispectral digital lensless holographic microscopy: from femtosecond laser to white light LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sucerquia, J.

    2015-04-01

    The use of femtosecond laser radiation and super bright white LED in digital lensless holographic microscopy is presented. For the ultrafast laser radiation two different configurations of operation of the microscope are presented and the dissimilar performance of each one analyzed. The microscope operating with a super bright white light LED in combination with optical filters shows very competitive performance as it is compared with more expensive optical sources. The broadband emission of both radiation sources allows the multispectral imaging of biological samples to obtain spectral responses and/or full color images of the microscopic specimens; sections of the head of a Drosophila melanogaster fly are imaged in this contribution. The simple, solid, compact, lightweight, and reliable architecture of digital lensless holographic microscopy operating with broadband light sources to image biological specimens exhibiting micrometer-sized details is evaluated in the present contribution.

  4. Electron Parametric Instabilities Driven by Relativistically Intense Laser Light in Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, H. C.; Mason, P.; Parr, D. M.

    1999-08-01

    A unified treatment of electron parametric instabilities driven by ultraintense laser light in plasma is described. It is valid for any intensity, polarization, plasma density, and scattering geometry. The method is applied to linearly polarized light in both underdense plasma and overdense plasma accessible by self-induced transparency. New options arise which are hybrids of stimulated Raman scattering, the two plasmon decay, the relativistic modulational and filamentation instabilities, and stimulated harmonic generation. There is vigorous growth over a wide range of wave numbers and harmonics.

  5. Speckle noise reduction on a laser projection display via a broadband green light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan Ei; Choi, Ju Won; Kang, Heejong; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Fu, Shih-Hao; Liou, Jiun-Wei; Kung, Andy H; Choi, Hee Joo; Kim, Byoung Joo; Cha, Myoungsik; Peng, Lung-Han

    2014-02-10

    A broadband green light source was demonstrated using a tandem-poled lithium niobate (TPLN) crystal. The measured wavelength and temperature bandwidth were 6.5 nm and 100 °C, respectively, spectral bandwidth was 36 times broader than the periodically poled case. Although the conversion efficiency was smaller than in the periodic case, the TPLN device had a good figure of merit owing to the extremely large bandwidth for wavelength and temperature. The developed broadband green light source exhibited speckle noise approximately one-seventh of that in the conventional approach for a laser projection display.

  6. Harmonic radiation emission from periodic lattices irradiated by short-pulse elliptically polarized laser light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondarza-Rovira, R; Boyd, T J

    2001-10-01

    Radiated emission at high-order harmonic numbers is observed from thin crystalline layers irradiated by short femtosecond elliptically polarized laser light. The applied external radiation field drives the free electrons in the material to large oscillation amplitudes and harmonics are generated by the electronic response to the periodic lattice potential. A model was modified by introducing a more general expression for the lattice force that by sharpening or by smoothing the potential in turn allows the strength of the electronic perturbation to be varied. The electron motion is computed numerically by solving the electromagnetic force equation and by regarding the lattice potential as a perturbative source. For linearly polarized laser light the radiation spectra are characterized by emission lines forming a flat plateau in the region of low harmonic orders with a sharp cutoff for higher numbers. For circular polarization strong emission is found for two harmonic numbers, the first in the low-harmonic region and the second around the cutoff. By solving analytically the electron motion in an elliptically polarized laser field, an exact expression for the electron displacement in all three spatial directions is found. The amplitude of the oscillations sets the analytic form for calculating the peak harmonic numbers emitted from the laser-lattice interaction. The radiation effect studied here, if detected, might hold some potential as a diagnostic and could be used, in principle, as a method for determining the lattice parameter in crystalline structures.

  7. Analysis of roll-stamped light guide plate fabricated with laser-ablated stamper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyunjun; Hong, Seokkwan; Kim, Jongsun; Hwang, Jeongho; Joo, Byungyun; Yoon, Kyunghwan; Kang, Jeongjin

    2017-12-01

    LGP (light guide plate) is one of the major components of LCD (liquid crystal display), and it makes surface illumination for LCD backlit. LGP is a transparent plastic plate usually produced by injection molding process. On the back of LGP there are micron size patterns for extraction of light. Recently a roll-stamping process has achieved the high mass productivity of thinner LGPs. In order to fabricate optical patterns on LGPs, a fabricating tool called as a stamper is used. Micro patterns on metallic stampers are made by several micro machining processes such as chemical etching, LIGA-reflow, and laser ablation. In this study, a roll-stamping process by using a laser ablated metallic stamper was dealt with in consideration of the compatibility with the roll-stamping process. LGP fabricating tests were performed using a roll-stamping process with four different roll pressures. Pattern shapes on the stamper fabricated by laser ablation and transcription ratios of the roll-stamping process were analyzed, and LGP luminance was evaluated. Based on the evaluation, optical simulation model for LGP was made and simulation accuracy was evaluated. Simulation results showed good agreements with optical performance of LGPs in the brightness and uniformity. It was also shown that the roll-stamped LGP has the possibility of better optical performance than the conventional injection molded LGP. It was also shown that the roll-stamped LGP with the laser ablated stamper is potential to have better optical performance than the conventional injection molded LGP.

  8. Determination of size distribution of barley starch granules using low angle laser light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psota, V.; Bohacenko, I.; Pytela, J.; Vydrova, H.; Chmelik, J.

    2000-01-01

    LALLS method (Low Angle Laser Light Scattering) was used to determine the size distribution of starch granules in caryopses of two varieties of malting barley (Hordeum vulgare). Two size fractions of granules were proved similarly to results obtained by other methods. The variety Kompakt contained significantly more large starch granules than the variety Novum. The LALLS method could be used as an accurate, reproducible and quick method for determination of starch granule size distribution

  9. Optical feedback-induced light modulation for fiber-based laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Optical fibers have been used as a minimally invasive tool in various medical fields. However, due to excessive heat accumulation, the distal end of a fiber often suffers from severe melting or devitrification, leading to the eventual fiber failure during laser treatment. In order to minimize thermal damage at the fiber tip, an optical feedback sensor was developed and tested ex vivo. Porcine kidney tissue was used to evaluate the feasibility of optical feedback in terms of signal activation, ablation performance, and light transmission. Testing various signal thresholds demonstrated that 3 V was relatively appropriate to trigger the feedback sensor and to prevent the fiber deterioration during kidney tissue ablation. Based upon the development of temporal signal signatures, full contact mode rapidly activated the optical feedback sensor possibly due to heat accumulation. Modulated light delivery induced by optical feedback diminished ablation efficiency by 30% in comparison with no feedback case. However, long-term transmission results validated that laser ablation assisted with optical feedback was able to almost consistently sustain light delivery to the tissue as well as ablation efficiency. Therefore, an optical feedback sensor can be a feasible tool to protect optical fiber tips by minimizing debris contamination and delaying thermal damage process and to ensure more efficient and safer laser-induced tissue ablation.

  10. Ion acoustic instability, turbulence, anomalous resistivity and enhanced laser light absorption in ICF plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmus, Wojciech

    2017-10-01

    Hot plasmas with strong temperature gradients in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments are examined for ion acoustic instabilities and kinetic effects produced by electron heat flux. Return current instability (RCI) due to neutralizing current of cold electrons arising in response to large electron heat flux is investigated as a source of the stationary levels of ion acoustic turbulence (IAT). Two mechanisms of anomalous laser light absorption on IAT: due to enhanced anomalous collisionality and mode conversion into Langmuir waves at the critical density are described in terms of effective absorption rates and applied to hohlraum plasmas with ZTe/Ti >> 1. The RCI threshold and growth rates are derived in the nonlocal regime of the thermal transport. They are compared with results of Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) simulations. Quasi-stationary state of the IAT produced by the RCI is achieved in VFP simulations. Nonlinear saturation of the RCI involves the mechanisms of the quasi-linear evolution and induced scattering of ions on IAT. In this talk, these topics will be explored in light of Professor Kaw's enduring research results on anomalous resistivity, enhanced laser light absorption and parametric instabilities in laser produced plasmas.

  11. Design of laser-driven SiO2-YAG:Ce composite thick film: Facile synthesis, robust thermal performance, and application in solid-state laser lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Liu, Bingguo; Liu, Zhiwen; Gong, Yuxuan; Hu, Baofu; Wang, Jian; Li, Hui; Wang, Xinliang; Du, Baoli

    2018-01-01

    In recent times, there have been rapid advances in the solid-state laser lighting technology. Due to the large amounts of heat accumulated from the high flux laser radiation, color conversion materials used in solid-state laser lighting devices should possess high durability, high thermal conductivity, and low thermal quenching. The aim of this study is to develop a thermally robust SiO2-YAG:Ce composite thick film (CTF) for high-power solid-state laser lighting applications. Commercial colloidal silica which was used as the source of SiO2, played the roles of an adhesive, a filler, and a protecting agent. Compared to the YAG:Ce powder, the CTF exhibits remarkable thermal stability (11.3% intensity drop at 200 °C) and durability (4.5% intensity drop after 1000 h, at 85 °C and 85% humidity). Furthermore, the effects of the substrate material and the thickness of the CTF on the laser lighting performance were investigated in terms of their thermal quenching and luminescence saturation behaviors, respectively. The CTF with a thickness of 50 μm on a sapphire substrate does not show luminescence saturation, despite a high-power density of incident radiation i.e. 20 W/mm2. These results demonstrate the potential applicability of the CTF in solid-state laser lighting devices.

  12. Development of highly qualified UV-laser light source for rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomizawa, H.; Dewa, H.; Taniuchi, T.

    2004-01-01

    We have been developing stable and highly qualified UV-laser pulse as a light source of the rf gun for an injector candidate of future light sources. Our gun cavity is a single-cell pillbox, and the copper inner wall is used as a photo cathode. In present status, the short pulse energy stability of laser has been improved down to 1.3∼1.5% (rms; 10pps; 10000 shots) at the third harmonic generation. The long stability depends on the stability of modelocking at oscillator. In this improvement we just passively stabilized the system. We considered environmental controls in clean room to reduce optical damage accidents and constructed a new humidity-controlled clean room in 2003. And we re-installed the total laser system in this room in 2004. The relative humidity of this new clean room at room temperature is in a region of 50∼60 % with a stability of less than 2% (p-p). On the other hand, the ideal spatial and temporal profiles of a shot-by-shot single laser pulse are essential to suppress the emittance growth of the electron beam from a photo-cathode rf gun. This laser-shaping project has been started in two steps since 2002. As the first successful test run in 2002, with a microlens array as a simple spatial shaper, we obtained a minimum emittance value of 2π mm·mrad with a beam energy of 3.1 MeV, holding its charge to 0.1 nC/bunch. In the next test run in 2004, we prepared a deformable mirror for spatial shaping, and a spatial light modulator based on fused-silica plates for temporal shaping. We are applying the both adaptive optics to automatically shape the both spatial and temporal UV-laser profiles with a feedback routine at the same time. We report herein the principle and developing process of our laser beam quality control system. (author)

  13. Phosphorous Diffuser Diverged Blue Laser Diode for Indoor Lighting and Communication

    KAUST Repository

    Chi, Yu-Chieh

    2015-12-21

    An advanced light-fidelity (Li-Fi) system based on the blue Gallium nitride (GaN) laser diode (LD) with a compact white-light phosphorous diffuser is demonstrated for fusing the indoor white-lighting and visible light communication (VLC). The phosphorous diffuser adhered blue GaN LD broadens luminescent spectrum and diverges beam spot to provide ample functionality including the completeness of Li-Fi feature and the quality of white-lighting. The phosphorous diffuser diverged white-light spot covers a radiant angle up to 120o with CIE coordinates of (0.34, 0.37). On the other hand, the degradation on throughput frequency response of the blue LD is mainly attributed to the self-feedback caused by the reflection from the phosphor-air interface. It represents the current state-of-the-art performance on carrying 5.2-Gbit/s orthogonal frequency-division multiplexed 16-quadrature-amplitude modulation (16-QAM OFDM) data with a bit error rate (BER) of 3.1 × 10−3 over a 60-cm free-space link. This work aims to explore the plausibility of the phosphorous diffuser diverged blue GaN LD for future hybrid white-lighting and VLC systems.

  14. Laser decontamination of metallic - Metallic surfaces decontamination by using Laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, F.; Objois, L.; Toulemonde, V.

    2014-01-01

    Within the next years, the volume of metallic contaminated with radionuclides will get higher. In that way, the development of new efficient decontamination methods appears to be a promising challenge for industrials as AREVA. Today, even if a few methods already exist, some of them point out a lack of efficiency and for the others, a production of secondary waste not compatible with the actual requirements. Based on this observation, we started the study of a new process based on the Laser technology. This technology is very promising in terms of effectiveness and waste minimization. Since a couple of years we went through an intensive experimental program (including active and non active tests, metallographic observations...) to fully describe this technology and also to prove its interest for our industry. (authors)

  15. Intrauterine device for laser light diffusion and method of using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadir, Yona; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lars O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1995-01-01

    An improved device for delivery of photoenergy from a light source, such as a laser, into a uterine cavity for photodynamic therapy is comprised of a plurality of optic fibers, which are bundled together and inserted into the uterine cavity by means of a uterine cannula. The cannula is positioned within the uterine cavity at a preferred location and then withdrawn thereby allowing the plurality of optic fibers to splay or diverge one from the other within the cavity. Different portions of the distal tip of the optic fiber is provided with a light diffusing tip, the remainder being provided with a nondiffusing tip portion. The fiber optic shape, as well as the segment which is permitted to actively diffuse light through the tip, is selected in order to provide a more uniform exposure intensity of the photo energy or at least sufficient radiation directed to each segment of the uterine walls.

  16. Lidar remote sensing of laser-induced incandescence on light absorbing particles in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Geffroy, Sylvain; Fréjafon, Emeric; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-02-09

    Carbon aerosol is now recognized as a major uncertainty on climate change and public health, and specific instruments are required to address the time and space evolution of this aerosol, which efficiently absorbs light. In this paper, we report an experiment, based on coupling lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII), which allows, in agreement with Planck's law, to retrieve the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by light-absorbing particles in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. Accordingly, we set the LII-lidar formalism and equation and addressed the main features of LII-lidar in the atmosphere by numerically simulating the LII-lidar signal. We believe atmospheric LII-lidar to be a promising tool for radiative transfer, especially when combined with elastic backscattering lidar, as it may then allow a remote partitioning between strong/less light absorbing carbon aerosols.

  17. Intrauterine device for laser light diffusion and method of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadir, Y.; Berns, M.W.; Svaasand, L.O.; Tromberg, B.J.

    1995-12-26

    An improved device for delivery of photoenergy from a light source, such as a laser, into a uterine cavity for photodynamic therapy is comprised of a plurality of optic fibers, which are bundled together and inserted into the uterine cavity by means of a uterine cannula. The cannula is positioned within the uterine cavity at a preferred location and then withdrawn thereby allowing the plurality of optic fibers to splay or diverge one from the other within the cavity. Different portions of the distal tip of the optic fiber is provided with a light diffusing tip, the remainder being provided with a nondiffusing tip portion. The fiber optic shape, as well as the segment which is permitted to actively diffuse light through the tip, is selected in order to provide a more uniform exposure intensity of the photo energy or at least sufficient radiation directed to each segment of the uterine walls. 5 figs.

  18. Airborne laser scanner (LiDAR) proxies for understory light conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Cici; Moeslund, Jesper Erenskjold; Bøcher, Peder Klith

    2013-01-01

    on the average Ellenberg indicator values for light for the plant species present in a given plot. The correlations of Ellenberg values with ALS-based canopy closure were higher (r2: 0.47) than those with ALS-based canopy cover (r2: 0.26) and densiometer readings (r2: 0.41) for the forest sites. ALS-based canopy......Canopy cover and canopy closure are two closely related measures of vegetation structure. They are used for estimating understory light conditions and their influence on a broad range of biological components in forest ecosystems, from the demography and population dynamics of individual species...... to community structure. Angular canopy closure is more closely related to the direct and indirect light experienced by a plant or an animal than vertical canopy cover, but more challenging to estimate. We used airborne laser scanner (ALS) data to estimate canopy cover for 210 5-m radius vegetation plots...

  19. The Light Plane Calibration Method of the Laser Welding Vision Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B. G.; Wu, M. H.; Jia, W. P.

    2018-03-01

    According to the aerospace and automobile industry, the sheet steels are the very important parts. In the recent years, laser welding technique had been used to weld the sheet steel part. The seam width between the two parts is usually less than 0.1mm. Because the error of the fixture fixed can’t be eliminated, the welding parts quality can be greatly affected. In order to improve the welding quality, the line structured light is employed in the vision monitoring system to plan the welding path before welding. In order to improve the weld precision, the vision system is located on Z axis of the computer numerical control (CNC) tool. The planar pattern is placed on the X-Y plane of the CNC tool, and the structured light is projected on the planar pattern. The vision system stay at three different positions along the Z axis of the CNC tool, and the camera shoot the image of the planar pattern at every position. Using the calculated the sub-pixel center line of the structure light, the world coordinate of the center light line can be calculated. Thus, the structured light plane can be calculated by fitting the structured light line. Experiment result shows the effective of the proposed method.

  20. Miniature magnetic bottle confined by circularly polarized laser light and measurements of the inverse Faraday effect in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliezer, S.; Paiss, Y.; Horovitz, Y.; Henis, Z.

    1997-01-01

    A new concept of hot plasma confinement in a miniature magnetic bottle induced by circularly polarized laser light is suggested. Magnetic fields generated by circularly polarized laser light may be of the order of megagauss, depending on the laser intensity. In this configuration the circularly polarized light is used to obtain confinement of a plasma contained in a good conductor vessel. The confinement in this scheme is supported by the magnetic forces. The Lawson criterion for a DT plasma might be achieved for number density n = 5*10 21 cm -3 and confinement time τ= 20 ns. The laser and plasma parameters required to obtain an energetic gain are calculated. Experiments and preliminary calculations were performed to study the feasibility of the above scheme. Measurements of the axial magnetic field induced by circularly polarized laser light, the so called inverse Faraday effect, and of the absorption of circularly polarized laser light in plasma, are reported. The experiments were performed with a circularly polarized Nd:YAG laser, having a wavelength of 1.06 τm and a pulse duration of 7 ns, in a range of irradiances from 10 9 to 10 14 W/cm 2 . Axial magnetic fields from 500 Gauss to 2 megagauss were measured. Up to 5*10 13 W/cm 3 the results are in agreement with a nonlinear model of the inverse Faraday effect dominated by the ponderomotive force. For the laser irradiance studied here, 9*10 13 - 2.5*10 14 W/cm 2 , the absorption of circularly polarized light was 14% higher relative to the absorption of linear polarized light

  1. Perturbative diffusion theory formalism for interpreting temporal light intensity changes during laser interstitial thermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Lee C L; Whelan, William M; Vitkin, I Alex

    2007-03-21

    In an effort to understand dynamic optical changes during laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT), we utilize the perturbative solution of the diffusion equation in heterogeneous media to formulate scattering weight functions for cylindrical line sources. The analysis explicitly shows how changes in detected interstitial light intensity are associated with the extent and location of the volume of thermal coagulation during treatment. Explanations for previously reported increases in optical intensity observed early during laser heating are clarified using the model and demonstrated with experimental measurements in ex vivo bovine liver tissue. This work provides an improved understanding of interstitial optical signal changes during LITT and indicates the sensitivity and potential of interstitial optical monitoring of thermal damage.

  2. Efficient and accurate laser shaping with liquid crystal spatial light modulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxson, Jared M.; Bartnik, Adam C.; Bazarov, Ivan V. [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    A phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) is capable of precise transverse laser shaping by either functioning as a variable phase grating or by serving as a variable mask via polarization rotation. As a phase grating, the highest accuracy algorithms, based on computer generated holograms (CGHs), have been shown to yield extended laser shapes with <10% rms error, but conversely little is known about the experimental efficiency of the method in general. In this work, we compare the experimental tradeoff between error and efficiency for both the best known CGH method and polarization rotation-based intensity masking when generating hard-edged flat top beams. We find that the masking method performs comparably with CGHs, both having rms error < 10% with efficiency > 15%. Informed by best practices for high efficiency from a SLM phase grating, we introduce an adaptive refractive algorithm which has high efficiency (92%) but also higher error (16%), for nearly cylindrically symmetric cases.

  3. Laser-induced photo emission detection: data acquisition based on light intensity counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, N.; Yudasari, N.; Putri, K. Y.

    2017-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Detection (LIBD) is one of the quantification techniques for colloids. There are two ways of detection in LIBD: optical detection and acoustic detection. LIBD is based on the detection of plasma emission due to the interaction between particle and laser beam. In this research, the changing of light intensity during plasma formations was detected by a photodiode sensor. A photo emission data acquisition system was built to collect and transform them into digital counts. The real-time system used data acquisition device National Instrument DAQ 6009 and LABVIEW software. The system has been tested on distilled water and tap water samples. The result showed 99.8% accuracy by using counting technique in comparison to the acoustic detection with sample rate of 10 Hz, thus the acquisition system can be applied as an alternative method to the existing LIBD acquisition system.

  4. Novel technique for manipulating MOX fuel particles using radiation pressure of a laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, R.

    2000-01-01

    We have continued theoretical and experimental studies on laser manipulation of nuclear fuel particles, such as UO 2 , PuO 2 and ThO 2 , In this paper, we investigate the applicability of the collection of MOX particles floating in air using radiation pressure of a laser light; some preliminary results are shown. This technique will be useful for removal and confinement of MOX particles being transported by air current or dispersed in a cell box. First, we propose two types of principles for collecting MOX particles. Second, we show some experimental results, Third, we show numerical results of radiation pressure exerted on submicrometer-sized UO 2 particles using Generalized Lorentz-Mie theory. Because optical constants of UO 2 are similar to those of MOX fuel particles, it seems that calculation results obtained hold for MOX fuel particles. 2. Principles of collecting MOX fuel particles using radiation pressure (authors)

  5. Light wave transmission through free space using atmospheric laser links with adaptive equalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Gamal A.; Mohamed, Abd El-Naser A.; Oraby, Osama A.; Hassan, Emad S.; Eldokany, Ibrahim M.; El-Rabaie, El-Sayed M.; Dessouky, Moawad I.; Alshebeili, Saleh A.; El-Samie, Fathi E. Abd

    2013-07-01

    The utilization of adaptive equalization in the design of atmospheric laser link transceiver architectures that can be used for television and broadcast signal interconnect between the external place of event and the master control room is suggested. At the transmitter side of the proposed transceiver; an array of atmospheric laser sources, digital signal processing, and optical radiators are used to send light waves in free space. At the receiver side, an adaptive finite impulse response least mean square (LMS) equalizer with activity detection guidance (ADG) and tap decoupling (TD) is used to mitigate the effect of channel impairments. The performance of the suggested adaptive equalizer is compared with that of the conventional adaptive equalizer based only on the standard LMS algorithm. The simulation results revealed that the adaptive LMS equalizer with ADG and TD is a promising solution for the inter-symbol interference problem in optical wireless communication systems.

  6. 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light at 515 nm from SHG of a single-frequency tapered diode laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Müller, André

    2017-01-01

    Multi-Watt efficient compact green laser sources are required for a number of applications e.g. within biophotonics, laser pumping and laser displays. We present generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light at 515 nm by second harmonic generation (SHG) of a tapered diode laser, itself...

  7. Comparative study of diode laser versus neodymium-yttrium aluminum: garnet laser versus intense pulsed light for the treatment of hirsutism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerja Puri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lasers are widely used for the treatment of hirsutism. But the choice of the right laser for the right skin type is very important. Before starting with laser therapy, it is important to assess the skin type, the fluence, the pulse duration and the type of laser to be used. Aims: To compare the efficacy and side effects of Diode laser, Neodymium-yttrium aluminum - garnet (Nd: YAG laser and intense pulsed light (IPL on 30 female patients of hirsutism. Materials and Methods: Thirty female patients with hirsutism were selected for a randomised controlled study. The patients were divided into three groups of 10 patients each. In group I patients diode laser was used, in group II patients long pulsed Nd: YAG laser was used and in group III, IPL was used. The patients were evaluated and result graded according to a 4-point scale as excellent, >75% reduction; good, 50-75% reduction; fair; 25-50% reduction; and poor, <25% reduction in hair density. Results: It was seen that the percentage of hair reduction after two sessions of treatment was maximum (40% in the diode laser group, followed by 35% hair reduction in the Nd: Yag laser group and 10% hair reduction in the IPL group. The percentage of hair reduction after four sessions of treatment was maximum (64% in the diode laser group, followed by 62% hair reduction in the Nd: Yag laser group and 48% hair reduction in the IPL group. The percentage of hair reduction after eight sessions of treatment was maximum (92% in the diode laser group, followed by 90% hair reduction in the Nd: YAG group and 70% hair reduction in the IPL group. Conclusions: To conclude for the Indian skin with dark hairs, the diode laser still stands the test of time. But, since the diode laser has a narrow margin of safety, proper pre and post-procedure cooling is recommended. Although, the side effects of Nd: YAG laser are less as compared to the diode laser, it is less efficacious as compared to the diode laser.

  8. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology for Newborn Infection (STROBE-NI): an extension of the STROBE statement for neonatal infection research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Elizabeth J A; Seale, Anna C; Vergnano, Stefania; Sharland, Michael; Heath, Paul T; Saha, Samir K; Agarwal, Ramesh; Ayede, Adejumoke I; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Black, Robert; Bojang, Kalifa; Campbell, Harry; Cousens, Simon; Darmstadt, Gary L; Madhi, Shabir A; Meulen, Ajoke Sobanjo-Ter; Modi, Neena; Patterson, Janna; Qazi, Shamim; Schrag, Stephanie J; Stoll, Barbara J; Wall, Stephen N; Wammanda, Robinson D; Lawn, Joy E

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal infections are estimated to account for a quarter of the 2·8 million annual neonatal deaths, as well as approximately 3% of all disability-adjusted life-years. Despite this burden, few data are available on incidence, aetiology, and outcomes, particularly regarding impairment. We aimed to develop guidelines for improved scientific reporting of observational neonatal infection studies, to increase comparability and to strengthen research in this area. This checklist, Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology for Newborn Infection (STROBE- NI), is an extension of the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement. STROBE-NI was developed following systematic reviews of published literature (1996-2015), compilation of more than 130 potential reporting recommendations, and circulation of a survey to relevant professionals worldwide, eliciting responses from 147 professionals from 37 countries. An international consensus meeting of 18 participants (with expertise in infectious diseases, neonatology, microbiology, epidemiology, and statistics) identified priority recommendations for reporting, additional to the STROBE statement. Implementation of these STROBE-NI recommendations, and linked checklist, aims to improve scientific reporting of neonatal infection studies, increasing data utility and allowing meta-analyses and pathogen-specific burden estimates to inform global policy and new interventions, including maternal vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-compression of spatially limited laser pulses in a system of coupled light-guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakin, A. A.; Litvak, A. G.; Mironov, V. A.; Skobelev, S. A.

    2018-04-01

    The self-action features of wave packets propagating in a 2D system of equidistantly arranged fibers are studied analytically and numerically on the basis of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Self-consistent equations for the characteristic scales of a Gaussian wave packet are derived on the basis of the variational approach, which are proved numerically for powers P self-focusing. At higher powers, the wave beams become filamented, and their amplitude is limited due to the nonlinear breaking of the interaction between neighboring light-guides. This makes it impossible to collect a powerful wave beam in a single light-guide. Variational analysis shows the possibility of the adiabatic self-compression of soliton-like laser pulses in the process of 3D self-focusing on the central light-guide. However, further increase of the field amplitude during self-compression leads to the development of longitudinal modulation instability and the formation of a set of light bullets in the central fiber. In the regime of hollow wave beams, filamentation instability becomes predominant. As a result, it becomes possible to form a set of light bullets in optical fibers located on the ring.

  10. High luminous flux from single crystal phosphor-converted laser-based white lighting system

    KAUST Repository

    Cantore, Michael

    2015-12-14

    The efficiency droop of light emitting diodes (LEDs) with increasing current density limits the amount of light emitted per wafer area. Since low current densities are required for high efficiency operation, many LED die are needed for high power white light illumination systems. In contrast, the carrier density of laser diodes (LDs) clamps at threshold, so the efficiency of LDs does not droop above threshold and high efficiencies can be achieved at very high current densities. The use of a high power blue GaN-based LD coupled with a single crystal Ce-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce) sample was investigated for white light illumination applications. Under CW operation, a single phosphor-converted LD (pc-LD) die produced a peak luminous efficacy of 86.7 lm/W at 1.4 A and 4.24 V and a peak luminous flux of 1100 lm at 3.0 A and 4.85 V with a luminous efficacy of 75.6 lm/W. Simulations of a pc-LD confirm that the single crystal YAG:Ce sample did not experience thermal quenching at peak LD operating efficiency. These results show that a single pc-LD die is capable of emitting enough luminous flux for use in a high power white light illumination system.

  11. Changes in Cell Viability of Wounded Fibroblasts following Laser Irradiation in Broad-Spectrum or Infrared Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, D.; Abrahamse, H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to establish if broad-spectrum or infrared (IR) light in combination with laser therapy can assist phototherapy to improve the cell function of wounded cells. Background. The effect of laser light may be partly or completely reduced by broad-spectrum light. Methods. Wounded human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with 5 J/cm2 using a helium-neon laser, a diode laser, or an Nd:YAG laser in the dark, in the light, or in IR. Changes in cell viability were evaluated by cell morphology, ATP cell viability, LDH membrane integrity, and caspase 3/7 as an early marker of apoptosis. Results. Wounded cells exposed to 5 J/cm2 using 632.8 nm in the dark or 830 nm in the light or 1064 nm in the dark showed an increase in ATP viability, an increase in cytokine expression, and a decrease in LDH cytotoxicity indicating that the metabolic activity of the wounded cells was stimulated. Conclusion. Wounded cells irradiated in IR light showed an undesirable thermal effect that was proportional to the duration of exposure.

  12. In Vivo measurement of pediatric vocal fold motion using structured light laser projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rita R; Donohue, Kevin D; Lau, Daniel; Unnikrishnan, Harikrishnan

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the study was to present the development of a miniature structured light laser projection endoscope and to quantify vocal fold length and vibratory features related to impact stress of the pediatric glottis using high-speed imaging. The custom-developed laser projection system consists of a green laser with a 4-mm diameter optics module at the tip of the endoscope, projecting 20 vertical laser lines on the glottis. Measurements of absolute phonatory vocal fold length, membranous vocal fold length, peak amplitude, amplitude-to-length ratio, average closing velocity, and impact velocity were obtained in five children (6-9 years), two adult male and three adult female participants without voice disorders, and one child (10 years) with bilateral vocal fold nodules during modal phonation. Independent measurements made on the glottal length of a vocal fold phantom demonstrated a 0.13mm bias error with a standard deviation of 0.23mm, indicating adequate precision and accuracy for measuring vocal fold structures and displacement. First, in vivo measurements of amplitude-to-length ratio, peak closing velocity, and impact velocity during phonation in pediatric population and a child with vocal fold nodules are reported. The proposed laser projection system can be used to obtain in vivo measurements of absolute length and vibratory features in children and adults. Children have large amplitude-to-length ratio compared with typically developing adults, whereas nodules result in larger peak amplitude, amplitude-to-length ratio, average closing velocity, and impact velocity compared with typically developing children. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Multi-channel normal speed gated integrator in the measurement of the laser scattering light energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Dong; Yu Xiaoqi; Hu Yuanfeng

    2005-01-01

    With the method of integration in a limited time, a Multi-channel normal speed gated integrator based on VXI system has been developed for measuring the signals with changeable pulse width in laser scattering light experiment. It has been tested with signal sources in ICF experiment. In tests, the integral nonlinearity between the integral results of the gated integrator and that of an oscilloscope is less than 1%. In the ICF experiments the maximum error between the integral results of the gated integrator and that of oscilloscope is less than 3% of the full scale range of the gated integrator. (authors)

  14. An Methodology for Quality Control and Draught Assessment of Room Ventilation Supply Using Laser Light Sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Christian Anker; Petersen, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    of ventilation inlet and smoke experiments are next step to track the draught source. However, these methods do not provide an understanding of the air flow pattern in the room with sufficient resolution to necessarily identify the source of the draught problem. However, laser light sheets together with smoke...... image velocimetry software to gain overall flow pattern visualization, if not accurate readings. The latter result indicates that there could be a potential for real-time velocimetry processing by smartphones but the method in general needs further investigation and documentation....

