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Sample records for striped maple acer

  1. Monitoring the health of sugar maple, Acer saccharum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Martha

    The sugar maple, Acer saccharum, is projected to decline and die in 88 to 100 percent of its current range in the United States. An iconic symbol of the northeastern temperate forest and a dominant species in this forest, the sugar maple is identified as the most sensitive tree in its ecosystem to rising temperatures and a warming climate. This study measures the health of sugar maples on 12 privately owned forests and at three schools in New Hampshire. Laboratory quantitative analyses of leaves, buds and sap as well as qualitative measures of leaf and bud indicate that record high beat in 2012 stressed the sugar maple. The study identifies several laboratory and qualitative tests of health which seem most sensitive and capable of identifying stress early when intervention in forest management or public policy change might counter decline of the species. The study presents evidence of an unusual atmospheric pollution event which defoliated sugar maples in 2010. The study examines the work of citizen scientists in Forest Watch, a K-12 school program in which students monitor the impacts of ozone on white pine, Pinus strobus, another keystone species in New Hampshire's forest. Finally, the study examines three simple measurements of bud, leaf and the tree's acclimation to light. The findings of these tests illuminate findings in the first study. And they present examples of what citizen scientists might contribute to long-term monitoring of maples. A partnership between science and citizens is proposed to begin long-term monitoring and to report on the health of sugar maples.

  2. Presumptive red maple (Acer rubrum) toxicosis in Grevy's zebra (Equus grevyi).

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    Weber, M; Miller, R E

    1997-03-01

    Two female Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi), one juvenile and one adult, were treated for hemolytic anemia. The juvenile survived, but the adult animal, which also had methemoglobinemia, was euthanized after it failed to recover from anesthesia. Significant pathologic findings in the adult zebra included generalized icterus, hemoglobinuric nephrosis, and paracentral hepatic necrosis. Serum titers for known infectious causes of anemia were negative. Examination of the zebra holding areas revealed two hybrid red maple (Acer sp.) trees. There was no known exposure to other hemolytic agents. This is the first report of probable red maple-induced hemolysis in zebra.

  3. Morphometric characteristics of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L. fruits in Novi Sad urban populations

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    Kostić Saša

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the results of the analysis of the fruit morphometric characteristics of 29 trees of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus L. and red - leaf sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus ‘Аtropurpureum’ Späth. in Novi Sad area. Based on the test trees, it can be concluded that the analyzed secondary population of sycamore maple has a high level of intra - populations variability, based on different degrees of variability of measured parameters and statistically significant differences of all analyzed parameters within the analysed genotypes. The results indicate that there are certain differences between fruit of sycamore maple and its red - leaf variety. Given that there is no statistically significant difference between sites and different urban spaces, it can be concluded that stress factors caused by a high degree of urbanity do not affect the morphometric characteristics of fruits in the analyzed test trees. Testing the symmetry of fruits indicates a high level of genetic variability within the analyzed population.

  4. Traditional uses, phytochemistry, and pharmacology of the genus Acer (maple): A review.

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    Bi, Wu; Gao, Ying; Shen, Jie; He, Chunnian; Liu, Haibo; Peng, Yong; Zhang, Chunhong; Xiao, Peigen

    2016-08-02

    The genus Acer (Aceraceae), commonly known as maple, comprises approximately 129 species that primarily grow in the northern hemisphere, especially in the temperate regions of East Asia, eastern North America, and Europe. These plants have been traditionally used to treat a wide range of diseases in East Asia and North America. Moreover, clinical studies have shown that medicinal plants belonging to Acer are highly effective in the treatment of rheumatism, bruises, hepatic disorders, eye disease, and pain, and in detoxification. This review provides a systematic and constructive overview of the traditional uses, chemical constituents, and pharmacological activities of plants of the genus Acer. This review is based on a literature study of scientific journals and books from libraries and electronic sources such as SciFinder, ScienceDirect, Springer, PubMed, CNKI, Google Scholar, Baidu Scholar, and Web of Science. The literature in this review related to chemical constituents and pharmacological activities dates from 1922 to the end of October 2015. Furthermore, ethnopharmacological information on this genus was obtained from libraries and herbaria in China and USA. In traditional medicine, 40 species, 11 subspecies, and one varieta of the genus Acer are known to exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities. To date, 331 compounds have been identified from 34 species of the genus Acer, including flavonoids, tannins, phenylpropanoids, diarylheptanoids, terpenoids, benzoic acid derivatives, and several other types of compounds, such as phenylethanoid glycosides and alkaloids. Preliminary pharmacological studies have shown that the extracts and compounds isolated from this genus exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities such as antioxidant, antitumor, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, hepatoprotective, and antiobesity activities, as well as promoting osteoblast differentiation. To date, reports on the toxicity of Acer species to humans are very limited, and

  5. Red Maple (Acer rubrum L.) Growth and Foliar Nutrient Responses to Soil Fertility Level and Water Regime

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    C. H. Pham; Howard G. Halverson; Gordon M. Heisler

    1978-01-01

    Red maple (Acer rubrum L.) seedlings were grown in a greenhouse using three treatments: two soil horizons, two soil moisture regimes, and three nutrient levels. Fertilization increased growth under moist conditions on the more fertile topsoil. Under dry conditions, fertilization had no effect on growth in subsoil, and slightly increased growth in...

  6. Morphometric characteristics of the leaves of Greek maple (Acer heldreichii Orph in central Serbia

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    Perović Marko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic characteristics of Greek maple (Acer heldreichii Orph were studied based on the analysis of leaf characteristics, by comparative-morphological method. The study was performed at three localities in central Serbia: Goč, Jastrebac and Rudnik. 30 normally developed trees were selected per each locality, and 30 leaves were selected from each tree for the analysis. The study includes 8 measured and 15 derived characteristics of leaves. The study results were statistically processed by correlation analysis, analysis of variance and cluster-analysis. It is concluded that there are two varieties, var. heldreichii and var. macropterum. Four forms are set aside in the variety macropterum: f. typicum f. dissectum, f. Equiloba and f. rotundiloba. The populations are relatively homogeneous, and both varieties occur at all three localities in significant numbers.

  7. Winter climate change and fine root biogenic silica in sugar maple trees (Acer saccharum): Implications for silica in the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Timothy J.; Templer, Pamela H.; Battles, John J.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2017-03-01

    Winter temperatures are projected to increase over the next century, leading to reductions in winter snowpack and increased frequency of soil freezing in many northern forest ecosystems. Here we examine biogenic silica (BSi) concentrations in sugar maple (Acer saccharum) fine roots collected from a snow manipulation experiment at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA). Increased soil freezing significantly lowered the BSi content of sugar maple fine roots potentially decreasing their capacity to take up water and dissolved nutrients. The reduced silica uptake (8 ± 1 kmol silica km-2) by sugar maple fine roots is comparable to silica export from temperate forest watersheds. We estimate that fine roots account for 29% of sugar maple BSi, despite accounting for only 4% of their biomass. These results suggest that increased frequency of soil freezing will reduce silica uptake by temperate tree roots, thereby changing silica availability in downstream receiving waters.

  8. Climate Change in the School Yard: Monitoring the Health of Acer Saccharum with A Maple Report Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, M.; Diller, A.; Rock, B. N.

    2012-12-01

    K-12 Teachers and students engage in authentic science and a research partnership with scientists in Maple Watch, a University of New Hampshire outreach program. Maple Watch is a hands-on, inquiry-based program in which students learn about climate change and air quality as well as many other environmental stress factors which may affect the health of sugar maple. The iconic New England tree is slated to lose 52% of its range in this century. Maple Watch builds on the 20-year record of Forest Watch, a K-12 program in which students and teachers have contributed annual research specimens and data to a UNH study of tropospheric ozone and its impact on white pine (Pinus strobus). Maple Watch students monitor sugar maples (Acer saccharum) year-round for signals of strain and disease. Students report the first run in sap season, bud burst and leaf development, and leaf senescence and fall. Across New England the timing of these phenologic events is changing with climate warming. Students assess maple health with simple measures of leaf development in May, leaf senescence in early fall and bud quality in late fall. Simple student arithmetic rankings of leaf and bud health correlate with chlorophyll content and spectral reflectance measures that students can analyze and compare with researchers at UNH. Grading their trees for each test on a one-two-three scale, students develop a Maple Report Card for each type of measurement, which presents an annual portrait of tree health. Year-by-year, schools across the sugar maple's 31 million acre range could monitor changes in tree health. The change over time in maple health can be graphed in parallel with the Goddard Space Institute's Common Sense Climate Index. Four teachers, listed as co-authors here, began a pilot study with Maple Watch in 2010, contributing sap samples and sharing curricular activities with UNH. Pilot Maple Watch schools already manage stands of sugar maples and make maple syrup and are assisting in training

  9. New forms of maples (ACER L., Aceraceae cultivated at Peter the Great Botanic Garden (ST. Petersburg, Russia

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    Firsov Gennadii

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article contains description of two new maple forms - Acer miyabei Maxim. f. suberosum Byalt et Firsov forma nova (Aceraceae and Acer saccharinum L. f. variifolium Byalt et Firsov forma nova – cultivated at Peter the Great Botanic Garden of the Komarov Botanical Institute RAS in St. Petersburg, Russia. The article contains a brief history of the introduction of A. miyabei Maxim. and A. saccharinum L., information about the origin of the planting material in the park of the botanical garden of RAS, basic differences between the new forms and similar taxa (incl. Latin diagnoses, as well as data about standard samples and their storage. The article has color photos of the alive plants located in the botanical garden of RAS. Both maple forms are very decorative and appear to be very useful for a large-scale implementation in the urban landscape planting.

  10. Managing for delicious ecosystem service under climate change: can United States sugar maple (Acer saccharum) syrup production be maintained in a warming climate?

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    Stephen N. Matthews; Louis R. Iverson

    2017-01-01

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is a highly valued tree in United States (US) and Canada, and its sap when collected from taps and concentrated, makes a delicious syrup. Understanding how this resource may be impacted by climate change and other threats is essential to continue management for maple syrup into the future. Here, we evaluate the current...

  11. Influence of overstory density on ecophysiology of red oak (Quercus rubra) and sugar maple (Acer saccharum) seedlings in central Ontario shelterwoods

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    William C. Parker; Daniel C. Dey

    2008-01-01

    A field experiment was established in a secondgrowth hardwood forest dominated by red oak (Quercus rubra L.) to examine the effects of shelterwood overstory density on leaf gas exchange and seedling water status of planted red oak, naturally regenerated red oak and sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) seedlings during the first...

  12. Long-term calcium addition increases growth release, wound closure, and health of sugar maple (Acer saccharum) trees at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

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    Brett A. Huggett; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Christopher Eager

    2007-01-01

    We surveyed and wounded forest-grown sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) trees in a long-term, replicated Ca manipulation study at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA. Plots received applications of Ca (to boost Ca availability above depleted ambient levels) or A1 (to compete with Ca uptake and further reduce Ca availability...

  13. Equine acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) in 14 horses associated with ingestion of Maple leaves (Acer pseudoplatanus) covered with European tar spot (Rhytisma acerinum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, J. H.; Wijnberg, I. D.; Westermann, C. M.; Dorland, L.; de Sain-van der Velden, M. G. M.; Kranenburg, L. C.; Duran, M.; Dijkstra, J. A.; van der Lugt, J. J.; Wanders, R. J. A.; Gruys, E.

    2010-01-01

    This case-series describes fourteen horses suspected of equine acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) also known as atypical myopathy of which seven cases were confirmed biochemically with all horses having had access to leaves of the Maple tree (Acer pseudoplatanus) covered with

  14. Bark thickness related to tree diameter in sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Clay Smith

    1969-01-01

    Bark thickness for sugar maple trees in Vermont was found to be related to tree diameter at breast height (d.b.h.). The relationship was positive-as the diameter increased, the bark thickness increased.

  15. Rooting Depths of Red Maple (Acer Rubrum L.) on Various Sites in the Lake States

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    Carl L. Haag; James E. Johnson; Gayne G. Erdmann

    1989-01-01

    Rooting depth and habit of red maple were observed on 60 sites in northern Wisconsin and Michigan as part of a regional soil-site studay. Vertical woody root extension on dry, outwash sites averaged 174 cm, which was significantly greater than the extension on sites with fragipans (139 cm) and on wet sites (112 cm). Site index was higher on wet sites and non-woody...

  16. Proteomic analysis of embryogenesis and the acquisition of seed dormancy in Norway maple (Acer platanoides L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszak, Aleksandra Maria; Pawłowski, Tomasz Andrzej

    2014-06-17

    The proteome of zygotic embryos of Acer platanoides L. was analyzed via high-resolution 2D-SDS-PAGE and MS/MS in order to: (1) identify significant physiological processes associated with embryo development; and (2) identify changes in the proteome of the embryo associated with the acquisition of seed dormancy. Seventeen spots were identified as associated with morphogenesis at 10 to 13 weeks after flowering (WAF). Thirty-three spots were associated with maturation of the embryo at 14 to 22 WAF. The greatest changes in protein abundance occurred at 22 WAF, when seeds become fully mature. Overall, the stage of morphogenesis was characterized by changes in the abundance of proteins (tubulins and actin) associated with the growth and development of the embryo. Enzymes related to energy supply were especially elevated, most likely due to the energy demand associated with rapid growth and cell division. The stage of maturation is crucial to the establishment of seed dormancy and is associated with a higher abundance of proteins involved in genetic information processing, energy and carbon metabolism and cellular and antioxidant processes. Results indicated that a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein and proteasome proteins may be directly involved in dormancy acquisition control, and future studies are warranted to verify this association.

  17. Antioxidant activity, inhibition of nitric oxide overproduction, and in vitro antiproliferative effect of maple sap and syrup from Acer saccharum.

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    Legault, Jean; Girard-Lalancette, Karl; Grenon, Carole; Dussault, Catherine; Pichette, André

    2010-04-01

    Antioxidant activity, inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) overproduction, and antiproliferative effect of ethyl acetate extracts of maple sap and syrup from 30 producers were evaluated in regard to the period of harvest in three different regions of Québec, Canada. Oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) values of maple sap and syrup extracts are, respectively, 12 +/- 6 and 15 +/- 5 micromol of Trolox equivalents (TE)/mg. The antioxidant activity was also confirmed by a cell-based assay. The period of harvest has no statistically significant incidence on the antioxidant activity of both extracts. The antioxidant activity of pure maple syrup was also determined using the ORAC assay. Results indicate that the ORAC value of pure maple syrup (8 +/- 2 micromol of TE/mL) is lower than the ORAC value of blueberry juice (24 +/- 1 micromol of TE/mL) but comparable to the ORAC values of strawberry (10.7 +/- 0.4 micromol of TE/mL) and orange (10.8 +/- 0.5 micromol of TE/mL) juices. Maple sap and syrup extracts showed to significantly inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced NO overproduction in RAW264.7 murine macrophages. Maple syrup extract was significantly more active than maple sap extract, suggesting that the transformation of maple sap into syrup increases NO inhibition activity. The highest NO inhibition induced by the maple syrup extracts was observed at the end of the season. Moreover, darker maple syrup was found to be more active than clear maple syrup, suggesting that some colored oxidized compounds could be responsible in part for the activity. Finally, maple syrup extracts (50% inhibitory concentration = 42 +/- 6 microg/mL) and pure maple syrup possess a selective in vitro antiproliferative activity against cancer cells.

  18. Simulated root dynamics of a 160-year-old sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) tree with and without ozone exposure using the TREGRO model.

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    Retzlaff, W. A.; Weinstein, D. A.; Laurence, J. A.; Gollands, B.

    1996-01-01

    Because of difficulties in directly assessing root responses of mature forest trees exposed to atmospheric pollutants, we have used the model TREGRO to analyze the effects of a 3- and a 10-year exposure to ozone (O(3)) on root dynamics of a simulated 160-year-old sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) tree. We used existing phenological, allometric, and growth data to parameterize TREGRO to produce a simulated 160-year-old tree. Simulations were based on literature values for sugar maple fine root production and senescence and the photosynthetic responses of sugar maple seedlings exposed to O(3) in open-top chambers. In the simulated 3-year exposure to O(3), 2 x ambient atmospheric O(3) concentrations reduced net carbon (C) gain of the 160-year-old tree. This reduction occurred in the C storage pools (total nonstructural carbohydrate, TNC), with most of the reduction occurring in coarse (woody) roots. Total fine root production and senescence were unaffected by the simulated 3-year exposure to O(3). However, extending the simulated O(3) exposure period to 10 years depleted the TNC pools of the coarse roots and reduced total fine root production. Similar reductions in TNC pools have been observed in forest-grown sugar maple trees exhibiting symptoms of stress. We conclude that modeling can aid in evaluating the belowground response of mature forest trees to atmospheric pollution stress and could indicate the potential for gradual deterioration of tree health under conditions of long-term stress, a situation similar to that underlying the decline of sugar maple trees.

  19. Simulated changes in biogenic VOC emissions and ozone formation from habitat expansion of Acer Rubrum (red maple)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drewniak, Beth A; Snyder, Peter K; Twine, Tracy E; Steiner, Allison L; Wuebbles, Donald J

    2014-01-01

    A new vegetation trend is emerging in northeastern forests of the United States, characterized by an expansion of red maple at the expense of oak. This has changed emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), primarily isoprene and monoterpenes. Oaks strongly emit isoprene while red maple emits a negligible amount. This species shift may impact nearby urban centers because the interaction of isoprene with anthropogenic nitrogen oxides can lead to tropospheric ozone formation and monoterpenes can lead to the formation of particulate matter. In this study the Global Biosphere Emissions and Interactions System was used to estimate the spatial changes in BVOC emission fluxes resulting from a shift in forest composition between oak and maple. A 70% reduction in isoprene emissions occurred when oak was replaced with maple. Ozone simulations with a chemical box model at two rural and two urban sites showed modest reductions in ozone concentrations of up to 5–6 ppb resulting from a transition from oak to red maple, thus suggesting that the observed change in forest composition may benefit urban air quality. This study illustrates the importance of monitoring and representing changes in forest composition and the impacts to human health indirectly through changes in BVOCs. (paper)

  20. Levels of selected trace elements in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), silver birch (Betula pendula L.), and Norway maple (Acer platanoides L.) in an urbanized environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiorek, Milena; Modrzewska, Beata; Wyszkowski, Mirosław

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the concentrations of selected trace elements in needles and bark of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), leaves and bark of silver birch (Betula pendula L.), and Norway maple (Acer platanoides L.), as well as in the soil in which the trees grew, depending on their localization and hence the distribution of local pollution sources. The content of trace elements in needles of Scots pine, leaves of silver birch, and Norway maple and in bark of these trees depended on the location, tree species, and analyzed organ. The content of Fe, Mn, and Zn in needles, leaves, and bark of the examined tree species was significantly higher than that of the other elements. The highest average content of Fe and Mn was detected in leaves of Norway maple whereas the highest average content of Zn was found in silver birch leaves. The impact of such locations as the center of Olsztyn or roadside along Road 51 on the content of individual elements tended to be more pronounced than the influence of the other locations. The influence of the sampling sites on the content of trace elements in tree bark was less regular than the analogous effect in needles and leaves. Moreover, the relevant dependences were slightly different for Scots pine than for the other two tree species. The concentrations of heavy metals determined in the soil samples did not exceed the threshold values set in the Regulation of the Minister for the Environment, although the soil along Road 51 and in the center of Olsztyn typically had the highest content of these elements. There were also significant correlations between the content of some trace elements in soil and their accumulation in needles, leaves, and bark of trees.

  1. Effects of elevated [CO2] and low soil moisture on the physiological responses of Mountain Maple (Acer spicatum L. seedlings to light.

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    Gabriel Danyagri

    Full Text Available Global climate change is expected to affect how plants respond to their physical and biological environments. In this study, we examined the effects of elevated CO2 ([CO2] and low soil moisture on the physiological responses of mountain maple (Acer spicatum L. seedlings to light availability. The seedlings were grown at ambient (392 µmol mol(-1 and elevated (784 µmol mol(-1 [CO2], low and high soil moisture (M regimes, at high light (100% and low light (30% in the greenhouse for one growing season. We measured net photosynthesis (A, stomatal conductance (g s, instantaneous water use efficiency (IWUE, maximum rate of carboxylation (V cmax, rate of photosynthetic electron transport (J, triose phosphate utilization (TPU, leaf respiration (R d, light compensation point (LCP and mid-day shoot water potential (Ψx. A and g s did not show significant responses to light treatment in seedlings grown at low soil moisture treatment, but the high light significantly decreased the C i/C a in those seedlings. IWUE was significantly higher in the elevated compared with the ambient [CO2], and the effect was greater at high than the low light treatment. LCP did not respond to the soil moisture treatments when seedlings were grown in high light under both [CO2]. The low soil moisture significantly reduced Ψx but had no significant effect on the responses of other physiological traits to light or [CO2]. These results suggest that as the atmospheric [CO2] rises, the physiological performance of mountain maple seedlings in high light environments may be enhanced, particularly when soil moisture conditions are favourable.

  2. Effects of elevated [CO2] and low soil moisture on the physiological responses of Mountain Maple (Acer spicatum L.) seedlings to light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danyagri, Gabriel; Dang, Qing-Lai

    2013-01-01

    Global climate change is expected to affect how plants respond to their physical and biological environments. In this study, we examined the effects of elevated CO2 ([CO2]) and low soil moisture on the physiological responses of mountain maple (Acer spicatum L.) seedlings to light availability. The seedlings were grown at ambient (392 µmol mol(-1)) and elevated (784 µmol mol(-1)) [CO2], low and high soil moisture (M) regimes, at high light (100%) and low light (30%) in the greenhouse for one growing season. We measured net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g s), instantaneous water use efficiency (IWUE), maximum rate of carboxylation (V cmax), rate of photosynthetic electron transport (J), triose phosphate utilization (TPU)), leaf respiration (R d), light compensation point (LCP) and mid-day shoot water potential (Ψx). A and g s did not show significant responses to light treatment in seedlings grown at low soil moisture treatment, but the high light significantly decreased the C i/C a in those seedlings. IWUE was significantly higher in the elevated compared with the ambient [CO2], and the effect was greater at high than the low light treatment. LCP did not respond to the soil moisture treatments when seedlings were grown in high light under both [CO2]. The low soil moisture significantly reduced Ψx but had no significant effect on the responses of other physiological traits to light or [CO2]. These results suggest that as the atmospheric [CO2] rises, the physiological performance of mountain maple seedlings in high light environments may be enhanced, particularly when soil moisture conditions are favourable.

  3. Proteome analysis of Norway maple (Acer platanoides L. seeds dormancy breaking and germination: influence of abscisic and gibberellic acids

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    Pawłowski Tomasz A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seed dormancy is controlled by the physiological or structural properties of a seed and the external conditions. It is induced as part of the genetic program of seed development and maturation. Seeds with deep physiological embryo dormancy can be stimulated to germinate by a variety of treatments including cold stratification. Hormonal imbalance between germination inhibitors (e.g. abscisic acid and growth promoters (e.g. gibberellins is the main cause of seed dormancy breaking. Differences in the status of hormones would affect expression of genes required for germination. Proteomics offers the opportunity to examine simultaneous changes and to classify temporal patterns of protein accumulation occurring during seed dormancy breaking and germination. Analysis of the functions of the identified proteins and the related metabolic pathways, in conjunction with the plant hormones implicated in seed dormancy breaking, would expand our knowledge about this process. Results A proteomic approach was used to analyse the mechanism of dormancy breaking in Norway maple seeds caused by cold stratification, and the participation of the abscisic (ABA and gibberellic (GA acids. Forty-four proteins showing significant changes were identified by mass spectrometry. Of these, eight spots were identified as water-responsive, 18 spots were ABA- and nine GA-responsive and nine spots were regulated by both hormones. The classification of proteins showed that most of the proteins associated with dormancy breaking in water were involved in protein destination. Most of the ABA- and GA-responsive proteins were involved in protein destination and energy metabolism. Conclusion In this study, ABA was found to mostly down-regulate proteins whereas GA up-regulated proteins abundance. Most of the changes were observed at the end of stratification in the germinated seeds. This is the most active period of dormancy breaking when seeds pass from the quiescent

  4. Analytical approaches to the determination of simple biophenols in forest trees such as Acer (maple), Betula (birch), Coniferus, Eucalyptus, Juniperus (cedar), Picea (spruce) and Quercus (oak).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedgood, Danny R; Bishop, Andrea G; Prenzler, Paul D; Robards, Kevin

    2005-06-01

    Analytical methods are reviewed for the determination of simple biophenols in forest trees such as Acer (maple), Betula (birch), Coniferus, Eucalyptus, Juniperus (cedar), Picea (spruce) and Quercus (oak). Data are limited but nevertheless clearly establish the critical importance of sample preparation and pre-treatment in the analysis. For example, drying methods invariably reduce the recovery of biophenols and this is illustrated by data for birch leaves where flavonoid glycosides were determined as 12.3 +/- 0.44 mg g(-1) in fresh leaves but 9.7 +/- 0.35 mg g(-1) in air-dried samples (data expressed as dry weight). Diverse sample handling procedures have been employed for recovery of biophenols. The range of biophenols and diversity of sample types precludes general procedural recommendations. Caution is necessary in selecting appropriate procedures as the high reactivity of these compounds complicates their analysis. Moreover, our experience suggests that their reactivity is very dependent on the matrix. The actual measurement is less contentious and high performance separation methods particularly liquid chromatography dominate analyses whilst coupled techniques involving electrospray ionization are becoming routine particularly for qualitative applications. Quantitative data are still the exception and are summarized for representative species that dominate the forest canopy of various habitats. Reported concentrations for simple phenols range from trace level (<0.1 microg g(-1)) to in excess of 500 microg g(-1) depending on a range of factors. Plant tissue is one of these variables but various biotic and abiotic processes such as stress are also important considerations.

  5. Responses of secondary chemicals in sugar maple (Acer saccharum) seedlings to UV-B, springtime warming and nitrogen additions

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    Sager, E.P.S.; Hutchinson, T.C. [Trent Univ., Peterborough, ON (Canada). Environmental Studies

    2006-10-15

    Elevated UV-B radiation due to climatic change and ozone depletion may represent a significant springtime environmental stressor to germinating seedlings in temperate forest regions. This study aimed to determine the effects of UV-B, nitrogen (N) fertilization and climate warming on the concentrations of base cations and secondary metabolites in the foliage of sugar maple seedlings growing in acid or alkaline soils. The influence of measured flavonoids and phenolics on herbivore activity was examined, as well as the relationship between foliar concentrations of calcium (Ca); manganese (Mn); and N and the production of phenolic and flavonoid compounds. Experimental plots were established in mature hardwood forests in alkaline and acid soil locations in Bobcaygeon and Haliburton, Ontario. Pentagonal open-top chambers were used to lengthen the growing season and simulate an earlier spring. Ammonium nitrate was applied at a rate comparable with an additional deposition of 5 g N per m per year. Fertilizer was applied on 3 separate occasions. Ambient UV-B radiation was screened out with Mylar D polyester film. Sites, treatments and time of sampling had complex effects on foliar elemental chemistry, production of secondary compounds and herbivory. Foliar concentrations of individual phenols were higher in seedlings in the UV-B exclusion treatments. At both sites, removal of ambient UV-B led to increases in flavonoids and chlorogenic acid, and reduced herbivore activity. At Haliburton, ammonium nitrate fertilization led to further increases in foliar Mn. Nitrogen additions led to decreases in the concentrations of some flavonoids at both sites. It was concluded that the composition of the forest soil governs the response of seedlings when they are exposed to abiotic stressors. 63 refs., 5 tabs., 8 figs.

  6. Photosynthetic and growth response of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) mature trees and seedlings to calcium, magnesium, and nitrogen additions in the Catskill Mountains, NY, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Bahram; Behling, Shawna J; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Sullivan, Joseph H

    2015-01-01

    Decline of sugar maple in North American forests has been attributed to changes in soil calcium (Ca) and nitrogen (N) by acidic precipitation. Although N is an essential and usually a limiting factor in forests, atmospheric N deposition may cause N-saturation leading to loss of soil Ca. Such changes can affect carbon gain and growth of sugar maple trees and seedlings. We applied a 22 factorial arrangement of N and dolomitic limestone containing Ca and Magnesium (Mg) to 12 forest plots in the Catskill Mountain region of NY, USA. To quantify the short-term effects, we measured photosynthetic-light responses of sugar maple mature trees and seedlings two or three times during two summers. We estimated maximum net photosynthesis (An-max) and its related light intensity (PAR at An-max), apparent quantum efficiency (Aqe), and light compensation point (LCP). To quantify the long-term effects, we measured basal area of living mature trees before and 4 and 8 years after treatment applications. Soil and foliar chemistry variables were also measured. Dolomitic limestone increased Ca, Mg, and pH in the soil Oe horizon. Mg was increased in the B horizon when comparing the plots receiving N with those receiving CaMg. In mature trees, foliar Ca and Mg concentrations were higher in the CaMg and N+CaMg plots than in the reference or N plots; foliar Ca concentration was higher in the N+CaMg plots compared with the CaMg plots, foliar Mg was higher in the CaMg plots than the N+CaMg plots; An-max was maximized due to N+CaMg treatment; Aqe decreased by N addition; and PAR at An-max increased by N or CaMg treatments alone, but the increase was maximized by their combination. No treatment effect was detected on basal areas of living mature trees four or eight years after treatment applications. In seedlings, An-max was increased by N+CaMg addition. The reference plots had an open herbaceous layer, but the plots receiving N had a dense monoculture of common woodfern in the

  7. Photosynthetic and Growth Response of Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum Marsh. Mature Trees and Seedlings to Calcium, Magnesium, and Nitrogen Additions in the Catskill Mountains, NY, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Momen

    Full Text Available Decline of sugar maple in North American forests has been attributed to changes in soil calcium (Ca and nitrogen (N by acidic precipitation. Although N is an essential and usually a limiting factor in forests, atmospheric N deposition may cause N-saturation leading to loss of soil Ca. Such changes can affect carbon gain and growth of sugar maple trees and seedlings. We applied a 22 factorial arrangement of N and dolomitic limestone containing Ca and Magnesium (Mg to 12 forest plots in the Catskill Mountain region of NY, USA. To quantify the short-term effects, we measured photosynthetic-light responses of sugar maple mature trees and seedlings two or three times during two summers. We estimated maximum net photosynthesis (An-max and its related light intensity (PAR at An-max, apparent quantum efficiency (Aqe, and light compensation point (LCP. To quantify the long-term effects, we measured basal area of living mature trees before and 4 and 8 years after treatment applications. Soil and foliar chemistry variables were also measured. Dolomitic limestone increased Ca, Mg, and pH in the soil Oe horizon. Mg was increased in the B horizon when comparing the plots receiving N with those receiving CaMg. In mature trees, foliar Ca and Mg concentrations were higher in the CaMg and N+CaMg plots than in the reference or N plots; foliar Ca concentration was higher in the N+CaMg plots compared with the CaMg plots, foliar Mg was higher in the CaMg plots than the N+CaMg plots; An-max was maximized due to N+CaMg treatment; Aqe decreased by N addition; and PAR at An-max increased by N or CaMg treatments alone, but the increase was maximized by their combination. No treatment effect was detected on basal areas of living mature trees four or eight years after treatment applications. In seedlings, An-max was increased by N+CaMg addition. The reference plots had an open herbaceous layer, but the plots receiving N had a dense monoculture of common woodfern in the

  8. A sugar maple planting study in Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry W. Yawney; Clayton M., Jr. Carl; Clayton M. Carl

    1970-01-01

    Past attempts to establish sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) by planting have generally met with little success. The failures have been blamed mainly on competition by other vegetation and on damage done by animals. Finding an effective way to establish sugar maple seedlings is a key part in the research being carried on in Vermont by the USDA Forest Service to...

  9. Maturation of sugar maple seed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton M., Jr. Carl; Albert G., Jr. Snow; Albert G. Snow

    1971-01-01

    The seeds of a sugar maple tree (Acer saccharum Marsh.) do not mature at the same time every year. And different trees mature their seeds at different times. So time of year is not a reliable measure of when seeds are ripe. Better criteria are needed. In recent studies we have found that moisture content and color are the best criteria for judging when sugar maple...

  10. Population dynamics of sugar maple through the southern portion of its range: implications for range migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin L. Hart; Christopher M. Oswalt; Craig M. Turberville

    2014-01-01

    The range of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) is expected to shift northward in accord with changing climate. However, a pattern of increased sugar maple abundance has been reported from sites throughout the eastern US. The goal of our study was to examine the stability of the sugar maple southern range boundary by analyzing its demography through...

  11. Health of eastern North American sugar maple forests and factors affecting decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen B. Horsley; Robert P. Long; Scott W. Bailey; Richard A. Hallett; Philip M. Wargo

    2002-01-01

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is a keystone species in the forests of the northeastern and Midwestern United States and eastern Canada. Its sustained health is an important issue in both managed and unmanaged forests. While sugar maple generally is healthy throughout its range, decline disease of sugar maple has occurred sporadically during the past...

  12. Effect of manganese on endomycorrhizal sugar maple seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    George A. Schier; Carolyn J. McQuattie

    2002-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity may play an important role in the poor survival of seedlings in declining sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) stands in northern Pennsylvania. To determine the effect of Mn on the growth of sugar maple seedlings, 1-year-old seedlings inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and growing in sand-vermiculite-...

  13. Building improved models of sugar maple mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Perry; Patrick L. Zimmerman

    2012-01-01

    The decline of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) in the northern United States is causing concern, and several studies have identified soil properties that are linked to the observation of dead/dying trees. Unfortunately, the sample of trees supporting these studies is purposive in nature; soil properties are assessed only on those plots where dead...

  14. Use of waveform lidar and hyperspectral sensors to assess selected spatial and structural patterns associated with recent and repeat disturbance and the abundance of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) in a temperate mixed hardwood and conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.E.; Ducey, Mark J.; Fast, A.; Martin, M.E.; Lepine, L.; Smith, M.-L.; Lee, T.D.; Dubayah, R.O.; Hofton, M.A.; Hyde, P.; Peterson, Birgit; Blair, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Waveform lidar imagery was acquired on September 26, 1999 over the Bartlett Experimental Forest (BEF) in New Hampshire (USA) using NASA's Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). This flight occurred 20 months after an ice storm damaged millions of hectares of forestland in northeastern North America. Lidar measurements of the amplitude and intensity of ground energy returns appeared to readily detect areas of moderate to severe ice storm damage associated with the worst damage. Southern through eastern aspects on side slopes were particularly susceptible to higher levels of damage, in large part overlapping tracts of forest that had suffered the highest levels of wind damage from the 1938 hurricane and containing the highest levels of sugar maple basal area and biomass. The levels of sugar maple abundance were determined through analysis of the 1997 Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) high resolution spectral imagery and inventory of USFS Northern Research Station field plots. We found a relationship between field measurements of stem volume losses and the LVIS metric of mean canopy height (r2 = 0.66; root mean square errors = 5.7 m3/ha, p < 0.0001) in areas that had been subjected to moderate-to-severe ice storm damage, accurately documenting the short-term outcome of a single disturbance event.

  15. Effects of defoliation and drought on root food reserves in sugar maple seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Parker; Johnson Parker

    1970-01-01

    The artificial defoliation of sugar maple (Acer. saccharum Marsh.) can cause a marked decline in root food reserves, especially starch, and an increase in the levels of the reducing sugars, fructose and glucose. Defoliation can also bring on the dieback-decline syndrome in sugar maples (Parker and Houston 1968). Two experiments designed to examine this question were...

  16. Hypoglycin A in maple trees in the Netherlands and the risk of equine atypical myopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westermann, C.M.; van Leeuwen, Robbert; Mol, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The Acer (maple) genus of trees comprises over 120 species worldwide. Some of these contain the plant-toxin hypoglycin-A which has been proven to be a cause of the highly fatal condition called atypical myopathy (AM) in horses and ponies. In an earlier study of maple-tree samples (leaves and seeds)

  17. Influence of nutrition and stress on sugar maple at a regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. Hallett; Scott W. Bailey; Stephen B. Horsley; Robert P. Long

    2006-01-01

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) decline disease on the Allegheny Plateau (region 1) resulted in high levels of mortality during the 1990s. Sugar maple was predisposed to decline because of an imbalance in Mg, Ca, and Mn nutrition and incited to decline by repeated defoliation. We sampled 33 stands in New York, Vermont, and New Hampshire (region 2...

  18. Understanding Maple

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Maple is a powerful symbolic computation system that is widely used in universities around the world. This short introduction gives readers an insight into the rules that control how the system works, and how to understand, fix, and avoid common problems. Topics covered include algebra, calculus, linear algebra, graphics, programming, and procedures. Each chapter contains numerous illustrative examples, using mathematics that does not extend beyond first-year undergraduate material. Maple worksheets containing these examples are available for download from the author's personal website. The book is suitable for new users, but where advanced topics are central to understanding Maple they are tackled head-on. Many concepts which are absent from introductory books and manuals are described in detail. With this book, students, teachers and researchers will gain a solid understanding of Maple and how to use it to solve complex mathematical problems in a simple and efficient way.

  19. Annual cycle of shoot development in sugar maple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Gregory

    1980-01-01

    Cytohistology and the development and morphogenesis of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) shoots were studied. Three types were recognized: short shoots, long shoots entirely preformed in the bud (Epf long), and long shoots partially preformed in the bud (heterophyllous). The three shoot types varied not only in the size and number of internodes...

  20. Potential causes of the pear thrips outbreak in sugar maple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack C. Schultz

    1991-01-01

    No one knows what caused the 1988 outbreak of pear thrips, Taeniothrips inconsequens (Uzel), in sugar maple, Acer saccharum Marsh., in the northeastern United States. As an entomologist and ecologist who knows even less about this insect than most of the authors of this volume, I cannot presume to understand the causes of this...

  1. Development of fall foliage color in sugar maple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abby K. Van den Berg; John R. Donnelly; Paula F. Murakami; Paul G. Schaberg

    2001-01-01

    Fall foliage development is important to tourism and culture in the Northeast. However, few data exist on the control of the timing and brilliance of fall color. In this study, leaf tissue from 16 sugar maples (Acer saccharum) was collected periodically from June 30 through October 27, 1999 and analyzed for foliar nutrient, moisture and carbohydrate...

  2. Foliar nutrient analysis of sugar maple decline: retrospective vector diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victor R. Timmer; Yuanxin Teng

    1999-01-01

    Accuracy of traditional foiiar analysis of nutrient disorders in sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh) is limited by lack of validation and confounding by nutrient interactions. Vector nutrient diagnosis is relatively free of these problems. The technique is demonstrated retrospectively on four case studies. Diagnostic interpretations consistently...

  3. Foliar chemistry of sugar maple: a regional view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. Hallett; Stephen B. Horsley; Robert P. Long; Scott W. Bailey; Thomas J. Hall

    1999-01-01

    Forest health and monitoring issues have become major focus of scientists and research institutions in Europe and North America during the last decade because of wide-spread forest decline symptoms in Europe, high elevation spruce/fir decline in eastern North America and sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) decline in Quebec, and the United States....

  4. Detection of Inulin, a Prebiotic Polysaccharide, in Maple Syrup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiadong; Ma, Hang; Seeram, Navindra P; Rowley, David C

    2016-09-28

    Maple syrup is a widely consumed plant-derived natural sweetener produced by concentrating xylem sap collected from certain maple (Acer) species. During thermal evaporation of water, natural phytochemical components are concentrated in maple syrup. The polymeric components from maple syrup were isolated by ethanol precipitation, dialysis, and anion exchange chromatography and structurally characterized by glycosyl composition analysis, glycosyl linkage analysis, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Among the maple syrup polysaccharides, one neutral polysaccharide was characterized as inulin with a broad molecular weight distribution, representing the first isolation of this prebiotic carbohydrate from a xylem sap. In addition, two acidic polysaccharides with structural similarity were identified as arabinogalactans derived from rhamnogalacturonan type I pectic polysaccharides.

  5. Hypoglycin A Concentrations in Maple Tree Species in the Netherlands and the Occurrence of Atypical Myopathy in Horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westermann, C.M.; Van Leeuwen, Robbert; Van Raamsdonk, L.W.D.; Mol, H.G.J.

    BACKGROUND: Atypical myopathy (AM) in horses is caused by the plant toxin hypoglycin A, which in Europe typically is found in the sycamore maple tree (Acer pseudoplatanus). Owners are concerned about whether their horses are in danger if they graze near maple trees. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: To measure

  6. Hypoglycin A Concentrations in Maple Tree Species in the Netherlands and the Occurrence of Atypical Myopathy in Horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westermann, C.M.; Leeuwen, van R.; Raamsdonk, van L.W.D.; Mol, H.G.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atypical myopathy (AM) in horses is caused by the plant toxin hypoglycin A, which in Europe typically is found in the sycamore maple tree (Acer pseudoplatanus). Owners are concerned about whether their horses are in danger if they graze near maple trees. Hypothesis/Objectives: To

  7. Evaluation of Sugar Maple Dieback in the Upper Great Lakes Region and Development of a Forest Health Youth Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Tara L.

    2013-01-01

    Sugar Maple, "Acer saccharum" Marsh., is one of the most valuable trees in the northern hardwood forests. Severe dieback was recently reported by area foresters in the western Upper Great Lakes Region. Sugar Maple has had a history of dieback over the last 100 years throughout its range and different variables have been identified as…

  8. Effect of planting procedures in initial growth of Acer rubrum L. and Fraxinus pennsylvanicum L. in a parking lot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon M. Heisler; Robert E. Schutzki; Robert P. Zisa; Howard G. Halverson; Bruce A. Hamilton

    1982-01-01

    Five-year old red maples, Acer rubrum L. 'October Glory', and green ash, Fraxinus pennsylvanicum L. 'Marshall Seedless', were planted in 8 ft x 8 ft openings in an asphalt parking lot with two planting stocks (bare-root, BR, and balled and burlapped, B&B) and two fertilizer levels (a control and 1.36 kg of...

  9. Analysis of stand basal area development of thinned and unthinned Acer rubrum forests in the upper Great Lakes region, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justin L. Pszwaro; Anthony W. D' Amato; Thomas E. Burk; Matthew B. Russell; Brian J. Palik; Terry F. Strong

    2016-01-01

    Red maple (Acer rubrum L.), historically a common but not abundant tree species in North America, has increased in abundance throughout its range over the last several decades; however, it has received little attention in growth and yield studies. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the effects of stocking level and stand density on...

  10. Carbohydrate reserves in Acer saccharum trees damaged during the January 1998 ice storm in northern New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.L. Wong; L.J. Staats; A.S. Burfeind; K.L. Baggett; A.H. Rye; A.H. Rye

    2005-01-01

    To assess the effect of the ice storm of January 1998 on sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) tree health, starch, and soluble sugars in twigs from two damaged sugarbushes (younger: trees 50-100 years old, and older: trees approximately 200 years old) in northern New York were measured throughout the leafless phase (September 1998 - May 1999). Trees severely damaged by...

  11. Volatiles from a Rare Acer spp. Honey Sample from Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Jerković

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A rare sample of maple (Acer spp. honey from Croatia was analysed. Ultrasonic solvent extraction (USE using: 1 pentane, 2 diethyl ether, 3 a mixture of pentane and diethyl ether (1:2 v/v and 4 dichloromethane as solvents was applied. All the extracts were analysed by GC and GC/MS. The most representative extracts were 3 and 4. Syringaldehyde was the most striking compound, being dominant in the extracts 2, 3 and 4 with percentages 34.5%, 33.1% and 35.9%, respectively. In comparison to USE results of other single Croatian tree honey samples (Robinia pseudoacacia L. nectar honey, Salix spp. nectar and honeydew honeys, Quercus frainetto Ten. honeydew as well as Abies alba Mill. and Picea abies L. honeydew and literature data the presence of syringaldehyde, previously identified in maple sap and syrup, can be pointed out as a distinct characteristic of the Acer spp. honey sample. Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME combined with GC and GC/MS identified benzaldehyde (16.5%, trans-linalool oxide (20.5% and 2-phenylethanol (14.9% as the major compounds that are common in different honey headspace compositions.

  12. Stimulatory effects of aluminum on growth of sugar maple seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    George A. Schier; Carolyn J. McQuattie

    2002-01-01

    To determine the effect of aluminum (Al) on sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), seedlings were grown in sand irrigated with nutrient solution (pH 3.8) containing 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, or 40 mg L-1 Al. Seedling growth was enhanced at 2.5 and 5mgL-1 Al. Although higher levels of Al reduced calcium (Ca) and...

  13. The rate of value increase for black cherry, red maple,and white ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ted J. Grisez; Joseph J. Mendel; Joseph J. Mendel

    1972-01-01

    In this paper we present the dollar values and value increases, as well as the rates of value increase, for three of the most important tree species of the Allegheny Plateau of New York and Pennsylvania: black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), and white ash (Fraxinus americana L.).

  14. Preliminary results of sugar maple carbohydrate and growth response under vacuum and gravity sap extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark L. Isselhardt; Timothy D. Perkins; Abby K. van den Berg; Paul G. Schaberg

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advancements have increased the amount of sugar-enriched sap that can be extracted from sugar maple (Acer saccharum). This pilot study quantified overall sugar removal and the impacts of vacuum (60 cm Hg) and gravity sap extraction on residual nonstructural carbohydrate (NSC) concentrations and on stem and twig growth. Vacuum...

  15. Stem girdling manipulates leaf sugar concentrations and anthocyanin expression in sugar maples trees during autumn

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.F. Murakami; P.G. Schaberg; J.B. Shane

    2008-01-01

    To better understand the effects of sugar accumulation on red color development of foliage during autumn, we compared carbohydrate concentration, anthocyanin expression and xylem pressure potential of foliage on girdled versus non-girdled (control) branches of 12 mature, open-grown sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) trees. Half of the study trees...

  16. Calcium and aluminum impacts on sugar maple physiology in a northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua M. Halman; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Linda H. Pardo; Timothy J. Fahey

    2013-01-01

    Forests of northeastern North America have been exposed to anthropogenic acidic inputs for decades, resulting in altered cation relations and disruptions to associated physiological processes in multiple tree species, including sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.). In the current study, the impacts of calcium (Ca) and aluminum (Al) additions on mature...

  17. Association of red coloration with senescence of sugar maple leaves in autumn

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.G. Schaberg; P.F. Murakami; M.R. Turner; H.K. Heitz; G.J. Hawley

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the association of red coloration with senescence in sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) leaves by assessing differences in leaf retention strength and the progression of the abscission layer through the vascular bundle of green, yellow, and red leaves of 14 mature open-grown trees in October 2002. Computer image analysis confirmed...

  18. A stocking diagram for midwestern eastern cotonwood-silver maple-American sycamore bottomland forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Larsen; Daniel C. Dey; Thomas. Faust

    2010-01-01

    A stocking diagram for Midwestern bottomland eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartram ex Marsh.)-silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.)-American sycamore (Platanus occidentalis L.) forests was developed following the methods of S.F. Gingrich (1967. Measuring and evaluating stocking and stand density in upland...

  19. Influence of geologic and pedologic factors on health of sugar maple on the Allegheny Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott W. Bailey; Stephen B. Horsley; Robert P. Long; Richard A. Hallett

    1999-01-01

    Decline of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) has been a problem on the Allegheny Plateau of Pennsylvania since the mid-1980's (Kolb and McCormick 1993; Williams et al. 1996). Horsley et al. (this volume) found that declining stands were distinguished from non-declining stands by a combination of repeated insect defoliation and low foliar...

  20. Associations of calcium and aluminum with the growth and health of sugar maple trees in Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul G. Schaberg; James W. Tilley; Gary J. Hawley; Donald H. DeHayes; Scott W. Bailey

    2006-01-01

    We compared tree growth and crown condition with soil and foliar elemental composition in 14 sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) stands in VT, USA, to evaluate if deficiencies or imbalances in cation nutrition were associated with growth and health reductions in native stands. The Till Source Model (TSM) was used to select study sites potentially...

  1. RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOUR OF CURLYMAPLE WOOD (ACER PSEUDOPLATANUS USED FOR BACK SIDE OF VIOLIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Domnica STANCIU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stringed instruments are made of high quality wood species from physical, mechanical and acoustical point of view, being carefully selected, kiln dried and processed under specific conditions that assure micro-structural integrity. Maple wood (Acer Pseudoplatanus for musical instruments is used to getting back plates and sides for string instruments (violin family. This species of wood is valued for both acoustic qualities but mostly for aesthetic, using a natural defect of maple wood characterized by wavy grain. The paper presents the research on visco-elasticity behavior of maple wood with different types of grain deviation in wood from very curly maple to common maple. The storage modulus, loss modulus, damping capacity in varying temperature conditions and for different loading frequencies were determined using dynamical mechanical analysis (DMA. It was found that specimens characterized by very wavy grain shows a high damping capacity of frequency range between 33.33 to 50Hz, unlike specimens of common maple which do not have the capacity of frequency selectivity.

  2. Polyploidy in Acer rubrum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John W. Duffield

    1943-01-01

    Acer rubrum L. is a highly polymorphic species occupying a range which includes almost all of the United States east of the prairies, southeastern Canada, and a portion of Newfoundland. The range of habitats occupied is equally impressive. Cytological study of this species was first undertaken by Mottier in 1893, but the first indication of...

  3. Evaluation of a single application of Neonicotnoid and multi-application contact insecticides for flatheaded borer management in field grown Acer rubrum L. cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two trials evaluated insecticides for flatheaded borer (Chrysobothris femorata [Olivier]) control and red maple (Acer rubrum L.) cultivar growth over a 4-year period. Soil-applied systemic insecticides (acephate, imidacloprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, and thiamethoxam) and trunk-applied contact i...

  4. [Maples at the sub-Alpine vegetation belt: a long history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, F; Barbero, M

    2001-02-01

    Pollen analysis was carried out on lacustrine sediment of a small hollow (15 m x 25 m) at the treeless sub-Alpine belt (202 m) of the inner Maurienne valley in the northern French Alps. A 2,500-year-long maple settlement was demonstrared. Three AMS dates of terrestrial plant macroremains support the chronology. First, Betula and Salix spread prior to 9,000 C14 BP. The first pollen grains of Acer, Abies and Pinus cembra are quoted at 8,600 C14 BP. High frequencies of Alnus glutinosa/incana (20%) and Acer (10%) show that mixed communities of Acer and Alnus persisted above the mountainous Abies forest between 7,490 and 5,850 C14 BP. After 5,850 C14 BP, the decrease in Acer stands could be attributed to fire as suggested by the strong increase in Betula and by the delayed expansion of Pinus cembra.

  5. Hypoglycin A Concentrations in Maple Tree Species in the Netherlands and the Occurrence of Atypical Myopathy in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, C M; van Leeuwen, R; van Raamsdonk, L W D; Mol, H G J

    2016-05-01

    Atypical myopathy (AM) in horses is caused by the plant toxin hypoglycin A, which in Europe typically is found in the sycamore maple tree (Acer pseudoplatanus). Owners are concerned about whether their horses are in danger if they graze near maple trees. To measure hypoglycin A in the most common maple tree species in the Netherlands, and to determine whether concentration of toxin is a predictor of AM in horses. A total of 278 samples of maple tree leaves, sprouts, and seeds were classified by species. Mean concentrations of hypoglycin A were compared for the type of sample, the season and the occurrence of AM in the pasture (non-AM versus AM). Statistical analysis was performed using generalized a linear model (SPPS22). Almost all Acer pseudoplatanus samples contained hypoglycin A, with concentrations differing significantly among sources (P < .001). Concentrations were significantly higher in seeds from the AM group than in seeds from the non-AM group (856 ± 677 and 456 ± 358 mg/kg, respectively; P = .039). In sprouts and leaves this was not the case. Acer platanoides and Acer campestre samples did not contain detectable concentrations of hypoglycin A. Acer platanoides and campestre seem to be safe around paddocks and pastures, whereas almost all Acer pseudoplatanus samples contained hypoglycin A. In all AM cases, Acer pseudoplatanus was found. Despite significantly higher concentration of hypoglycin A in seeds of pastures where AM has occurred, individual prediction of AM cannot be made by measuring these concentrations because of the high standard deviation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Maple by example

    CERN Document Server

    Abell, Martha L

    2005-01-01

    Maple by Example, Third Edition, is a reference/text with CD for beginning and experienced students, professional engineers, and other Maple users. This new edition has been updated to be compatible with the most recent release of the Maple software. Coverage includes built-in Maple commands used in courses and practices that involve calculus, linear algebra, business mathematics, ordinary and partial differential equations, numerical methods, graphics and more. The CD-ROM provides updated Maple input and all text from the book.* Updated coverage of Maple features and functions * Backwards compatible for all versions* New applications from a variety of fields, including biology, physics and engineering* Expanded topics with many additional examples

  7. Acute O3 damage on first year coppice sprouts of aspen and maple sprouts in an open-air experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph N.T. Darbah; Wendy S. Jones; Andrew J. Burton; John Nagy; Mark E. Kubiske

    2011-01-01

    We studied the effect of high ozone (O3) concentration (110-490 nmol mol-1) on regenerating aspen (Populus tremuloides) and maple (Acer saccharum) trees at an open-air O3 pollution experiment near Rhinelander WI USA. This study is the first of its kind to examine...

  8. Green lumber grade yields from black cherry and red maple factory grade logs sawed at band and circular mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel A. Yaussy

    1989-01-01

    Multivariate regression models were developed to predict green board-foot yields (1 board ft. = 2.360 dm 3) for the standard factory lumber grades processed from black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) and red maple (Acer rubrum L.) factory grade logs sawed at band and circular sawmills. The models use log...