  15. Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Andreyev, Andrei

    2013-01-01

    Part I: $\\beta$-delayed fission, laser spectroscopy and shape-coexistence studies with astatine beams; Part II: Delineating the island of deformation in the light gold isotopes by means of laser spectroscopy

  16. Quality of reporting of confounding remained suboptimal after the STROBE guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Koen B.; Widyakusuma, Niken N.; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Hak, Eelko

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Poor quality of reporting of confounding has been observed in observational studies prior the STrenghtening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement, a reporting guideline for observational studies. We assessed whether the reporting of confounding improved

  17. Quality of reporting of confounding remained suboptimal after the STROBE guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Koen B; Widyakusuma, Niken N; Groenwold, Rolf Hh; Hak, Eelko

    Objectives: Poor quality of reporting of confounding has been observed in observational studies prior the STrenghtening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement, a reporting guideline for observational studies. We assessed whether the reporting of confounding

  18. Evaluation of the Quality of Reporting of Observational Studies in Otorhinolaryngology - Based on the STROBE Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksma, Martine; Joosten, Michiel H M A; Peters, Jeroen P M; Grolman, Wilko; Stegeman, Inge

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational studies are the most frequently published studies in literature. When randomized controlled trials cannot be conducted because of ethical or practical considerations, an observational study design is the first choice. The STROBE Statement (STrengthening the Reporting of

  19. [The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology [STROBE] statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, E. von; Altman, D.G.; Egger, M.

    2008-01-01

    Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) initiative developed rec...

  20. Impact of STROBE statement publication on quality of observational study reporting: interrupted time series versus before-after analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Bastuji-Garin

    Full Text Available In uncontrolled before-after studies, CONSORT was shown to improve the reporting of randomised trials. Before-after studies ignore underlying secular trends and may overestimate the impact of interventions. Our aim was to assess the impact of the 2007 STROBE statement publication on the quality of observational study reporting, using both uncontrolled before-after analyses and interrupted time series.For this quasi-experimental study, original articles reporting cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies published between 2004 and 2010 in the four dermatological journals having the highest 5-year impact factors (≥ 4 were selected. We compared the proportions of STROBE items (STROBE score adequately reported in each article during three periods, two pre STROBE period (2004-2005 and 2006-2007 and one post STROBE period (2008-2010. Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series was also performed.Of the 456 included articles, 187 (41% reported cohort studies, 166 (36.4% cross-sectional studies, and 103 (22.6% case-control studies. The median STROBE score was 57% (range, 18%-98%. Before-after analysis evidenced significant STROBE score increases between the two pre-STROBE periods and between the earliest pre-STROBE period and the post-STROBE period (median score2004-05 48% versus median score2008-10 58%, p<0.001 but not between the immediate pre-STROBE period and the post-STROBE period (median score2006-07 58% versus median score2008-10 58%, p = 0.42. In the pre STROBE period, the six-monthly mean STROBE score increased significantly, by 1.19% per six-month period (absolute increase 95%CI, 0.26% to 2.11%, p = 0.016. By segmented analysis, no significant changes in STROBE score trends occurred (-0.40%; 95%CI, -2.20 to 1.41; p = 0.64 in the post STROBE statement publication.The quality of reports increased over time but was not affected by STROBE. Our findings raise concerns about the relevance of uncontrolled before

  1. Impact of STROBE statement publication on quality of observational study reporting: interrupted time series versus before-after analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie; Sbidian, Emilie; Gaudy-Marqueste, Caroline; Ferrat, Emilie; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Richard, Marie-Aleth; Canoui-Poitrine, Florence

    2013-01-01

    In uncontrolled before-after studies, CONSORT was shown to improve the reporting of randomised trials. Before-after studies ignore underlying secular trends and may overestimate the impact of interventions. Our aim was to assess the impact of the 2007 STROBE statement publication on the quality of observational study reporting, using both uncontrolled before-after analyses and interrupted time series. For this quasi-experimental study, original articles reporting cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies published between 2004 and 2010 in the four dermatological journals having the highest 5-year impact factors (≥ 4) were selected. We compared the proportions of STROBE items (STROBE score) adequately reported in each article during three periods, two pre STROBE period (2004-2005 and 2006-2007) and one post STROBE period (2008-2010). Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series was also performed. Of the 456 included articles, 187 (41%) reported cohort studies, 166 (36.4%) cross-sectional studies, and 103 (22.6%) case-control studies. The median STROBE score was 57% (range, 18%-98%). Before-after analysis evidenced significant STROBE score increases between the two pre-STROBE periods and between the earliest pre-STROBE period and the post-STROBE period (median score2004-05 48% versus median score2008-10 58%, pSTROBE period and the post-STROBE period (median score2006-07 58% versus median score2008-10 58%, p = 0.42). In the pre STROBE period, the six-monthly mean STROBE score increased significantly, by 1.19% per six-month period (absolute increase 95%CI, 0.26% to 2.11%, p = 0.016). By segmented analysis, no significant changes in STROBE score trends occurred (-0.40%; 95%CI, -2.20 to 1.41; p = 0.64) in the post STROBE statement publication. The quality of reports increased over time but was not affected by STROBE. Our findings raise concerns about the relevance of uncontrolled before-after analysis for estimating the impact of

  2. Resonant laser power build-up in ALPS. A 'light-shining-through-walls' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehret, Klaus; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Frede, Maik

    2009-05-01

    The ALPS collaboration runs a light-shining-through-walls (LSW) experiment to search for photon oscillations into weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) inside of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet at the site of DESY. In this paper we report on the first successful integration of a large-scale optical cavity to boost the available power for WISP production in this type of experiments. The key elements are a frequency tunable narrow line-width continuous wave laser acting as the primary light source and an electronic feed-back control loop to stabilize the power build-up. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate the data analysis procedures on the basis of a brief exemplary run. (orig.)

  3. Lunar Laser-Ranging Detection of Light-Speed Anisotropy and Gravitational Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Apache Point Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO, in NM, can detect pho- ton bounces from retroreflectors on the moon surface to 0.1ns timing resolution. This facility enables not only the detection of light speed anisotropy, which defines a local preferred frame of reference — only in that frame is the speed of light isotropic, but also fluctuations / turbulence (gravitational waves in the flow of the dynamical 3-space rela- tive to local systems / observers. So the APOLLO facility can act as an e ective “gravi- tational wave” detector. A recently published small data set from November 5, 2007, is analysed to characterise both the average anisotropy velocity and the wave / turbulence effects. The results are consistent with some 13 previous detections, with the last and most accurate being from the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler-shift NASA data.

  4. Lunar Laser-Ranging Detection of Light-Speed Anisotropy and Gravitational Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahill R. T.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Apache Point Lunar Laser-ranging Operation (APOLLO, in NM, can detect photon bounces from retroreflectors on the moon surface to 0.1ns timing resolution. This facility enables not only the detection of light speed anisotropy, which defines a local preferred frame of reference - only in that frame is the speed of light isotropic, but also fluctuations/turbulence (gravitational waves in the flow of the dynamical 3-space relative to local systems/observers. So the APOLLO facility can act as an effective "gravitational wave" detector. A recently published small data set from November 5, 2007, is analysed to characterise both the average anisotropy velocity and the wave/turbulence effects. The results are consistent with some 13 previous detections, with the last and most accurate being from the spacecraft earth-flyby Doppler-shift NASA data.

  5. Self-organized pattern formation upon femtosecond laser ablation by circularly polarized light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlamova, Olga; Costache, Florenta; Reif, Juergen; Bestehorn, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Surface ripples generation upon femtosecond laser ablation is attributed to self-organized structure formation from instability. We report that linear arrangements are observed not only for linearly polarized light but also for ablation with circularly polarized light. Long ordered chains of spherical nanoparticles, reminding of bead-strings are almost parallel but exhibit typical non-linear dynamics features such as bifurcations. In a first attempt to understand the self-assembly, we rely on models recently developed for the description of similar structures upon ion beam erosion and for the simulation of instabilities in thin liquid films. Our picture describes an unstable surface layer, non-uniformly eroded through Coulomb repulsion between individual positive charges

  6. The use of lasers as sources for Raman spectrometry, resonance Raman spectrometry, and light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitini, R.; Ceccaldi, M.; Leicknam, J.P.; Plus, R.

    1975-01-01

    The activity of the laboratory is principally centred on the determination of molecular structures and the study of molecular interactions in solution by infrared and Raman spectrometry. With the development of work on relatively large molecules, particularly biological molecules, it became necessary to complete information on the molecular weight and on the intra and intermolecular geometry and interactions of these bodies. In order to obtain these informations Rayleigh scattering and resonance Raman spectrometry were used. The advantages of using vibrational spectrometry, particularly Raman, in conjunction with the diffusion of light for these structural and molecular interaction studies is emphasized. It is shown that these two techniques could not have developed as they have done in the last few years without the use of lasers as light source [fr

  7. A very thin light sheet technique used to investigate meniscus shapes by laser induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a light sheet technique is described to accurately (50 μm) measure meniscus profiles in film formation problems. The use of a slit to create the thin (0.1 mm) laser sheet makes the technique easy to implement, and allows tunable sheet thickness. The low light intensity obtained through the slit is compensated by the induced fluorescence of the tested fluid, which provides good picture contrast. After video recording through a microscope, the actual meniscus is recovered by image processing and proper calibration. The efficiency of the technique is demonstrated on a coating flow experiment. Due to its good accuracy and ease of use, this technique is expected to provide useful quantitative information about meniscus problems, in particular for the validation of computational fluid dynamics CFD solutions of coating flows. (author)

  8. In vitro comparative study of share bond of light cured composite resins with halogen light and argon laser, using stainless steel brackets on human premolars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carillo, Vitoria Eugenia Bismarck

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study in vitro was to compare the share bond strength of the light-cured composite resins Transbond XT (Unitek), with halogen light and argon laser. The Adhesive Remmant Index (ARI) was also investigated. The brackets Dyna lock (3M-UNITEK) were bonded to 75 human premolars, divided into 5 groups (15 each) according to time and the polymerization: Group H20, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 20s (10s both sides); Group H40, 15 brackets bonded with halogen light for 40s (20s both sides); Group A40, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 40s (20s both sides); Group A20, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 20s (10s both sides); Group A10, 15 brackets bonded with argon laser for 10s (5s both sides). The pulpal temperature changes were determined during a polymerization, not exceeding 3,5 deg C. After bonding, the teeth were submitted to a thermo cycled of 700 cycles between 5 deg C and 55 deg C, to simulate the consuming that the light cured composite resin would have in a short space of time. The specimens were then placed in PVC ring and embedded in acrylic resin (Aero-Jet). The tensile bond strength test was performed on an Universal Machine set at a crosshead speed of 1,5 mm/min, and for each rupture we registered a graphic and the best load required in Newtons, was converted to MPa and kgf. The share bond strength showed bigger values for the exposure time of 20 seconds, for the Group bonded for halogen light (H20), 7,45 kgf (7,64 MPa) and for argon laser 7,50 kgf (7,69 MPa); lesser values for the exposure time of 40s for the Group with halogen light (H40), 6,15 kgf (6,30 MPa) and argon laser Group (A40), 6,20 kgf (6,35 MPa) 0; and A10, 4,85 kgf (4,97 MPa). In the ARI Index, only A40 Group showed the 1 Index, with statistical results. In this Group, less than half of the remainder adhesive stayed on the surface of the enamel, conferring specimens failed at the enamel-adhesive interface. The results of the in vitro study demonstrate that

  9. Explanation and Elaboration Document for the STROBE-Vet Statement: Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary Extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, A M; Sargeant, J M; Dohoo, I R

    2016-01-01

    The STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement was first published in 2007 and again in 2014. The purpose of the original STROBE was to provide guidance for authors, reviewers and editors to improve the comprehensiveness of reporting; however, STROBE has...... a unique focus on observational studies. Although much of the guidance provided by the original STROBE document is directly applicable, it was deemed useful to map those statements to veterinary concepts, provide veterinary examples and highlight unique aspects of reporting in veterinary observational...... studies. Here, we present the examples and explanations for the checklist items included in the STROBE-Vet Statement. Thus, this is a companion document to the STROBE-Vet Statement Methods and process document, which describes the checklist and how it was developed....

  10. Explanation and Elaboration Document for the STROBE-Vet Statement: Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, A M; Sargeant, J M; Dohoo, I R; Erb, H N; Cevallos, M; Egger, M; Ersbøll, A K; Martin, S W; Nielsen, L R; Pearl, D L; Pfeiffer, D U; Sanchez, J; Torrence, M E; Vigre, H; Waldner, C; Ward, M P

    2016-12-01

    The STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement was first published in 2007 and again in 2014. The purpose of the original STROBE was to provide guidance for authors, reviewers and editors to improve the comprehensiveness of reporting; however, STROBE has a unique focus on observational studies. Although much of the guidance provided by the original STROBE document is directly applicable, it was deemed useful to map those statements to veterinary concepts, provide veterinary examples and highlight unique aspects of reporting in veterinary observational studies. Here, we present the examples and explanations for the checklist items included in the STROBE-Vet Statement. Thus, this is a companion document to the STROBE-Vet Statement Methods and process document, which describes the checklist and how it was developed. © 2016 The Authors. Zoonoses and Public Health published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. The STROBE-X Science Case: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarone, Thomas J.; STROBE-X consortium

    2018-01-01

    STROBE-X is a proposed NASA Probe class mission aimed at the extremes of high throughput X-ray astronomy, making use of an 8 m^2 total collecting area, CCD-quality spectral resolution, and a state-of-the art wide field monitor with both very large instantaneous sky coverage (ideal for follow-up of LIGO events) and good intrinsic spectral and time resolution. The core goals are time domain astrophysics and high count spectroscopy. Its capabilities span a broad range of topics, including those traditional to X-ray timing missions, like understanding the equation of states of neutron stars, and the spin distributions and masses of neutron stars and stellar mass and supermassive black holes, and the rates, and detailed properties, of a variety of classes of X-ray transients; and also topics not traditionally studied by such missions such as the spectra of supernova remnants, comets and of clusters and groups of galaxies.

  12. Effects of LED or laser phototherapy on bone defects grafted with MTA and irradiated with laser or LED light: a comparative Raman spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Soares, Luiz G. P.; Barbosa, Artur Felipe S.; Silveira, Landulfo, Jr.

    2012-03-01

    We studied peaks of calcium hydroxyapatite - CHA on defects grafted with MTA, treated or not with Light Emitting Diode - LED or IR Laser. 54 rats were divided in 6 groups each subdivided into 3 subgroups (15,21,30d). LED (λ850 +/- 10nm) or IR Laser (λ850 nm) was applied over (LED) or in 4 points around the defect at 48 h intervals for 15 days. Raman readings were taken at the surface of the defect. The smaller overall intensity of the peak was found in Group MTA + Laser (1510.2 +/- 274.1) and the highest on Group LED (2322 +/- 715). There were no statistically significant differences between non-irradiated subjects on regards the CHA peaks. On the other hand, there were statistically significant differences between the Group Clot and LED, Clot and Laser, and Clot and MTA + Laser (p =0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.003). There were no significant differences between Group MTA and MTA + LED (p=0.2) but significant differences were seen between Groups MTA and MTA + Laser (p=0.01). Significant differences were also observed between Groups LED and Laser (p LED and MTA + Laser (p=0.009). MTA, due to its characteristics, seemed to be directly affected by the light. However, the use of either phototherapy positively affected bone healing similarly as observed on different studies using other biomaterials. The overall analysis of our results indicated that the use of either light source resulted in a better, more advanced, and of quality bone repair.

  13. [Strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology (STROBE): explanation and elaboration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, Jan P; Von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mulrow, Cynthia D; Pocock, Stuart J; Poole, Charles; Schlesselman, James J; Egger, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Much medical research is observational. The reporting of observational studies is often of insufficient quality. Poor reporting hampers the assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of a study and the generalisability of its results. Taking into account empirical evidence and theoretical considerations, a group of methodologists, researchers, and editors developed the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) recommendations to improve the quality of reporting of observational studies. The STROBE Statement consists of a checklist of 22 items, which relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results and discussion sections of articles. Eighteen items are common to cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies and four are specific to each of the three study designs. The STROBE Statement provides guidance to authors about how to improve the reporting of observational studies and facilitates critical appraisal and interpretation of studies by reviewers, journal editors and readers. This explanatory and elaboration document is intended to enhance the use, understanding, and dissemination of the STROBE Statement. The meaning and rationale for each checklist item are presented. For each item, one or several published examples and, where possible, references to relevant empirical studies and methodological literature are provided. Examples of useful flow diagrams are also included. The STROBE Statement, this document, and the associated Web site (http://www.strobe-statement.org/) should be helpful resources to improve reporting of observational research.

  14. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE: explanation and elaboration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P Vandenbroucke

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Much medical research is observational. The reporting of observational studies is often of insufficient quality. Poor reporting hampers the assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of a study and the generalisability of its results. Taking into account empirical evidence and theoretical considerations, a group of methodologists, researchers, and editors developed the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE recommendations to improve the quality of reporting of observational studies. The STROBE Statement consists of a checklist of 22 items, which relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results and discussion sections of articles. Eighteen items are common to cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies and four are specific to each of the three study designs. The STROBE Statement provides guidance to authors about how to improve the reporting of observational studies and facilitates critical appraisal and interpretation of studies by reviewers, journal editors and readers. This explanatory and elaboration document is intended to enhance the use, understanding, and dissemination of the STROBE Statement. The meaning and rationale for each checklist item are presented. For each item, one or several published examples and, where possible, references to relevant empirical studies and methodological literature are provided. Examples of useful flow diagrams are also included. The STROBE Statement, this document, and the associated Web site (http://www.strobe-statement.org/ should be helpful resources to improve reporting of observational research.

  15. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE): explanation and elaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbroucke, Jan P; von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Mulrow, Cynthia D; Pocock, Stuart J; Poole, Charles; Schlesselman, James J; Egger, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    Much medical research is observational. The reporting of observational studies is often of insufficient quality. Poor reporting hampers the assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of a study and the generalisability of its results. Taking into account empirical evidence and theoretical considerations, a group of methodologists, researchers, and editors developed the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) recommendations to improve the quality of reporting of observational studies. The STROBE Statement consists of a checklist of 22 items, which relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results and discussion sections of articles. Eighteen items are common to cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies and four are specific to each of the three study designs. The STROBE Statement provides guidance to authors about how to improve the reporting of observational studies and facilitates critical appraisal and interpretation of studies by reviewers, journal editors and readers. This explanatory and elaboration document is intended to enhance the use, understanding, and dissemination of the STROBE Statement. The meaning and rationale for each checklist item are presented. For each item, one or several published examples and, where possible, references to relevant empirical studies and methodological literature are provided. Examples of useful flow diagrams are also included. The STROBE Statement, this document, and the associated Web site (http://www.strobe-statement.org/) should be helpful resources to improve reporting of observational research. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of Laser-Produced Tin Plasma-Based EUV Light Source Technology for HVM EUV Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichi Fujimoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2002, we have been developing a carbon dioxide (CO2 laser-produced tin (Sn plasma (LPP extreme ultraviolet (EUV light source, which is the most promising solution because of the 13.5 nm wavelength high power (>200 W light source for high volume manufacturing. EUV lithography is used for its high efficiency, power scalability, and spatial freedom around plasma. We believe that the LPP scheme is the most feasible candidate for the EUV light source for industrial use. We have several engineering data from our test tools, which include 93% Sn ionization rate, 98% Sn debris mitigation by a magnetic field, and 68% CO2 laser energy absorption rate. The way of dispersion of Sn by prepulse laser is key to improve conversion efficiency (CE. We focus on prepulsed laser pulsed duration. When we have optimized pulse duration from nanosecond to picosecond, we have obtained maximum 4.7% CE (CO2 laser to EUV; our previous data was 3.8% at 2 mJ EUV pulse energy. Based on these data we are developing our first light source as our product: “GL200E.” The latest data and the overview of EUV light source for the industrial EUV lithography are reviewed in this paper.

  17. Ultraviolet light and laser irradiation enhances the antibacterial activity of glucosamine-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraju, Saravanan; Ramasamy, Mohankandhasamy; Baskaran, Rengarajan; Ahn, Sang Jung; Yun, Kyusik

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a novel method for the synthesis of glucosamine-functionalized gold nanoparticles (GlcN-AuNPs) using biocompatible and biodegradable glucosamine for antibacterial activity. GlcN-AuNPs were prepared using different concentrations of glucosamine. The synthesized AuNPs were characterized for surface plasmon resonance, surface morphology, fluorescence spectroscopy, and antibacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the AuNPs, GlcN-AuNPs, and GlcN-AuNPs when irradiated by ultraviolet light and laser were investigated and compared with the MIC of standard kanamycin using Escherichia coli by the microdilution method. Laser-irradiated GlcN-AuNPs exhibited significant bactericidal activity against E. coli. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopic analysis supported the cell death mechanism in the presence of GlcN-AuNP-treated bacteria. Further, morphological changes in E. coli after laser treatment were investigated using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The overall results of this study suggest that the prepared nanoparticles have potential as a potent antibacterial agent for the treatment of a wide range of disease-causing bacteria.

  18. Efficient generation of 3.5W laser light at 515nm by frequency doubling a single-frequency high power DBR tapered diode laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Müller, André

    2017-01-01

    More than 3.5 W of green light at 515 nm is generated by frequency doubling a single-frequency high power DBR tapered diode laser. The frequency doubling is performed in a cascade of PPMgLN and PPMgSLT crystals in order to reach high power and avoid thermal effects present in PPMgLN at high power....... The green light is diffraction limited (M2

  19. How to cool down cold atoms using laser light? Principles and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guellati-Khelifa, Saida; Clade, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This article is devoted to the description of various mechanisms of the laser cooling of neutral atoms. These mechanisms are all based on the interaction between a photon, an entity of light, and an atom, an entity of matter. One of the macroscopic manifestations of this interaction is the pressure of radiation force. The effect of this force is strongly amplified when the source of photon is a laser. We will describe how it is possible to use this force with the Doppler effect in order to slow an atomic beam and also to reduce considerably the thermal agitation of atoms. We will explain how by shaping the light potentials and magnetic fields it is possible to reach extremely low temperatures of some nano-kelvin. At these temperatures, very near to the absolute zero, it is possible for certain kind of atoms, called bosons, to achieve a new state of matter, where quantum behaviour of atoms became apparent on a macroscopic scale. (authors)

  20. Laser textured substrates for light in-coupling in thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakanga, Kambulakwao; Siepmann, Ortwin; Sergeev, Oleg; Geißendörfer, Stefan; von Maydell, Karsten; Agert, Carsten

    2014-03-01

    In this work we investigate the use of a picosecond (ps) laser used for monolithic connection to pattern glass substrates to achieve light in-coupling in silicon thin film solar cells. We present our results on the patterning of three commercially available and frequently used multi-component glasses Corning EAGLE XG®, Schott BOROFLOAT® 33 and Saint-Gobain SGG DIAMANT®. We find that the different glass structural components influence the degree of texturing obtained. This can be attributed to the different laser induced electron collision times and recombination rates, and thus the critical electron density evolution leading to ablation. Thus the ablated crater profile is glass composition dependent. The surface texture is altered from periodic to random with decreasing scribing speed. The transmission of the textured substrates gradually decreases while the reflection increases as a consequence of the topological and morphological changes. The angular resolved measurements illustrate that highly textured substrates scatter the light towards greater angles. This demonstrates potential for the application in substrate configuration (nip) thin film solar cells, as the scattering can increase the optical path, and hence the absorption in the absorber layer. Simulations of periodically textured glass substrates demonstrate a focused optical generation rate near the front contact and absorber layer interface. The influence of the modified refractive index region on the optical generation rate and reflection depends on the crater profile. The reflection is generally reduced when a periodic texture in the micrometre range is implemented.

  1. Ultraviolet Laser SQUID Microscope for GaN Blue Light Emitting Diode Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daibo, M; Kamiwano, D; Kurosawa, T; Yoshizawa, M; Tayama, N

    2006-01-01

    We carried out non-contacting measurements of photocurrent distributions in GaN blue light emitting diode (LED) chips using our newly developed ultraviolet (UV) laser SQUID microscope. The UV light generates the photocurrent, and then the photocurrent induces small magnetic fields around the chip. An off-axis arranged HTS-SQUID magnetometer is employed to detect a vector magnetic field whose typical amplitude is several hundred femto-tesla. Generally, it is difficult to obtain Ohmic contacts for p-type GaN because of the low hole concentration in the p-type epitaxial layer and the lack of any available metal with a higher work function compared with the p-type GaN. Therefore, a traditional probecontacted electrical test is difficult to conduct for wide band gap semiconductors without an adequately annealed electrode. Using the UV-laser SQUID microscope, the photocurrent can be measured without any electrical contact. We show the photocurrent vector map which was reconstructed from measured magnetic fields data. We also demonstrate how we found the position of a defect of the electrical short circuits in the LED chip

  2. Ultraviolet light and laser irradiation enhances the antibacterial activity of glucosamine-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govindaraju S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Saravanan Govindaraju,1,3 Mohankandhasamy Ramasamy,1 Rengarajan Baskaran,2 Sang Jung Ahn,3,4 Kyusik Yun1 1Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, 2College of Pharmacy, Gachon University, Incheon, 3Centre for Advanced Instrumentation, Korea Research Institute of Standard and Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea; 4Major of Nano Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea Abstract: Here we report a novel method for the synthesis of glucosamine-functionalized gold nanoparticles (GlcN-AuNPs using biocompatible and biodegradable glucosamine for antibacterial activity. GlcN-AuNPs were prepared using different concentrations of glucosamine. The synthesized AuNPs were characterized for surface plasmon resonance, surface morphology, fluorescence spectroscopy, and antibacterial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the AuNPs, GlcN-AuNPs, and GlcN-AuNPs when irradiated by ultraviolet light and laser were investigated and compared with the MIC of standard kanamycin using Escherichia coli by the microdilution method. Laser-irradiated GlcN-AuNPs exhibited significant bactericidal activity against E. coli. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopic analysis supported the cell death mechanism in the presence of GlcN-AuNP-treated bacteria. Further, morphological changes in E. coli after laser treatment were investigated using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The overall results of this study suggest that the prepared nanoparticles have potential as a potent antibacterial agent for the treatment of a wide range of disease-causing bacteria. Keywords: gold nanoparticles, glucosamine, light irradiation, antibacterial activity, bacterial morphology

  3. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Effect of nonlinear light scattering in air on ablation of materials produced by femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimentov, Sergei M.; Kononenko, Taras V.; Pivovarov, Pavel A.; Konov, Vitalii I.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Breitling, D.; Dausinger, F.

    2002-05-01

    Nonlinear light scattering appearing upon air breakdown induced by high-power ultrashort pulses (110 — 5200 fs) from a Ti:Al2O3 laser is studied. As a result of forward scattering, the beam profile is severely deformed, which is accompanied by spectral conversion of the incident radiation to a series of shorter-wavelength peaks extending into the visible spectral range. Measurements are made of the thresholds and the scattered radiation energy, which amounts to 75% of the incident energy. The effect of scattering on the material ablation in air is investigated. The obtained data offer an explanation for the experimentally observed paradoxical morphology of the channels ablated by high-power femtosecond pulses.

  4. Simulation study of light transport in laser-processed LYSO:Ce detectors with single-side readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläckberg, L; El Fakhri, G; Sabet, H

    2017-10-19

    A tightly focused pulsed laser beam can locally modify the crystal structure inside the bulk of a scintillator. The result is incorporation of so-called optical barriers with a refractive index different from that of the crystal bulk, that can be used to redirect the scintillation light and control the light spread in the detector. We here systematically study the scintillation light transport in detectors fabricated using the laser induced optical barrier technique, and objectively compare their potential performance characteristics with those of the two mainstream detector types: monolithic and mechanically pixelated arrays. Among countless optical barrier patterns, we explore barriers arranged in a pixel-like pattern extending all-the-way or half-way through a 20 mm thick LYSO:Ce crystal. We analyze the performance of the detectors coupled to MPPC arrays, in terms of light response functions, flood maps, line profiles, and light collection efficiency. Our results show that laser-processed detectors with both barrier patterns constitute a new detector category with a behavior between that of the two standard detector types. Results show that when the barrier-crystal interface is smooth, no DOI information can be obtained regardless of barrier refractive index (RI). However, with a rough barrier-crystal interface we can extract multiple levels of DOI. Lower barrier RI results in larger light confinement, leading to better transverse resolution. Furthermore we see that the laser-processed crystals have the potential to increase the light collection efficiency, which could lead to improved energy resolution and potentially better timing resolution due to higher signals. For a laser-processed detector with smooth barrier-crystal interfaces the light collection efficiency is simulated to  >42%, and for rough interfaces  >73%. The corresponding numbers for a monolithic crystal is 39% with polished surfaces, and 71% with rough surfaces, and for a mechanically

  5. Direct periodic patterning of GaN-based light-emitting diodes by three-beam interference laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); Yuan, Dajun; Guo, Rui [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); Liu, Jianping [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215125 (China); Asadirad, Mojtaba [Materials Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4005 (United States); Kwon, Min-Ki [Department of Photonic Engineering, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Dupuis, Russell D. [Center for Compound Semiconductors and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 777 Atlantic Dr. NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Das, Suman [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0245 (United States); Ryou, Jae-Hyun, E-mail: jryou@uh.edu [Materials Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4005 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204-4006 (United States)

    2014-04-07

    We report on the direct patterning of two-dimensional periodic structures in GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) through laser interference ablation for the fast and reliable fabrication of periodic micro- and nano-structures aimed at enhancing light output. Holes arranged in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice array having an opening size of 500 nm, depth of 50 nm, and a periodicity of 1 μm were directly formed by three-beam laser interference without photolithography or electron-beam lithography processes. The laser-patterned LEDs exhibit an enhancement in light output power of 20% compared to conventional LEDs having a flat top surface without degradation of electrical and optical properties of the top p-GaN layer and the active region, respectively.