  9. Influence of experimental snow removal on root and canopy physiology of sugar maple trees in a northern hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel P. Comerford; Paul G. Schaberg; Pamela H. Templer; Anne M. Socci; John L. Campbell; Kimberly F. Wallin

    2013-01-01

    Due to projected increases in winter air temperatures in the northeastern USA over the next 100 years, the snowpack is expected to decrease in depth and duration, thereby increasing soil exposure to freezing air temperatures. To evaluate the potential physiological responses of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) to a reduced snowpack, we measured...

  10. Linking environmental gradients, species composition, and vegetation indicators of sugar maple health in the northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen B. Horsley; Scott W. Bailey; Todd E. Ristau; Robert P. Long; Richard A. Hallett

    2008-01-01

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) decline has occurred throughout its range over the past 50 years, although decline symptoms are minimal where nutritional thresholds of Ca, Mg, and Mn are met. Here, we show that availability of these elements also controls vascular plant species composition in northern hardwood stands and we identify indicator...

  11. Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Accelerator Center for Energy Research (ACER) exploits radiation chemistry techniques to study chemical reactions (and other phenomena) by subjecting samples to...

  12. On merging Acer sections Rubra and Hyptiocarpa: Molecular and morphological evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Harris

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we expanded Acer sect. Rubra Pax to include A. sect. Hyptiocarpa Fang. Traditionally, section Rubra comprises two iconic species, Acer rubrum Linnaeus (red maple and A. saccharinum Linnaeus (silver maple, of eastern North American forests as well as the rare Japanese montane species, A. pycnanthum K. Koch. Section Hyptiocarpa consists of A. laurinum Hasskarl and A. pinnatinervium Merrill, which occur in subtropical and tropical regions of southwestern China to southeast Asia. Here, we confirm prior phylogenetic results showing the close relationship between sects. Rubra and Hyptiocarpa, and we use scanning electron microscopy to demonstrate that leaves of species within these sections have similar arrangements of cuticular waxes, which account for the silvery color of their abaxial surfaces. We describe that the sections also share labile sex expression; inflorescences that range from compound racemose thyrses, to racemes or umbels and that may have undergone evolutionary reduction; and several features of their fruits, such as seed locules without keels, basal portion of wings straight, acute attachment angle between mericarps, and production of some mericarps that are seedless and partially developed at maturity. Our expansion of sect. Rubra to include sect. Hyptiocarpa better elucidates the biogeographic and evolutionary history of these species. Additionally, we show that A. laurinum and A. pinnatinervium have intergrading morphology and are probably synonymous, but we note that further studies are required to conclude their taxonomic status.

  13. ECOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF ORIBATID MITE COMMUNITIES IN ACER PLATANOIDES L. STAND ON THE REMEDIATED SITE OF PAVLOGRADSKAYA MINE (PAVLOGRAD, THE DNIPROPETROVSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Kulbachko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Species composition and features of ecological structure of oribatid mite communities were studied on various options of bulk artificial-mixed soil in Acer platanoides L. stand growing on the remediated site of Pavlogradskaya mine (Pavlograd, Dnipropetrovsk Region. The ecological structure of oribatid population generally was damaged and this is typical for the man-modified ecosystems. Oribatid mite density in maple litter was higher than in the top layer of bulk soil (loess loam and chernozem by 4.1–7.4 times. Species abundance of oribatid mite was almost equal in maple litter and bulk soil. Punctoribates liber Pavlitshenko, 1991 prevailed generally as eudominant species in oribatid mite structure in Acer platanoides stand. The representatives of unspecialized life-forms were dominated among the oribatid life-forms in the remediated site with chernozem bulk. Key words: oribatid mites, forest remediation, mine dumps.

  14. Concentrations of Ca and Mg in early stages of sapwood decay in red spruce, eastern hemlock, red maple, and paper birch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle; Jody Jellison; Jon Connolly; Jonathan Schilling

    2007-01-01

    The decay of coarse woody debris is a key component in the formation of forest soil and in the biogeochemical cycles of Ca and Mg. We tracked changes in density and concentration of Ca and Mg in sapwood of red maple (Acer rubrum L.), red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.), paper birch (Betula papyrifera Marsh.), and...

  15. Cold-season patterns of reserve and soluble carbohydrates in sugar maple and ice-damaged trees of two age classes following drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. L. Wong; K. L. Baggett; A. H. Rye

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the effects of summer drought on the composition and profiles of cold-season reserve and soluble carbohydrates in sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) trees (50-100 years old or ~200 years old) in which the crowns were nondamaged or damaged by the 1998 ice storm. The overall cold season reserve...

  16. Potential of fluorescence spectroscopy for the characterisation of maple syrup flavours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneton, Bernard; Clément, Alain; Lagacé, Luc

    2013-10-01

    Maple syrup has high maket value. It is produced in North East America from the heat-evaporated sap of Acer saccharum Marshall. For marketing purposes, there is interest in defining its flavour profile in a consistent and repeatable manner. An experiment was undertaken to explore the potential of autofluorescence of maple syrup induced at 275 and 360 nm to characterise flavours. A mixed data factor analysis revealed two independent groups of variables. One represents early season woody and late season empyreumatic flavours. The other is related to off-flavour, confectionery and maple flavours. Maple and confectionery flavours are subtle, difficult to distinguish and opposed to off-flavour. There were clear relationships among the two groups and fluorescence profiles. For each of the five basic flavours, discriminant models based on partial least squares regressions were developed. For each sample of syrup, flavours combined to form flavour profiles, and the results from the five discriminant models were aggregated to reproduce these profiles. For excitation at 275 nm, the woody/off-flavour and confectionery/empyreumatic/maple flavour profiles were classified correctly 86 and 78% of the time (cross-validation) respectively. Induced autofluorescence spectra were shown to contain information related to maple syrup flavours. This fluorescence-flavour relationship is not considered quantitative yet, and further research avenues are proposed. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Evaluation of rumble stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study were to: a) monitor the initial installations of rumble stripes and b) evaluate the results of rumble stripe installations. : Ten rural, two-lane road locations were selected by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet across t...

  18. Maple syrup urine disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the mildest form, repeated periods of physical stress can cause mental disability and high levels of leucine to build up. Symptoms Symptoms of this disorder include: Coma Feeding difficulties Lethargy Seizures Urine that smells like maple syrup Vomiting Exams and Tests These tests may be done to ...

  19. Low Light Availability Associated with American Beech Is the Main Factor for Reduced Sugar Maple Seedling Survival and Growth Rates in a Hardwood Forest of Southern Quebec

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Collin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Several recent studies have reported a marked increase in American beech dominance (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. relative to sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh. in late successional forests of North America. However, many factors have been proposed to explain this sudden shift in tree species composition. We investigated the microsite factors responsible for maple regeneration failure under maple-beech stands, focusing on both light availability and soil conditions. The survival and growth of maple seedlings planted in the natural soil and in pots with enriched soil were monitored for two years, as well as foliar nutrition and herbivory damages of natural seedlings. The results indicate that low light availability associated with the presence of beech is the primary factor leading to maple regeneration failures. Soil nutrient availability and foliar nutrition of natural seedlings did not differ between forest types. Yet, the results indicate that factors such as allelopathy and preferential herbivory on maple seedlings under beech could be superimposed effects that hinder maple regeneration. Under similar forests, a control of beech sapling abundance in the understory followed by selection cutting could be one way to promote and maintain maple populations in the longer term.

  20. What's a sugar maple worth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George L. Cook

    1991-01-01

    What is a sugar maple worth? This is an interesting question and not one which is easy to answer. I have some thoughts on this subject to share with you. Many of these have been discussed with county and district foresters, sugarmakers and people from the community who appreciate the maple tree very much.

  1. 7 CFR 1437.107 - Maple sap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.107 Maple sap. (a) NAP assistance for maple sap is... maple sap. (g) The actual production history for maple sap shall be recorded on the basis of gallons of...

  2. Consumer Preference for Graded Maple Syrup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul E. Sendak

    1978-01-01

    The three grades of maple syrup and a commercial table syrup containing artificial flavor and 3 percent pure maple syrup were evaluated by 1,018 women in four cities. The results indicate that differences in preference for flavor are related to how close the respondents are to a maple syrup-production region. Differences in preference among grades of pure maple syrup...

  3. Drying hard maple (Acer saccharum L.) lumber in a small dehumidification kiln

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal. Bennett

    2013-01-01

    Portable sawmill owners quickly recognize the advantage to kiln drying lumber they produce. Having the ability to provide properly kiln-dried lumber opens new market opportunities and can increase profit margins. However, the construction and operation of a dry kiln must be economical and simple. A small dehumidification dry kiln constructed and tested in Princeton, WV...

  4. Phenotypic variability of plant leaves of Acer genus, introduced into steppe zone of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Zaitseva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with studying of the patterns of ecological adaptation of wood species of Acer L. genus during their introduction into steppe zone of Ukraine. Hydrothermal conditions of the growing season in steppe zone of Ukraine are particularly unfavorable for tree and shrubbery plantings, comprising both native and introduced species. In the course of plants’ introduction, adaptive changes occur; such changes represent the spectrum of phenotypic implementation of the definite genotype under the influence of new environmental conditions. Stress environment of the region of introduction leads to occurrence of a great variety of phenotypic forms, as the different variants of genotype implementation. Studying of phenotypic variability gives an opportunity to determine the capacity to adaptation of introduced species and ways of adaptive reactions in new conditions of living. Therefore, objective of the work consists in studying of the processes of differentiation of morphological characters in species of Acer genus introduced in the regions of steppe zone with varying intensity of hydrothermal factors. Studies were carried out in the central and south-eastern steppe regions, as well as in the south of steppe zone in the coastal and continental areas. Subjects of research were 9 species of maples, differing by their botanic and geographic origin and by the degree of drought resistance in the steppe zone of Ukraine. Patterns of variability of morphostructural characters of leaves were determined by the indicator of specific weight of leaves which was calculated as a ratio of weight of dry laminas to their area (mg/cm2. Following the results of study, it was found that adaptation of maples to xerothermic factors of the environment is connected with changing of the ratio of groups of character variation and their contribution into total sample. Direct relationship is established between the probability density of expression (phenotypic

  5. Root vitality of Fagus sylvatica L., Quercus petraea Liebl. and Acer pseudoplatanus L. in mature mixed forest stand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grygoruk Dorota

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main task of the present study was to investigate the root vitality of common beech Fagus sylvatica L., sessile oak Quercus petraea Liebl. and sycamore maple Acer pseudoplatanus L. in the optimal g rowth conditions in south-western Poland. The study was carried out in 130-year-old mixed stand located within natural range of studied tree species. The density of roots (g/100 cm3 of soil and biomass of fine roots (g/m2 in topsoil layers (0-5 cm, 5-15 cm were determined in the tree biogroups of the same species. The mean total root density ranged from 0.248 to 0.417 g/100 cm3 in the 0-5 cm soil layer, and it decreased in the deeper soil layer (5-15 cm. There were found no statistically significant differences of total root densities between tree biogroups in topsoil layers. Diversity of fine root biomass was comparable in the tree biogroups (H’ = 1.5, but common beech showed more intensive growth of fine roots in the topsoil 0-15 cm when compared to sessile oak and sycamore maple. The results of the study point out the stability of the multi-species structure of the mixed stand studied, and consequently - the ability of beech, sessile oak and sycamore maple trees to coexist in the mixed stands - in the area of natural range of these species.

  6. The role of habitat factors in successful invasion of alien plant Acer negundo in riparian zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Piotr; Sikorska, Daria

    2016-04-01

    Ash-leaved maple (Acer negundo) is one of the most invasive species occurring in riparian zones. The invasion is especially effective in disturbed areas, as the plant favours anthropogenic sites. The plant was also observed to be able to penetrate into sandy bars, also those separated from the land, inaccessible to people. It's removal is time-consuming and laborious, often involves damage done to sensitive vegetation and the results are doubtful, as the plant quickly regenerates. The invasion patterns and establishment of ash-leaved maple in natural ecosystems are poorly investigated. The aim of this study was to test how habitat factors such as: light availability, soil characteristics and competition contribute to ash-leaved maple effective colonization of natural sand bars free from anthropogenic pressure. In 2014 sand bars located in Vistula River Valley in Warsaw were inventoried and classified basing on their development stage as 1 - initial, 2 - unstable, 3 - stable. Apart from the occurrence of the invasive ash-leaved maple the plants competing with it were recognized and the percentage of the shoots of shrubs and herbaceous plants was estimated. PAR was measured at ground level and 1 meter above ground, the thickness of organic layer formed on the top of the sand was also measured as the indicator of sand bar development stage. The maple's survival in extremely difficult conditions resembles the strategy of willows and poplars naturally occurring in the riparian zones, which are well adapted to this environment. The success of invasion strongly depends on the plants establishment during sand bars initial stage of development. The seedlings growth correlates with the age of the sand bar (r1=0,41, r2=0,42 i r3=0,57). The colonization lasts for 4-6 years and the individuals start to cluster in bigger parches. After that period the maple turns into the phase of competition for space. Habitat factors such as shading (r2=0,41 i r3=0,51) and organic layer

  7. Equine atypical myopathy caused by hypoglycin A intoxication associated with ingestion of sycamore maple tree seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuraw, A; Dietert, K; Kühnel, S; Sander, J; Klopfleisch, R

    2016-07-01

    Evidence suggest there is a link between equine atypical myopathy (EAM) and ingestion of sycamore maple tree seeds. To further evaluate the hypothesis that the ingestion of hypoglycin A (HGA) containing sycamore maple tree seeds causes acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and might be associated with the clinical and pathological signs of EAM. Case report. Necropsy and histopathology, using hematoxylin and eosin and Sudan III stains, were performed on a 2.5-year-old mare that died following the development of clinical signs of progressive muscle stiffness and recumbency. Prior to death, the animal ingested sycamore maple tree seeds (Acer pseudoplatanus). Detection of metabolites in blood and urine obtained post mortem was performed by rapid ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Data from this case were compared with 3 geldings with no clinical history of myopathy. Macroscopic examination revealed fragments of maple tree seeds in the stomach and severe myopathy of several muscle groups including Mm. intercostales, deltoidei and trapezii. Histologically, the affected muscles showed severe, acute rhabdomyolysis with extensive accumulation of finely dispersed fat droplets in the cytoplasm of degenerated skeletal muscle cells not present in controls. Urine and serum concentrations of several acyl carnitines and acyl glycines were increased, and both contained metabolites of HGA, a toxic amino acid present in sycamore maple tree seeds. The study supports the hypothesis that ingestion of HGA-containing maple tree seeds may cause EAM due to acquired multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  8. Detection of hypoglycin A in the seeds of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus) and box elder (A. negundo) in New Zealand; the toxin associated with cases of equine atypical myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, R K; Hill, F I; Habyarimana, J A; Boemer, F; Votion, D M

    2016-05-01

    During April and May 2014 four horses aged between 5 months and 9 years, located in the Canterbury, Marlborough and Southland regions, presented with a variety of clinical signs including recumbency, stiffness, lethargy, dehydration, depression, and myoglobinuria suggestive of acute muscle damage. Two horses were subjected to euthanasia and two recovered. In all cases seeds of sycamore maple (Acer pseudoplatanus) or box elder (A. negundo) were present in the area where the horse had been grazing. The samaras (seeds) of some Acer spp. may contain hypoglycin A, that has been associated with cases of atypical myopathy in Europe and North America. To determine if hypoglycin A is present in the samaras of Acer spp. in New Zealand, samples were collected from trees throughout the country that were associated with historical and/or current cases of atypical myopathy, and analysed for hypoglycin A. Serum samples from the four cases and four unaffected horses were analysed for the presence of hypoglycin A, profiles of acylcarnitines (the definitive diagnosis for atypical myopathy) and activities of creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase.Markedly elevated serum activities of creatine kinase and aspartate aminotransferase, and increased concentrations of selected acylcarnitines were found in the case horses. Hypoglycin A was detected in the serum of those horses but not in the healthy controls. Hypoglycin A was detected in 10/15 samples of samaras from sycamore maple and box elder from throughout New Zealand. Cases of atypical myopathy were diagnosed on properties where samaras containing hypoglycin A were also found. Sycamore and box elder trees in New Zealand are a source of hypoglycin A associated with the development of atypical myopathy. If pastured horses present with clinical and biochemical signs of severe muscle damage then the environment should be checked for the presence of these trees. Horses should be prevented from grazing samaras from Acer spp. in the

  9. After the Maples--What Then?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisler, Carmen E.

    1994-01-01

    Uses models to illustrate the possible "migration route" of the sugar maple in response to predicted global climate change. Curriculum activities for students are provided that specifically address the sugar maple forests of the Great Lakes regions. (ZWH)

  10. Analysis of pure maple syrup consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul E. Sendak

    1974-01-01

    Virtually all of the pure maple syrup productim in the United States is in the northern states of Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and Wisconsin. Pure maple syrup users living in the maple production area and users living in other areas of the United States were asked a series of questions about their use of pure...

  11. UV-B-mediated changes on below-ground communities associated with the roots of Acer saccharum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klironomos, J.N.; Allen, M.F.

    1995-01-01

    1. Little is known about how exposure to UV-B radiation affects rhizosphere microbes. Rhizosphere organisms are fed primarily by root-derived substrates and fulfil functions such as mineralization, immobilization, decomposition, pathogeneity and improvement of plant nutrition; they form the base of the below-ground food web. 2. In this study, we exposed Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum) seedlings to UV-B radiation in order to determine if UV-B influences the activities of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal fungi, bacteria and microbe-feeding arthropods in the rhizosphere. 3. Below-ground organisms are greatly affected by UV-B radiation. Overall, carbon-flow in the plant soil system was shifted from a mutualistic-closed, mycorrhizal-dominated system to an opportunist-open, saprobe/pathogen-dominated one. (author)

  12. Effects of Acer okamotoanum sap on the function of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Beum-Soo; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Hyun; Yang, Mhan-Pyo; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-02-01

    Sap is a plant fluid that primarily consists of water and small amounts of mineral elements, sugars, hormones and other nutrients. Acer mono (A. mono) is an endemic Korean mono maple which was recently suggested to have health benefits due to its abundant calcium and magnesium ion content. In the present study, we examined the effects of sap from Acer okamotoanum (A. okamotoanum) on the phagocytic response of mouse neutrophils in vivo and rat and canine neutrophils in vitro. We tested the regulation of phagocytic activity, oxidative burst activity (OBA) and the levels of filamentous polymeric actin (F-actin) in the absence and presence of dexamethasone (DEX) in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that DEX primarily reduced OBA in the mouse neutrophils, and that this was reversed in the presence of the sap. By contrast, the phagocytic activity of the mouse cells was not regulated by either DEX or the sap. Rat and canine polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) responded in vitro to the sap in a similar manner by increasing OBA. However, regulation of phagocytic activity by the sap was different between the species. In canine PMNs, phagocytic activity was enhanced by the sap at a high dose, while it did not significantly modulate this activity in rat PMNs. These findings suggest that the sap of A. okamotoanum stimulates neutrophil activity in the mouse, rat and canine by increasing OBA in vivo and in vitro, and thus may have a potential antimicrobial effect in the PMNs of patients with infections.

  13. Morphological and molecular identification of phytophthora species from maple trees in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenković Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the study performed with aims to determine the presence and diversity of Phytophthora species on maple trees in Serbia. Due to high aggressiveness and their multicyclic nature, presence of these pathogens is posing significant threat to forestry and biodiversity. In total, 29 samples of water, soil and tissues were taken from 10 different localities, and six different maple hosts were tested. After the isolation tests, 17 samples from five different maple hosts were positive for the presence of Phytophthora spp., and 31 isolates were obtained. After the detailed morphological and physiological classification, four distinct groups of isolates were separated. DNA was extracted from selected representative isolates and molecular identification with sequencing of ITS region was performed. Used ITS4 and ITS6 primers successfully amplified the genomic DNA of chosen isolates and morphological identification of obtained isolates was confirmed after the sequencing. Four different Phytophthora species were detected, including P. cactorum, P. gonapodyides, P. plurivora and P. lacustris. The most common isolated species was homothallic, and with very variable and semipapillate sporangia, P. plurivora with 22 obtained isolates. This is the first report of P. plurivora and P. gonapodyides on A. campestre, P. plurivora and P. lacustris on Acer heldreichii and first report of P. lacustris on A. pseudoplatanus and A. tataricum in Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 37008

  14. The effect of the tariff on the maple industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul E. Sendak

    1972-01-01

    The U. S. maple tariff is a tax on maple syrup and sugar imports from Canada into the United States. An analysis of the maple tariff indicates that it was never very effective in protecting the domestic maple industry from foreign competition. The tariff has been especially ineffective since World War II. Its removal will not hurt the U. S. maple syrup industry.

  15. Physiological and foliar injury responses of Prunus serotina, Fraxinus americana, and Acer rubrum seedlings to varying soil moisture and ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaub, M.; Skelly, J.M.; Steiner, K.C.; Davis, D.D.; Pennypacker, S.P.; Zhang, J.; Ferdinand, J.A.; Savage, J.E.; Stevenson, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    High soil water availability favors ozone uptake, increases foliar injury, and exacerbates the negative ozone effect on gas exchange of seedlings of deciduous tree species. - Sixteen black cherry (Prunus serotina, Ehrh.), 10 white ash (Fraxinus americana, L.) and 10 red maple (Acer rubrum, L.) 1-year old seedlings were planted per plot in 1997 on a former nursery bed within 12 open-top chambers and six open plots. Seedlings were exposed to three different ozone scenarios (ambient air: 100% O 3 ; non-filtered air: 98% ambient O 3 ; charcoal-filtered air: 50% ambient O 3 ) within each of two different water regimes (nine plots irrigated, nine plots non-irrigated) during three growing seasons. During the 1998 and 1999 growing season, leaf gas exchange, plant water relations, and foliar injury were measured. Climatic data, ambient- and chamber-ozone-concentrations were monitored. We found that seedlings grown under irrigated conditions had similar (in 1998) but significantly higher gas exchange rates (in 1999) than seedlings grown within non-irrigated plots among similar ozone exposures. Cherry and ash had similar ozone uptake but cherry developed more ozone-induced injury (<34% affected leaf area, LAA) than ash (<5% LAA), while maple rarely showed foliar injury, indicating the species differed in ozone sensitivity. Significantly more severe injury on seedlings grown under irrigated conditions than seedlings grown under non-irrigated conditions demonstrated that soil moisture altered seedling responses to ambient ozone exposures

  16. Wheat Stripe Rust

    OpenAIRE

    Pace, Mike; Israelsen, Clark; Evans, Kent; Barnhill, James

    2008-01-01

    Stripe rust, or yellow rust, is primarily a foliar fungal disease of wheat, although it can infect spike and stem tissues. If the pathogen infects the spike (head) it causes extensive quality and grain yield loss. The disease is caused by the fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici. The fungus can only survive and reproduce on wheat. It survives from one season to the next on volunteer plants.

  17. On Robot Modelling using Maple

    OpenAIRE

    Wallén, Johanna

    2007-01-01

    This report studies robot modelling by means of the computer algebra tool Maple. First coordinate systems are described, and the more general way with transformation matrices is chosen in the further work. The position kinematics of the robot are then described by homogeneous transformations. The Denavit-Hartenberg representation is used, which is a systematic way to develop the forward kinematics for rigid robots. The velocity kinematics is then described by the Jacobian. The industrial robo...

  18. Lighting up superconducting stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergeçen, Emre; Gedik, Nuh

    2018-02-01

    Cuprate superconductors display a plethora of complex phases as a function of temperature and carrier concentration, the understanding of which could provide clues into the mechanism of superconductivity. For example, when about one-eighth of the conduction electrons are removed from the copper oxygen planes in cuprates such as La2‑xBaxCuO4 (LBCO), the doped holes (missing electrons) organize into one-dimensional stripes (1). The bulk superconducting transition temperature (Tc) is greatly reduced, and just above Tc, electrical transport perpendicular to the planes (along the c axis) becomes resistive, but parallel to the copper oxygen planes, resistivity remains zero for a range of temperatures (2). It was proposed a decade ago (3) that this anisotropic behavior is caused by pair density waves (PDWs); superconducting Cooper pairs exist along the stripes within the planes but cannot tunnel to the adjacent layers. On page 575 of this issue, Rajasekaran et al. (4) now report detection of this state in LBCO using nonlinear reflection of high-intensity terahertz (THz) light.

  19. Flowering and sex expression in Acer L. : a biosystematic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de P.C.

    1976-01-01

    A review and an analysis is given of flowering and sex expression in Acer. The process of sex differentiation was studied in physiological experiments and could be influenced by accelerated flowering and by removal of female.gif flower buds just after bud break. The

  20. Exploding Stars and Stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of a pattern of X-ray "stripes" in the remains of an exploded star may provide the first direct evidence that a cosmic event can accelerate particles to energies a hundred times higher than achieved by the most powerful particle accelerator on Earth. This result comes from a very long observation of the Tycho supernova remnant with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. It could explain how some of the extremely energetic particles bombarding the Earth, called cosmic rays, are produced. "We've seen lots of intriguing structures in supernova remnants, but we've never seen stripes before," said Kristoffer Eriksen, a postdoctoral researcher at Rutgers University who led the study. "This made us think very hard about what's happening in the blast wave of this powerful explosion." This latest study from Chandra provides support for a theory about how magnetic fields can be dramatically amplified in such blast waves. In this theory, the magnetic fields become highly tangled and the motions of the particles very turbulent near the expanding supernova shock wave at the front edge of the supernova remnant. High-energy charged particles can bounce back and forth across the shock wave repeatedly, gaining energy with each crossing. Theoretical models of the motion of the most energetic particles -- which are mostly protons -- are predicted to leave a messy network of holes and dense walls corresponding to weak and strong regions of magnetic fields, respectively. The X-ray stripes discovered by the Chandra researchers are thought to be regions where the turbulence is greater and the magnetic fields more tangled than surrounding areas, and may be the walls predicted by the theory. Electrons become trapped in these regions and emit X-rays as they spiral around the magnetic field lines. However, the regular and almost periodic pattern of the X-ray stripes was not predicted by the theory. "It was a big surprise to find such a neatly arranged set of stripes," said co

  1. Biogeochemical features of maple and dandelion in Eastern Administrative District of Moscow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, Dmitry

    2014-05-01

    Today more than half of world population and 73% of population in Russia live in cities. Moscow is the only one megacity in Russia with the population more than 11 million. The main source of technogenic impact in Moscow is transport. Plants can be used as indicators of urban environment heavy metals and metalloids (HM) pollution. Large scale biogeochemical research was done in Eastern Administrative District of Moscow. Apart from transport there are many industrial sources of pollution: metalworking, mechanical engineering, chemical, energetic and incinerator. This study focuses on detection of HM composition of woody plant leaves (maple - Acer platanoides) and herbaceous species leaves (dandelion - Taraxacum officinale). Plant material was collected on a regular greed with a step of 500-700 m. Background plants were sampled at 40 km west away from the city. Determination of Fe, Mn, Mo, Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, As, Sb in plants was done using atomic absorption spectrometry after washing, drying and digestion with HNO3+H2O2. It was revealed that dandelion accumulates (index - concentration factors CF relatively background) Mo13Fe6Pb5Cd4.5As4Sb3, while maple Sb13As5.5Fe3Mo2Pb,Zn1.5. Geochemical specialization of plants in functional zones (industrial, transport, recreational, agricultural, residential areas with high-, middle- and low-rise buildings) was identified. The highest CF were determined for Mo in dandelion of all zones except industrial. In which the most accumulated elements are Fe and Mo, as well as Pb10As6Sb5Cu2. Arsenic is accumulated by dandelion in all zones. Copper is not concentrated by herbaceous species because of antagonism between Mo and Cu. The highest CF were determined for HM in maple of industrial zone. There trees concentrate Sb and As9Fe7Mo6Pb3Zn2. In the other zones levels of CF are lower in 2-5 times. Dandelion and maple don't accumulate Mn because of antagonism between Zn, Mo and Mn. Urban plants condition is estimated by the ratio between

  2. Ecotoxicological effects evoked in hydrophytes by leachates of invasive Acer negundo and autochthonous Alnus glutinosa fallen off leaves during their microbial decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krevš, Alina; Darginavičienė, Jūratė; Gylytė, Brigita; Grigutytė, Reda; Jurkonienė, Sigita; Karitonas, Rolandas; Kučinskienė, Alė; Pakalnis, Romas; Sadauskas, Kazys; Vitkus, Rimantas

    2013-01-01

    Throughout 90-day biodegradation under microaerobic conditions, invasive to Lithuania species boxelder maple (Acer negundo) leaves lost 1.5-fold more biomass than that of autochthonous black alder (Alnus glutinosa), releasing higher contents of N tot , ammonium and generating higher BOD 7 . Boxelder maple leaf leachates were characterized by higher total bacterial numbers and colony numbers of heterotrophic and cellulose-decomposing bacteria than those of black alder. The higher toxicity of A. negundo aqueous extracts and leachates to charophyte cell (Nitellopsis obtusa), the inhabitant of clean lakes, were manifested at mortality and membrane depolarization levels, while the effect on H + -ATPase activity in membrane preparations from the same algae was stronger in case of A. glutinosa. Duckweed (Lemna minor), a bioindicator of eutrophic waters, was more sensitive to leaf leachates of A. glutinosa. Fallen leaves and leaf litter leachates from invasive and native species of trees, which enter water body, affect differently microbial biodestruction and aquatic vegetation in freshwater systems. - Highlights: ► We examined Acer negundo and Alnus glutinosa leaf extract effects on hydrophytes. ► Nitellopsis obtusa and Lemna minor responded differently to leaf litter leachates. ► 90-day biodegraded A. negundo leaves lost twofold more biomass than that of A. glutinosa. ► A. negundo leachates evoked higher mortality and cell depolarization of N. obtusa. ► Leachates affected H + -ATPase activity in algae membrane preparations. - Fallen leaves and leaf litter leachates from invasive and native species of trees, which enter waterbody can be environmental factor affecting differently microbial biodestruction and aquatic vegetation in freshwater systems, thus influencing ecological scenarios.

  3. Revealing the cellular metabolism and microstructural changes in vivo in senescing Acer saccharum leaves using two-photon FLIM and full-field OCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Anna, Tulsi; Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Chiou, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Seasonal as well as climate changes have immense effect on bud burst, leaf color and leaf abscission. Autumn phenology of leaves is clearly distinguishable in deciduous plant leaves where the leaf color changes from green to red (leaf senescence). In this work, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) and full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM) were applied to study mitochondrial activity and microstructural changes, respectively, in the senescence of Acer saccharum (Sugar maple) leaves. Fluorescence lifetime of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] was recorded using 2P-FLIM to quantify the cellular metabolic changes. Compared to the green leaves, the red leaves showed a 19% increase (P fluorescence lifetime of NAD(P)H, and a 52% decrease (p protein-bound NAD(P)H ratio. This infers a significant change in mitochondrial metabolic regulation in red leaves in contrast to green leaves. Additionally, en-face sectional images at 0.8 μm axial resolutions of the green and the red color Acer saccharum leaves via FF-OCM using white light emitting diode (WLED) showed a well-defined microstructure of epicuticular waxy layer in green leaves as compared to red leaves where disintegrated microstructure was observed. Our approach can potentially be used to correlate mitochondrial activity with epicuticular microstructural changes in senescing leaves and other biological tissues.

  4. Ecotoxicological effects evoked in hydrophytes by leachates of invasive Acer negundo and autochthonous Alnus glutinosa fallen off leaves during their microbial decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krevš, Alina; Darginavičienė, Jūratė; Gylytė, Brigita; Grigutytė, Reda; Jurkonienė, Sigita; Karitonas, Rolandas; Kučinskienė, Alė; Pakalnis, Romas; Sadauskas, Kazys; Vitkus, Rimantas; Manusadžianas, Levonas

    2013-02-01

    Throughout 90-day biodegradation under microaerobic conditions, invasive to Lithuania species boxelder maple (Acer negundo) leaves lost 1.5-fold more biomass than that of autochthonous black alder (Alnus glutinosa), releasing higher contents of N(tot), ammonium and generating higher BOD(7). Boxelder maple leaf leachates were characterized by higher total bacterial numbers and colony numbers of heterotrophic and cellulose-decomposing bacteria than those of black alder. The higher toxicity of A. negundo aqueous extracts and leachates to charophyte cell (Nitellopsis obtusa), the inhabitant of clean lakes, were manifested at mortality and membrane depolarization levels, while the effect on H(+)-ATPase activity in membrane preparations from the same algae was stronger in case of A. glutinosa. Duckweed (Lemna minor), a bioindicator of eutrophic waters, was more sensitive to leaf leachates of A. glutinosa. Fallen leaves and leaf litter leachates from invasive and native species of trees, which enter water body, affect differently microbial biodestruction and aquatic vegetation in freshwater systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Physiological and foliar symptom response in the crowns of Prunus serotina, Fraxinus americana and Acer rubrum canopy trees to ambient ozone under forest conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaub, M.; Skelly, J.M.; Zhang, J.W.; Ferdinand, J.A.; Savage, J.E.; Stevenson, R.E.; Davis, D.D.; Steiner, K.C.

    2005-01-01

    The crowns of five canopy dominant black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.), five white ash (Fraxinus americana L.), and six red maple (Acer rubrum L.) trees on naturally differing environmental conditions were accessed with scaffold towers within a mixed hardwood forest stand in central Pennsylvania. Ambient ozone concentrations, meteorological parameters, leaf gas exchange and leaf water potential were measured at the sites during the growing seasons of 1998 and 1999. Visible ozone-induced foliar injury was assessed on leaves within the upper and lower crown branches of each tree. Ambient ozone exposures were sufficient to induce typical symptoms on cherry (0-5% total affected leaf area, LAA), whereas foliar injury was not observed on ash or maple. There was a positive correlation between increasing cumulative ozone uptake (U) and increasing percent of LAA for cherry grown under drier site conditions. The lower crown leaves of cherry showed more severe foliar injury than the upper crown leaves. No significant differences in predawn leaf water potential (ψ L ) were detected for all three species indicating no differing soil moisture conditions across the sites. Significant variation in stomatal conductance for water vapor (g wv ) was found among species, soil moisture, time of day and sample date. When comparing cumulative ozone uptake and decreased photosynthetic activity (P n ), red maple was the only species to show higher gas exchange under mesic vs. drier soil conditions (P wv and P n demonstrate the strong influence of heterogeneous environmental conditions within forest canopies. - Within the heterogeneous environment of a mature forest, many factors in addition to soil moisture play a significant role in determining exposure/response relationships to ozone

  6. The Stripe State in Cupratesa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee T.-K.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of high temperature superconductors (HTS two decades ago, many anomalous properties have been reported. One of the most interesting properties is the possible existence of the stripe state consisting of one dimensional charge-density modulation coupled with some kind of spin ordering. X-ray and neutron scattering experiments and recently high resolution scanning tunneling microscopy have reported direct evidences of such a structure. In particular it has found in the La-Sr-Cu-O (LSCO family the existence of the half-doped stripe with average of half a hole in one charge modulation period below and about 1/8 hole density. These results have fueled the idea about the presence of these charge or spin density wave states competing with the superconducting phase in underdoped HTS. They may even contribute to the pairing mechanism. In this talk, we will demonstrate that the presence of these stripes is actually a natural consequence of the strongly interacting t-J model by using a variational approach which provides a good enough accuracy to address the subtle result. Furthermore we show that half-doped stripes could be stabilized in hole-doped systems if we assume a simple electron-phonon interaction to renormalize the electron mass. However we have not found any evidence to support half-doped stripes in electron-doped systems.

  7. HEAVY METALS IN MAPLE AND DANDELION LEAVES FROM DIFERENT LAND-USE AREAS IN MOSCOW ’S EASTERN DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry V. Vlasov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on extensive biogeochemical research conducted in Moscow’s Eastern Administrative District, where motor-vehicle traffic and heavy industry have resulted in some of the highest levels of pollution in the city. For this study, 26 samples of maple leaves (Acer platanoides and 49 samples of dandelion leaves (Taraxacum officinalewere collected on a regular grid at 500–700 m intervals. Concentrations of Fe, Mn, Mo, Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, As and Sb in these plants were measured using atomic absorption spectrometry after washing, drying and HNO3 + H2O2 digestion. Maples accumulated Sb9,7As4,6Mo2,2Fe2,0Zn1,5 Pb1,4Cu1,2, while dandelions accumulated Mo12,7Pb4,9Cd4,4Fe4,3As3,9Sb2,7Cu1,4 — normalized to concentrations in background samples from an unpolluted site west from Moscow. The plants’ geochemical specialization was detected and compared in the following land-use areas: industrial, traffic, recreational, agricultural, and high-, mid-, and low-rise residential development. For maples, the highest concentration factor levels were found in industrial areas, with accumulations of Sb19As2,4Mo1,7Zn1,7Fe1,5Cu1,4Pb1,4. These levels were 2–5 timeslower for maples in other land-use areas. Dandelions and maples do not accumulate Mnbecause of antagonism between Zn, Mo and Mn in soils. Copper is not concentrated byherbaceous species because of antagonism between Mo and Cu. Differences in  eochemical specialization were shown using the Sb/Mo ratio: in dandelions this was 5 times lower than in background samples, while in maples it was 4.5 times higher. A Zv ratio was used to evaluate the intensity of biogeochemical transformation in urban plants. The highest Zv ratios were found in plants near industrial zones and large roads.

  8. Improving striping operations through system optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Striping operations generate a significant workload for Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) maintenance : operations. The requirement for each striping crew to replenish its stock of paint and other consumable items from a bulk storage : fa...

  9. Calculus of One and More Variables with Maple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkova, Libuse

    2012-01-01

    This is a guide to using Maple in teaching fundamental calculus of one, two and three variables (limits, derivatives, integrals, etc.), also suitable for Maple beginners. It outlines one of the ways to effective use of computers in the teaching process. It scans advantages and disadvantages of using Maple in relation to students and teacher. The…

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF MAPLE IN TRAINING HIGHER MATHEMATICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr M. Mykhalevych

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the material presented in this paper due to the need to develop and implement new information technologies in teaching higher mathematics with the use of systems of symbolic mathematics. Brief analysis of the Maple and Mathematica is given. The basic results of authors on working out of a training complex on higher mathematics are given. The complex was created in an environment of symbolic mathematics Maple. Procedure simulators, which give the whole process of model solutions of mathematical problems are a major element of the complex. The results of such procedures for typical problems from different sections of higher mathematics in accordance with the program for technical universities are represented. Questions the benefits and methods of using such programs, in particular those related to deficits of licensed copies of Maple was touched.

  11. Partial differential equations & boundary value problems with Maple

    CERN Document Server

    Articolo, George A

    2009-01-01

    Partial Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems with Maple presents all of the material normally covered in a standard course on partial differential equations, while focusing on the natural union between this material and the powerful computational software, Maple. The Maple commands are so intuitive and easy to learn, students can learn what they need to know about the software in a matter of hours- an investment that provides substantial returns. Maple''s animation capabilities allow students and practitioners to see real-time displays of the solutions of partial differential equations.  Maple files can be found on the books website. Ancillary list: Maple files- http://www.elsevierdirect.com/companion.jsp?ISBN=9780123747327  Provides a quick overview of the software w/simple commands needed to get startedIncludes review material on linear algebra and Ordinary Differential equations, and their contribution in solving partial differential equationsIncorporates an early introduction to Sturm-L...

  12. The effect of microbial inocula on the growth of black locust, Siberian elm and silver maple seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajnal-Jafari Timea

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Growth and development of forest plants depend mostly on the soil microbial activity since no mineral or organic fertilizers are applied. Microbial processes can be activated and conditions for plants development improved with the introduction of selected microorganisms in the soil. With the aim of obtaining quality planting material in a shorter period of time, the effects of Azotobacter chroococcum and Streptomyces sp. on the early growth of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia, Siberian elm (Ulmus pumila and silver-leaf maple (Acer dasycarpum were investigated in this study. Microorganisms were applied individually and in a mixture (1:1. Plant height was measured on the 90th, 120th and 180th day after planting. Plant diameter, as well as the number of actinomycetes and azotobacters was measured at the end of the vegetation period (180 days after planting. Applied microorganisms had a positive effect on the seedling height in all three plant species, with the best effect found in the black locust. Effectiveness of applied microorganisms on seedling diameter was the highest in the silver-leaf maple. The largest number of azotobacters was found in the rhizosphere of black locust. Number of microorganisms from both groups was increased in the inoculated variants. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 43002

  13. Technetium-99 cycling in maple trees: Characterization of changes in chemical form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, C.T. Jr.; Lomax, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Prior field studies near an old radioactive waste disposal site at Oak Ridge, TN, indicated that following root uptake, metabolism by deciduous trees rendered 99Tc less biogeochemically mobile than expected, based on chemistry of the pertechnetate (TcO-4) anion. Subsequently, the form of technetium (Tc) in maple tree (Acer sp.) sap, leaves, wood and forest leaf litter was characterized using one or more of the following methods: dialysis, physical fractionation, chemical extraction, gel permeation chromatography, enzymatic extraction, or thin layer chromatography (TLC) on silica gel. Chromatography (Sephadex G-25) of TcO-4 incubated in vitro with tree sap showed it to behave similar to TcO-4 anion. When labeled wood and leaf tissues were processed using a tissue homogenizer, 15% and 40%, respectively, of the Tc was solubilized into phosphate buffer. Most (65% to 80%) of the solubilized Tc passing a 0.45-micron filter also passed through an ultrafiltration membrane with a nominal molecular weight cutoff of 10,000 atomic mass units (amu). A majority (72% to 80%) of the Tc in wood could be chemically removed by successive extractions with ethanol, water and weak mineral acid. These same extractants removed only 23% to 31% of the Tc from maple leaves or forest floor leaf litter. Most of the Tc in leaves and leaf litter was removed only by strongly alkaline reagents typically used to release structural polysaccharides (hemicelluloses) from plant tissues. Chromatography (Sephadex G-25) of the ethanol-water extract from wood and the alkaline extract from leaves demonstrated that Tc in these extracts was not principally TcO-4 but was complexed with molecules greater than 1000 amu. Incubations of leaf and wood homogenates with protease approximately doubled the amount of Tc released from contaminated tissues

  14. Storage requirements for sugar maple seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry W. Yawney; Clayton M., Jr. Carl

    1974-01-01

    Sugar maple seeds, collected from three trees in northern Vermont, were stored at four temperatures (18, 7, 2, and -10ºC) in combination with four seed moisture contents (35, 25, 17, and 10 percent). Seed moisture content and storage temperature significantly affected keeping ability, and these factors were highly interrelated. Seeds from all trees kept best...

  15. Applications of Maple To Algebraic Cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmon, Neil P.

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates the use of technology to enhance the appreciation of applications involving abstract algebra. The symbolic manipulator Maple can perform computations required for a linear cryptosystem. One major benefit of this process is that students can encipher and decipher messages using a linear cryptosystem without becoming confused and…

  16. Maple Syrup Disease: Diagnosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Infants at high risk for maple syrup disease (MSD were identified by family history and molecular testing for the Y393N mutation of the E1a subunit of the branched chain a-ketoacid dehydrogenase in a study at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

  17. MAPLE activities and applications in gas sensors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Remsa, Jan; Kocourek, Tomáš; Kubešová, B.; Schůrek, J.; Myslík, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2011), 643-649 ISSN 0947-8396 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : MAPLE * gas sensors * biomedicine * thin films Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.630, year: 2011

  18. Genetic structure and hierarchical population divergence history of Acer mono var. mono in South and Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunping Liu

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the genetic structure and evolutionary history of tree species across their ranges is essential for the development of effective conservation and forest management strategies. Acer mono var. mono, an economically and ecologically important maple species, is extensively distributed in Northeast China (NE, whereas it has a scattered and patchy distribution in South China (SC. In this study, the genetic structure and demographic history of 56 natural populations of A. mono var. mono were evaluated using seven nuclear microsatellite markers. Neighbor-joining tree and STRUCTURE analysis clearly separated populations into NE and SC groups with two admixed-like populations. Allelic richness significantly decreased with increasing latitude within the NE group while both allelic richness and expected heterozygosity showed significant positive correlation with latitude within the SC group. Especially in the NE region, previous studies in Quercus mongolica and Fraxinus mandshurica have also detected reductions in genetic diversity with increases in latitude, suggesting this pattern may be common for tree species in this region, probably due to expansion from single refugium following the last glacial maximum (LGM. Approximate Bayesian Computation-based analysis revealed two major features of hierarchical population divergence in the species' evolutionary history. Recent divergence between the NE group and the admixed-like group corresponded to the LGM period and ancient divergence of SC groups took place during mid-late Pleistocene period. The level of genetic differentiation was moderate (FST  = 0.073; G'ST  = 0.278 among all populations, but significantly higher in the SC group than the NE group, mirroring the species' more scattered distribution in SC. Conservation measures for this species are proposed, taking into account the genetic structure and past demographic history identified in this study.

  19. Genetic structure and hierarchical population divergence history of Acer mono var. mono in South and Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunping; Tsuda, Yoshiaki; Shen, Hailong; Hu, Lijiang; Saito, Yoko; Ide, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic structure and evolutionary history of tree species across their ranges is essential for the development of effective conservation and forest management strategies. Acer mono var. mono, an economically and ecologically important maple species, is extensively distributed in Northeast China (NE), whereas it has a scattered and patchy distribution in South China (SC). In this study, the genetic structure and demographic history of 56 natural populations of A. mono var. mono were evaluated using seven nuclear microsatellite markers. Neighbor-joining tree and STRUCTURE analysis clearly separated populations into NE and SC groups with two admixed-like populations. Allelic richness significantly decreased with increasing latitude within the NE group while both allelic richness and expected heterozygosity showed significant positive correlation with latitude within the SC group. Especially in the NE region, previous studies in Quercus mongolica and Fraxinus mandshurica have also detected reductions in genetic diversity with increases in latitude, suggesting this pattern may be common for tree species in this region, probably due to expansion from single refugium following the last glacial maximum (LGM). Approximate Bayesian Computation-based analysis revealed two major features of hierarchical population divergence in the species' evolutionary history. Recent divergence between the NE group and the admixed-like group corresponded to the LGM period and ancient divergence of SC groups took place during mid-late Pleistocene period. The level of genetic differentiation was moderate (FST  = 0.073; G'ST  = 0.278) among all populations, but significantly higher in the SC group than the NE group, mirroring the species' more scattered distribution in SC. Conservation measures for this species are proposed, taking into account the genetic structure and past demographic history identified in this study.

  20. Geometry of curves and surfaces with Maple

    CERN Document Server

    Rovenski, Vladimir

    2000-01-01

    This concise text on geometry with computer modeling presents some elementary methods for analytical modeling and visualization of curves and surfaces. The author systematically examines such powerful tools as 2-D and 3-D animation of geometric images, transformations, shadows, and colors, and then further studies more complex problems in differential geometry. Well-illustrated with more than 350 figures---reproducible using Maple programs in the book---the work is devoted to three main areas: curves, surfaces, and polyhedra. Pedagogical benefits can be found in the large number of Maple programs, some of which are analogous to C++ programs, including those for splines and fractals. To avoid tedious typing, readers will be able to download many of the programs from the Birkhauser web site. Aimed at a broad audience of students, instructors of mathematics, computer scientists, and engineers who have knowledge of analytical geometry, i.e., method of coordinates, this text will be an excellent classroom resource...

  1. Chemical and physical properties of two-year short-rotation deciduous species. [Olea sp. , Populus deltoides, Platanus sp. , Alnus glutinosa, Paulownia tomentosa, Robina pseudoacacia, Acer saccharinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.S

    1982-01-01

    The following seven broadleaved species were tested: autumn olive (Olea sp.) eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), sycamore (Platanus species), black alder (Alnus glutinosa), royal paulownia (Paulownia tomentosa), black locust (Robina pseudoacacia) and silver maple (Acer saccharinum). The species and portions both significantly affected the chemical and the physical findings of the juvenile wood. The ages, which were tested in factorial combination with the species, also showed a significant effect on both the chemical and the physical properties of wood. All of the results indicated that both chemical and physical properties did vary with species, among the portions of the wood, and according to the ages of the wood. From the portion standpoint, the bark had higher gross heat content, sulphur content, ash content and lignin content, and it was also higher in all three kinds of extractives contents. The wood portion was found to be rich in holocellulose, alpha-cellulose and pentosan. In considering the chemical and physical properties of juvenile wood among the species, eastern cottonwood was found to have the highest value for ash content and all of the three kinds of extractives content. Paulownia had the highest value for sulphur content. Black locust had highest gross heat content, holocellulose and alpha-cellulose contents. Silver maple had highest lignin content. Results from this study showed that these seven juvenile hardwood species can produce high biomass yields of fibre and energy when grown under intensive care in central and southern Illinois sites. The best species of these seven tested woods seem to be black locust, which could also serve as a raw material for the pulp and paper industry, as well as for a fuel for energy generation. However, further economic and energy efficiency analyses are needed before judging the feasibility of these short-rotation juvenile hardwood species.

  2. A cost analysis: processing maple syrup products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil K. Huyler; Lawrence D. Garrett

    1979-01-01

    A cost analysis of processing maple sap to syrup for three fuel types, oil-, wood-, and LP gas-fired evaporators, indicates that: (1) fuel, capital, and labor are the major cost components of processing sap to syrup; (2) wood-fired evaporators show a slight cost advantage over oil- and LP gas-fired evaporators; however, as the cost of wood approaches $50 per cord, wood...

  3. Frozen Microemulsions for MAPLE Immobilization of Lipase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Califano

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Candida rugosa lipase (CRL was deposited by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE in order to immobilize the enzyme with a preserved native conformation, which ensures its catalytic functionality. For this purpose, the composition of the MAPLE target was optimized by adding the oil phase pentane to a water solution of the amino acid 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-2-methyl-l-alanine (m-DOPA, giving a target formed by a frozen water-lipase-pentane microemulsion. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM were used to investigate the structure of MAPLE deposited lipase films. FTIR deconvolution of amide I band indicated a reduction of unfolding and aggregation, i.e., a better preserved lipase secondary structure in the sample deposited from the frozen microemulsion target. AFM images highlighted the absence of big aggregates on the surface of the sample. The functionality of the immobilized enzyme to promote transesterification was determined by thin layer chromatography, resulting in a modified specificity.

  4. Structural characterization of MAPLE deposited lipase biofilm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aronne, Antonio [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Ausanio, Giovanni; Bloisi, Francesco [CNR-SPIN and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Calabria, Raffaela [Istituto Motori-CNR, via G. Marconi 8, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Califano, Valeria, E-mail: v.califano@im.cnr.it [Istituto Motori-CNR, via G. Marconi 8, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Fanelli, Esther [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Industrial Production, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Massoli, Patrizio [Istituto Motori-CNR, via G. Marconi 8, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Vicari, Luciano R.M. [CNR-SPIN and Department of Physics, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Lipase from Candida Rugosa was deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) on KBr pellets, mica and glass substrate. • The deposited film was characterized morphologically and structurally by optical microscopy, SEM and FTIR analysis. • Results of characterization underlined a phenomenon of aggregation taking place. • The aggregation phenomenon was reversible since lipase showed activity in the transesterification reaction between soybean oil and isopropyl alcohol once detached from the substrate. - Abstract: Lipases (triacylglycerol ester hydrolases) are enzymes used in several industrial applications. Enzymes immobilization can be used to address key issues limiting widespread application at industrial level. Immobilization efficiency is related to the ability to preserve the native conformation of the enzyme. MAPLE (Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation) technique, a laser deposition procedure for treating organic/polymeric/biomaterials, was applied for the deposition of lipase enzyme in an ice matrix, using near infrared laser radiation. Microscopy analysis showed that the deposition occurred in micrometric and submicrometric clusters with a wide size distribution. AFM imaging showed that inter-cluster regions are uniformly covered with smaller aggregates of nanometric size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used for both recognizing the deposited material and analyzing its secondary structure. Results showed that the protein underwent reversible self-association during the deposition process. Actually, preliminary tests of MAPLE deposited lipase used for soybean oil transesterification with isopropyl alcohol followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry gave results consistent with undamaged deposition of lipase.

  5. Dynamical systems with applications using Maple

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    "The text treats a remarkable spectrum of topics and has a little for everyone. It can serve as an introduction to many of the topics of dynamical systems, and will help even the most jaded reader, such as this reviewer, enjoy some of the interactive aspects of studying dynamics using Maple." —UK Nonlinear News (Review of First Edition) "The book will be useful for all kinds of dynamical systems courses…. [It] shows the power of using a computer algebra program to study dynamical systems, and, by giving so many worked examples, provides ample opportunity for experiments. … [It] is well written and a pleasure to read, which is helped by its attention to historical background." —Mathematical Reviews (Review of First Edition) Since the first edition of this book was published in 2001, Maple™ has evolved from Maple V into Maple 13. Accordingly, this new edition has been thoroughly updated and expanded to include more applications, examples, and exercises, all with solutions; two new chapters on neural n...