  6. Ultrafast dynamics driven by intense light pulses from atoms to solids, from lasers to intense X-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Gräfe, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    This book documents the recent vivid developments in the research field of ultrashort intense light pulses for probing and controlling ultrafast dynamics. The recent fascinating results in studying and controlling ultrafast dynamics in ever more complicated systems such as (bio-)molecules and structures of meso- to macroscopic sizes on ever shorter time-scales are presented. The book is written by some of the most eminent experimental and theoretical experts in the field. It covers the new groundbreaking research directions that were opened by the availability of new light sources such as fully controlled intense laser fields with durations down to a single oscillation cycle, short-wavelength laser-driven attosecond pulses and intense X-ray pulses from the upcoming free electron lasers. These light sources allowed the investigation of dynamics in atoms, molecules, clusters, on surfaces and very recently also in nanostructures and solids in new regimes of parameters which, in turn, led to the identification of...

  7. Tissue As A Medium For Laser Light Transport-Implications For Photoradiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, L. E.; Bolin, F. P.; Cain, B. W.

    1982-12-01

    An important medical laser application is in the emerging field of photoradiation therapy (PRT). PRT is the process in which malignant tissue is destroyed by administration of light to a specific photosensitized site. Filtered arcs, incandescents and dye lasers have been used as sources of activating light. We have carried out light experiments in tissue to study such PRT light distributions. The results of this research have shown that a number of important optical phenomena occurring within illuminated tissue must be accounted for in order to make good predictions of tumor light dosage. Among these are; tissue type, interface effects and anomalies due to composition. These effects substantially influence light levels in PRT and, thus, the therapeutic effect. The uniqueness of tissue as a medium for light transport presents special problems for optics research and instrumentation. Successful solutions necessarily will involve collaboration between the life sciences and optic specialists. Attempts at treatment of human disease using non-ionizing radiation have a history archaeologically traceable to archaic societies (in which the sun's photons were used and often worshipped).1 Western medicine in the past, has used visible light beneficially, albeit empirically, on a few ailments. However, in this century, a significant development in the understanding and in the therapeutic use of this electromagnetic radiation in the UV, visible and IR has occurred, based on scientific study. This utilization of radiation in the visible and ultraviolet can be by two distinct processes. One is through the direct action of the photons which serve as the sole treatment agent. In this case the photon interacts with the cell, or its components, in a single step, to produce a desired effect. An example is the successful use of blue light for treatment of bilirubinemia in newborns. The second process is a biological effect produced through the combination of electromagnetic radiation

  8. Efficient generation of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light with spectrally combined tapered diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Andersen, Peter E.

    We propose an efficient concept increasing the power of diode laser systems in the visible spectral range. In comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation enhances the available power significantly. Combining two...... 1060 nm tapered diode lasers, we achieve a 2.5-3.2 fold increase of green light with a maximum power of 3.9 Watts in a diffraction-limited beam. At this level, diode lasers have a high application potential, for example, within the biomedical field. In order to enhance the power even further, our...

  9. Development of gallium-nitride-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes for energy-efficient lighting and displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DenBaars, Steven P.; Feezell, Daniel; Kelchner, Katheryn; Pimputkar, Siddha; Pan, Chi-Chen; Yen, Chia-Chen; Tanaka, Shinichi; Zhao, Yuji; Pfaff, Nathan; Farrell, Robert; Iza, Mike; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) fabricated from gallium nitride (GaN) have led to the realization of high-efficiency white solid-state lighting. Currently, GaN white LEDs exhibit luminous efficacy greater than 150 lm W −1 , and external quantum efficiencies higher than 60%. This has enabled LEDs to compete with traditional lighting technologies, such as incandescent and compact fluorescent (CFL) lighting. Further improvements in materials quality and cost reduction are necessary for widespread adoption of LEDs for lighting. A review of the unique polarization anisotropy in GaN is included for the different crystal orientations. The emphasis on nonpolar and semipolar LEDs highlights high-power violet and blue emitters, and we consider the effects of indium incorporation and well width. Semipolar GaN materials have enabled the development of high-efficiency LEDs in the blue region and recent achievements of green laser diodes at 520 nm

  10. 4-Gbit/s visible light communication link based on 16-QAM OFDM transmission over remote phosphor-film converted white light by using blue laser diode

    KAUST Repository

    Duran Retamal, Jose Ramon

    2015-12-21

    Visible Light Communication (VLC) as a new technology for ultrahigh-speed communication is still limited when using slow modulation light-emitting diode (LED). Alternatively, we present a 4-Gbit/s VLC system using coherent blue-laser diode (LD) via 16-quadrature amplitude modulation orthogonal frequency division multiplexing. By changing the composition and the optical-configuration of a remote phosphor-film the generated white light is tuned from cool day to neutral, and the bit error rate is optimized from 1.9 × 10-2 to 2.8 × 10-5 in a blue filter-free link due to enhanced blue light transmission in forward direction. Briefly, blue-LD is an alternative to LED for generating white light and boosting the data rate of VLC. © 2015 Optical Society of America.

  11. Effect of Fast Curing Lights, Argon Laser, and Plasma Arc on Bond Strengths of Orthodontic Brackets: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hashem-Hoseini

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nowadays light-cured composites are used widely by orthodontists to bond brackets. As these composites require 20-40 seconds time per tooth to be light cured, more chair-time in needed compared to self-cured composites. In recent years, the argon laser and plasma arc lights have been introduced in dentistry to reduce this curing time. The purpose of this study was to compare bond strength of brackets bonded with the argon la-ser and plasma arc light with those bonded with the conventional halogen light.Materials and Methods: Fifty-one intact human premolars were randomly divided into three groups of 17 teeth each. Stainless steel twin premolar brackets (018- in Dyna lock, 3M Unitek were bonded to the teeth using one of these curing devices in each group: the halogen unit (Coltolux 75, Switzerland, the argon laser unit (Bo-5, Iran , and the plasma arc unit (Remecure 15, Belgium. The orthodontic adhesive was the same in the three groups (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek. After thermal cycling, the diametral tensilebond strength of specimens was measured using a debonding plier in a Zwick Universal Testing machine (Z/100, Germany.Results: The mean bond strengths was 17.344 MPa (SD=4.567 for halogen 19.172 MPa(SD=6.328 for laser and 19.322 MPa (SD=4.036 for plasma arc groups. No statistically significant difference existed in the mean bond strengths among three groups.Conclusion: Argon laser lights, significantly reducing the curing time of orthodonticbrackets without affecting bond strength, have the potential to be considered as advanta-geous alternatives to conventional halogen light.

  12. Research on the speed of light transmission in a dual-frequency laser pumped single fiber with two directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Liu, Jianjun; Wang, Yuda; Yang, Yujing; Gao, Yuan; Lv, Pin; Jiang, Qiuli

    2018-01-01

    In this article a general theory of the coherent population oscillation effect in an erbium-doped fiber at room temperature is presented. We use dual pumping light waves with a simplified two-level system. Thus the time delay equations can be calculated from rate equations and the transmission equation. Using numerical simulation, in the case of dual-frequency pump light waves (1480 nm and 980 nm) with two directions, we analyze the influence of the pump power ratio on the group speed of light propagation. In addition, we compare slow light propagation with a single-pumping light and slow light propagation with a dual-pumping light at room temperature. The discussion shows that a larger time delay of slow light propagation can be obtained with a dual-frequency pumping laser. Compared to previous research methods, a dual-frequency laser pumped fiber with two directions is more controllable. Moreover, we conclude that the group velocity of light can be varied by changing the pump ratio.

  13. Surface roughness studies with DALLAS-detector array for laser light angular scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorburger, T. V.; Teague, E. C.; Scire, F. E.; Mclay, M. J.; Gilsinn, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop a better mathematical description of optical scattering phenomena, in order to construct an optical scattering apparatus for reliable and routine measurements of roughness parameters without resorting to comparator standards. After a brief outline of optical scattering theory, a description is presented of an experimental instrument for measuring surface roughness which incorporates optical scattering principles. The instrument has a He-Ne laser which illuminates the test surface at a variable angle of incidence. Scattered light distribution is detected by an array of 87 fiber-optic sensors positioned in a rotating semicircular yoke. The output from the detector is digitized and analyzed in a laboratory computer. For a comparison with experimental data, theoretical distributions are calculated by substituting the roughness profiles into the operand of and integral equation for electromagnetic scattering developed by Beckmann and Spizzichino (1963). A schematic diagram of the instrument is provided and the general implications of the experimental results are discussed.

  14. Analysis and manipulation of atomic and molecular collisions using laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimpe, A.

    2006-01-01

    Optical collisions in a crossed beam experiment are examined for the atomic collision pairs LiHe, LiNe, NaNe. Differential cross sections are measured in order to probe the quality of quantum chemical calculated and spectroscopical determined molecular potentials. The linear polarization of the excitation laser is used to manipulate the contrast of the differential cross sections for NaNe. Using elliptical polarized light total control over the angular position and the contrast of the interference pattern is demonstrated. Differential cross sections for the collision pairs LiH 2 and LiD 2 show a pronounced oscillatory structure, which for the first time is observed for atom-molecule optical collisions. (orig.)

  15. Spatial instabilities of light bullets in passively-mode-locked lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, S. V.; Javaloyes, J.

    2017-08-01

    Recently, the existence of robust three-dimensional light bullets (LBs) was predicted theoretically in the output of a laser coupled to a distant saturable absorber. In this paper, we analyze the stability and the range of existence of these dissipative localized structures and provide guidelines and realistic parameter sets for their experimental observation. In order to reduce the complexity of the analysis, we first approximate the three-dimensional problem by a reduced equation governing the dynamics of the transverse profile. This effective theory provides an intuitive picture of the LB formation mechanism. Moreover, it allows us to perform a detailed multiparameter bifurcation study and to identify the different mechanisms of instability. It is found that the LBs experience dominantly either homogeneous oscillation or symmetry-breaking transversal wave radiation. In addition, our analysis reveals several nonintuitive scaling behaviors as functions of the linewidth enhancement factors and the saturation parameters. Our results are confirmed by direct numerical simulations of the full system.

  16. DarkLight: A Search for Dark Forces at the Jefferson Laboratory Free-Electron Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balewski, Jan; Bernauer, J; Bertozzi, William; Bessuille, Jason; Buck, B; Cowan, Ray; Dow, K; Epstein, C; Fisher, Peter; Gilad, Shalev; Ihloff, Ernest; Kahn, Yonatan; Kelleher, Aidan; Kelsey, J; Milner, Richard; Moran, C; Ou, Longwu; Russell, R; Schmookler, Barak; Thaler, J; Tschalar, C; Vidal, Christopher; Winnebeck, A; Benson, Stephen [JLAB; Gould, Christopher [JLAB; Biallas, George [JLAB; Boyce, James [JLAB; Coleman, James [JLAB; Douglas, David [JLAB; Ent, Rolf [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Fenker, Howard [JLAB; Gubeli, Joseph [JLAB; Hannon, Fay [JLAB; Huang, Jia [JLAB; Jordan, Kevin [JLAB; Legg, Robert [JLAB; Marchlik, Matthew [JLAB; Moore, Steven [JLAB; Neil, George [JLAB; Shinn, Michelle D [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher [JLAB; Walker, Richard [JLAB; Williams, Gwyn [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB; Freytsis, M; Fiorito, Ralph; O' Shea, P; Alarcon, Ricardo; Dipert, R; Ovanesyan, G; Gunter, Thoth; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kohl, M; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Horn, Tanja; Gunarathne, D S; Martoff, C J; Olvitt, D L; Surrow, Bernd; Lia, X; Beck, Reinhard; Schmitz, R; Walther, D; Brinkmann, K; Zaunig, H

    2014-05-01

    We give a short overview of the DarkLight detector concept which is designed to search for a heavy photon A' with a mass in the range 10 MeV/c^2 < m(A') < 90 MeV/c^2 and which decays to lepton pairs. We describe the intended operating environment, the Jefferson Laboratory free electon laser, and a way to extend DarkLight's reach using A' --> invisible decays.

  17. A setup for resonant inelastic soft x ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources

    OpenAIRE

    Kunnus, K.; Rajkovic, I.; Schreck, S.; Quevedo, W.; Eckert, S.; Beye, M.; Suljoti, E.; Weniger, C.; Kalus, C.; Grübel, S.; Scholz, M.; Nordlund, D.; Zhang, W.; Hartsock, R.W.; Gaffney, K.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak f...

  18. Low-Level Laser Light Therapy Improves Cognitive Deficits and Inhibits Microglial Activation after Controlled Cortical Impact in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Khuman, Jugta; Zhang, Jimmy; Park, Juyeon; Carroll, James D.; Donahue, Chad; Whalen, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Low-level laser light therapy (LLLT) exerts beneficial effects on motor and histopathological outcomes after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI), and coherent near-infrared light has been reported to improve cognitive function in patients with chronic TBI. However, the effects of LLLT on cognitive recovery in experimental TBI are unknown. We hypothesized that LLLT administered after controlled cortical impact (CCI) would improve post-injury Morris water maze (MWM) performance. Low-level...

  19. Light-emitting diode and laser fluorescence-based devices in detecting occlusal caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jonas A.; Hug, Isabel; Neuhaus, Klaus W.; Lussi, Adrian

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the performance of two light-emitting diode (LED)- and two laser fluorescence-based devices in detecting occlusal caries in vitro. Ninety-seven permanent molars were assessed twice by two examiners using two LED- (Midwest Caries - MID and VistaProof - VP) and two laser fluorescence-based (DIAGNOdent 2095 - LF and DIAGNOdent pen 2190 - LFpen) devices. After measuring, the teeth were histologically prepared and classified according to lesion extension. At D1 the specificities were 0.76 (LF and LFpen), 0.94 (MID), and 0.70 (VP); the sensitivities were 0.70 (LF), 0.62 (LFpen), 0.31 (MID), and 0.75 (VP). At D3 threshold the specificities were 0.88 (LF), 0.87 (LFpen), 0.90 (MID), and 0.70 (VP); the sensitivities were 0.63 (LF and LFpen), 0.70 (MID), and 0.96 (VP). Spearman's rank correlations with histology were 0.56 (LF), 0.51 (LFpen), 0.55 (MID), and 0.58 (VP). Inter- and intraexaminer ICC values were high and varied from 0.83 to 0.90. Both LF devices seemed to be useful auxiliary tools to the conventional methods, presenting good reproducibility and better accuracy at D3 threshold. MID was not able to differentiate sound surfaces from enamel caries and VP still needs improvement on the cut-off limits for its use.

  20. Laser light interaction for texture evaluation of native woods and Eucalyptus grandis W. Hill ex Maiden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.R.; Mori, F.A.; Rabelo, G.F.; Braga Junior, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    This work had the objective of study in patterns of the ''speckle'' as function of the wood texture of Bowdichia virgilioides check for this species in other resources (sucupira), Swietenia macrophylla check for this species in other resources (mogno), Balfourodendron riedelianum check for this species in other resources (paumarfim) and Eucalyptus grandis wood. The He-Ne laser 10 mW was used to illuminate the wood samples and a digital camera captured the result of the interaction of the wood with the laser light. The results obtained from image analysis were compared with the pattern obtained by microscopic methodology. The captured images show the intensities of each pixel, varying between 0 and 255 in the gray scale. From the images, a central area of 16x16 pixels was removed and analyzed by the application of the convolution function and its Fourier Transform, resulting in the power density spectrum. The results showed that the information obtained by the power density spectrum of the ''speckle'' space variation allow classing samples of woods with different texture [pt

  1. The LAMP instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Timur; Bostedt, Christoph; Castagna, J.-C.; Ferguson, Ken R.; Bucher, Maximilian; Montero, Sebastian C.; Swiggers, Michele L.; Obaid, Razib; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Bozek, John D.; Berrah, Nora

    2018-03-01

    The Laser Applications in Materials Processing (LAMP) instrument is a new end-station for soft X-ray imaging, high-field physics, and ultrafast X-ray science experiments that is available to users at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free-electron laser. While the instrument resides in the Atomic, Molecular and Optical science hutch, its components can be used at any LCLS beamline. The end-station has a modular design that provides high flexibility in order to meet user-defined experimental requirements and specifications. The ultra-high-vacuum environment supports different sample delivery systems, including pulsed and continuous atomic, molecular, and cluster jets; liquid and aerosols jets; and effusive metal vapor beams. It also houses movable, large-format, high-speed pnCCD X-ray detectors for detecting scattered and fluorescent photons. Multiple charged-particle spectrometer options are compatible with the LAMP chamber, including a double-sided spectrometer for simultaneous and even coincident measurements of electrons, ions, and photons produced by the interaction of the high-intensity X-ray beam with the various samples. Here we describe the design and capabilities of the spectrometers along with some general aspects of the LAMP chamber and show some results from the initial instrument commissioning.

  2. Light and electron microscopic analysis of tattoos treated by Q-switched ruby laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.R.; Anderson, R.R.; Gange, R.W.; Michaud, N.A.; Flotte, T.J. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA))

    1991-07-01

    Short-pulse laser exposures can be used to alter pigmented structures in tissue by selective photothermolysis. Potential mechanisms of human tattoo pigment lightening with Q-switched ruby laser were explored by light and electron microscopy. Significant variation existed between and within tattoos. Electron microscopy of untreated tattoos revealed membrane-bound pigment granules, predominantly within fibroblasts and macrophages, and occasionally in mast cells. These granules contained pigment particles ranging from 2-in diameter. Immediately after exposure, dose-related injury was observed in cells containing pigment. Some pigment particles were smaller and lamellated. At fluences greater than or equal to 3 J/cm2, dermal vacuoles and homogenization of collagen bundles immediately adjacent to extracellular pigment were occasionally observed. A brisk neutrophilic infiltrate was apparent by 24 h. Eleven days later, the pigment was again intracellular. Half of the biopsies at 150 d revealed a mild persistent lymphocytic infiltrate. There was no fibrosis except for one case of clinical scarring. These findings confirm that short-pulse radiation can be used to selectively disrupt cells containing tattoo pigments. The physial alteration of pigment granules, redistribution, and elimination appear to account for clinical lightening of the tattoos.

  3. Pulsed lasers versus continuous light sources in capillary electrophoresis and fluorescence detection studies: Photodegradation pathways and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutonnet, Audrey; Morin, Arnaud; Petit, Pierre; Vicendo, Patricia; Poinsot, Véréna; Couderc, François

    2016-03-17

    Pulsed lasers are widely used in capillary electrophoresis (CE) studies to provide laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. Unfortunately pulsed lasers do not give linear calibration curves over a wide range of concentrations. While this does not prevent their use in CE/LIF studies, the non-linear behavior must be understood. Using 7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC) (10-5000 nM), Tamra (10-5000 nM) and tryptophan (1-200 μM) as dyes, we observe that continuous lasers and LEDs result in linear calibration curves, while pulsed lasers give polynomial ones. The effect is seen with both visible light (530 nm) and with UV light (355 nm, 266 nm). In this work we point out the formation of byproducts induced by pulsed laser upon irradiation of 7-HC. Their separation by CE using two Zeta LIF detectors clearly shows that this process is related to the first laser detection. All of these photodegradation products can be identified by an ESI-/MS investigation and correspond to at least two 7HC dimers. By using the photodegradation model proposed by Heywood and Farnsworth (2010) and by taking into account the 7-HC results and the fact that in our system we do not have a constant concentration of fluorophore, it is possible to propose a new photochemical model of fluorescence in LIF detection. The model, like the experiment, shows that it is difficult to obtain linear quantitation curves with pulsed lasers while UV-LEDs used in continuous mode have this advantage. They are a good alternative to UV pulsed lasers. An application involving the separation and linear quantification of oligosaccharides labeled with 2-aminobezoic acid is presented using HILIC and LED (365 nm) induced fluorescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrastructure and light microscope analysis of intact skin after a varying number of low level laser irradiations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki; Leão, Juliane Caroline; Rizzi, Élen Camargo; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Dias, Fernando José; Watanabe, Ii-sei; Iyomasa, Daniela Mizusaki

    2014-01-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used to relieve pain, inflammation, and wound healing processes. Thus, the skin is overexposed to laser and this effect is not completely understood. This study analyzed the effects of the number of laser applications (three, six, and 10) on the intact skin of the masseteric region in mice of strain HRS/J. The animals (n = 30) were equally divided into control (0 J/cm(2)) and irradiated (20 J/cm(2)), and each of these groups was further equally divided according to the number of laser applications (three, six, and 10) and underwent LLLT on alternate days. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The animals receiving applications exhibited open channels more dilated between the keratinocytes and photobiomodulation effect on endothelial cells and fibroblasts by TEM. Under the light microscope after 10 laser applications, the type I collagen decreased (P < 0.05) compared to the three and six applications. Under these experimental conditions, all numbers of applications provided photobiomodulatory effect on the epidermis and dermis, without damage. More studies are needed to standardize the energy density and number of applications recommended for laser therapy to have a better cost-benefit ratio associated with treatment.

  5. Quality of reporting of confounding remained suboptimal after the STROBE guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, Koen B; Widyakusuma, Niken N; Groenwold, Rolf H H; Hak, Eelko

    2016-01-01

    Poor quality of reporting of confounding has been observed in observational studies prior the STrenghtening the Reporting of Observational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement, a reporting guideline for observational studies. We assessed whether the reporting of confounding improved after the STROBE statement. We searched MEDLINE for all articles about observational cohort and case-control studies on interventions with a hypothesized beneficial effect in five general medical and five epidemiologic journals published between January 2010 and December 2012. We abstracted data for the baseline period before the publication of the STROBE statement (January 2004-April 2007) from a prior study. Six relevant items related to confounding were scored for each article. A comparison of the median number of items reported in both periods was made. In total, 174 articles published before and 220 articles published after the STROBE statement were included. The median number reported items was similar before and after the publication of the STROBE statement [median, 4; interquartile range [IQR], 3-5 vs. median, 4; IQR, 3.75-5]. However, the distribution of the number of reported items shifted somewhat to the right (P = 0.01). Although the quality of reporting of confounding improved in certain aspects, the overall quality remains suboptimal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 4 Gbps direct modulation of 450 nm GaN laser for high-speed visible light communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changmin; Zhang, Chong; Cantore, Michael; Farrell, Robert M; Oh, Sang Ho; Margalith, Tal; Speck, James S; Nakamura, Shuji; Bowers, John E; DenBaars, Steven P

    2015-06-15

    We demonstrate high-speed data transmission with a commercial high power GaN laser diode at 450 nm. 2.6 GHz bandwidth was achieved at an injection current of 500 mA using a high-speed visible light communication setup. Record high 4 Gbps free-space data transmission rate was achieved at room temperature.

  7. Laser and Light Treatments for Hair Reduction in Fitzpatrick Skin Types IV-VI: A Comprehensive Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayne, Rachel A; Perper, Marina; Eber, Ariel E; Aldahan, Adam S; Nouri, Keyvan

    2018-04-01

    Unwanted facial and body hair presents as a common finding in many patients, such as females with hirsutism. With advances in laser and light technology, a clinically significant reduction in hair can be achieved in patients with light skin. However, in patients with darker skin, Fitzpatrick skin types (FST) IV-VI, the higher melanin content of the skin interferes with the proposed mechanism of laser-induced selective photothermolysis, which is to target the melanin in the hair follicle to cause permanent destruction of hair bulge stem cells. Many prospective and retrospective studies have been conducted with laser and light hair-removal devices, but most exclude patients with darkly pigmented skin, considering them a high-risk group for unwanted side effects, including pigmentation changes, blisters, and crust formation. We reviewed the published literature to obtain studies that focused on hair reduction for darker skin types. The existing literature for this patient population identifies longer wavelengths as a key element of the treatment protocol and indicates neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG), diode, alexandrite, and ruby lasers as well as certain intense pulsed light sources for safe hair reduction with minimal side effects in patients with FST IV-VI, so long as energy settings and wavelengths are appropriate. Based on the findings in this review, safe and effective hair reduction for patients with FST IV-VI is achievable under proper treatment protocols and energy settings.

  8. 4 Gbps direct modulation of 450 nm GaN laser for high-speed visible light communication

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Changmin

    2015-06-10

    We demonstrate high-speed data transmission with a commercial high power GaN laser diode at 450 nm. 2.6 GHz bandwidth was achieved at an injection current of 500 mA using a high-speed visible light communication setup. Record high 4 Gbps free-space data transmission rate was achieved at room temperature.

  9. Laser beam shaping limitations for laboratory simulation of turbulence using a phase-only spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available phase screens. In this work the authors investigate the limitation of laser beam shaping with a phase-only spatial light modulator for the simulation of dynamic and pseudo-random turbulence in the laboratory. Findings state that there are regimes where...

  10. Search for Anisotropic Light Propagation as a Function of Laser Beam Alignment Relative to the Earth's Velocity Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navia C. E.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser diffraction experiment was conducted to study light propagation in air. The experiment is easy to reproduce and it is based on simple optical principles. Two optical sensors (segmented photo-diodes are used for measuring the position of diffracted light spots with a precision better than 0.1 μ m. The goal is to look for signals of anisotropic light propagation as function of the laser beam alignment to the Earth’s motion (solar barycenter motion obtained by COBE. Two raster search techniques have been used. First, a laser beam fixed in the laboratory frame scans in space due to Earth’s rotation. Second, a laser beam mounted on a turntable system scans actively in space by turning the table. The results obtained with both methods show that the course of light rays are affected by the motion of the Earth, and a predominant first order quantity with a Δ c/c = − β (1 + 2 a cos θ signature with ˉ a = − 0.393 ± 0.032 describes well the experimental results. This result differs in amount of 21% from the Special Relativity Theory prediction and that supplies the value of a = − 1 2 (isotropy.

  11. STROBE-AMS : recommendations to optimise reporting of epidemiological studies on antimicrobial resistance and informing improvement in antimicrobial stewardship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacconelli, Evelina; Cataldo, Maria A; Paul, M; Leibovici, L; Kluytmans, Jan; Schröder, Wiebke; Foschi, Federico; De Angelis, Giulia; De Waure, Chiara; Cadeddu, Chiara; Mutters, Nico T; Gastmeier, Petra; Cookson, Barry

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore the accuracy of application of the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) tool in epidemiological studies focused on the evaluation of the role of antibiotics in selecting resistance, and to derive and test an extension of STROBE to

  12. Achieving minimum-error discrimination of an arbitrary set of laser-light pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Marcus P.; Guha, Saikat; Dutton, Zachary

    2013-05-01

    Laser light is widely used for communication and sensing applications, so the optimal discrimination of coherent states—the quantum states of light emitted by an ideal laser—has immense practical importance. Due to fundamental limits imposed by quantum mechanics, such discrimination has a finite minimum probability of error. While concrete optical circuits for the optimal discrimination between two coherent states are well known, the generalization to larger sets of coherent states has been challenging. In this paper, we show how to achieve optimal discrimination of any set of coherent states using a resource-efficient quantum computer. Our construction leverages a recent result on discriminating multicopy quantum hypotheses [Blume-Kohout, Croke, and Zwolak, arXiv:1201.6625]. As illustrative examples, we analyze the performance of discriminating a ternary alphabet and show how the quantum circuit of a receiver designed to discriminate a binary alphabet can be reused in discriminating multimode hypotheses. Finally, we show that our result can be used to achieve the quantum limit on the rate of classical information transmission on a lossy optical channel, which is known to exceed the Shannon rate of all conventional optical receivers.

  13. Broadband white light emission from Ce:AlN ceramics: High thermal conductivity down-converters for LED and laser-driven solid state lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Wieg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN as a transparent ceramic host for Ce3+, a well-known active ion dopant. We show that the Ce:AlN ceramics have overlapping photoluminescent (PL emission peaks that cover almost the entire visible range resulting in a white appearance under 375 nm excitation without the need for color mixing. The PL is due to a combination of intrinsic AlN defect complexes and Ce3+ electronic transitions. Importantly, the peak intensities can be tuned by varying the Ce concentration and processing parameters, causing different shades of white light without the need for multiple phosphors or light sources. The Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage coordinates calculated from the measured spectra confirm white light emission. In addition, we demonstrate the viability of laser driven white light emission by coupling the Ce:AlN to a readily available frequency tripled Nd-YAG laser emitting at 355 nm. The high thermal conductivity of these ceramic down-converters holds significant promise for producing higher power white light sources than those available today.

  14. Laser response of a quartz crystal microbalance: frequency changes induced by light irradiation in the air phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takayoshi; Mochida, Tetsuhiro; Katada, Jun-ichi; Okahata, Yoshio

    2009-09-01

    A weak laser irradiation (523-785 nm, 5-60 mW) onto an Au electrode surface of a 27-MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) caused a frequency increase (a mass decrease) in the air phase. These frequency changes depended on the wavelength of the irradiated laser in the order of 523 nm > 636 nm > 785 nm, which corresponds to the light absorbance of the Au electrode of the QCM. The laser response increased linearly with increasing laser power (5-60 mW). In addition, the laser response showed a maximum at the incidence angle of 72 degrees when the P-polarized 636 nm laser was irradiated on the Au surface, due to the evanescent effect. These laser responses were also observed in the humid air of H2O, D2O, and in the vapors of various alcohols. Based on these findings, the observed frequency increase (mass decrease) can be explained by the photo-induced reversible desorption of water molecules from the Au electrode surface of the QCM due to the interfacial property changes.

  15. Influence of light polarization on the dynamics of optically pumped lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjona, M.; Corbalan, R. (Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)); Laguarta, F.; Pujol, J. (Departament d' Optica i Optometria, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08222 Terrassa (Spain)); Vilaseca, R. (Departament I. D' Optica, Universitat de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot (Spain))

    1990-06-01

    The dynamic behavior of a coherently pumped ring laser with a homogeneously broadened four-level medium is analyzed theoretically, considering linearly polarized pump and generated laser beams. The laser is shown to be much more stable when these polarizations are parallel than when they are orthogonal. In the latter case the instability pump threshold can be as low as four times the first laser threshold, and the laser dynamics shows Lorenz-type features.

  16. [The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology [STROBE] statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, E. von; Altman, D.G.; Egger, M.

    2008-01-01

    Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) initiative developed......, researchers, and journal editors to draft a che-cklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop...... and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case...

  17. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G; Egger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Initiative developed......, researchers, and journal editors to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop...... and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE Statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case...

  18. Pulsed lasers versus continuous light sources in capillary electrophoresis and fluorescence detection studies: Photodegradation pathways and models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutonnet, Audrey; Morin, Arnaud [Picometrics Technologies, 478 Rue de la Découverte, Labège France (France); Petit, Pierre [Institut de Mathématiques, Université de Toulouse, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse CEDEX 04 (France); Vicendo, Patricia; Poinsot, Véréna [Laboratoire des IMRCP, UMR 5623, Université de Toulouse, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse CEDEX 04 (France); Couderc, François, E-mail: couderc@chimie.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire des IMRCP, UMR 5623, Université de Toulouse, Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse CEDEX 04 (France)

    2016-03-17

    Pulsed lasers are widely used in capillary electrophoresis (CE) studies to provide laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. Unfortunately pulsed lasers do not give linear calibration curves over a wide range of concentrations. While this does not prevent their use in CE/LIF studies, the non-linear behavior must be understood. Using 7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC) (10–5000 nM), Tamra (10–5000 nM) and tryptophan (1–200 μM) as dyes, we observe that continuous lasers and LEDs result in linear calibration curves, while pulsed lasers give polynomial ones. The effect is seen with both visible light (530 nm) and with UV light (355 nm, 266 nm). In this work we point out the formation of byproducts induced by pulsed laser upon irradiation of 7-HC. Their separation by CE using two Zeta LIF detectors clearly shows that this process is related to the first laser detection. All of these photodegradation products can be identified by an ESI-/MS investigation and correspond to at least two 7HC dimers. By using the photodegradation model proposed by Heywood and Farnsworth (2010) and by taking into account the 7-HC results and the fact that in our system we do not have a constant concentration of fluorophore, it is possible to propose a new photochemical model of fluorescence in LIF detection. The model, like the experiment, shows that it is difficult to obtain linear quantitation curves with pulsed lasers while UV-LEDs used in continuous mode have this advantage. They are a good alternative to UV pulsed lasers. An application involving the separation and linear quantification of oligosaccharides labeled with 2-aminobezoic acid is presented using HILIC and LED (365 nm) induced fluorescence. - Highlights: • No linear calibration curves are obtained in CE/Pulsed-LIF detection. • Photodegradation and photodimerisation are responsible of this non linearity. • A mathematical model of this phenomenon is presented. • 7 hydroxycoumarin in CE/LIF is used to verify the

  19. III-nitride Photonic Integrated Circuit: Multi-section GaN Laser Diodes for Smart Lighting and Visible Light Communication

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2017-04-01

    The past decade witnessed the rapid development of III-nitride light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and laser diodes (LDs), for smart lighting, visible-light communication (VLC), optical storage, and internet-of-things. Recent studies suggested that the GaN-based LDs, which is free from efficiency droop, outperform LEDs as a viable high-power light source. Conventionally, the InGaN-based LDs are grown on polar, c-plane GaN substrates. However, a relatively low differential gain limited the device performance due to a significant polarization field in the active region. Therefore, the LDs grown on nonpolar m-plane and semipolar (2021)-plane GaN substrates are posed to deliver high-efficiency owing to the entirely or partially eliminated polarization field. To date, the smart lighting and VLC functionalities have been demonstrated based on discrete devices, such as LDs, transverse-transmission modulators, and waveguide photodetectors. The integration of III-nitride photonic components, including the light emitter, modulator, absorber, amplifier, and photodetector, towards the realization of III-nitride photonic integrated circuit (PIC) offers the advantages of small-footprint, high-speed, and low power consumption, which has yet to be investigated. This dissertation presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of the multi-section InGaN laser diodes with integrated functionalities on semipolar (2021)-plane GaN substrates for enabling such photonic integration. The blue-emitting integrated waveguide modulator-laser diode (IWM-LD) exhibits a high modulation efficiency of 2.68 dB/V. A large extinction ratio of 11.3 dB is measured in the violet-emitting IWM-LD. Utilizing an integrated absorber, a high optical power (250mW), droop-free, speckle-free, and large modulation bandwidth (560MHz) blue-emitting superluminescent diode is reported. An integrated short-wavelength semiconductor optical amplifier with the laser diode at ~404 nm is demonstrated with a large gain of 5

  20. Centering a DDR Strobe in the Middle of a Data Packet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael; Nelson, Dave; Seefeldt, James; Roper, Weston; Passow, Craig

    2014-01-01

    The Orion CEV Northstar ASIC (application- specific integrated circuit) project required a DDR (double data rate) memory bus driver/receiver (DDR PHY block) to interface with external DDR memory. The DDR interface (JESD79C) is based on a source synchronous strobe (DQS\\) that is sent along with each packet of data (DQ). New data is provided concurrently with each edge of strobe and is sent irregularly. In order to capture this data, the strobe needs to be delayed and used to latch the data into a register. A circuit solves the need for training a DDR PRY block by incorporating a PVT-compensated delay element in the strobe path. This circuit takes an external reference clock signal and uses the regular clock to calibrate a known delay through a data path. The compensated delay DQS signal is then used to capture the DQ data in a normal register. This register structure can be configured as a FIFO (first in first out), in order to transfer data from the DDR domain to the system clock domain. This design is different in that it does not rely upon the need for training the system response, nor does it use a PLL (phase locked loop) or a DLL (delay locked loop) to provide an offset of the strobe signal. The circuit is created using standard ASIC building blocks, plus the PVT (process, voltage, and temperature) compensated delay line. The design uses a globally available system clock as a reference, alleviating the need to operate synchronously with the remote memory. The reference clock conditions the PVT compensated delay line to provide a pre-determined amount of delay to any data signal that passes through this delay line. The delay line is programmed in degrees of offset, so that one could think of the clock period representing 360deg of delay. In an ideal environment, delaying the strobe 1/4 of a clock cycle (90deg) would place the strobe in the middle of the data packet. This delayed strobe can then be used to clock the data into a register, satisfying setup and

  1. STROBE-X: X-ray Timing & Spectroscopy on Dynamical Timescales from Microseconds to Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson-Hodge, C.~A.; Ray, P. S.; Maccarone, T. J.

    We describe a probe-class mission concept that provides an unprecedentedview of the X-ray sky, performing timing and 0.2-30 keV spectroscopy overtimescales from microseconds to years. The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X) comprises three primary......, with enhanced optics to take advantage of the longer focal length of STROBE-X. The second uses large-area collimated silicon drift detectors, developed for ESA's LOFT, to cover the 2-30 keV band. These two instruments each provide an order of magnitude improvement ineffective area compared with its predecessor...

  2. Generation of shock fronts in the interaction of short pulses of intense laser light in supercritical plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez V, V.E.; Ondarza R, R.

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of the laser interaction with plasma has been carried out mainly in laboratories of Europe, Japan and United States during the last decades. This studies concern the propagation of intense light laser in a non homogeneous plasma, the radiation absorption and the generation of suprathermal electrons, among others. Numerical simulations made by Denavit, for radiation pulses for up of 10 20 W/cm 2 on solid targets, have allowed to observe the generation of ionic crash fronts with high propagation speeds. In this work it is expanded the study of this effect through algorithms of particles simulation. (Author)

  3. Efficient concept generating 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light with spectrally combined tapered diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hasler, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    We propose an efficient concept increasing the power of diode laser systems in the visible spectral range. In comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, we show that spectral beam combining with subsequent sumfrequency generation enhances the available power significantly....... Combining two 1060 nm distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers (M 24σ ≤ 5.2), we achieve a 2.5-3.2 fold increase of green light with a maximum power of 3.9 Watts in a diffraction-limited beam (M 24σ ≤ 1.3). Without any further stabilization the obtained power stability is within ± 2.6 %. The electro...

  4. Pulse radiolysis based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with double-pulse injection technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jinfeng; Kondoh, Takafumi; Kozawa, Takahiro; Yoshida, Youichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2006-01-01

    A new pulse radiolysis system based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with oblique double-pulse injection was developed for studying ultrafast chemical kinetics and primary processes of radiation chemistry. The time resolution of 5.2 ps was obtained by measuring transient absorption kinetics of hydrated electrons in water. The optical density of hydrated electrons was measured as a function of the electron charge. The data indicate that the double-laser-pulse injection technique was a powerful tool for observing the transient absorptions with a good signal to noise ratio in pulse radiolysis

  5. How Stable is a Light Sail Riding on a Laser Beam?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    The Breakthrough Starshot Initiative made headlines last year when the plan was first announced to send tiny spacecraft to our nearest stellar neighbors. But just how feasible is this initiative? A new study looks at just one aspect of this plan: whether we can propel the spacecraft successfully.Propelling a FleetThe Alpha Centauri star system, which consists of Alpha (left) and Beta (right) Centauri as well as Proxima Centauri (circled). [Skatebiker]The goal behind the Breakthrough Starshot Initiative is to build a fleet of tiny, gram-scale spacecraft to travel to the Alpha Centauri star system a systemin whicha planet was recently discovered around Proxima Centauri, the star nearest to us.To propel the spacecraft, the team plans to attach a reflective sail to each one. When a high-power laser beam is pointed at that sail from Earth, the impulse of the photons bouncing off the sail can acceleratethe lightweight spacecraft to a decent fraction of the speed of light, allowing it to reach the Alpha Centauri system within decades.Among the many potential engineering challenges forsuch a mission, one interesting one is examined in a recent study by Zachary Manchester and Avi Loeb of Harvard University: how do wekeep the spacecrafts light sail centered on the laser beam long enough to accelerate it?Beam profile (left) and corresponding potential function (right) for a laser beam made up of four Gaussians. With this configuration, the potential well pushes the spacecraft back to the center if it drifts toward the edges of the well. [Manchester Loeb 2017]The Search for StabilityManchester and Loeb arguethat any slight perturbations to the light sails position relative to the laser beam in the form of random disturbances, misalignments, or manufacturing imperfections could cause it to slide off the beam, preventing it from continuing toaccelerate. Ideally, the project would use a sail that could be passively stable: the sail wants to stay centered on the beam, rather than

  6. High-space resolution imaging plate analysis of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light from tin laser-produced plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, Christopher S A; Murakami, Takehiro; Ugomori, Teruyuki; Yoshida, Kensuke; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Atarashi, Hironori; Iyoda, Tomokazu; Nagai, Keiji

    2017-03-01

    With the advent of high volume manufacturing capabilities by extreme ultraviolet lithography, constant improvements in light source design and cost-efficiency are required. Currently, light intensity and conversion efficiency (CE) measurments are obtained by charged couple devices, faraday cups etc, but also phoshpor imaging plates (IPs) (BaFBr:Eu). IPs are sensitive to light and high-energy species, which is ideal for studying extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light from laser produced plasmas (LPPs). In this work, we used IPs to observe a large angular distribution (10°-90°). We ablated a tin target by high-energy lasers (1064 nm Nd:YAG, 10 10 and 10 11 W/cm 2 ) to generate the EUV light. The europium ions in the IP were trapped in a higher energy state from exposure to EUV light and high-energy species. The light intensity was angular dependent; therefore excitation of the IP depends on the angle, and so highly informative about the LPP. We obtained high-space resolution (345 μm, 0.2°) angular distribution and grazing spectrometer (5-20 nm grate) data simultaneously at different target to IP distances (103 mm and 200 mm). Two laser systems and IP types (BAS-TR and BAS-SR) were also compared. The cosine fitting values from the IP data were used to calculate the CE to be 1.6% (SD ± 0.2) at 13.5 nm 2% bandwidth. Finally, a practical assessment of IPs and a damage issue are disclosed.

  7. Clinical comparison between the bleaching efficacy of light-emitting diode and diode laser with sodium perborate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçak, Sibel; Koçak, Mustafa Murat; Sağlam, Baran Can

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to test the efficacy of a light-emitting diode (LED) light and a diode laser, when bleaching with sodium perborate. Thirty volunteers were selected to participate in the study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. The initial colour of each tooth to be bleached was quantified with a spectrophotometer. In group A, sodium perborate and distilled water were mixed and placed into the pulp chamber, and the LED light was source applied. In group B, the same mixture was used, and the 810 nm diode laser was applied. The final colour of each tooth was quantified with the same spectrophotometer. Initial and final spectrophotometer values were recorded. Mann-Whitney U-test and Wicoxon tests were used to test differences between both groups. Both devices successfully whitened the teeth. No statistical difference was found between the efficacy of the LED light and the diode laser. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2013 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  8. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  9. An informal teaching of light and lasers through the CSIR-NLC PULSE programme

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shikwambana, L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The PULSE programme of the CSIR relates to the public understanding of laser science and engineering and the awareness of laser science and engineering to schools and tertiary institutions....

  10. Assessment of laser photobiomodulation and polarized light on the healing of cutaneous wounds on euthyroid and hypothyroid induced rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Luciana Maria Pedreira; Weyll, Barbara Mayoral Pedroso; da Costa Lino, Maíra Dória M.; Ramalho, Maria Jose Pedreira; Barbosa Pinheiro, Antonio Luis

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) or polarized light (PL) in cutaneous wound healing of hypothyroid rats at dosages of 20 or 40J/cm2. Bioestimulatory effects of Laser radiation and Polarized light are recognized alternative therapies to improve healing on systemic disease patients, but their usefulness in the improvement of hypothyroidism healing impairment is uncertain till date. Forty Wistar rats were used in this study. Hypothyroidism was propylthiouracil- induced. Standard excisional cutaneous wounds were created without suturing and LLLT (λ660nm, 30mW, φ 3mm) or PL (λ 400-2000nm, 40mW, φ 10mm) was applied every 48 hours up to seven days on experimental groups. The rats were killed on the eighth day when wound contraction was assessed. The healing features were evaluated by light microscopy (H/E and Sirius Red). The cutaneous wounds of hypothyroid rats showed delayed healing process characterized by reduced thickness of epithelial layers, incipient formation of disorganized collagen fibers and wound contraction to a lesser extent (FISHER, p=0.0276), when compared to the euthyroid group. The use of both the Laser and Polarized Light on hypothyroid rats increased the amount of fibroblasts and the thickness of collagen fibers, especially on the L 20J/cm2 group. Euthyroid rats have still demonstrated more regular collagen fibers pattern than hypothyroid rats. It was therefore concluded that hypothyroidism delays wound healing and both Laser photobiomodulation and Polarized Light at 20j/cm2 dosages had improved the healing process in hypothyroid rats.

  11. Low infra red laser light irradiation on cultured neural cells: effects on mitochondria and cell viability after oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Alessandro; Lorenzini, Luca; Gallamini, Michele; Massella, Alessandro; Giardino, Luciana; Calzà, Laura

    2009-04-15

    Considerable interest has been aroused in recent years by the well-known notion that biological systems are sensitive to visible light. With clinical applications of visible radiation in the far-red to near-infrared region of the spectrum in mind, we explored the effect of coherent red light irradiation with extremely low energy transfer on a neural cell line derived from rat pheochromocytoma. We focused on the effect of pulsed light laser irradiation vis-à-vis two distinct biological effects: neurite elongation under NGF stimulus on laminin-collagen substrate and cell viability during oxidative stress. We used a 670 nm laser, with extremely low peak power output (3 mW/cm2) and at an extremely low dose (0.45 mJ/cm2). Neurite elongation was measured over three days in culture. The effect of coherent red light irradiation on cell reaction to oxidative stress was evaluated through live-recording of mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) using JC1 vital dye and laser-confocal microscopy, in the absence (photo bleaching) and in the presence (oxidative stress) of H2O2, and by means of the MTT cell viability assay. We found that laser irradiation stimulates NGF-induced neurite elongation on a laminin-collagen coated substrate and protects PC12 cells against oxidative stress. These data suggest that red light radiation protects the viability of cell culture in case of oxidative stress, as indicated by MMP measurement and MTT assay. It also stimulates neurite outgrowth, and this effect could also have positive implications for axonal protection.

  12. Low infra red laser light irradiation on cultured neural cells: effects on mitochondria and cell viability after oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giardino Luciana

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considerable interest has been aroused in recent years by the well-known notion that biological systems are sensitive to visible light. With clinical applications of visible radiation in the far-red to near-infrared region of the spectrum in mind, we explored the effect of coherent red light irradiation with extremely low energy transfer on a neural cell line derived from rat pheochromocytoma. We focused on the effect of pulsed light laser irradiation vis-à-vis two distinct biological effects: neurite elongation under NGF stimulus on laminin-collagen substrate and cell viability during oxidative stress. Methods We used a 670 nm laser, with extremely low peak power output (3 mW/cm2 and at an extremely low dose (0.45 mJ/cm2. Neurite elongation was measured over three days in culture. The effect of coherent red light irradiation on cell reaction to oxidative stress was evaluated through live-recording of mitochondria membrane potential (MMP using JC1 vital dye and laser-confocal microscopy, in the absence (photo bleaching and in the presence (oxidative stress of H2O2, and by means of the MTT cell viability assay. Results We found that laser irradiation stimulates NGF-induced neurite elongation on a laminin-collagen coated substrate and protects PC12 cells against oxidative stress. Conclusion These data suggest that red light radiation protects the viability of cell culture in case of oxidative stress, as indicated by MMP measurement and MTT assay. It also stimulates neurite outgrowth, and this effect could also have positive implications for axonal protection.

  13. Gigabit-per-second white light-based visible light communication using near-ultraviolet laser diode and red-, green-, and blue-emitting phosphors

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Changmin

    2017-07-12

    Data communication based on white light generated using a near-ultraviolet (NUV) laser diode (LD) pumping red-, green-, and blue-emitting (RGB) phosphors was demonstrated for the first time. A III-nitride laser diode (LD) on a semipolar (2021) substrate emitting at 410 nm was used for the transmitter. The measured modulation bandwidth of the LD was 1 GHz, which was limited by the avalanche photodetector. The emission from the NUV LD and the RGB phosphor combination measured a color rendering index (CRI) of 79 and correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4050 K, indicating promise of this approach for creating high quality white lighting. Using this configuration, data was successfully transmitted at a rate of more than 1 Gbps. This NUV laser-based system is expected to have lower background noise from sunlight at the LD emission wavelength than a system that uses a blue LD due to the rapid fall off in intensity of the solar spectrum in the NUV spectral region.

  14. Feedback control of laser welding based on frequency analysis of light emissions and adaptive beam shaping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrňa, Libor; Šarbort, Martin; Řeřucha, Šimon; Jedlička, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, NOV (2012), s. 784-791 ISSN 1875-3892. [LANE 2012. Laser Assisted Net Shape Engineering /7./ International Conference on Photonic Technologies. Fürth, 12.11.2012-15.12.2012] Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : laser weld ing * feedback control * frequency analysis * adaptive beam shaping Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  15. Large odd-even staggering in the very light platinum isotopes from laser spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Le Blanc, F; Cabaret, L A; Crawford, J E; Duong, H T; Genevey, J; Girod, M; Huber, G; Krieg, M; Lee, J K P; Lettry, Jacques; Lunney, M D; Obert, J; Oms, J; Peru, S; Putaux, J C; Roussière, B; Sauvage, J; Sebastian, V; Zemlyanoi, S G

    1998-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy measurements have been carried out on very neutron-deficient platinum isotopes with the COMPLIS experimental set-up on line with the ISOLDE-Booster facility. For the first time, Hg alpha -decay was exploited to extend the very light platinum chain. Using the 5d/sup 9/6s /sup 3/D/sub 3/ to 5d/sup 9/6p /sup 3/P /sub 2/ optical transition, hyperfine spectra of /sup 182,181,180,179,178/Pt and /sup 183/Pt/sup m/ were recorded for the first time. The variation of the mean square charge radius between these nuclei, the magnetic moments of the odd isotopes and the quadrupole moment of /sup 183/Pt/sup m/ were thus measured. A large deformation change between /sup 183/Pt/sup 9/ and /sup 183/Pt/sup m/, an odd-even staggering of the charge radius and a deformation drop from A=179 are clearly observed. All these results are discussed and compared with microscopic theoretical predictions using Hartree-Fock- Bogolyubov calculations using the Gogny force. (20 refs).

  16. GaN nanostructure-based light emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Annamraju Kasi

    2014-02-01

    GaN and related materials have received a lot of attention because of their applications in a number of semiconductor devices such as LEDs, laser diodes, field effect transistors, photodetectors etc. An introduction to optical phenomena in semiconductors, light emission in p-n junctions, evolution of LED technology, bandgaps of various semiconductors that are suitable for the development of LEDs are discussed first. The detailed discussion on photoluminescence of GaN nanostructures is made, since this is crucial to develop optical devices. Fabrication technology of many nanostructures of GaN such as nanowires, nanorods, nanodots, nanoparticles, nanofilms and their luminescence properties are given. Then the optical processes including ultrafast phenomena, radiative, non-radiative recombination, quantum efficiency, lifetimes of excitons in InGaN quantum well are described. The LED structures based on InGaN that give various important colors of red, blue, green, and their design considerations to optimize the output were highlighted. The recent efforts in GaN technology are updated. Finally the present challenges and future directions in this field are also pointed out.

  17. Comparative Study Between Intense Pulsed Light IPLAND Pulsed Dye Laser In The Treatment Of Striae Distensae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khalafawy, Gh.M.K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Pulsed dye laser (PDL) and Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) have been used to treat Striae Distensae (SD). Thirty patients with age ranging from 14 - 42 years were included in this study. Twenty patients were treated on one side of their bodies with PDL and on the other side with IPL while seven patients were treated on both sides by IPL and three patients were treated on both sides by PDL for five sessions with four weeks interval between sessions. Skin biopsies were stained with H and E, Masson Trichrome, Orcein, Alcian blue and anti-collagen I Α1. After both PDL and IPL treatments striae width was decreased and the texture was improved in a highly significant manners where P value was 0.001. Collagen expression was increased in a highly significant manner and P values were <0.001 and 0.004 after PDL and IPL treatments respectively. However, PDL induced expression of collagen I in a highly significant manner compared to the treatment with IPL where P values were <0.001 and 0.193 respectively. Striae rubra gave a superior response with either PDL or IPL compared to striae alba which was evaluated clinically by the width, color and texture, although the histological changes could not verify this consequence. Both PDL and IPL can enhance the clinical picture of striae through collagen stimulation therapeutic modalities

  18. The growth of human scalp hair in females using visible red light laser and LED sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzafame, Raymond J; Blanche, Raymond R; Chiacchierini, Richard P; Kazmirek, Eric R; Sklar, Jeffrey A

    2014-10-01

    Low level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to promote hair growth in males. A double-blind randomized controlled trial was undertaken to define the safety and physiologic effects of LLLT on females with androgenic alopecia. Forty-seven females (18-60 years old, Fitzpatrick I-IV, and Ludwig-Savin Baldness Scale I-2, I-3, I-4, II-1, II-2 baldness patterns) were recruited. A transition zone scalp site was selected; hairs were trimmed to 3 mm height; the area was tattooed and photographed. The active group received a "TOPHAT655" unit containing 21, 5 mW diode lasers (655 ± 5 nm) and 30 LEDS (655 ± 20 nm), in a bicycle-helmet like apparatus. The placebo group unit appeared identical, containing incandescent red lights. Patients treated at home every other day × 16 weeks (60 treatments, 67 J/cm(2) irradiance/25 minute treatment, 2.9 J dose), with follow up and photography at 16 weeks. A masked 2.85 cm(2) photographic area was evaluated by another blinded investigator. The primary endpoint was the percent increase in hair counts from baseline. Forty-two patients completed the study (24 active, 18 sham). No adverse events or side effects were reported. Baseline hair counts were 228.2 ± 133.4 (N = 18) in the sham and 209.6 ± 118.5 (N = 24) in the active group (P = 0.642). Post Treatment hair counts were 252.1 ± 143.3 (N = 18) in the sham group and 309.9 ± 166.6 (N = 24) in the active group (P = 0.235). The change in hair counts over baseline was 23.9 ± 30.1 (N = 18) in the sham group and 100.3 ± 53.4 (N = 24) in the active group (P hair increase over the duration of the study was 11.05 ± 48.30 (N = 18) for the sham group and 48.07 ± 17.61 (N = 24) for the active group (P hair growth in the active treatment group as compared to the placebo group. LLLT of the scalp at 655 nm significantly improved hair counts in women with androgenetic

  19. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology for respondent-driven sampling studies: "STROBE-RDS" statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard G; Hakim, Avi J; Salganik, Matthew J; Spiller, Michael W; Johnston, Lisa G; Kerr, Ligia; Kendall, Carl; Drake, Amy; Wilson, David; Orroth, Kate; Egger, Matthias; Hladik, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a new data collection methodology used to estimate characteristics of hard-to-reach groups, such as the HIV prevalence in drug users. Many national public health systems and international organizations rely on RDS data. However, RDS reporting quality and available reporting guidelines are inadequate. We carried out a systematic review of RDS studies and present Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology for RDS Studies (STROBE-RDS), a checklist of essential items to present in RDS publications, justified by an explanation and elaboration document. We searched the MEDLINE (1970-2013), EMBASE (1974-2013), and Global Health (1910-2013) databases to assess the number and geographical distribution of published RDS studies. STROBE-RDS was developed based on STROBE guidelines, following Guidance for Developers of Health Research Reporting Guidelines. RDS has been used in over 460 studies from 69 countries, including the USA (151 studies), China (70), and India (32). STROBE-RDS includes modifications to 12 of the 22 items on the STROBE checklist. The two key areas that required modification concerned the selection of participants and statistical analysis of the sample. STROBE-RDS seeks to enhance the transparency and utility of research using RDS. If widely adopted, STROBE-RDS should improve global infectious diseases public health decision making. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology for respondent-driven sampling studies: “STROBE-RDS” statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard G.; Hakim, Avi J.; Salganik, Matthew J.; Spiller, Michael W.; Johnston, Lisa G.; Kerr, Ligia; Kendall, Carl; Drake, Amy; Wilson, David; Orroth, Kate; Egger, Matthias; Hladik, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a new data collection methodology used to estimate characteristics of hard-to-reach groups, such as the HIV prevalence in drug users. Many national public health systems and international organizations rely on RDS data. However, RDS reporting quality and available reporting guidelines are inadequate. We carried out a systematic review of RDS studies and present Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology for RDS Studies (STROBE-RDS), a checklist of essential items to present in RDS publications, justified by an explanation and elaboration document. Study Design and Setting We searched the MEDLINE (1970–2013), EMBASE (1974–2013), and Global Health (1910–2013) databases to assess the number and geographical distribution of published RDS studies. STROBE-RDS was developed based on STROBE guidelines, following Guidance for Developers of Health Research Reporting Guidelines. Results RDS has been used in over 460 studies from 69 countries, including the USA (151 studies), China (70), and India (32). STROBE-RDS includes modifications to 12 of the 22 items on the STROBE checklist. The two key areas that required modification concerned the selection of participants and statistical analysis of the sample. Conclusion STROBE-RDS seeks to enhance the transparency and utility of research using RDS. If widely adopted, STROBE-RDS should improve global infectious diseases public health decision making. PMID:26112433

  1. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  2. Evidence-based assessment of the efficacy and effectiveness of light/laser activation in in-office dental bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem A Ajaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many in-office bleaching techniques use the light/laser in conjunction with the bleaching agent claiming more favorable bleaching results. Controversy still exists in the literature as to the role of a light/laser in bleaching results. The goal of this study is to determine, through Comparative Effectiveness-Efficacy Research and Analysis for Practice (CEERAP, if the co-use of light/laser activation with the chemical bleaching agent has improved teeth whitening compared to using the chemical bleaching agent alone. Systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials on the research question were obtained using multiple search engines. Assessment of the level and quality of evidence and acceptable sample analysis were performed for the Randomized Clinical Trials (RCTs. Due to heterogeneity of the acceptable studies, meta-analysis was performed only on the two most homogenous studies. Qualitative assessment of the acceptable studies was performed. The strength of clinical recommendation was assessed. Only one qualitative systematic review was found. Eight articles were accepted as high quality RCTs. The meta-analysis shows preferable outcome when using the light activation with the bleaching material than when using the bleaching material alone. Qualitative assessment of the acceptable studies shows conflicting results. Most studies agreed that the use of light is proven to increase the whitening effect of the bleaching agent, especially for a short term after treatment. Additional studies with greater consistency in methodology and outcomes are needed to be able to reach a definite consensus regarding the effectiveness of using light during bleaching through an overarching meta-analysis for more powerful statistical results.

  3. Using the STROBE statement to assess reporting in blindness prevalence surveys in low and middle income countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Ramke

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional blindness prevalence surveys are essential to plan and monitor eye care services. Incomplete or inaccurate reporting can prevent effective translation of research findings. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE statement is a 32 item checklist developed to improve reporting of observational studies. The aim of this study was to assess the completeness of reporting in blindness prevalence surveys in low and middle income countries (LMICs using STROBE.MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science databases were searched on April 8 2016 to identify cross-sectional blindness prevalence surveys undertaken in LMICs and published after STROBE was published in December 2007. The STROBE tool was applied to all included studies, and each STROBE item was categorized as 'yes' (met criteria, 'no' (did not meet criteria or 'not applicable'. The 'Completeness of reporting (COR score' for each manuscript was calculated: COR score = yes / [yes + no]. In journals with included studies the instructions to authors and reviewers were checked for reference to STROBE.The 89 included studies were undertaken in 32 countries and published in 37 journals. The mean COR score was 60.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 58.1-63.7%; range 30.8-88.9%. The mean COR score did not differ between surveys published in journals with author instructions referring to STROBE (10/37 journals; 61.1%, 95%CI 56.4-65.8% or in journals where STROBE was not mentioned (60.9%, 95%CI 57.4-64.3%; p = 0.93.While reporting in blindness prevalence surveys is strong in some areas, others need improvement. We recommend that more journals adopt the STROBE checklist and ensure it is used by authors and reviewers.

  4. Using the STROBE statement to assess reporting in blindness prevalence surveys in low and middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramke, Jacqueline; Palagyi, Anna; Jordan, Vanessa; Petkovic, Jennifer; Gilbert, Clare E

    2017-01-01

    Cross-sectional blindness prevalence surveys are essential to plan and monitor eye care services. Incomplete or inaccurate reporting can prevent effective translation of research findings. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement is a 32 item checklist developed to improve reporting of observational studies. The aim of this study was to assess the completeness of reporting in blindness prevalence surveys in low and middle income countries (LMICs) using STROBE. MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science databases were searched on April 8 2016 to identify cross-sectional blindness prevalence surveys undertaken in LMICs and published after STROBE was published in December 2007. The STROBE tool was applied to all included studies, and each STROBE item was categorized as 'yes' (met criteria), 'no' (did not meet criteria) or 'not applicable'. The 'Completeness of reporting (COR) score' for each manuscript was calculated: COR score = yes / [yes + no]. In journals with included studies the instructions to authors and reviewers were checked for reference to STROBE. The 89 included studies were undertaken in 32 countries and published in 37 journals. The mean COR score was 60.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 58.1-63.7%; range 30.8-88.9%). The mean COR score did not differ between surveys published in journals with author instructions referring to STROBE (10/37 journals; 61.1%, 95%CI 56.4-65.8%) or in journals where STROBE was not mentioned (60.9%, 95%CI 57.4-64.3%; p = 0.93). While reporting in blindness prevalence surveys is strong in some areas, others need improvement. We recommend that more journals adopt the STROBE checklist and ensure it is used by authors and reviewers.