  6. Invasion of the striped mollusks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Introduced to this country only five years ago, the prolific zebra mussel has infested the Great Lakes and has already begun to move into fresh waters beyond the region. Dense populations in utility water systems have caused serious problems, reducing plant efficiency and blocking lines used for cooling and fire fighting. Experts say the striped mollusk has the potential to become the industry's worst biological problem, possibly affecting 70% of US power plants. While it appears that the invader is here to stay, EPRI and others continue to develop and refine techniques to control mussel growth

  7. Response of maple sapwood to injury and infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.C. Shortle; K.T. Smith; K.R. Dudzik; Sharon Parker

    1995-01-01

    In sapwood challenge experiments in Acer rubrum, columns of discolouration initiated by wounding and inoculation with pioneer fungi (Cephalosporium sp., Phialophora sp.) were similar in size to untreated wounds. Inoculation with decay fungi (Pleurotus ostreatus, Trametes versicolor) produced...

  8. Seasonality of cavitation and frost fatigue in Acer mono Maxim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Feng, Feng; Tyree, Melvin T

    2017-12-08

    Although cavitation is common in plants, it is unknown whether the cavitation resistance of xylem is seasonally constant or variable. We tested the changes in cavitation resistance of Acer mono before and after a controlled cavitation-refilling and freeze-thaw cycles for a whole year. Cavitation resistance was determined from 'vulnerability curves' showing the percent loss of conductivity versus xylem tension. Cavitation fatigue was defined as a reduction of cavitation resistance following a cavitation-refilling cycle, whereas frost fatigue was caused by a freeze-thaw cycle. A. mono developed seasonal changes in native embolisms; values were relatively high during winter but relatively low and constant throughout the growing season. Cavitation fatigue occurred and changed seasonally during the 12-month cycle; the greatest fatigue response occurred during summer and the weakest during winter, and the transitions occurred during spring and autumn. A. mono was highly resistant to frost damage during the relatively mild winter months; however, a quite different situation occurred during the growing season, as the seasonal trend of frost fatigue was strikingly similar to that of cavitation fatigue. Seasonality changes in cavitation resistance may be caused by seasonal changes in the mechanical properties of the pit membranes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Maple sugaring with vacuum pumping during the fall season

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Clay Smith; Alan G., Jr. Snow

    1971-01-01

    Vacuum pumping of sugar maple trees during the late fall and early winter months is not advisable in northern Vermont. However, fall pumping may be profitable in other areas of the sugar maple range. It is recommended that the weather pattern in a given locale be observed; and if conditions are favorable, vacuum pumping should be tried on a small scale before...

  10. Food-chain transfer of zinc from contaminated Urtica dioica and Acer pseudoplatanus L. to the aphids Microlophium carnosum and Drepanosiphum platanoidis Schrank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnett, Danielle, E-mail: danielle.sinnett@forestry.gsi.gov.u [Centre for Forestry and Climate Change, Forest Research, Alice Holt Lodge, Farnham, Surrey GU10 4LH (United Kingdom); Department of Soil Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6DW (United Kingdom); Hutchings, Tony R., E-mail: tony.hutchings@forestry.gsi.gov.u [Centre for Forestry and Climate Change, Forest Research, Alice Holt Lodge, Farnham, Surrey GU10 4LH (United Kingdom); Hodson, Mark E., E-mail: m.e.hodson@reading.ac.u [Department of Soil Science, School of Human and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading RG6 6DW (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    This study examines the food-chain transfer of Zn from two plant species, Urtica dioica (stinging nettle) and Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple), into their corresponding aphid species, Microlophium carnosum and Drepanosiphum platanoidis. The plants were grown in a hydroponic system using solutions with increasing concentrations of Zn from 0.02 to 41.9 mg Zn/l. Above-ground tissue concentrations in U. dioica and M. carnosum increased with increasing Zn exposure (p < 0.001). Zn concentrations in A. pseudoplatanus also increased with solution concentration from the control to the 9.8 mg Zn/l solution, above which concentrations remained constant. Zn concentrations in both D. platanoidis and the phloem tissue of A. pseudoplatanus were not affected by the Zn concentration in the watering solution. It appears that A. pseudoplatanus was able to limit Zn transport in the phloem, resulting in constant Zn exposure to the aphids. Zn concentrations in D. platanoidis were around three times those in M. carnosum. - Concentrations of Zn in two aphid species are dependant on species and exposure.

  11. Food-chain transfer of zinc from contaminated Urtica dioica and Acer pseudoplatanus L. to the aphids Microlophium carnosum and Drepanosiphum platanoidis Schrank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinnett, Danielle; Hutchings, Tony R.; Hodson, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the food-chain transfer of Zn from two plant species, Urtica dioica (stinging nettle) and Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple), into their corresponding aphid species, Microlophium carnosum and Drepanosiphum platanoidis. The plants were grown in a hydroponic system using solutions with increasing concentrations of Zn from 0.02 to 41.9 mg Zn/l. Above-ground tissue concentrations in U. dioica and M. carnosum increased with increasing Zn exposure (p < 0.001). Zn concentrations in A. pseudoplatanus also increased with solution concentration from the control to the 9.8 mg Zn/l solution, above which concentrations remained constant. Zn concentrations in both D. platanoidis and the phloem tissue of A. pseudoplatanus were not affected by the Zn concentration in the watering solution. It appears that A. pseudoplatanus was able to limit Zn transport in the phloem, resulting in constant Zn exposure to the aphids. Zn concentrations in D. platanoidis were around three times those in M. carnosum. - Concentrations of Zn in two aphid species are dependant on species and exposure.

  12. Invasion of the striped mollusks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-09-01

    Introduced to this country only five years ago, the prolific zebra mussel has infested the Great Lakes and has already begun to move into fresh waters beyond the region. Dense populations in utility water systems have caused serious problems, reducing plant efficiency and blocking lines used for cooling and fire fighting. Experts say the striped mollusk has the potential to become the industry's worst biological problem, possibly affecting 70% of US power plants. While it appears that the invader is here to stay, EPRI and others continue to develop and refine techniques to control mussel growth. This article describes how the mollusk got here, reviews the problems it can cause and what is being done to mitigate the problems and control the growth and spread of the mollusk.

  13. Large scale patterns of genetic variation and differentiation in sugar maple from tropical Central America to temperate North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Rodriguez, Yalma L; Platt, William J; Urbatsch, Lowell E; Foltz, David W

    2015-11-19

    Geological events in the latter Cenozoic have influenced the distribution, abundance and genetic structure of tree populations in temperate and tropical North America. The biogeographical history of temperate vegetation that spans large ranges of latitude is complex, involving multiple latitudinal shifts that might have occurred via different migration routes. We determined the regional structuring of genetic variation of sugar maple (Acer saccharum subsp. saccharum) and its only subspecies in tropical America (Acer saccharum subsp. skutchii) using nuclear and chloroplast data. The studied populations span a geographic range from Maine, USA (46°N), to El Progreso, Guatemala (15°N). We examined genetic subdivisions, explored the locations of ancestral haplotypes, analyzed genetic data to explore the presence of a single or multiple glacial refugia, and tested whether genetic lineages are temporally consistent with a Pleistocene or older divergence. Nuclear and chloroplast data indicated that populations in midwestern USA and western Mexico were highly differentiated from populations in the rest of the sites. The time of the most recent common ancestor of the western Mexico haplotype lineage was dated to the Pliocene (5.9 Ma, 95% HPD: 4.3-7.3 Ma). Splits during the Pleistocene separated the rest of the phylogroups. The most frequent and widespread haplotype occurred in half of the sites (Guatemala, eastern Mexico, southeastern USA, and Ohio). Our data also suggested that multiple Pleistocene refugia (tropics-southeastern USA, midwestern, and northeastern USA), but not western Mexico (Jalisco), contributed to post-glacial northward expansion of ranges. Current southern Mexican and Guatemalan populations have reduced population sizes, genetic bottlenecks and tend toward homozygosity, as indicated using nuclear and chloroplast markers. The divergence of western Mexican populations from the rest of the sugar maples likely resulted from orographic and volcanic barriers

  14. Structural characterization of MAPLE deposited lipase biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronne, Antonio; Ausanio, Giovanni; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Fanelli, Esther; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2014-11-01

    Lipases (triacylglycerol ester hydrolases) are enzymes used in several industrial applications. Enzymes immobilization can be used to address key issues limiting widespread application at industrial level. Immobilization efficiency is related to the ability to preserve the native conformation of the enzyme. MAPLE (Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation) technique, a laser deposition procedure for treating organic/polymeric/biomaterials, was applied for the deposition of lipase enzyme in an ice matrix, using near infrared laser radiation. Microscopy analysis showed that the deposition occurred in micrometric and submicrometric clusters with a wide size distribution. AFM imaging showed that inter-cluster regions are uniformly covered with smaller aggregates of nanometric size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used for both recognizing the deposited material and analyzing its secondary structure. Results showed that the protein underwent reversible self-association during the deposition process. Actually, preliminary tests of MAPLE deposited lipase used for soybean oil transesterification with isopropyl alcohol followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry gave results consistent with undamaged deposition of lipase.

  15. Maple syrup urine disease: mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Patrick R; Gass, Jennifer M; Vairo, Filippo Pinto E; Farnham, Kristen M; Atwal, Herjot K; Macklin, Sarah; Klee, Eric W; Atwal, Paldeep S

    2017-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of metabolism caused by defects in the branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex, which results in elevations of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in plasma, α-ketoacids in urine, and production of the pathognomonic disease marker, alloisoleucine. The disorder varies in severity and the clinical spectrum is quite broad with five recognized clinical variants that have no known association with genotype. The classic presentation occurs in the neonatal period with developmental delay, failure to thrive, feeding difficulties, and maple syrup odor in the cerumen and urine, and can lead to irreversible neurological complications, including stereotypical movements, metabolic decompensation, and death if left untreated. Treatment consists of dietary restriction of BCAAs and close metabolic monitoring. Clinical outcomes are generally good in patients where treatment is initiated early. Newborn screening for MSUD is now commonplace in the United States and is included on the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP). We review this disorder including its presentation, screening and clinical diagnosis, treatment, and other relevant aspects pertaining to the care of patients.

  16. Further Investigation Into Maple Syrup Yields Three New Lignans, a New Phenylpropanoid, and Twenty-Six Other Phytochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, LIYA; SEERAM, NAVINDRA P.

    2011-01-01

    Maple syrup is made by boiling the sap collected from certain maple (Acer) species. During this process, phytochemicals naturally present in tree sap are concentrated in maple syrup. We previously reported 23 phytochemicals from a butanol extract of Canadian maple syrup (MS-BuOH). Here we report the isolation and identification of 30 additional compounds (1–30) from its ethyl acetate extract (MS-EtOAc) not previously reported from MS-BuOH. Of these, 4 compounds are new (1–3, 18) and 20 compounds (4–7, 10–12, 14–17, 19–20, 22–24, 26, 28–30) are being reported from maple syrup for the first time. The new compounds include 3 lignans and 1 phenylpropanoid: 5-(3″,4″-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-3-(4′-hydroxy-3′-methoxybenzyl)-4-hydroxymethyl-dihydrofuran-2-one (1), (erythro, erythro)-1-[4-[2-hydroxy-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1-(hydroxymethyl)ethoxy]-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl]-1,2,3-propanetriol (2), (erythro, threo)-1-[4-[2-hydroxy-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1-(hydroxymethyl)ethoxy]-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl]-1,2,3-propanetriol (3) and 2,3-dihydroxy-1-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-1-propanone (18), respectively. In addition, 25 other phenolic compounds were isolated including (threo, erythro)-1-[4-[(2-hydroxy-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1-(hydroxymethyl)ethoxy]-3-methoxyphenyl]-1,2,3-propanetriol (4), (threo, threo)-1-[4-[(2-hydroxy-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1-(hydroxymethyl)ethoxy]-3-methoxyphenyl]-1,2,3-propanetriol (5), threo-guaiacylglycerol-β-O-4′-dihydroconiferyl alcohol (6), erythro-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-[4-(3-hydroxypropyl)-2,6-dimethoxyphenoxy]-1,3-propanediol (7), 2-[4-[2,3-dihydro-3-(hydroxymethyl)-5-(3-hydroxypropyl)-7-methoxy-2-benzofuranyl]-2,6-dimethoxyphenoxy]-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,3-propanediol (8), acernikol (9), leptolepisol D (10), buddlenol E (11), (1S,2R)-2-[2,6-dimethoxy-4-[(1S,3aR,4S,6aR)-tetrahydro-4-(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-1H,3H-furo[3,4-c]furan-1-yl]phenoxy]-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1

  17. Whole-plant water flux in understory red maple exposed to altered precipitation regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wullschleger, Stan D.; Hanson, Paul J.; Tschaplinski, Tim J.

    1998-02-01

    Sap flow gauges were used to estimate whole-plant water flux for five stem-diameter classes of red maple (Acer rubrum L.) growing in the understory of an upland oak forest and exposed to one of three large-scale (0.64 ha) manipulations of soil water content. This Throughfall Displacement Experiment (TDE) used subcanopy troughs to intercept roughly 30% of the throughfall on a "dry" plot and a series of pipes to move this collected precipitation across an "ambient" plot and onto a "wet" plot. Saplings with a stem diameter larger than 10 cm lost water at rates 50-fold greater than saplings with a stem diameter of 1 to 2 cm (326 versus 6.4 mol H(2)O tree(-1) day(-1)). These size-class differences were driven largely by differences in leaf area and cross-sectional sapwood area, because rates of water flux expressed per unit leaf area (6.90 mol H(2)O m(-2) day(-1)) or sapwood area (288 mol H(2)O dm(-2) day(-1)) were similar among saplings of the five size classes. Daily and hourly rates of transpiration expressed per unit leaf area varied throughout much of the season, as did soil matrix potentials, and treatment differences due to the TDE were observed during two of the seven sampling periods. On July 6, midday rates of transpiration averaged 1.88 mol H(2)O m(-2) h(-1) for saplings in the "wet" plot, 1.22 mol H(2)O m(-2) h(-1) for saplings in the "ambient" plot, and 0.76 mol H(2)O m(-2) h(-1) for saplings in the "dry" plot. During the early afternoon of August 28, transpiration rates were sevenfold lower for saplings in the "dry" plot compared to saplings in the "wet" plot and 2.5-fold lower compared to saplings in the "ambient" plot. Treatment differences in crown conductance followed a pattern similar to that of transpiration, with values that averaged 60% lower for saplings in the "dry" plot compared to saplings in the "wet" plot and 35% lower compared to saplings in the "ambient" plot. Stomatal and boundary layer conductances were roughly equal in magnitude

  18. Stock characteristics of Hudson River striped bass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, T.B.; McLaren, J.B.; Cooper, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Striped bass, because of their tremendous popularity both commercially and recreationally, were a principal focus of the Hudson River power plant case. Between 1976 and 1979, over 23,000 age-II and older striped bass were studied as one facet of an extensive research program on the spring population in the Hudson River. Samples were collected from the overwintering as well as the spawning portion of the striped bass population, and included immature as well as mature fish. At least 12 age-groups contributed to spawning each year. Of these 12, age-groups III, IV, and V usually were most abundant, but the percentage of the population represented by any single age-group varied as the result of fluctuations in year-class strength. Males first became sexually mature at age II and females at age IV. Fast-growing individuals within a year class tended to mature earlier. Fecundity increased with the size of fish, reaching an observed maximum of about 3 million eggs per female. Although significant annual variations in maturity and growth were detected for Hudson River striped bass, there was no evidence of a consistent change in either variable that might be associated with increasing power plant operations and a reduction in striped bass abundance. Age at maturity and age structure are the two life history components that differ the most between the Hudson River population and other striped bass populations. 36 refs., 7 tabs

  19. Brazilian adaptation of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Amaral Carvalho

    Full Text Available Abstract The Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R is a highly sensitive and specific tool for the detection of mild dementia. It is particularly useful in differentiating Alzheimer's disease from frontotemporal dementia. While the first version of the test battery has been adapted in many countries, its revised version has not, probably because it was published very recently. Objective: To translate and adapt the ACE-R for use in the Brazilian population. Methods: Two independent translations were made from English into Portuguese, followed by two independent back-translations. Few adaptations in accordance to the Brazilian culture and language were made and a first version of the instrument produced. This former version of the ACE-R was administered to 21 cognitively healthy subjects aged 60 years or more, with different educational levels. Results: The mean age of the studied sample of healthy elderly was 75.4 years (ranging from 60 to 89 years. Small additional modifications were necessary after the evaluation of the first ten subjects in order to improve comprehension of the test. The final Portuguese version of the ACE-R was produced and was found to be well understood by the remaining 11 subjects, taking an average of 15 minutes to be administered. Conclusions: The Brazilian version of the ACE-R proved to be a promising cognitive instrument for testing both in research and clinical settings. With this regard, additional studies are currently being carried out in our unit in order to investigate the diagnostic properties of the ACE-R in our milieu.

  20. Competition for nitrogen between Fagus sylvatica and Acer pseudoplatanus seedlings depends on soil nitrogen availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuyuan; Rennenberg, Heinz; Simon, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Competition for nitrogen (N), particularly in resource-limited habitats, might be avoided by different N acquisition strategies of plants. In our study, we investigated whether slow-growing European beech and fast-growing sycamore maple seedlings avoid competition for growth-limiting N by different N uptake patterns and the potential alteration by soil N availability in a microcosm experiment. We quantified growth and biomass indices, 15N uptake capacity and N pools in the fine roots. Overall, growth indices, N acquisition and N pools in the fine roots were influenced by species-specific competition depending on soil N availability. With inter-specific competition, growth of sycamore maple reduced regardless of soil N supply, whereas beech only showed reduced growth when N was limited. Both species responded to inter-specific competition by alteration of N pools in the fine roots; however, sycamore maple showed a stronger response compared to beech for almost all N pools in roots, except for structural N at low soil N availability. Beech generally preferred organic N acquisition while sycamore maple took up more inorganic N. Furthermore, with inter-specific competition, beech had an enhanced organic N uptake capacity, while in sycamore maple inorganic N uptake capacity was impaired by the presence of beech. Although sycamore maple could tolerate the suboptimal conditions at the cost of reduced growth, our study indicates its reduced competitive ability for N compared to beech. PMID:25983738

  1. MAPLE: a Canadian multipurpose reactor concept for national nuclear development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidstone, R.F.

    1984-06-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, following an investigation of Canadian and international needs and world-market prospects for research reactors, has developed a new multipurpose concept, called MAPLE (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental). The MAPLE concept combines H 2 O- and D 2 O-moderated lattices within a D 2 O calandria tank in order to achieve the flux advantages of a basic H 2 O-cooled and moderated core along with the flexibility and space of a D 2 O-moderated core. The SUGAR (Slowpoke Uprated for General Applied Research) MAPLE version of the conept provides a range of utilization that is well suited to the needs of countries with nuclear programs at an early stage. The higher power MAPLE version furnishes high neutron flux levels and the variety of irradiation facilities that are appropriate for more advanced nuclear programs

  2. Organic heterostructures based on arylenevinylene oligomers deposited by MAPLE

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Socol, M.; Preda, N.; Vacareanu, L.; Grigoras, M.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Stanculescu, F.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Stanculescu, A.; Stoicanescu, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 302, May (2014), s. 216-222 ISSN 0169-4332 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : organic heterostructures * MAPLE * oligomer * optoelectronica Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014

  3. Nonlinear physics with Maple for scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Enns, Richard H

    1997-01-01

    Philosophy of the Text This text has been designed to be an introductory survey of the basic concepts and applied mathematical methods of nonlinear science. Students in engineer­ ing, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computing science, and biology should be able to successfully use this text. In an effort to provide the students with a cutting edge approach to one of the most dynamic, often subtle, complex, and still rapidly evolving, areas of modern research-nonlinear physics-we have made extensive use of the symbolic, numeric, and plotting capabilities of Maple V Release 4 applied to examples from these disciplines. No prior knowledge of Maple or computer programming is assumed, the reader being gently introduced to Maple as an auxiliary tool as the concepts of nonlinear science are developed. The diskette which accompanies the text gives a wide variety of illustrative nonlinear examples solved with Maple. An accompanying laboratory manual of experimental activities keyed to the text allows the student the...

  4. Speed of tapping does not influence maple sap yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Clay Smith; Richard J. LaMore

    1971-01-01

    Results of this study showed no statistical difference in the quantity or sweetness of sugar maple sap collected from tapholes that were drilled with a variety of tappers running at different drilling speeds

  5. METHODS OF OBTAINING LONGITUDINAL STRIPES LAYOUTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OANA Dorina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available From the technological point of view it is necessary that the phase of warping to be done two or three multiple warp, which results in two or three rolls of the warp final will meet only the warping. To achieve longitudinal striped fabric spinning machines is necessary to have all tensioning mechanism dispensing rolls which requires their special construction. The homogeneity of the fabric from the point of view of the warp yarns tension must be ensured by synchronizing operation of the tensioning two cutting mechanisms of the two reels on which the wires are wound with a degree of waving and thus the fuel consumption at the different weaving. It is recommended that the design be adopted average float bonds, such that the wires can be wrapped around more than two final reels. In terms of manufacturing technology with longitudinal stripes fabrics have a more complicated and expensive technology to cross-striped fabrics for the manufacture of which technology is simplified. Cross-striped fabrics containing groups of warp threads those linked to floating average is materially different. Due to this degree of crimping of wires in the stripes with different bonds makes their contract to be different, having a direct influence on the wires consumption. The different contraction of wire weaving makes warp yarn length, contained in a linked reports are so different that it requires winding wires with different bonds also differing on the final rolls.

  6. Bioinspired Heterogeneous Structural Color Stripes from Capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ze; Wang, Huan; Shang, Luoran; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2017-12-01

    As an important characteristic of many creatures, structural colors play a crucial role in the survival of organisms. Inspired by these features, an intelligent structural color material with a heterogeneous striped pattern and stimuli-responsivity by fast self-assembly of colloidal nanoparticles in capillaries with a certain diameter range are presented here. The width, spacing, color, and even combination of the structural color stripe patterns can be precisely tailored by adjusting the self-assembly parameters. Attractively, with the integration of a near-infrared (NIR) light responsive graphene hydrogel into the structural color stripe pattern, the materials are endowed with light-controlled reversible bending behavior with self-reporting color indication. It is demonstrated that the striped structural color materials can be used as NIR-light-triggered dynamic barcode labels for the anti-counterfeiting of different products. These features of the bioinspired structural color stripe pattern materials indicate their potential values for mimicking structural color organisms, which will find important applications in constructing intelligent sensors, anti-counterfeiting devices, and so on. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Guiding thermomagnetic avalanches with soft magnetic stripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Colauto, F.; Benseman, T.; Rosenmann, D.; Kwok, W. -K.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate the potential for manipulating the ultrafast dynamics of thermomagnetic flux avalanches (TMA) in superconducting films with soft magnetic stripes deposited on the film. By tuning the in-plane magnetization of the stripes, we induce lines of strong magnetic potentials for Abrikosov vortices, resulting in guided slow motion of vortices along the stripe edges and preferential bursts of TMA along the stripes. Furthermore, we show that transversely polarized stripes can reduce the TMA size by diverting magnetic flux away from the major trunk of the TMA into interstripe gaps. Our data indicate that TMAs are launched from locations with enhanced vortex entry barrier, where flux accumulation followed by accelerated vortex discharge significantly reduces the threshold of the applied field ramping speed required for the creation of TMAs. Finally, vortex-antivortex annihilation at the moving front of an expanding TMA can account for the enhanced TMA activity in the receding branches of the sample's magnetization cycle and the preferred propagation of TMAs into maximum trapped flux regions.

  8. The IAC stripe82 legacy project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Javier; Fliri, Juergen; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2017-03-01

    We present new deep co-adds of data taken within Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), especially stacked to reach the faintest surface brightness limits of this data set. Our reduction puts special emphasis on preserving the characteristics of the background (sky + diffuse light) in the input images using a non-aggressive sky subtraction strategy, resulting in an exquisite quality on extremely faint structures. The IAC Stripe 82 co-adds offer a rather unique possibility to study the low surface brightness Universe like stellar haloes and disc truncations, low surface brightness, tidal galactic interactions, extremely faint dwarf galaxies, intra-cluster light or diffuse light from galactic dust. The imaging data is publicly available at http://www.iac.es/proyecto/stripe82/.

  9. Improving striping operations through system optimization - phase 2 : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Striping operations generate a significant workload for MoDOT maintenance operations. The requirement for each striping crew : to replenish its stock of paint and other consumable items from a bulk storage facility, along with the necessity to make s...

  10. Probing optically silent superfluid stripes in cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, S.; Okamoto, J.; Mathey, L.; Fechner, M.; Thampy, V.; Gu, G. D.; Cavalleri, A.

    2018-02-01

    In many theoretical models of high-temperature superconductors, remnants of superconductivity persist to temperatures higher than the transition temperature, TC. Rajasekaran et al. used nonlinear terahertz spectroscopy to probe this region of the phase diagram of a cuprate superconductor that is well known for a stripe phase that appears for certain doping levels (see the Perspective by Ergeçen and Gedik). For a sample deep in the stripe phase, a large nonlinear signal persisted from the superconducting region up to temperatures much higher than TC. The findings suggest the formation of a peculiar spatially modulated superconducting state called the pair-density wave.

  11. DNA methylation profiles correlated to striped bass sperm fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spermatozoa are used to fertilize in vitro the eggs of white bass (Morone chrysops) to produce the preferred hybrid for the striped bass aquaculture industry. Currently, only one source of domestic striped bass juveniles are available to growers that are not obtained ...

  12. substitution line for resistance to stripe rust

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    Aug 19, 2011 ... c Indian Academy of Sciences. RESEARCH ARTICLE. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of a new wheat Secale africanum. 2R a. (2D) substitution line for resistance to stripe rust. MENGPING LEI, GUANGRONG LI, SUFEN ZHANG, CHENG LIU and ZUJUN YANG. ∗. School of Life Science and ...

  13. Effects of air injection during sap processing on maple syrup color, chemical composition and flavor volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air injection (AI) is a maple sap processing technology reported to increase the efficiency of maple syrup production by increasing production of more economically valuable light-colored maple syrup, and reducing development of loose scale mineral precipitates in syrup, and scale deposits on evapora...

  14. Root-Crown Relations of Young Sugar Maple and Yellow Birch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl H. Tubbs

    1977-01-01

    Young forest-grown sugar maple and yellow birch (1 to 6 inches d.b.h.) crowns were mapped and roots excavated. Crown dimensions were compared. Sugar maple roots usually terminated within a few feet of the crown perimeter. Yellow birch roots frequently terminated well outside crown perimeters and roots of birch were more irregularly distributed than those of maple....

  15. Effect of Sugar Maple Root Exudate on Seedlings of Northern Conifer Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl H. Tubbs

    1976-01-01

    It has been shows that a root exudate of sugar maple reduces the growth of yellow birch. A laboratory test indicated that the growth of northern conifers is also reduced in sugar maple root exudate. Allelopathy may play an important role in survival of species on sites where sugar maple is abundant.

  16. Breakup Behavior of a Capillary Bridge on a Hydrophobic Stripe Separating Two Hydrophilic Stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Maximilian; Hardt, Steffen

    2017-11-01

    The breakup dynamics of a capillary bridge on a hydrophobic area between two liquid filaments occupying two parallel hydrophilic stripes is studied experimentally. In addition calculations with the finite-element software Surface Evolver are performed to obtain the corresponding stable minimal surfaces. Droplets of de-ionized water are placed on substrates with alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes of different width. Their volume decreases by evaporation. This results in a droplet shaped as the letter ``H'' covering two hydrophilic stripes separated by one hydrophobic stripe. The width of the capillary bridge d(t) on the hydrophobic stripe during the breakup process is observed using a high-speed camera mounted on a bright-field microscope. The results of the experiments and the numerical studies show that the critical width dcrit, indicating the point where the capillary bridge becomes unstable, mainly depends on the width ratio of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes. It is found that the time derivative of d(t) first decreases after dcrit has been reached. The final breakup dynamics then follows a t 2 / 3 scaling. We kindly acknowledge the financial support by the German Research Foundation (DFG) within the Collaborative Research Centre 1194 ``Interaction of Transport and Wetting Processes'', Project A02a.

  17. ACER Mathematics Profile Series: Number Test. (Test Booklet, Answer and Record Sheet, Score Key, and Teachers Handbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Greg; Wines, Robin

    The Number Test of the ACER Mathematics Profile Series, contains 30 items, for each of three suggested grade levels: 7-8, 8-9, and 9-10. Raw scores on all tests in the ACER Mathematics Profile Series (Number, Operations, Space and Measurement) are converted to a common scale called MAPS, a major feature of the Series. Based on the Rasch Model,…

  18. Rapid degradation of abnormal proteins in vacuoles from Acer pseudoplatanus L. cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canut, H.; Alibert, G.; Carrasco, A.; Boudet, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    In Acer pseudoplatanus cells, the proteins synthesized in the presence of an amino acid analog ([ 14 C]p-fluorophenylalanine), were degraded more rapidly than normal ones ([ 14 C]phenylalanine as precursor). The degradation of an important part of these abnormal proteins occurred inside the vacuoles. The degradation process was not apparently associated to a specific proteolytic system but was related to a preferential transfer of these aberrant proteins from the cytoplasm to the vacuole

  19. Safety features of the MAPLE-X10 reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.; Bishop, W.E.; Heeds, W.

    1990-09-01

    The MAPLE-X10 reactor is a D 2 0-reflected, H 2 0-cooled and -moderated pool-type reactor under construction at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. This 10-MW reactor will produce key medical and industrial radio-isotopes such as 99 Mo, 125 I, and 192 Ir. As the prototype for the MAPLE research reactor concept, the reactor incorporates diverse safety features both inherent in the design and in the added engineered systems. The safety requirements are analogous to those of the Canadian CANDU power reactor since standards for the licensing of new research reactors have not been developed yet by the licensing authority in Canada

  20. Assessment of genetic diversity and variation of acer mono max seedlings after spaceflight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, C.; Li, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Yang, M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity and variation of Acer Mono Maxim seedlings sampled from space-mutated (sm) populations were compared to seedlings from parallel control (ck) ones using molecular markers. RAMP analysis showed that the percentage of polymorphic band, Shannon diversity index and Nei gene diversity index of the space-mutated populations were higher than those of the control ones, which indicated that genetic variation increased after spaceflight in populations of Acer Mono Maxim. By using un-weighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) method, three space-mutated repeats (populations) were clustered together, and control groups clustered separately, which further indicated that there was difference between the space-mutated ones and the control ones, which may be caused by space mutation. Further analysis of genomic inconsistency between the root and leaf samples from the same tree showed that a total variation rate of 6.3% and 1.7% were obtained in ten space-mutated individuals by using RAMP and SSR markers, respectively, however, the variation rate was zero in control ones. It provided that space mutation may be caused the individual variation of Acer Mono Maxim. (author)

  1. STRIPE: Remote Driving Using Limited Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Jennifer S.

    1997-01-01

    Driving a vehicle, either directly or remotely, is an inherently visual task. When heavy fog limits visibility, we reduce our car's speed to a slow crawl, even along very familiar roads. In teleoperation systems, an operator's view is limited to images provided by one or more cameras mounted on the remote vehicle. Traditional methods of vehicle teleoperation require that a real time stream of images is transmitted from the vehicle camera to the operator control station, and the operator steers the vehicle accordingly. For this type of teleoperation, the transmission link between the vehicle and operator workstation must be very high bandwidth (because of the high volume of images required) and very low latency (because delayed images can cause operators to steer incorrectly). In many situations, such a high-bandwidth, low-latency communication link is unavailable or even technically impossible to provide. Supervised TeleRobotics using Incremental Polyhedral Earth geometry, or STRIPE, is a teleoperation system for a robot vehicle that allows a human operator to accurately control the remote vehicle across very low bandwidth communication links, and communication links with large delays. In STRIPE, a single image from a camera mounted on the vehicle is transmitted to the operator workstation. The operator uses a mouse to pick a series of 'waypoints' in the image that define a path that the vehicle should follow. These 2D waypoints are then transmitted back to the vehicle, where they are used to compute the appropriate steering commands while the next image is being transmitted. STRIPE requires no advance knowledge of the terrain to be traversed, and can be used by novice operators with only minimal training. STRIPE is a unique combination of computer and human control. The computer must determine the 3D world path designated by the 2D waypoints and then accurately control the vehicle over rugged terrain. The human issues involve accurate path selection, and the

  2. Crystal shapes on striped surface domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia, Antoni

    2004-01-01

    The equilibrium shapes of a simple cubic crystal in contact with a planar chemically patterned substrate are studied theoretically using an effective interface model. The substrate is primarily made of lyophobic material and is patterned with a lyophilic (easily wettable) stripe domain. Three regimes can be distinguished for the equilibrium shapes of the crystal. The transitions between these regimes as the volume of the crystal is changed are continuous or discontinuous depending on the strength of the couplings between the crystal and the lyophilic and lyophobic surface domains. If the crystal grows through a series of states close to equilibrium, the discontinuous transitions correspond to growth instabilities. These transitions are compared with similar results that have been obtained for a volume of liquid wetting a lyophilic stripe domain

  3. The preparation of immunochromatographic stripe of methamphetamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Jing; Liu Yibing; Zhou Ling; Guo Weizheng

    2004-01-01

    A gold immunochromatographic assay (GICA) is developed for methamphetamine in urine. Colloidal gold is obtained by reducing the gold chloride with sodium citrate, and labeled methamphetamine monoclonal antibody. The drug or metabolite competes with the immobilized drug conjugate in the test area for the limited colloidal gold-labeled antibody complex in which the stripe is made to screen the drug abuser. This method has sensitivity of 1000 μg/L, and without cross-reaction with some drugs

  4. 3D face recognition using isogeodesic stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretti, Stefano; Del Bimbo, Alberto; Pala, Pietro

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to 3D face matching that shows high effectiveness in distinguishing facial differences between distinct individuals from differences induced by nonneutral expressions within the same individual. The approach takes into account geometrical information of the 3D face and encodes the relevant information into a compact representation in the form of a graph. Nodes of the graph represent equal width isogeodesic facial stripes. Arcs between pairs of nodes are labeled with descriptors, referred to as 3D Weighted Walkthroughs (3DWWs), that capture the mutual relative spatial displacement between all the pairs of points of the corresponding stripes. Face partitioning into isogeodesic stripes and 3DWWs together provide an approximate representation of local morphology of faces that exhibits smooth variations for changes induced by facial expressions. The graph-based representation permits very efficient matching for face recognition and is also suited to being employed for face identification in very large data sets with the support of appropriate index structures. The method obtained the best ranking at the SHREC 2008 contest for 3D face recognition. We present an extensive comparative evaluation of the performance with the FRGC v2.0 data set and the SHREC08 data set.

  5. Classifying Variable Sources in SDSS Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willecke Lindberg, Christina

    2018-01-01

    SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) Stripe 82 is a well-documented and researched region of the sky that does not have all of its ~67,500 variable objects labeled. By collecting data and consulting different catalogs such as the Catalina Survey, we are able to slowly cross-match more objects and add classifications within the Stripe 82 catalog. Such matching is performed either by pairing SDSS identification numbers, or by converting and comparing the coordinates of every object within the Stripe 82 catalog to every object within the classified catalog, such as the Catalina Survey catalog. If matching is performed with converted coordinates, a follow-up check is performed to ascertain that the magnitudes of the paired objects are within a reasonable margin of error and that objects have not been mismatched. Once matches have been confirmed, the light curves of classified objects can then be used to determine features that most effectively separate the different types of variable objects in feature spaces. By classifying variable objects, we can construct a reference for subsequent large research surveys, such as LSST (the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope), that could utilize SDSS data as a training set for its own classifications.

  6. Occupational Noise Reduction in CNC Striping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmad Khairai, Kamarulzaman; Shamime Salleh, Nurul; Razlan Yusoff, Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    Occupational noise hearing loss with high level exposure is common occupational hazards. In CNC striping process, employee that exposed to high noise level for a long time as 8-hour contributes to hearing loss, create physical and psychological stress that reduce productivity. In this paper, CNC stripping process with high level noises are measured and reduced to the permissible noise exposure. First condition is all machines shutting down and second condition when all CNC machine under operations. For both conditions, noise exposures were measured to evaluate the noise problems and sources. After improvement made, the noise exposures were measured to evaluate the effectiveness of reduction. The initial average noise level at the first condition is 95.797 dB (A). After the pneumatic system with leakage was solved, the noise reduced to 55.517 dB (A). The average noise level at the second condition is 109.340 dB (A). After six machines were gathered at one area and cover that area with plastic curtain, the noise reduced to 95.209 dB (A). In conclusion, the noise level exposure in CNC striping machine is high and exceed the permissible noise exposure can be reduced to acceptable levels. The reduction of noise level in CNC striping processes enhanced productivity in the industry.

  7. Sugar maple seed production in northern New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter W. Garrett; Raymond E. Graber

    1995-01-01

    Large numbers of sugar maple seed are dispersed every second or third year. Very little seed was damaged by insects or mammals prior to dispersal. The trapping methods used prevented major losses following seed fall. Seed production was positively correlated with tree diameter but not with age of seed trees.

  8. Increasing the Efficiency of Maple Sap Evaporators with Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence D. Garrett; Howard Duchacek; Mariafranca Morselli; Frederick M. Laing; Neil K. Huyler; James W. Marvin

    1977-01-01

    A study of the engineering and economic effects of heat exchangers in conventional maple syrup evaporators indicated that: (1) Efficiency was increased by 15 to 17 percent with heat exchangers; (2) Syrup produced in evaporators with heat exchangers was similar to syrup produced in conventional systems in flavor and in chemical and physical composition; and (3) Heat...

  9. HOW to Control Sapstreak Disease of Sugar Maple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth K. Jr. Kessler

    1978-01-01

    Sapstreak disease, caused by the fungus Ceratocystis coerulescens, is a serious threat to sugar maple forests. Although the disease is causing only minor damage at present, it has the potential to become an important problem. Sapstreak is a fatal disease; infected trees do not recover. In addition, timber salvage value is low because the wood is discolored.

  10. Use of the Maple System in Math Tuition at Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacheva, Tsvetanka

    2007-01-01

    The following article explores the application of educational technologies at a University level and their contribution in enhancing the educational effectiveness. It discusses the capabilities of computer algebra systems, such as Maple. It is integrated in the math tuition of the Technical University (TU) in Varna and is used by its students during laboratory exercises.

  11. Effect of dark-colored maple syrup on cell proliferation of human gastrointestinal cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Sato, Kanta; Kubota, Yuika; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2017-07-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener that is commonly consumed worldwide. While maple syrup mainly comprises sucrose, it also contains phytochemicals that present various biological effects. Maple syrup is made by boiling down sap, and its color and composition vary in accordance with the sap collection season. Typically, seasonal progression is associated with darker syrup color, and antioxidant activity is proportional to the increasingly dark color. The authors previously reported that maple syrup demonstrated inhibitory effects on colorectal cancer cell growth and invasion, which correlated with darker maple syrup color. In the present study, they examined the effects of two different grades of maple syrup on gastrointestinal cancer cell proliferation, to investigate whether the dark-color maple syrup was suitable as a phytomedicine for gastrointestinal cancer treatment. Administration of dark-color maple syrup significantly inhibited gastrointestinal cancer cell growth as compared to non-treated cancer cells. Moreover, administration of dark-color maple syrup clearly inhibited protein kinase B (AKT) phosphorylation and did not impact mitogen-associated protein kinase phosphorylation. These data suggested that dark-color maple syrup may inhibit cell proliferation through suppression of AKT activation and, thus, may be suitable as a phytomedicine for gastrointestinal cancer treatment.

  12. Altered growth and fine root chemistry of Betula papyrifera and Acer saccharum under elevated CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, W. F. J.; Kopper, B. J.; Lindroth, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of carbon dioxide enrichment on fine root chemical composition of two tree species common to northern hardwood forests was investigated. Results showed no change in the root/shoot ratios and fine root percentages in either birch or maple samples as a result of enriched carbon dioxide. Tissue nitrogen concentrations decreased in the fine roots, and consequently, carbon/nitrogen ratios increased with elevated carbon dioxide. In birch only, condensed tannins increased with carbon dioxide enrichment; in maple, neither complex tannins nor hydrosable tannins appear to have been influenced by elevated carbon dioxide. It is suspected that the responses of the tree saplings to elevated carbon dioxide may be related to their successional status. 37 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Reproduction and vegetative growth in the dioecious shrub Acer barbinerve in temperate forests of Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Chunyu; Gadow, Klaus V; Cheng, Yanxia; Zhao, Xiuhai

    2015-06-01

    Trade-off in dioecious plant. The trade-off between reproduction, vegetative growth and maintenance is a major issue in the life history of an organism and a record of the process which is producing the largest possible number of living offspring by natural selection. Dioecious species afford an excellent opportunity for detecting such possible trade-offs in resource allocation. In this study, we selected the dioecious shrub Acer barbinerve to examine possible trade-offs between reproduction and vegetative growth in both genders at different modular levels during three successive years. Reproductive and vegetative biomass values were assessed during successive years to evaluate their intra-annual and inter-annual trade-offs. These trade-offs were examined at shoot, branch and shrub modular levels in Acer barbinerve shrubs. An intra-annual trade-off was detected at the shoot level for both genders in 2011 and 2012. Both males and females showed a negative correlation between reproduction and vegetative growth, but this was more prominent in males. For the females of the species, inter-annual trade-offs were only found at branch and shrub levels. Slightly negative correlations in females were detected between the reproduction in 2012 and the reproduction in the two previous years. The gender ratio was significantly male biased during the three successive years of our investigation. Females had higher mortality rates in the larger diameter classes, both in 2011 and 2012. This study revealed a clear trade-off between reproduction and vegetative growth in Acer barbinerve, but results varied between males and females. The degree of autonomy of the different modular levels may affect the ability to detect such trade-offs.

  14. Inhomogeneous Stripe Phase Revisited for Surface Superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzykin, Victor; Gor'kov, Lev P.

    2002-11-01

    We consider 2D surface superconductivity in high magnetic fields parallel to the surface. We demonstrate that the spin-orbit interaction at the surface changes the properties of the inhomogeneous superconducting Larkin-Ovchinnikov-Fulde-Ferrell (LOFF) state that develops above fields given by the paramagnetic criterion. Strong spin-orbit interaction significantly broadens the range of existence of the LOFF phase, which takes the form of periodic superconducting stripes running along the field direction on the surface, leading to the anisotropy of its properties. Our results provide a tool for studying surface superconductivity as a function of doping.

  15. leaf and stripe rust resistance among ethiopian grown wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    pathogen pathotypes. These varieties and lines, therefore, may be utilized in leaf and stripe rust resistance breeding programs. Key words/phrases: Leaf rust, resistance, stripe rust, Triticum aestivum, Triticum turgidum. * Current address: University of Limpopo, School of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Private Bag ...

  16. Transfer of stripe rust resistance from Aegilops variabilis to bread ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In terms of area, the bread wheat producing regions of China comprise the largest area in the world that is constantly threatened by stripe rust epidemics. Consequently, it is important to exploit new adultplant resistance genes in breeding. This study reports the transfer of stripe rust resistance from Aegilops variabilis to ...

  17. Controlling Hazel, Aspen Suckers, and Mountain Maple with Picloram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Perala

    1971-01-01

    Tests showed that picloram/2,4-D mixture was equal to or superior to 2,4-D alone or a 2,4,5-D/2,4,5-T mixture in controlling hazel, aspen suckers, and mountain maple for reforestation purposes. Survival of red pine planted 9 months after treatment was not influenced by residual soil effects of picloram. However, foliar application contributed to mortality of...

  18. Thin organic layers prepared by MAPLE for gas sensor application

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fryček, R.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Fitl, P.; Vrňata, M.; Myslík, , V.; Vrbová, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 495, - (2006), s. 308-311 ISSN 0040-6090 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/03/0406 Grant - others:CTU projects(CZ) 6640770030 a 88/1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : PLD * MAPLE * sensor s * thin films Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.666, year: 2006

  19. Inhibitory effect of maple syrup on the cell growth and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Uemura, Kentaro; Moriyama, Kaho; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener consumed by individuals of all ages throughout the world. Maple syrup contains not only carbohydrates such as sucrose but also various components such as organic acids, amino acids, vitamins and phenolic compounds. Recent studies have shown that these phenolic compounds in maple syrup may possess various activities such as decreasing the blood glucose level and an anticancer effect. In this study, we examined the effect of three types of maple syrup, classified by color, on the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in order to investigate whether the maple syrup is suitable as a phytomedicine for cancer treatment. CRC cells that were administered maple syrup showed significantly lower growth rates than cells that were administered sucrose. In addition, administration of maple syrup to CRC cells caused inhibition of cell invasion, while there was no effect on cell migration. Administration of maple syrup clearly inhibited AKT phosphorylation, while there was no effect on ERK phosphorylation. These data suggest that maple syrup might inhibit cell proliferation and invasion through suppression of AKT activation and be suitable as a phytomedicine for CRC treatment, with fewer adverse effects than traditional chemotherapy.

  20. Testing hypotheses that link wood anatomy to cavitation resistance and hydraulic conductivity in the genus Acer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lens, Frederic; Sperry, John S; Christman, Mairgareth A; Choat, Brendan; Rabaey, David; Jansen, Steven

    2011-05-01

    • Vulnerability to cavitation and conductive efficiency depend on xylem anatomy. We tested a large range of structure-function hypotheses, some for the first time, within a single genus to minimize phylogenetic 'noise' and maximize detection of functionally relevant variation. • This integrative study combined in-depth anatomical observations using light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy of seven Acer taxa, and compared these observations with empirical measures of xylem hydraulics. • Our results reveal a 2 MPa range in species' mean cavitation pressure (MCP). MCP was strongly correlated with intervessel pit structure (membrane thickness and porosity, chamber depth), weakly correlated with pit number per vessel, and not related to pit area per vessel. At the tissue level, there was a strong correlation between MCP and mechanical strength parameters, and some of the first evidence is provided for the functional significance of vessel grouping and thickenings on inner vessel walls. In addition, a strong trade-off was observed between xylem-specific conductivity and MCP. Vessel length and intervessel wall characteristics were implicated in this safety-efficiency trade-off. • Cavitation resistance and hydraulic conductivity in Acer appear to be controlled by a very complex interaction between tissue, vessel network and pit characteristics. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Improving students’ understanding of mathematical concept using maple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningsih, Y. L.; Paradesa, R.

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to improve students’ understanding of mathematical concept ability through implementation of using Maple in learning and expository learning. This study used a quasi-experimental research with pretest-posttest control group design. The sample on this study was 61 students in the second semester of Mathematics Education of Universitas PGRI Palembang, South Sumatera in academic year 2016/2017. The sample was divided into two classes, one class as the experiment class who using Maple in learning and the other class as a control class who received expository learning. Data were collective through the test of mathematical initial ability and mathematical concept understanding ability. Data were analyzed by t-test and two ways ANOVA. The results of this study showed (1) the improvement of students’ mathematical concept understanding ability who using Maple in learning is better than those who using expository learning; (2) there is no interaction between learning model and students’ mathematical initial ability toward the improvement of students’ understanding of mathematical concept ability.

  2. Competing States in the t-J Model: Uniform d-Wave State versus Stripe State versus Stripe State

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corboz, P.R.; Rice, T.M.; Troyer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Variational studies of the t-J model on the square lattice based on infinite projected-entangled pair states confirm an extremely close competition between a uniform d-wave superconducting state and different stripe states. The site-centered stripe with an in-phase d-wave order has an equal or only

  3. Comparative Analysis of Milled Wood Lignins (MWLs Isolated from Sugar Maple (SM and Hot-Water Extracted Sugar Maple (ESM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangesh J. Goundalkar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To further elucidate the advantageous effects of hot-water extraction (HWE on delignification, milled wood lignin (MWL was isolated from sugar maple (SM and from hot-water extracted sugar maple (ESM. Ball-milled wood was analyzed for particle size distribution (PSD before and after dioxane:water (DW extraction. The MWL samples were analyzed by analytical and spectral methods. The results indicated that the MWL isolated from SM and ESM was mainly released from the middle lamella (ML and the secondary wall (SW, respectively. The cleavage of dibenzodioxocin (DB and spirodienone (SD lignin substructures during HWE is suggested. The removal of lignin during acetone:water (AW extraction of hot-water extracted wood indicates that including an additional operation in a hardwood HWE-based biorefinery would be beneficial for processing of wood.

  4. A Nuclear Ribosomal DNA Phylogeny of Acer Inferred with Maximum Likelihood, Splits Graphs, and Motif Analysis of 606 Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido W. Grimm

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The multi-copy internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of nuclear ribosomal DNA is widely used to infer phylogenetic relationships among closely related taxa. Here we use maximum likelihood (ML and splits graph analyses to extract phylogenetic information from ~ 600 mostly cloned ITS sequences, representing 81 species and subspecies of Acer, and both species of its sister Dipteronia. Additional analyses compared sequence motifs in Acer and several hundred Anacardiaceae, Burseraceae, Meliaceae, Rutaceae, and Sapindaceae ITS sequences in GenBank. We also assessed the effects of using smaller data sets of consensus sequences with ambiguity coding (accounting for within-species variation instead of the full (partly redundant original sequences. Neighbor-nets and bipartition networks were used to visualize conflict among character state patterns. Species clusters observed in the trees and networks largely agree with morphology-based classifications; of de Jong’s (1994 16 sections, nine are supported in neighbor-net and bipartition networks, and ten by sequence motifs and the ML tree; of his 19 series, 14 are supported in networks, motifs, and the ML tree. Most nodes had higher bootstrap support with matrices of 105 or 40 consensus sequences than with the original matrix. Within-taxon ITS divergence did not differ between diploid and polyploid Acer, and there was little evidence of differentiated parental ITS haplotypes, suggesting that concerted evolution in Acer acts rapidly.

  5. Hypoglycin A concentrations in seeds of Acer pseudoplatanus trees growing on atypical myopathy-affected and control pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, L; Nicholson, A; Jewitt, E M; Gerber, V; Hegeman, A; Sweetman, L; Valberg, S

    2014-01-01

    Hypoglycin A, found in seeds of Acer negundo, appears to cause seasonal pasture myopathy (SPM) in North America and is implicated in atypical myopathy (AM) in Europe. Acer negundo is uncommon in Europe. Thus, the potential source of hypoglycin A in Europe is unknown. We hypothesized that seeds of Acer pseudoplatanus were the source of hypoglycin A in Europe. Our objective was to determine the concentration of hypoglycin A in seeds of A. pseudoplatanus trees located in pastures where previous cases of AM had occurred. None. University of Berne records were searched to retrospectively identify 6 farms with 10 AM cases and 11 suspected AM deaths between 2007 and 2011. During October 2012, A. pseudoplatanus seeds were collected from 2 to 6 trees per pasture on 6 AM farms (7 pastures) from trees in or close to 2 pastures on 2 control farms where AM had not been previously reported. Hypoglycin A in seeds was analyzed by GC-MS. Acer pseudoplatanus trees were identified on all AM pastures. Hypoglycin A was detected in all A. pseudoplatanus seeds in highly variable concentrations ranging from 0.04 to 2.81 μg/mg (mean 0.69) on AM farms and 0.10 to 9.12 μg/mg (mean 1.59) on control farms. Preventing horses from grazing pastures containing A. pseudoplatanus seeds during late fall and early spring might be the best means to prevent AM. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Critical assessment of the evidence for striped nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Stirling

    Full Text Available There is now a significant body of literature which reports that stripes form in the ligand shell of suitably functionalised Au nanoparticles. This stripe morphology has been proposed to strongly affect the physicochemical and biochemical properties of the particles. We critique the published evidence for striped nanoparticles in detail, with a particular focus on the interpretation of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM data (as this is the only technique which ostensibly provides direct evidence for the presence of stripes. Through a combination of an exhaustive re-analysis of the original data, in addition to new experimental measurements of a simple control sample comprising entirely unfunctionalised particles, we show that all of the STM evidence for striped nanoparticles published to date can instead be explained by a combination of well-known instrumental artefacts, or by issues with data acquisition/analysis protocols. We also critically re-examine the evidence for the presence of ligand stripes which has been claimed to have been found from transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, small angle neutron scattering experiments, and computer simulations. Although these data can indeed be interpreted in terms of stripe formation, we show that the reported results can alternatively be explained as arising from a combination of instrumental artefacts and inadequate data analysis techniques.

  7. Critical assessment of the evidence for striped nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, Julian; Lekkas, Ioannis; Sweetman, Adam; Djuranovic, Predrag; Guo, Quanmin; Pauw, Brian; Granwehr, Josef; Lévy, Raphaël; Moriarty, Philip

    2014-01-01

    There is now a significant body of literature which reports that stripes form in the ligand shell of suitably functionalised Au nanoparticles. This stripe morphology has been proposed to strongly affect the physicochemical and biochemical properties of the particles. We critique the published evidence for striped nanoparticles in detail, with a particular focus on the interpretation of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) data (as this is the only technique which ostensibly provides direct evidence for the presence of stripes). Through a combination of an exhaustive re-analysis of the original data, in addition to new experimental measurements of a simple control sample comprising entirely unfunctionalised particles, we show that all of the STM evidence for striped nanoparticles published to date can instead be explained by a combination of well-known instrumental artefacts, or by issues with data acquisition/analysis protocols. We also critically re-examine the evidence for the presence of ligand stripes which has been claimed to have been found from transmission electron microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, small angle neutron scattering experiments, and computer simulations. Although these data can indeed be interpreted in terms of stripe formation, we show that the reported results can alternatively be explained as arising from a combination of instrumental artefacts and inadequate data analysis techniques.