  5. Fiber-Coupled Planar Light-Wave Circuit for Seed Laser Control in High Spectral Resolution Lidar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Anthony; McNeil, Shirley; Switzer, Gregg; Battle, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Precise laser remote sensing of aerosol extinction and backscatter in the atmosphere requires a high-power, pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser that is wavelength- stabilized to a narrow absorption line such as found in iodine vapor. One method for precise wavelength control is to injection seed the Nd:YAG laser with a low-power CW laser that is stabilized by frequency converting a fraction of the beam to 532 nm, and to actively frequency-lock it to an iodine vapor absorption line. While the feasibility of this approach has been demonstrated using bulk optics in NASA Langley s Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) program, an ideal, lower cost solution is to develop an all-waveguide, frequency-locked seed laser in a compact, robust package that will withstand the temperature, shock, and vibration levels associated with airborne and space-based remote sensing platforms. A key technology leading to this miniaturization is the integration of an efficient waveguide frequency doubling element, and a low-voltage phase modulation element into a single, monolithic, planar light-wave circuit (PLC). The PLC concept advances NASA's future lidar systems due to its compact, efficient and reliable design, thus enabling use on small aircraft and satellites. The immediate application for this technology is targeted for NASA Langley's HSRL system for aerosol and cloud characterization. This Phase I effort proposes the development of a potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) waveguide phase modulator for future integration into a PLC. For this innovation, the proposed device is the integration of a waveguide-based frequency doubler and phase modulator in a single, fiber pigtail device that will be capable of efficient second harmonic generation of 1,064-nm light and subsequent phase modulation of the 532 nm light at 250 MHz, providing a properly spectrally formatted beam for HSRL s seed laser locking system. Fabrication of the integrated PLC chip for NASA Langley, planned for

  6. Photoelectrolysis of water at high current density - Use of laser light excitation of semiconductor-based photoelectrochemical cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrighton, M. S.; Bocarsley, A. B.; Bolts, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    In the present paper, some results are given for UV laser light irradiation of the photoanode (SnO2, SrTiO3, or TiO2) in a cell for the light-driven electrolysis of H2O, at radiation intensities of up to 380 W/sq cm. The properties of the anode material are found to be independent of light intensity. Conversion of UV light to stored chemical energy in the form of 2H2/O2 from H2O was driven at a rate of up to 30 W/sq cm. High O2 evolution rates at the irradiated anodes without changes in the current-voltage curves are attributed to the excess oxidizing power associated with photogenerated holes. A test for this sort of hypothesis for H2 evolution at p-type materials is proposed.

  7. Relationship of light-output nonlinearities and light-output spikes in proton-bombarded stripe-geometry double-heterostructure (Al,Ga)As lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.W.; Joyce, W.B.; Miller, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    By using a fast photodetector and a simple spatial filtering technique, the relationship between the optical spike which frequently appears at the leading edge of a pulsed-GaAs-laser response and the optical nonlinearities called kinks has been investigated. It is suggested that the spike can be viewed consistently as a transition period during which the lasing mode distortion, which has been previously associated with kinks, occurs. It is the time taken for the kink to become established. During the spike, light emisson occurs with a spatial and angular intensity distribution consistent with the lasing which would be appropriate if the kink did not exist. It is shown that the experimental technique can also be used to investigate sustained laser optical-intensity oscillations

  8. Can an LED-laser hybrid light help to decrease hydrogen peroxide concentration while maintaining effectiveness in teeth bleaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, J.; Ovies, N.; Cisternas, P.; Fernández, E.; Oliveira Junior, O. B.; de Andrade, M. F.; Moncada, G.; Vildósola, P.

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the bleaching efficacy of 35% hydrogen peroxide and 15% hydrogen peroxide with nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide catalysed by an LED-laser hybrid light. We studied 70 patients randomized to two groups. Tooth shade and pulpal sensitivity were registered. Group 1: 15% hydrogen peroxide with nitrogen-doped titanium dioxide. Group 2: 35% hydrogen peroxide. Both groups were activated by an LED-laser light. No significant differences were seen in shade change immediately, one week or one month after treatment (p > 0.05). Differences were seen in pulpal sensitivity (p concentration with similar aesthetic results and less pulpal sensitivity than using 35% hydrogen peroxide for bleaching teeth.

  9. Rhodamine B as an optical thermometer in cells focally exposed to infrared laser light or nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, David; Lefort, Claire; Burke, Ryan; Leveque, Philippe; O'Connor, Rodney P

    2015-10-01

    The temperature-dependent fluorescence property of Rhodamine B was used to measure changes in temperature at the cellular level induced by either infrared laser light exposure or high intensity, ultrashort pulsed electric fields. The thermal impact of these stimuli were demonstrated at the cellular level in time and contrasted with the change in temperature observed in the extracellular bath. The method takes advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the fluorescent dye Rhodamine B which has a quantum yield linearly dependent on temperature. The thermal effects of different temporal pulse applications of infrared laser light exposure and of nanosecond pulsed electric fields were investigated. The temperature increase due to the application of nanosecond pulsed electric fields was demonstrated at the cellular level.

  10. A setup for resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Schreck, Simon; Foehlisch, Alexander [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24/25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Rajkovic, Ivan; Quevedo, Wilson; Gruebel, Sebastian; Scholz, Mirko [IFG Structural Dynamics of (Bio)chemical Systems, Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37070 Goettingen (Germany); Eckert, Sebastian; Beye, Martin; Suljoti, Edlira; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kalus, Christian [Abteilung Betrieb Beschleuniger BESSYII, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Nordlund, Dennis [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J. [PULSE Institute, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J. [Linac Coherent Light Source, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kennedy, Brian [MAX-lab, PO Box 118, 221 00 Lund (Sweden); and others

    2012-12-15

    We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak fluences which currently sets a limit to maximum attainable count rate at FELs. The setup presented here opens up new possibilities to study the structure and dynamics in liquids.

  11. STROBE-X: X-ray timing and spectroscopy on dynamical timescales from microseconds to years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Ray, Paul S.; Gendreau, Keith; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Feroci, Marco; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Brandt, Soren; Hernanz, Margarita; Hui, C. Michelle; Jenke, Peter A.; Maccarone, Thomas; Remillard, Ron; Wood, Kent; Zane, Silvia; Strobe-X Collaboration

    The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X) probes strong gravity for stellar mass to supermassive black holes and ultradense matter with unprecedented effective area, high time-resolution, and good spectral resolution, while providing a powerful time-domain X-ray observatory.

  12. [The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G; Egger, Matthias; Pocock, Stuart J; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Vandenbroucke, Jan P

    2008-01-01

    Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September, 2004, with methodologists, researchers, and journal editors to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed explanation and elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the websites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies.

  13. [The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology [STROBE] statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G; Egger, Matthias; Pocock, Stuart J; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Vandenbroucke, Jan P

    2008-01-01

    Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September, 2004, with methodologists, researchers, and journal editors to draft a che-cklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed explanation and elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the websites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies.

  14. STROBE-X: X-Ray Timing and Spectroscopy on Dynamical Timescales from Microseconds to Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Ray, Paul S.; Gendreau, Keith C.

    2017-01-01

    The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X) probes strong gravity for stellar mass to supermassive black holes and ultradense matter with unprecedented effective area, high time-resolution, and good spectral resolution, while providing a powerful time...

  15. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G; Egger, Matthias; Pocock, Stuart J; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Vandenbroucke, Jan P

    2014-12-01

    Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September 2004, with methodologists, researchers, and journal editors to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE Statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed Explanation and Elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the Web sites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE Statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik von Elm

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE Initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September 2004, with methodologists, researchers, and journal editors to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE Statement that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed Explanation and Elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the Web sites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE Statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies.

  17. Light emitting polymer blends and diffractive optical elements in high-speed direct laser writing of microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyal, H; Waddie, A J; Taghizadeh, M R; McCarthy, A; Walker, A C; Mackintosh, A R; Kuehne, A J C; Pethrick, R A; Gu, E; Dawson, M D; Bradley, D D C

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a series of improvements that have been made to our direct laser writing waveguide/microfluidic fabrication technology. We demonstrate significant increases in the writing speed (measured in micrometres of written structure per second) by both the use of customized photopolymers containing light emitting polymer and the inclusion of a diffractive optical element to enable the writing of multiple channels in a single pass

  18. Fragmentation of neutral van der Waals clusters with visible laser light: A new variant of the Raman effect?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stamatovic, A.; Howorka, F.; Scheier, P.; Maerk, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    We have observed strong photodissociation (using visible laser light) of neutral van der Waals clusters (Ar, N 2 , O 2 , CO 2 , SO 2 , NH 3 ) produced by supersonic expansion and detected by electron ionization/mass spectrometer. Several tests were performed, all of them supporting this surprising discovery. We suggest that Raman induced photodissociation (RIP) is responsible for this phenomenon. This first observation of Raman induced photodissociation provides a new technique for the study of neutral van der Waals clusters. (orig.)

  19. Frequency-swept laser light source at 1050 nm with higher bandwidth due to multiple semiconductor optical amplifiers in series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschall, Sebastian; Thrane, Lars; Andersen, Peter E.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the development of an all-fiber frequency-swept laser light source in the 1050 nm range based on semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) with improved bandwidth due to multiple gain media. It is demonstrated that even two SOAs with nearly equal gain spectra can improve the performance......Hz) the SSOA configuration can maintain a significantly higher bandwidth (~50% higher) compared to the MOPA architecture. Correspondingly narrower point spread functions can be generated in a Michelson interferometer....

  20. FDA MAUDE data on complications with lasers, light sources, and energy-based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremaine, Anne Marie; Avram, Mathew M

    2015-02-01

    It is essential for physicians to be fully informed regarding adverse events and malfunctions associated with medical devices that occur in routine practice. There is limited information on this important issue in the medical literature, and it is mostly based on initial studies and case reports. More advanced knowledge regarding device adverse events is necessary to guide physicians towards providing safe treatments. The FDA requires that manufacturers and device users submit medical device reports (MDRs) for suspected injuries from device use or malfunction. The database of MDRs, entitled Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) enables the FDA to monitor device performance and identify potential safety issues. We employed the following search strategy to identify reported adverse events. We searched the MAUDE electronic database on the FDA website in December 2013: http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfmaude/search.cfm We collected all reported cases between 1991 and December 2013. The search terms utilized included a comprehensive list of device manufacturers, specific product names, and the wavelengths/technology of the devices used in the field of dermatology. Our search yielded 1257 MDRs. Forty-five MDRs were excluded due to insufficient data. The data is broken down into the adverse events observed, such as, but not limited to: blistering, burns, scarring, dyschromia, fat loss, and nerve palsy. The MDRs describe the adverse event and attempt to determine if it was related to device malfunction versus operator error. Radiofrequency devices, diode lasers, and intense pulsed light devices were the most commonly reported devices related to injuries. 1257 MDRs, from a myriad of devices used in dermatology, have been reported to the FDA as of December 2013. Despite the underreporting of adverse events, the MAUDE database is an untapped resource of post-market surveillance of medical devices. The database can offer additional

  1. Numerical investigation of the self-focusing of broad-bandwidth laser light with applied angular dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenty, P. W.; Skupsky, S.; Kelly, J. H.; Cotton, C. T.

    1994-08-01

    The self-focusing of phase-modulated broad-bandwidth (BBW) laser light, in which the spectral components are angularly dispersed to produce smoothing of laser nonuniformities, is analyzed. A multifrequency, multidimensional computer code has been developed to simulate the propagation of angularly dispersed BBW light within a nonlinear medium. Earlier work has shown that the self-focusing behavior of phase-modulated BBW light without angular dispersion is insignificantly different from that of monochromatic beams. With the addition of angular dispersion, pure phase modulation cannot be maintained during propagation, and the beam becomes subject to the development of spatial amplitude modulation which moves across the beam in time. Instantaneously, this amplitude modulation will begin to self-focus in a nonlinear medium. However, when examined over one period of the phase modulation, the time-integrated intensity (TII) due to the angularly dispersed BBW beam is consistently smooth, regardless of the amount of propagation modulation or self-focusing growth present in the instantaneous profile. Similarly, the angular dispersion will produce a time-dependent deflection of any amplitude modulation on the beam produced by laser defects. Because the focus of the modulation is enlarged due to the deflection, the TII of this amplitude structure is found to be less than that for a monochromatic beam.

  2. All fiber cladding mode stripper with uniform heat distribution and high cladding light loss manufactured by CO2 laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebali, M. A.; Basso, E. T.

    2018-02-01

    Cladding mode strippers are primarily used at the end of a fiber laser cavity to remove high-power excess cladding light without inducing core loss and beam quality degradation. Conventional manufacturing methods of cladding mode strippers include acid etching, abrasive blasting or laser ablation. Manufacturing of cladding mode strippers using laser ablation consist of removing parts of the cladding by fused silica ablation with a controlled penetration and shape. We present and characterize an optimized cladding mode stripper design that increases the cladding light loss with a minimal device length and manufacturing time. This design reduces the localized heat generation by improving the heat distribution along the device. We demonstrate a cladding mode stripper written on a 400um fiber with cladding light loss of 20dB, with less than 0.02dB loss in the core and minimal heating of the fiber and coating. The manufacturing process of the designed component is fully automated and takes less than 3 minutes with a very high throughput yield.

  3. Tritium Decontamination of TFTR D-T Graphite Tiles Employing Ultra Violet Light and a Nd:YAG Laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Skinner, C.H.; Young, K.M.; Ciebiera, L.

    1999-01-01

    The use of an ultra violet (UV) light source (wavelength = 172 nm) and a Nd:YAG Laser for the decontamination of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) deuterium-tritium (D-T) tiles will be investigated at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The development of this form of tritium decontamination may be useful for future D-T burning fusion devices which employ carbon plasma-facing components on the first wall. Carbon tiles retain hydrogen isotopes, and the in-situ tritium decontamination of carbon can be extremely important in maintaining resident in-vessel tritium inventory to a minimum. A test chamber has been designed and fabricated at PPPL. The chamber has the ability to be maintained under vacuum, be baked to 200 *C, and provides sample ports for gas analyses. Tiles from TFTR that have been exposed to D-T plasmas will be placed within the chamber and exposed to either an UV light source or the ND:YAG Laser. The experiment will determine the effectiveness of these two techniques for the removal of tritium. In addition, exposure rates and scan times for the UV light source and/or Nd:YAG Laser will be determined for tritium removal optimization from D-T tiles

  4. Evaluation of the Quality of Reporting of Observational Studies in Otorhinolaryngology - Based on the STROBE Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksma, Martine; Joosten, Michiel H M A; Peters, Jeroen P M; Grolman, Wilko; Stegeman, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies are the most frequently published studies in literature. When randomized controlled trials cannot be conducted because of ethical or practical considerations, an observational study design is the first choice. The STROBE Statement (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology) was developed to provide guidance on how to adequately report observational studies. The objectives were 1) to evaluate the quality of reporting of observational studies of otorhinolaryngologic literature using the STROBE Statement checklist, 2) to compare the quality of reporting of observational studies in the top 5 Ear, Nose, Throat (ENT) journals versus the top 5 general medical journals and 3) to formulate recommendations to improve adequate reporting of observational research in otorhinolaryngologic literature. The top 5 general medical journals and top 5 otorhinolaryngologic journals were selected based on their ISI Web of Knowledge impact factors. On August 3rd, 2015, we performed a PubMed search using different filters to retrieve observational articles from these journals. Studies were selected from 2010 to 2014 for the general medical journals and from 2015 for the ENT journals. We assessed all STROBE items to examine how many items were reported adequately for each journal type. The articles in the top 5 general medical journals (n = 11) reported a mean of 69.2% (95% confidence interval (CI): 65.8%-72.7%; median 70.6%), whereas the top 5 ENT journals (n = 29) reported a mean of 51.4% (95% CI: 47.7%-55.0%; median 50.0%). The two journal types reported STROBE items significantly different (p STROBE Statement.

  5. Methods and processes of developing the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary (STROBE-Vet) statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sargeant, J. M.; O'Connor, A. M.; Dohoo, I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reporting of observational studies in veterinary research presents challenges that often are not addressed in published reporting guidelines.Objective: To develop an extension of the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement that addresses...... a pre-meeting survey about whether items in the STROBE statement should be added to or modified to address unique issues related to observational studies in animal species with health, production, welfare, or food safety outcomes. During the meeting, each STROBE item was discussed to determine whether...... or not re-wording was recommended and whether additions were warranted. Anonymous voting was used to determine consensus.Results: Six items required no modifications or additions. Modifications or additions were made to the STROBE items 1 (title and abstract), 3 (objectives), 5 (setting), 6 (participants...

  6. Intense pulsed light, near infrared pulsed light, and fractional laser combination therapy for skin rejuvenation in Asian subjects: a prospective multi-center study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Wu, Jiaqiang; Qian, Hui; Lu, Zhong; Li, Yuanhong; Wang, Weizhen; Zhao, Xiaozhong; Tu, Ping; Yin, Rui; Xiang, Leihong

    2015-09-01

    Ablative skin rejuvenation therapies have limitations for Asian people, including post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation and long down time. Non-ablative lasers are safer but have limited efficacy. This study is to investigate the safety and efficacy of a combination therapy consisting of intense pulsed light (IPL), near infrared (NIR) light, and fractional erbium YAG (Er:YAG) laser for skin rejuvenation in Asian people. This study recruited 113 subjects from six sites in China. Subjects were randomly assigned to a full-face group, who received combination therapy, and split-face groups, in which one half of the face received combination therapy and the other half received IPL monotherapy. Each subject received five treatment sessions during a period of 90 days. Subjects were followed up at 1 and 3 months post last treatment. Three months after last treatment, the full-face group (n = 57) had a global improvement rate of 29 % and 29 % for wrinkles, 32 % for skin texture, 33 % for pigment spots, 28 % for pore size, respectively. For patients in the split-face groups (n = 54), monotherapy side had a global improvement rate of 23 % and 20 % for wrinkles, 27 % for skin texture, 25 % for pigment spots, 25 % for pore size, respectively. Both combination therapy and monotherapy resulted in significant improvements at the follow-up visits compared to baseline (P skin rejuvenation in Asian people.

  7. Ponderomotive dressing of doubly-excited states with intensity-controlled laser light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We laser-dress several doubly-excited states in helium. Tuning the coupling-laser intensity from perturbative to the strong-coupling regime, we are able to measure phases imprinted on the two-electron wavefunctions, and observe a new continuum coupling mechanism.

  8. Pulpal blood flow recorded from exposed dentine with a laser Doppler flow meter using red or infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijsamanmith, Kanittha; Vongsavan, Noppakun; Matthews, Bruce

    2018-03-01

    To determine the percentage of the blood flow signal that is derived from dental pulp when recording from exposed dentine in a human premolar. Recordings were made from 7 healthy teeth in 5 subjects (aged 22-33 yr.) with a laser Doppler flow meter (Periflux 4001) using either a red (635 nm) or an infrared (780 nm) laser. After exposing dentine above the buccal pulpal horn (cavity diam. 1.6 mm, depth 3 mm) and isolating the crown with opaque rubber dam, blood flow was recorded alternately with infrared or red light from the exposed dentine under four conditions: before and after injecting local anaesthetic (3% Mepivacaine without vasoconstrictor) (LA) over the apex of the root of the tooth; after exposing the pulp by cutting a buccal, class V cavity in the tooth; and after sectioning the coronal pulp transversely through the exposure. There was no significant change in mean blood flow recorded with either light source when the tooth was anaesthetized or when the pulp was exposed. After the pulp had been sectioned, the blood flow recorded with infrared light fell by 67.8% and with red light, by 68.4%. The difference between these effects was not significant. When recording blood flow from exposed coronal dentine with either infrared or red light in a tooth isolated with opaque rubber dam, about 68% to the signal was contributed by the pulp. The signal:noise ratio was better with infrared than red light, and when recording from dentine than enamel. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Semipolar InGaN quantum-well laser diode with integrated amplifier for visible light communications

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2018-02-14

    GaN-based semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) and its integration with laser diode (LD) is an essential building block yet to be demonstrated for III-nitride photonic integrated circuits (PICs) at visible wavelength. This paper presents the InGaN/GaN quantum well (QW) based dual-section LD consisting of integrated amplifier and laser gain regions fabricated on a semipolar GaN substrate. The threshold current in the laser gain region was favorably reduced from 229mA to 135mA at SOA driving voltages, VSOA, of 0V and 6.25V, respectively. The amplification effect was measured based on a large gain of 5.7 dB at VSOA = 6.25V from the increased optical output power of 8.2 mW to 30.5 mW. Such integrated amplifier can be modulated to achieve Gbps data communication using on-off keying technique. The monolithically integrated amplifier-LD paves the way towards the III-nitride on-chip photonic system, providing a compact, low-cost, and multi-functional solution for applications such as smart lighting and visible light communications.

  10. A unique color converter architecture enabling phosphor-in-glass (PiG) films suitable for high-power and high-luminance laser-driven white lighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Peng; Li, Shuxing; Wang, Le; Zhou, Tianliang; You, Shihai; Takeda, Takashi; Hirosaki, Naoto; Xie, Rong-Jun

    2018-04-11

    As a next-generation high-power lighting technology, laser lighting has attracted great attention in high-luminance applications. However, thermally robust and highly efficient color converters suitable for high-quality laser lighting are scarce. Despite of its versatility, the phosphor-in-glass (PiG) has been seldomly applied in laser lighting due to its low thermal conductivity. In this work, we develop a unique architecture that a phosphor-in-glass (PiG) film was directly sintered on a high thermally conductive sapphire substrate coated by one-dimensional photonic crystals (1DPCs). The designed color converter with the composite architecture exhibits an excellent packaging efficiency up to ~90%. Under a high power blue laser excitation (11.2 Wmm-2), the color converter gives a uniform white light with a high luminance of 845 Mcdm-2 (luminous flux: 1839 lm). A high color rendering index (CRI) of 74 is attained by adding a robust orange or red phosphor layer to the architecture. These outstanding properties meet the standards of vehicle regulations, enabling the PiG films with the composite architecture to be applied in automotive lighting or other high-power and high-luminance laser lighting.

  11. Manipulating femtosecond laser interactions in bulk glass and thin-film with spatial light modulation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadian, Ehsan; Ho, Stephen; Ertorer, Erden; Gherghe, Sebastian; Li, Jianzhao; Herman, Peter R.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial Light Modulators (SLM) are emerging as a power tool for laser beam shaping whereby digitally addressed phase shifts can impose computer-generated hologram patterns on incoming laser light. SLM provide several additional advantages with ultrashort-pulsed lasers in controlling the shape of both surface and internal interactions with materials. Inside transparent materials, nonlinear optical effects can confine strong absorption only to the focal volume, extend dissipation over long filament tracks, or reach below diffraction-limited spot sizes. Hence, SLM beam shaping has been widely adopted for laser material processing applications that include parallel structuring, filamentation, fiber Bragg grating formation and optical aberration correction. This paper reports on a range of SLM applications we have studied in femtosecond processing of transparent glasses and thin films. Laser phase-fronts were tailored by the SLM to compensate for spherical surface aberration, and to further address the nonlinear interactions that interplay between Kerr-lens self-focusing and plasma defocusing effects over shallow and deep focusing inside the glass. Limits of strong and weak focusing were examined around the respective formation of low-loss optical waveguides and long uniform filament tracks. Further, we have employed the SLM for beam patterning inside thin film, exploring the limits of phase noise, resolution and fringe contrast during interferometric intra-film structuring. Femtosecond laser pulses of 200 fs pulse duration and 515 nm wavelength were shaped by a phase-only LCOS-SLM (Hamamatsu X10468-04). By imposing radial phase profiles, axicon, grating and beam splitting gratings, volume shape control of filament diameter, length, and uniformity as well as simultaneous formation of multiple filaments has been demonstrated. Similarly, competing effects of spherical surface aberration, self-focusing, and plasma de-focusing were studied and delineated to enable formation

  12. Explanation and Elaboration Document for the STROBE-Vet Statement: Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-Veterinary Extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, A.M.; Sargeant, J.M.; Dohoo, I.R.

    2016-01-01

    The STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement was first published in 2007 and again in 2014. The purpose of the original STROBE was to provide guidance for authors, reviewers, and editors to improve the comprehensiveness of reporting; however, STROBE...... has a unique focus on observational studies. Although much of the guidance provided by the original STROBE document is directly applicable, it was deemed useful to map those statements to veterinary concepts, provide veterinary examples, and highlight unique aspects of reporting in veterinary...... observational studies. Here, we present the examples and explanations for the checklist items included in the STROBE-Vet statement. Thus, this is a companion document to the STROBE-Vet statement methods and process document (JVIM_14575 “Methods and Processes of Developing the Strengthening the Reporting...

  13. Single-frequency blue light generation by single-pass sum-frequency generation in a coupled ring cavity tapered laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    A generic approach for generation of tunable single frequency light is presented. 340 mW of near diffraction limited, single-frequency, and tunable blue light around 459 nm is generated by sum-frequency generation (SFG) between two tunable tapered diode lasers. One diode laser is operated in a ring...... cavity and another tapered diode laser is single-passed through a nonlinear crystal which is contained in the coupled ring cavity. Using this method, the single-pass conversion efficiency is more than 25%. In contrast to SFG in an external cavity, the system is entirely self-stabilized with no electronic...

  14. Analysis of peripheral thermal damage after laser irradiation of dentin using polarized light microscopy and synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Rosa, Alfredo; Sarma, Anupama V.; Le, Charles Q.; Jones, Robert S.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    It is necessary to minimize peripheral thermal damage during laser irradiation, since thermal damage to collagen and mineral compromises the bond strength to restorative materials in dentin and inhibits healing and osteointegration in bone. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that lasers resonant to the specific absorption of water, collagen, and hydroxyapatite with pulse durations less than the thermal relaxation times at each respective laser wavelength will efficiently remove dentin with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Precise incisions were produced in 3 x 3 mm2 blocks of human dentin using CO2 (9.6 μm), Er:YSGG (2.79 μm), and Nd:YAG (355 nm) lasers with and without a computer controlled water spray. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography was used to obtain optical cross-sections of each incision to determine the rate and efficiency of ablation. The peripheral thermal damage zone around each incision was analyzed using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and Synchrotron-Radiation Fourier Transform Infrared Spectro-microscopy (SR-FTIR). Thermally induced chemical changes to both mineral and the collagen matrix was observed with SR-FTIR with a 10-μm spatial resolution and those changes were correlated with optical changes observed with PLM. Minimal (alveolar bone.

  15. Light propagation studies on laser modified waveguides using scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrise, X.; Berini, Abadal Gabriel; Jimenez, D.

    2001-01-01

    microscope (SNOM) has been used. The laser modifications locally changes the optical properties of the waveguide. The change in the effective refractive index is attributed to a TE to TM mode conversion, Thus, the laser modification might be a new way to fabricate optical mode converters.......By means of direct laser writing on Al, a new method to locally modify optical waveguides is proposed. This technique has been applied to silicon nitride waveguides, allowing modifications of the optical propagation along the guide. To study the formed structures, a scanning near-held optical...

  16. Sharp edge broad-band lasers for ``white-light`` cooling in storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atutov, S.N.; Calabrese, R.; Guidi, V.; Lenisa, P.; Petruio, S. [Ferrara Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Ferrara (Italy); Mariotti, E.; Moi, L. [INFM, Siena (Italy)]|[Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Siena (Italy)

    1997-04-01

    We have developed broad-band laser sources which show a sharp edge in their spectra and are particularly suitable for ``white-laser`` cooling of ions in storage rings. They allow for a very large velocity capture range by maintaining the same cooling rate allowed by the single mode lasers. A large fraction of the circulating ions are expected to be cooled both in coasting and bunched beams. The device, which does not use an active medium, can easily operate at any frequency from UV to IR spectral region. (orig.). 13 refs.

  17. Generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser in a cascade of nonlinear crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Kragh; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Sumpf, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    frequency conversion of infrared tapered diode lasers. Here, we describe the generation of 3.5 W of diffraction-limited green light from SHG of a single tapered diode laser, itself yielding 10 W at 1063 nm. This SHG is performed in single pass through a cascade of two PPMgO:LN crystals with re...... power of 3.5 W corresponds to a power enhancement greater than 2 compared to SHG in each of the crystals individually and is the highest visible output power generated by frequency conversion of a single diode laser. Such laser sources provide the necessary pump power for biophotonics applications...

  18. Effect of radiant heat on conventional glass ionomer cements during setting by using a blue light diode laser system (445 nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionysopoulos, Dimitrios; Tolidis, Kosmas; Strakas, Dimitrios; Gerasimou, Paris; Sfeikos, Thrasyvoulos; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of radiant heat on surface hardness of three conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) by using a blue diode laser system (445 nm) and a light-emitting diode (LED) unit. Additionally, the safety of the laser treatment was evaluated. Thirty disk-shaped specimens were prepared of each tested GIC (Equia Fil, Ketac Universal Aplicap and Riva Self Cure). The experimental groups (n = 10) of the study were as follows: group 1 was the control group of the study; in group 2, the specimens were irradiated for 60 s at the top surface using a LED light-curing unit; and in group 3, the specimens were irradiated for 60 s at the top surface using a blue light diode laser system (445 nm). Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests at a level of significance of a = 0.05. Radiant heat treatments, with both laser and LED devices, increased surface hardness (p diode laser treatment was seemed to be more effective compared to LED treatment. There were no alterations in surface morphology or chemical composition after laser treatment. The tested radiant heat treatment with a blue diode laser may be advantageous for the longevity of GIC restorations. The safety of the use of blue diode laser for this application was confirmed.

  19. Nonlinear threshold effect in the Z-scan method of characterizing limiters for high-intensity laser light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tereshchenko, S. A., E-mail: tsa@miee.ru; Savelyev, M. S.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Gerasimenko, A. Yu.; Selishchev, S. V. [National Research University of Electronic Technology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-07

    A threshold model is described which permits one to determine the properties of limiters for high-powered laser light. It takes into account the threshold characteristics of the nonlinear optical interaction between the laser beam and the limiter working material. The traditional non-threshold model is a particular case of the threshold model when the limiting threshold is zero. The nonlinear characteristics of carbon nanotubes in liquid and solid media are obtained from experimental Z-scan data. Specifically, the nonlinear threshold effect was observed for aqueous dispersions of nanotubes, but not for nanotubes in solid polymethylmethacrylate. The threshold model fits the experimental Z-scan data better than the non-threshold model. Output characteristics were obtained that integrally describe the nonlinear properties of the optical limiters.

  20. Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Passeron, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be succesfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-aulait macules should not b...

  1. Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Du, K.; Loosen, P.; Herziger, G.

    1991-01-01

    Laser, consisting of a beam path multiple-folded by means of two cavity end mirrors and having at least one reflector folding the laser beam retroreflectively, the axis of which is arranged offset in parallel to the axis of a further reflector. So that the laser exhibits an improved beam quality while retaining its comparatively low adjustment sensitivity, the beam path is folded at least twice by means of the retoreflective reflector.

  2. Laser line scan underwater imaging by complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiyi; Luo, Meixing; Song, Xiyu; Wang, Dundong; He, Ning

    2017-12-01

    This work employs the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) camera to acquire images in a scanning manner for laser line scan (LLS) underwater imaging to alleviate backscatter impact of seawater. Two operating features of the CMOS camera, namely the region of interest (ROI) and rolling shutter, can be utilized to perform image scan without the difficulty of translating the receiver above the target as the traditional LLS imaging systems have. By the dynamically reconfigurable ROI of an industrial CMOS camera, we evenly divided the image into five subareas along the pixel rows and then scanned them by changing the ROI region automatically under the synchronous illumination by the fun beams of the lasers. Another scanning method was explored by the rolling shutter operation of the CMOS camera. The fun beam lasers were turned on/off to illuminate the narrow zones on the target in a good correspondence to the exposure lines during the rolling procedure of the camera's electronic shutter. The frame synchronization between the image scan and the laser beam sweep may be achieved by either the strobe lighting output pulse or the external triggering pulse of the industrial camera. Comparison between the scanning and nonscanning images shows that contrast of the underwater image can be improved by our LLS imaging techniques, with higher stability and feasibility than the mechanically controlled scanning method.