  8. Fire history and the establishment of oaks an maples in second-growth forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd F. Hutchinson; Robert P. Long; Robert D. Ford; Elaine Kennedy Sutherland

    2008-01-01

    We used dendrochronology to examine the influence of past fires on oak and maple establishment. Six study units were located in southern Ohio, where organized fire control began in 1923. After stand thinning in 2000, we collected basal cross sections from cut stumps of oak (n = 137) and maple (n = 204). The fire history of each unit was developed from the oaks, and...

  9. A study on matrix assisted pulsed evaporation (MAPLE) of organic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matei, Andreea; Canulescu, Stela; Constantinescu, Catalin

    2012-01-01

    Organic films can be produced either by MAPLE or directly by PLD (Pulsed laser deposition). For a reasonable deposition rate of ng/cm2 per pulse for film production by MAPLE a fluence of 1-1.5 J/cm2 is required at the laser wavelength of 355 nm, while the fluence can be considerably lower at 248 ...

  10. The Influence of Residual Stand Densities on Regeneration in Sugar Maple Stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl H. Tubbs

    1968-01-01

    Studies of regeneration 2, 5, and 10 years after cutting mature and overmature sugar maple stands to several residual densities show that (1) sugar maple is still the predominant species under all stand densities (2) nearly all regeneration reaching larger size classes became established before cutting (3) heavier cuttings (30, 50, and 70 square feet) are more rapidly...

  11. Influence of demographic characteristics on production practices within the Ohio maple syrup industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary W. Graham; P. Charles Goebel; Randall B. Heiligmann; Matthew S. Bumgardner

    2007-01-01

    Maple syrup production contributes approximately $5 million annually to Ohio's economy and provides supplemental nontimber forest product income for forestland owners. To better understand the factors that influence this important nontimber forest industry in Ohio, including producer heritage, producer age, sap collection methods, size of maple operation, and...

  12. Sugar maple: abundance and site relationships in the pre- and post- settlement forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon G. Whitney

    1999-01-01

    A review of the available historical evidence provides a picture of sugar maple's site relationstiips in the presettlement forest and its changing statis over the last 300 years. Sugar maple was widely distributed throughout the Northeast during the presettlerment period. it was particularly abundant on the richer, better drained, silt-rich sites. A comparison of...

  13. Chemical synthesis, redox transformation, and identification of sonnerphenolic C, an antioxidant in Acer nikoense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Takehiro; Nihei, Ken-Ichi

    2017-04-15

    Sonnerphenolic C (3), which was predicted in a redox product of epirhododendrin (1) isolated from Acer nikoense, was synthesized for the first time via the epimeric separation of benzylidene acetal intermediates as a key step. From a similar synthetic route, 1 was obtained concisely. As a result of their antioxidative evaluation, only 3 revealed potent activity. The redox transformation of 1 into 3 was achieved in the presence of tyrosinase and vitamin C. Moreover, 3 was identified in the decoction of A. nikoense by HPLC analysis with the effective use of synthesized 3. Thus, a novel naturally occurring antioxidant 3 was developed through the sequential flow including redox prediction, chemical synthesis, evaluation of the activity, and identification as the natural product. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Enfermedad pulmonar por amianto en trabajadores de acería

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Zurbriggen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermedades relacionadas al amianto se producen por la inhalación de fibras de asbestos en su variedad crisotilo o amianto blanco. A pesar de que en la Argentina la prohibición data del año 2003, existen numerosas industrias donde se sigue trabajando con este mineral, entre ellas las metalúrgicas y acerías. Actualmente se conoce la alta patogenicidad de este material, por lo que en muchos países existen programas de seguimiento de los trabajadores expuestos. Se describen las características generales y manifestaciones clínicas pulmonares de 27 pacientes que trabajaron en una gran acería de América del Sur. El diagnóstico de amiantopatías se realizó mediante historia clínica laboral, antecedente de exposición al amianto, estudios complementarios de función pulmonar e imágenes del tórax. Se analizaron la fuente de exposición (laboral, doméstica y ambiental, tiempo de exposición y período de latencia en los pacientes de los cuales se detectó enfermedad relacionada. Los antecedentes de tabaquismo fueron tenidos en cuenta para el análisis. En 22 pacientes se presentaron patologías benignas (81.4%, 16 de ellos tenían lesiones exclusivamente pleurales y otros 6 asbestosis. Las patologías malignas se presentaron en 5 pacientes (18.5%, en 4 fueron mesoteliomas y en uno carcinoma pulmonar. El problema de la exposición al amianto tiene vigencia actual. De ahí la necesidad de un programa de vigilancia en trabajadores expuestos al amianto actualmente o en el pasado, para detectar, notificar, registrar e investigar las características de estas patologías.

  15. Foliar Nutrient Distribution Patterns in Sympatric Maple Species Reflect Contrasting Sensitivity to Excess Manganese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise R Fernando

    Full Text Available Sugar maple and red maple are closely-related co-occurring tree species significant to the North American forest biome. Plant abiotic stress effects including nutritional imbalance and manganese (Mn toxicity are well documented within this system, and are implicated in enhanced susceptibility to biotic stresses such as insect attack. Both tree species are known to overaccumulate foliar manganese (Mn when growing on unbuffered acidified soils, however, sugar maple is Mn-sensitive, while red maple is not. Currently there is no knowledge about the cellular sequestration of Mn and other nutrients in these two species. Here, electron-probe x-ray microanalysis was employed to examine cellular and sub-cellular deposition of excessively accumulated foliar Mn and other mineral nutrients in vivo. For both species, excess foliar Mn was deposited in symplastic cellular compartments. There were striking between-species differences in Mn, magnesium (Mg, sulphur (S and calcium (Ca distribution patterns. Unusually, Mn was highly co-localised with Mg in mesophyll cells of red maple only. The known sensitivity of sugar maple to excess Mn is likely linked to Mg deficiency in the leaf mesophyll. There was strong evidence that Mn toxicity in sugar maple is primarily a symplastic process. For each species, leaf-surface damage due to biotic stress including insect herbivory was compared between sites with acidified and non-acidified soils. Although it was greatest overall in red maple, there was no difference in biotic stress damage to red maple leaves between acidified and non-acidified soils. Sugar maple trees on buffered non-acidified soil were less damaged by biotic stress compared to those on unbuffered acidified soil, where they are also affected by Mn toxicity abiotic stress. This study concluded that foliar nutrient distribution in symplastic compartments is a determinant of Mn sensitivity, and that Mn stress hinders plant resistance to biotic stress.

  16. Solving Nonlinear Partial Differential Equations with Maple and Mathematica

    CERN Document Server

    Shingareva, Inna K

    2011-01-01

    The emphasis of the book is given in how to construct different types of solutions (exact, approximate analytical, numerical, graphical) of numerous nonlinear PDEs correctly, easily, and quickly. The reader can learn a wide variety of techniques and solve numerous nonlinear PDEs included and many other differential equations, simplifying and transforming the equations and solutions, arbitrary functions and parameters, presented in the book). Numerous comparisons and relationships between various types of solutions, different methods and approaches are provided, the results obtained in Maple an

  17. Implications of Maple Syrup Urine Disease in Newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris-Haman, Pamela; Brown, Lenora; Massey, Susan; Ramamoorthy, Sivaranjani

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited metabolic disorder that affects the body's ability to metabolize amino acids. If left untreated, it places newborns at risk for life-threatening health problems, including episodes of illness called metabolic crisis. Newborn screening for MSUD should ideally be done within the first 24 to 48 hours after birth. With proper screening, along with genetic counseling, nutritional counseling, primary care follow-up, and ongoing monitoring, newborns with MSUD can typically go on to live healthful lives. Nurses play a key role in supporting families with a diagnosis of MSUD. © 2017 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  18. Stripe order from the perspective of the Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devereaux, Thomas Peter

    2018-03-01

    A microscopic understanding of the strongly correlated physics of the cuprates must account for the translational and rotational symmetry breaking that is present across all cuprate families, commonly in the form of stripes. Here we investigate emergence of stripes in the Hubbard model, a minimal model believed to be relevant to the cuprate superconductors, using determinant quantum Monte Carlo (DQMC) simulations at finite temperatures and density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) ground state calculations. By varying temperature, doping, and model parameters, we characterize the extent of stripes throughout the phase diagram of the Hubbard model. Our results show that including the often neglected next-nearest-neighbor hopping leads to the absence of spin incommensurability upon electron-doping and nearly half-filled stripes upon hole-doping. The similarities of these findings to experimental results on both electron and hole-doped cuprate families support a unified description across a large portion of the cuprate phase diagram.

  19. Curcurbita pepo subspecies delineates striped cucumber beetle (Acalymma vittatum) preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzozowski, L; Leckie, B M; Gardner, J; Hoffmann, M P; Mazourek, M

    2016-01-01

    The striped cucumber beetle (Acalymma vittatum (F.)) is a destructive pest of cucurbit crops, and management could be improved by host plant resistance, especially in organic farming systems. However, despite the variation in striped cucumber beetle preference observed within the economically important species, Cucurbita pepo L., plant breeders and entomologists lacked a simple framework to classify and exploit these differences. This study used recent phylogenetic evidence and bioassays to organize striped cucumber beetle preference within C. pepo. Our results indicate preference contrasts between the two agriculturally relevant subspecies: C. pepo subsp. texana and C. pepo subsp. pepo. Plants of C. pepo subsp. pepo were more strongly preferred than C. pepo subsp. texana plants. This structure of beetle preference in C. pepo will allow plant breeders and entomologists to better focus research efforts on host plant non-preference to control striped cucumber beetles. PMID:27347423

  20. Pathological changes associated with white striping in broiler breast muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttappan, V A; Shivaprasad, H L; Shaw, D P; Valentine, B A; Hargis, B M; Clark, F D; McKee, S R; Owens, C M

    2013-02-01

    White striping is a condition in broiler chickens characterized grossly by the occurrence of white striations, seen parallel to the direction of muscle fibers, on broiler breast fillets and thighs. Based on visual evaluation of the intensity of white striping, breast fillets can be categorized into normal (NORM), moderate (MOD), and severe (SEV) categories. This study was undertaken to evaluate the details of changes in histology as well as proximate composition occurring in the fillets with respect to the 3 degrees of white striping. In experiment 1, representative breast fillets for each degree of white striping (n = 20) were collected from 45-d-old broilers, approximately 2 h postmortem. From each fillet, 2 skeletal muscle samples were obtained and fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin. To identify and differentiate the histological changes, slides were prepared and stained using hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's Trichrome, and Oil Red O stains. In experiment 2, samples with 3 degrees of white striping were collected from 57-d-old birds for conducting proximate analysis. Major histopathological changes observed in the MOD and SEV samples consisted of loss of cross striations, variability in fiber size, floccular/vacuolar degeneration and lysis of fibers, mild mineralization, occasional regeneration (nuclear rowing and multinucleated cells), mononuclear cell infiltration, lipidosis, and interstitial inflammation and fibrosis. Microscopic lesions were visually scored for degeneration and necrosis, fibrosis, and lipidosis. The scale used to score the samples ranged from 0 (normal) to 3 (severe). There was an increase (P white striping increased from NORM to SEV. The results from the histopathological study were supported by the findings from proximate analysis confirming that the fat and protein contents of muscle increased (P white striping increased. In conclusion, the histopathological changes occurring in white striping indicate a degenerative myopathy that

  1. Organic heterostructures deposited by MAPLE on AZO substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, M.; Preda, N.; Stanculescu, A.; Breazu, C.; Florica, C.; Stanculescu, F.; Iftimie, S.; Girtan, M.; Popescu-Pelin, G.; Socol, G.

    2017-09-01

    Organic heterostructures based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and fullerene (C60) as blends or multilayer were deposited on Al:ZnO (AZO) by Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique. The AZO layers were obtained by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) on glass substrate, the high quality of the films being reflected by the calculated figure of merit. The organic heterostructures were investigated from morphological, optical and electrical point of view by atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-vis spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements, respectively. The increase of the C60 content in the blend heterostructure has as result a high roughness. Compared with the multilayer heterostructure, those based on blends present an improvement in the electrical properties. Under illumination, the highest current value was recorded for the heterostructure based on the blend with the higher C60 amount. The obtained results showed that MAPLE is a useful technique for the deposition of the organic heterostructures on AZO as transparent conductor electrode.

  2. An Experimental Study on the aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performances of Maple-Seed-Inspired UAV Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hui; Ning, Zhe

    2016-11-01

    Due to the auto-rotating trait of maple seeds during falling down process, flow characteristics of rotating maple seeds have been studied by many researchers in recent years. In the present study, an experimental investigation was performed to explore maple-seed-inspired UAV propellers for improved aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performances. Inspired by the auto-rotating trait of maple seeds, the shape of a maple seed is leveraged for the planform design of UAV propellers. The aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performances of the maple-seed-inspired propellers are examined in great details, in comparison with a commercially available UAV propeller purchased on the market (i.e., a baseline propeller). During the experiments, in addition to measuring the aerodynamic forces generated by the maple-seed-inspired propellers and the baseline propeller, a high-resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to quantify the unsteady flow structures in the wakes of the propellers. The aeroacoustic characteristics of the propellers are also evaluated by leveraging an anechoic chamber available at the Aerospace Engineering Department of Iowa State University. The research work is supported by National Science Foundation under Award Numbers of OSIE-1064235.

  3. Disseny, construcció i manteniment de paviments industrials de formigó armats amb fibres d’acer

    OpenAIRE

    Villaverde González, José María; Moreno Moreno, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    En el present projecte s’ha pretès descriure amb detall els avantatges específics del formigó reforçat amb fibres d’acer en la seva utilització com a paviment industrial. Segons això, la primera part d’aquest document s’estructura de la següent manera: En primer lloc, es fa una comparació amb els sistemes convencionals d’execució de paviments on, inicialment, es planteja el procés de disseny d’un paviment de formigó reforçat amb fibres d’acer, tant des del punt de vista del càl...

  4. Indirect approach to C-3 branched 1,2-cis-glycofuranosides: synthesis of aceric acid glycoside analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcelo T; Hughes, David L; Nepogodiev, Sergey A; Field, Robert A

    2008-02-04

    Aceric acid (3-C-carboxy-5-deoxy-alpha-l-xylofuranose) residues are present in pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan II (RG II) in the form of synthetically challenging 1,2-cis-glycofuranosides. To access synthetic fragments of RG II incorporating aceric acid, a four-step procedure based on C-2 epimerisation of initially prepared 1,2-trans-glycofuranoside was developed. Readily available derivatives of branched-chain l-lyxofuranose bearing a 3-C-vinyl group as a masked 3-C-carboxyl group were investigated as potential precursors of aceric acid units. In the first step of the procedure, installation of a participating group at C-2 of the furanose ring ensured stereocontrol of the O-glycosylation, which was carried out with the thioglycoside of 2-O-acetyl-3,5-di-O-benzyl-3-C-vinyl-L-lyxofuranose. After the glycosylation step, the 2-O-acetyl group was removed, the free 2-OH group was oxidised and the resulting ketone was finally reduced to form the C-3-vinyl-L-xylofuranoside. The use of L-Selectride in the key reduction reaction was essential to achieve the required stereoselectivity to generate 1,2-cis-furanoside.

  5. Millijansky radio variability in SDSS stripe 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, J. A.; Becker, R. H. [University of California, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); White, R. L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Richards, G. T., E-mail: hodge@mpia.de [Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    We report on a blind survey for extragalactic radio variability that was carried out by comparing two epochs of data from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimeters survey with a third epoch from a new 1.4 GHz survey of SDSS Stripe 82. The three epochs are spaced seven years apart and have an overlapping area of 60 deg{sup 2}. We uncover 89 variable sources down to the millijansky level, 75 of which are newly identified, and we find no evidence for transient phenomena. This new sample of variable sources allows us to infer an upper limit to the mean characteristic timescale of active galactic nucleus radio variability of 14 yr. We find that only 1% of extragalactic sources have fractional variability f {sub var} > 3, while 44% of Galactic sources vary by this much. The variable sample contains a larger fraction of quasars than a comparable non-variable control sample, though the majority of the variable sources appear to be extended galaxies in the optical. This implies that either quasars are not the dominant contributor to the variability of the sample, or that the deep optical data allow us to detect the host galaxies of some low-z quasars. We use the new, higher resolution data to report on the morphology of the variable sources. Finally, we show that the fraction of sources that are variable remains constant or increases at low flux densities. This may imply that next generation radio surveys with telescopes like Australian Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder and MeerKAT will see a constant or even increasing fraction of variable sources down into the sub-millijansky regime.

  6. From stripe to slab confinement for DNA linearization in nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifra, Peter; Benkova, Zuzana; Namer, Pavol

    We investigate suggested advantageous analysis in the linearization experiments with macromolecules confined in a stripe-like channel using Monte Carlo simulations. The enhanced chain extension in a stripe that is due to significant excluded volume interactions between monomers in two dimensions weakens on transition to experimentally feasible slit-like channel. Based on the chain extension-confinement strength dependence and the structure factor behavior for the chain in stripe we infer the excluded volume regime typical for two-dimensional systems. On transition to the slab geometry, the advantageous chain extension decreases and the Gaussian regime is observed for not very long semiflexible chains. The evidence for pseudo-ideality in confined chains is based on indicators such as the extension curves, variation of the extension with the persistence length or the structure factor. The slab behavior is observed when the stripe (originally of monomer thickness) reaches the thickness larger than cca 10nm in the third dimension. This maximum height of the slab to retain the advantage of the stripe is very low and this have implication for DNA linearization experiments. The presented analysis, however, has a broader relevance for confined polymers. Support from Slovak R&D Agency (SRDA-0451-11) is acknowledged.

  7. Phenotypic plasticity of leaf shape along a temperature gradient in Acer rubrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana L Royer

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Both phenotypic plasticity and genetic determination can be important for understanding how plants respond to environmental change. However, little is known about the plastic response of leaf teeth and leaf dissection to temperature. This gap is critical because these leaf traits are commonly used to reconstruct paleoclimate from fossils, and such studies tacitly assume that traits measured from fossils reflect the environment at the time of their deposition, even during periods of rapid climate change. We measured leaf size and shape in Acer rubrum derived from four seed sources with a broad temperature range and grown for two years in two gardens with contrasting climates (Rhode Island and Florida. Leaves in the Rhode Island garden have more teeth and are more highly dissected than leaves in Florida from the same seed source. Plasticity in these variables accounts for at least 6-19% of the total variance, while genetic differences among ecotypes probably account for at most 69-87%. This study highlights the role of phenotypic plasticity in leaf-climate relationships. We suggest that variables related to tooth count and leaf dissection in A. rubrum can respond quickly to climate change, which increases confidence in paleoclimate methods that use these variables.

  8. [Effects of benthic macro-invertebrate on decomposition of Acer buergerianum leaf litter in streams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Hong; Wang, Bei-Xin; Chen, Ai-Qing; Lan, Ce-Jie

    2009-05-01

    By using composite mesh bag method, the effects of benthic macro-invertebrate in an undisturbed stream and an ecologically restored stream on the decomposition process of Acer buergerianum leaf litter from the Purple Mountain of Nanjing in winter were studied. After 112 days of decomposition, the remaining rate of A. buergerianum leaf litter based on ash-free dry mass was 31-62%, and the decomposition rate followed a declined exponential equation (P leaf litter was 0.0064 d(-1) and 0.0030 d(-1); while in the still water of the streams, it was 0.0016 d(-1) and 0. 0018 d(-1), respectively. The abundance and biomass of benthic macro-invertebrate were significantly higher in the flowing water of undisturbed stream than in that of ecologically restored stream (P Shredders (mainly Asellus sp.) had the highest abundance (70.4%) in the flowing water of undisturbed stream, while filterers (mainly Tanytarsus sp.) were dominant (37.8%) in the flowing water of ecologically restored stream. The decomposition rate of the leaf litter was significantly correlated with the richness and abundance of shredder species in flowing water (P shredders, suggesting that the decomposition of A. buergerianum leaf litter in streams in winter was more dependent on the richness and abundance of shredders.

  9. Cranial computed tomography in maple syrup urine disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irnberger, T.; Ploechl, E.; Rittinger, O.; Bachmann, C.; Pilz, P.; Walter, G.F.; Wendel, U.; Landeskrankenanstalten Salzburg; Bern Univ.; Landesnervenklinik Salzburg; Graz Univ.; Dudley Observatory, Albany, NY; Duesseldorf Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Cranial computed tomography in the initial stage of the intermediate phenotype of maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) demonstrates diffuse, symmetric hypodensities in white and grey matter, which show a complete return to normal after early introduction of an adequate protein-restrictive diet. If diagnosis of this disease is missed or delayed, progressive global (end-stage) atrophy will take place over several years. A decrease in density values correlates well with the total cerebral lipid and water content (closely related to myelinisation), whereas progression and grade of atrophy show a relationship with the severity of pathological white and grey matter changes that are not demonstrable with computed tomography but can be proven histologically. Analysis of both morphological parameters corresponds well with clinical-neurological outcome and therapeutic success. (orig.) [de

  10. Diffusion-weighted MRI of maple syrup urine disease encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalleri, F.; Mavilla, L. [Servizio di Neuroradiologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Policlinico, Modena (Italy); Berardi, A.; Ferrari, F. [Servizio di Neonatologia, Azienda Ospedaliera Policlinico, Modena (Italy); Burlina, A.B. [Dipartimento di Pediatria, Azienda Ospedaliera, Universita di Padova, Padua (Italy)

    2002-06-01

    We report the case of a newborn child with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), diagnosed at 10 days of life. Diffusion-weighted echoplanar MRI showed marked hyperintensity of the cerebellar white matter, the brainstem, the cerebral peduncles, the thalami, the dorsal limb of the internal capsule and the centrum semiovale, while conventional dual-echo sequence evidenced only a weak diffuse T2 hyperintensity in the cerebellar white matter and in the dorsal brainstem. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of these regions was markedly (>80%) decreased. Therefore, in agreement with current hypotheses on MSUD pathogenesis, MSUD oedema proves to be a cytotoxic oedema. Diffusion-weighted MRI may be a valuable tool, more sensitive than conventional spin-echo techniques, to assess the extent and progression of cytotoxicity in MSUD, as well as the effectiveness of the therapeutic interventions. (orig.)

  11. Diffusion-weighted MRI of maple syrup urine disease encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalleri, F.; Mavilla, L.; Berardi, A.; Ferrari, F.; Burlina, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    We report the case of a newborn child with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), diagnosed at 10 days of life. Diffusion-weighted echoplanar MRI showed marked hyperintensity of the cerebellar white matter, the brainstem, the cerebral peduncles, the thalami, the dorsal limb of the internal capsule and the centrum semiovale, while conventional dual-echo sequence evidenced only a weak diffuse T2 hyperintensity in the cerebellar white matter and in the dorsal brainstem. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of these regions was markedly (>80%) decreased. Therefore, in agreement with current hypotheses on MSUD pathogenesis, MSUD oedema proves to be a cytotoxic oedema. Diffusion-weighted MRI may be a valuable tool, more sensitive than conventional spin-echo techniques, to assess the extent and progression of cytotoxicity in MSUD, as well as the effectiveness of the therapeutic interventions. (orig.)

  12. Acute Illness Protocol for Maple Syrup Urine Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodan, Lance H; Aldubayan, Saud H; Berry, Gerard T; Levy, Harvey L

    2018-01-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are genetic disorders that disrupt enzyme activity, cellular transport, or energy production. They are individually rare but collectively have an incidence of 1:1000. Most patients with IEMs are followed up by a physician with expertise in biochemical genetics (metabolism), but may present outside this setting. Because IEMs can present acutely with life-threatening crises that require specific interventions, it is critical for the emergency medicine physician, pediatrician, internist, and critical care physician as well as the biochemical geneticist to have information on the initial assessment and management of patients with these disorders. Appropriate early care can be lifesaving. This protocol is not designed to replace the expert consultation of a biochemical geneticist, but rather to improve early care and increase the level of comfort of the acute care physician with initial management of maple syrup urine disease until specialty consultation is obtained.

  13. Paraformaldehyde pellet not necessary in vacuum-pumped maple sap system

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Clay Smith; Carter B. Gibbs

    1970-01-01

    In a study of sugar maple sap collection through a vacuum-pumped plastic tubing system, yields were compared between tapholes in which paraformaldehyde pellets were used and tapholes without pellets, Use of the pellets did not increase yield.

  14. Stocking and structure for maximum growth in sugar maple selection stands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas R. Crow; Carl H. Tubbs; Rodney D. Jacobs; Robert R. Oberg

    1981-01-01

    The impacts of stocking, structure, and cutting cycle on basal area, cubic foot volume, board foot volume, and diameter growth are considered. Recommendations are provided for maximum growth in uneven-aged sugar maple stands.

  15. Factors contributing to sugar maple decline along topographic gradients on the glaciated and unglaciated Allegheny Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen B. Horsley; Robert P. Long; Scott W. Bailey; Richard A. Hallett; Thomas J. Hall

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the relationship between sugar maple health and 1) glacial history, 2) topographic or physiographic position, 3) site (elevation, aspect) and stand characteristics (species composition, structure, density), 4) disturbance history (management, defoliation), and foliar nutrition.

  16. Time domain-nuclear magnetic resonance study of chars from southern hardwoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Elder; Nicole Labbe; David Harper; Timothy Rials

    2006-01-01

    Chars from the thermal degradation of silver maple (Acer saccharinum), red maple (Acer rubrum), sugar maple (Acer saccharum), and white oak (Quercus spp.), performed at temperatures from 250 to 350 oC, were examined using time domain-nuclear magnetic resonance...

  17. Flexural properties of laminated veneer lumber manufactured from ultrasonically rated red maple veneer : a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Robert J. Ross; Brian K. Brashaw; Steven A. Verhey; John W. Forsman; John R. Erickson

    2003-01-01

    The study described in this report was conducted to examine the flexural properties of laminated veneer lumber (LVL) manufactured from red maple veneer. Ultrasonically rated veneer, which was peeled from low value red maple saw-logs, was fabricated into 1/2-in.-(1.3-cm-) and 2-in.-(5-cm-) thick LVL billets. The flexural properties of the billets and of corresponding...

  18. Roadway striping productivity data analysis for INDOT Greenfield and Crawfordsville districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The main objective of the SPR3650 project is to provide an accurate overview of striping operation so that INDOT finds a way to : effectively save significant investment for purchasing new striping trucks in near future without compromising roadwa...

  19. Twin InSb/GaAs quantum nano-stripes: Growth optimization and related properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narabadeesuphakorn, Phisut; Thainoi, Supachok; Tandaechanurat, Aniwat; Kiravittaya, Suwit; Nuntawong, Noppadon; Sopitopan, Suwat; Yordsri, Visittapong; Thanachayanont, Chanchana; Kanjanachuchai, Songphol; Ratanathammaphan, Somchai; Panyakeow, Somsak

    2018-04-01

    Growth of InSb/GaAs quantum nanostructures on GaAs substrate by using molecular beam epitaxy with low growth temperature and slow growth rate typically results in a mixture of isolated and paired nano-stripe structures, which are termed as single and twin nano-stripes, respectively. In this work, we investigate the growth conditions to maximize the number ratio between twin and single nano-stripes. The highest percentage of the twin nano-stripes of up to 59% was achieved by optimizing the substrate temperature and the nano-stripe growth rate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the substantial size and height reduction of the buried nano-stripes. We also observed the Raman shift and photon emission from our twin nano-stripes. These twin nano-stripes are promising for spintronics and quantum computing devices.

  20. Effect of Value Congruence, Brand Distinctiveness, Brand Social, Brand Warmth, and Memorable Brand Experience on Customer-Brand Identification and Brand Loyalty (Case Study: Brand of ACER Laptop)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanty, Aries; Tresnaningrum, Aprilia

    2018-02-01

    This study has several purposes. First, this study aims to investigate the effect of consumer-brand value congruence, brand distinctiveness, brand social benefit, brand warmth, and memorable brand experience on customer-brand identification (CBI). We call all of those factors as the antecedent factor of CBI. Second, this study aims to investigate the effect of CBI on customer loyalty. Third, investigate the role of product involvement as a moderating variable of the relationship between brand distinctiveness, brand social benefit, brand warmth, memorable brand experience and CBI. This research used primary data collected through closed questionnaires using a Likert scale of 1 - 5. The total sample size was 273 respondents located in Semarang City who has or has been using Acer Laptop for minimal one year. This research was conducted using Partial Least Square (PLS) method through SmartPLS 3.0 software. The result of data processing indicated that all of the antecedent factors of CBI have the positive and significant effect on CBI of the user of Acer Laptop. In this case, among the five antecedent factors of CBI, value congruence has the greatest effect on CBI of the user of Acer Laptop. The result of data processing also indicated that CBI has the positive and significant effect on brand loyalty of user of Acer Laptop. This study fails to prove the role of product involvement as a moderating variable of the relationship between brand distinctiveness, brand social benefit, brand warmth, memorable brand experience and CBI of the user of Acer Laptop. Moreover, based on the result of hypothesis testing, this study gives some recommendation to Acer Laptop to develop or create some features which are match with the value of user of Laptop Acer in Semarang City.

  1. Effect of Value Congruence, Brand Distinctiveness, Brand Social, Brand Warmth, and Memorable Brand Experience on Customer-Brand Identification and Brand Loyalty (Case Study: Brand of ACER Laptop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanty Aries

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study has several purposes. First, this study aims to investigate the effect of consumer–brand value congruence, brand distinctiveness, brand social benefit, brand warmth, and memorable brand experience on customer-brand identification (CBI. We call all of those factors as the antecedent factor of CBI. Second, this study aims to investigate the effect of CBI on customer loyalty. Third, investigate the role of product involvement as a moderating variable of the relationship between brand distinctiveness, brand social benefit, brand warmth, memorable brand experience and CBI. This research used primary data collected through closed questionnaires using a Likert scale of 1 - 5. The total sample size was 273 respondents located in Semarang City who has or has been using Acer Laptop for minimal one year. This research was conducted using Partial Least Square (PLS method through SmartPLS 3.0 software. The result of data processing indicated that all of the antecedent factors of CBI have the positive and significant effect on CBI of the user of Acer Laptop. In this case, among the five antecedent factors of CBI, value congruence has the greatest effect on CBI of the user of Acer Laptop. The result of data processing also indicated that CBI has the positive and significant effect on brand loyalty of user of Acer Laptop. This study fails to prove the role of product involvement as a moderating variable of the relationship between brand distinctiveness, brand social benefit, brand warmth, memorable brand experience and CBI of the user of Acer Laptop. Moreover, based on the result of hypothesis testing, this study gives some recommendation to Acer Laptop to develop or create some features which are match with the value of user of Laptop Acer in Semarang City.

  2. Distinguishing Patterns of Charge Order: Stripes or Checkerboards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, J.A.

    2010-04-06

    In two dimensions, quenched disorder always rounds transitions involving the breaking of spatial symmetries so, in practice, it can often be difficult to infer what form the symmetry breaking would take in the 'ideal,' zero disorder limit. We discuss methods of data analysis which can be useful for making such inferences, and apply them to the problem of determining whether the preferred order in the cuprates is 'stripes' or 'checkerboards.' In many cases we show that the experiments clearly indicate stripe order, while in others (where the observed correlation length is short), the answer is presently uncertain.

  3. Visual acuity in the striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Ulrich, Zoe; Hoffmaster, Eric; Robeson, Audrey; Vonk, Jennifer

    2017-11-01

    The visual acuity of striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) was tested using a 2 alternative forced-choice task with square wave gratings. Skunks were reinforced with food items for touching a ball in front of a striped stimulus when paired with a ball in front of a solid gray stimulus. Skunks demonstrated a maximum visual acuity of 0.42 cycles per degree when tested with bright outdoor illumination. This poor visual acuity may be due to their nocturnal lifestyle, lack of predation, and is consistent with their preferential use of smell and sound during foraging. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 246 - Stars and Stripes (S&S) Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stars and Stripes (S&S) Board of Directors E... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS STARS AND STRIPES (S&S) NEWSPAPER AND BUSINESS OPERATIONS Pt. 246, App. E Appendix E to Part 246—Stars and Stripes (S&S) Board of Directors A. Organization and Management...

  5. Hallazgo de un endocarpo del genero Acer en niveles del Cretácico superior del embalse de Pedrezuela (Guadalix de la Sierra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesiak, M. A.

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is described and discussed an endocarp of Acer genus that exhibits a morphology like the living species A. buergerianum Miquel. The fruit was met in the upper part of Cretaceous series from the Pedrezuela barrier of Madrid Community. We propose a new denomination for the plant that contains this endocarp: Acer palaeobuergerianum n. fsp. This name has only taxonomic value. The prefix is give in order to the age and -buergerianum by its similarity with the actual species.Se describe y discute un endocarpo fósil perteneciente al género Acer, encontrado en el Cretácico superior del embalse de Pedrezuela (Madrid. Este fruto muestra una marcada semejanza con los endocarpos de la especie actual Acer buergerianum Miquel. Se propone una nueva denominación, con valor taxonómico, para la planta: Acer palaeobuergerianum n. fsp. El prefijo palaeo sugiere su edad y la denominación - buergerianum su semejanza morfológica con la especie actual.

  6. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... rust resistance depicted a single major gene conditioning adult plant resistance (APR) with stripe rust reaction varying from TR-20MS in resistant RILs signifying the presence of some minor genes as well. Genetic association with leaf rust resistance revealed that two genes are located at a recombination distance of 13%.

  7. Anatomical studies of the gastrointestinal tract of the striped sand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out on the gross anatomical, morphometric features and histology of the gastrointestinal tract of the Striped Sand Snake (Psammophis sibilans). Ten snakes (five males and five females) were euthanized and dissected for the study. The gastrointestinal tract appeared as a straight tubular organ from oral ...

  8. Stripe domains and magnetoresistance in thermally deposited nickel films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, P.D.; Stern, N.P.; Snowden, D.S.; Kappus, B.A.; Checkelsky, J.G.; Harberger, S.S.; Fusello, A.M.; Eckert, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    We report a study of the domain structure and magnetoresistance of thermally deposited nickel films. For films thicker than 17 nm, we observe striped domains with period varying with film thickness as a power law with exponent 0.21±0.02 up to 120 nm thickness. There is a negative magnetoresistance for fields out of the plane

  9. Distribution patterns of striped mullet Mugil cephalus in mangrove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spatial and seasonal variations in density of striped mullet Mugil cephalus were investigated in four mangrove creeks in Zanzibar, Tanzania, during a one-year cycle. Fish were collected monthly in the lower, intermediate and upper reaches of each creek using a beach-seine net. All fish collected were juveniles between 2 ...

  10. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Artificial rust epidemic was created by spraying the infector rows and experimental material with the mixture of uredinospores of Pst isolates 78S84 and 46S119. Stripe rust assessment was according to the modified Cobb's scale. (Peterson et al. 1948). The RIL population was screened at the seedling stage against leaf rust ...

  11. Monitoring quantity and quality of striped catfish pond effluent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der P.G.M.; Poelman, M.; Bosma, R.H.; Long, N.; Son, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    The production of striped catfish and other fish species in ponds has several possible impacts on the environment, one of which is caused by the discharge of pond waste water (effluent), which is enriched with nitrogen and phosphorous compounds as result of feeding and fish faeces. To restrict the

  12. Intervertebral Disk Disease in 3 Striped Skunks (Mephitis mephitis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krauss, M.W.; Benato, L.; McDonnell, J.; Schoemaker, N.J.; Westerhof, I.; Bronson, E.; Gielen, I.; van Caelenberg, A.; Hellebuyck, T.; Meij, B.P.; de Decker, S.

    Objective To describe diagnostic findings, surgical technique, and outcome in 3 striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) with a history of paraparesis. Study Design Case series. Animals Skunks (n = 3) with paraparesis. Methods Neurologic examination revealed upper motor neuron disease (T2–L2) in 2 skunks

  13. Modulation of the innate immune responses in the striped ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus, most of the innate non-specific immune responses are inducible though they are constitutive of fish immune system exhibiting a basal level of activity even in the absence of pathogen challenge. Keywords: Aeromonas hydrophila, Experimental challenge, Innate immune response, Striped snakehead murrel ...

  14. Siim Nestor soovitab : Supreme 7aastane. White Stripes / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    Kolmik Supreme tähistab oma 7. tegutsemisaastat 24. juunil Von Krahlis, kus toimub ka Krecki debüütalbumi "If You Live" (väljaandjaks ettevõte Umblu) esitlus. Detroidi blues-rock duo White Stripes esitleb oma uut albumit "Get Behind Me Satan" 29. juunil Tallinnas klubis Hollywood

  15. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic mapping indicated the introgression of stripe rust resistance gene on wheat chromosome. 5DS in the region carrying leaf rust resistance gene LrAc, but as an independent introgression. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-tagged site (STS) markers designed from the survey sequence data of 5DS ...

  16. Dependence of leaf structural indices in two forest maple species from within-crown irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Belyavskaya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The main leaf structural parameters of two genus Acer L. representatives ( A. platanoides and A. tataricum have been characterized. The responses of structural indices to within-crown light level have been studied. Inter-species differences have been revealed in irradiance adaptation at the cellular level.

  17. Distinct Nature of Static and Dynamic Magnetic Stripes in Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, H.; Holm, S. L.; Lǎcǎtuşu, M.-E.; Rømer, A. T.; Bertelsen, M.; Boehm, M.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Grivel, J.-C.; Emery, S. B.; Udby, L.; Wells, B. O.; Lefmann, K.

    2018-01-01

    We present detailed neutron scattering studies of the static and dynamic stripes in an optimally doped high-temperature superconductor, La2 CuO4 +y . We observe that the dynamic stripes do not disperse towards the static stripes in the limit of vanishing energy transfer. Therefore, the dynamic stripes observed in neutron scattering experiments are not the Goldstone modes associated with the broken symmetry of the simultaneously observed static stripes, and the signals originate from different domains in the sample. These observations support real-space electronic phase separation in the crystal, where the static stripes in one phase are pinned versions of the dynamic stripes in the other, having slightly different periods. Our results explain earlier observations of unusual dispersions in underdoped La2 -xSrx CuO4 (x =0.07 ) and La2 -xBax CuO4 (x =0.095 ).

  18. Distinct Nature of Static and Dynamic Magnetic Stripes in Cuprate Superconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, H.; Holm, S. L.; Lăcătuşu, M. E.

    2018-01-01

    We present detailed neutron scattering studies of the static and dynamic stripes in an optimally doped high-Temperature superconductor, La2CuO4+y. We observe that the dynamic stripes do not disperse towards the static stripes in the limit of vanishing energy transfer. Therefore, the dynamic stripes...... observed in neutron scattering experiments are not the Goldstone modes associated with the broken symmetry of the simultaneously observed static stripes, and the signals originate from different domains in the sample. These observations support real-space electronic phase separation in the crystal, where...... the static stripes in one phase are pinned versions of the dynamic stripes in the other, having slightly different periods. Our results explain earlier observations of unusual dispersions in underdoped La2-xSrxCuO4 (x=0.07) and La2-xBaxCuO4 (x=0.095)....

  19. Maple Syrup Urine Disease Complicated with Kyphoscoliosis and Myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jia-Woei

    2016-10-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an autosomal recessive aminoacidopathy secondary to an enzyme defect in the catabolic pathway of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs: leucine, isoleucine, and valine). Accumulation of their corresponding keto-acids leads to encephalopathy if not treated in time. A newborn male patient was suspected to have MSUD after tandem mass study when he presented symptoms and signs suggestive neonatal sepsis, anemia, and diarrhea. Food restriction of BCAAs was started; however, acrodermatitis enteropathica-like skin eruptions occurred at age 2 months. The skin rashes resolved after adding BCAAs and adjusting the infant formula. At age 7 months, he suffered from recurrent skin lesions, zinc deficiency, osteoporosis, and kyphosis of the thoracic spine with acute angulation over the T11-T12 level associated with spinal compression and myelopathy. After supplementation of zinc products and pamidronate, skin lesions and osteopenia improved gradually. Direct sequencing of the DBT gene showed a compound heterozygous mutation [4.7 kb deletion and c.650-651insT (L217F or L217fsX223)]. It is unusual that neurodegeneration still developed in this patient despite diet restriction. Additionally, brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging, bone mineral density study, and monitoring of zinc status are suggested in MSUD patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Biocompatible polymeric implants for controlled drug delivery produced by MAPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Moldovan, Antoniu; Luculescu, Catalin Romeo; Dinescu, Maria

    2011-10-01

    Implants consisting of drug cores coated with polymeric films were developed for delivering drugs in a controlled manner. The polymeric films were produced using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and consist of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), used individually as well as blended with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Indomethacin (INC) was used as model drug. The implants were tested in vitro (i.e. in conditions similar with those encountered inside the body), for predicting their behavior after implantation at the site of action. To this end, they were immersed in physiological media (i.e. phosphate buffered saline PBS pH 7.4 and blood). At various intervals of PBS immersion (and respectively in blood), the polymeric films coating the drug cores were studied in terms of morphology, chemistry, wettability and blood compatibility. PEG:PLGA film exhibited superior properties as compared to PLGA film, the corresponding implant being thus more suitable for internal use in the human body. In addition, the implant containing PEG:PLGA film provided an efficient and sustained release of the drug. The kinetics of the drug release was consistent with a diffusion mediated mechanism (as revealed by fitting the data with Higuchi's model); the drug was gradually released through the pores formed during PBS immersion. In contrast, the implant containing PLGA film showed poor drug delivery rates and mechanical failure. In this case, fitting the data with Hixson-Crowell model indicated a release mechanism dominated by polymer erosion.

  1. MAPLE-X10 reactor digital control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deverno, M.T.; Hinds, H.W.

    1991-10-01

    The MAPLE-X10 reactor, currently under construction at the Chalk River Laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, is a 10 MW t , pool-type, light-water reactor. It will be used for radioisotope production and silicon neutron transmutation doping. The reactor is controlled by a Digital Control System (DCS) and protected against abnormal process events by two independent safety systems. The DCS is an integrated control system used to regulate the reactor power and process systems. The safety philosophy for the control system is to minimize unsafe events arising from system failures and operational errors. this is achieved through redundancy, fail-safe design, automatic fault detection, and the selection of highly reliable components. The DCS provides both computer-controlled reactor regulation from the shutdown state to full power and automated reactor shutdown if safe limits are exceeded or critical sensors malfunction. The use of commercially available hardware with enhanced quality assurance makes the system cost effective while providing a high degree of reliability

  2. Maple Syrup Urine Disease Complicated with Kyphoscoliosis and Myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Woei Hou

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD is an autosomal recessive aminoacidopathy secondary to an enzyme defect in the catabolic pathway of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Accumulation of their corresponding keto-acids leads to encephalopathy if not treated in time. A newborn male patient was suspected to have MSUD after tandem mass study when he presented symptoms and signs suggestive neonatal sepsis, anemia, and diarrhea. Food restriction of BCAAs was started; however, acrodermatitis enteropathica-like skin eruptions occurred at age 2 months. The skin rashes resolved after adding BCAAs and adjusting the infant formula. At age 7 months, he suffered from recurrent skin lesions, zinc deficiency, osteoporosis, and kyphosis of the thoracic spine with acute angulation over the T11-T12 level associated with spinal compression and myelopathy. After supplementation of zinc products and pamidronate, skin lesions and osteopenia improved gradually. Direct sequencing of the DBT gene showed a compound heterozygous mutation [4.7 kb deletion and c.650-651insT (L217F or L217fsX223]. It is unusual that neurodegeneration still developed in this patient despite diet restriction. Additionally, brain and spinal magnetic resonance imaging, bone mineral density study, and monitoring of zinc status are suggested in MSUD patients.

  3. Validation of the language component of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination--Revised (ACE-R) as a screening tool for aphasia in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Tarek A-Z K; Parsons, Faye; Gautam, Vidushi

    2011-09-01

    Several tests are available for aphasia screening following stroke. However, some of them have shortcomings such as need of specialist knowledge, low sensitivity and/or specificity and lengthy administration time. Our study aims to evaluate the language component of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination--Revised (ACE-R) as a screening tool for aphasia in stroke patients. The language component of ACE-R was administered to consecutive patients admitted to a post-acute stroke unit. Patients who were medically unstable or had a significant history of sensory impairment or mental health issues were excluded. The test was administered by two junior doctors with basic training in ACE-R administration. Patients recruited were also assessed by an experienced speech and language therapist (SLT). The results of the two assessments were documented by a different member of the team and the SLT results were used as the benchmark to calculate the ACE-R language component sensitivity and specificity.   Fifty-nine participants were recruited and 27 of them were women. The mean age was 72 (SD 11.9). Thirty-four participants had left and 11 right hemisphere stroke. Fourteen had bilateral affection. Six participants were left handed. A cut-off value of 22/26 of ACE-R language component showed 100% specificity and 83.1% sensitivity, while a cut-off value of 16/26 had 88.2% specificity and 100% sensitivity. Our results suggest that the language component of ACE-R has a satisfactory sensitivity and specificity compared with other screening tests used in strokes. It is easy to administer and free to use. © 2010 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2010 ACOTA.

  4. Molecular weight dependent structure and charge transport in MAPLE-deposited poly(3-hexylthiophene) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Ban Xuan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; Smith, Mitchell [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; Strzalka, Joseph [X-Ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne Illinois 60439; Li, Huanghe [Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; McNeil, Anne J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; Stein, Gila E. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Tennessee 37996; Green, Peter F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; Macromolecular Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Michigan 48109; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver W Pkwy, Golden Colorado 80401

    2018-02-06

    In this work, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films prepared using the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique are shown to possess morphological structures that are dependent on molecular weight (MW). Specifically, the structures of low MW samples of MAPLE-deposited film are composed of crystallites/aggregates embedded within highly disordered environments, whereas those of high MW samples are composed of aggregated domains connected by long polymer chains. Additionally, the crystallite size along the side-chain (100) direction decreases, whereas the conjugation length increases with increasing molecular weight. This is qualitatively similar to the structure of spin-cast films, though the MAPLE-deposited films are more disordered. In-plane carrier mobilities in the MAPLE-deposited samples increase with MW, consistent with the notion that longer chains bridge adjacent aggregated domains thereby facilitating more effective charge transport. The carrier mobilities in the MAPLE-deposited simples are consistently lower than those in the solvent-cast samples for all molecular weights, consistent with the shorter conjugation length in samples prepared by this deposition technique.

  5. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens levansucrase-catalyzed the synthesis of fructooligosaccharides, oligolevan and levan in maple syrup-based reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengxi; Seo, Sooyoun; Karboune, Salwa

    2015-11-20

    Maple syrups with selected degree Brix (°Bx) (15, 30, 60) were investigated as reaction systems for levansucrase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. The enzymatic conversion of sucrose present in the maple syrup and the production of the transfructosylation products were assessed over a time course of 48h. At 30°C, the use of maple syrup 30°Bx led to the highest levansucrase activity (427.53μmol/mg protein/min), while maple syrup 66°Bx led to the highest converted sucrose concentration (1.53M). In maple syrup 30°Bx, oligolevans (1080%). In maple syrup 66°Bx, the most abundant products were oligolevans at 30°C and levans (DP≥30) at 8°C. The acceptor specificity study revealed the ability of B. amyloliquefaciens levansucrase to synthesize a variety of hetero-fructooligosaccharides (FOSs) in maple syrups 15°Bx and 30°Bx enriched with various disaccharides, with lactose being the preferred fructosyl acceptor. The current study is the first to investigate maple-syrup-based reaction systems for the synthesis of FOSs/oligolevans/levans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. GENERAL: A Maple Package to Compute Lie Symmetry Groups and Symmetry Reductions of (1+1)-Dimensional Nonlinear Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ruo-Xia; Lou, Sen-Yue

    2008-06-01

    Armed with the computer algebra system Maple, using a direct algebraic substitution method, we obtain Lie point symmetries, Lie symmetry groups and the corresponding symmetry reductions of one component nonlinear integrable and nonintegrable equations only by clicking the 'Enter' key. Abundant (1+1)-dimensional nonlinear mathematical physical systems are analysed effectively by using a Maple package LieSYMGRP proposed by us.

  7. The Changing Colors of Maple Hills: Intersections of Culture, Race, Language, and Exceptionality in a Rural Farming Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This case describes Maple Hills Elementary, a K-8 school in a rural farming community of the Midwest. As a community, Maple Hills has historically experienced a narrow range of diversity across race, ethnicity, language, and religion. Residents have predominantly been White, with German and English heritage, speak English as a mother tongue, and…

  8. A Profile of Lake States Maple Syrup Producers and Their Attitudes and Responses to Economic, Social, Ecological and Climate Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephanie A. Snyder; Michael A. Kilgore; Marla R. Emery; Marissa. Schmitz

    2018-01-01

    Maple syrup is an iconic as well as economically and culturally important non-timber forest product in North America. The economic benefits derived from maple syrup production are substantial. In 2016, the U.S. produced 4.2 million gallons of syrup worth an estimated $147 million (USDA, 2017b). In addition, sugaring provides many with a deep, personal connection to...

  9. PERAWATAN GIGI PADA ANAK DENGAN MAPLE SYRUP URINE DISEASE (LAPORAN KASUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Fajari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Maple Syrup Urine Disease is a disparity of leusin decarboxilation, and isoleusin of valin defect that is synthesized with complex enzyme systems. It is a rare disease and represents disparity. In some cases can generate ketosis that grows according to health change and can cause comma. Dental treatment of a child with Maple Syrup Urine Disease was not clearly mentioned, there is only a factor such as infection, which is very dangerous at any age, and can generate irregular metabolism. Dental treatment of a child with Maple Syrup Urine Disease accompanied by mental retardation must be done continuously to avoid infection that can result in the death of the patients.

  10. THE USE OF GAP AND MAPLE SOFTWARE IN TEACHING GROUP THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ema Carnia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Algebra is a subject that must be taken by all students in an undergraduate mathematics study program. However, teachers are often faced with students’ difficulties in understanding some of the concepts that are contained in this subject. The tendency of students who generally follow the development of technology can be seen as an opportunity to overcome these problems. Several studies have been undertaken regarding the use of computers in teaching abstract algebra. This paper will detail a comparison between GAP and Maple software as a commonly used software and constantly updated until today. The paper focused on the concept of group theory as the basis for understanding the course of abstract algebra. Result shows that in terms of visualization, Maple is better than GAP but in terms of substance GAP is better than Maple.

  11. Skin Lesions Associated with Dietary Management of Maple Syrup Urine Disease: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazandjieva Jana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leucinosis (maple syrup urine disease - MSUD is an inherited aminoacidopathy and organic aciduria caused by severe enzyme defect in the metabolic pathway of amino acids: leucine, isoleucine, and valine. The classical variant of the disease is characterized by accumulation of both amino and α-keto acids, particulary the most toxic rapid elevation of circulating leucine and its ketoacid, α-ketoisocaproate, which cause encephalopathy and life-threatening brain swelling. However, patients with the most severe form, classical maple syrup urine disease, may appear normal at birth, but develop acute metabolic decompensation within the first weeks of life with typical symptoms: poor feeding, vomiting, poor weight gain, somnolence and burnt sugar-smelling urine, reminiscent of maple syrup. Early diagnosis and dietary intervention improve the patient’s condition, prevent severe complications, and may allow normal intellectual development.

  12. Characterization of MAPLE deposited WO3 thin films for electrochromic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjiev, S. I.; Stefan, N.; Szilágyi, I. M.; Mihailescu, N.; Visan, A.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Stan, G. E.; Besleaga, C.; Iliev, M. T.; Gesheva, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is a widely studied material for electrochromic applications. The structure, morphology and optical properties of WO3 thin films, grown by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) from monoclinic WO3 nano-sized particles, were investigated for their possible application as electrochromic layers. A KrF* excimer (λ=248 nm, ζFWHM=25 ns) laser source was used in all experiments. The MAPLE deposited WO3 thin films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Cyclic voltammetry measurements were also performed, and the coloring and bleaching were observed. The morpho-structural investigations disclosed the synthesis of single-phase monoclinic WO3 films consisting of crystalline nano-grains embedded in an amorphous matrix. All thin films showed good electrochromic properties, thus validating application of the MAPLE deposition technique for the further development of electrochromic devices.

  13. Bulk temperature measurement in thermally striped pipe flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemure, N.; Olvera, J.R.; Ruggles, A.E.

    1995-12-01

    The hot leg flows in some Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) designs have a temperature distribution across the pipe cross-section. This condition is often referred to as a thermally striped flow. Here, the bulk temperature measurement of pipe flows with thermal striping is explored. An experiment is conducted to examine the feasibility of using temperature measurements on the external surface of the pipe to estimate the bulk temperature of the flow. Simple mixing models are used to characterize the development of the temperature profile in the flow. Simple averaging techniques and Backward Propagating Neural Net are used to predict bulk temperature from the external temperature measurements. Accurate bulk temperatures can be predicted. However, some temperature distributions in the flow effectively mask the bulk temperature from the wall and cause significant error in the bulk temperature predicted using this technique

  14. The LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    The availability of isotope grade, Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), from the United States for use in the manufacture of targets for molybdenum-99 production in AECL's NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a reliable, secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets is a proven and established method that has reliably produced medical isotopes for several decades. The HEU process provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume, molybdenum-99 production. Other medical isotopes such as I-131 and Xe-133, which play an important role in nuclear medicine applications, are also produced from irradiated HEU targets as a by-product of the molybdenum-99 process. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the commissioning of two MAPLE reactors and an associated isotope processing facility (the New Processing Facility). The new MAPLE facilities, which will be dedicated exclusively to medical isotope production, will provide an essential contribution to a secure, robust global healthcare system. Design and construction of these facilities has been based on a life cycle management philosophy for the isotope production process. This includes target irradiation, isotope extraction and waste management. The MAPLE reactors will operate with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel, a significant contribution to the objectives of the RERTR program. The design of the isotope production process in the MAPLE facilities is based on an established process - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. This is a proven technology that has been demonstrated over more than three decades of operation. However, in support of the RERTR program and in compliance with U.S. legislation, MDS Nordion has undertaken a LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. This paper will provide an

  15. Experimental Testing and Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Maple Seeds and Performance Analysis as a Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Jacob R.

    Descending maple seeds generate lift to slow their fall and remain aloft in a blowing wind; have the wings of these seeds evolved to descend as slowly as possible? A unique energy balance equation, experimental data, and computational fluid dynamics simulations have all been developed to explore this question from a turbomachinery perspective. The computational fluid dynamics in this work is the first to be performed in the relative reference frame. Maple seed performance has been analyzed for the first time based on principles of wind turbine analysis. Application of the Betz Limit and one-dimensional momentum theory allowed for empirical and computational power and thrust coefficients to be computed for maple seeds. It has been determined that the investigated species of maple seeds perform near the Betz limit for power conversion and thrust coefficient. The power coefficient for a maple seed is found to be in the range of 48-54% and the thrust coefficient in the range of 66-84%. From Betz theory, the stream tube area expansion of the maple seed is necessary for power extraction. Further investigation of computational solutions and mechanical analysis find three key reasons for high maple seed performance. First, the area expansion is driven by maple seed lift generation changing the fluid momentum and requiring area to increase. Second, radial flow along the seed surface is promoted by a sustained leading edge vortex that centrifuges low momentum fluid outward. Finally, the area expansion is also driven by the spanwise area variation of the maple seed imparting a radial force on the flow. These mechanisms result in a highly effective device for the purpose of seed dispersal. However, the maple seed also provides insight into fundamental questions about how turbines can most effectively change the momentum of moving fluids in order to extract useful power or dissipate kinetic energy.

  16. Protein and leucine metabolism in maple syrup urine disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.N.; Bresson, J.L.; Pacy, P.J.; Bonnefont, J.P.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Saudubray, J.M.; Halliday, D.

    1990-01-01

    Constant infusions of [13C]leucine and [2H5]phenylalanine were used to trace leucine and protein kinetics, respectively, in seven children with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) and eleven controls matched for age and dietary protein intake. Despite significant elevations of plasma leucine (mean 351 mumol/l, range 224-477) in MSUD subjects, mean whole body protein synthesis [3.78 +/- 0.42 (SD) g.kg-1. 24 h-1] and catabolism (4.07 +/- 0.46) were similar to control values (3.69 +/- 0.50 and 4.09 +/- 0.50, respectively). The relationship between phenylalanine and leucine fluxes was also similar in MSUD subjects (mean phenylalanine-leucine flux ratio 0.35 +/- 0.07) and previously reported adult controls (0.33 +/- 0.02). Leucine oxidation was undetectable in four of the MSUD subjects and very low in the other three (less than 4 mumol.kg-1.h-1; controls 13-20). These results show that persistent elevation in leucine concentration has no effect on protein synthesis. The marked disturbance in leucine metabolism in MSUD did not alter the relationship between rates of catabolism of protein to phenylalanine and leucine, which provides further support for the validity of the use of a single amino acid to trace whole body protein metabolism. The minimal leucine oxidation in MSUD differs from findings in other inborn metabolic errors and indicates that in patients with classical MSUD there is no significant route of leucine disposal other than through protein synthesis

  17. Striped bass stocks and concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizio, Mary C.; Sloan, Ronald J.; O'Brien, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Harvest restrictions on striped bass Morone saxatilis fisheries in Atlantic coastal states were relaxed in 1990, but consistent, coastwide regulations of the harvest have been difficult to implement because of the mixed-stock nature of the fisheries and the recognized contamination of Hudson River fish by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). We examined PCB concentrations and stock of origin of coastal striped bass to better understand the effects of these two factors on the composition of the harvest. The probability of observing differences in PCB concentration among fish from the Hudson River stock and the 'southern' group (Chesapeake Bay and Roanoke River stocks combined) was investigated with the logit model (a linear model for analysis of categorical data). Although total PCB concentrations were highly variable among fish from the two groups, striped bass classified as Hudson River stock had a significantly greater probability of having PCB concentrations equal to or greater than 2.00 mg/kg than did fish belonging to the southern group for all age- and size-classes examined. There was a significantly greater probability of observing total PCB concentrations equal to or exceeding 2.00 mg/kg in fish that were 5, 6, and 7 or more years old, and this probability increased linearly with age. We observed similar results when we examined the effect of size on total PCB concentration. The minimum-size limit estimated to permit escapement of fish to sustain stock production is 610 mm total length. Unless total PCB concentrations decrease in striped bass, it is likely that many harvestable fish will have concentrations that exceed the tolerance limit set by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

  18. Charge stripes and spin correlations in copper-oxide superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Tranquada, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Recent neutron diffraction studies have yielded evidence that, in a particular cuprate family, holes doped into the CuO(2) planes segregate into stripes that separate antiferromagnetic domains. Here it is shown that such a picture provides a quantitatively consistent interpretation of the spin fluctuations measured by neutron scattering in La(1.85)Sr(0.15)CuO(4) and YBa(2)Cu(3)O(6+x).

  19. Disorder induced stripes in d-wave superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Markus; Loder, Florian; Kampf, Arno P.; Kopp, Thilo

    2013-07-01

    Stripe phases are observed experimentally in several copper-based high-Tc superconductors near 1/8 hole doping. However, the specific characteristics may vary depending on the degree of dopant disorder and the presence or absence of a low-temperature tetragonal phase. On the basis of a Hartree-Fock decoupling scheme for the t-J model, we discuss the diverse behavior of stripe phases. In particular, the effect of inhomogeneities is investigated in two distinctly different parameter regimes which are characterized by the strength of the interaction. We observe that small concentrations of impurities or vortices pin the unidirectional density waves, and dopant disorder is capable of stabilizing a stripe phase in parameter regimes where homogeneous phases are typically favored in clean systems. The momentum-space results exhibit universal features for all coexisting density-wave solutions, nearly unchanged even in strongly disordered systems. These coexisting solutions feature generically a full energy gap and a particle-hole asymmetry in the density of states.

  20. Survey of cardiac pathologies in captive striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benato, Livia; Wack, Allison; Cerveny, Shannon N S; Rosenthal, Steven L; Bronson, Ellen

    2014-06-01

    Cardiac disease is a common finding in small mammals but it is rarely reported in striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis). The aim of this survey was to evaluate the prevalence of cardiac disease in striped skunks and to characterize the types of cardiac disease that might be present. In April 2010, a questionnaire was sent to veterinarians in zoologic collections with membership in the International Species Inventory System. Surveys were distributed to 55 institutions in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Twenty collections with a total of 95 skunks replied to the questionnaire. Of these, five collections reported at least one skunk with cardiac conditions for a total of 11 cases. In these 11 animals, the following conditions were diagnosed: myocardial fibrosis (n = 4), myxomatous valve degeneration (n = 4), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 1), dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 1), and valvular endocarditis (n = 1). Based on these findings, cardiac diseases should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in captive striped skunks presenting with weakness, lethargy, and decreased appetite. Cardiac ultrasound also should be considered at the time of annual health examinations to evaluate for possible cardiac conditions at an early stage.

  1. Ultrafast charge localization in a stripe-phase nickelate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coslovich, Giacomo; Huber, Bernhard; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Sasagawa, Takao; Hussain, Zahid; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; W. Schoenlein, Robert; A. Kaindl, Robert

    2013-08-30

    Self-organized electronically-ordered phases are a recurring feature in correlated materials, resulting in e.g. fluctuating charge stripes whose role in high-Tc superconductivity is under debate. However, the relevant cause-effect relations between real-space charge correlations and low-energy excitations remain hidden in time-averaged studies. Here, we reveal ultrafast charge localization and lattice vibrational coupling as dynamical precursors of stripe formation in the model compound La1.75Sr0.25NiO4, using ultrafast and equilibrium mid-infrared spectroscopy. The opening of a pseudogap at a crossover temperature T* far above long-range stripe formation establishes the onset of electronic localization which is accompanied by an enhanced Fano asymmetry of Ni-O stretch vibrations. Ultrafast excitation triggers a sub-picosecond dynamics exposing the synchronous modulation of electron-phonon coupling and charge localization. These results illuminate the role of localization in forming the pseudogap in nickelates, opening a path to understanding this mysterious phase in a broad class of complex oxides.

  2. NATURAL TRANSVERSE VIBRATIONS OF A PRESTRESSED ORTHOTROPIC PLATE-STRIPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egorychev Oleg Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article represents a new outlook at the boundary-value problem of natural vibrations of a homogeneous pre-stressed orthotropic plate-stripe. In the paper, the motion equation represents a new approximate hyperbolic equation (rather than a parabolic equation used in the majority of papers covering the same problem describing the vibration of a homogeneous orthotropic plate-stripe. The proposed research is based on newly derived boundary conditions describing the pin-edge, rigid, and elastic (vertical types of fixing, as well as the boundary conditions applicable to the unfixed edge of the plate. The paper contemplates the application of the Laplace transformation and a non-standard representation of a homogeneous differential equation with fixed factors. The article proposes a detailed representation of the problem of natural vibrations of a homogeneous orthotropic plate-stripe if rigidly fixed at opposite sides; besides, the article also provides frequency equations (no conclusions describing the plate characterized by the following boundary conditions: rigid fixing at one side and pin-edge fixing at the opposite side; pin-edge fixing at one side and free (unfixed other side; rigid fixing at one side and elastic fixing at the other side. The results described in the article may be helpful if applied in the construction sector whenever flat structural elements are considered. Moreover, specialists in solid mechanics and theory of elasticity may benefit from the ideas proposed in the article.

  3. Why is intracellular ice lethal? A microscopical study showing evidence of programmed cell death in cryo-exposed embryonic axes of recalcitrant seeds of Acer saccharinum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wesley-Smith, J

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available of Botany, Volume 115, Issue 6 pp. 991-1000. Why is intracellular ice lethal? A microscopical study showing evidence of programmed cell death in cryo- exposed embryonic axes of recalcitrant seeds of Acer saccharinum James Wesley-Smith1,2, Christina...

  4. Intracellular ice and cell survival in cryo-exposed embryonic axes of recalcitrant seeds of Acer saccharinum: an ultrastructural study of factors affecting cell and ice structures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wesley-Smith, J

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Annals of Botany 113: 695–709, 2014 doi:10.1093/aob/mct284, available online at www.aob.oxfordjournals.org Intracellular ice and cell survival in cryo-exposed embryonic axes of recalcitrant seeds of Acer saccharinum: an ultrastructural study...

  5. Klíčení semen javoru jasanolistého (Acer negundo) a postup jeho invaze v ČR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrázský, Z.; Mihulka, Stanislav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 43, Mater. 23 (2008), s. 151-162 ISSN 1212-3323. [Rostlinné invaze v ČR: situace, výzkum a management . Praha, 30.11.2007-01.12.2007] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : Acer negundo * invasion * mapping of distributiion Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  6. Photosynthetic acclimation of overstory Populus tremuloides and understory Acer saccharum to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration: interactions with shade and soil nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark E. Kubiske; Donald R. Zak; Kurt S. Pregitzer; Yu Takeuchi

    2002-01-01

    We exposed Populus tremuloides Michx. and Acer saccharum Marsh. to a factorial combination of ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) and high-nitrogen (N) and low-N soil treatments in open-top chambers for 3 years. Our objective was to compare photosynthetic...

  7. The STRIPES Trial - Support to Rural India's Public Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Performance of primary school students in India lags far below government expectations, and major disparity exists between rural and urban areas. The Naandi Foundation has designed and implemented a programme using community members to deliver after-school academic support for children in over 1,100 schools in five Indian states. Assessments to date suggest that it might have a substantial effect. This trial aims to evaluate the impact of this programme in villages of rural Andhra Pradesh and will compare test scores for children in three arms: a control and two intervention arms. In both intervention arms additional after-school instruction and learning materials will be offered to all eligible children and in one arm girls will also receive an additional 'kit' with a uniform and clothes. Methods/Design The trial is a cluster-randomised controlled trial conducted in conjunction with the CHAMPION trial. In the CHAMPION trial 464 villages were randomised so that half receive health interventions aiming to reduce neonatal mortality. STRIPES will be introduced in those CHAMPION villages which have a public primary school attended by at least 15 students at the time of a baseline test in 2008. 214 villages of the 464 were found to fulfil above criteria, 107 belonging to the control and 107 to the intervention arm of the CHAMPION trial. These latter 107 villages will serve as control villages in the STRIPES trial. A further randomisation will be carried out within the 107 STRIPES intervention villages allocating half to receive an additional kit for girls on the top of the instruction and learning materials. The primary outcome of the trial is a composite maths and language test score. Discussion The study is designed to measure (i) whether the educational intervention affects the exam score of children compared to the control arm, (ii) if the exam scores of girls who receive the additional kit are different from those of girls living in the other STRIPES

  8. Microwave permeability of stripe patterned FeCoN thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yuping; Yang, Yong; Ma, Fusheng; Zong, Baoyu; Yang, Zhihong; Ding, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic stripe patterns are of great importance for microwave applications owing to their highly tunable microwave permeability by adjusting the geometrical dimensions. In this work, stripe patterned FeCoN films with 160 nm thickness are fabricated by using standard UV photolithography. Their microwave permeability are investigated systematically via both experiment and micromagnetic simulation. The good agreement between experimental and simulation results suggests that stripe width is crucial for the microwave magnetic properties of the stripe pattern. It is demonstrated by simulation that with increasing stripe width from 1 to 80 µm the initial permeability shows a continuous growth from about 8–322, whiles the resonance frequency drops dramatically from 18.7 to 3.1 GHz at 4 µm gap size. Smaller gap size would result in slightly increased initial permeability due to larger magnetic volume ratio, accompanied by decreased resonance frequency because of stronger magnetostatic interaction. Moreover, the experimental investigation on stripe length effect indicates that the stripe length should be kept as long as possible to achieve uniform bulk resonance mode and high permeability value. Insufficient stripe length would result in low frequency edge mode and decayed bulk mode. This study could provide valuable guidelines on the selection of proper geometry dimensions of FeCoN stripe patterns for high frequency applications. - Highlights: • This work presents a systematic study on permeability of FeCoN stripe pattern. • Geometrical parameters of the stripe pattern are systematically optimized. • Several important conclusions has been obtained. • The results offer guideline on FeCoN stripe patterns for high frequency applications.

  9. Microwave permeability of stripe patterned FeCoN thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuping [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Yang, Yong, E-mail: tslyayo@nus.edu.sg [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Ma, Fusheng; Zong, Baoyu; Yang, Zhihong [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, 5A Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117411 (Singapore); Ding, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117574 (Singapore)

    2017-03-15

    Magnetic stripe patterns are of great importance for microwave applications owing to their highly tunable microwave permeability by adjusting the geometrical dimensions. In this work, stripe patterned FeCoN films with 160 nm thickness are fabricated by using standard UV photolithography. Their microwave permeability are investigated systematically via both experiment and micromagnetic simulation. The good agreement between experimental and simulation results suggests that stripe width is crucial for the microwave magnetic properties of the stripe pattern. It is demonstrated by simulation that with increasing stripe width from 1 to 80 µm the initial permeability shows a continuous growth from about 8–322, whiles the resonance frequency drops dramatically from 18.7 to 3.1 GHz at 4 µm gap size. Smaller gap size would result in slightly increased initial permeability due to larger magnetic volume ratio, accompanied by decreased resonance frequency because of stronger magnetostatic interaction. Moreover, the experimental investigation on stripe length effect indicates that the stripe length should be kept as long as possible to achieve uniform bulk resonance mode and high permeability value. Insufficient stripe length would result in low frequency edge mode and decayed bulk mode. This study could provide valuable guidelines on the selection of proper geometry dimensions of FeCoN stripe patterns for high frequency applications. - Highlights: • This work presents a systematic study on permeability of FeCoN stripe pattern. • Geometrical parameters of the stripe pattern are systematically optimized. • Several important conclusions has been obtained. • The results offer guideline on FeCoN stripe patterns for high frequency applications.

  10. A Content Analysis Comparison between Stars and Stripes and Commercial National Newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    McQuail , Mass Communication Theory , (London: Sage Publications, 1983) 126. 15 He notes that some of the concerns... Communication Theory . London: SAGE Publications, 1983. " S & S Ombudsman’E Plan Draws Fire," European Stars and Stripes, 4 February 1990. "Stars and Stripes May...STRIPES AND COMMERCIAL NATIONAL NEWSPAPERS A THESIS APPROVED FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION By Shirley Rafey Bruce Hinson

  11. Relationship of Soil Properties and Sugarcane Yields to Red Stripe in Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard M; Grisham, Michael P; Warnke, Kathryn Z; Maggio, Jeri R

    2016-07-01

    Symptoms of red stripe disease caused by Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae in Louisiana between 1985 and 2010 were limited to the leaf stripe form, which caused no apparent yield loss. During 2010, the more severe top rot form was observed, and a study was initiated to investigate the distribution of red stripe in the field and determine its effects on cane and sugar yields. Soil properties data, red stripe incidence, and sugarcane yields were all highly variable and were not randomly distributed in the field. Combined harvest data showed a negative correlation between yield components and red stripe incidence, with the strongest relationship between sucrose per metric ton and disease incidence. Red stripe incidence was positively correlated with several soil properties, including phosphorus, potassium, zinc, and calcium. Red stripe incidence also was found to increase with increasing nitrogen rate, with the greatest effects in heavy soils. Results also indicated that using red-stripe-infected cane as a seed source can significantly decrease shoot emergence, stalk population, and subsequent cane and sugar yields. These combined data suggest that red stripe disease can exhibit a highly variable rate of infection in commercial sugarcane fields and may also significantly decrease sugar yields.

  12. Microsatellite markers linked to the locus of the watermelon fruit stripe pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, R N C S; Santos, C A F; Dias, R C S; Alves, J C S F; Nogueira, T O

    2015-01-16

    Agronomic performance and external and internal appearance of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) fruit are important traits that should be taken into consideration during the development of a new cultivar, as well as being the principal identification elements used by the consumer, which are based on the external appearance and quality of the fruit. Externally, the fruit can be characterized in terms of the shape, the color of the lower rind, and the presence of grooves and stripes, the stripes can be classified as clearly defined or diffuse. The objective of this study was to identify microsatellite markers linked to the stripe pattern of watermelon fruit to support watermelon improvement programs, with the selection of this characteristic in the plantlet stage. F1 and F2 populations, result of a cross between the cultivars BRS Opara (clearly defined stripes) and Pérola (diffuse stripes), were phenotyped for their fruit stripe pattern. The CTAB 2X protocol was used for DNA extraction and 116 microsatellite markers were examined in a group of F2 plants that had fruit with well-defined stripes and fruit with diffuse stripes. The microsatellite loci MCPI_05 and MCPI_16 exhibited a linkage to the stripe pattern at a distance of 1.5 and 1.8 cM, respectively, with LOD scores of 39.28 and 38.11, respectively, which were located on chromosome six of the watermelon genome. These markers can be used in marker-assisted selection in watermelon improvement programs, by various research institutions.

  13. Physical Localization of a Locus from Agropyron cristatum Conferring Resistance to Stripe Rust in Common Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Song, Liqiang; Han, Haiming; Zhou, Shenghui; Zhang, Jinpeng; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2017-11-13

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici ( Pst ), is one of the most destructive diseases of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) worldwide. Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2 n = 28, PPPP), one of the wild relatives of wheat, exhibits resistance to stripe rust. In this study, wheat- A . cristatum 6P disomic addition line 4844-12 also exhibited resistance to stripe rust. To identify the stripe rust resistance locus from A . cristatum 6P, ten translocation lines, five deletion lines and the BC₂F₂ and BC₃F₂ populations of two wheat- A . cristatum 6P whole-arm translocation lines were tested with a mixture of two races of Pst in two sites during 2015-2016 and 2016-2017, being genotyped with genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and molecular markers. The result indicated that the locus conferring stripe rust resistance was located on the terminal 20% of 6P short arm's length. Twenty-nine 6P-specific sequence-tagged-site (STS) markers mapped on the resistance locus have been acquired, which will be helpful for the fine mapping of the stripe rust resistance locus. The stripe rust-resistant translocation lines were found to carry some favorable agronomic traits, which could facilitate their use in wheat improvement. Collectively, the stripe rust resistance locus from A . cristatum 6P could be a novel resistance source and the screened stripe rust-resistant materials will be valuable for wheat disease breeding.

  14. Dual Mechanism of Brain Injury and Novel Treatment Strategy in Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnanti, William J.; Lazovic, Jelena; Griffin, Kathleen; Skvorak, Kristen J.; Paul, Harbhajan S.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Bewley, Maria C.; Cheng, Keith C.; LaNoue, Kathryn F.; Flanagan, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited disorder of branched-chain amino acid metabolism presenting with life-threatening cerebral oedema and dysmyelination in affected individuals. Treatment requires life-long dietary restriction and monitoring of branched-chain amino acids to avoid brain injury. Despite careful management, children…

  15. The first use of N-carbamylglutamate in a patient with decompensated maple syrup urine disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ucar, Sema Kalkan; Coker, Mahmut; Habif, Sara; Saz, Eylem Ulas; Karapinar, Bulent; Ucar, Hakan; Kitis, Omer; Duran, Marinus

    2009-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a defect in the catabolism of the branched-chain amino acids; leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Affected patients may also develop hyperammonaemia of unknown etiology. This report describes a four-year-old girl with MSUD, who presented with decompensated

  16. Interannual and spatial variability of maple syrup yield as related to climatic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Louis; Houle, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Sugar maple syrup production is an important economic activity for eastern Canada and the northeastern United States. Since annual variations in syrup yield have been related to climate, there are concerns about the impacts of climatic change on the industry in the upcoming decades. Although the temporal variability of syrup yield has been studied for specific sites on different time scales or for large regions, a model capable of accounting for both temporal and regional differences in yield is still lacking. In the present study, we studied the factors responsible for interregional and interannual variability in maple syrup yield over the 2001-2012 period, by combining the data from 8 Quebec regions (Canada) and 10 U.S. states. The resulting model explained 44.5% of the variability in yield. It includes the effect of climatic conditions that precede the sapflow season (variables from the previous growing season and winter), the effect of climatic conditions during the current sapflow season, and terms accounting for intercountry and temporal variability. Optimal conditions for maple syrup production appear to be spatially restricted by less favourable climate conditions occurring during the growing season in the north, and in the south, by the warmer winter and earlier spring conditions. This suggests that climate change may favor maple syrup production northwards, while southern regions are more likely to be negatively affected by adverse spring conditions.

  17. Chemical Compositional, Biological, and Safety Studies of a Novel Maple Syrup Derived Extract for Nutraceutical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Maple syrup has nutraceutical potential given the macronutrients (carbohydrates, primarily sucrose), micronutrients (minerals and vitamins), and phytochemicals (primarily phenolics) found in this natural sweetener. We conducted compositional (ash, fiber, carbohydrates, minerals, amino acids, organic acids, vitamins, phytochemicals), in vitro biological, and in vivo safety (animal toxicity) studies on maple syrup extracts (MSX-1 and MSX-2) derived from two declassified maple syrup samples. Along with macronutrient and micronutrient quantification, thirty-three phytochemicals were identified (by HPLC-DAD), and nine phytochemicals, including two new compounds, were isolated and identified (by NMR) from MSX. At doses of up to 1000 mg/kg/day, MSX was well tolerated with no signs of overt toxicity in rats. MSX showed antioxidant (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay) and anti-inflammatory (in RAW 264.7 macrophages) effects and inhibited glucose consumption (by HepG2 cells) in vitro. Thus, MSX should be further investigated for potential nutraceutical applications given its similarity in chemical composition to pure maple syrup. PMID:24983789

  18. Characterization of lysozyme films produced by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Kingshott, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Thin lysozyme films of thickness up to more than 100 nm have been produced in a dry environment by MAPLE (matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation) from a water ice matrix. Analysis of the films demonstrates that a significant part of the lysozyme molecules is transferred to the substrate without...

  19. Growth of thin films of low molecular weight proteins by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matei, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Constantinescu, C.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of lysozyme and myoglobin grown by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) from a water ice matrix have been investigated. The deposition rate of these two low molecular weight proteins (lysozyme: 14307 amu and myoglobin: 17083 amu) exhibits a maximum of about 1–2 ng/cm2 per...

  20. Surface morphology of thin lysozyme films produced by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jørgen; Pryds, Nini

    2007-01-01

    Thin films of the protein, lysozyme, have been deposited by the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique. Frozen targets of 0.3-1.0 wt.% lysozyme dissolved in ultrapure water were irradiated by laser light at 355 mn with a fluence of 2 J/cm(2). The surface quality of the thin...

  1. RIR MAPLE Procedure for Deposition of Carbon Rich Si/C/H Films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dřínek, Vladislav; Strašák, Tomáš; Novotný, F.; Fajgar, Radek; Bastl, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 292, FEB 15 (2014), s. 413-419 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-25747S Grant - others:MŠMT(CZ) RVO6840770 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : MAPLE * dendrimer * SiC * DLC * cross-kinking Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014

  2. Effects of Watering and Fertilization on Carbohydrate Reserves in Sugar Maple Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton M., Jr. Carl; John R. Donnelly; Boyd W. Post

    1978-01-01

    Sugar maple seedlings, grown under three nutrient and three moisture levels, were analyzed after three growing seasons for starch and ethanol-soluble sugars. Analytical procedures are detailed in the appendix. Fertilization did not affect carbohydrate levels in stems or roots. Water stress caused a significant reduction in the amount of carbohydrates in stems and roots...

  3. Maple (Computer Algebra System) in Teaching Pre-Calculus: Example of Absolute Value Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuluk, Güler

    2014-01-01

    Modules in Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) make Mathematics interesting and easy to understand. The present study focused on the implementation of the algebraic, tabular (numerical), and graphical approaches used for the construction of the concept of absolute value function in teaching mathematical content knowledge along with Maple 9. The study…

  4. Algorithms for the extension of precise and imprecise conditional probability assessments: an implementation with maple V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Biazzo

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we illustrate an implementation with Maple V of some procedures which allow to exactly propagate precise and imprecise probability assessments. The extension of imprecise assessments is based on a suitable generalization of the concept of coherence of de Finetti. The procedures described are supported by some examples and relevant cases.

  5. Collecting maple sap with unvented spouts, using aerial and ground lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Clay Smith; Carter B. Gibbs

    1971-01-01

    Two methods of using plastic tubing to collect sugar maple sap were tried: aerial lines and ground lines. Unvented spouts were used in both. We found that the sap yields collected from the aerial and ground lines were not statistically different from each other.

  6. Comparison of vacuum and gravity sap flows from paired sugar maple trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Clay Smith; Carter B. Gibbs

    1970-01-01

    Paired sugar maple trees with single tapholes were used to compare sap yields from vacuum-pumping with sap yields from gravity flow. Results indicated that vacuum yields were approximately twice as great as gravity flows. These results support previous findings from studies in which vacuum and gravity were compared with two tapholes on the same tree.

  7. The Effects of Maple Integrated Strategy on Engineering Technology Students' Understanding of Integral Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Tuan Salwani; Zakaria, Effandi

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the effectiveness of a learning strategy using Maple in integral calculus. This research was conducted using a quasi-experimental nonequivalent control group design. One hundred engineering technology students at a technical university were chosen at random. The effectiveness of the learning…

  8. Processing Maple Syrup with a Vapor Compression Distiller: An Economic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence D. Garrett

    1977-01-01

    A test of vapor compression distillers for processing maple syrup revealed that: (1) vapor compression equipment tested evaporated 1 pound of water with .047 pounds of steam equivalent (electrical energy); open-pan evaporators of similar capacity required 1.5 pounds of steam equivalent (oil energy) to produce 1 pound of water; (2) vapor compression evaporation produced...

  9. A conversion development program to LEU targets for medical isotope production in the MAPLE Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). The molybdenum extraction process from the HEU targets provided predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. A reliable supply of HEU for the NRU research reactor targets has enabled MDS Nordion to develop a secure chain of medical isotope supply for the international nuclear medicine community. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to patient application, has been established on a proven method of HEU target irradiation and processing. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, the design of the MAPLE facilities was based on our established process - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a program to convert the MAPLE facilities to LEU targets. An initial feasibility study was initiated to identify the technical issues to convert the MAPLE targets from HEU to LEU. This paper will present the results of the feasibility study. It will also describe future challenges and opportunities in converting the MAPLE facilities to LEU targets for large scale, commercial medical isotope production. (author)

  10. Individual tree differences confound effects of growth regulators in rooting sugar maple softwood cuttings

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Donnelly

    1971-01-01

    Softwood stem cuttings from three mature sugar maple trees were treated with several types and concentrations of growth regulators. Lack of statistical significance was due to extreme variability in tree response: low levels of auxin stimulated rooting in two study trees, while auxins inhibited rooting in the other tree. It is postulated that variations in rooting...

  11. Economic values for growth and grade changes of sugar maple in the Lake States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard M. Godman; Joseph J. Mendel

    1978-01-01

    Current and expected rates of value increase over a 10-year period were developed for sawtimber-size sugar maple based on variable growth rates, expected merchantable height changes, and butt log grade improvement. These economic guides, along with silvicultural considerations, provide a value basis for selecting trees during thinning and determining final harvest...

  12. Biosynthesis of gallic and ellagic acids with 14C-labeled compounds in Acer and Rhus leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Nariyuki; Hayashida, Shunzo; Tazaki, Kiyoshi

    1984-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway for gallic and ellagic acids in young, mature and autumn leaves of Acer buergerianum and Rhus succedanea was examined by tracer experiments, and also by isotope competition, with D-shikimic acid- 14 C, L-phenylalanine-U- 14 C, L-phenyllactic acid-U- 14 C, gallic acid-G- 14 C and their unlabeled compounds. In young leaves of both plants, the incorporation rate of labeled shikimic acid into gallic acid was significantly higher than that of labeled phenylalanine, whereas in the mature and autumn leaves the latter was a good precursor rather than the former for the gallic acid biosynthesis. Therefore, two pathways for gallic acid formation, through β-oxidation of phenylpropanoid and through dehydrogenation of shikimic acid, could be operating in Acer and Rhus leaves, and the preferential pathway is altered by leaf age. In both plants, the incorporation rate of labeled phenyllactic acid during a 24 hr metabolic period was almost the same as that of labeled phenylalanine. The incorporation of D-shikimic acid-G- 14 C, L-phenylalanine-U- 14 C and L-phenyllactic acid-U- 14 C into ellagic acid was very similar to the case of the radioactive gallic acid formation. Furthermore, regardless of the presence of unlabeled shikimic acid and/or phenylalanine, incorporation of the radioactivity of labeled gallic acid into ellagic acid occurred at a very high rate, suggesting the reciprocal radical reaction of gallic acid for the ellagic acid formation. The incorporation of labeled compounds into ellagitannins was also examined and their biosynthesis discussed further. (author)

  13. Colonization of Three Maple Species by Asian Longhorned Beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis, in Two Mixed-Hardwood Forest Stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Dodds

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Asian longhorned beetle (ALB, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky, is an invasive insect that has successfully established multiple times in North America. To investigate host colonization and reproductive success (exit holes/eggs, two ALB infested forest stands were sampled in central Massachusetts, USA. Infested Acer platanoides L., Acer rubrum L., and Acer saccharum Marsh. were felled, bucked into 1 m sections and dissected to determine indications of ALB infestations, such as presence of life stages or signs of damage on trees. ALB damage was also aged on a subset of trees to determine the earliest attacks on the three Acer species. In one stand, ALB oviposition was significantly higher on the native A. rubrum and A. saccharum than the exotic A. platanoides. In the second stand, ALB oviposition was significantly higher and cumulative reproductive success was higher on A. rubrum than A. platanoides or A. saccharum. An A. saccharum had the earliest signs of attack that occurred in 2006. Acer rubrum (2007 and A. platanoides (2010 were colonized shortly thereafter. Overall, ALB was more successful in A. rubrum, where adults emerged from 53% and 64% of trees in each stand, compared to A. platanoides (11% and 18% or A. saccharum (14% and 9%.

  14. MODELING IN MAPLE AS THE RESEARCHING MEANS OF FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS AND PROCEDURES IN LINEAR ALGEBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasil Kushnir

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to binary technology and "fundamental training technology." Binary training refers to the simultaneous teaching of mathematics and computer science, for example differential equations and Maple, linear algebra and Maple. Moreover the system of traditional course of Maple is not performed. The use of the opportunities of Maple-technology in teaching mathematics is based on the following fundamental concepts of computer science as an algorithm, program, a linear program, cycle, branching, relative operators, etc. That’s why only a certain system of command operators in Maple is considered. They are necessary for fundamental concepts of linear algebra and differential equations studying in Maple-environment. Relative name - "the technology of fundamental training" reflects the study of fundamental mathematical concepts and procedures that express the properties of these concepts in Maple-environment. This article deals with the study of complex fundamental concepts of linear algebra (determinant of the matrix and algorithm of its calculation, the characteristic polynomial of the matrix and the eigenvalues of matrix, canonical form of characteristic matrix, eigenvectors of matrix, elementary divisors of the characteristic matrix, etc., which are discussed in the appropriate courses briefly enough, and sometimes are not considered at all, but they are important in linear systems of differential equations, asymptotic methods for solving differential equations, systems of linear equations. Herewith complex and voluminous procedures of finding of these linear algebra concepts embedded in Maple can be performed as a result of a simple command-operator. Especially important issue is building matrix to canonical form. In fact matrix functions are effectively reduced to the functions of the diagonal matrix or matrix in Jordan canonical form. These matrices are used to rise a square matrix to a power, to extract the roots of the n

  15. WE-EF-207-10: Striped Ratio Grids: A New Concept for Scatter Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, S [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a new method for estimating scatter in x-ray imaging. We propose the “striped ratio grid,” an anti-scatter grid with alternating stripes of high scatter rejection (attained, for example, by high grid ratio) and low scatter rejection. To minimize artifacts, stripes are oriented parallel to the direction of the ramp filter. Signal discontinuities at the boundaries between stripes provide information on local scatter content, although these discontinuities are contaminated by variation in primary radiation. Methods: We emulated a striped ratio grid by imaging phantoms with two sequential CT scans, one with and one without a conventional grid, and processed them together to mimic a striped ratio grid. Two phantoms were scanned with the emulated striped ratio grid and compared with a conventional anti-scatter grid and a fan-beam acquisition, which served as ground truth. A nonlinear image processing algorithm was developed to mitigate the problem of primary variation. Results: The emulated striped ratio grid reduced scatter more effectively than the conventional grid alone. Contrast is thereby improved in projection imaging. In CT imaging, cupping is markedly reduced. Artifacts introduced by the striped ratio grid appear to be minimal. Conclusion: Striped ratio grids could be a simple and effective evolution of conventional anti-scatter grids. Unlike several other approaches currently under investigation for scatter management, striped ratio grids require minimal computation, little new hardware (at least for systems which already use removable grids) and impose few assumptions on the nature of the object being scanned.

  16. Bi-sensory, striped representations: comparative insights from owl and platypus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, John D

    2004-01-01

    Bi-sensory striped arrays are described in owl and platypus that share some similarities with the other variant of bi-sensory striped array found in primate and carnivore striate cortex: ocular dominance columns. Like ocular dominance columns, the owl and platypus striped systems each involve two different topographic arrays that are cut into parallel stripes, and interdigitated, so that higher-order neurons can integrate across both arrays. Unlike ocular dominance stripes, which have a separate array for each eye, the striped array in the middle third of the owl tectum has a separate array for each cerebral hemisphere. Binocular neurons send outputs from both hemispheres to the striped array where they are segregated into parallel stripes according to hemisphere of origin. In platypus primary somatosensory cortex (S1), the two arrays of interdigitated stripes are derived from separate sensory systems in the bill, 40,000 electroreceptors and 60,000 mechanoreceptors. The stripes in platypus S1 cortex produce bimodal electrosensory-mechanosensory neurons with specificity for the time-of-arrival difference between the two systems. This "thunder-and-lightning" system would allow the platypus to estimate the distance of the prey using time disparities generated at the bill between the earlier electrical wave and the later mechanical wave caused by the motion of benthic prey. The functional significance of parallel, striped arrays is not clear, even for the highly-studied ocular dominance system, but a general strategy is proposed here that is based on the detection of temporal disparities between the two arrays that can be used to estimate distance.

  17. Spatial distribution of Prosopis glandulosa var. torreyana in vegetation stripes of the southern Chihuahuan Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Portillo, Jorge; Montaña, Carlos

    1999-05-01

    Mosaics consisting of vegetation stripes surrounded by bare areas have been described in several arid and semiarid ecosystems. The dynamics of the system depends on the redistribution of rainwater which is preferentially stored and evapotranspired in the vegetated stripes. A process of plant `colonization' in the upslope fringe of the stripes has been described in some cases and a consequent upslope migration of the stripes has been inferred, but not confirmed in all cases quoted in the literature. In this paper, we studied the spatial distribution of mesquite ( Prosopis glandulosa var. torreyana) and the soil parameters in three vegetation stripes and their associated bare areas in the southern Chihuahuan Desert. The spatial distribution of mesquites of different sizes do not coincide with that expected under the hypothesis of an uniform upslope stripe migration, but soil data suggest that current bare areas had been vegetated some time ago. Dispersion and establishment abilities enhanced by overgrazing may explain the observed mesquite distribution, but the presence of trees with high basal diameters in any part of the stripes suggests stripe permanence at the same site and no upslope migration. These results point to the conflicting evidence on stripe migration that has been already found in other areas. The most probable scenario in our study area is that of a general long-term change of form of the stripes taking place at very variable speeds in different stripes, including the possibility that some of them remain stationary for prolonged periods, and showing different histories of colonization according to the life-history of the different species concerned. The speed and regularity of the process would show a very high temporal and spatial variability due to the interaction of climatic, geomorphologic and biotic interactions.

  18. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert D; Scyphers, Steven B; Grabowski, Jonathan H

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA). Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state's management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71%) and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%), but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%). Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54%) and mandated use of circle hooks (56%). Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts that may

  19. Unfolding of Vortices into Topological Stripes in a Multiferroic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Mostovoy, M.; Han, M. G.; Horibe, Y.; Aoki, T.; Zhu, Y.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2014-06-01

    Multiferroic hexagonal RMnO3 (R =rare earths) crystals exhibit dense networks of vortex lines at which six domain walls merge. While the domain walls can be readily moved with an applied electric field, the vortex cores so far have been impossible to control. Our experiments demonstrate that shear strain induces a Magnus-type force pulling vortices and antivortices in opposite directions and unfolding them into a topological stripe domain state. We discuss the analogy between this effect and the current-driven dynamics of vortices in superconductors and superfluids.

  20. MEDIASTINAL LYMPHOMA AND CHYLOTHORAX IN A STRIPED SKUNK (MEPHITIS MEPHITIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liptovszky, Mátyás; Kerekes, Zoltán; Perge, Edina; Vajdovich, Péter; Papp, Endre Ákos; Molnár, Viktor

    2017-06-01

    Tumors are infrequently reported in skunks, with only a few case reports published in the literature. Chylothorax associated with mediastinal lymphoma was diagnosed in a captive 7-yr-old male striped skunk ( Mephitis mephitis ). The animal presented with anorexia and apathy. Supportive care and prednisolone improved the animal's clinical status for 2 wk preceding its death. Histopathology supported the clinical findings, and the tumor was classified as a mediastinal non-Hodgkin lymphoma, stage 2b, which has not been documented in the literature.

  1. Response to "Critical Assessment of the Evidence for Striped Nanoparticles".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quy Khac Ong

    Full Text Available Stirling et al., (10.1371/journal.pone.0108482 presented an analysis on some of our publications on the formation of stripe-like domains on mixed-ligand coated gold nanoparticles. The authors shed doubts on some of our results however no valid argument is provided against what we have shown since our first publication: scanning tunneling microscopy (STM images of striped nanoparticles show stripe-like domains that are independent of imaging parameters and in particular of imaging speed. We have consistently ruled out the presence of artifacts by comparing sets of images acquired at different tip speeds, finding invariance of the stipe-like domains. Stirling and co-workers incorrectly analyzed this key control, using a different microscope and imaging conditions that do not compare to ours. We show here data proving that our approach is rigorous. Furthermore, we never solely relied on image analysis to draw our conclusions; we have always used the chemical nature of the particles to assess the veracity of our images. Stirling et al. do not provide any justification for the spacing of the features that we find on nanoparticles: ~1 nm for mixed ligand particles and ~ 0.5 nm for homoligand particles. Hence our two central arguments remain unmodified: independence from imaging parameters and dependence on ligand shell chemical composition. The paper report observations on our STM images; none is a sufficient condition to prove that our images are artifacts. We thoroughly addressed issues related to STM artifacts throughout our microscopy work. Stirling et al. provide guidelines for what they consider good STM images of nanoparticles, such images are indeed present in our literature. They conclude that the evidences we provided to date are insufficient, this is a departure from one of the authors' previous article which concluded that our images were composed of artifacts. Given that four independent laboratories have reproduced our measurements and

  2. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy L Caldwell

    Full Text Available Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  3. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Roy L; Ross, Richard; Rodaniche, Arcadio; Huffard, Christine L

    2015-01-01

    Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  4. Assessing the variability of Red Stripe Disease in Louisiana sugarcane using precision agriculture methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms of red stripe disease caused by Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae in Louisiana between 1985 and 2010 were limited to the leaf stripe form which caused no apparent yield loss. During 2010, the more severe top rot form was observed, and a study was initiated to investigate the distribution of r...

  5. Osmoregulatory effects of hypophysectomy and homologous prolactin replacement in hybrid striped bass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Leslie F; McCormick, Stephen D; Madsen, Steffen S

    2005-01-01

    The effects of ovine prolactin (oPRL) and striped bass prolactin (sbPRL; Morone saxatilis) on plasma osmolality, electrolyte balance, and gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity were investigated in hypophysectomized (Hx), freshwater (FW)-acclimated, hybrid striped bass (M. saxatilis x Morone chrysops...

  6. Color Fringes Bordering Black Stripes at the Bottom of a Swimming Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Gonzalo; Rojas, Roberto; Slüsarenko, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We have observed a nice example of chromatic dispersion due to refraction in water, in the form of color fringes bordering the black stripes that exist at the bottom of a swimming pool. Here we give a qualitative description of the phenomenon, explaining the role of the black stripes and the dispersive index of refraction of water.

  7. Genetics of leaf and stripe rust resistance in a bread wheat cultivar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MYT), Mexico, has shown resistance to leaf rust and stripe rust in the Indian ... rust resistance against. -isogenic line genes present Leaf rust. Stripe rust. Origin. Source. Parentage. Tonichi. –. TR. 10.0. Mexico. RAMC CAR422/Anahuac75. CSP44. Lr48 .... separately have been reported earlier by several authors. Table 2.

  8. Genetics of adult plant stripe rust resistance in CSP44, a selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This suggests the presence of nonhypersensitive adult plant stripe rust resistance in the line CSP44. The evaluation of F1, F2 and F3 generations and F6 SSD families from the cross of CSP44 with susceptible wheat cultivar WL711 for stripe rust severity indicated that the resistance in CSP44 is based on two genes showing ...

  9. Genetics of adult plant stripe rust resistance in CSP44, a selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Wheat line CSP44, a selection from an Australian bread wheat cultivar Condor, has shown resistance to stripe rust in. India since the last twenty years. Seedlings and adult plants of CSP44 showed susceptible infection types against stripe rust race 46S119 but displayed average terminal disease severity of 2.67 on adult ...

  10. Comparisons of egg quality traits, egg weight loss and hatchability between striped and normal duck eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J; Wang, B; Huang, Z; Fan, Y; Huang, C; Hou, Z

    2013-01-01

    1. The egg quality of striped and normal duck eggs was compared to determine why striped eggs show decreased hatchability. A total of 430 eggs, obtained from a Pekin duck breeder flock aged 50-65 wks, were used in three experiments. The eggs were weighed and assigned randomly to measure egg quality traits, egg weight (EW) loss and hatchability during incubation. 2. There were no significant differences between egg types in terms of egg shape index, eggshell strength and thickness, albumen height, Haugh unit, yolk colour, weight of the eggshell with or without membranes, calcium, phosphorus, copper and manganese contents in the eggshell (with the inner and outer membranes or without the inner membrane), albumen weight, dry matter of albumen, crude protein (CP) of thick albumen and pH of the thick albumen. 3. The weight of eggshells with membranes, weight of thick albumen and CP of thin albumen in striped eggs were lower than those in normal eggs. 4. The thin albumen in striped eggs was heavier than that in normal eggs. The pH of the thin albumin in striped egg was significantly higher than that in normal eggs. 5. There were no significant differences in EW loss during incubation or duckling weight between striped and normal eggs. However, the hatchability of striped eggs was lower. 6. The lower weight of the eggshell inner membrane and thick albumen, lower CP content and higher pH in the thin albumen of striped eggs might contribute to lower hatchability.

  11. Mapping genes for resistance to stripe rust in spring wheat landrace PI 480035

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Erikks. is an economically important disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Hexaploid spring wheat landrace PI 480035 was highly resistant to stripe rust in the field in Washington during 2011 and 2012. The objective of this resear...

  12. Material properties and applications of blended organic thin films with nanoscale domains deposited by RIR-MAPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.; McCormick, Ryan D.; Ge, Wangyao

    2015-03-01

    Resonant-infrared, matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) has been used to deposit blended, organic thin-films with nanoscale domain sizes of constituent polymers, small molecules, or colloidal nanoparticles. In the emulsion-based RIR-MAPLE process, the target contains a nonpolar, organic solvent phase and a polar, water phase. The emulsion properties have a direct impact on the nanoscale morphology of single-component organic thin films, while the morphology of blended, organic thin films also depends on the RIR-MAPLE deposition mode. In addition to these fundamental aspects, applications of blended organic films (organic solar cells, anti-reflection coatings, and multi-functional surfaces) deposited by emulsion-based RIR-MAPLE are presented. Importantly, domain sizes in the blended films are critical to thin-film functionality.

  13. The Evolutionary History of MAPL (Mitochondria-Associated Protein Ligase and Other Eukaryotic BAM/GIDE Domain Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy G Wideman

    Full Text Available MAPL (mitochondria-associated protein ligase, also called MULAN/GIDE/MUL1 is a multifunctional mitochondrial outer membrane protein found in human cells that contains a unique BAM (beside a membrane domain and a C-terminal RING-finger domain. MAPL has been implicated in several processes that occur in animal cells such as NF-kB activation, innate immunity and antiviral signaling, suppression of PINK1/parkin defects, mitophagy in skeletal muscle, and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Previous studies demonstrated that the BAM domain is present in diverse organisms in which most of these processes do not occur, including plants, archaea, and bacteria. Thus the conserved function of MAPL and its BAM domain remains an open question. In order to gain insight into its conserved function, we investigated the evolutionary origins of MAPL by searching for homologues in predicted proteomes of diverse eukaryotes. We show that MAPL proteins with a conserved BAM-RING architecture are present in most animals, protists closely related to animals, a single species of fungus, and several multicellular plants and related green algae. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that eukaryotic MAPL proteins originate from a common ancestor and not from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We also determined that two independent duplications of MAPL occurred, one at the base of multicellular plants and another at the base of vertebrates. Although no other eukaryote genome examined contained a verifiable MAPL orthologue, BAM domain-containing proteins were identified in the protists Bigelowiella natans and Ectocarpus siliculosis. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that these proteins are more closely related to prokaryotic BAM proteins and therefore likely arose from independent horizontal gene transfers from bacteria. We conclude that MAPL proteins with BAM-RING architectures have been present in the holozoan and viridiplantae lineages since their very beginnings

  14. Mice as stowaways? Colonization history of Danish striped field mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Liselotte Wesley; Jacobsen, Magnus; Vedel-Smith, Christina; Jensen, Thomas Secher

    2017-07-01

    Species from the steppe region of Eastern Europe likely colonized northwestern Europe in connection with agriculture after 6500 BP. The striped field mouse ( Apodemus agrarius Pallas, 1783), is a steppe-derived species often found in human crops. It is common on the southern Danish islands of Lolland and Falster, which have been isolated from mainland Europe since approximately 10 300-8000 BP. Thus, this species could have been brought in with humans in connection with agriculture, or it could be an earlier natural invader. We sequenced 86 full mitochondrial genomes from the northwestern range of the striped field mouse, analysed phylogenetic relationships and estimated divergence time. The results supported human-induced colonization of Denmark in the Subatlantic or Subboreal period. A newly discovered population from Central Jutland in Denmark diverged from Falster approximately 100-670 years ago, again favouring human introduction. One individual from Sweden turned out to be a recent introduction from Central Jutland. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Systemic sarcocystosis in a striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, G N; Ramos-Vara, J A; Vemulapalli, R

    2010-05-01

    A striped skunk with neurological signs was euthanized and examined via necropsy. Histologically, protozoa were found in multiple tissues. Protozoal schizonts measured 15 to 25 mum in diameter and contained 4 to 6 mum crescent-shaped merozoites. Protozoa were associated with necrosis and inflammation in the lung, brain, liver, and nasal epithelium. Immunohistochemistry labeled protozoa strongly positive for Sarcocystis neurona. Polymerase chain reaction-amplified products from the protozoan were 99.6% identical to the corresponding portion of the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of S neurona. S neurona origin was further confirmed by amplifying a 451-base pair DNA fragment from the skunk lung, which differed by just 2 or 3 base pairs from the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of S neurona. Striped skunks act as intermediate and aberrant hosts for S neurona; however, S neurona has rarely been found in extraneural tissues in any species, and systemic sarcocystosis has not been reported in skunks. Additionally, canine distemper virus infection was confirmed with histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Concurrent canine distemper suggests that immunosuppression may have played a role in S neurona infection in this skunk.

  16. Processing of functional polymers and organic thin films by the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqué, A.; Wu, P.; Ringeisen, B. R.; Bubb, D. M.; Melinger, J. S.; McGill, R. A.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2002-01-01

    The matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique has been successfully used to deposit highly uniform thin films of various functional materials such as non-linear optical (NLO) organic materials, conductive polymers, luminescent organic molecules and several types of proteinaceous compounds. MAPLE is a laser evaporation technique for growing thin films of organic and polymeric materials which involves directing a pulsed laser beam (λ=193 nm; fluence=0.01-0.5 J cm -2) onto a frozen target (-40 to -160 °C) consisting of a solute polymeric or organic compound dissolved in a solvent matrix. Using MAPLE, thin films of N-(4-nitrophenyl)-( L)-prolinol or NPP, an NLO material; polypyrrole, a conductive polymer; and tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum or Alq3, a luminescent organic compound, have been separately deposited with minor (in the case of Alq3) or no degradation (for the NPP and polypyrrole) to their optical and electrical properties. The MAPLE process has also been used to deposit discrete thin film micro-arrays of biotinylated bovine serum albumin (BSA). The deposited BSA films, after washing with a blocking protein and fluorescently tagged streptavidin, fluoresce when exposed to UV. This fluorescence indicates that the biochemical specificity of the transferred biotinylated protein is unaffected by the MAPLE process. These results demonstrate that the MAPLE technique can be used for growing thin films of functional polymer and active biomaterials.

  17. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reflects metabolic decompensation in maple syrup urine disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindel, W.; Kugel, H.; Wendel, U.; Roth, B.; Benz-Bohm, G.

    1995-01-01

    Using localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS), accumulation of branchedchain amino acids (BCAA) and their corresponding 2-oxo acids (BCOA) could be non-invasively demonstrated in the brain of a 9-year-old girl suffering from classical maple syrup urine disease. During acute metabolic decompensation, the compounds caused a signal at a chemical shift of 0.9 ppm which was assigned by in vitro experiments. The brain tissue concentration of the sum of BCAA and BCOA could be estimated as 0.9 mmol/l. Localized 1 H-MRS of the brain appears to be suitable for examining patients suffering from maple syrup urine disease in different metabolic states. (orig.)

  18. A Direct Algorithm Maple Package of One-Dimensional Optimal System for Group Invariant Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Han, Zhong; Chen, Yong

    2018-01-01

    To construct the one-dimensional optimal system of finite dimensional Lie algebra automatically, we develop a new Maple package One Optimal System. Meanwhile, we propose a new method to calculate the adjoint transformation matrix and find all the invariants of Lie algebra in spite of Killing form checking possible constraints of each classification. Besides, a new conception called invariance set is raised. Moreover, this Maple package is proved to be more efficiency and precise than before by applying it to some classic examples. Supported by the Global Change Research Program of China under Grant No. 2015CB95390, National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11675054 and 11435005, and Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center of Trustworthy Software for Internet of Things under Grant No. ZF1213

  19. MAPLE fabrication of thin films based on kanamycin functionalized magnetite nanoparticles with anti-pathogenic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grumezescu, Valentina; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Holban, Alina Maria; Mogoantă, Laurenţiu; Mogoşanu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Stănculescu, Anca; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin; Maniu, Horia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2015-05-01

    In this study we aimed to evaluate the biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity of kanamycin functionalized 5 nm-magnetite (Fe3O4@KAN) nanoparticles thin films deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique. A laser deposition regime was established in order to stoichiometrically transfer Fe3O4@KAN thin films on silicone and glass substrates. Morphological and physico-chemical properties of powders and coatings were characterized by XRD, TEM, SEM, AFM and IR microscopy (IRM). Our nanostructured thin films have proved efficiency in the prevention of microbial adhesion and mature biofilms development as a result of antibiotic release in its active form. Furthermore, kanamycin functionalized nanostructures exhibit a good biocompatibility, both in vivo and in vitro, demonstrating their potential for implants application. This is the first study reporting the assessment of the in vivo biocompatibility of a magnetite-antimicrobial thin films produced by MAPLE technique.