  3. 2 Gbit/s data transmission from an unfiltered laser-based phosphor-converted white lighting communication system

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Changmin

    2015-11-05

    We demonstrate data transmission of unfiltered white light generated by direct modulation of a blue gallium nitride (GaN) laser diode (LD) exciting YAG:Ce phosphors. 1.1 GHz of modulation bandwidth was measured without a limitation from the slow 3.8 MHz phosphor response. A high data transmission rate of 2 Gbit/s was achieved without an optical blue-filter using a non-return-to-zero on-off keying (NRZ-OOK) modulation scheme. The measured bit error rate (BER) of 3.50 × 10−3 was less than the forward error correction (FEC) limit of 3.8 × 10−3. The generated white light exhibits CIE 1931 chromaticity coordinates of (0.3628, 0.4310) with a color rendering index (CRI) of 58 and a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 4740 K when the LD was operated at 300 mA. The demonstrated laser-based lighting system can be used simultaneously for indoor broadband access and illumination applications with good color stability.

  4. Portable Light-Weight Laser Ultrasonic System for Multi-Purpose NDT, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I project describes the development of a high-performance, robust, portable, and compact laser ultrasonic system for multi-purpose Non-Destructive...

  5. Noninvasive Micromanipulation of Live HIV-1 Infected Cells via Laser Light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available , in the authors' research, both continuous wave and pulsed lasers operated at varying wavelengths are employed, as they possess special properties that allow classical biomedical applications. This paper discusses photo-translocation of antiretroviral drugs...

  6. Investigation of a scanning laser projector as an energy-efficient light source in plant production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murase, Haruhiko; Helm, van der Bob; Oke, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The energy costs for artificial lighting in plant factories are very high, but may be decreased by introducing more efficient light sources. Light absorption in plants takes place in the order of a femtosecond, while the chemical reactions for carbon fixation of 5 milliseconds are limiting the

  7. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  8. Bactericidal effect of visible light in the presence of erythrosine on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum compared with diode laser, an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiboallah, Ghanbari; Mahdi, Zakeri; Mahbobeh, Naderi Nasab; Mina, Zareian Jahromi; Sina, Faghihi; Majid, Zakeri

    2014-12-27

    Recently, photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been introduced as a new modality in oral bacterial decontamination. Besides, the ability of laser irradiation in the presence of photosensitizing agent to lethal effect on oral bacteria is well documented. Current research aims to evaluate the effect of photodynamic killing of visible blue light in the presence of plaque disclosing agent erythrosine as photosensitizer on Porphyromonas gingivalis associated with periodontal bone loss and Fusobacterium nucleatum associated with soft tissue inflammation, comparing with the near-infrared diode laser. Standard suspension of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum were exposed to Light Emitting Diode (LED) (440-480 nm) used to photopolymerize composite resine dental restoration in combination with erythrosine (22 µm) up to 5 minutes. Bacterial sample were also exposed to a near-infrared diode laser (wavelength, 830 nm), using identical irradiation parameters for comparison. Bacterial samples from each treatment groups (radiation-only group, erythrosine-only group and light or laser with erythrosine group) were subcultured onto the surface of agar plates. Survival of these bacteria was determined by counting the number of colony forming units (CFU) after incubation. Exposure to visible blue light and diode laser in conjugation with erythrosine significantly reduced both species examined viability, whereas erythrosine-treated samples exposed to visible light suggested a statically meaningful differences comparing to diode laser. In addition, bactericidal effect of visible light or diode laser alone on P. gingivalis as black-pigmented bacteria possess endogenous porphyrins was noticeably. Our result suggested that visible blue light source in the presence of plaque disclosing agent erythrosine could can be consider as potential approach of PDT to kill the main gram-negative periodontal pathogens. From a clinical standpoint, this regimen could be established as an additional minimally

  9. Solid-phase laser-induced forward transfer of variable shapes using a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, R.; Jansink, M.; Römer, G. R. B. E.; Huis in `t Veld, A. J.

    2015-08-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer is a promising method for 3D printing of various materials, including metals. The ejection mechanism is complex and depends strongly on the experimental parameters, such as laser fluence and donor layer thickness. However, the process can be categorized by the physical condition of the ejected material, i.e., the donor layer is transferred in liquid phase or the material is transferred as a `pellet' in solid phase. Currently, solid-phase transfer faces several problems. Large shearing forces, occurring at the pellet perimeter during transfer, limit the similarity between the desired pellet shape and the deposited pellet shape. Furthermore, the deposited pellet may be surrounded by debris particles formed by undesired transferred donor material. This work introduces a novel approach for laser-induced forward transfer of variable shaped solid-phase pellets. A liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) is used to apply grayscale intensity modulation to an incident laser beam to shape the intensity profile. Optimized beams consist of a high fluence perimeter around an interior characterized by a lower fluence level. These beams are used successfully to transfer solid-phase pellets out of a 100-nm Au donor layer using a single laser pulse. The flexibility of the SLM allows a variable desired pellet shape. The shapes of the resulting deposited pellets show a high degree of similarity to the desired shapes. Debris-free deposited pellets are achieved by pre-machining the donor layer, prior to the transfer, using a double-pulse process.

  10. Biocompatible silver nanoparticles embedded in a PEG–PLA polymeric matrix for stimulated laser light drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, F.; Scala, A.; Grimato, S.; Santoro, M.; Spadaro, S.; Barreca, F.; Cimino, F.; Speciale, A.; Saija, A.; Grassi, G.; Fazio, E.

    2016-01-01

    The laser-induced release of a well-known hepatoprotective drug (silibinin, SLB) from a temperature-sensitive polymeric composite loaded with silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) was investigated. The surface chemistry tuning and the specific design of Ag NPs are fundamental in view of the engineering of specific stimuli-responsive systems, able to control drug release in response to external stimuli. The release profiles of SLB from the newly synthesized PEG–PLA@Ag composite show strong dependences on laser wavelength and Ag NPs’ Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). The resonant laser light excites the SPR of the NPs and the absorbed energy is converted into heat due to electron–photon collisions. The heat generated from the nanometer-sized metal particles embedded within the polymer is efficient and strongly localized. The nanovector, irradiated by a relatively low-intensity laser but tuned specifically to the metal NPs’ SPR, releases the encapsulated drug with a higher efficiency than that not irradiated or irradiated with a laser wavelength far from the metal SPR. A combination of analytical techniques including UV–Vis, NMR, and FT-IR spectroscopy and scanning/transmission electron microscopy has been used to study the structural and morphological properties of the composite. The controllable specificity of this approach and the possibility of the SPR-mediated localized photothermal effect to be usefully applied in aqueous environments are the relevant advances of the proposed system for photothermal therapies that make use of visible optical radiation or for the drug delivery in proximity of the tumor cells.

  11. A parallel approach for subwavelength molecular surgery using gene-specific positioned metal nanoparticles as laser light antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaki, Andrea; Garwe, Frank; Steinbrück, Andrea; Maubach, Gunter; Festag, Grit; Weise, Anja; Riemann, Iris; König, Karsten; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2007-02-01

    An optical technique for the parallel manipulation of nanoscale structures with molecular resolution is presented. Bioconjugated metal nanoparticles are thereby positioned at the location of interest, such as, e.g., certain DNA sequences along metaphase chromosomes, prior to pulsed laser light irradiation of the whole sample. The nanoparticles are designed to absorb the introduced energy highly efficiently, in that way acting as nanoantenna. As result of the interaction, structural changes of the sample with subwavelength dimensions and nanoscale precision are observed at the location of the particles. The process leading to the nanolocalized destruction is caused by particle ablation as well as thermal damage of the surrounding material.

  12. STROBE-X: X-ray timing and spectroscopy on dynamical timescales from microseconds to years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen A. Wilson-Hodge

    Full Text Available The Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X probes strong gravity for stellar mass to supermassive black holes and ultradense matter with unprecedented effective area, high time-resolution, and good spectral resolution, while providing a powerful time-domain X-ray observatory. Keywords: Missions, X-ray timing, X-ray spectroscopy, Compact objects

  13. The STROBE extensions: protocol for a qualitative assessment of content and a survey of endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Melissa K; Utrobičić, Ana; Gómez, Guadalupe; Cobo, Erik; Wager, Elizabeth; Hren, Darko

    2017-10-22

    The STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement was developed in response to inadequate reporting of observational studies. In recent years, several extensions to STROBE have been created to provide more nuanced field-specific guidance for authors. The content and the prevalence of extension endorsement have not yet been assessed. Accordingly, there are two aims: (1) to classify changes made in the extensions to identify strengths and weaknesses of the original STROBE checklist and (2) to determine the prevalence and typology of endorsement by journals in fields related to extensions. Two independent researchers will assess additions in each extension. Additions will be coded as 'field specific' (FS) or 'not field specific' (NFS). FS is defined as particularly relevant information for a single field and guidance provided generally cannot be extrapolated beyond that field. NFS is defined as information that reflects epidemiological or methodological tenets and can be generalised to most, if not all, types of observational research studies. Intraclass correlation will be calculated to measure reviewers' concordance. On disagreement, consensus will be sought. Individual additions will be grouped by STROBE checklist items to identify the frequency and distribution of changes.Journals in fields related to extensions will be identified through National Library of Medicine PubMed Broad Subject Terms, screened for eligibility and further distilled via Ovid MEDLINE® search strategies for observational studies. Text describing endorsement will be extracted from each journal's website. A classification scheme will be created for endorsement types and the prevalence of endorsement will be estimated. Analyses will use NVivo V.11 and SAS University Edition. This study does not require ethical approval as it does not involve human participants. This study has been preregistered on Open Science Framework. © Article author(s) (or their

  14. The STROBE extensions: protocol for a qualitative assessment of content and a survey of endorsement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utrobičić, Ana; Gómez, Guadalupe; Hren, Darko

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement was developed in response to inadequate reporting of observational studies. In recent years, several extensions to STROBE have been created to provide more nuanced field-specific guidance for authors. The content and the prevalence of extension endorsement have not yet been assessed. Accordingly, there are two aims: (1) to classify changes made in the extensions to identify strengths and weaknesses of the original STROBE checklist and (2) to determine the prevalence and typology of endorsement by journals in fields related to extensions. Methods and analysis Two independent researchers will assess additions in each extension. Additions will be coded as ‘field specific’ (FS) or ‘not field specific’ (NFS). FS is defined as particularly relevant information for a single field and guidance provided generally cannot be extrapolated beyond that field. NFS is defined as information that reflects epidemiological or methodological tenets and can be generalised to most, if not all, types of observational research studies. Intraclass correlation will be calculated to measure reviewers’ concordance. On disagreement, consensus will be sought. Individual additions will be grouped by STROBE checklist items to identify the frequency and distribution of changes. Journals in fields related to extensions will be identified through National Library of Medicine PubMed Broad Subject Terms, screened for eligibility and further distilled via Ovid MEDLINE® search strategies for observational studies. Text describing endorsement will be extracted from each journal’s website. A classification scheme will be created for endorsement types and the prevalence of endorsement will be estimated. Analyses will use NVivo V.11 and SAS University Edition. Ethics and dissemination This study does not require ethical approval as it does not involve human participants. This study has been

  15. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement: Guidelines for reporting observational studies

    OpenAIRE

    von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G; Egger, Matthias; Pocock, Stuart J; Gøtzsche, Peter C; Vandenbroucke, Jan P

    2014-01-01

    Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study’s generalizability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-contro...

  16. Strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology (STROBE): Explanation and elaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbroucke, JP; von Elm, E; Altman, DG; Gotzsche, PC; Mulrow, CD; Pocock, SJ; Poole, C; Schlesselman, JJ; Egger, M

    2007-01-01

    Much medical research is observational. The reporting of observational studies is often of insufficient quality. Poor reporting hampers the assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of a study and the generalisability of its results. Taking into account empirical evidence and theoretical considerations, a group of methodologists, researchers, and editors developed the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) recommendations to improve the quality of repor...

  17. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Light is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind light, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  18. Visible light scattering properties of irregularly shaped silica microparticles using laser based laboratory simulations for remote sensing and medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruah, Manash J.; Ahmed, Gazi A.

    2018-01-01

    Laser based experimental light scattering studies of irregularly shaped silica microparticles have been performed at three incident wavelengths 543.5 nm, 594.5 nm and 632.8 nm supported by laboratory based computations and 3D realistic simulations, using an indigenously fabricated light scattering setup. A comparative analysis of the computational and experimentally acquired results is done and a good agreement is found in the forward scattering lobes in all cases for each of the measured scattering parameters. This study also provides an efficient way of detecting and measuring particle size distribution for irregular micro- and nanoparticles and is highly applicable in remote sensing, atmospheric, astrophysical, and medical applications and also for finding potential health hazards in the form of inhalable and respirable small particulate matter.

  19. [Application possibilities of dynamic laser light scattering photometry for the examination of poly(ethylene glycol) suppositories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bácskay, I; Kéki, S; Deák, G; Zsuga, M; Mezey, G

    2001-08-01

    Status epilepticus is one of the most common neurologic emergencies in children, adolescents, and young adults. The advantage of diazepam suppository in medicinal therapy appears mainly in treatment of childhood epilepsy. A hydrophilic suppository base was investigated in solution by dynamic light scattering and results were compared to those of the membrane diffusion experiments measuring diazepam solubilization. According to the dynamic laser light scattering photometric measurements, the good solubilization effect of the macrogol mixture (5% Polysorbatum 20, 10% Macrogolum 400, 85% Macrogolum 1540) is explained by the formation of small, tight micellas. As the Polysorbatum 20 tenside resulted in the significant decrease (p < 0.05) of the formation of great micellas, its use led to the formation of small, tight, almost monodisperse micellas of 40-50 nm in the aqueous solution of the macrogol mixture.

  20. Pulsed laser light forces cancer cells to absorb anticancer drugs--the role of water in nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Andrei P; Zhu, Dan; Mester, Adam R; Försterling, Horst-Dieter

    2011-06-01

    Anticancer drugs executing their function intracellularly enter cancer cells via diffusive processes. Complementary to these slow processes, cells can be forced to incorporate drugs by convection - a more efficient transport process. Transmembrane convection is induced by moderately intense pulsed laser light (or light emitting diodes) changing the structure of nanoscopic water layers in cells. This is a fundamental difference with the method of photodynamic therapy. In a model system we demonstrate that a total irradiation time of one minute is sufficient to completely inhibit proliferation of cancer cells. Transmembrane convection protects healthy cells from extended chemotherapy exposure, could be exploited to overcome multidrug resistance, and is a promising new tool in a variety of therapies as well as in skin rejuvenation.

  1. Resonant laser power build-up in ALPS. A 'light-shining-through-walls' experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehret, Klaus; Ghazaryan, Samvel [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Frede, Maik [Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (DE)] (and others)

    2009-05-15

    The ALPS collaboration runs a light-shining-through-walls (LSW) experiment to search for photon oscillations into weakly interacting sub-eV particles (WISPs) inside of a superconducting HERA dipole magnet at the site of DESY. In this paper we report on the first successful integration of a large-scale optical cavity to boost the available power for WISP production in this type of experiments. The key elements are a frequency tunable narrow line-width continuous wave laser acting as the primary light source and an electronic feed-back control loop to stabilize the power build-up. We describe and characterize our apparatus and demonstrate the data analysis procedures on the basis of a brief exemplary run. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of Moments and Radii of Light Nuclei by Collinear Fast-Beam Laser Spectroscopy and $\\beta$-NMR Spectroscopy

    CERN Multimedia

    Marinova, K P

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear Moments and radii of light unstable isotopes are investigated by applying different high-sensitivity and high-resolution techniques based on collinear fast-beam laser spectroscopy. A study of nuclear structure in the sd shell is performed on neon isotopes in the extended chain of $^{17-28}$Ne, in particular on the proton-halo candidate $^{17}$Ne. Measurements of hyperfine structure and isotope shift have become possible by introducing an ultra-sensitive non-optical detection method which is based on optical pumping, state-selective collisional ionization and $\\beta$-activity counting. The small effect of nuclear radii on the optical isotope shifts of light elements requires very accurate measurements. The errors are dominated by uncertainties of the Doppler shifts which are conventionally determined from precisely measured acceleration voltages. These uncertainties are removed by measuring the beam energy with simultaneous excitation of two optical lines in parallel / antiparallel beam configuration. ...

  3. Automatic Laser Light Detection and Filtering Using a Liquid Crystal Lyot Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, S.; Staromlynska, J.

    A device which acts as both a simple cw laser warner and anti-dazzle protection device has been designed and tested. The design is based on a single stage, double element, tunable liquid crystal Lyot filter. Laboratory tests have shown that the detection sensitivity of the device for monochromatic cw radiation is approximately 43×10-9 W/cm2 and that the achievable contrast ratio is greater than 100:1 Automatic detection and filtering of a cw laser source has been demonstrated. Results indicate that the algorithm to automatically filter the laser radiation works well and that the extinction obtained is good. Factors which affect the contrast ratio are discussed and improved device design suggested.

  4. Lights Will Guide You : Sample Preparation and Applications for Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Correlative microscopy is the combined use of two different forms of microscopy in the study of a specimen, allowing for the exploitation of the advantages of both imaging tools. The integrated Laser and Electron Microscope (iLEM), developed at Utrecht University, combines a fluorescence microscope (FM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a single set-up. The region of interest in the specimen is labeled or tagged with a fluorescent probe and can easily be identified within a large field of view with the FM. Next, this same area is retraced in the TEM and can be studied at high resolution. The iLEM demands samples that can be imaged with both FM and TEM. Biological specimen, typically composed of light elements, generate low image contrast in the TEM. Therefore, these samples are often ‘contrasted’ with heavy metal stains. FM, on the other hand, images fluorescent samples. Sample preparation for correlative microscopy, and iLEM in particular, is complicated by the fact that the heavy metals stains employed for TEM quench the fluorescent signal of the probe that is imaged with FM. The first part of this thesis outlines preparation procedures for biological material yielding specimen that can be imaged with the iLEM. Here, approaches for the contrasting of thin sections of cells and tissue are introduced that do not affect the fluorescence signal of the probe that marks the region of interest. Furthermore, two novel procedures, VIS2FIXH and VIS2FIX­FS are described that allow for the chemical fixation of thin sections of cryo-immobilized material. These procedures greatly expedite the sample preparation process, and open up novel possibilities for the immuno-labeling of difficult antigens, eg. proteins and lipids that are challenging to preserve. The second part of this thesis describes applications of iLEM in research in the field of life and material science. The iLEM was employed in the study of UVC induced apoptosis (programmed cell death) of

  5. Inhibition of yeast growth during long term exposure to laser light around 1064 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Thomas; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the effect of a 1070 nm continuous wave Ytterbium fiber laser on exponentially growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells over a span of 4 hours. The cells were immobilized onto Concanavalin A covered microscope slides and the growth was measured using the area increase of the c......We have studied the effect of a 1070 nm continuous wave Ytterbium fiber laser on exponentially growing Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells over a span of 4 hours. The cells were immobilized onto Concanavalin A covered microscope slides and the growth was measured using the area increase...

  6. Narrow-band laser amplifier system for tunable UV light generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Leo; Hashimoto, Masashi; Yokoyama, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    We developed a Ti:Sapphire narrow-band laser amplifier system for efficient third harmonic generation. The amplifier system was composed of a wavelength tunable narrow-band regenerative amplifier and a broadband multi-pass amplifier. With a pumping of ∼17 mJ by the second harmonics of a Nd:YLF laser, mode-locked seed pulses were amplified to ∼1.0 mJ at 1-kHz repetition. We obtained the third harmonic wave of ∼208-μJ pulse energy after the wavelength conversion by two β-BBO crystals. (author)

  7. Dispersion of Light and Heavy Pollutants in Urban Scale Models: CO2 Laser Photoacoustic Studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zelinger, Zdeněk; Střižík, M.; Kubát, Pavel; Civiš, Svatopluk; Grigorová, E.; Janečková, R.; Zavila, O.; Nevrlý, Václav; Herecová, L.; Bailleux, S.; Horká-Zelenková, Veronika; Ferus, Martin; Skříňský, J.; Kozubková, M.; Drábková, S.; Jaňour, Zbyněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 4 (2009), s. 430-436 ISSN 0003-7028 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 111; GA MŠk LC06071; GA ČR GA202/06/0216; GA MŽP SPII1A0/45/07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : Air pollution * CO2 laser photoacoustic spectroscopy * PAS * Laser diode spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.564, year: 2009

  8. Improvement of laser dicing performance II: dicing rate enhancement by multi beams and simultaneous aberration correction with phase-only spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Yu; Matsumoto, Naoya; Oyaizu, Masaki; Okuma, Jyunji; Nakano, Makoto; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Itoh, Haruyasu; Inoue, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    "Stealth Dicing" laser processing is a dry and debris-free semiconductor wafer dicing method achieved by generating thermal micro-cracks inside a wafer with a tightly focused laser beam. This method has two practical issues: (1) the dicing speed is limited by the repetition rate of the pulsed laser, and (2) integrated circuits on the opposite side of the wafer from the laser light are potentially damaged by excessive laser intensity required to compensate for insufficient beam convergence. The insufficient beam convergence is a result of spherical aberration due to a refractive index mismatch between air and the wafer. These problems can be resolved by incorporating a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) into the laser dicing system. The SLM produces two types of wavefront configurations simultaneously for two different functions. One is for multi-beam generation with a phase grating pattern. This improves the dicing speed by a factor equal to the number of diffracted beams. The other is for aberration correction of the multiple beams using a pre-distorted wavefront pattern. By correcting aberrations, the focused multiple beams inside the wafer will become sufficiently convergent to avoid undesirable laser damage. We demonstrated these improvements by dicing sapphire wafers with a pulsed laser and a high-numerical-aperture objective lens.

  9. Characterization of extreme ultraviolet light-emitting plasmas from a laser-excited fluorine containing liquid polymer jet target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, B.; Assmann, J.; Faubel, M.; Gaebel, K.; Kranzusch, S.; Lugovoj, E.; Mann, K.; Missalla, T.; Peth, Ch.

    2004-01-01

    The operation of a liquid polymer jet laser-plasma target and the characterization of the absolute x-ray emission in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength window from 9-19 nm is reported. The target is a liquid polymer (perfluoro-polyether) that is exposed to pulsed and focused laser light at 532 nm in the form of a thin, liquid microjet (d=40 to 160 μm) in vacuum. The spectral brightness of the source in the 13 nm range is relatively high because a large fraction of radiative energy is emitted in one single line only, which is assigned to be the 2p-3d F VII doublet at 12.8 nm, with a laser energy conversion efficiency of 0.45% (2π sr, 2% bandwidth) in our initial experiment. A further increase of the relative emission has been found in the wavelength range between 7 and 17 nm when the jet diameter was increased from 40 to 160 μm. The two-dimensional spatial profile of the source plasma (d=40 to 50 μm) has been analyzed with a pinhole camera

  10. Initial Results of Testing a Multilayer Laser Scanner in a Collision Avoidance System for Light Rail Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Lüy

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application to detect and track obstacles using a multilayer laser scanner. The goal of the detection system is to develop collision avoidance for the Light Rail Vehicle (LRV. The laser scanner, which is mounted in front of the tram, collects information in a four-scan plane. The object recognition and tracking module, which is composed of a three sub-modules segmentation, classification, and Kalman Filter tracking, was carried out on the raw data. Thus, data were provided for collision avoidance module. The proposed system was applied to a tram named “Silkworm” which is manufactured by Durmazlar Machine Inc. (Bursa, Turkey and initial experimental tests have been conducted at the facilities of Durmazlar Machine Inc. in the city of Bursa, Turkey. This study aims to illustrate parts of the possible tests that can be carried out and to share with the scientific community an important application of multilayer laser scanners, although in the initial implementation phase, in urban rail transportation.

  11. Enhancement of light absorption by blood to Nd:YAG laser using PEG-modified gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Linzhuang; Li, Dong; Chen, Bin; Dai, Yuze; Wu, Wenjuan; Wang, Guoxiang

    2016-10-01

    On the basis of the principle of selective photothermolysis, laser therapy has been the most effective treatment strategy for Port-wine stains (PWSs) caused by the expansion of dermal capillaries. Neodymium:Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser at 1064 nm wavelength has great potential for deeply buried PWS, although its application is limited because of its weak absorption by blood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of PEG-modified gold nanorods (NRs) on the blood absorption enhancement for Nd:YAG laser. PEG-modified gold nanorods (NRs) were synthesized via the seeded growth method. Then, the effect of PEG-modified gold NRs on blood light absorbance was investigated through adding different concentration of PEG-modified gold NRs to 1 ml of blood at room temperature. Finally, the optical properties of whole mice blood with or without PEG-modified gold NRs under slow heating were investigated. The average length and width of PEG-modified gold NRs are 79.5 ± 10.5 and 13.5 ± 0.9 nm, respectively, with the aspect ratio of 5.89, and a strong absorption peak exists at ∼1050 nm in the near-infrared range. A linear correlation between the blood absorbance at 1064 nm and the amount of PEG-modified gold NRs was obtained. The absorbance at 1064 nm increased 17.6, 33.0, 48.3, and 65.4 times when 0.4, 0.8, 1.2, and 1.6 mg of PEG-modified gold NRs was added to 1 ml of blood at room temperature, respectively. After adding 0.8 mg of PEG-modified gold NRs to 1 ml of blood, blood absorbance at 1064 nm at different temperatures increased by an average of 24.0 times. After intravenously injecting PEG-modified gold NRs (0.87 mg/ml) into Sprague-Dawley mice, the blood absorbance at 1064 nm increased from 0.014 to 0.5. Our findings suggest that PEG-modified gold NRs injection is an efficient way to enhance light absorption by blood to Nd:YAG laser. Lasers Surg. Med. 48:790-803, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley

  12. Underwater wireless transmission of high-speed QAM-OFDM signals using a compact red-light laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Song, Yuhang; Yu, Xiangyu; Lin, Aobo; Kong, Meiwei; Han, Jun; Deng, Ning

    2016-04-18

    We first study the transmission property of red light in water in terms of extinction coefficient and channel bandwidth via Monte Carlo simulation, with an interesting finding that red light outperforms blue-green light in highly turbid water. We further propose and experimentally demonstrate a broadband underwater wireless optical communication system based on a simple and cost-effective TO56 red-light laser diode. We demonstrate a 1.324-Gb/s transmission at a bit error rate (BER) of 2.02 × 10-3 over a 6-m underwater channel, by using 128-QAM OFDM signals and a low-cost 150-MHz positive-intrinsic-negative photodetector, with a record spectral efficiency higher than 7.32 bits/Hz. By using an avalanche photodetector and 32-QAM OFDM signals, we have achieved a record bit rate of 4.883 Gb/s at a BER of 3.20 × 10-3 over a 6-m underwater channel.

  13. Femtosecond laser texturing of glass substrates for improved light in-coupling in thin-film photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imgrunt, J.; Chakanga, K.; von Maydell, K.; Teubner, U.

    2017-12-01

    Due to their low thickness, thin-film solar cells usually suffer from poor light absorption. To improve this situation, light-management is necessary. Within the present work, in order to enhance light coupling, an ultra-short-pulse laser is used for texturing substrates. Here commercially available multi component soda lime glass substrates are patterned with a dot grid at ambient air pressure with 150 fs pulses, centered at a wavelength of 775 nm. The structures consist of small depressions with approximately 3 μ m diameter. Varying depths of around 300 nm could be well reproduced. Reducing the pitch (distance between structure-to-structure centers), from ten to approximately one times the crater diameter, influences the structure quality and increases the deformation of the surface in the vicinity of the depressions. Consequently, the diffuse light scattering is improved from 0 to 30% haze. Overall, the presented approach is quite simple. This single-step texturing technique which can be easily used on different substrates is applicable in a wide range of thin-film solar cells. It has the advantage that ultra-thin electrodes can be used as the front contact as well as the potential to be integrated into a PV production line. Thus, complicated layer stacks for absorption enhancement can be avoided.

  14. Characterization of electrically-active defects in ultraviolet light-emitting diodes with laser-based failure analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Mary A.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Cole, Edward I.

    2016-01-01

    Laser-based failure analysis techniques demonstrate the ability to quickly and non-intrusively screen deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for electrically-active defects. In particular, two laser-based techniques, light-induced voltage alteration and thermally-induced voltage alteration, generate applied voltage maps (AVMs) that provide information on electrically-active defect behavior including turn-on bias, density, and spatial location. Here, multiple commercial LEDs were examined and found to have dark defect signals in the AVM indicating a site of reduced resistance or leakage through the diode. The existence of the dark defect signals in the AVM correlates strongly with an increased forward-bias leakage current. This increased leakage is not present in devices without AVM signals. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of a dark defect signal site revealed a dislocation cluster through the pn junction. The cluster included an open core dislocation. Even though LEDs with few dark AVM defect signals did not correlate strongly with power loss, direct association between increased open core dislocation densities and reduced LED device performance has been presented elsewhere [M. W. Moseley et al., J. Appl. Phys. 117, 095301 (2015)

  15. Semipolar GaN-based laser diodes for Gbit/s white lighting communication: devices to systems

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Changmin

    2018-02-23

    We report the high-speed performance of semipolar GaN ridge laser diodes at 410 nm and the dynamic characteristics including differential gain, damping, and the intrinsic maximum bandwidth. To the best of our knowledge, the achieved modulation bandwidth of 6.8 GHz is the highest reported value in the blue-violet spectrum. The calculated differential gain of ~3 x 10-16 cm2, which is a critical factor in high-speed modulation, proved theoretical predictions of higher gain in semipolar GaN laser diodes than the conventional c-plane counterparts. In addition, we demonstrate the first novel white lighting communication system by using our near-ultraviolet (NUV) LDs and pumping red-, green-, and blueemitting phosphors. This system satisfies both purposes of high-speed communication and high-quality white light illumination. A high data rate of 1.5 Gbit/s using on-off keying (OOK) modulation together with a high color rendering index (CRI) of 80 has been measured.

  16. Ultrabroad linewidth orange-emitting nanowires LED for high CRI laser-based white lighting and gigahertz communications

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2016-08-10

    Group-III-nitride laser diode (LD)-based solid-state lighting device has been demonstrated to be droop-free compared to light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and highly energy-efficient compared to that of the traditional incandescent and fluorescent white light systems. The YAG:Ce3+ phosphor used in LD-based solid-state lighting, however, is associated with rapid degradation issue. An alternate phosphor/LD architecture, which is capable of sustaining high temperature, high power density, while still intensity- and bandwidth-tunable for high color-quality remained unexplored. In this paper, we present for the first time, the proof-of-concept of the generation of high-quality white light using an InGaN-based orange nanowires (NWs) LED grown on silicon, in conjunction with a blue LD, and in place of the compound-phosphor. By changing the relative intensities of the ultrabroad linewidth orange and narrow-linewidth blue components, our LED/LD device architecture achieved correlated color temperature (CCT) ranging from 3000 K to above 6000K with color rendering index (CRI) values reaching 83.1, a value unsurpassed by the YAG-phosphor/blue-LD counterpart. The white-light wireless communications was implemented using the blue LD through on-off keying (OOK) modulation to obtain a data rate of 1.06 Gbps. We therefore achieved the best of both worlds when orange-emitting NWs LED are utilized as “active-phosphor”, while blue LD is used for both color mixing and optical wireless communications.