  20. Optics learning by computing, with examples using Maple, MathCad, Mathematica, and MATLAB

    CERN Document Server

    Moeller, Karl Dieter

    2007-01-01

    This new edition is intended for a one semester course in optics for juniors and seniors in science and engineering; it uses scripts from Maple, MathCad, Mathematica, and MATLAB provide a simulated laboratory where students can learn by exploration and discovery instead of passive absorption. The text covers all the standard topics of a traditional optics course, including: geometrical optics and aberration, interference and diffraction, coherence, Maxwell's equations, wave guides and propagating modes, blackbody radiation, atomic emission and lasers, optical properties of materials, Fourier transforms and FT spectroscopy, image formation, and holography. It contains step by step derivations of all basic formulas in geometrical, wave and Fourier optics. The basic text is supplemented by over 170 files in Maple, MathCad, Mathematica, and MATLAB (many of which are in the text, each suggesting programs to solve a particular problem, and each linked to a topic in or application of optics. The computer files are d...

  1. Thinning cherry-maple stands in West Virginia: 5-year results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil I. Lamson; H. Clay. Smith; H. Clay. Smith

    1988-01-01

    In northern West Virginia, 60-year-old cherry-maple stands were thinned to 75,60, and 45 percent relative stand density. Analysis of 5-year growth data showed that basal-area growth was not reduced by thinning. Cubic-foot and board-foot volume growth decreased slightly. Individual-tree growth of all trees, dominant/codominant trees, and the 50 largest diameter trees...

  2. Organic/hybrid thin films deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne D.; Ge, Wangyao

    2017-12-01

    Some of the most exciting materials research in the 21st century attempts to resolve the challenge of simulating, synthesizing, and characterizing new materials with unique properties designed from first principles. Achievements in such development for organic and organic-inorganic hybrid materials make them important options for electronic and/or photonic devices because they can impart multi-functionality, flexibility, transparency, and sustainability to emerging systems, such as wearable electronics. Functional organic materials include small molecules, oligomers, and polymers, while hybrid materials include inorganic nanomaterials (such as zero-dimensional quantum dots, one-dimensional carbon nanotubes, or two-dimensional nanosheets) combined with organic matrices. A critically important step to implementing new electronic and photonic devices using such materials is the processing of thin films. While solution-based processing is the most common laboratory technique for organic and hybrid materials, vacuum-based deposition has been critical to the commercialization of organic light emitting diodes based on small molecules, for example. Therefore, it is desirable to explore vacuum-based deposition of organic and hybrid materials that include larger macromolecules, such as polymers. This review article motivates the need for physical vapor deposition of polymeric and hybrid thin films using matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE), which is a type of pulsed laser deposition. This review describes the development of variations in the MAPLE technique, discusses the current understanding of laser-target interactions and growth mechanisms for different MAPLE variations, surveys demonstrations of MAPLE-deposited organic and hybrid materials for electronic and photonic devices, and provides a future outlook for the technique.

  3. A friendly Maple module for one and two group reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Camila O.; Pavan, Guilherme A.; Braga, Kelmo L.; Silva, Marcelo V.; Pereira, P.G.S.; Werner, Rodrigo; Antunes, Valdir; Vellozo, Sergio O.

    2015-01-01

    The well known two energy groups core reactor design model is revisited. A simple and friendly Maple module was built to cover the steps calculations of a plate reactor in five situations: 1. one group bare reactor, 2. two groups bare reactor, 3. one group reflected reactor, 4. 1-1/2 groups reflected reactor and 5. two groups reflected reactor. The results show the convergent path of critical size, as it should be. (author)

  4. Costs of reducing sapling basal area in thinned cherry-maple stands in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary W. Miller

    1984-01-01

    Unmanaged 60-year-old cherry-maple stands in West Virginia were thinned to three levels of stocking according to the Allegheny hardwoods stocking guide. After the merchantable timber was removed, the basal area in saplings was reduced to less than 10 ft² per acre (2.3 m²/ha), as the guide recommends for stands with dense understories. A detailed time...

  5. Cristulariella depraedans as causal agent of leaf spots of maple and other trees and shrubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kowalski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of the first studies in Poland on Cristulariella depraedans, the causal agent of necroses on tree and shrub leaves, are presented. The fungus was recorded on Acer platanoides, A. pseudoplatanus and eight other species of trees and shrubs, including Corylus avellana, Fagus sylvatica, Lonicera xylosteum and Padus avium that were not previously known as hosts of the fungus. The disease symptoms, which depend on the host plant species, the size and number of necrotic lesions on leaves, and the morphological features of the fungal propagules were characterized.

  6. Tailored biodegradable triblock copolymer coatings obtained by MAPLE: a parametric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brajnicov, S.; Neacsu, P.; Moldovan, A.; Marascu, V.; Bonciu, A.; Ion, R.; Dinca, V.; Cimpean, A.; Dinescu, M.

    2017-11-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable coatings with controllable and tailored chemical and physical characteristics (i.e. morphology and roughness) are of great interest in bone related research applications. Within this research direction, in this work, a series of novel biodegradable coatings based on triblock copolymers poly(lactide- co-caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene-glycol)-block-poly(lactide- co-caprolactone) (PLCL-PEG-PLCL) were obtained by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) and their morphological characteristics and roughness were modulated by varying target composition and laser fluence. The coatings were used for preliminary in vitro testing with MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts. It was found that for a specific range of fluences, the main functional groups in the MAPLE-deposited thin films, as determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, are similar to the molecular structures of the initial material. Depending on the deposition parameters, significant changes in morphologies, i.e. material accumulation in the form of droplets, wrinkles, or carpet-like structures were revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy. The optimized coating characteristics were further correlated to MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts response. The ability to control the morphology and to maintain unaltered the chemistry of the deposited material through MAPLE is an important step in creating functional bio-interfaces in the field of biomedical research and tissue engineering.

  7. Building food safety into the company culture: a look at Maple Leaf Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Jespersen; Huffman, Randy

    2014-07-01

    Maple Leaf Foods learned a hard lesson following its tragic 2008 Listeria outbreak that ended up taking the lives of 23 Canadians. The organization has since 2008 transformed its commitment to food safety with a strong drive and manifest in embedding sustainable food safety behaviours into the existing company culture. Its focus on combining technical risk analysis with behavioural sciences has led to the development and deployment of a food safety strategy deeply rooted in the company values and management commitment. Using five tactics described in this article the organization has been on a journey towards food safety transformation through adoption of best practices for people and systems. The approach to food safety has been one where food safety is treated as a non-competitive issue and Maple Leaf Foods have been open to sharing learning about what happened and how the organization will continue to take a leadership position in food safety to continuously raise the bar for food safety across the industry. Maple Leaf Foods has benefited tremendously by learning about best practice from numerous companies in North America and around the world. The authors believe this brief story will bring value to others as we continue to learn and improve.

  8. Pengaruh Model Pembelajaran Investigasi Kelompok berbantuan Perangkat Lunak Maple terhadap Kemampuan Pemecahan Masalah Matematis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putri Wulandari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effect of mathematical problem solving ability of learners who follow the learning by using an instructional model of maple assisted software assisted, with learners who use, study group investigation model, as well as learners who follow the conventional learning model conducted by researchers on participants Students of class X SMK Muhammadiyah 1 Metro. This type of research is a quasi experimental research with posttest only control design design. Hypothesis test using a one-way anava test with unequal cells and obtained the conclusion that the model of group investigation learning is better than an instructional model of maple assisted software group and both models of learning is better than conventional learning model. Based on the results of analysis and discussion of research data obtained that there is an influence on the ability of solving mathematical problems among students in class applying group investigation model assisted maple software, students in class apply only group investigation learning model, and students whose class apply the conventional learning model on the principal Discussion of the matrix.

  9. Exploration of Solvent Effects On Morphology of Polyaniline & Other Polymer Films Deposited Through RIR-MAPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza, Enrique; Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne

    Through the use of aromatic solvents with varying numbers of hydroxyl and methyl moieties, there is an opportunity to positively impact morphology of polymer films deposited through emulsion-based Resonant-Infrared Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (RIR-MAPLE). These more complex solvents may result in smaller emulsified particles within the target, such that smoother films are achieved. We hypothesize the amphiphilic nature of polymers, like doped Polyaniline, requires a solvent with the same solubility to form a stable emulsion target. Control over the emulsion and resulting film properties can yield beneficial device properties, like low contact resistance. Our hypothesis is also tested against hydrophobic polymers, like P3HT, which have been deposited successfully using RIR-MAPLE with chlorobenzenes as the solvent family. We propose that the addition of hydroxyl moieties to the aromatic ring of the solvent should also yield more control over the film morphology. Atomic force microscopy, UV-Vis absorbance, and dark current density-voltage measurements of the resulting films will be reported, as well as a discussion of how these results relate to previously understood paradigms in RIR-MAPLE deposition.

  10. Stripe to slab confinement for the linearization of macromolecules in nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benková, Zuzana; Námer, Pavol; Cifra, Peter

    2015-03-21

    We investigated the recently suggested advantageous analysis of chain linearization experiments with macromolecules confined in a stripe-like channel (Huang and Battacharya, EPL, 2014, 106, 18004) using Monte Carlo simulations. The enhanced chain extension in a stripe, which is due to the significant excluded volume interactions between the monomers in two dimensions, weakens considerably on transition to an experimentally feasible slit-like channel. Based on the chain extension-confinement strength dependence and the structure factor behavior for a chain in a stripe, we infer the excluded volume regime (de Gennes regime) typical for two-dimensional systems. On widening of the stripe in a direction perpendicular to the stripe plane, i.e. on the transition to the slab geometry, the advantageous chain extension decreases and a Gaussian regime is observed for not very long semiflexible chains. The evidence for pseudo-ideality in confined chains is based on four indicators: the extension curves, variation of the extension with the persistence length P, estimated limits for the regimes in the investigated systems, and the structure factor behavior. The slab behavior can be observed when the two-dimensional stripe (originally of a one-monomer thickness) reaches a reduced thickness D larger than approximately D/P ≈ 0.2 in the third dimension. This maximum height of a slab at which the advantage of a stripe is retained is very low and has implications for DNA linearization experiments.

  11. Intervertebral disk disease in 3 striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Maximiljan W; Benato, Livia; Wack, Allison; McDonnell, John J; Schoemaker, Nico J; Westerhof, Ineke; Bronson, Ellen; Gielen, Ingrid; Van Caelenberg, Annemie; Hellebuyck, Tom; Meij, Björn P; De Decker, Steven

    2014-07-01

    To describe diagnostic findings, surgical technique, and outcome in 3 striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) with a history of paraparesis. Case series. Skunks (n = 3) with paraparesis. Neurologic examination revealed upper motor neuron disease (T2-L2) in 2 skunks and lower motor neuron disease (L3-S3) in 1 skunk. Diagnostic imaging included radiography, myelography, CT, and MRI and confirmed intervertebral disk herniation (IVDH) in each skunk. Because initial treatment with pain medication and cage rest did not result in lasting improvement, spinal surgery was performed. Hemilaminectomy (2 skunks) and dorsal laminectomy (1 skunk) was performed with removal of extruded disk material. The skunks improved after surgery but all had minor residual neurologic deficits when examined at various times postoperatively. Thoracolumbar intervertebral disk herniation occurs in skunks, and must be included in the differential diagnosis of paraparesis. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  12. Explanation of the nature of stripe magnetic anomalies without inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikhov, Vjacheslav; Lygin, Ivan; Sokolova, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Several scientists of different branches express doubts on the validity of the Earth's geomagnetic field inversions hypothesis [Vine F.J., Matthews D.H, 1963]. Presently a lot of information allows to link the appearance of stripe magnetic anomalies of both signs with the spreading fracture structure (horizontal segmentation of intrusions and sills, breaks in the strong crust, vertical movements of blocks), remagnetization near the borders of the blocks, hydrothermal activity. Non-inversion mechanism of origin of linear stripe magnetic anomalies in the oceans could be explained as follows. Ascending asthenospheric flows have been enrich with volatile components, become thinner, pressure on the walls of the lithospheric plates grows and part them. When it approaches the surface: - horizontal tensile pressure grows, - lithostatic pressure in the vertical column of rocks decreases, - crust strong upper layer flakes away and begins to move horizontally. It is important that thin magmatic and magnetic layers (further layers) of the newly formed strong upper crust move away from the ridge axis. The structure of such layers forms by horizontal stresses and so consist of the hills and depressions sequences or updiped and downdiped blocks heaped each other. This layer is the main source of the magnetic field and cannot be approximated by a horizontal homogeneous plate as it proved before. In the mid-ocean ridges (MOR) the folding periods of layer depend on its thickness and rigidity and horizontal velocity of spreading. The higher velocity - the longer periods of roughness are and contrary. Same pattern is observed for the stripe magnetic anomalies distribution. The magnetic field of the MOR forms there due to young lava flows which get thermoremanent magnetization according the current direction of geomagnetic field. Partial destruction of the relief, overlaying and creation of the new shapes occur when new magma penetrates the moved magnetic layer. The process entails

  13. Seasonal changes in the degree of symplasmic continuity between the cells of cambial region of Acer pseudoplatanus and Ulmus minor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Sokołowska

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of symplasmic isolation and symplasmic continuity which are functional aspects of cell-to-cell communication, had been studied in cambium of Acer pseudoplatanus and Ulmus minor, with hope that uniqueness of this meristem, exemplified by its morphology and seasonal variations in its activity is also manifested in differences in the efficiency of communication between cambial cells during the year. The degree of symplasmic continuity was estimated by loading the fluorescent symplasmic tracer to the stem and following its distribution in a population of cambial cells observed on tangential, transverse and radial sections. In active cambium the tracer did not enter the rays. This suggested that the ray and fusiform cells, growing and dividing intensively at different rates were specifically isolated from each other. In the state of dormancy the tracer was present also in the rays implying continuity between the two types of cambial cells. Temporal restriction in tracer spreading from secondary xylem to cambial region was observed on transverse sections in both physiological states of the meristem. Higher degree of symplasmic isolation in active cambium is, most probably, associated with functional distinctiveness of ray and fusiform cells. We hypothesize further that the symplasmic continuity in dormant cambium results from the open conformation states of plasmodesmata, because the energy costs of these states are low. It is reasonable strategy when cambial cells do not divide and maintenance of their functional individuality is not necessary.

  14. Characterization of Endophytic Fungi from Acer ginnala Maxim. in an Artificial Plantation: Media Effect and Tissue-Dependent Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yaguang

    2012-01-01

    The community of endophytic fungi associated with Acer ginnala, a common tree in northeastern China, was investigated. Four media, PDA, Czapek’s, WA and Sabouraud’s, were used to inoculate explants from seeds, annual twigs and perennial twigs (xylem and bark). Media strongly affected the isolated species number, but not colonization frequency (CF) or isolation frequency (IF). To investigate media effect further, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was done. As a result, two components accounted for 86.502% of the total variance were extracted. These two components were named as PDA-determined factor (accounted for 45.139% of the total variance) and Czapek’s-determined factor (accounted for 41.363% of the total variance), respectively. This result suggested that only two media, PDA and Czapek’s, could be used instead of all four media in this study without affecting the isolation results significantly. In total, ten taxa were isolated in this study. Alternaria sp., Phomopsis sp., Neurospora sp. and Phoma sp. were dominant endophytes while Pleosporales Incertae Sedis sp., Cladosporium sp., Trichoderma sp. and Epicoccum sp. were rare taxa. Different tissues/organs had different endophyte assemblages. All tissue/organ pairs had low Bray-Curtis indices (endophyte dominance and diversity indices. Seeds had distinct assemblage, lower similarity and similar low diversity indices to annual twigs. These results suggested that tissue type determines the endophyte assemblage while age determines the diversity. PMID:23056451

  15. Rogue wave and a pair of resonance stripe solitons to a reduced (3+1)-dimensional Jimbo-Miwa equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoen; Chen, Yong

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a combination of stripe soliton and lump soliton is discussed to a reduced (3+1)-dimensional Jimbo-Miwa equation, in which such solution gives rise to two different excitation phenomena: fusion and fission. Particularly, a new combination of positive quadratic functions and hyperbolic functions is considered, and then a novel nonlinear phenomenon is explored. Via this method, a pair of resonance kink stripe solitons and rogue wave is studied. Rogue wave is triggered by the interaction between lump soliton and a pair of resonance kink stripe solitons. It is exciting that rogue wave must be attached to the stripe solitons from its appearing to disappearing. The whole progress is completely symmetry, the rogue wave starts itself from one stripe soliton and lose itself in another stripe soliton. The dynamic properties of the interaction between one stripe soliton and lump soliton, rogue wave are discussed by choosing appropriate parameters.

  16. Static and dynamic magnetic properties of stripe-patterned Fe20Ni80 soft magnetic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zengtai; Feng, Hongmei; Cheng, Xiaohong; Xie, Hongkang; Liu, Qingfang; Wang, Jianbo

    2018-01-01

    Stripe-patterned soft magnetic Fe20Ni80 films were fabricated on silicon substrate via radio frequency magnetron sputtering technology. The static and dynamic magnetic properties of samples were measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer and vector network analyzer. The vector network analyzer ferromagnetic resonance technique was used to analyze the experimental results, which showed that damping and in-plane uniaxial anisotropy can be tuned significantly for the samples with various stripe widths from 5 to 20 µm. A stripe-shaped anisotropy model was used to analyze the experimental results, which were in accord with the theoretical predictions. Moreover, the variation of damping was investigated in detail.

  17. Striped Bass Spawning in Non-Estuarine Portions of the Savannah River

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, D.; Paller, M.

    2007-04-17

    Historically, the estuarine portions of the Savannah River have been considered to be the only portion of the river in which significant amounts of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spawning normally occur. A reexamination of data from 1983 through 1985 shows a region between River Kilometers 144 and 253 where significant numbers of striped bass eggs and larvae occur with estimated total egg production near that currently produced in the estuarine reaches. It appears possible that there are two separate spawning populations of striped bass in the Savannah River.

  18. Magnetic stripes and holes: Complex domain patterns in perforated films with weak perpendicular anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Valdés-Bango

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hexagonal antidot arrays have been patterned on weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy NdCo films by e-beam lithography and lift off. Domain structure has been characterized by Magnetic Force Microscopy at remanence. On a local length scale, of the order of stripe pattern period, domain configuration is controlled by edge effects within the stripe pattern: stripe domains meet the hole boundary at either perpendicular or parallel orientation. On a longer length scale, in-plane magnetostatic effects dominate the system: clear superdomains are observed in the patterned film with average in-plane magnetization along the easy directions of the antidot array, correlated over several antidot array cells.

  19. Magnetic stripes and holes: Complex domain patterns in perforated films with weak perpendicular anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Bango, F.; Vélez, M.; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Alameda, J. M.; Martín, J. I.

    2017-05-01

    Hexagonal antidot arrays have been patterned on weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy NdCo films by e-beam lithography and lift off. Domain structure has been characterized by Magnetic Force Microscopy at remanence. On a local length scale, of the order of stripe pattern period, domain configuration is controlled by edge effects within the stripe pattern: stripe domains meet the hole boundary at either perpendicular or parallel orientation. On a longer length scale, in-plane magnetostatic effects dominate the system: clear superdomains are observed in the patterned film with average in-plane magnetization along the easy directions of the antidot array, correlated over several antidot array cells.

  20. The LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). A reliable supply of HEU metal from the United States used in the manufacture of targets for the NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to ultimate use by the physician, has been established using this proven and established method of HEU target irradiation and processing to extract molybdenum-99. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the construction of two MAPLE reactors and a New Processing Facility. The design of the MAPLE facilities was based on an established process developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) - extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a three phase LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. Phase 1, the Initial Feasibility Study, which identified the technical issues to convert the MAPLE reactor targets from HEU to LEU for large scale commercial production was reported on at the RERTR- 2000 conference. The second phase of the LEU Target Development and Conversion Program was developed with extensive consultation and involvement of experts knowledgeable in target development, process system design, enriched uranium conversion chemistry and commercial scale reactor operations and molybdenum production. This paper will provide an overview of the Phase 2 Conversion Development Program, report on progress to date, and further

  1. Sequence analysis of RNA3 of Maize stripe virus associated with stripe disease of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalanghad Puthankalam SRINIVAS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maize stripe virus (MSpV, one of the distinct species of the genus Tenuivirus, has been associated with stripe disease of sorghum in India. In this study, we report the complete sequence analysis of ambisense RNA3 of four MSpV isolates associated with this disease, to confirm its correct identity. The RNA3 of four MSpV-Sorg isolates is 2357 nucleotides in length with two ORFs, one in virion sense (594 nucleotides, non-structural protein 3, NS3 and the other in complementary sense (951 nucleotides, coat protein, CP. The intergenic region between these two ORFs is 653 nucleotides in length, which is rich in U and A residues. The deduced molecular weights of NS3 and CP are ≈22 and ≈34 kDa, respectively. RNA3 has ≈82% sequence identity at nucleotide level with RNA3 of MSpV infecting maize in Florida, USA and Reunion. NS3 and CP ORFs shared ≈94% and ≈95% identities at amino acid levels, respectively with MSpV isolates of maize from Florida and Reunion. The internal non-coding region between two ORFs has 67–68% identity at nucleotide level with the reported MSpV isolates from Florida and Reunion. The sequence identity was more than ≈98% among the four isolates of MSpV-Sorg. Compared to maize-infecting MSpV isolates in USA and Reunion, the sorghum-infecting MSpV isolates in India had more amino acid substitutions in both NS3 and CP. This is the first report of complete sequence analysis of MSpV RNA3 from Asia.

  2. BINERY TECHNOLOGY IN DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION AND COMPUTER SCIENCE STUDY AT THE UNIVERSITIES BASED ON MAPLE-ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasyl Kushnir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The problems of training basics of binary technology creation while teaching differential equations and information-communication technology (ICT based on the Maple-technology are researched. The relevance of the study is resulted from the basic contradiction between the latest opportunities of modern ICT, in particular Maple-technology and traditional methods of teaching mathematical disciplines, including differential equations. It is not enough only occasional applications of Maple-technology while conducting the lessons of mathematics. Maple-technology opportunities allow to teach such differential equations by means of ICT. Thus it is necessary to solve the problem of the organic connection of traditional methods for solving differential equations and possibilities of Maple-technology regarding to the solving the generalization of high level. These actions include the simplification of the expression, solution of algebraic equations and systems, determining of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of matrices, differentiation and integration of scalar functions, vector functions and matrix functions, multiplication of matrix and matrix-vectors, the finding of the inverse matrix, etc. Binary classes are designed to teach mathematics and Computer science at the same time. Therefore, the creation of binary training technology is rather complicated problem. First of all, the teacher needs to develop an algorithm for determining the method for solving differential equations or systems of differential equations. This algorithm must consist of activities that can be automated in Maple-technology. Such actions are of a technical nature and do not have meaning-forming actions of a method of solving problems. Then efforts and attention to the subjects of the teaching will be directed to a method of solving the problem, the establishment of an appropriate algorithm and program in Maple-technology. The creation and set-up of the program algorithm, is carried

  3. Improving sustainability of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) farming in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam through recirculation technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Nhut

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to document improvements in sustainability indicators of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, Sauvage, 1878) production through the application of recirculation and waste treatment techniques. To be able to document improvements in sustainability, in each system

  4. Nonlocal Electron-Phonon Interaction as a Source of Dynamic Charge Stripes in the Cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Falter

    2012-01-01

    small pockets with reduced doping. We argue that the incompressibility of the orbital and simultaneously the compressibility of the orbital in the pseudogap state seem to be required to nucleate dynamic stripes.

  5. Striped Marlin Hardparts and Gonads Collected by the PIRO Hawaii Longline Observer Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Compilation of all samples collected from striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax) collected and brought to the Aiea Heights Research Facility by the PIRO Hawaii Longline...

  6. Complementary Response of Static Spin-Stripe Order and Superconductivity to Nonmagnetic Impurities in Cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guguchia, Z.; Roessli, B.; Khasanov, R.; Amato, A.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.; Uemura, Y. J.; Tranquada, J. M.; Keller, H.; Shengelaya, A.

    2017-08-01

    We report muon-spin rotation and neutron-scattering experiments on nonmagnetic Zn impurity effects on the static spin-stripe order and superconductivity of the La214 cuprates. Remarkably, it was found that, for samples with hole doping x ≈1 /8 , the spin-stripe ordering temperature Tso decreases linearly with Zn doping y and disappears at y ≈4 %, demonstrating a high sensitivity of static spin-stripe order to impurities within a CuO2 plane. Moreover, Tso is suppressed by Zn in the same manner as the superconducting transition temperature Tc for samples near optimal hole doping. This surprisingly similar sensitivity suggests that the spin-stripe order is dependent on intertwining with superconducting correlations.

  7. Evaluation of the effectiveness of centerline rumble stripes on rural roads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report documents the site characteristics, constructability, summary of audibility testing, and maintenance response of centerline rumble : stripes at two locations: US Route 4 in Mendon-Killington and VT Route 105 in Sheldon. : The primary obje...

  8. Histopathologic correlates of radial stripes on MR images in lysosomal storage disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, J.P. van der; Pouwels, P.J.; Kamphorst, W.; Powers, J.M.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Barkhof, F.; Knaap, M.S. van der

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Radially oriented hypointense stripes in hyperintense cerebral white matter are recognized on T2-weighted images of certain lysosomal storage disorders. We compared in vivo and postmortem MR imaging with histopathologic findings in three patients with metachromatic

  9. Yr32 for resistance to stripe (yellow) rust present in the wheat cultivar Carstens V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, L.; Afshari, F.; Christiansen, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Stripe or yellow rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important disease in many wheat-growing regions of the world. A number of major genes providing resistance to stripe rust have been used in breeding, including one gene that is present in the differential tester...... Carstens V. The objective of this study was to locate and map a stripe rust resistance gene transferred from Carstens V to Avocet S and to use molecular tools to locate a number of genes segregating in the cross Savannah/Senat. One of the genes present in Senat was predicted to be a gene that is present...... in Carstens V. For this latter purpose, stripe rust response data from both seedling and field tests on a doubled haploid population consisting of 77 lines were compared to an available molecular map for the same lines using a non-parametric quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. Results obtained in Denmark...

  10. Propagation of dark stripe beams in nonlinear media: Snake instability and creation of optical vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamaev, A.V.; Saffman, M.; Zozulya, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the evolution of (1+1) dimensional dark stripe beams in bulk media with a photorefractive nonlinear response. These beams, including solitary wave solutions, are shown to be unstable with respect to symmetry breaking and formation of structure along the initially homogeneous coordinate....... Experimental results show the complete sequence of events starting from self-focusing of the stripe, its bending due to the snake instability, and subsequent decay into a set of optical vortices....

  11. Topographic Organization of Inferior Olive Projections to the Zebrin II Stripes in the Pigeon Cerebellar Uvula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia Craciun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at mapping the organization of the projections from the inferior olive (IO to the ventral uvula in pigeons. The uvula is part of the vestibulocerebellum (VbC, which is involved in the processing of optic flow resulting from self-motion. As in other areas of the cerebellum, the uvula is organized into sagittal zones, which is apparent with respect to afferent inputs, the projection patterns of Purkinje cell (PC efferents, the response properties of PCs and the expression of molecular markers such as zebrin II (ZII. ZII is heterogeneously expressed such that there are sagittal stripes of PCs with high ZII expression (ZII+, alternating with sagittal stripes of PCs with little to no ZII expression (ZII−. We have previously demonstrated that a ZII+/− stripe pair in the uvula constitutes a functional unit, insofar as the complex spike activity (CSA of all PCs within a ZII+/− stripe pair respond to the same type of optic flow stimuli. In the present study we sought to map the climbing fiber (CF inputs from the IO to the ZII+ and ZII− stripes in the uvula. We injected fluorescent Cholera Toxin B (CTB of different colors (red and green into ZII+ and ZII− bands of functional stripe pair. Injections in the ZII+ and ZII− bands resulted in retrograde labeling of spatially separate, but adjacent regions in the IO. Thus, although a ZII+/− stripe pair represents a functional unit in the pigeon uvula, CF inputs to the ZII+ and ZII− stripes of a unit arise from separate regions of the IO.

  12. Stripe patterns in a granular system induced by slow deformation of its container

    OpenAIRE

    Kitsunezaki, So; Kurumatani, Akemi

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the formation of stripe patterns that appear on the surface of a dry granular system as the container is deformed very slowly. In an experimental study using nearly mono-disperse glass beads, we found that many faults develop beneath t he surface. Our results show that the spacing of stripes is independent of the system size and does not depend significantly on the grain size.

  13. Comparison of the enhancement of plasma glucose levels in type 2 diabetes Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats by oral administration of sucrose or maple syrup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ito, Yoshimasa; Taga, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Maple syrup is used as a premium natural sweeter, and is known for being good for human health. In the present study, we investigate whether maple syrup is suitable as a sweetener in the management of type 2 diabetes using Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats, a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus. OLETF rats develop type 2 diabetes mellitus by 30 weeks of age, and 60-week-old OLETF rats show hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia via pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. The administration of sucrose or maple syrup following an OGT test increased plasma glucose (PG) levels in OLETF rats, but the enhancement in PG following the oral administration of maple syrup was lower than in the case of sucrose administration in both 30- and 60-week-old OLETF rats. Although, the insulin levels in 30-week-old OLETF rats also increased following the oral administration of sucrose or maple syrup, no increase in insulin levels was seen in 60-week-old OLETF rats following the oral administration of either sucrose or maple syrup. No significant differences were observed in insulin levels between sucrose- and maple syrup-administered OLETF rats at either 30 or 60 weeks of age. The present study strongly suggests that the maple syrup may have a lower glycemic index than sucrose, which may help in the prevention of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Characterization of endophytic fungi from Acer ginnala Maxim. in an artificial plantation: media effect and tissue-dependent variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenghui Qi

    Full Text Available The community of endophytic fungi associated with Acer ginnala, a common tree in northeastern China, was investigated. Four media, PDA, Czapek's, WA and Sabouraud's, were used to inoculate explants from seeds, annual twigs and perennial twigs (xylem and bark. Media strongly affected the isolated species number, but not colonization frequency (CF or isolation frequency (IF. To investigate media effect further, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA was done. As a result, two components accounted for 86.502% of the total variance were extracted. These two components were named as PDA-determined factor (accounted for 45.139% of the total variance and Czapek's-determined factor (accounted for 41.363% of the total variance, respectively. This result suggested that only two media, PDA and Czapek's, could be used instead of all four media in this study without affecting the isolation results significantly. In total, ten taxa were isolated in this study. Alternaria sp., Phomopsis sp., Neurospora sp. and Phoma sp. were dominant endophytes while Pleosporales Incertae Sedis sp., Cladosporium sp., Trichoderma sp. and Epicoccum sp. were rare taxa. Different tissues/organs had different endophyte assemblages. All tissue/organ pairs had low Bray-Curtis indices (<0.3 except for bark and annual twigs (0.63. Compared to perennial twigs, annual twigs had a lower taxon number, lower isolate number, lower endophyte dominance and diversity indices. Seeds had distinct assemblage, lower similarity and similar low diversity indices to annual twigs. These results suggested that tissue type determines the endophyte assemblage while age determines the diversity.

  15. Are stripes beneficial? Dazzle camouflage influences perceived speed and hit rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina von Helversen

    Full Text Available In the animal kingdom, camouflage refers to patterns that help potential prey avoid detection. Mostly camouflage is thought of as helping prey blend in with their background. In contrast, disruptive or dazzle patterns protect moving targets and have been suggested as an evolutionary force in shaping the dorsal patterns of animals. Dazzle patterns, such as stripes and zigzags, are thought to reduce the probability with which moving prey will be captured by impairing predators' perception of speed. We investigated how different patterns of stripes (longitudinal-i.e., parallel to movement direction-and vertical-i.e., perpendicular to movement direction affect the probability with which humans can hit moving objects and if differences in hitting probability are caused by a misperception of speed. A first experiment showed that longitudinally striped objects were hit more often than unicolored objects. However, vertically striped objects did not differ from unicolored objects. A second study examining the link between perceived speed and hitting probability showed that longitudinally and vertically striped objects were both perceived as moving faster and were hit more often than unicolored objects. In sum, our results provide evidence that striped patterns disrupt the perception of speed, which in turn influences how often objects are hit. However, the magnitude and the direction of the effects depend on additional factors such as speed and the task setup.

  16. Microbial colonization of biopolymeric thin films containing natural compounds and antibiotics fabricated by MAPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristescu, R., E-mail: rodica.cristescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, PO Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Surdu, A.V.; Grumezescu, A.M.; Oprea, A.E.; Trusca, R.; Vasile, O. [Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Politehnica University of Bucharest, Polizu Street No. 1–7, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Dorcioman, G.; Visan, A.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, PO Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Mihaiescu, D. [Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Department of Organic Chemistry, Politehnica University of Bucharest, 1–7 Polizu Street, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Enculescu, M. [National Institute of Materials Physics, PO Box MG-7, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Chifiriuc, M.C. [Microbiology Immunology Department, Faculty of Biology, Research Institute of the University of Bucharest—ICUB, Research Institute of the University of Bucharest, 77206 Bucharest (Romania); Boehm, R.D.; Narayan, R.J. [Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Chrisey, D.B. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • We deposited thin composite quercetin/polyvinylpyrrolidone/antibiotic films with close resemblance to the starting/drop-cast composition by MAPLE. • Quercetin flavonoid shows an anti-biofilm activity comparable to that of the tested large-spectrum antibiotics (norfloxacin or cefuroxime), especially in case of 72 h biofilms. • These results could account for the possible use of quercetin as an alternative to antibiotics to combat the mature biofilms developed on different substrates. • MAPLE may be used to produce implantable medical devices that provide a relatively long term in vitro stability and resistance to the growth of microorganisms. - Abstract: Although a great number of antibiotics are currently available, they are often rendered ineffective by the ability of microbial strains to develop genetic resistance and to grow in biofilms. Since many antimicrobial agents poorly penetrate biofilms, biofilm-associated infections often require high concentrations of antimicrobial agents for effective treatment. Among the various strategies that may be used to inhibit microbial biofilms, one strategy that has generated significant interest involves the use of bioactive surfaces that are resistant to microbial colonization. In this respect, we used matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) involving a pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) to obtain thin composite biopolymeric films containing natural (flavonoid) or synthetic (antibiotic) compounds as bioactive substances. Chemical composition and film structures were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Films morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The antimicrobial assay of the microbial biofilms formed on these films was assessed by the viable cell counts method. The flavonoid-containing thin films showed increased resistance to microbial colonization

  17. Microbial colonization of biopolymeric thin films containing natural compounds and antibiotics fabricated by MAPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, R.; Surdu, A.V.; Grumezescu, A.M.; Oprea, A.E.; Trusca, R.; Vasile, O.; Dorcioman, G.; Visan, A.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I.N.; Mihaiescu, D.; Enculescu, M.; Chifiriuc, M.C.; Boehm, R.D.; Narayan, R.J.; Chrisey, D.B.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We deposited thin composite quercetin/polyvinylpyrrolidone/antibiotic films with close resemblance to the starting/drop-cast composition by MAPLE. • Quercetin flavonoid shows an anti-biofilm activity comparable to that of the tested large-spectrum antibiotics (norfloxacin or cefuroxime), especially in case of 72 h biofilms. • These results could account for the possible use of quercetin as an alternative to antibiotics to combat the mature biofilms developed on different substrates. • MAPLE may be used to produce implantable medical devices that provide a relatively long term in vitro stability and resistance to the growth of microorganisms. - Abstract: Although a great number of antibiotics are currently available, they are often rendered ineffective by the ability of microbial strains to develop genetic resistance and to grow in biofilms. Since many antimicrobial agents poorly penetrate biofilms, biofilm-associated infections often require high concentrations of antimicrobial agents for effective treatment. Among the various strategies that may be used to inhibit microbial biofilms, one strategy that has generated significant interest involves the use of bioactive surfaces that are resistant to microbial colonization. In this respect, we used matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) involving a pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) to obtain thin composite biopolymeric films containing natural (flavonoid) or synthetic (antibiotic) compounds as bioactive substances. Chemical composition and film structures were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Films morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The antimicrobial assay of the microbial biofilms formed on these films was assessed by the viable cell counts method. The flavonoid-containing thin films showed increased resistance to microbial colonization

  18. Fungi in Ontario maple syrup & some factors that determine the presence of mold damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasz, Samantha L; Miller, J David

    2015-08-17

    Maple syrup is a high value artisanal product produced mainly in Canada and a number of States primarily in the northeast USA. Mold growth (Wallemia sebi) on commercial product was first reported in syrup in 1908. Since then, few data have been published. We conducted a systematic examination for fungi in maple syrup from 68 producers from all of the syrup-producing areas of Ontario, Canada. The mean pH of the samples was pH 6.82, sugar content averaged 68.0±0.89 °Brix and aw averaged 0.841±0.011. Some 23 species of fungi were isolated based on morphology and molecular techniques. The most common fungus in the maple syrup samples was Eurotium herbariorum, followed by Penicillium chrysogenum, Aspergillus penicillioides, Aspergillus restrictus, Aspergillus versicolor and two species of Wallemia. Cladosporium cladosporioides was also common but only recovered when fungi known from high sugar substrates were also present in the mold damaged sample. The rarely reported yeast Citeromyces matrinsis was found in samples from three producers. There appear to be three potential causes for mold damage observed. High aw was associated with about one third of the mold damage. Independently, cold packing (bottling at ~25 °C) was a risk factor. However, syrup of good quality and quite low aw values was contaminated. We hypothesize that sanitation in the bottling line and other aspects of the bottling process may be partial explanations. Clarifying this requires further study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Shelf Life Extension of Maple pea (Pisum sativum var. arvense L. Spread Using Sous Vide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ķirse Asnate

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sous vide packaging on the shelf life of maple pea (Pisum sativum var. arvense L. spread. Pea spreads were made of ground re-hydrated cooked maple peas ‘Bruno’ (Pisum sativum var. arvense L., to which salt, citric acid, oil, and spices were added. Pea spread was stored in polyamide/polyethylene (PA/PE film pouches, packaged in vacuum and hermetically sealed. Pea spread pouches were heat treated in a water bath, then rapidly cooled in ice-water and stored at 4.0 ± 0.5 °C. Sous vide was applied in three different heat regimens +(65.0; 80.0 and 100.0 ± 0.5 °C with cooking times 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min at a constant temperature. Total plate count was determined according to ISO 4833-1:2014 on Plate Count Agar and Enterobacteriaceae determination was performed in accordance with ISO 21528-2:2004 on Violet Red Bile Glucose Agar. Total plate count in pea spread without thermal treatment was 3.41 log10 CFU g−1, in all sous vide packaged pea spread samples microbial contamination was significantly lower (p < 0.05. Enterobacteriaceae were not detected in any samples. It is possible to extend the shelf life of sous vide maple pea spread up to 14 weeks when stored at 4.0 ± 0.5 °C.

  20. Flexible heterostructures based on metal phthalocyanines thin films obtained by MAPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Socol, M., E-mail: cela@infim.ro [National Institute of Material Physics, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-7, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Preda, N.; Rasoga, O. [National Institute of Material Physics, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-7, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Breazu, C. [National Institute of Material Physics, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-7, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-11, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Stavarache, I. [National Institute of Material Physics, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-7, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Stanculescu, F. [University of Bucharest, Faculty of Physics, 405 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-11, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Socol, G.; Gherendi, F.; Grumezescu, V.; Popescu-Pelin, G. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-36, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Girtan, M. [Laboratoire de Photonique d’Angers, Université d’Angers, 2, Bd. Lavoisier, 49045 Angers (France); Stefan, N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, PO Box MG-36, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • Organic heterostructures prepared by MAPLE having a large absorbtion domain. • Photogeneration process is evidenced in the structure with ZnPc:TPyP mixed layer. • An increase in current value is observed in the structure with MgPc:TPyP mixed layer. - Abstract: Heterostructures based on zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc), magnesium phthalocyanine (MgPc) and 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-pyrydil)21H,23H-porphine (TPyP) were deposited on ITO flexible substrates by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique. Organic heterostructures containing (TPyP/ZnPc(MgPc)) stacked or (ZnPc(MgPc):TPyP) mixed layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction-XRD, photoluminescence-PL, UV–vis and FTIR spectroscopy. No chemical decomposition of the initial materials was observed. The investigated structures present a large spectral absorption in the visible range making them suitable for organic photovoltaics applications (OPV). Scanning electron microscopy-SEM and atomic force microscopy-AFM revealed morphologies typical for the films prepared by MAPLE. The current–voltage characteristics of the investigated structures, measured in dark and under light, present an improvement in the current value (∼3 order of magnitude larger) for the structure based on the mixed layer (Al/MgPc:TPyP/ITO) in comparison with the stacked layer (Al/MgPc//TPyP/ITO). A photogeneration process was evidenced in the case of structures Al/ZnPc:TPyP/ITO with mixed layers.

  1. PENGEMBANGAN MODEL PEMBELAJARAN KALKULUS BERBANTUAN KOMPUTER MELALUI PROGRAM MAPLE DI PROGRAM STUDI PENDIDIKAN MATEMATIKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parma Parma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is the renewal of learning methods into calculus courses with modules of computer-assisted learning through maple. The products produced in this study is in the form of teaching materials in the form of calculus course lab guide through maple. With the resulting product of this research will be useful theoretically and practically. Theoretically, it is expected to result in the learning principles that can improve the quality of learning calculus, so as to enrich the theory of the existing learning models.Type of research is the development, which is planned for 2 (two years of activity. The design of the study in the first year needs assessment was conducted to obtain data on the characteristics and the need for calculus learning model that has been done in mathematics education courses Se-Lombok Island. The instruments used are interviews and questionnaires were imposed on the calculus course lecturers, heads of university and college students. The collected data was then analyzed using descriptive analysis techniques.The study design in the second year is the development of research that aims to develop software products in the form of learning calculus with computer-aided learning model through the maple. Learning products developed include: (1. Models and learning strategies; (2. The device in the form of learning, Syllabus, Unit Learning Event, Book Teaching Material Calculus computer-assisted, student worksheet; and (3 test the learning outcomes. Product trials involving calculus course lecturers, heads of university and student mathematics education courses Se-Lombok. The test results were analyzed using descriptive statistics   

  2. [SADE] a Maple package for the symmetry analysis of differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha Filho, Tarcísio M.; Figueiredo, Annibal

    2011-02-01

    We present the package SADE (Symmetry Analysis of Differential Equations) for the determination of symmetries and related properties of systems of differential equations. The main methods implemented are: Lie, nonclassical, Lie-Bäcklund and potential symmetries, invariant solutions, first-integrals, Nöther theorem for both discrete and continuous systems, solution of ordinary differential equations, order and dimension reductions using Lie symmetries, classification of differential equations, Casimir invariants, and the quasi-polynomial formalism for ODE's (previously implemented by the authors in the package QPSI) for the determination of quasi-polynomial first-integrals, Lie symmetries and invariant surfaces. Examples of use of the package are given. Program summaryProgram title: SADE Catalogue identifier: AEHL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 704 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 346 954 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MAPLE 13 and MAPLE 14 Computer: PCs and workstations Operating system: UNIX/LINUX systems and WINDOWS Classification: 4.3 Nature of problem: Determination of analytical properties of systems of differential equations, including symmetry transformations, analytical solutions and conservation laws. Solution method: The package implements in MAPLE some algorithms (discussed in the text) for the study of systems of differential equations. Restrictions: Depends strongly on the system and on the algorithm required. Typical restrictions are related to the solution of a large over-determined system of linear or non-linear differential equations. Running time: Depends strongly on the order, the complexity of the differential

  3. MAPLE deposition of polypyrrole-based composite layers for bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra, E-mail: irina.paun@physics.pub.ro [Faculty of Applied Sciences, University Politehnica of Bucharest, RO-060042 (Romania); National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania); Acasandrei, Adriana Maria [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering IFIN-HH, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania); Luculescu, Catalin Romeo, E-mail: catalin.luculescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania); Mustaciosu, Cosmin Catalin [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering IFIN-HH, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania); Ion, Valentin [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania); Mihailescu, Mona; Vasile, Eugenia [Faculty of Applied Sciences, University Politehnica of Bucharest, RO-060042 (Romania); Dinescu, Maria, E-mail: dinescum@nipne.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest RO-077125 (Romania)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • PPy-based composite layers for bone regeneration were produced by MAPLE. • Conductive PPy nanograins were embedded in insulating PLGA and PU matrices. • PLGA was chosen for providing biodegradability and PU for toughness and elasticity. • The layers conductivities reached 10{sup −2} S/cm for PPy loadings of 1:10 weight ratios. • The layers promoted osteoblast viability, proliferation and mineralization. - Abstract: We report on biocompatible, electrically conductive layers of polypyrrole (PPy)-based composites obtained by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) for envisioned bone regeneration. In order to preserve the conductivity of the PPy while overcoming its lack of biodegradability and low mechanical resilience, conductive PPy nanograins were embedded in two biocompatible, insulating polymeric matrices, i.e. poly(lactic-co-glycolic)acid (PLGA) and polyurethane (PU). PLGA offers the advantage of full biodegradability into non-toxic products, while PU provides toughness and elasticity. The PPy nanograins formed micro-domains and networks within the PLGA and PU matrices, in a compact spatial arrangement favorable for electrical percolation. The proposed approach allowed us to obtain PPy-based composite layers with biologically meaningful conductivities up to 10{sup −2} S/cm for PPy loadings as low as 1:10 weight ratios. Fluorescent staining and viability assays showed that the MG63 osteoblast-like cells cultured on the PPy-based layers deposited by MAPLE were viable and retained their capacity to proliferate. The performance of the proposed method was demonstrated by quantitative evaluation of the calcium phosphate deposits from the cultured cells, as indicative for cell mineralization. Electrical stimulation using 200 μA currents passing through the PPy-based layers, during a time interval of 4 h, enhanced the osteogenesis in the cultured cells. Despite their lowest conductivity, the PPy/PU layers showed the best

  4. Analysis of plastic residues in maple sap and syrup collected from tubing systems sanitized with isopropyl alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Lagacé

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A plastic tubing system operated under vacuum is usually used to collect sap from maple trees during spring time to produce maple syrup. This system is commonly sanitized with isopropyl alcohol (IPA to remove microbial contamination colonizing the system during the sugar season. Questions have been raised whether IPA would contribute to the leaching of plastic residues in maple sap and syrup coming from sanitized systems. First, an extraction experiment was performed in the lab on commercial plastic tubing materials that were submitted to IPA under harsh conditions. The results of the GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of many compounds that served has target for further tests. Secondly, tests were done on early and mid-season maple sap and syrup coming from many sugarbushes using IPA or not to determine potential concentrations of plastic residues. Results obtained from sap and syrup samples showed that no quantifiable (< 1–75 μg/L concentration of any plastic molecules tested was determined in all samples coming from IPA treated or not treated systems. However, some samples of first sap run used as a rinse solution to be discarded before the season start and that were coming from non sanitized or IPA sanitized systems, showed quantifiable concentrations of chemical residue such as ultraviolet protector (octabenzone. These results show that IPA can be safely used to sanitize maple sap collection system in regards to the leaching of plastic residues in maple sap and syrup and reinforced the need to thoroughly rinse the tubing system at the beginning of the season for both sanitized and non sanitized systems.

  5. Structural lability of Barley stripe mosaic virus virions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin V Makarov

    Full Text Available Virions of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV were neglected for more than thirty years after their basic properties were determined. In this paper, the physicochemical characteristics of BSMV virions and virion-derived viral capsid protein (CP were analyzed, namely, the absorption and intrinsic fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, differential scanning calorimetry curves, and size distributions by dynamic laser light scattering. The structural properties of BSMV virions proved to be intermediate between those of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, a well-characterized virus with rigid rod-shaped virions, and flexuous filamentous plant viruses. The BSMV virions were found to be considerably more labile than expected from their rod-like morphology and a distant sequence relation of the BSMV and TMV CPs. The circular dichroism spectra of BSMV CP subunits incorporated into the virions, but not subunits of free CP, demonstrated a significant proportion of beta-structure elements, which were proposed to be localized mostly in the protein regions exposed on the virion outer surface. These beta-structure elements likely formed during virion assembly can comprise the N- and C-terminal protein regions unstructured in the non-virion CP and can mediate inter-subunit interactions. Based on computer-assisted structure modeling, a model for BSMV CP subunit structural fold compliant with the available experimental data was proposed.

  6. Experimental Toxoplasma gondii infection in striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Travis; Dubey, J P

    2008-06-01

    Twenty-three striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) without demonstrable antibodies in 1:25 serum dilution in the modified agglutination test (MAT) were fed sporulated Toxoplasma gondii oocysts (9 skunks) or tissue cysts (10 skunks), and 4 skunks (controls) were not fed T. gondii. Skunks were bled before feeding T. gondii, 10 and 23- 25 days postinoculation (PI). All 9 seronegative skunks fed oocysts died of acute toxoplasmosis between 7 and 19 days PI; T. gondii tachyzoites were found in histological sections of many tissues. One of the 10 skunks fed tissue cysts and 1 of the 4 controls also died of acute toxoplasmosis days 19 and 20 PI; these animals probably became infected by ingestion of unexcysted oocysts passed in feces of skunks fed oocysts that were housed in the same room that skunks fed tissue cysts were housed. The remaining 9 skunks fed tissue cysts and the 3 controls developed only a mild illness and were killed in good health on days 23-25 PI. Antibodies to T. gondii were not found in 1:25 serum dilution of any of the 19 of 23 skunks that were alive on day 10 PI; 12 of 13 skunks had antibodies (MAT 1:80 or higher) on the day they were killed. Antibodies were not found in 1 skunk. Results indicate that skunks can develop IgG antibodies to T. gondii within 3 wk PI, and primary toxoplasmosis can be fatal in skunks.

  7. Evaluation of marked-recapture for estimating striped skunk abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, R.J.; Sargeant, A.B.; Johnson, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    The mark-recapture method for estimating striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) abundance was evaluated by systematically livetrapping a radio-equipped population on a 31.4-km2 study area in North Dakota during late April of 1977 and 1978. The study population was 10 females and 13 males in 1977 and 20 females and 8 males in 1978. Skunks were almost exclusively nocturnal. Males traveled greater nightly distances than females (3.3 vs. 2.6 km, P skunks spent on the study area. Little variation in capture probabilities was found among trap-nights. Skunks exhibited neither trap-proneness nor shyness. Capture rates in 1977 were higher for males than for females; the reverse occurred in 1978. Variation in individual capture rates was indicated among males in 1977 and among females in 1978. Ten estimators produced generally similar results, but all underestimated true population size. Underestimation was a function of the number of untrapped skunks, primarily those that spent limited time on the study area. The jackknife method produced the best estimates of skunk abundance.

  8. Characterizing the Heat Flow from Between Enceladus' Tiger Stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howett, C.; Spencer, J. R.; Verbiscer, A.

    2017-12-01

    Enceladus' heat flow provides a fundamental constraint on its tidal dissipation mechanisms, orbital evolution, and the physical processes that generate the plumes. Determining the total amount of emission is proving difficult, as different techniques produce differing constraints. For example, an initial estimate of this value, 5.8±1.3 GW, was made by Spencer et al. (2006) using Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) 600 to 1100 cm-1 observations, which was refined using 10 to 600 cm-1 CIRS observations to 15.8±3.1 GW by Howett et al. (2011). However, recent reanalysis of high-spatial resolution 10 to 1100 cm-1 CIRS observations of Enceladus' active south polar region conducted by Spencer and Howett gives a heat flow of 4.64±0.23 GW. Whilst all of these heat flow estimates are much larger than those expected in a steady state, 1.1 GW (Meyer and Wisdom, 2007), their obvious discrepancy is a puzzle. In this work we seek to help understand these discrepancies by determining how much endogenic heat flow is coming from the funiscular terrain between Enceladus active tiger stripes.

  9. Strategies for Wheat Stripe Rust Pathogenicity Identified by Transcriptome Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana P Garnica

    Full Text Available Stripe rust caused by the fungus Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst is a major constraint to wheat production worldwide. The molecular events that underlie Pst pathogenicity are largely unknown. Like all rusts, Pst creates a specialized cellular structure within host cells called the haustorium to obtain nutrients from wheat, and to secrete pathogenicity factors called effector proteins. We purified Pst haustoria and used next-generation sequencing platforms to assemble the haustorial transcriptome as well as the transcriptome of germinated spores. 12,282 transcripts were assembled from 454-pyrosequencing data and used as reference for digital gene expression analysis to compare the germinated uredinospores and haustoria transcriptomes based on Illumina RNAseq data. More than 400 genes encoding secreted proteins which constitute candidate effectors were identified from the haustorial transcriptome, with two thirds of these up-regulated in this tissue compared to germinated spores. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the expression patterns of 94 effector candidates. The analysis also revealed that spores rely mainly on stored energy reserves for growth and development, while haustoria take up host nutrients for massive energy production for biosynthetic pathways and the ultimate production of spores. Together, these studies substantially increase our knowledge of potential Pst effectors and provide new insights into the pathogenic strategies of this important organism.

  10. Proposed Robot Scheme with 5 DoF and Dynamic Modelling Using Maple Software

    OpenAIRE

    Shala Ahmet; Bruçi Mirlind

    2017-01-01

    In this paper is represented Dynamical Modelling of robots which is commonly first important step of Modelling, Analysis and Control of robotic systems. This paper is focused on using Denavit-Hartenberg (DH) convention for kinematics and Newton-Euler Formulations for dynamic modelling of 5 DoF - Degree of Freedom of 3D robot. The process of deriving of dynamical model is done using Software Maple. Derived Dynamical Model of 5 DoF robot is converted for Matlab use for future analysis, control ...

  11. PENGARUH MODEL PEMBELAJARAN CREATIVE PROBLEM SOLVING BERBANTUAN MEDIA MAPLE 11 TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN PEMECAHAN MASALAH MATEMATIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhamad Syazali

    2015-06-01

    This research is a quantitative type of experimentation with Quasy Experimental Design. In this study a total population of 121 students with sampling techniques in this study using a sample saturated. Based on calculations, after the hypothesis test using ANOVA obtained  Fobservasi of 10,54. If the value is compared with the value Ftabel of 3,07, it can be concluded that  Fobservasi  ≥ Ftabel, so the hypothesis H0 is rejected and H1 accepted, which means that there are significant CPS assisted learning Maple 11 on problem solving skills of learners.

  12. Management of a Woman With Maple Syrup Urine Disease During Pregnancy, Delivery, and Lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Ann E; Mogensen, Kris M; Rohr, Frances; Erick, Miriam; Neilan, Edward G; Chopra, Sameer; Levy, Harvey L; Gray, Kathryn J; Wilkins-Haug, Louise; Berry, Gerard T

    2015-09-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inherited disorder of metabolism of the branched-chain amino acids leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Complications of acute elevation in plasma leucine include ketoacidosis and risk of cerebral edema, which can be fatal. Individuals with MSUD are at risk of metabolic crisis throughout life, especially at times of physiological stress. We present a case of successful management of a woman with MSUD through pregnancy, delivery, postpartum, and lactation, including nutrition therapy using modified parenteral nutrition. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  13. Proposed Robot Scheme with 5 DoF and Dynamic Modelling Using Maple Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shala Ahmet

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is represented Dynamical Modelling of robots which is commonly first important step of Modelling, Analysis and Control of robotic systems. This paper is focused on using Denavit-Hartenberg (DH convention for kinematics and Newton-Euler Formulations for dynamic modelling of 5 DoF - Degree of Freedom of 3D robot. The process of deriving of dynamical model is done using Software Maple. Derived Dynamical Model of 5 DoF robot is converted for Matlab use for future analysis, control and simulations.

  14. Der Eschen-Ahorn (Acer negundo) am nördlichen Oberrhein : Beitrag zur naturschutzfachlichen Einschätzung eines Neophyten

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgärtel, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Der Eschen-Ahorn (Acer negundo) hat in Mitteleuropa seinen Verbreitungsschwerpunkt an der Donau unterstrom von Wien sowie am Nördlichen Oberrhein, am Mittel- und Niederrhein. A. negundo zeichnet sich durch eine hohe Überflutungstoleranz aus, seine Samen weisen gegenüber den Diasporen von Weiden und Pappeln eine wesentlich längere Keimfähigkeit auf. Dadurch ist die Art in der Lage, offene Standorte in dynamischen Systemen über einen langen Zeitraum zu besiedeln und einheimische Gehölze zu verd...

  15. Deposition of matrix-free fullerene films with improved morphology by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen; Fæster, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Thin films of C60 were deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) from a frozen target of anisole with 0.67 wt% C60. Above a fluence of 1.5 J/cm2 the C60 films are strongly non-uniform and are resulting from transfer of matrix-droplets containing fullerenes. At low fluence...... the fullerene molecules in the films are intact, the surface morphology is substantially improved and there are no measurable traces of the matrix molecules in the film. This may indicate a regime of dominant evaporation at low fluence which merges into the MAPLE regime of liquid ejection of the host matrix...

  16. 78 FR 56192 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Threatened Status for Arabis georgiana (Georgia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... (white ash), Acer barbatum (southern sugar maple), and Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud) with a rich... meadia (shooting star), Solidago auriculata (eared goldenrod), Symphyotrichum shortii (Short's aster...

  17. A New Estimate of the Power Emitted by Enceladus' Tiger Stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John R.; Howett, C. J.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Hurford, T. A.; Segura, M.; Spencer, D. C.

    2013-10-01

    The heat flow from the south pole of Enceladus is a fundamental constraint on its tidal dissipation mechanisms, orbital evolution, and the physical processes that generate the plumes. Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) observations of the integrated 17 - 1000 micron thermal emission from the south pole have produced an estimated heat flow of 15.8 +/- 3.1 GW (Howett et al. 2011). This is a surprisingly high value, about 10x higher than can be generated by steady-state tidal heating (Meyer and Wisdom 2007). The estimate includes all sources of south polar endogenic emission, but is model-dependent because the observation also includes passive re-radiation of absorbed sunlight, which must be modeled and subtracted from the observed radiation. An alternate approach is to use higher spatial resolution CIRS observations in which emission from the tiger stripes, which is certainly endogenic, is spatially separated from emission from the surrounding terrain, which consists of passive emission plus a possible endogenic component. Tiger stripe emission is thus a lower bound on total endogenic emission, and is itself important as a constraint on plume generation and transport. CIRS has several observations of 9 - 16 micron emission with sufficient resolution to resolve the tiger stripes, but only limited resolved observations at longer wavelengths where most heat is radiated. Combining the best resolved data at all wavelengths, with reasonable assumptions about the ratio of long to short wavelength emission, we obtain preliminary estimates of tiger stripe thermal emission of roughly 4.2 GW, to which must be added ~0.5 GW of plume latent heat (Ingersoll and Pankine 2009), for a total tiger stripe power of about 4.7 GW. We are investigating whether the discrepancy between the new tiger stripe heat flow estimate, and the earlier estimate for the entire south pole, results from a large heat flow component that is not from the tiger stripes, or possible inaccuracies in

  18. Introgression of Chromosome 3Ns from Psathyrostachys huashanica into Wheat Specifying Resistance to Stripe Rust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Houyang; Wang, Yi; Fedak, George; Cao, Wenguang; Zhang, Haiqin; Fan, Xing; Sha, Lina; Xu, Lili; Zheng, Youliang; Zhou, Yonghong

    2011-01-01

    Wheat stripe rust is a destructive disease in the cool and humid wheat-growing areas of the world. Finding diverse sources of stripe rust resistance is critical for increasing genetic diversity of resistance for wheat breeding programs. Stripe rust resistance was identified in the alien species Psathyrostachys huashanica, and a wheat- P. huashanica amphiploid line (PHW-SA) with stripe rust resistance was reported previously. In this study, a P. huashanica 3Ns monosomic addition line (PW11) with superior resistance to stripe rust was developed, which was derived from the cross between PHW-SA and wheat J-11. We evaluated the alien introgressions PW11-2, PW11-5 and PW11-8 which were derived from line PW11 for reaction to new Pst race CYR32, and used molecular and cytogenetic tools to characterize these lines. The introgressions were remarkably resistant to CYR32, suggesting that the resistance to stripe rust of the introgressions thus was controlled by gene(s) located on P. huashanica chromosome 3Ns. All derived lines were cytologically stable in term of meiotic chromosome behavior. Two 3Ns chromosomes of P. huashanica were detected in the disomic addition line PW11-2. Chromosomes 1B of substitution line PW11-5 had been replaced by a pair of P. huashanica 3Ns chromosomes. In PW11-8, a small terminal segment from P. huashanica chromosome arm 3NsS was translocated to the terminal region of wheat chromosomes 3BL. Thus, this translocated chromosome is designated T3BL-3NsS. These conclusions were further confirmed by SSR analyses. Two 3Ns-specific markers Xgwm181 and Xgwm161 will be useful to rapidly identify and trace the translocated fragments. These introgressions, which had significant characteristics of resistance to stripe rust, could be utilized as novel germplasms for wheat breeding. PMID:21760909

  19. Meat quality of broiler breast fillets with white striping and woody breast muscle myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tijare, V V; Yang, F L; Kuttappan, V A; Alvarado, C Z; Coon, C N; Owens, C M

    2016-09-01

    The global poultry industry has been faced with emerging broiler breast meat quality issues including conditions known as white striping (WS, white striations parallel to muscle fibers) and woody breast (WB, hardness of raw fillet). Experiments were conducted to evaluate effects of WS and WB hardness on meat quality traits in broiler breast fillets. In Exp. 1, birds were processed at approximately 9 wk of age and deboned at 4 h postmortem (PM); in Exp. 2, birds were processed at approximately 6 and 9 wk of age and deboned at 2 h PM. Fillets were categorized as: normal for both white striping and woody breast (NORM); moderate for white striping and mild for woody breast (MILD); severe for white striping and mild for woody breast (WS); severe for woody breast and moderate for white striping (WB); or severe for both white striping and woody breast (BOTH). Sarcomere length, gravimetric fragmentation index, marination uptake, cook loss, and Meullenet-Owens razor shear energy (MORSE) values on non-marinated and marinated fillets were assessed. Sarcomeres tended to be longer (P = 0.07) with increasing severity of WS and WB in both experiments and gravimetric fragmentation index did not differ (P > 0.05) among categories. Marinade uptake decreased (P  0.05) in non-marinated fillets, the marinated BOTH fillets had greater MORSE values (P  0.05) among categories of marinated breasts. At 9 wk, WS and BOTH were higher (P white striping and woody breast, individually or in combination, negatively impact meat quality, especially water holding capacity attributes such as marinade uptake and cook loss. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  20. Effects of forest fragmentation on the mating system of a cool-temperate heterodichogamous tree Acer mono

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kikuchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollination is a key process for reproduction and gene flow in flowering plants. Anthropogenic habitat fragmentation, however, can disrupt plant–pollinator interactions, and may have a negative impact on the reproductive success and population viability of entomophilous plants. Heterodichogamous plants containing protandrous and protogynous individuals within a population may be susceptible to habitat fragmentation due to a lack of available mating partners. In this study, we investigated the effects of forest fragmentation on the mating system in the heterodichogamous plant Acer mono, a major constituent of cool-temperate deciduous forests in Japan. Microsatellite analysis was applied to 212 adult trees and 17 seed families from continuous and fragmented forests. Dispersal kernel modeling using the neighborhood model indicated that pollen dispersal of A. mono was highly fat-tailed. The estimated parameters of the model suggested that the siring success of a pollen donor increased approximately fivefold, with a 100 cm increase in its diameter at breast height (DBH, and that disassortative mating was five times more frequent than assortative mating. The mating system parameters of each mother tree, outcrossing rate (tm, biparental inbreeding (tm−ts, and paternity correlation (rpm varied among sites and conditions, depending on the local density of potential pollen donors. Whereas A. mono was effectively outcrossed (tm=0.901, tm−ts=0.052, and the number of effective sires was 1/rpm=14.93 in the continuous forest, clumped trees within the fragmented forest showed increased biparental inbreeding and reduced pollen pool genetic diversity (tm=0.959, tm−ts=0.245,1/rpm=1.742 as a result of localized mating combined with spatial genetic structures. In contrast, the isolated trees had a higher selfing rate, but the pollen pool diversity was maintained (tm=0.801, tm−ts=0.022, and 1/rpm=15.63 due to frequent long-distance pollination. These

  1. Lipase immobilization for catalytic applications obtained using fumed silica deposited with MAPLE technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloisi, Francesco; Califano, Valeria; Perretta, Giuseppe; Nasti, Libera; Aronne, Antonio; Di Girolamo, Rocco; Auriemma, Finizia; De Rosa, Claudio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2016-06-01

    Lipases are enzymes used for catalyzing reactions of acylglycerides in biodiesel production from lipids, where enzyme immobilization on a substrate is required. Silica nanoparticles in different morphologies and configurations are currently used in conjunction with biological molecules for drug delivery and catalysis applications, but up to date their use for triglycerides has been limited by the large size of long-chain lipid molecules. Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE), a laser deposition technique using a frozen solution/suspension as a target, is widely used for deposition of biomaterials and other delicate molecules. We have carried out a MAPLE deposition starting from a frozen mixture containing fumed silica and lipase in water. Deposition parameters were chosen in order to increase surface roughness and to promote the formation of complex structures. Both the target (a frozen thickened mixture of nanoparticles/catalyst in water) and the deposition configuration (a small target to substrate distance) are unusual and have been adopted in order to increase surface contact of catalyst and to facilitate access to long-chain molecules. The resulting innovative film morphology (fumed silica/lipase cluster level aggregation) and the lipase functionality (for catalytic biodiesel production) have been studied by FESEM, FTIR and transesterification tests.

  2. Spring leaf phenology and the diurnal temperature range in a temperate maple forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Jonathan M

    2014-03-01

    Spring leaf phenology in temperate climates is intricately related to numerous aspects of the lower atmosphere [e.g., surface energy balance, carbon flux, humidity, the diurnal temperature range (DTR)]. To further develop and improve the accuracy of ecosystem and climate models, additional investigations of the specific nature of the relationships between spring leaf phenology and various ecosystem and climate processes are required in different environments. This study used visual observations of maple leaf phenology, below-canopy light intensities, and micrometeorological data collected during the spring seasons of 2008, 2009, and 2010 to examine the potential influence of leaf phenology on a seasonal transition in the trend of the DTR. The timing of a reversal in the DTR trend occurred near the time when the leaves were unfolding and expanding. The results suggest that the spring decline in the DTR can be attributed primarily to the effect of canopy closure on daily maximum temperature. These findings improve our understanding of the relationship between leaf phenology and the diurnal temperature range in temperate maple forests during the spring. They also demonstrate the necessity of incorporating accurate phenological data into ecosystem and climate models and warrant a careful examination of the extent to which canopy phenology is currently incorporated into existing models.

  3. m-DOPA addition in MAPLE immobilization of lipase for biosensor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Califano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE is a thin film deposition technique which uses a pulsed laser beam impinging, inside a high vacuum chamber, on a frozen target containing the guest molecules in a volatile matrix to induce fast “evaporation” of the matrix, and ejection of the guest molecules. Lipase, an enzyme acting as a catalyst in hydrolysis of lipids, is widely used in biosensors for detection of triglycerides in blood serum. A key action to this purpose is lipase immobilization on a substrate. In a recent paper, we have shown that MAPLE technique is able to deposit lipase on a substrate in an active form. Here we show that addition to the guest/matrix target of a small amount of m-DOPA (3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-2-methyl-l-alanine in order to improve adhesion and protect lipase secondary structure, also allows the lowering the laser pulse energy required for matrix evaporation and therefore the risk of damaging the enzyme.

  4. A Maple Program That Illustrates the Effect of pH on Peptide Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolik, Charles W.

    1998-11-01

    One topic covered early in an introductory biochemistry course is acid-base chemistry and the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation (buffer equation). Using this equation a biochemistry student can determine the partial charges of amino acids in a peptide chain. This is an important concept to master for a student who is learning the structure-function relationship in proteins. The program described in this paper, written for Maple V, release 3 (Waterloo Maple Software, Waterloo, ON, Canada), uses the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation to calculate the partial charges of individual amino acids and the net charge of a peptide over the pH range 0 to 14. The amino acid sequence of a peptide is entered and an animated histogram is displayed illustrating the partial charge of the amino acids over the pH range. A graph showing the net charge of the peptide from pH 0 to 14 is also given. The program has been used with success in an introductory biochemistry course as an in-class demonstration as well as for individual homework assignments. The program is available through the Web page of the Journal of Chemical Education.

  5. WISE-Selected Red and Obscured Quasars in Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glikman, Eilat; Lacy, M.; Urrutia, T.; Urry, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    We identified a sample of 120 dust-reddened quasars identified by matching radio sources detected at 1.4 GHz in the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) survey with the near-infrared Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) catalog and color-selecting red sources. We interpret this population of objects as a tansitional phase in merger-driven quasar/galaxy co-evolution where these reddened quasars are shedding their dusty environment prior to becoming a “normal” blue quasar. When correcting for extinction, we find that red quasars make up ~15%-20% of the luminous quasar population. The radio requirement was intended to avoid contamination from stars, but restricts our sample to radio-detected objects. With the release of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) we can now select all red quasars regardless of their radio propoerties, using infrared colors. We present a pilot survey for heavily obscured luminous quasars using infrared selection from WISE colors in the SDSS Stripe 82. We concentrated on objects with both bright WISE 22 micron fluxes and 2MASS magnitudes that lack spectra in SDSS to identify the brightest (mostly high luminosity) sources that complement the fainter objects in Spitzer-selected samples. Our relatively liberal color selection produced a candidate list of 12 sources. We obtained near-infrared spectra for all using SpeX on IRTF and have spectroscopically confirmed at least five obscured and reddened quasars. We explore the nature of the dusty quasar population and how it depends on redshift, luminosity and radio-loudness.

  6. The ACER pollen and charcoal database: a global resource to document vegetation and fire response to abrupt climate changes during the last glacial period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Goñi, María Fernanda; Desprat, Stéphanie; Daniau, Anne-Laure; Bassinot, Frank C.; Polanco-Martínez, Josué M.; Harrison, Sandy P.; Allen, Judy R. M.; Anderson, R. Scott; Behling, Hermann; Bonnefille, Raymonde; Burjachs, Francesc; Carrión, José S.; Cheddadi, Rachid; Clark, James S.; Combourieu-Nebout, Nathalie; Mustaphi, Colin. J. Courtney; Debusk, Georg H.; Dupont, Lydie M.; Finch, Jemma M.; Fletcher, William J.; Giardini, Marco; González, Catalina; Gosling, William D.; Grigg, Laurie D.; Grimm, Eric C.; Hayashi, Ryoma; Helmens, Karin; Heusser, Linda E.; Hill, Trevor; Hope, Geoffrey; Huntley, Brian; Igarashi, Yaeko; Irino, Tomohisa; Jacobs, Bonnie; Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo; Kawai, Sayuri; Kershaw, A. Peter; Kumon, Fujio; Lawson, Ian T.; Ledru, Marie-Pierre; Lézine, Anne-Marie; Liew, Ping Mei; Magri, Donatella; Marchant, Robert; Margari, Vasiliki; Mayle, Francis E.; Merna McKenzie, G.; Moss, Patrick; Müller, Stefanie; Müller, Ulrich C.; Naughton, Filipa; Newnham, Rewi M.; Oba, Tadamichi; Pérez-Obiol, Ramón; Pini, Roberta; Ravazzi, Cesare; Roucoux, Katy H.; Rucina, Stephen M.; Scott, Louis; Takahara, Hikaru; Tzedakis, Polichronis C.; Urrego, Dunia H.; van Geel, Bas; Valencia, B. Guido; Vandergoes, Marcus J.; Vincens, Annie; Whitlock, Cathy L.; Willard, Debra A.; Yamamoto, Masanobu

    2017-09-01

    Quaternary records provide an opportunity to examine the nature of the vegetation and fire responses to rapid past climate changes comparable in velocity and magnitude to those expected in the 21st-century. The best documented examples of rapid climate change in the past are the warming events associated with the Dansgaard-Oeschger (D-O) cycles during the last glacial period, which were sufficiently large to have had a potential feedback through changes in albedo and greenhouse gas emissions on climate. Previous reconstructions of vegetation and fire changes during the D-O cycles used independently constructed age models, making it difficult to compare the changes between different sites and regions. Here, we present the ACER (Abrupt Climate Changes and Environmental Responses) global database, which includes 93 pollen records from the last glacial period (73-15 ka) with a temporal resolution better than 1000 years, 32 of which also provide charcoal records. A harmonized and consistent chronology based on radiometric dating (14C, 234U/230Th, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), 40Ar/39Ar-dated tephra layers) has been constructed for 86 of these records, although in some cases additional information was derived using common control points based on event stratigraphy. The ACER database compiles metadata including geospatial and dating information, pollen and charcoal counts, and pollen percentages of the characteristic biomes and is archived in Microsoft AccessTM at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.870867.

  7. Zero-bias-field microwave dynamic magnetic properties in trapezoidal ferromagnetic stripe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi, Mei; Wang, Xin; Lu, Haipeng; Zhang, Li; Deng, Longjiang; Xie, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic magnetization response of the axially magnetized ferromagnetic stripe with trapezoidal cross section has been studied. The stripe with beveled edges exhibits multiple resonant peaks modes under an in-plane microwave excitation compared with the single resonant of vertical edge surfaces. The complexity of the observed response is attributed to the spatially nonuniform equilibrium spin distribution at the stripe edges. Micromagnetic simulations identify spin waves as spatially localized mode at the modified edges. This one is also described by effective pinning boundary conditions taking into account finite-size effects, which is related to the exchange interaction, surface anisotropy and dipole–dipole interaction. These results provide detailed insights into the nonlinear spin dynamics of microstructures influenced by the edge properties. - Highlights: • Series of FeCoNbBCu stripes with trapezoidal cross section have been fabricated. • The stripe with beveled edges exhibits multiple resonant peaks modes. • Micromagnetic simulations identify the spatially localized mode. • The effective pinning boundary conditions taking into account finite-size effects.

  8. Development of a Spectrophotometric System to Detect White Striping Physiopathy in Whole Chicken Carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traffano-Schiffo, Maria Victoria; Castro-Giraldez, Marta; Colom, Ricardo J.; Fito, Pedro J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the high intensification of poultry production in recent years, white chicken breast striping is one of the most frequently seen myopathies. The aim of this research was to develop a spectrophotometry-based sensor to detect white striping physiopathy in chicken breast meat in whole chicken carcasses with skin. Experiments were carried out using normal and white striping breasts. In order to understand the mechanism involved in this physiopathy, the different tissues that conform each breast were analyzed. Permittivity in radiofrequency (40 Hz to 1 MHz) was measured using two different sensors; a sensor with two flat plates to analyze the whole breast with skin (NB or WSB), and a two needles with blunt-ended sensor to analyze the different surface tissues of the skinless breast. In the microwave range (500 MHz to 20 GHz), permittivity was measured as just was described for the two needles with blunt-ended sensor. Moreover, fatty acids composition was determined by calorimetry techniques from −40 °C to 50 °C at 5 °C/min after previously freeze-drying the samples, and pH, microstructure by Cryo-SEM and binocular loupe structure were also analyzed. The results showed that the white striping physiopathy consists of the partial breakdown of the pectoral muscle causing an increase in fatty acids, reducing the quality of the meat. It was possible to detect white striping physiopathy in chicken carcasses with skin using spectrophotometry of radiofrequency spectra. PMID:28471378

  9. Analysis of plastic residues in maple sap and syrup collected from tubing systems sanitized with isopropyl alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagacé, Luc; Charron, Carmen; Sadiki, Mustapha

    2017-05-01

    A plastic tubing system operated under vacuum is usually used to collect sap from maple trees during spring time to produce maple syrup. This system is commonly sanitized with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) to remove microbial contamination colonizing the system during the sugar season. Questions have been raised whether IPA would contribute to the leaching of plastic residues in maple sap and syrup coming from sanitized systems. First, an extraction experiment was performed in the lab on commercial plastic tubing materials that were submitted to IPA under harsh conditions. The results of the GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of many compounds that served has target for further tests. Secondly, tests were done on early and mid-season maple sap and syrup coming from many sugarbushes using IPA or not to determine potential concentrations of plastic residues. Results obtained from sap and syrup samples showed that no quantifiable (syrup and reinforced the need to thoroughly rinse the tubing system at the beginning of the season for both sanitized and non sanitized systems.

  10. Selected reaction monitoring as an effective method for reliable quantification of disease-associated proteins in maple syrup urine disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Guerra, Paula; Birkler, Rune I D; Merinero, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    in mitochondria-enriched samples from cultured fibroblasts from healthy individuals and patients with mutations in branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. BCKDH is a mitochondrial multienzyme complex and its defective activity causes maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), a rare but severe inherited...

  11. Magnetic core/shell nanoparticle thin films deposited by MAPLE: Investigation by chemical, morphological and in vitro biological assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristescu, R., E-mail: rodica.cristescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Popescu, C.; Socol, G.; Iordache, I.; Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Mihaiescu, D.E.; Grumezescu, A.M. [Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, ' Politehnica' University of Bucharest, 1-7 Polizu Street, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Balan, A.; Stamatin, I. [University of Bucharest, 3Nano-SAE Research Center, PO Box MG-38, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Chifiriuc, C. [Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest, Microbiology Immunology Department, Aleea Portocalilor 1-3, Sector 5, 77206 Bucharest (Romania); Bleotu, C. [Stefan S. Nicolau Institute of Virology, 285 Mihai Bravu, 030304 Bucharest (Romania); Saviuc, C.; Popa, M. [Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest, Microbiology Immunology Department, Aleea Portocalilor 1-3, Sector 5, 77206 Bucharest (Romania); Chrisey, D.B. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, School of Engineering, Departments of Materials Science and Biomedical Engineering, Troy, 12180-3590, NY (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We deposit magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/oleic acid/cephalosporin nanoparticle thin films by MAPLE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films have a chemical structure similar to the starting material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cephalosporins have an additive effect on the grain size and induce changes in grain shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPLE can be used to develop novel strategies for fighting medical biofilms associated with chronic infections. - Abstract: We report on thin film deposition of nanostructured Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/oleic acid/ceftriaxone and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/oleic acid/cefepime nanoparticles (core/shell/adsorption-shell) were fabricated by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) onto inert substrates. The thin films were characterized by profilometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and investigated by in vitro biological assays. The biological properties tested included the investigation of the microbial viability and the microbial adherence to the glass coverslip nanoparticle film, using Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains with known antibiotic susceptibility behavior, the microbial adherence to the HeLa cells monolayer grown on the nanoparticle pellicle, and the cytotoxicity on eukaryotic cells. The proposed system, based on MAPLE, could be used for the development of novel anti-microbial materials or strategies for fighting pathogenic biofilms frequently implicated in the etiology of biofilm associated chronic infections.

  12. CADDS [Computer-aided Drafting and Design System] brings quality and precision to the Canadian Maple [research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goland, D.

    1989-01-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd (AECL) has found that using the ''intelligent'' Computer-Aided Drafting and Design System (CADDS) helped address design problems at an early stage and led to productivity gains of around 50 per cent. Other bonuses were the quality and precision of the designs and documents produced. Its application to the MAPLE research reactor project is described. (author)

  13. Charged Stripes in the Two-Orbital Hubbard Model for Pnictides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Dao-Xin; Luo, Qinlong; Prestel, Thomas; Daghofer, Maria; Moreo, Adriana; Dagotto, Elbio

    2011-03-01

    The two-orbital Hubbard model for the pnictides is studied numerically in the real-space Hartree-Fock approximation. Upon electron doping, states with a nonuniform ditribution of charge are stabilized. The patterns observed correspond to charge stripes that run perpendicular to the direction of the spin stripes of the undoped magnetic ground state. These striped states are robust when the undoped state has a gap, although with a decreasing amplitude as the gap decreases. Results for hole doping and implications for recent experiments that reported electronic nematic states and spin incommensurability in the pnictides are also discussed. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division (Q.L., A.M., E.D.), the SYSU and NSFC-11074310 (D.X.Y.), the DFG under the Emmy-Noether program (T.P., M.D.).

  14. Lump Solutions and Resonance Stripe Solitons to the (2+1-Dimensional Sawada-Kotera Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the symbolic computation, a class of lump solutions to the (2+1-dimensional Sawada-Kotera (2DSK equation is obtained through making use of its Hirota bilinear form and one positive quadratic function. These solutions contain six parameters, four of which satisfy two determinant conditions to guarantee the analyticity and rational localization of the solutions, while the others are free. Then by adding an exponential function into the original positive quadratic function, the interaction solutions between lump solutions and one stripe soliton are derived. Furthermore, by extending this method to a general combination of positive quadratic function and hyperbolic function, the interaction solutions between lump solutions and a pair of resonance stripe solitons are provided. Some figures are given to demonstrate the dynamical properties of the lump solutions, interaction solutions between lump solutions, and stripe solitons by choosing some special parameters.

  15. Influence of substrate on the magnetic properties of Ni and permalloy sub-micrometric patterned stripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, J G S [Nucleo de Fisica, UFS, 49500-000, Itabaiana, SE (Brazil); Rosa, W O [CSIC, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Nunes, W C [Instituto de Fisica, UFF, Campus da Praia Vermelha, Niteroi, RJ 24.210-340 (Brazil); De Araujo, A E P [Unidade Academica de Garanhuns, UFRPE, CEP 55296-190, Garanhuns-PE (Brazil); Pagliuso, P G; Cescato, L; Knobel, M [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , UNICAMP, CP 6165, Campinas SP (Brazil); Socolovsky, L M [UFG, Instituto de Fisica, BR-74001970 Goiania, GO (Brazil); Zysler, R D, E-mail: jduque@fisica.ufs.b [Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche, RN (Argentina)

    2010-01-20

    The magnetic properties of sub-micrometric magnetic structures of Ni and permalloy (Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}) patterned stripes are studied as functions of temperature. The samples are produced by combining an interferometric lithographic technique with sputtering. At room temperature, ferromagnetic resonance and hysteresis data indicate the existence of an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy in both samples. The NiFe sample has an easy axis along the stripes direction in the entire studied temperature range (2 < T < 300 K). On the other hand, an interesting change in the easy magnetization direction is observed in Ni samples, from parallel to perpendicular to the axis of the stripes, when the temperature is decreased. The results are interpreted in terms of a competition between shape and magnetoelastic anisotropies.

  16. A new species of striped Ichthyophis Fitzinger, 1826 (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Ichthyophiidae) from Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Presswell, Bronwen; Sherratt, Emma; Papadopoulou, Anna; Gower, David J

    2014-04-02

    A new species of striped ichthyophiid caecilian, Ichthyophis multicolor sp. nov., is described on the basis of morphological and molecular data from a sample of 14 specimens from Ayeyarwady Region, Myanmar. The new species resembles superficially the Indian I. tricolor Annandale, 1909 in having both a pale lateral stripe and an adjacent dark ventrolateral stripe contrasting with a paler venter. It differs from I. tricolor in having many more annuli, and in many details of cranial osteology, and molecular data indicate that it is more closely related to other Southeast Asian Ichthyophis than to those of South Asia. The caecilian fauna of Myanmar is exceptionally poorly known but is likely to include chikilids as well as multiple species of Ichthyophis.

  17. Striped states in a many-body system of tilted dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Matthias; Böttcher, Fabian; Langen, Tim; Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Pfau, Tilman

    2017-11-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally the behavior of a strongly confined dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in the regime of quantum-mechanical stabilization by beyond-mean-field effects. Theoretically, we demonstrate that self-organized "striped" ground states are predicted in the framework of the extended Gross-Pitaevskii theory. Experimentally, by tilting the magnetic dipoles we show that self-organized striped states can be generated, likely in their metastable state. Matter-wave interference experiments with multiple stripes show that there is no long-range off-diagonal order (global phase coherence). We outline a parameter range where global phase coherence could be established, thus paving the way towards the observation of supersolid states in this system.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of biopolymeric thin films containing flavonoid natural compounds and silver nanoparticles fabricated by MAPLE: A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristescu, R., E-mail: rodica.cristescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma & Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Visan, A.; Socol, G. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma & Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Surdu, A.V.; Oprea, A.E.; Grumezescu, A.M. [Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Politehnica University of Bucharest, 1–7 Polizu Street, Bucharest, 011061 Romania (Romania); Chifiriuc, M.C. [Microbiology Immunology Department, Faculty of Biology, Research Institute of the University of Bucharest - ICUB, Bucharest, 77206 (Romania); Boehm, R.D.; Yamaleyeva, D.; Taylor, M.; Narayan, R.J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Chrisey, D.B. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA (United States)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • We successfully deposited composite quercetin dehydrate-, resveratrol- and silver nanoparticle-polyvinylpyrrolidone thin coatings with chemical structure close to that of the starting materials by MAPLE. • Thin film morphology studies revealed a uniform surface without aggregates or grains on the top of the surface. • MAPLE-deposited thin films exhibited antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. • We demonstrated the potential use of these hybrid systems and MAPLE deposition method for the development of new harmless, ecological antimicrobial strategies. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate the interactions between microorganisms, including the planktonic and adherent organisms, and biopolymer (polyvinylpyrrolidone), flavonoid (quercetin dihydrate and resveratrol)-biopolymer, and silver nanoparticles-biopolymer composite thin films that were deposited using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A pulsed KrF{sup *} excimer laser source was used to deposit the aforementioned composite thin films, which were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), infrared microscopy (IRM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The antimicrobial activity of thin films was quantified using an adapted disk diffusion assay against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains. FT-IR, AFM and SEM studies confirmed that MAPLE may be used to fabricate thin films with chemical properties corresponding to the input materials as well as surface properties that are appropriate for medical use. The silver nanoparticles and flavonoid-containing films exhibited an antimicrobial activity both against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains demonstrating the potential use of these hybrid systems for the development of novel antimicrobial strategies.

  19. An update on the LEU target development and conversion program for the MAPLE reactors and new processing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoske, G.R.; Eng, B.Sc; Eng, P.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the production of molybdenum-99 in the NRU research reactors at Chalk River, Canada, has been extracted from reactor targets employing highly enriched uranium (HEU). A reliable supply of HEU metal from the United States used in the manufacture of targets for the NRU research reactor has been a key factor to enable MDS Nordion to develop a secure supply of medical isotopes for the international nuclear medicine community. The molybdenum extraction process from HEU targets provides predictable, consistent yields for our high-volume molybdenum production process. Each link of the isotope supply chain, from isotope production to ultimate use by the physician, has been established using this proven and established method of HEU target irradiation and processing to extract molybdenum-99. To ensure a continued reliable and timely supply of medical isotopes, MDS Nordion is completing the construction of two MAPLE reactors and a New Processing Facility. The design of the MAPLE facilities was based on an established process developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL)-extraction of isotopes from HEU target material. However, in concert with the global trend to utilize low enriched uranium (LEU) in research reactors, MDS Nordion has launched a three phase LEU Target Development and Conversion Program for the MAPLE facilities. Phase 1, the Initial Feasibility Study, which identified the technical issues to convert the MAPLE reactor targets from HEU to LEU for large scale commercial production was reported on at the RERTR-2000 conference. The second phase of the LEU Target Development and Conversion Program was developed with extensive consultation and involvement of experts knowledgeable in target development, process system design, enriched uranium conversion chemistry and commercial scale reactor operations and molybdenum production. This paper will provide an overview of the Phase 2 Conversion Development Program, report on progress to date, and further

  20. Effect of white striping on chemical composition and nutritional value of chicken breast meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Petracci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available White striping defect (appearance of white striations parallel to muscle fiber on surface of breast is considered an emerging issue in chicken breast meat which is related to increasing growth rate of modern hybrid birds. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of white striping on chemical composition and nutritional value of chicken breast meat. During three replications, a total of 108 Pectoralis major muscles representing three degrees of white striping (absence=normal; presence classified in 2 levels as moderate or severe were selected to determine proximate composition (moisture, protein, lipid and collagen as well as sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein profile by sodium dodecyl sulphatepolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. The results showed that both severe and moderate white-striped fillets had higher fat content (2.53 vs 1.46 vs 0.78%; P<0.001, lower protein level (20.9 vs 22.2 vs 22.9%; P<0.001, decreased quality of protein as proven by higher collagen content (1.30 vs 1.37 vs 1.43%; P<0.001, and different pattern on myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic fractions when compared to normal fillets. Moreover, severe white-striped fillets exhibited higher energy content (450.7 vs 421.1 kJ/100g; P<0.01 with respect to normal meat. In conclusion, there was a large worsening of nutritional value of chicken breast meat following occurrence of white striping and this might impair consumer attitude towards poultry meat.

  1. Determination of the quality of stripe-marked and cracked eggs during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chi Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Stripe marks, which occasionally occur on the shell, do not cause breakage to the shell and shell membranes of eggs. This study investigated the quality of intact eggs (IEs, minor stripe-marked eggs (MEs, severe stripe-marked eggs (SEs, and cracked eggs (CEs during 3-week storage at 25°C. Methods Shell eggs were collected the day after being laid and were washed. Among them, eggs without any visual cracks or stripe marks on the shells were evaluated as IEs by the plant employees using candling in a darkened egg storage room; the remaining eggs exhibited some eggshell defects. At day 3, the eggs were further categorized into IEs, MEs, SEs, CEs, and broken eggs (BEs on the basis of the description given. Except BEs, which were discarded, the remaining eggs were stored at 25°C (approximate relative humidity 50% and then analyzed. Results Stripe marks were observed primarily within the first 3 days after washing. At day 3, CEs had significantly (p<0.05 lower Haugh unit values, but all eggs had grades AA or A, according to the United States Department of Agriculture standard. As storage time increased, differences in egg quality between groups were more obvious. IEs had the highest eggshell breaking strength. During storage, the total plate counts and pathogens, namely Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella spp., were not detectable in the internal content of IEs and SEs. Conclusion In conclusion, cracks degraded egg quality severely and minor stripe marks only slightly influenced the egg quality.

  2. Effect of white striping on turkey breast meat quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soglia, F; Baldi, G; Laghi, L; Mudalal, S; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2018-01-08

    In the past decades, the intense selection practices carried out in order to develop fast growing and high breast-yield turkey hybrids profoundly modified the muscle physiology leading to the development of growth-related alterations and muscular abnormalities. White striations of variable thickness have been particularly observed on the ventral surface of Pectoralis major muscle belonging from heavy male turkeys since several years. However, although the effects of white striping (WS) have been extensively studied on broilers, this condition was not considered as a main quality issue by both turkey producers and meat industry. Thus, this study aimed at evaluating whether the occurrence of WS in heavy male turkeys affects the quality traits and technological properties of meat to the same extent previously observed for broilers. In two replications, 72 Pectoralis major muscles were classified as: normal (NORM), moderate WS (MOD) and severe WS (SEV) cases. The whole muscle was weighed and cut in order to assess colour, ultimate pH, water holding (drip and cooking losses) and binding (marinade uptake) capacities, NMR relaxation properties, shear force as well as proximate composition of meat. The Pectoralis major muscles affected by WS (both moderate and severe cases) exhibited a one-fifth increased weight in comparison with their NORM counterpart. However, the occurrence of WS only partially affected the proximate composition of the meat. In detail, although moisture, collagen and protein contents did not differ among the groups, if compared with NORM, higher lipid levels were found in SEV muscles, whereas MOD had intermediate values. On the other hand, both MOD and SEV exhibited lower ash content. Despite these variations in proximate composition, both water holding and binding capacities of turkey breast meat were not affected by WS. Indeed, quality traits of raw (pH, colour, cooking losses and shear force) and marinated (uptake, cooking losses and shear force

  3. Discrete modes of a ferromagnetic stripe dipolarly coupled to a ferromagnetic film: a Brillouin light scattering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubbiotti, G; Tacchi, S; Carlotti, G; Ono, T; Roussigne, Y; Tiberkevich, V S; Slavin, A N

    2007-01-01

    Spin wave excitations in a magnetic structure consisting of a series of long permalloy stripes of a rectangular cross section magnetized along the stripe length and situated above a continuous permalloy film are studied both experimentally and theoretically. Stripes and continuous film are coupled by dipole-dipole interaction across 10 nm thick Cu spacers. Experimental measurements made using the Brillouin light scattering technique (with the light wavevector oriented along the stripe width) provide evidence for one dispersive spin wave mode associated with the continuous film and several discrete non-dispersive modes resonating within the finite width of the stripes. To interpret the experimental spectra, an analytic theory based on the spin wave formalism for finite-width magnetic stripes has been developed, achieving a good qualitative and partly quantitative description of the experimentally observed spin wave spectrum of the system. In particular, it is explained why the presence of a continuous magnetic film near the magnetic stripe leads to a substantial decrease of the frequencies of the discrete dipolar spin wave modes localized within the stripes. A more quantitative description of the measured frequencies and of the spatial profiles of the spin wave eigenmodes has been obtained by numerical calculations performed using a finite element method

  4. Checkerboard local density of states in striped domains pinned by vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, B.M.; Hedegård, P.; Bruus, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    We discuss recent elastic neutron scattering and scanning tunneling experiments on high-T-c cuprates exposed to an applied magnetic field. Antiferromagnetic vortex cores operating as pinning centers for surrounding stripes is qualitatively consistent with the neutron data provided the stripes have...... the antiphase modulation. Within a Green's function formalism we study the low energy electronic structure around the vortices and find that besides the dispersive quantum interference there exists a non-dispersive checkerboard interference pattern consistent with recent scanning tunneling measurements. Thus...

  5. Magnetic anisotropy of two-dimensional nanostructures: Transition-metal triangular stripes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorantes-Davila, J.; Villasenor-Gonzalez, P.; Pastor, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of one-dimensional stripes having infinite length and triangular lateral structure are investigated in the framework of a self-consistent tight-binding method. One observes discontinuous changes in the easy magnetization direction along the crossover from one to two dimensions. The MAE oscillates as a function of stripe width and depends strongly on the considered transition metal (TM). The MAE of the two-leg ladder is strongly reduced as compared to that of the monoatomic chain and the convergence to the two-dimensional limit is rather slow

  6. Magnetic anisotropy of two-dimensional nanostructures: Transition-metal triangular stripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorantes-Davila, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: jdd@ifisica.uaslp.mx; Villasenor-Gonzalez, P. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Pastor, G.M. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    2005-07-15

    The magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of one-dimensional stripes having infinite length and triangular lateral structure are investigated in the framework of a self-consistent tight-binding method. One observes discontinuous changes in the easy magnetization direction along the crossover from one to two dimensions. The MAE oscillates as a function of stripe width and depends strongly on the considered transition metal (TM). The MAE of the two-leg ladder is strongly reduced as compared to that of the monoatomic chain and the convergence to the two-dimensional limit is rather slow.

  7. Feshbach shape resonance for high Tc pairing in superlattices of quantum stripes and quantum wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bianconi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   The Feshbach shape resonances in the interband pairing in superconducting superlattices of quantum wells or quantum stripes is shown to provide the mechanism for high Tc superconductivity. This mechanism provides the Tc amplification driven by the architecture of material: superlattices of quantum wells (intercalated graphite or diborides and superlattices of quantum stripes (doped high Tc cuprate perovskites where the chemical potential is tuned to a Van Hove-Lifshitz singularity (vHs in the electronic energy spectrum of the superlattice associated with the change of the Fermi surface dimensionality in one of the subbands.

  8. Partial resistance to stripe rust and its effect on sustainability of wheat yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qamar, M.; Din, R.U.; Gardazi, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    Stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici) poses a serious threat to wheat production in cooler areas of Pakistan. The 70% area of wheat in Pakistan is prone to stripe rust disease. It can cause 10-17% yield losses if susceptible cultivars are planted under favorable conditions. Level of partial plant resistance in bread wheat and its impact on sustainable wheat production was studied at the National Agricultural Research Centre, Islamabad under natural conditions in the field. Eleven Pakistani commercial wheat cultivars/advance lines including check (Inqalab 91) were assessed for the level of partial resistance against stripe rust using Area Under the Disease Progress Curve (AUDPC), disease severity (DS) and epidemic growth rate in comparison with wheat cultivar, Inqalab 91. During 2007 cropping season, natural epidemic was developed and relative AUDPC was recorded from 0 to 100% whereas the 2008 cropping season was dry and no stripe rust appeared. Two advanced lines (NR 268 and NR 285) showed the infection type (IT) less than 7 (incompatible reaction) to the mixture of prevailing stripe rust inoculums. Very low level of DS and AUDPC were recorded in the remaining cultivars/lines indicating a high level of partial resistance to stripe rust compared to the susceptible check cultivar, Inqalab 91. Among eight cultivars/lines that showed compatible type of reaction (IT greater then equal to 7), one was resistant (relative AUDPC = 20% of Inqalab 91) and six showed very high resistance levels (relative AUDPC greater then equal to 5%). Maximum level of resistance (relative AUDPC = 0.1%) was observed in advanced line, NR 271. The wheat cultivars/lines that showed a slow disease development (low DS and AUDPC), could be considered as -1 partially resistant for stripe rust infection. The yield (2178 kg ha) of susceptible check cultivar Inqalab-91 during 2007 was reduced to 45% as -1 compared to its yield (3945 kg ha) in epidemic free year (2008). Thus the use

  9. Evaluation of thermal striping risks: Limitation of cracks initiation and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drubay, B.; Acker, D.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal striping is the effect of a rapid random oscillation of surface temperature inducing a corresponding fluctuation of surface strains. It occurs on components situated in the mixing zone of coolant streams of different temperatures and is characterised by large numbers of strain cycles having the potential to add to the fatigue damage produced by strain cycles associated with all other plant operating events. The purpose of this paper is to describe the R and D works performed in the frame of the European Fast Reactor project between 1985 and 1992 on the thermal striping: experimental works and validation of assessment methodology. (author)

  10. Sonographic anatomy of the newborn hip and high-resolution US equipments: internal capsular stripe and perichondral gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortore, P.; Fodor, G.; Psenner, F.; Stuefert, S.; Scherer, M.

    1991-01-01

    The use of high-resolution US equipments in the examination of the newborn hip allowed the evaluation of a thin echogenic stripe (the internal capsule stripe), which defines laterally the acetabular hyaline cartilage. By means of an anatomo-histological preparation the echogenic stripe can be related to either the capsular circular fibres or the interface between the latter and the hyaline cartilage. The internal capsular stripe, together with the echogenic synovial stripe, precisely delimit the whole acetabular hyaline cartilage. Further-more, in many babies high-resolution US sometimes fails to demonstrate Graft's 'perichondral gap', so that an accurate anatomic knowledge of the hip becomes necessary in the evaluation of acetabular labrum

  11. [GENETIC AND METABOLIC URGENCIES IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT: MAPLE SYRUP URINE DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez Rojas, Paola Liliana; Suarez Obando, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is a hereditary disorder of branched chain amino/keto acid metabolism, caused by a decreased activity of the branched-chain alpha- ketoacid dehydrogenase complex (BCKAD), which leads to abnormal elevated plasma concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) clinically manifested as a heavy burden for Central Nervous system. The toxic accumulation of substrates promotes the development of a severe and rapidly progressive neonatal encephalopathy if treatment is not immediately given. This disorder has a specific medical management in acute phase in order to minimize mortality and morbidity. For all those reasons, it is important to include the MSUD as a possible diagnosis in a encephalopathic newborn. We present a colombian newborn with classical MSUD with fatal outcome as an example of metabolic emergency and a differential diagnosis in the encephalopathic newborn. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. The management of pregnancy in maple syrup urine disease: experience with two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchan, Michel; Westbrook, M; Wilcox, G; Cutler, R; Smith, N; Penman, R; Strauss, B J G; Wilcken, B

    2013-01-01

    We describe the management and outcomes of pregnancy in two women affected with Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). Both patients had classical disease diagnosed in the newborn period and were managed with low-protein diets and supplements, although compliance was moderately poor throughout life. Both pregnancies were complicated by poor compliance and one patient had a metabolic decompensation, which included seizures and profound encephalopathy, at the end of the first trimester. Peri-partum management required a coordinated team approach including a high-calorie and low-protein diet. Both patients had elevated leucine levels in the post-partum period - one due to mastitis and the other due to poor dietary and supplement compliance combined with uterine involution. On later review, leucine had returned to pre-pregnancy levels. Both infants were unaffected and have made normal developmental progress in the subsequent 1 to 2 years.

  13. Anti-reflective polymer-nanocomposite coatings fabricated by RIR-MAPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaravalu, S.; Mayo, D. C.; Park, H. K.; Schriver, K. E.; Haglund, R. F.

    2013-02-01

    There is increasing demand for functional polymeric optical coatings for plastic substrates. In the case of anti-reflective (AR) coatings, this is challenging because polymers exhibit a relatively narrow range of refractive indices. We synthesized a four-layer AR stack using hybrid polymer:nanoparticle materials deposited by resonant infrared matrixassisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE). An Er:YAG laser ablated frozen solutions of a high-index composite containing TiO2 nanoparticles and PMMA, alternating with a low-index solution of PMMA. The optimized AR coatings, with thicknesses calculated using commercial software, yielded a coating for polycarbonate with relative transmission over 94%, scattering less than 5% and a reflection coefficient below 0.8% across the visible range.

  14. Characterization of lysozyme films produced by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purice, Andreea; Schou, Jorgen; Kingshott, Peter; Pryds, Nini; Dinescu, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Thin lysozyme films of thickness up to more than 100 nm have been produced in a dry environment by MAPLE (matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation) from a water ice matrix. Analysis of the films demonstrates that a significant part of the lysozyme molecules is transferred to the substrate without decomposition and that the protein activity is preserved. The film deposition rate for 1 wt% lysozyme has a maximum at 2 J/cm 2 of about 1 ng/cm 2 per laser shot. During the film production the deposition rate is constant without any sign of depletion or accumulation effects in the water ice target or in the growing film. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images demonstrate that the silicon substrate is completely covered by lysozyme films thicker than 100 nm. Deposition was also made from a target with pressed (100%) solid lysozyme, but the deposition was difficult to handle and with a much slower rate than that from a water ice matrix

  15. Two consecutive partial liver transplants in a patient with Classic Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.L. Chin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Maple syrup urine disease is caused by a deficiency in the branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKAD complex. This results in the accumulation of branched chain amino acids (BCAA and branched chain ketoacids in the body. Even when aggressively treated with dietary restriction of BCAA, patients experience long term cognitive, neurological and psychosocial problems. Liver transplantation from deceased donors has been shown to be an effective modality in introducing adequate BCKAD activity, attaining a metabolic cure for patients. Here, we report the clinical course of the first known patient with classic MSUD who received two consecutive partial liver grafts from two different living non-carrier donors and his five year outcome posttransplant. We also show that despite the failure of the first liver graft, and initial acute cellular rejection of the second liver graft in our patient, his metabolic control remained good without metabolic decompensation.

  16. High laser-fluence deposition of organic materials in water ice matrices by ''MAPLE''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo Toftmann; Rodrigo, K.; Schou, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) is a deposition technique for organic material. Water ice was used as a matrix for the biotechnologically important guest material, polyethylene glycol (PEG), for concentrations from 0.5 to 4 wt.%. The target was irradiated with 6 ns laser pulses...... at 355 nm at a fluence of 2.5-12 J/cm(2). Even at this high fluence, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicates a chemical structure of the deposit close to that of the un-irradiated PEG. Matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization (MALDI) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) show...... that the mass distribution of the deposited PEG is similar to that of the starting material. Optical pictures of the films show particle structures of PEG of a size up to 5-10 mu m. The deposition rate measured with a quartz crystal microbalance is typically of the order of 1 ng/ (cm(2) shot). (c) 2005 Elsevier...

  17. Contribution of the diffusion-weighted MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of encephalopathy caused by maple syrup urine disease in a full-term newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraz-Filho, Jose Roberto Lopes; Floriano, Valdeci Helio; Quirici, Marcelo Bianco; Souza, Antonio Soares; Albuquerque, Regina Pires de

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to show conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings of the different evolutionary phases in MSUD (Maple syrup urine disease) of a newborn that evolved with brain white matter lesions (author)

  18. Contribution of the diffusion-weighted MRI in the diagnosis and follow-up of encephalopathy caused by maple syrup urine disease in a full-term newborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraz-Filho, Jose Roberto Lopes; Floriano, Valdeci Helio; Quirici, Marcelo Bianco; Souza, Antonio Soares [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia; Albuquerque, Regina Pires de [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Pediatria

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this case report is to show conventional MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) findings of the different evolutionary phases in MSUD (Maple syrup urine disease) of a newborn that evolved with brain white matter lesions (author)

  19. PSsolver: A Maple implementation to solve first order ordinary differential equations with Liouvillian solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellar, J.; Duarte, L. G. S.; da Mota, L. A. C. P.

    2012-10-01

    We present a set of software routines in Maple 14 for solving first order ordinary differential equations (FOODEs). The package implements the Prelle-Singer method in its original form together with its extension to include integrating factors in terms of elementary functions. The package also presents a theoretical extension to deal with all FOODEs presenting Liouvillian solutions. Applications to ODEs taken from standard references show that it solves ODEs which remain unsolved using Maple's standard ODE solution routines. New version program summary Program title: PSsolver Catalogue identifier: ADPR_v2_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADPR_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2302 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 31962 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Maple 14 (also tested using Maple 15 and 16). Computer: Intel Pentium Processor P6000, 1.86 GHz. Operating system: Windows 7. RAM: 4 GB DDR3 Memory Classification: 4.3. Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADPR_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 144 (2002) 46 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Symbolic solution of first order differential equations via the Prelle-Singer method. Solution method: The method of solution is based on the standard Prelle-Singer method, with extensions for the cases when the FOODE contains elementary functions. Additionally, an extension of our own which solves FOODEs with Liouvillian solutions is included. Reasons for new version: The program was not running anymore due to changes in the latest versions of Maple. Additionally, we corrected/changed some bugs/details that were hampering the smoother functioning of the routines. Summary

  20. Inheritance of trunk striping in the Sumatran tiger barb, Barbus tetrazona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, J S

    1985-01-01

    The Sumatran tiger barb, Barbus tetrazona, exhibits three truck (pelvic) striping phenotypes: complete, incomplete, and half banded. Segregation patterns observed in the progeny from 12 different matings indicate that the inheritance of these phenotypes is controlled by two autosomal gene loci acting additively, with complete dominance at each locus.