  17. Synergic phototoxic effect of visible light or Gallium-Arsenide laser in the presence of different photo-sensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Habibollah; Mousavi, Seyed Amir; Forouzanfar, Ali; Zakeri, Mahdi; Shafaee, Hooman; Shahnaseri, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    According to the development of resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria following treatment with antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, alternative approaches such as lethal photosensitization are being used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of visible light and laser beam radiation in conjugation with three different photosensitizers on the survival of two main periodontopathogenic bacteria including Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum in different exposure periods. In this in vitro prospective study, strains of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. were exposed to visible light at wavelengths of 440 nm and diode laser light, Gallium-Arsenide, at wavelength of 830 nm in the presence of a photosensitizer (erythrosine, curcuma, or hydrogen peroxide). They were exposed 1-5 min to each light. Each experiment was repeated 3 times for each strain of bacteria. Data were analyzed by two-ways ANOVA and least significant difference post-hoc tests. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. After 4 days the colonies were counted. Viability of P. gingivalis was reduced 10% and 20% subsequent to exposure to visible light and diode laser, respectively. The values were 65% and 75% for F. nucleatum in a period of 5-min, respectively. Exposure to visible light or laser beam in conjugation with the photosensitizers suspension caused significant reduction in the number of P. gingivalis in duration of 5-min, suggesting a synergic phototoxic effect. However, the survival rate of F. nucleatum following the exposure to laser with hydrogen peroxide, erythrosine and rhizome of Curcuma longa (curcumin) after 5-min was 10%, 20% and 90% respectively. Within the limitations of this study, the synergic phototoxic effect of visible light in combination with each of the photosensitizers on P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. However, the synergic phototoxic effect of laser exposure and hydrogen peroxide and curcumin as photosensitizers on F. nucleatum was not shown.

  18. A rotational diffusion coefficient of the 70s ribosome determined by depolarized laser light scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, J.; Fijnaut, H.M.

    We have obtained a rotational diffusion coefficient of the 70S ribosome isolated from Escherichia-coli (MRE-600), from the depolarized light scattering spectrum measured by photon correlation spectroscopy. The intensity correlation function of depolarized scattered light contains contributions due

  19. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  20. Scattered light evidence for short density scale heights near critical density in laser-irradiated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillion, D.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Rupert, V.C.; Haas, R.A.; Boyle, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented of a steepened electron density profile near critical density obtained from studying the time-integrated scattered light from targets illuminated by linearly polarized, 1.06 μ light. Both 10 μ thick disks and DT-filled glass microshells were irradiated by light focused by f/1 or f/2.5 lenses in one and two-beam experiments, respectively. From the dependence of the asymmetry of the scattered light about the beam axis upon the scattering angle, we infer scale lengths on the order of one micron. Scale lengths have also been deduced from measurements on the polarization state of the reflected light. Both analytic and numerical results are presented to show how the polarization state varies with the incidence angle and the scale length

  1. Scattered light evidence for short density scale heights near critical density in laser-irradiated plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillion, D.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Rupert, V.C.; Haas, R.A.; Boyle, M.J.

    1976-09-15

    Experimental evidence is presented of a steepened electron density profile near critical density obtained from studying the time-integrated scattered light from targets illuminated by linearly polarized, 1.06 ..mu.. light. Both 10 ..mu.. thick disks and DT-filled glass microshells were irradiated by light focused by f/1 or f/2.5 lenses in one and two-beam experiments, respectively. From the dependence of the asymmetry of the scattered light about the beam axis upon the scattering angle, we infer scale lengths on the order of one micron. Scale lengths have also been deduced from measurements on the polarization state of the reflected light. Both analytic and numerical results are presented to show how the polarization state varies with the incidence angle and the scale length.

  2. Generation of single-frequency tunable green light in a coupled ring tapered diode laser cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    in the broad wavelength range from 1049 nm to 1093 nm and the beam propagation factor is improved from M2 = 2.8 to below 1.1. The laser frequency is automatically locked to the cavity resonance frequency using optical feedback. Furthermore, we show that this adaptive external cavity approach leads to efficient...

  3. Lights Will Guide You : Sample Preparation and Applications for Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karreman, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative microscopy is the combined use of two different forms of microscopy in the study of a specimen, allowing for the exploitation of the advantages of both imaging tools. The integrated Laser and Electron Microscope (iLEM), developed at Utrecht University, combines a fluorescence microscope

  4. The UV and Laser Aging for PMMA/BDK/Azo-dye Polymer Blend Cured by UV Light Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, A A; Omari, A M

    2015-01-01

    A polymeric-based solution blend composed of Azo-dye methyl red (MR) doped with polymethelmethacrelate (PMMA) solution, in addition, to the BenzylDimethylKetal (BDK) photoinitiator was made with optimum molar ratios and deposited on glass substrate by spin coating technique. The samples were then exposed to UV light beams in order to assist the layers polymerization by the proper exposure process. The photo chemical reaction occurred during the UV light polymerization process induces photo refractive changes which were presented as a function of wavelength or photon energy. Two main strong absorption peaks were observed in the films at around 330 nm (3.75 eV) and 500 nm (2.48 eV) for different curing time periods. This phenomenon enhances the films usage for optical data storage media at these two wavelengths. Since the deposited films were then useful as based layers for Read/Write optical data storage media, they were then tested by UV or laser Read/Write beams independently. The optical properties of the films were investigated while exposed to each beam. Finally, their optical properties were investigated as a function of aging time in order to relate the temporary and/or permanent light-exposure effect on the films compared to their optical properties before the light exposure. The films show a low absorbance at 630 nm (1.97 eV) and high absorbance at 480 nm (2.58 eV). This fact makes it possible to record holographic gratings in the polymeric film upon light exposure. In all cases the optical properties were evaluated by using the very sensitive, non destructive surface testing spectroscopic ellipsometry technique. The films were characterized in the spectral range of 300 to 1000 nm using Lorentz oscillator model with one oscillator centred at 4.15 eV. This study has been supported by the SEM and EDAX results to investigate the effect of the UV and visible beams on their optical properties. The results of this research determined the proper conditions for

  5. Lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-12-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. [Lasers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeron, T

    2012-11-01

    Lasers are a very effective approach for treating many hyperpigmented lesions. They are the gold standard treatment for actinic lentigos and dermal hypermelanocytosis, such as Ota nevus. Becker nevus, hyperpigmented mosaicisms, and lentigines can also be successfully treated with lasers, but they could be less effective and relapses can be observed. However, lasers cannot be proposed for all types of hyperpigmentation. Thus, freckles and café-au-lait macules should not be treated as the relapses are nearly constant. Due to its complex pathophysiology, melasma has a special place in hyperpigmented dermatoses. Q-switched lasers (using standard parameters or low fluency) should not be used because of consistent relapses and the high risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation. Paradoxically, targeting the vascular component of the melasma lesion with lasers could have a beneficial effect. However, these results have yet to be confirmed. In all cases, a precise diagnosis of the type of hyperpigmentation is mandatory before any laser treatment, and the limits and the potential side effects of the treatment must be clearly explained to patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. STROBE-AMS: recommendations to optimise reporting of epidemiological studies on antimicrobial resistance and informing improvement in antimicrobial stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconelli, Evelina; Cataldo, Maria A; Paul, M; Leibovici, L; Kluytmans, Jan; Schröder, Wiebke; Foschi, Federico; De Angelis, Giulia; De Waure, Chiara; Cadeddu, Chiara; Mutters, Nico T; Gastmeier, Petra; Cookson, Barry

    2016-02-19

    To explore the accuracy of application of the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) tool in epidemiological studies focused on the evaluation of the role of antibiotics in selecting resistance, and to derive and test an extension of STROBE to improve the suitability of the tool in evaluating the quality of reporting in these area. A three-step study was performed. First, a systematic review of the literature analysing the association between antimicrobial exposure and acquisition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and/or multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii was performed. Second, articles were reviewed according to the STROBE checklist for epidemiological studies. Third, a set of potential new items focused on antimicrobial-resistance quality indicators was derived through an expert two-round RAND-modified Delphi procedure and tested on the articles selected through the literature review. The literature search identified 78 studies. Overall, the quality of reporting appeared to be poor in most areas. Five STROBE items, comprising statistical analysis and study objectives, were satisfactory in STROBE for antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) tool should enhance appropriate study design and reporting, and therefore contribute to the improvement of evidence to be used for AMS programme development and assessment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. A light touch: application of optics and lasers to temperature control problems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available is by definition a non-contact measurement process; there is not physical contact with the object under study, and the light we use for our measurement is light that is being ?released? or emitted from the object due to its temperature. Bodies radiate energy... Around one hundred years ago, physicists discovered the na-ture of blackbodies: objects that exhibit a particular trait that the light they emit is dependent on the temperature of the body itself. The most well known example of a blackbody is our Sun...

  9. Experimental demonstration of OFDM/OQAM transmission with DFT-based channel estimation for visible laser light communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jing; Shi, Jin; Deng, Rui; Chen, Lin

    2017-08-01

    Recently, visible light communication (VLC) based on light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is considered as a candidate technology for fifth-generation (5G) communications, VLC is free of electromagnetic interference and it can simplify the integration of VLC into heterogeneous wireless networks. Due to the data rates of VLC system limited by the low pumping efficiency, small output power and narrow modulation bandwidth, visible laser light communication (VLLC) system with laser diode (LD) has paid more attention. In addition, orthogonal frequency division multiplexing/offset quadrature amplitude modulation (OFDM/OQAM) is currently attracting attention in optical communications. Due to the non-requirement of cyclic prefix (CP) and time-frequency domain well-localized pulse shapes, it can achieve high spectral efficiency. Moreover, OFDM/OQAM has lower out-of-band power leakage so that it increases the system robustness against inter-carrier interference (ICI) and frequency offset. In this paper, a Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT)-based channel estimation scheme combined with the interference approximation method (IAM) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated for VLLC OFDM/OQAM system. The performance of VLLC OFDM/OQAM system with and without DFT-based channel estimation is investigated. Moreover, the proposed DFT-based channel estimation scheme and the intra-symbol frequency-domain averaging (ISFA)-based method are also compared for the VLLC OFDM/OQAM system. The experimental results show that, the performance of EVM using the DFT-based channel estimation scheme is improved about 3dB compared with the conventional IAM method. In addition, the DFT-based channel estimation scheme can resist the channel noise effectively than that of the ISFA-based method.

  10. Low-level laser light therapy improves cognitive deficits and inhibits microglial activation after controlled cortical impact in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuman, Jugta; Zhang, Jimmy; Park, Juyeon; Carroll, James D; Donahue, Chad; Whalen, Michael J

    2012-01-20

    Low-level laser light therapy (LLLT) exerts beneficial effects on motor and histopathological outcomes after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI), and coherent near-infrared light has been reported to improve cognitive function in patients with chronic TBI. However, the effects of LLLT on cognitive recovery in experimental TBI are unknown. We hypothesized that LLLT administered after controlled cortical impact (CCI) would improve post-injury Morris water maze (MWM) performance. Low-level laser light (800 nm) was applied directly to the contused parenchyma or transcranially in mice beginning 60-80 min after CCI. Injured mice treated with 60 J/cm² (500 mW/cm²×2 min) either transcranially or via an open craniotomy had modestly improved latency to the hidden platform (pcraniotomy mice were associated with reduced microgliosis at 48 h (21.8±2.3 versus 39.2±4.2 IbA-1+ cells/200×field, pcognitive function was observed using the other doses, a 4-h administration time point and 7-day administration of 60 J/cm². No effect of LLLT (60 J/cm² open craniotomy) was observed on post-injury motor function (days 1-7), brain edema (24 h), nitrosative stress (24 h), or lesion volume (14 days). Although further dose optimization and mechanism studies are needed, the data suggest that LLLT might be a therapeutic option to improve cognitive recovery and limit inflammation after TBI.

  11. Characterization of surface modifications by white light interferometry: applications in ion sputtering, laser ablation, and tribology experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshev, Sergey V; Erck, Robert A; Moore, Jerry F; Zinovev, Alexander V; Tripa, C Emil; Veryovkin, Igor V

    2013-02-27

    In materials science and engineering it is often necessary to obtain quantitative measurements of surface topography with micrometer lateral resolution. From the measured surface, 3D topographic maps can be subsequently analyzed using a variety of software packages to extract the information that is needed. In this article we describe how white light interferometry, and optical profilometry (OP) in general, combined with generic surface analysis software, can be used for materials science and engineering tasks. In this article, a number of applications of white light interferometry for investigation of surface modifications in mass spectrometry, and wear phenomena in tribology and lubrication are demonstrated. We characterize the products of the interaction of semiconductors and metals with energetic ions (sputtering), and laser irradiation (ablation), as well as ex situ measurements of wear of tribological test specimens. Specifically, we will discuss: i. Aspects of traditional ion sputtering-based mass spectrometry such as sputtering rates/yields measurements on Si and Cu and subsequent time-to-depth conversion. ii. Results of quantitative characterization of the interaction of femtosecond laser irradiation with a semiconductor surface. These results are important for applications such as ablation mass spectrometry, where the quantities of evaporated material can be studied and controlled via pulse duration and energy per pulse. Thus, by determining the crater geometry one can define depth and lateral resolution versus experimental setup conditions. iii. Measurements of surface roughness parameters in two dimensions, and quantitative measurements of the surface wear that occur as a result of friction and wear tests. Some inherent drawbacks, possible artifacts, and uncertainty assessments of the white light interferometry approach will be discussed and explained.

  12. Health-friendly high-quality white light using violet-green-red laser and InGaN nanowires-based true yellow nanowires light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien K.; Zhao, Chao; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Prabaswara, Aditya; Consiglio, Giuseppe Bernardo; Shen, Chao; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-02-01

    White light based on blue laser - YAG: Ce3+ phosphor has the advantage of implementing solid-state lighting and optical wireless communications combined-functionalities in a single lamp. However, the blue light was found to disrupt melatonin production, and therefore the human circadian rhythm in general; while the yellow phosphor is susceptible to degradation by laser irradiation and also lack tunability in color rendering index (CRI). In this investigation, by using a violet laser, which has 50% less impact on circadian response, as compared to blue light, and an InGaN-quantum-disks nanowires-based light-emitting diode (NWs-LED), we address both issues simultaneously. The white light is therefore generated using violet-green-red lasers, in conjunction with a yellow NWs-LED realized using molecular beam epitaxy technique, on titanium-coated silicon substrates. Unlike the conventional quantum-well-based LED, the NWs-LED showed efficiency-droop free behavior up to 9.8 A/cm2 with peak output power of 400 μW. A low turn-on voltage of 2.1 V was attributed to the formation of conducting titanium nitride layer at NWs nucleation site and improved fabrication process in the presence of relatively uniform height distribution. The 3D quantum confinement and the reduced band bending improve carriers-wavefunctions overlap, resulting in an IQE of 39 %. By changing the relative intensities of the individual color components, CRI of >85 was achieved with tunable correlated color temperature (CCT), thus covering the desired room lighting conditions. Our architecture provides important considerations in designing smart solid-state lighting while addressing the harmful effect of blue light.

  13. Health-friendly high-quality white light using violet-green-red laser and InGaN nanowires-based true yellow nanowires light-emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Janjua, Bilal

    2017-02-16

    White light based on blue laser - YAG: Ce phosphor has the advantage of implementing solid-state lighting and optical wireless communications combined-functionalities in a single lamp. However, the blue light was found to disrupt melatonin production, and therefore the human circadian rhythm in general; while the yellow phosphor is susceptible to degradation by laser irradiation and also lack tunability in color rendering index (CRI). In this investigation, by using a violet laser, which has 50% less impact on circadian response, as compared to blue light, and an InGaN-quantum-disks nanowires-based light-emitting diode (NWs-LED), we address both issues simultaneously. The white light is therefore generated using violet-green-red lasers, in conjunction with a yellow NWs-LED realized using molecular beam epitaxy technique, on titanium-coated silicon substrates. Unlike the conventional quantum-well-based LED, the NWs-LED showed efficiency-droop free behavior up to 9.8 A/cm with peak output power of 400 μW. A low turn-on voltage of ∼2.1 V was attributed to the formation of conducting titanium nitride layer at NWs nucleation site and improved fabrication process in the presence of relatively uniform height distribution. The 3D quantum confinement and the reduced band bending improve carriers-wavefunctions overlap, resulting in an IQE of ∼39 %. By changing the relative intensities of the individual color components, CRI of >85 was achieved with tunable correlated color temperature (CCT), thus covering the desired room lighting conditions. Our architecture provides important considerations in designing smart solid-state lighting while addressing the harmful effect of blue light.

  14. Quality of Reporting and Study Design of CKD Cohort Studies Assessing Mortality in the Elderly Before and After STROBE: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Anirudh; Brück, Katharina; Methven, Shona; Evans, Rebecca; Stel, Vianda S.; Jager, Kitty J.; Hooft, Lotty; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Caskey, Fergus

    2016-01-01

    The STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement was published in October 2007 to improve quality of reporting of observational studies. The aim of this review was to assess the impact of the STROBE statement on observational study reporting and study

  15. Quality of reporting and study design of CKD cohort studies assessing mortality in the elderly before and after STROBE : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Anirudh; Brück, Katharina; Methven, Shona; Evans, Rebecca; Stel, Vianda S.; Jager, Kitty J.; Hooft, Lotty; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Caskey, Fergus

    2016-01-01

    Background: The STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement was published in October 2007 to improve quality of reporting of observational studies. The aim of this review was to assess the impact of the STROBE statement on observational study reporting and

  16. Lasers and high-energy light as a decontamination tool for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flesher, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    Light-aided decontamination (LAD) removal of paint and concrete layers is competitive with sand blasting rates. Remote operations, up to 137 m (450 ft), and lower waste volumes can provide cost, safety, and environmental advantages for nuclear facilities

  17. Pre-sowing laser light effect on some biochemical and physiological processes in seeds and plants of maize (Zea mays L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podleśny, J.; Stochmal, A.

    2005-01-01

    The work is a contribution towards to widen the knowledge concerning the influence of laser irradiation on maize seeds and plants. The treating of seeds by laser light increased the activity of amylolytic enzymes in studied seeds. The largest differentiation of amylolytic activity for irridiated vs. non irridiated seeds was found after 96 hours from sowing. The dynamics of activity of these enzymes was similar in the seeds of both maize hybrids. Pre-sowing laser stimulation of seeds also positively influenced the growth and development of seedlings grew from the seeds

  18. Mejorar la comunicación de estudios observacionales en epidemiología (STROBE: explicación y elaboración Strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology (STROBE: explanation and elaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P. Vandenbroucke

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Gran parte de la investigación biomédica es de tipo observacional. Los informes de los estudios observacionales a menudo poseen una calidad insuficiente, lo que dificulta la evaluación de sus fortalezas y debilidades para generalizar los resultados. Teniendo en cuenta la evidencia empírica y consideraciones teóricas, un grupo de expertos en metodología, investigadores y editores de revistas científicas, desarrollaron una lista de recomendaciones para aumentar la calidad de las publicaciones de los estudios observacionales: Strenghtening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE. La Declaración STROBE consiste en una lista de verificación de 22 puntos que guardan relación con las diferentes secciones de un artículo: título, resumen, introducción, metodología, resultados y discusión. De ellos, 18 puntos son comunes a los tres diseños de estudio: cohorte, casos y controles, y transversales; los otros cuatro son específicos para cada una de estas tres modalidades. La Declaración STROBE proporciona a los autores información sobre cómo mejorar la calidad de los artículos sobre estudios observacionales y facilita a los revisores, editores de revistas y lectores su apreciación crítica y su interpretación. Este documento explicativo tiene el propósito de impulsar el uso, la comprensión y la difusión de la Declaración STROBE. Se presentan el significado y el análisis razonado para cada punto de la lista de verificación, proporcionando uno o varios ejemplos publicados en la literatura y, en lo posible, referencias de estudios empíricos relevantes y literatura metodológica. También se incluyen ejemplos de diagramas de flujo. La Declaración STROBE, el presente documento y la página Web asociada (http://www.strobe-statement.org/ son recursos útiles para mejorar la divulgación de la investigación observacional.Much medical research is observational. The reporting of observational studies is often of

  19. Optimized laser cutting on light guide plates using grey relational analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Fei; Ho, Yu-Sen; Hsiao, Wen-Tse; Wu, Tse-Hung; Tseng, Shih-Feng; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2011-02-01

    This paper present the optimum conditions for direct CO 2 laser cutting of 6-mm-thick polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) for backlit module applications. The influence of the major processing parameters on the optical transmittance ratio and surface roughness of cut samples material have been discussed. In order to assess the effects of several operational parameters on multiple-performance characteristics, we applied the grey relational analysis method. In this paper, we studied the effects of several laser direct cut parameters, such as assisted gas-flow rate, pulse repetition frequency, cutting speed, and focus position to achieve optimum characteristics for two product characteristics, optical transmittance ratio and work-piece surface roughness. The study involved nine experiments based on an orthogonal array, and results indicate the optimal process parameters as 20 NL/min for assisted-gas flow rate, 5 kHz for pulse repetition frequency, 2 mm/s for cutting speed, and 0 mm for laser focusing position. Additionally, by analyzing the grey relational grade, we found that the assisted-gas flow rate has more influence than any other single parameter.

  20. Gold-silicon nanofiber synthesized by femtosecond laser radiation for enhanced light absorptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Abdul Salam; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan; Tan, Bo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we devised a new concept for the precise nanofabrication of Au-Si fibrous nanostructures using megahertz femtosecond laser irradiation in air and atmospheric pressure conditions. The weblike fibrous nanostructures of Au thin layer on silicon substrate, which are proposed for the application of solar cells, exhibit a specific improvement of the optical properties in visible wavelength. Varying numbers of laser interaction pulses were used to control the synthesis of the nanofibrous structures. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that the nanostructures are formed due to the aggregation of polycrystalline nanoparticles of the respective constituent materials with diameters varying between 30 and 90 nm. Measurement of the reflectance through a spectroradiometer showed that the coupling of incident electromagnetic irradiation was greatly improved over the broadband wavelength range. Lower reflectance intensity was obtained with a higher number of laser pulses due to the bulk of gold nanoparticles being agglomerated by the mechanism of fusion. This forms interweaving fibrous nanostructures which reveal a certain degree of assembly. 81.05.Zx; 81.07.-b.

  1. Powder agglomeration study in RF silane plasmas by in situ polarization-sensitive laser light scattering and TEM measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courteille, C.; Hollenstein, C.; Dorier, J.L.; Gay, P.; Schwarzenbach, W.; Howling, A.A.; Bertran, E.; Viera, G.; Martins, R.; Macarico, A.

    1966-03-01

    To determine self-consistently the time evolution of particle size and their number density in situ multi-angle polarization laser light scattering was used. Cross-polarization intensities (incident and scattered light intensities with opposite polarization) measured at 135 o and ex-situ TEM analysis demonstrate the existence of non-spherical agglomerates during the early phase of agglomeration. Later in the particle time development both techniques reveal spherical particles again. The presence of strong cross-polarization intensities is accompanied by low frequency instabilities detected on the scattered light intensities and plasma emission. It is found that the particle radius and particle number density during the agglomeration phase can be well described by the Brownian Free Molecule Coagulation model. Application of this neutral particle coagulation model is justified by calculation of the particle charge whereby it is shown that particles of a few tens of nanometer can be considered as neutral under our experimental conditions. The measured particle dispersion can be well described by a Brownian Free Molecule Coagulation model including a log-normal particle size distribution. (author) 11 figs., 48 refs

  2. Chirality Emergence in Thin Solid Films of Amino Acids by Polarized Light from Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashahiro Adachi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most attractive hypothesis for the origin of homochirality in terrestrial bioorganic compounds is that a kind of “chiral impulse” as an asymmetric excitation source induced asymmetric reactions on the surfaces of such materials such as meteorites or interstellar dusts prior to the existence of terrestrial life (Cosmic Scenario. To experimentally introduce chiral structure into racemic films of amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine, isovaline, etc., we irradiated them with linearly polarized light (LPL from synchrotron radiation and circularly polarized light (CPL from a free electron laser. After the irradiation, we evaluated optical anisotropy by measuring the circular dichroism (CD spectra and verified that new Cotton peaks appeared at almost the same peak position as those of the corresponding non-racemic amino acid films. With LPL irradiation, two-dimensional anisotropic structure expressed as linear dichroism and/or linear birefringence was introduced into the racemic films. With CPL irradiation, the signs of the Cotton peaks exhibit symmetrical structure corresponding to the direction of CPL rotation. This indicates that some kinds of chiral structure were introduced into the racemic film. The CD spectra after CPL irradiation suggest the chiral structure should be derived from not only preferential photolysis but also from photolysis-induced molecular structural change. These results suggest that circularly polarized light sources in space could be associated with the origin of terrestrial homochirality; that is, they would be effective asymmetric exciting sources introducing chiral structures into bio-organic molecules or complex organic compounds.

  3. Chirality Emergence in Thin Solid Films of Amino Acids by Polarized Light from Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Shinojima, Hiroyuki; Seyama, Michiko; Ueno, Yuko; Kaneko, Takeo; Kobayashi, Kensei; Mita, Hajime; Adachi, Mashahiro; Hosaka, Masahito; Katoh, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    One of the most attractive hypothesis for the origin of homochirality in terrestrial bioorganic compounds is that a kind of “chiral impulse” as an asymmetric excitation source induced asymmetric reactions on the surfaces of such materials such as meteorites or interstellar dusts prior to the existence of terrestrial life (Cosmic Scenario). To experimentally introduce chiral structure into racemic films of amino acids (alanine, phenylalanine, isovaline, etc.), we irradiated them with linearly polarized light (LPL) from synchrotron radiation and circularly polarized light (CPL) from a free electron laser. After the irradiation, we evaluated optical anisotropy by measuring the circular dichroism (CD) spectra and verified that new Cotton peaks appeared at almost the same peak position as those of the corresponding non-racemic amino acid films. With LPL irradiation, two-dimensional anisotropic structure expressed as linear dichroism and/or linear birefringence was introduced into the racemic films. With CPL irradiation, the signs of the Cotton peaks exhibit symmetrical structure corresponding to the direction of CPL rotation. This indicates that some kinds of chiral structure were introduced into the racemic film. The CD spectra after CPL irradiation suggest the chiral structure should be derived from not only preferential photolysis but also from photolysis-induced molecular structural change. These results suggest that circularly polarized light sources in space could be associated with the origin of terrestrial homochirality; that is, they would be effective asymmetric exciting sources introducing chiral structures into bio-organic molecules or complex organic compounds. PMID:19742124

  4. Methods and processes of developing the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary (STROBE-Vet) statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sargeant, J. M.; O'Connor, A. M.; Dohoo, I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The reporting of observational studies in veterinary research presents many challenges thatoften are not adequately addressed in published reporting guidelines.Objective: To develop an extension of the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studiesin Epidemiology......) statement that addresses unique reporting requirements for observational studies inveterinary medicine related to health, production, welfare, and food safety.Design: A consensus meeting of experts was organized to develop an extension of the STROBE statementto address observational studies in veterinary...... and biostatisticians, many of whom hold or have held editorial positionswith relevant journals.Methods: Prior to the meeting, 19 experts completed a survey about whether they felt any of the 22 itemsof the STROBE statement should be modified and if items should be added to address unique issues relatedto observational...

  5. Methods and Processes of Developing the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology—Veterinary (STROBE-Vet) Statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sargeant, J. M.; O'Connor, A. M.; Dohoo, I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Reporting of observational studies in veterinary research presents challenges that often are not addressed in published reporting guidelines. Our objective was to develop an extension of the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement that addresses...... unique reporting requirements for observational studies in veterinary medicine related to health, production, welfare, and food safety. We conducted a consensus meeting with 17 experts in Mississauga, Canada. Experts completed a premeeting survey about whether items in the STROBE statement should...... be modified or added to address unique issues related to observational studies in animal species with health, production, welfare, or food safety outcomes. During the meeting, each STROBE item was discussed to determine whether or not rewording was recommended, and whether additions were warranted. Anonymous...

  6. Methods and Processes of Developing the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary (STROBE-Vet) Statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sargeant, J.M.; O'Connor, A.M.; Dohoo, I.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background:  The reporting of observational studies in veterinary research presents many challenges that often are not adequately addressed in published reporting guidelines. Objective: To develop an extension of the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology......) statement that addresses unique reporting requirements for observational studies in veterinary medicine related to health, production, welfare, and food safety. Design: A consensus meeting of experts was organized to develop an extension of the STROBE statement to address observational studies in veterinary...... and biostatisticians, many of whom hold or have held editorial positions with relevant journals. Methods: Prior to the meeting, 19 experts completed a survey about whether they felt any of the 22 items of the STROBE statement should be modified and if items should be added to address unique issues related...

  7. Direct measuring of single-cycle mid-IR light bullets path length in LiF by the laser coloration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekalin, Sergey; Kompanets, Victor; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Dormidonov, Alexander; Kandidov, Valerii

    2017-10-01

    A colour-centre structure formed in a LiF crystal under filamentation of a femtosecond mid-IR laser pulse with a power slightly exceeding the critical power for self-focusing has been experimentally and theoretically investigated. A single-cycle light bullet was recorded for the first time by observation of strictly periodic oscillations for the density of the color centers induced in an isotropic LiF crystal under filamentation of a laser beam with a wavelength tuned in the range from 2600 to 3900 nm, which is due to the periodic change in the light field amplitude in the light bullet formed under filamentation under propagation in dispersive medium. The light bullet path length was not more than one millimeter.

  8. Direct measuring of single-cycle mid-IR light bullets path length in LiF by the laser coloration method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekalin Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A colour-centre structure formed in a LiF crystal under filamentation of a femtosecond mid-IR laser pulse with a power slightly exceeding the critical power for self-focusing has been experimentally and theoretically investigated. A single-cycle light bullet was recorded for the first time by observation of strictly periodic oscillations for the density of the color centers induced in an isotropic LiF crystal under filamentation of a laser beam with a wavelength tuned in the range from 2600 to 3900 nm, which is due to the periodic change in the light field amplitude in the light bullet formed under filamentation under propagation in dispersive medium. The light bullet path length was not more than one millimeter.

  9. Design of a solid state laser for low noise upconversion detection of near infrared light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Lasse; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    To maximize signal-to-noise ratio for upconversion of near-infrared light we show that the mixing intensity should be 3 GW/m2. With emphasis on the noise contribution from random duty-cycle errors the optimum design parameters is discussed.......To maximize signal-to-noise ratio for upconversion of near-infrared light we show that the mixing intensity should be 3 GW/m2. With emphasis on the noise contribution from random duty-cycle errors the optimum design parameters is discussed....

  10. Comparison of harmful gases produced during GreenLight High-Performance System laser prostatectomy and transurethral resection of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Chol; Lee, Sang Kyi; Han, Suk Hee; Chung, Yun Jo; Park, Jong Kwan

    2012-05-01

    To compare the gases generated from GreenLight High-Performance System (HPS) laser prostatectomy with Urosol or normal saline solution and transurethral resection and vaporization of the prostate (TURVP) with Urosol. A total of 36 smoke samples were collected from a continuous irrigation suction system attached to a Tenax absorber during transurethral surgery of the prostate. The gases were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry equipped with a purge and trap sample injector. The gas produced during TURVP contained propylene, allene, isobutylene, 1,3-butadiene, vinyl acetylene, mercaptomethane, ethyl acetylene, diacetylene, 1-pentene, ethanol, piperylene, propenylacetylene, 1,4-pentadiene, cyclopentadiene, acrylnitrile, and butyrolacton. The types and amount of gas produced during HPS laser prostatectomy were fewer and smaller than during TURVP. However, 1,3-butadiene, a well-known human carcinogen, was also generated by HPS laser prostatectomy. HPS laser prostatectomy with saline produced a greater amount and number of gases than HPS laser prostatectomy with Urosol. The surgical smoke produced from TURVP and HPS laser prostatectomy contains potentially harmful chemical compounds, although HPS laser prostatectomy produced less surgical smoke than TURVP. Urosol produced fewer types and a smaller amount of gas than normal saline during HPS laser prostatectomy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Sandia laser plasma extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray (XUV) light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tooman, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    Laser produced plasmas have been shown to be extremely bright sources of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray (XUV) radiation; however, certain practical difficulties have hindered the development of this source as a routinely usable laboratory device. To explore solutions to these difficulties, Sandia has constructed an XUV laser plasma source (LASPS) with the intention of developing an instrument that can be used for experiments requiring intense XUV radiation from 50-300 eV. The driving laser for this source is a KrF excimer with a wavelength of 248 nm, divergence of 200 μrad, pulse width of 23 ns at 20 Hz and typical pulse energy of 500 mJ which allows for good energy coupling to the plasma at moderate (10/sup 12/ W cm/sup 2/) power densities. This source has been pulsed approximately 2 x 10/sup 5/ times, demonstrating good tolerance to plasma debris. The source radiates from the visible to well above 1000 eV, however, to date attention has been concentrated on the 50-300 eV region. In this paper, spectral data and plasma images for both stainless steel and gold targets are presented with the gold target yielding a 200 μm plasma and reradiating 3.9% of the pump energy into 15-73 eV band, a flux of 1.22 x 10/sup 13/ photons/pulse/eV into 2π sr. Further efforts will expand these measurements to rare earth targets and to higher spectral energies. A special high throughput wide angle XUV (50-300 eV) monochromator and associated optics is being concurrently developed to collect the plasma radiation, perform energy dispersion and focus the radiation onto the experimental area

  12. Rear surface light emission measurements from laser-produced shock waves in clear and Al-coated polystyrene targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, E. A.; Deniz, A. V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Stamper, J. A.; Obenschain, S. P.; Lehecka, T.; Mostovych, A. N.; Seely, J.

    1999-08-01

    The Nike KrF laser, with its very uniform focal distributions, has been used at intensities near 10 14 W/cm 2 to launch shock waves in polystyrene targets. The rear surface visible light emission differed between clear polystyrene (CH) targets and targets with a thin (125 nm) Al coating on the rear side. The uncoated CH targets showed a relatively slowly rising emission followed by a sudden fall when the shock emerges, while the Al-coated targets showed a rapid rise in emission when the shock emerges followed by a slower fall, allowing an unambiguous determination of the time the shock arrived at the rear surface. A half-aluminized target allowed us to observe this difference in a single shot. The brightness temperature of both the aluminized targets and the non-aluminized targets was slightly below but close to rear surface temperature predictions of a hydrodynamic code. A discussion of preheat effects is given.

  13. Multimodal and multiplex spectral imaging of rat cornea ex vivo using a white-light laser source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Hiroki; Kaji, Yuichi; Leproux, Philippe; Couderc, Vincent; Ozawa, Takeaki; Oshika, Tetsuro; Kano, Hideaki

    2015-09-01

    We applied our multimodal nonlinear spectral imaging microscope to the measurement of rat cornea. We successfully obtained multiple nonlinear signals of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), third-order sum frequency generation (TSFG), and second harmonic generation (SHG). Depending on the nonlinear optical processes, the cornea tissue was visualized with different image contrast mechanism simultaneously. Due to white-light laser excitation, multiplex CARS and TSFG spectra were obtained. Combined multimodal and spectral analysis clearly elucidated the layered structure of rat cornea with molecular structural information. This study indicates that our multimodal nonlinear spectral microscope is a promising bioimaging method for tissue study. Multimodal nonlinear spectral images of rat cornea at corneal epithelium and corneal stroma in the in-plane (XY) direction. With use of the combinational analysis of different nonlinear optical processes, detailed molecular structural information is available without staining or labelling. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Predictions for the energy loss of light ions in laser-generated plasmas at low and medium velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayzac, W; Bagnoud, V; Basko, M M; Blažević, A; Frank, A; Gericke, D O; Hallo, L; Malka, G; Ortner, A; Tauschwitz, An; Vorberger, J; Roth, M

    2015-11-01

    The energy loss of light ions in dense plasmas is investigated with special focus on low to medium projectile energies, i.e., at velocities where the maximum of the stopping power occurs. In this region, exceptionally large theoretical uncertainties remain and no conclusive experimental data are available. We perform simulations of beam-plasma configurations well suited for an experimental test of ion energy loss in highly ionized, laser-generated carbon plasmas. The plasma parameters are extracted from two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, and a Monte Carlo calculation of the charge-state distribution of the projectile ion beam determines the dynamics of the ion charge state over the whole plasma profile. We show that the discrepancies in the energy loss predicted by different theoretical models are as high as 20-30%, making these theories well distinguishable in suitable experiments.

  15. Real-time diagnostics of fast light ion beams accelerated by a sub-nanosecond laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margarone, Daniele; Krása, Josef; Picciotto, A.; Prokůpek, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2011), s. 137-141 ISSN 0029-5922 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/1165 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 212105 - ELI-PP Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser-driven acceleration * ion beams * real-time diagnostics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.389, year: 2011 http://www.nukleonika.pl/www/back/full/vol56_2011/v56n2p137f.pdf

  16. Simultaneous Modeling of Waveforms Associated With Backscattered He-Ne Laser Light from a Fluid Filled Capillary Tube by Use of Geometrical Optics and Wave Theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarigan, Hendra J.

    2008-01-01

    Backscattered He-Ne laser light from a side illuminated fluid-filled fused silica capillary tube generates a series of fringes when viewed in an imaging plane. The light intensity variation as a function of scattering angle constitutes a waveform, which contains hills and valleys. Geometrical Optics and Wave Theories, simultaneously, are employed to model the waveforms and quantify the index of refraction of fluid in the capillary tube.

  17. Directly modulated green-light diode-pumped solid-state laser for underwater wireless optical communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Kong, Meiwei; Lin, Aobo; Song, Yuhang; Han, Jun; Xu, Zhiwei; Wu, Bo; Gao, Shiming; Deng, Ning

    2017-05-01

    It is widely known that a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) has very limited modulation bandwidth. Recently, we directed our attention toward the opportunities for directly modulating a DPSSL to generate high-speed green-light signals, with high power and superior beam quality, which are highly desirable in underwater wireless optical communication. The constraint imposed by the limited modulation bandwidth of a DPSSL is circumvented with the strategy of orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing and power loading. With a compact DPSSL dismantled from a low-cost laser pointer, we achieve net bit rates of 108.55 Mb/s for the 64 quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) signal at a bit error rate (BER) of 6.42×10-4 and 89.55 Mb/s for the 32 QAM signal at a BER of 4.81×10-4, respectively, over a 2 m underwater channel. When the underwater transmission distance is increased to 6 m, the BERs are still below the forward error correction (FEC) limit of 3.8×10-3.

  18. Implementation of a practical model for light and heat distribution using laser-induced thermotherapy near to a large vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhey, J F [Department of Medical Informatics, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany); Mohammed, Y [Department of Medical Informatics, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany); Ludwig, A [Department of Craneo-Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany); Giese, K [Department of Medical Informatics, University of Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, D-37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2003-11-07

    This paper introduces a simulation model for light and heat transport in tissues including perfusion effects. The model enables an efficient simulation of the damaged zone induced with an optical fibre for laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT). It is designed specially for, but not limited to, tissue ablation in the neck region near to vessels. We describe in detail the effects of the rise in temperature caused by the absorption of light in tissue, using the heat equation and including the cooling effects of flow in vessels and of microperfusion in tissue in order to determine the extent of thermal damage. The extent of the necrosis zone is calculated with a damage function at each point of a finite element method (FEM) mesh. The FEM mesh is implemented with FEMLAB 2.3 as an add-on for finite element modelling for Matlab 6.5. LITT for tumour ablation in liver and some other anatomical regions is a well-known and established method (Bundesaerztekammer und Kassenaerztliche Bundesvereinigung 2002 Assessment der Bundesaerztekammer und der Kassenaerztlichen Bundesvereinigung, Koeln). Investigations of treatments using LITT in the neck region are still in progress. We propose a refined model to validate the LITT method in the future in another anatomic region, e.g., in the highly sensitive region of the neck. Our calculations show that in order to induce a lesion with a maximum diameter of about 1 cm near to a large vessel, an application time between 3 and 4 min is needed using a laser power of about 10 W with a Nd:YAG 1064 nm radiation wavelength.

  19. Degree of conversion and temperature increase of a composite resin light cured with an argon laser and blue LED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastelli, A. N. S.; Jacomassi, D. P.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2008-12-01

    Different light sources and power densities used on the photoactivation process may provide changes in the degree of conversion (DC%) and temperature ( T) of the composite resins. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the DC (%) and T (°C) of the microhybrid composite resin (Filtek™ Z-250, 3M/ESPE) photoactivated with one argon laser and one LED (light-emitting diode) with different power densities. For the KBr pellet technique, the composite resin was placed into a metallic mould (2-mm thickness, 4-mm diameter) and photoactivated as follows: a continuous argon laser (CW) and LED LCUs with power density values of 100, 400, 700, and 1000 mW/cm2 for 20 s. The measurements for DC (%) were made in a FTIR spectrometer Bomen (model MB 102, Quebec, Canada). Spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra for both uncured and cured samples were analyzed using an accessory of the reflectance diffusion. The measurements were recorded in absorbance operating under the following conditions: 32 scans, 4 cm-1 resolution, 300 to 4000-cm-1 wavelength. The percentage of unreacted carbon double bonds (% C=C) was determined from the ratio of absorbance intensities of aliphatic C=C (peak at 1638 cm-1) against an internal standard before and after the curing of the specimen: aromatic C-C (peak at 1608 cm-1). For T (°C), the samples were created in a metallic mould (2-mm thickness, 4-mm diameter) and photoactivated for 20 s. The thermocouple was attached to the multimeter allowing temperature readings. The DC (%) and T (°C) were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey’s test ( p units.

  20. Light microscopic description of the effects of laser phototherapy on bone defects grafted with mineral trioxide aggregate, bone morphogenetic proteins, and guided bone regeneration in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L B; Soares, Luiz G P; Aciole, Gilberth T S; Correia, Neandder A; Barbosa, Artur F S; Ramalho, Luciana M P; Dos Santos, Jean N

    2011-08-01

    We carried out a histological analysis on bone defects grafted with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) treated or not with laser, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Benefits of the use of MTA, laser, BMPs, and GBR on bone repair are well known, but there is no report on their association with laser light. Ninety rats were divided into 10 groups each subdivided into 3. Defects on G II and I were filled with the blood clot. G II was further irradiated with LED. G III and IV were filled with MTA; G IV was further irradiated with laser. G V and VI, the defects filled with MTA and covered with a membrane (GBR). G VI was further irradiated with laser. G VII and VIII, BMPs were added to the MTA and group VIII further irradiated with laser. G IX and X, the MTA + BMP graft was covered with a membrane (GBR). G X was further irradiated with laser. Laser light (λ = 850 nm, 150 mW, 4 J/cm(2) ) was applied over the defect at 48-h intervals and repeated for 15 days. Specimens were processed, cut and stained with H&E and Sirius red and underwent histological analysis. Subjects on group X were irradiated. The results showed different tissue response on all groups during the experimental time. Major changes were seen on irradiated subjects and included marked deposition of new bone in advanced maturation. It is concluded that near infrared laser phototherapy improved the results of the use of the MTA on bone defects. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Up to 30 mW of broadly tunable CW green-to-orange light, based on sum-frequency mixing of Cr4+:forsterite and Nd:YVO4 lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jesper Liltorp; McWilliam, Allan; G. Leburn, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Efficient generation of continuous-wave (CW) tunable light in the yellow region is reported. The method is based on sum-frequency mixing of a tunable Cr4+:forsterite laser with a Nd:YVO4 laser. A periodically poled lithium niobate crystal was placed intra-cavity in a Nd:YVO4 laser, and the Cr4+:f...

  2. Light induced drift: a possible mechanism of separation of isotopes by laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, D.J.; Nilaya, J.P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2003-02-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature on the effect of light induced drift and its exploitation in the separation of isotopes, both in atomic and molecular forms, is presented. An experimental scheme based on this effect to separate S 33 , with a natural abundance of ∼0.76%, from SF 6 has also been worked out. (author)

  3. Doppler Monte Carlo simulations of light scattering in tissue to support laser-Doppler perfusion measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, F.F.M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Greve, Jan

    1999-01-01

    Doppler Monte Carlo (DMC) simulations of the transport of light through turbid media, e.g., tissue, can be used to predict or to interpret measurements of the blood perfusion of tissue by laser‐Doppler perfusion flowmetry. We describe the physical and mathematical background of Doppler Monte Carlo

  4. Reporting Guidelines for Health Care Simulation Research: Extensions to the CONSORT and STROBE Statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Kessler, David; Mackinnon, Ralph; Chang, Todd P; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Duval-Arnould, Jordan; Lin, Yiqun; Cook, David A; Pusic, Martin; Hui, Joshua; Moher, David; Egger, Matthias; Auerbach, Marc

    2016-08-01

    Simulation-based research (SBR) is rapidly expanding but the quality of reporting needs improvement. For a reader to critically assess a study, the elements of the study need to be clearly reported. Our objective was to develop reporting guidelines for SBR by creating extensions to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) and Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statements. An iterative multistep consensus-building process was used on the basis of the recommended steps for developing reporting guidelines. The consensus process involved the following: (1) developing a steering committee, (2) defining the scope of the reporting guidelines, (3) identifying a consensus panel, (4) generating a list of items for discussion via online premeeting survey, (5) conducting a consensus meeting, and (6) drafting reporting guidelines with an explanation and elaboration document. The following 11 extensions were recommended for item 1 (title/abstract), item 2 (background), item 5 (interventions), item 6 (outcomes), item 11 (blinding), item 12 (statistical methods), item 15 (baseline data), item 17 (outcomes/estimation), item 20 (limitations), item 21 (generalizability), and item 25 (funding). The following 10 extensions were recommended for STROBE: item 1 (title/abstract), item 2 (background/rationale), item 7 (variables), item 8 (data sources/measurement), item 12 (statistical methods), item 14 (descriptive data), item 16 (main results), item 19 (limitations), item 21 (generalizability), and item 22 (funding). An elaboration document was created to provide examples and explanation for each extension. We have developed extensions for the CONSORT and STROBE Statements that can help improve the quality of reporting for SBR.

  5. Reporting guidelines for health care simulation research: extensions to the CONSORT and STROBE statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Kessler, David; Mackinnon, Ralph; Chang, Todd P; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Duval-Arnould, Jordan; Lin, Yiqun; Cook, David A; Pusic, Martin; Hui, Joshua; Moher, David; Egger, Matthias; Auerbach, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Simulation-based research (SBR) is rapidly expanding but the quality of reporting needs improvement. For a reader to critically assess a study, the elements of the study need to be clearly reported. Our objective was to develop reporting guidelines for SBR by creating extensions to the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) and Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statements. An iterative multistep consensus-building process was used on the basis of the recommended steps for developing reporting guidelines. The consensus process involved the following: (1) developing a steering committee, (2) defining the scope of the reporting guidelines, (3) identifying a consensus panel, (4) generating a list of items for discussion via online premeeting survey, (5) conducting a consensus meeting, and (6) drafting reporting guidelines with an explanation and elaboration document. The following 11 extensions were recommended for CONSORT: item 1 (title/abstract), item 2 (background), item 5 (interventions), item 6 (outcomes), item 11 (blinding), item 12 (statistical methods), item 15 (baseline data), item 17 (outcomes/ estimation), item 20 (limitations), item 21 (generalizability), and item 25 (funding). The following 10 extensions were recommended for STROBE: item 1 (title/abstract), item 2 (background/rationale), item 7 (variables), item 8 (data sources/measurement), item 12 (statistical methods), item 14 (descriptive data), item 16 (main results), item 19 (limitations), item 21 (generalizability), and item 22 (funding). An elaboration document was created to provide examples and explanation for each extension. We have developed extensions for the CONSORT and STROBE Statements that can help improve the quality of reporting for SBR ( Sim Healthcare 00:00-00, 2016).

  6. Using the STROBE Statement to Assess Reporting of Observational Trials in Hand Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Amelia A.; Wojahn, Robert D.; Manske, Mary Claire; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To use the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist to critically evaluate the change in quality of observational trial reporting in the Journal of Hand Surgery American between 2005 and 2011. Methods A cross-sectional analysis of observational studies published in Journal of Hand Surgery American was designed to sample 2 6-month periods of publication (March 2005 - August 2005 and June 2011 - November 2011). Fifty-one items were extracted from the STROBE statement for evaluation. Overall STROBE compliance rates for articles and specific checklist items were determined. Final compliance percentages from each period were compared by Student t-testing. Changes in item compliance over time were quantified. Results Overall compliance with the STROBE statement was 38% (range, 10-54%) in 2005 and 58% (range, 39%-85%) for 2011 manuscripts representing a significant improvement. Seventy-five percent or greater of articles (2005/2011) provided the explicit reporting of background (100%/97%), follow-up time (85%/94%), overall interpretation of data (100%/94%), and results of similar studies (95%/89%). Twenty-five percent or less of articles provided the study design in the abstract (10%/20%), a clear description of the study's setting (10%/23%), the handling of missing data (0%/6%), the potential directions of bias (5%/11%) and use of a power analysis (0%/17%). Eighty-six percent (44/51) of items were more frequently satisfied in 2011 articles compared to 2005 publications. Absolute increases in compliance rates of ≥40% were noted in 10 items (20%) with no worsening in compliance for an individual item over 6%. Discussion The overall quality of the reporting of observational trials in Journal of Hand Surgery American improved from 2005 to 2011. Current observational trials in hand surgery could still benefit from increased reporting of methodologic details including the use of power analyses, the handling of

  7. A randomized trial to determine the influence of laser therapy, monopolar radiofrequency treatment, and intense pulsed light therapy administered immediately after hyaluronic acid gel implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Mitchel P; Alster, Tina S; Weiss, Robert

    2007-05-01

    Hyaluronic acid-based dermal fillers, such as hyaluronic acid gel (Restylane, Q-Medical AB, Uppsala, Sweden), are widely used for tissue augmentation of the nasolabial folds. Additional dermatologic treatments using infrared light, radiofrequency (RF), and intense pulsed light (IPL) are also important tools for facial rejuvenation. This study was designed to evaluate whether these therapies could be safely administered immediately after hyaluronic acid gel treatment without compromising the effect of the dermal filler. The objective of this study was to confirm or refute any possible subtractive effects of augmentation of the nasolabial folds when followed by 1,320-nm Nd:YAG laser, 1,450-nm diode laser, monopolar RF, and/or IPL treatments. Thirty-six patients with prominent nasolabial folds were treated with hyaluronic acid gel implantation on one side of the face and hyaluronic acid gel followed by one of the nonablative laser/RF/IPL therapies on the contralateral side of the face. There were no statistically significant differences between wrinkle severity or global aesthetic scores for hyaluronic acid gel implantation alone and hyaluronic acid gel with laser/RF/IPL treatment at any time point. In a small sample, histologic changes were not apparent after laser/RF/IPL treatment. Based on this small pilot study, laser, RF, and IPL treatments can safely be administered immediately after hyaluronic acid gel implantation without reduction in overall clinical effect.

  8. Particle emission from polymer-doped water ice matrices induced by non-linear absorption of laser light at 1064 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, A.; Schou, Jørgen; Dinescu, M.

    2006-01-01

    though linear absorption in defect-free water ice is two orders of magnitude larger at 1064 ran than 355 nm, the deposition rate and ion current density are much smaller for IR than for ultraviolet laser light. The similarity of results for both wavelengths indicates that non-linear absorption...

  9. Design of a photonic integrated circuit (pic) in silicon on isolator (soi) technology for a novel chaotic integrated laser light source (chill)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerveld, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    A light source with the brightness of a laser but the bandwidth of a LED is required for different fields of applications, such as inspection and metrology in the semiconductor industry, data encryption in telecommunications and LIDAR. Currently, this issue is addressed by so-called coherence

  10. Synergic phototoxic effect of visible light or Gallium-Arsenide laser in the presence of different photo-sensitizers on Porphyromonas gingivalis and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollah Ghanbari

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the synergic phototoxic effect of visible light in combination with each of the photosensitizers on P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum. However, the synergic phototoxic effect of laser exposure and hydrogen peroxide and curcumin as photosensitizers on F. nucleatum was not shown.

  11. Long-pulsed dye laser versus intense pulsed light for photodamaged skin: A randomized split-face trial with blinded response evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, G.F.; Hedelund, L.; Haedersdal, M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In a randomized controlled split-face trial to evaluate efficacy and adverse effects from rejuvenation with long-pulsed dye laser (LPDL) versus intense pulsed light (IPL). Materials and Methods: Twenty female volunteers with Fitzpatrick skin types I-III, classes I-II rhytids, and symme......Objective: In a randomized controlled split-face trial to evaluate efficacy and adverse effects from rejuvenation with long-pulsed dye laser (LPDL) versus intense pulsed light (IPL). Materials and Methods: Twenty female volunteers with Fitzpatrick skin types I-III, classes I-II rhytids......, and symmetrical split-face photodamage were included in the study. Subjects received a series of three treatments at 3-week intervals with half-face LPDL (V-beam Perfecta, 595 nm, Candela Laser Corporation) and half-face IPL (Ellipse Flex, Danish Dermatologic Development); the interventions being randomly...

  12. Generation of shock fronts in the interaction of the short pulses of intense laser light in supercritical plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez V, V.E.

    2004-01-01

    The plasma is the state of the matter but diffused in the nature. The sun and the stars big heaps of hot plasma can be considered. The external surface of the terrestrial atmosphere this recovered by a layer of plasma. All gassy discharge (lightning spark arch etc.) this related with the formation of plasma. This way, 99 percent of our environment this formed almost of plasma. It is denominated plasma to the ionized gas in the one which all or most of the atoms have lost one or several of the electrons that belonged him, becoming positive ions and free electrons. In the plasma certain physical characteristics exist as for their behavior like they are the collective movements the quasi neutrality, the Debye length, the uncertainty etc. All these behaviors make that the study of the plasma is complex. For this they exist technical of numeric simulation joined to the technological advance of big computers of more capacity and prosecution speed. The simulation techniques of particles are those where a numeric code is built based on a model or theory of a system that it is wanted to investigate. This way through the simulation the results are compared with those theoretical predictions based on an analytic model. The applications of the physics of the plasma are multiple however we focus ourselves in the interaction laser-plasma. Both finish decades of investigation in the interaction of lasers with plasma they have been carried out in laboratories of Europe, Japan, United States. This studies concern the propagation of intense light laser in dense plasma homogeneous, the radiation absorption in cold plasma and problems related with the generation of suprathermal electrons among others. Other areas of the physics of the plasma-laser interaction that it has been considerable attention is the broadly well-known field as parametric uncertainties induced instabilities by the light and that they include the dispersions for example stimulated Raman and Brillouin being able to

  13. GPC Light Shaper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Raaby, Peter; Glückstad, Jesper

    Generalized Phase Contrast is a disruptive light sculpting technology for studying brain functionalities via light-activated neuron control. GPC dynamically reshapes conventional or multiwavelength lasers for precise and efficient neuron targeting. GPC also makes existing laser systems much more...

  14. On-line determination of the grain angle using ellipse analysis of the laser light scattering pattern image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, C.; Tanaka, C.; Ohtani, T.

    2004-01-01

    Under fixed cutting conditions, the surface finish roughness is correlated to the grain angle. However, the means of determining the grain angle automatically and accurately is still a challenge for on-line control of the router. It is therefore necessary to develop a new technology to determine the grain angle accurately and automatically. In this research, a laser light scattering pattern was used to accurately determine the grain angle. The light scattering pattern image was a quasi-ellipse caused by the grain direction and tracheid effect. A new modified Hough transform ellipse analysis technology was adopted to determine the ellipse parameters that could be used to determine the grain angle. The results indicated that the measured grain angle using the method proposed here was accurate and effective. The measured gain angle coincided with the real grain angle. There was an insignificant difference between the measured grain angle of Japanese beech (Fagus crenata blume) and that of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica D.Don) under two machining conditions that gave planed or sawn finishes. However, the accuracy of the measured grain angle of sugi was better than that of Japanese beech for the planed finish, the accuracy of the measured grain angle of Japanese beech was better than that of sugi for the sawn finish, and the accuracy of the measured grain angle for planed samples was better than that for sawn samples of both sugi and Japanese beech

  15. Air-void embedded GaN-based light-emitting diodes grown on laser drilling patterned sapphire substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Yufeng; Wang, Shuai; Feng, Lungang; Xiong, Han; Yun, Feng, E-mail: fyun2010@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Physical Electronics and Devices of Ministry of Education and Shaanxi Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonics and Information Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Solid-State Lighting Engineering Research Center, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Su, Xilin [Shaanxi Supernova Lighting Technology Co., Ltd., Xi’an, Shaanxi 710075 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Air-void structure was introduced in GaN-based blue light-emitting diodes (LED) with one-step growth on periodic laser drilling patterned sapphire substrate, which free of any photolithography or wet/dry etching process. The influence of filling factors (FF) of air-void on crystal quality and optical performance were investigate. Transmission electron microscopy images and micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the dislocation was bended and the partially compressed strain was released. When FF was 55.43%, compared with the LED structure grown on flat sapphire substrate, the incorporation of air-void was observed to reduce the compressed stress of ∼20% and the luminance intensity has improved by 128%. Together with the simulated reflection intensity enhancement by finite difference time-domain (FDTD) method, we attribute the enhanced optical performance to the combined contribution of strong back-side light reflection of air-void and better GaN epitaxial quality. This approach provides a simple replacement to the conventional air-void embedded LED process.

  16. Preparation and disinfection of root canals by 308-nm excimer laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesenhoff, Tim; Folwaczny, Matthias; Lehn, Norbert

    1994-09-01

    Conventional root canal treatments often fail due to insufficient removal of root canal contents and due to ineffective reduction of bacterial growth. In vitro investigations on the 308 nm excimer laser root canal preparation showed excellent results concerning the preparation quality. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of 308 nm excimer laserlight on the growth of bacteria. Bacterial suspensions of Staph. aureus, E. coli, and Enterococcus faec. were irradiated with various energy densities and different time duration. In order to exclude thermal side effects the temperature rise inside the suspensions was registered during irradiation. It was able to demonstrate that 308 nm excimer laserlight effects a log reduction of germ concentration at energy densities of 0.5 - 2.4 J/cm2. Laserlight effects germ reduction even without tissue removal. The effectiveness is dependent on the type of bacteria, the energy density, and the time of irradiation. The antimicrobial effect is independent from temperature.

  17. Efficient concept for generation of diffraction-limited green light by sum-frequency generation of spectrally combined tapered diode lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Sumpf, Bernd; Erbert, Götz; Andersen, Peter E; Petersen, Paul Michael

    2012-09-15

    In order to increase the power of visible diode laser systems in an efficient manner, we propose spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation. We show that this approach, in comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, can enhance the available power significantly. By combining two distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers we achieve a 2.5-3.2 fold increase in power and a maximum of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light. At this power level, green diode laser systems have a high application potential, e.g., within the biomedical field. Our concept can be expanded combining multiple diode lasers to increase the power even further.

  18. Efficient concept for generation of diffraction-limited green light by sum-frequency generation of spectrally combined tapered diode lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Hasler, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    In order to increase the power of visible diode laser systems in an efficient manner, we propose spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation. We show that this approach, in comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, can enhance the available power signific......In order to increase the power of visible diode laser systems in an efficient manner, we propose spectral beam combining with subsequent sum-frequency generation. We show that this approach, in comparison with second harmonic generation of single emitters, can enhance the available power...... significantly. By combining two distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode lasers we achieve a 2.5–3.2 fold increase in power and a maximum of 3.9 W of diffraction-limited green light. At this power level, green diode laser systems have a high application potential, e.g., within the biomedical field. Our concept...

  19. Split-face comparison of intense pulsed light and nonablative 1,064-nm Q-switched laser in skin rejuvenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Meng-Hua; Wang, Yong-Qian; Yang, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Multiple nonablative skin rejuvenation techniques have been used to improve facial aging. To compare rejuvenation efficiency of intense pulsed light (IPL) with nonablative 1,064-nm Q-switched laser in Asian patients. Twelve female subjects were enrolled and received five sessions of treatments at 2-week intervals. A split-face study was performed, with IPL applied to the left side of the face and nonablative 1,064-nm Q-switched laser to the right side. All assessments showed significant skin rejuvenation. For the improvement of skin texture, pore size, and sebum secretion, similar efficiency from laser and IPL was observed. For lightening of skin tone and macula, the IPL was more efficient than the laser after the first treatment, although no further clinical improvement resulted after three treatments. The laser gradually lightened the skin tone and macula and was ultimately more efficient than the IPL after five treatments. A series of IPL and nonablative 1,064-nm Q-switched laser treatments were performed with similar efficiency and safety for the improvement in skin texture, pore size, and sebum secretion. IPL was faster, but nonablative 1,064-nm Q-switched laser was more effective in improving skin tone and macula. © 2010 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  20. Within-patient right-left blinded comparison of diode (810 nm) laser therapy and intense pulsed light therapy for hair removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, H; Ibbotson, S H; Dawe, R S; Ferguson, J; Moseley, H

    2008-10-01

    Excessive facial hair in women can cause significant psychological distress. A variety of treatment methods are available, including lasers and, more recently, intense pulsed light (IPL) sources. There are very few studies comparing laser and IPL devices. The purpose of our study was to compare a laser diode device with an IPL, using a within-patient, right-left, assessor-blinded, controlled, study design. Hair counts were made, using coded close-up photographs. Treatments were carried out on three occasions at 6-week intervals, and a final assessment was made 6 weeks following the third treatment. Patient self-assessment was also included. Nine women were recruited, and seven completed the study. Average hair counts in a 16 cm(2) area before and after treatment were, respectively, 42.4 and 10.4 (laser), 38.1 and 20.4 (IPL), 45.3 and 44.7 (control). Both laser and IPL reduced the hair count substantially; laser vs control was significant at P=0.028, but IPL vs control had P=0.13, suggesting that more subjects or more treatments were required if statistical significance were to be achieved. Despite subjecting the patients to higher pain scores and more inflammation, laser was preferred by five patients; two preferred IPL and one had no preference.