  1. Helminths of sympatric striped, hog-nosed, and spotted skunks in west-central Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiswenter, Sean A; Pence, Danny B; Dowler, Robert C

    2006-07-01

    Twenty-eight hog-nosed skunks (Conepatus leuconotus), 23 striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), and nine spotted skunks (Spilogale gracilis) from an area of sympatry in west-central Texas were examined for helminth parasites. Shared helminth species among all three host species were one nematode (Physaloptera maxillaris), two acanthocephalans (Pachysentis canicola, Macracanthorhynchus ingens), and one cestode (Mathevotaenia mephitis). Two nematodes (Gongylonema sp. and Filaria taxidaea) occurred in both the striped and hog-nosed skunks. One nematode (Filaroides milksi) and one acanthocephalan (Oncicola canis) were collected only from C. leuconotus. The most common helminth infections for striped and hog-nosed skunks were P. maxillaris and P. canicola. Helminth species richness was highest in hog-nosed skunks, but striped skunks had the highest prevalences and intensities of all the common helminth species. The helminth fauna of spotted skunks was markedly depauperate in terms of species richness and helminth abundance compared to the other two host species. Differences in helminth communities across these three sympatric skunks may be related to differences in their relative abundance, behavior, food habits, and geographic range.

  2. Improving sustainability of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) farming in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam through recirculation technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Nhut

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to document improvements in sustainability indicators of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, Sauvage, 1878) production through the application of recirculation and waste treatment techniques. To be able to document improvements in sustainability, in each

  3. 3D Measurement Technology by Structured Light Using Stripe-Edge-Based Gray Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H B; Chen, Y; Wu, M Y; Guan, C R; Yu, X Y

    2006-01-01

    The key problem of 3D vision measurement using triangle method based on structured light is to acquiring projecting angle of projecting light accurately. In order to acquire projecting angle thereby determine the corresponding relationship between sampling point and image point, method for encoding and decoding structured light based on stripe edge of Gray code is presented. The method encoded with Gray code stripe and decoded with stripe edge acquired by sub-pixel technology instead of pixel centre, so latter one-bit decoding error was removed. Accuracy of image sampling point location and correspondence between image sampling point and object sampling point achieved sub-pixel degree. In addition, measurement error caused by dividing projecting angle irregularly by even-width encoding stripe was analysed and corrected. Encoding and decoding principle and decoding equations were described. Finally, 3dsmax and Matlab software were used to simulate measurement system and reconstruct measured surface. Indicated by experimental results, measurement error is about 0.05%

  4. Hypoxia tolerance and partitioning of bimodal respiration in the striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Wang, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Air-breathing fish are common in the tropics, and their importance in Asian aquaculture is increasing, but the respiratory physiology of some of the key species such as the striped catfish, Pangasianodon hypophthalmus Sauvage 1878 is unstudied. P. hypophthalmus is an interesting species as it app...

  5. The effect of freezing rate on the quality of Striped Bass Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several studies have been conducted in an attempt to determine the optimal freezing rate for the cryopreservation of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spermatozoa. In this study, the effects of freezing rate (-10, -15, -20 and -40oC/minute) on gamete quality including, viability, motion characteristi...

  6. Variation in the timing of reproduction of the four-striped field mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We used the four-striped field mouse, Rhabdomys pumilio (Sparrmann, 1784), to test the hypothesis that reproduction in a small, short-lived mammal will be opportunistic, characterized by temporal and spatial variation in the timing of events, and only be inhibited under harsh and predictable winter conditions. Field mice ...

  7. Genetic analysis and location of gene for resistance to stripe rust in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-06

    Aug 6, 2013 ... to rust race CYR26. The gene YrSD in Strube Dickkopf resistant to stripe rust CYR26 using SSR method was located on chromosome 5B. There are four pairs (Wmc640,. Barc59, Wmc783 and Wms497) polymorphic SSR primers on chromosome 5B which produced polymorphic DNA bands between the ...

  8. Luminous Obscured AGN Unveiled in the Stripe 82 X-ray Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMassa, Stephanie; Glikman, Eilat; Brusa, Marcella; Rigby, Jane; Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Stern, Daniel; Lira, Paulina; Urry, Meg; Salvato, Mara; Alexandroff, Rachael; Allevato, Viola; Cardamone, Carolin; Civano, Francesca Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Farrah, Duncan; Komossa, S.; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Marchesi, Stefano; Richards, Gordon; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Treister, Ezequiel

    2018-01-01

    Stripe 82X is a wide-area (30 deg2) X-ray survey overlapping the legacy Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field, designed to uncover rare, high luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN). We report on the results of an on-going near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic campaign to follow-up reddened AGN candidates with Palomar TripleSpec, Keck NIRSPEC, and Gemini GNIRS. We identified 8 AGN in our bright NIR sample (K colors (> 4, Vega); four of these sources had existing optical spectra in SDSS. We targeted four out of 34 obscured AGN candidates in our faint NIR sample (K > 17, Vega), all of which are undetected in the single-epoch SDSS imaging, making them the best candidates for the most obscured and/or the most distant reddend AGN in Stripe 82X. All twelve sources are Type 1 AGN, with the FWHM of at least one permitted emission line exceeding 1300 km/s. We find that our nearly complete bright NIR sample (12/13 obscured AGN candidates have spectroscopic redshifts) is more distant (z > 0.5) than a matched sample of blue Type 1 AGN from Stripe 82X; these AGN tend to be more luminous than their blue, unobscured counterparts. Results from our pilot program of faint NIR-selected obscured AGN candidates demonstrate that our selection recovers reddened quasars missed by SDSS.

  9. Quantifying sustainability indicators in striped catfish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus downstream and upstream ponds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nhut, N.; Hao, N.V.; Bosma, R.H.; Verreth, J.A.V.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Eding, E.H.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the potential for improving sustainability and efficiency in an important Vietnamese finfish culture, we quantified sustainability indicators for 2 downstream and 2 upstream 3 to 4 m deep ponds for striped catfish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus (Sauvage, 1878) production along the Mekong

  10. Parallel carbon nanotube stripes in polymer thin film with remarkable conductive anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinrui; Zhu, Yutian; Jiang, Wei; Yin, Jinghua; Tang, Qingxin; Yang, Xiaodong

    2014-02-12

    In our previous study ( Mao et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2013 , 4 , 43 - 47 ), we proposed a novel method, that is, the shear-flow-induced hierarchical self-assembly of two-dimensional fillers (octadecylamine-functionalized graphene) into the well-ordered parallel stripes in a polymer matrix, to fabricate the anisotropic conductive materials. In this study, we extend this method to one-dimensional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Under the induction of shear flow, the dispersed poly(styrene ethylene/butadiene-styrene) (SEBS) phase and MWCNTs can spontaneously assemble into well-ordered parallel stripes in the polypropylene (PP) thin film. The electrical measurements indicate that the electrical resistivity in the direction parallel to the stripes is almost 6 orders of magnitude lower than that in the perpendicular direction, which is by far the most striking conductive anisotropy for the plastic anisotropic conductive materials. In addition, it is found that the size of the MWCNT stripe as well as the electrical property of the resulting anisotropic conductive thin film can be well-controlled by the gap of the shear cell.

  11. Post-epizootic chronic dolphin morbillivirus infection in Mediterranean striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Sara; Alba, Ana; Ganges, Llilianne; Vidal, Enric; Raga, Juan Antonio; Alegre, Ferrán; González, Beatriz; Medina, Pascual; Zorrilla, Irene; Martínez, Jorge; Marco, Alberto; Pérez, Mónica; Pérez, Blanca; Pérez de Vargas Mesas, Ana; Martínez Valverde, Rosa; Domingo, Mariano

    2011-10-06

    Dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) has caused 2 epizootics with high mortality rates on the Spanish Mediterranean coast, in 1990 and 2006-07, mainly affecting striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba. Following the first epizootic unusual DMV infections affecting only the central nervous system of striped dolphins were found, with histological features similar to subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and old dog encephalitis, the chronic latent localised infections caused by defective forms of measles virus and canine distemper virus, respectively. Between 2008 and 2010, monitoring by microscopic and immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of 118 striped dolphins stranded along Catalonia, the Valencia Region and Andalusia showed similar localised DMV nervous system infections in 25.0, 28.6 and 27.4% of cases, respectively, with no significant differences among regions or sex. The body length of DMV-infected dolphins was statistically greater than that of non-infected dolphins (196.5 vs. 160.5 cm; p dolphins with positive IHC-DMV had positive PCR results. All 6 cases were positive with the 78 bp RT-PCR. These findings contraindicate the use of the 429 bp RT-PCR protocol based on the P gene to detect this specific form of DMV. DMV localised nervous infection constitutes the most relevant single cause of stranding and death in Mediterranean striped dolphins in the years following a DMV epizootic, and it might even overwhelm the effects of the epizootic itself, at least in 2007.

  12. Genetics of adult plant stripe rust resistance in CSP44, a selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    areas of temperate zones (Johnson 1988). Yield losses can be considerable, ranging from about 40 per cent to com- plete destruction of the crop depending upon the growth stage at which the disease attacks. Using diverse genes for resistance against stripe rust disease is the most eco- nomical and environmentally safe ...

  13. Molecular mapping of a stripe rust resistance gene in wheat line C51

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stripe rust, a major disease in areas where cool temperatures prevail, can strongly influence grain yield. To control this disease, breeders have incorporated seedling resistance genes from a variety of sources outside the primary wheat gene pool. The wheat line C51, introduced from the International Center for Agricultural ...

  14. Soil base saturation combines with Beech Bark Disease to influence composition and structure of Sugar Maple-Beech forests in an acid rain-impacted region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; McDonnell, Todd C.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Dovciak, Martin; Bailey, Scott W.; Antidormi, Michael; Zarfos, Michael R.

    2017-01-01

    Sugar maple, an abundant and highly valued tree species in eastern North America, has experienced decline from soil calcium (Ca) depletion by acidic deposition, while beech, which often coexists with sugar maple, has been afflicted with beech bark disease (BBD) over the same period. To investigate how variations in soil base saturation combine with effects of BBD in influencing stand composition and structure, measurements of soils, canopy, subcanopy, and seedlings were taken in 21 watersheds in the Adirondack region of NY (USA), where sugar maple and beech were the predominant canopy species and base saturation of the upper B horizon ranged from 4.4 to 67%. The base saturation value corresponding to the threshold for Al mobilization (16.8%) helped to define the species composition of canopy trees and seedlings. Canopy vigor and diameter at breast height (DBH) were positively correlated (P soils, soil-Ca depletion and BBD may have created opportunities for gap-exploiting species such as red maple and black cherry, whereas in high-base saturation soils, sugar maple dominated the canopy. Where soils were beginning to recover from acidic deposition effects, sugar maple DBH and basal area increased progressively from 2000 to 2015, whereas for beech, average DBH did not change and basal area did not increase after 2010.

  15. The ACER pollen and charcoal database: a global resource to document vegetation and fire response to abrupt climate changes during the last glacial period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Sánchez Goñi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Quaternary records provide an opportunity to examine the nature of the vegetation and fire responses to rapid past climate changes comparable in velocity and magnitude to those expected in the 21st-century. The best documented examples of rapid climate change in the past are the warming events associated with the Dansgaard–Oeschger (D–O cycles during the last glacial period, which were sufficiently large to have had a potential feedback through changes in albedo and greenhouse gas emissions on climate. Previous reconstructions of vegetation and fire changes during the D–O cycles used independently constructed age models, making it difficult to compare the changes between different sites and regions. Here, we present the ACER (Abrupt Climate Changes and Environmental Responses global database, which includes 93 pollen records from the last glacial period (73–15 ka with a temporal resolution better than 1000 years, 32 of which also provide charcoal records. A harmonized and consistent chronology based on radiometric dating (14C, 234U∕230Th, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL, 40Ar∕39Ar-dated tephra layers has been constructed for 86 of these records, although in some cases additional information was derived using common control points based on event stratigraphy. The ACER database compiles metadata including geospatial and dating information, pollen and charcoal counts, and pollen percentages of the characteristic biomes and is archived in Microsoft AccessTM at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.870867.

  16. VICS82: The VISTA–CFHT Stripe 82 Near-infrared Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geach, J. E.; Lin, Y.-T.; Makler, M.; Kneib, J.-P.; Ross, N. P.; Wang, W.-H.; Hsieh, B.-C.; Leauthaud, A.; Bundy, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Comparat, J.; Caminha, G. B.; Hudelot, P.; Lin, L.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Pereira, M. E. S.; Mast, D.

    2017-07-01

    We present the VISTA–CFHT Stripe 82 (VICS82) survey: a near-infrared (J+Ks) survey covering 150 square degrees of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) equatorial Stripe 82 to an average depth of J = 21.9 AB mag and Ks = 21.4 AB mag (80% completeness limits; 5σ point-source depths are approximately 0.5 mag brighter). VICS82 contributes to the growing legacy of multiwavelength data in the Stripe 82 footprint. The addition of near-infrared photometry to the existing SDSS Stripe 82 coadd ugriz photometry reduces the scatter in stellar mass estimates to δ {log}({M}\\star )≈ 0.3 dex for galaxies with {M}\\star > {10}9 {M}ȯ at z≈ 0.5, and offers improvement compared to optical-only estimates out to z≈ 1, with stellar masses constrained within a factor of approximately 2.5. When combined with other multiwavelength imaging of the Stripe, including moderate-to-deep ultraviolet (GALEX), optical and mid-infrared (Spitzer-IRAC) coverage, as well as tens of thousands of spectroscopic redshifts, VICS82 gives access to approximately 0.5 Gpc3 of comoving volume. Some of the main science drivers of VICS82 include (a) measuring the stellar mass function of {L}\\star galaxies out to z∼ 1; (b) detecting intermediate-redshift quasars at 2≲ z≲ 3.5; (c) measuring the stellar mass function and baryon census of clusters of galaxies, and (d) performing cross-correlation experiments of cosmic microwave background lensing in the optical/near-infrared that link stellar mass to large-scale dark matter structure. Here we define and describe the survey, highlight some early science results, and present the first public data release, which includes an SDSS-matched catalog as well as the calibrated pixel data themselves.

  17. Measurement Error Affects Risk Estimates for Recruitment to the Hudson River Stock of Striped Bass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Dunning

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the consequences of ignoring the distinction between measurement error and natural variability in an assessment of risk to the Hudson River stock of striped bass posed by entrainment at the Bowline Point, Indian Point, and Roseton power plants. Risk was defined as the probability that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more, relative to the equilibrium value, at least once during the time periods examined (1, 5, 10, and 15 years. Measurement error, estimated using two abundance indices from independent beach seine surveys conducted on the Hudson River, accounted for 50% of the variability in one index and 56% of the variability in the other. If a measurement error of 50% was ignored and all of the variability in abundance was attributed to natural causes, the risk that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more after 15 years was 0.308 at the current level of entrainment mortality (11%. However, the risk decreased almost tenfold (0.032 if a measurement error of 50% was considered. The change in risk attributable to decreasing the entrainment mortality rate from 11 to 0% was very small (0.009 and similar in magnitude to the change in risk associated with an action proposed in Amendment #5 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic striped bass (0.006— an increase in the instantaneous fishing mortality rate from 0.33 to 0.4. The proposed increase in fishing mortality was not considered an adverse environmental impact, which suggests that potentially costly efforts to reduce entrainment mortality on the Hudson River stock of striped bass are not warranted.

  18. Estimating abundance of adult striped bass in reservoirs using mobile hydroacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Joseph E.; Taylor, J. Christopher; Degan, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroacoustic surveys have proven valuable for estimating reservoir forage fish abundance but are more challenging for adult predators such as striped bass Morone saxatilis. Difficulties in assessing striped bass in reservoirs include their low density and the inability to distinguish species with hydroacoustic data alone. Despite these difficulties, mobile hydroacoustic surveys have potential to provide useful data for management because of the large sample volume compared to traditional methods such as gill netting and the ability to target specific areas where striped bass are aggregated. Hydroacoustic estimates of reservoir striped bass have been made using mobile surveys, with data analysis using a threshold for target strength in order to focus on striped bass-sized targets, and auxiliary sampling with nets to obtain species composition. We provide recommendations regarding survey design, based in part on simulations that provide insight on the level of effort that would be required to achieve reasonable estimates of abundance. Future surveys may be able to incorporate telemetry or other sonar techniques such as side-scan or multibeam in order to focus survey efforts on productive habitats (within lake and vertically). However, species apportionment will likely remain the main source of error, and we see no hydroacoustic system on the horizon that will identify fish by species at the spatial and temporal scale required for most reservoir surveys. In situations where species composition can be reliably assessed using traditional gears, abundance estimates from hydroacoustic methods should be useful to fishery managers interested in developing harvest regulations, assessing survival of stocked juveniles, identifying seasonal aggregations, and examining predator–prey balance.

  19. Remapping of the stripe rust resistance gene Yr10 in common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cuiling; Wu, Jingzheng; Yan, Baiqiang; Hao, Qunqun; Zhang, Chaozhong; Lyu, Bo; Ni, Fei; Caplan, Allan; Wu, Jiajie; Fu, Daolin

    2018-02-23

    Yr10 is an important gene to control wheat stripe rust, and the search for Yr10 needs to be continued. Wheat stripe rust or yellow rust is a devastating fungal disease caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst). Host disease resistance offers a primary source for controlling wheat stripe rust. The stripe rust resistance gene Yr10 confers the race-specific resistance to most tested Pst races in China including CYR29. Early studies proposed that Yr10 was a nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat gene archived as GenBank accession AF149112 (hereafter designated the Yr10 candidate gene or Yr10 CG ). In this study, we revealed that 15 Chinese wheat cultivars positive for Yr10 CG are susceptible to CYR29. We then expressed the Yr10 CG cDNA in the common wheat 'Bobwhite'. The Yr10 CG -cDNA positive transgenic plants were also susceptible to CYR29. Thus, it is highly unlikely that Yr10 CG corresponds to the Yr10 resistance gene. Using the Yr10 donor 'Moro' and the Pst-susceptible wheat 'Huixianhong', we generated two F 3 populations that displayed a single Mendelian segregation on the Yr10 gene, and used them to remap the Yr10 gene. Six markers were placed in the Yr10 region, with the Yr10 CG gene now mapping about 1.2-cM proximal to the Yr10 locus and the Xsdauw79 marker is completely linked to the Yr10 locus. Apparently, the Yr10 gene has not yet been identified. Fine mapping and positional cloning of Yr10 is important for gene pyramiding for stripe rust resistance in wheat.

  20. TensorPack: a Maple-based software package for the manipulation of algebraic expressions of tensors in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huf, P A; Carminati, J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we: (1) introduce TensorPack, a software package for the algebraic manipulation of tensors in covariant index format in Maple; (2) briefly demonstrate the use of the package with an orthonormal tensor proof of the shearfree conjecture for dust. TensorPack is based on the Riemann and Canon tensor software packages and uses their functions to express tensors in an indexed covariant format. TensorPack uses a string representation as input and provides functions for output in index form. It extends the functionality to basic algebra of tensors, substitution, covariant differentiation, contraction, raising/lowering indices, symmetry functions and other accessory functions. The output can be merged with text in the Maple environment to create a full working document with embedded dynamic functionality. The package offers potential for manipulation of indexed algebraic tensor expressions in a flexible software environment. (paper)

  1. Fully integrated analysis of reactor kinetics, thermalhydraulics and the reactor control system in the MAPLE-X10 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, S.Y.; Carlson, P.A.; Baxter, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    A prototype research reactor, designated MAPLE-X10 (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental - X 10MW), is currently being built at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. The CATHENA (Canadian Algorithm for Thermalhydraulic Network Analysis) two-fluid code was used in the safety analysis of the reactor to determine the adequacy of core cooling during postulated reactivity and loss-of-forced-flow transients. The system responses to a postulated transient are predicted including the feedback between reactor kinetics, thermalhydrauilcs and the reactor control systems. This paper describes the MAPLE-X10 reactor and the modelling methodology used. Sample simulations of postulated loss-of-heat-sink and loss-of-regulation transients are presented. (author)

  2. When Does Choice of Downscaling Method Matter in Decision Making? A Case Study with Maple Syrup Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, A. M.; Kearney, E.; Rapp, J. M.; Karmalkar, A.; Morelli, T. L.

    2016-12-01

    When planning and preparing for climate change, practitioners rely on climate models to help them make informed decisions. All climate change model data ultimately derive from global-scale models, which are typically too coarse for local-scale decision making; thus, these models are often "downscaled" in order to resolve finer details within the decision space. A few downscaling approaches exist, each with a unique set of strengths and limitations, yet their implications on any particular decision are not always clear to decision makers. Using maple syrup production as a case study, we demonstrate a possible method of evaluating the sensitivity of a specific decision to downscaling method selection. We compare two downscaling techniques (dynamical and statistical) and two training methods within the statistical downscaling approach (bias-corrected spatial disaggregation, or BCSD, and bias corrected constructed analogs, or BCCA) with respect to their ability to capture daily freeze- thaw cycles, the driver of sapflow in maple syrup production. For each downscaling approach, we evaluate simulations of historical freeze-thaw patterns using gridded temperature observations, and compare projected changes in freeze-thaw patterns by mid-century. We discuss the implications of our results on the decision of "when to tap" faced by maple syrup producers, as well as similar decisions in other industries. Our results reveal which downscaling technique(s) is (are) best suited for helping maple syrup producers make plans toward adapting their tapping practices for climate change. In addition, our results provide producers with a plausible range of optimal tapping dates by mid-century, based on the most skilled downscaling approach. Finally, we highlight insights relevant to the climate modeling community, and lessons learned toward making climate science actionable.

  3. Maple syrup urine disease encephalopathy: a follow-up study in the acute stage using diffusion-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jong Su; Kim, Taik-Kun; Lee, Ki Yeol; Seol, Hae Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Eun, Baik-Lin; Lee, Hee Sun

    2004-01-01

    Neonatal maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is associated with diffuse oedema and characteristic MSUD oedema. We present a newborn infant with two coexisting different types of oedema. The myelinated white matter showed a marked decrease in the water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) compatible with cytotoxic oedema. The unmyelinated white matter showed an increase in ADC, consistent with vasogenic-interstitial oedema. On follow-up studies, the cytotoxic oedema showed improvement, but the vasogenic-interstitial oedema progressed into brain atrophy. (orig.)

  4. Maple procedures for the coupling of angular momenta. IX. Wigner D-functions and rotation matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagaran, J.; Fritzsche, S.; Gaigalas, G.

    2006-04-01

    expressions to be evaluated. Licensing provisions:None Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it is operable: All computers with a license for the computer algebra package Maple [Maple is a registered trademark of Waterloo Maple Inc.] Installations:University of Kassel (Germany) Operating systems under which the program has been tested: Linux 8.2+ Program language used:MAPLE, Release 8 and 9 Memory required to execute with typical data:10-50 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:52 653 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:1 195 346 Distribution format:tar.gzip Nature of the physical problem: The Wigner D-functions and (reduced) rotation matrices occur very frequently in physical applications. They are known not only as the (infinite) representation of the rotation group but also to obey a number of integral and summation rules, including those for their orthogonality and completeness. Instead of the direct computation of these matrices, therefore, one first often wishes to find algebraic simplifications before the computations can be carried out in practice. Reasons for new version: The RACAH program has been found an efficient tool during recent years, in order to evaluate and simplify expressions from Racah's algebra. Apart from the Wigner n-j symbols ( j=3,6,9) and spherical harmonics, we now extended the code to allow for Wigner rotation matrices. This extension will support the study of those quantum processes especially where different axis of quantization occurs in course of the theoretical deviations. Summary of revisions: In a revised version of the RACAH program [S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Comm. 103 (1997) 51; S. Fritzsche, T. Inghoff, M. Tomaselli, Comput. Phys. Comm. 153 (2003) 424], we now also support the occurrence of the Wigner D-functions and reduced rotation matrices. By following our previous design, the (algebraic) properties of these rotation matrices as well as a number of

  5. Evidence for Increased Aggressiveness in a Recent Widespread Strain of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici Causing Stripe Rust of Wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milus, Eugene A; Kristensen, Kristian; Hovmøller, Mogens S

    2009-01-01

    Stripe rust (yellow rust) of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, has become more severe in eastern United States, Australia, and elsewhere since 2000. Recent research has shown that this coincided with a global spread of two closely related strains that were similar based...... to the warm temperature regime for all variables. Based on these results and previously published models for stripe rust epidemics, recent severe stripe rust epidemics were most likely enhanced by the pathogen's increased aggressiveness, especially at higher temperature. Furthermore, these results demonstrate...... that wheat rust fungi can adapt to warmer temperatures and cause severe disease in previously unfavorable environments...

  6. Early osteological development of white perch and striped bass with emphasis on identification of their larvae. [Morone saxatilis; Morone americana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, R.A. (Univ. of Mississippi, University); Johnson, G.D.

    1980-07-01

    A cartilage and bone straining technique was employed to study the developmental osteology of the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white perch (Morone americana). Special attention was given to those osteological characters that appeared to be unique to the larvae of each species. Larval striped bass and white perch exhibited diagnostic differences in the position and shape of the median ethmoid, predorsal bones, dorsal- and anal-fin pterygiophores, vertebral column, and caudal skeleton. These differences were discernible at the earliest appearance of these elements as cartilage, and allow identification of striped bass and white perch larvae above a length of about 7.5 mm.

  7. Aluminum solubility and mobility in relation to organic carbon in surface soils affected by six tree species of the northeastern United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.A.; Fitzhugh, R.D.

    2003-01-01

    We compared Al solubility and mobility in surface soils among six tree species (sugar maple [Acer saccharum], white ash [Fraxinus americana], red maple [Acer rubrum, L.], American beech [Fagus grandifolia, Ehrh.], red oak [Quercus rubra, L.], and hemlock [Tsuga canadensis, Carr.]) in a mixed

  8. Finding higher symmetries of differential equations using the MAPLE package DESOLVII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, K. T.; Jefferson, G. F.; Carminati, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present and describe, with illustrative examples, the MAPLE computer algebra package DESOLVII, which is a major upgrade of DESOLV. DESOLVII now includes new routines allowing the determination of higher symmetries (contact and Lie-Bäcklund) for systems of both ordinary and partial differential equations. Catalogue identifier: ADYZ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYZ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 10 858 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 112 515 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MAPLE internal language Computer: PCs and workstations Operating system: Linux, Windows XP and Windows 7 RAM: Depends on the type of problem and the complexity of the system (small ≈ MB, large ≈ GB) Classification: 4.3, 5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADYZ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 176 (2007) 682 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: There are a number of approaches one may use to find solutions to systems of differential equations. These include numerical, perturbative, and algebraic methods. Unfortunately, approximate or numerical solution methods may be inappropriate in many cases or even impossible due to the nature of the system and hence exact methods are important. In their own right, exact solutions are valuable not only as a yardstick for approximate/numerical solutions but also as a means of elucidating the physical meaning of fundamental quantities in systems. One particular method of finding special exact solutions is afforded by the work of Sophus Lie and the use of continuous transformation groups. The power of Lie's group theoretic method lies in its ability to unify a number of ad hoc

  9. Biomedical properties and preparation of iron oxide-dextran nanostructures by MAPLE technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciobanu Carmen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this work the chemical structure of dextran-iron oxide thin films was reported. The films were obtained by MAPLE technique from composite targets containing 10 wt. % dextran with 1 and 5 wt.% iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs. The IONPs were synthesized by co-precipitation method. A KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM≅25 ns, ν = 10 Hz was used for the growth of the hybrid, iron oxide NPs-dextran thin films. Results Dextran coated iron oxide nanoparticles thin films were indexed into the spinel cubic lattice with a lattice parameter of 8.36 Å. The particle sized calculated was estimated at around 7.7 nm. The XPS shows that the binding energy of the Fe 2p3/2 of two thin films of dextran coated iron oxide is consistent with Fe3+ oxides. The atomic percentage of the C, O and Fe are 66.71, 32.76 and 0.53 for the films deposited from composite targets containing 1 wt.% maghemite and 64.36, 33.92 and 1.72 respectively for the films deposited from composite targets containing 5 wt.% maghemite. In the case of cells cultivated on dextran coated 5% maghemite γ-Fe2O3, the number of cells and the level of F-actin were lower compared to the other two types of thin films and control. Conclusions The dextran-iron oxide continuous thin films obtained by MAPLE technique from composite targets containing 10 wt.% dextran as well as 1 and 5 wt.% iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation method presented granular surface morphology. Our data proved a good viability of Hep G2 cells grown on dextran coated maghemite thin films. Also, no changes in cells morphology were noticed under phase contrast microscopy. The data strongly suggest the potential use of iron oxide-dextran nanocomposites as a potential marker for biomedical applications.

  10. Population Genetics of red striped mullet (Mullus surmuletus in Turkish Seas Based on Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fevzi Bardakci

    2014-07-01

    This study was determined a preview of genetic structure of red striped mullet because of few sampling localities so a further study is would be useful to determine its population structure along its distribution area in detail.

  11. Technological quality, mineral profile, and sensory attributes of broiler chicken breasts affected by White Striping and Wooden Breast myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasoniero, G; Cullere, M; Cecchinato, M; Puolanne, E; Dalle Zotte, A

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the research was to study the impact of white striping and wooden breast myopathies on the technological quality, mineral, and sensory profile of poultry meat. With this purpose, a total of 138 breasts were selected for a control group with normal breasts (N), a group of breasts characterised by white striping (WS) myopathy, and a group of breasts having both white striping and wooden breast myopathies (WSWB). Data revealed that the simultaneous presence of the two myopathies, with respect to the WS lesion individually considered, had a further detrimental effect on pH (6.04 vs. 5.96; P white striping and wooden breast myopathies. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  12. Identification and mapping of leaf, stem and stripe rust resistance quantitative trait loci and their interactions in durum wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, A.; Pandey, M. P.; Singh, A. K.; Knox, R. E.; Ammar, K.; Clarke, J. M.; Clarke, F. R.; Singh, R. P.; Pozniak, C. J.; DePauw, R. M.; McCallum, B. D.; Cuthbert, R. D.; Randhawa, H. S.; Fetch, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    Leaf rust (Puccinia triticina Eriks.), stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. tritici Eriks.) and stem rust (Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici) cause major production losses in durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. var. durum). The objective of this research was to identify and map leaf, stripe and stem rust resistance loci from the French cultivar Sachem and Canadian cultivar Strongfield. A doubled haploid population from Sachem/Strongfield and parents were phenotyped for seedling reaction to leaf ...

  13. Race-Specific Adult-Plant Resistance in Winter Wheat to Stripe Rust and Characterization of Pathogen Virulence Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milus, Eugene A; Moon, David E; Lee, Kevin D; Mason, R Esten

    2015-08-01

    Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important disease of wheat in the Great Plains and southeastern United States. Growing resistant cultivars is the preferred means for managing stripe rust, but new virulence in the pathogen population overcomes some of the resistance. The objectives of this study were to characterize the stripe rust resistance in contemporary soft and hard red winter wheat cultivars, to characterize the virulence of P. striiformis f. sp. tritici isolates based on the resistances found in the cultivars, and to determine wheat breeders' perceptions on the importance and methods for achieving stripe rust resistance. Seedlings of cultivars were susceptible to recent isolates, indicating they lacked effective all-stage resistance. However, adult-plants were resistant or susceptible depending on the isolate, indicating they had race-specific adult-plant resistance. Using isolates collected from 1990 to 2013, six major virulence patterns were identified on adult plants of twelve cultivars that were selected as adult-plant differentials. Race-specific adult-plant resistance appears to be the only effective type of resistance protecting wheat from stripe rust in eastern United States. Among wheat breeders, the importance of incorporating stripe rust resistance into cultivars ranged from high to low depending on the frequency of epidemics in their region, and most sources of stripe rust resistance were either unknown or already overcome by virulence in the pathogen population. Breeders with a high priority for stripe rust resistance made most of their selections based on adult-plant reactions in the field, whereas breeders with a low priority for resistance based selections on molecular markers for major all-stage resistance genes.

  14. [Prediction model of meteorological grade of wheat stripe rust in winter-reproductive area, Sichuan Basin, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiang; Wang, Ming Tian; Zhang, Guo Zhi

    2017-12-01

    The winter reproductive areas of Puccinia striiformis var. striiformis in Sichuan Basin are often the places mostly affected by wheat stripe rust. With data on the meteorological condition and stripe rust situation at typical stations in the winter reproductive area in Sichuan Basin from 1999 to 2016, this paper classified the meteorological conditions inducing wheat stripe rust into 5 grades, based on the incidence area ratio of the disease. The meteorological factors which were biologically related to wheat stripe rust were determined through multiple analytical methods, and a meteorological grade model for forecasting wheat stripe rust was created. The result showed that wheat stripe rust in Sichuan Basin was significantly correlated with many meteorological factors, such as the ave-rage (maximum and minimum) temperature, precipitation and its anomaly percentage, relative humidity and its anomaly percentage, average wind speed and sunshine duration. Among these, the average temperature and the anomaly percentage of relative humidity were the determining factors. According to a historical retrospective test, the accuracy of the forecast based on the model was 64% for samples in the county-level test, and 89% for samples in the municipal-level test. In a meteorological grade forecast of wheat stripe rust in the winter reproductive areas in Sichuan Basin in 2017, the prediction was accurate for 62.8% of the samples, with 27.9% error by one grade and only 9.3% error by two or more grades. As a result, the model could deliver satisfactory forecast results, and predicate future wheat stripe rust from a meteorological point of view.

  15. Multilayer graphene electro-absorption optical modulator based on double-stripe silicon nitride waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Meiyong; Yang, Huimin; Zheng, Pengfei; Hu, Guohua; Yun, Binfeng; Cui, Yiping

    2017-09-04

    A graphene electro-absorption optical modulator based on double-stripe silicon nitride waveguide is proposed and analyzed. By embedding four graphene layers in the double-stripe silicon nitride waveguide and the graphene layers co-electrode design, the total metal-graphene contact resistance can be reduced 50% and as high as 30.6GHz modulation bandwidth can be achieved theoretically. The calculated extinction ratio and figure of merit are 0.1658dB/um and 9.7, respectively. And the required switching voltage from its minimum to maximum absorption state is 3.8180V and 780.50fJ/bit power consuming can be achieved. The proposed modulator can remedy the lack of high speed modulator on the passive silicon nitride waveguide.

  16. Effect of an electric field on the properties of BN Möbius stripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos de Melo, J. [Departamento de Física, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Azevedo, S., E-mail: sazevedo@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Kaschny, J.R. [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Campus Vitória da Conquista, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45075-265 Vitória da conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, we present a first-principles study on the effects of an external electric field on the structural stability and electronic properties of boron nitride Möbius stripes with armchair and zigzag chirality. The calculation results indicate that the gap energy can be remarkably reduced by the application of an external field. Such reduction is in principle attributed to the occurrence of Stark effect, which significance depends on the orientation of the applied field relative to the stripe axis. Moreover, the electric field produces significant changes on dipole momentum of the structure and induces a negative shift on the calculated total energy, reducing the obtained formation energy. - Highlights: • The gap energy is remarkably reduced by the application of an external field. • The electric field produces significant changes on dipole momentum. • The field induces a negative shift on the total energy due to Stark effect.

  17. On fast iterative mapping algorithms for stripe based coarse-grained reconfigurable architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Gayatri; Patel, Krunalkumar; Pollard, Nancy S.

    2015-01-01

    Reconfigurable devices have potential for great flexibility/efficiency, but mapping algorithms onto these architectures is a long-standing challenge. This paper addresses this challenge for stripe based coarse-grained reconfigurable architectures (CGRAs) by drawing on insights from graph drawing. We adapt fast, iterative algorithms from hierarchical graph drawing to the problem of mapping to stripe based architectures. We find that global sifting is 98 times as fast as simulated annealing and produces very compact designs with 17% less area on average, at a cost of 5% greater wire length. Interleaving iterations of Sugiyama and global sifting is 40 times as fast as simulated annealing and achieves somewhat more compact designs with 1.8% less area on average, at a cost of only 1% greater wire length. These solutions can enable fast design space exploration, rapid performance testing, and flexible programming of CGRAs "in the field."

  18. Pigment cell interactions and differential xanthophore recruitment underlying zebrafish stripe reiteration and Danio pattern evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Larissa B; Bain, Emily J; Parichy, David M

    2014-11-06

    Fishes have diverse pigment patterns, yet mechanisms of pattern evolution remain poorly understood. In zebrafish, Danio rerio, pigment-cell autonomous interactions generate dark stripes of melanophores that alternate with light interstripes of xanthophores and iridophores. Here, we identify mechanisms underlying the evolution of a uniform pattern in D. albolineatus in which all three pigment cell classes are intermingled. We show that in this species xanthophores differentiate precociously over a wider area, and that cis regulatory evolution has increased expression of xanthogenic Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (Csf1). Expressing Csf1 similarly in D. rerio has cascading effects, driving the intermingling of all three pigment cell classes and resulting in the loss of stripes, as in D. albolineatus. Our results identify novel mechanisms of pattern development and illustrate how pattern diversity can be generated when a core network of pigment-cell autonomous interactions is coupled with changes in pigment cell differentiation.

  19. Effect of the tiger stripes on the deformation of Saturn's moon Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souček, Ondřej; Hron, Jaroslav; Běhounková, Marie; Čadek, Ondřej

    2016-07-01

    Enceladus is a small icy moon of Saturn with active jets of water emanating from fractures around the south pole, informally called tiger stripes, which might be connected to a subsurface water ocean. The effect of these features on periodic tidal deformation of the moon has so far been neglected because of the difficulties associated with implementation of faults in continuum mechanics models. Here we estimate the maximum possible impact of the tiger stripes on tidal deformation and heat production within Enceladus's ice shell by representing them as narrow zones with negligible frictional and bulk resistance passing vertically through the whole ice shell. Assuming a uniform ice shell thickness of 25 km, consistent with the recent estimate of libration, we demonstrate that the faults can dramatically change the distribution of stress and strain in Enceladus's south polar region, leading to a significant increase of the heat production in this area.

  20. Maple syrup urine disease in Brazil: a panorama of the last two decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herber, Silvani; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa D; Nalin, Tatiéle; Oliveira Netto, Cristina Brinkmann; Camelo Junior, José Simon; Santos, Mara Lúcia; Ribeiro, Erlane Marques; Schüler-Faccini, Lavinia; Souza, Carolina Fischinger Moura de

    2015-01-01

    To characterize a sample of Brazilian patients with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) diagnosed between 1992 and 2011. In this retrospective study, patients were identified through a national reference laboratory for the diagnosis of MSUD and through contact with other medical genetics services across Brazil. Data were collected by means of a chart review. Eighty-three patients from 75 families were enrolled in the study (median age, 3 years; interquartile range [IQR], 0.57-7). Median age at onset of symptoms was 10 days (IQR 5-30), whereas median age at diagnosis was 60 days (IQR 29-240, p=0.001). Only three (3.6%) patients were diagnosed before the onset of clinical manifestations. A comparison between patients with (n=12) and without (n=71) an early diagnosis shows that early diagnosis is associated with the presence of positive family history and decreased prevalence of clinical manifestations at the time of diagnosis, but not with a better outcome. Overall, 98.8% of patients have some psychomotor or neurodevelopmental delay. In Brazil, patients with MSUD are usually diagnosed late and exhibit neurological involvement and poor survival even with early diagnosis. We suggest that specific public policies for diagnosis and treatment of MSUD should be developed and implemented in the country. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Cranial computed tomography in a patient with a variant form of maple syrup urine disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, S.; Naito, H.; Abe, T.; Nihei, K.

    1983-01-01

    A male infant, who was suspected to be a case of variant form of maple syrup urine disease has been given dietary treatment since the age of 9 months. Prior to the treatment, computed tomography showed abnormally high lucidity in the cerebral white matter area with the marked narrowness in size of the frontal horn of lateral ventricles. As the treatment proceeded, clinical symptoms alleviated, and CT findings have gradually changed with the result of improved density of the white matter. 2 months after starting the treatment, however, the patient suddenly developed a hyperaminoacidemic crisis that lasted 4-5 days. Despite this hyperaminoacidemia, CT scan taken during the crisis have revealed unexpectedly normal lucidity of the white matter as well as the normal width of the frontal horn. From these findings it was concluded that markedly lucent area in CT findings prior to the treatment was not due to an acute change in serum aminoacid concentration, but rather to chronic brain edema which had insidiously and gradually developed. (orig.)

  2. Successful domino liver transplantation in maple syrup urine disease using a related living donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feier, F.H.; Miura, I.K.; Fonseca, E.A.; Porta, G.; Pugliese, R.; Porta, A.; Schwartz, I.V.D.; Margutti, A.V.B.; Camelo, J.S.; Yamaguchi, S.N.; Taveira, A.T.; Candido, H.; Benavides, M.; Danesi, V.; Guimaraes, T.; Kondo, M.; Chapchap, P.; Seda, J.

    2014-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an autosomal recessive disease associated with high levels of branched-chain amino acids. Children with MSUD can present severe neurological damage, but liver transplantation (LT) allows the patient to resume a normal diet and avoid further neurological damage. The use of living related donors has been controversial because parents are obligatory heterozygotes. We report a case of a 2-year-old child with MSUD who underwent a living donor LT. The donor was the patient's mother, and his liver was then used as a domino graft. The postoperative course was uneventful in all three subjects. DNA analysis performed after the transplantation (sequencing of the coding regions of BCKDHA, BCKDHB, and DBT genes) showed that the MSUD patient was heterozygous for a pathogenic mutation in the BCKDHB gene. This mutation was not found in his mother, who is an obligatory carrier for MSUD according to the family history and, as expected, presented both normal clinical phenotype and levels of branched-chain amino acids. In conclusion, our data suggest that the use of a related donor in LT for MSUD was effective, and the liver of the MSUD patient was successfully used in domino transplantation. Routine donor genotyping may not be feasible, because the test is not widely available, and, most importantly, the disease is associated with both the presence of allelic and locus heterogeneity. Further studies with this population of patients are required to expand the use of related donors in MSUD. PMID:24770567

  3. Maple syrup urine disease in Brazil: a panorama of the last two decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvani Herber

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize a sample of Brazilian patients with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD diagnosed between 1992 and 2011. METHODS: In this retrospective study, patients were identified through a national reference laboratory for the diagnosis of MSUD and through contact with other medical genetics services across Brazil. Data were collected by means of a chart review. RESULTS: Eighty-three patients from 75 families were enrolled in the study (median age, 3 years; interquartile range [IQR], 0.57-7. Median age at onset of symptoms was 10 days (IQR 5-30, whereas median age at diagnosis was 60 days (IQR 29-240, p = 0.001. Only three (3.6% patients were diagnosed before the onset of clinical manifestations. A comparison between patients with (n = 12 and without (n = 71 an early diagnosis shows that early diagnosis is associated with the presence of positive family history and decreased prevalence of clinical manifestations at the time of diagnosis, but not with a better outcome. Overall, 98.8% of patients have some psychomotor or neurodevelopmental delay. CONCLUSION: In Brazil, patients with MSUD are usually diagnosed late and exhibit neurological involvement and poor survival even with early diagnosis. We suggest that specific public policies for diagnosis and treatment of MSUD should be developed and implemented in the country.

  4. Production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by Burkholderia cepacia ATCC 17759 using a detoxified sugar maple hemicellulosic hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wenyang; Perrotta, Joseph A; Stipanovic, Arthur J; Nomura, Christopher T; Nakas, James P

    2012-03-01

    Sugar maple hemicellulosic hydrolysate containing 71.9 g/l of xylose was used as an inexpensive feedstock to produce polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) by Burkholderia cepacia ATCC 17759. Several inhibitory compounds present in wood hydrolysate were analyzed for effects on cell growth and PHA production with strong inhibition observed at concentrations of 1 g/l furfural, 2 g/l vanillin, 7 g/l levulinic acid, and 1 M acetic acid. Gradual catabolism of lower concentrations of these inhibitors was observed in this study. To increase the fermentability of wood hydrolysate, several detoxification methods were tested. Overliming combined with low-temperature sterilization resulted in the highest removal of total inhibitory phenolics (65%). A fed-batch fermentation exhibited maximum PHA production after 96 h (8.72 g PHA/L broth and 51.4% of dry cell weight). Compositional analysis by NMR and physical-chemical characterization showed that PHA produced from wood hydrolysate was composed of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) with a molecular mass (M (N)) of 450.8 kDa, a melting temperature (T (m)) of 174.4°C, a glass transition temperature (T (g)) of 7.31°C, and a decomposition temperature (T (decomp)) of 268.6°C.

  5. In vitro studies of PEG thin films with different molecular weights deposited by MAPLE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paun, Irina Alexandra; Ion, Valentin; Luculescu, Catalin-Romeo

    2012-01-01

    In this work, polyethylene glycol (PEG) films were produced by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE). The possibility to tailor the properties of the films by means of polymer molecular weight was explored. The films of PEG of average molecular weights 400 Da, 1450 Da, and 10000 Da (PEG...... and their behavior in vitro. Thus, immersion in PBS induced swelling of the PEG films, which was more pronounced for PEG polymers of higher molecular weight. Prior to immersion in PBS, the PEG films of higher molecular weight were more hydrophilic, the water contact angles decreasing from ∼66 grd for PEG400 to ∼41...... grd for PEG 1450 and to ∼15 grd for PEG10000. The same trend was observed during immersion of the PEG films in PBS. Before immersion in PBS, the refractive index of the films increased from ∼1.43 for PEG400 to ∼1.48 for PEG1450 and to ∼1.68 for PEG10000. During immersion in PBS the refractive index...

  6. Successful domino liver transplantation in maple syrup urine disease using a related living donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H. Feier

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD is an autosomal recessive disease associated with high levels of branched-chain amino acids. Children with MSUD can present severe neurological damage, but liver transplantation (LT allows the patient to resume a normal diet and avoid further neurological damage. The use of living related donors has been controversial because parents are obligatory heterozygotes. We report a case of a 2-year-old child with MSUD who underwent a living donor LT. The donor was the patient's mother, and his liver was then used as a domino graft. The postoperative course was uneventful in all three subjects. DNA analysis performed after the transplantation (sequencing of the coding regions of BCKDHA, BCKDHB, and DBT genes showed that the MSUD patient was heterozygous for a pathogenic mutation in the BCKDHB gene. This mutation was not found in his mother, who is an obligatory carrier for MSUD according to the family history and, as expected, presented both normal clinical phenotype and levels of branched-chain amino acids. In conclusion, our data suggest that the use of a related donor in LT for MSUD was effective, and the liver of the MSUD patient was successfully used in domino transplantation. Routine donor genotyping may not be feasible, because the test is not widely available, and, most importantly, the disease is associated with both the presence of allelic and locus heterogeneity. Further studies with this population of patients are required to expand the use of related donors in MSUD.

  7. A Classic Case of Maple Syrup Urine Disease and a Novel Mutation in the BCKDHA Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alieh Mirzaee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD is an inherited branched-chain amino acid metabolic disorder caused by the deficiency in the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKD complex. In MSUD, elevation of the branched-chain amino acids, such as alpha-keto acid and alpha-hydroxy acid, occurs due to the BCKDC gene deficiency, appearing in the blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid, which leads to neurological damage and mental retardation. MSUD phenotypically penetrates due to the mutations in the coding genes of four subunits of the BCKD complex, including the BCKDHA, BCKDHB, DBT, and DLD genes.Case report: We aimed to report the cases of three families whose children were affected by MSUD and presented with symptomatic features during the first week of birth, which were identified by mass spectrometry. DNA study was performed as a diagnosis panel containing four encoded BCKDC subunit genes.Conclusion: In the current study, DNA analysis and phenotypic manifestations indicated a novel mutation of c.143delT, p.L48Rfs*15 in the BCKDHA gene in a homozygous state, which is a causative mutation for the classic MSUD phenotype. Early diagnosis and neonatal screening are recommended for the accurate and effective treatment of this disease

  8. Energy Expenditure in Chilean Children with Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Karen; Castro, Gabriela; Hamilton, Valerie; Cabello, Juan Francisco; Raimann, Erna; Arias, Carolina; Cornejo, Verónica

    2016-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a blockage of branched-chain keto acid of BCAA (branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase, BCKDH) leading to neurological damage induced by accumulation of leucine and metabolites. MSUD expenditure and energy requirement information is limited. To determine if basal/total energy expenditure (BEE/TEE) is comparable between different determination methods and if values agree with recommendations of energy in MSUD children, and whether they relate to nutritional status. Case-control study between MSUD (n = 16) and healthy children (n = 11) aged 6-18 years. Current nutritional status, physical activity level, body composition by DEXA and BEE/TEE by indirect calorimetry (BEEr) and predictive equations (FAO/WHO/ONU - WHO - and Schofield) were assessed; STATA 2013 (p < 0.05). When comparing the energy expenditure variables, there was no significant difference between groups. Moreover, compared to BEEr, equations underestimate according to BEE WHO and Schofield, respectively (P = 0.00; 0.02). The WHO equation had lower average calorie difference, greater concordance correlation and association with indirect calorimetry compared to the Schofield equation for both groups, being the best predictor of the BEE for MSUD group. Energy recommendations for MSUD children are according to energy expenditure; thus the use of WHO equation is a clinically and statistically feasible tool for its determination.

  9. Microbial colonization of biopolymeric thin films containing natural compounds and antibiotics fabricated by MAPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristescu, R.; Surdu, A. V.; Grumezescu, A. M.; Oprea, A. E.; Trusca, R.; Vasile, O.; Dorcioman, G.; Visan, A.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Mihaiescu, D.; Enculescu, M.; Chifiriuc, M. C.; Boehm, R. D.; Narayan, R. J.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2015-05-01

    Although a great number of antibiotics are currently available, they are often rendered ineffective by the ability of microbial strains to develop genetic resistance and to grow in biofilms. Since many antimicrobial agents poorly penetrate biofilms, biofilm-associated infections often require high concentrations of antimicrobial agents for effective treatment. Among the various strategies that may be used to inhibit microbial biofilms, one strategy that has generated significant interest involves the use of bioactive surfaces that are resistant to microbial colonization. In this respect, we used matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) involving a pulsed KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns, ν = 10 Hz) to obtain thin composite biopolymeric films containing natural (flavonoid) or synthetic (antibiotic) compounds as bioactive substances. Chemical composition and film structures were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Films morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The antimicrobial assay of the microbial biofilms formed on these films was assessed by the viable cell counts method. The flavonoid-containing thin films showed increased resistance to microbial colonization, highlighting their potential to be used for the design of anti-biofilm surfaces.

  10. MR diffusion imaging and MR spectroscopy of maple syrup urine disease during acute metabolic decompensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan, Wajanat; Wang, Zhiyue J. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Zimmerman, Robert A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, Gerard T.; Kaplan, Paige B.; Kaye, Edward M. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism, which affects the brain tissue resulting in impairment or death if untreated. Imaging studies have shown reversible brain edema during acute metabolic decompensation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and spectroscopy findings during metabolic decompensation and to assess the value of these findings in the prediction of patient outcome. Six patients with the diagnosis of MSUD underwent conventional MR imaging with DWI during acute presentation with metabolic decompensation. Spectroscopy with long TE was performed in four of the six patients. Follow-up examinations were performed after clinical and metabolic recovery. DWI demonstrated marked restriction of proton diffusion compatible with cytotoxic or intramyelinic sheath edema in the brainstem, basal ganglia, thalami, cerebellar and periventricular white matter and the cerebral cortex. This was accompanied by the presence of an abnormal branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and branched-chain alpha-keto acids (BCKA) peak at 0.9 ppm as well as elevated lactate on proton spectroscopy in all four patients. The changes in all six patients were reversed with treatment without evidence of volume loss or persistent tissue damage. The presence of cytotoxic or intramyelinic edema as evidenced by restricted water diffusion on DWI, with the presence of lactate on spectroscopy, could imply imminent cell death. However, in the context of metabolic decompensation in MSUD, it appears that changes in cell osmolarity and metabolism can reverse completely after metabolic correction. (orig.)

  11. MR diffusion imaging and MR spectroscopy of maple syrup urine disease during acute metabolic decompensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, Wajanat; Wang, Zhiyue J.; Zimmerman, Robert A.; Berry, Gerard T.; Kaplan, Paige B.; Kaye, Edward M.

    2003-01-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism, which affects the brain tissue resulting in impairment or death if untreated. Imaging studies have shown reversible brain edema during acute metabolic decompensation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and spectroscopy findings during metabolic decompensation and to assess the value of these findings in the prediction of patient outcome. Six patients with the diagnosis of MSUD underwent conventional MR imaging with DWI during acute presentation with metabolic decompensation. Spectroscopy with long TE was performed in four of the six patients. Follow-up examinations were performed after clinical and metabolic recovery. DWI demonstrated marked restriction of proton diffusion compatible with cytotoxic or intramyelinic sheath edema in the brainstem, basal ganglia, thalami, cerebellar and periventricular white matter and the cerebral cortex. This was accompanied by the presence of an abnormal branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and branched-chain alpha-keto acids (BCKA) peak at 0.9 ppm as well as elevated lactate on proton spectroscopy in all four patients. The changes in all six patients were reversed with treatment without evidence of volume loss or persistent tissue damage. The presence of cytotoxic or intramyelinic edema as evidenced by restricted water diffusion on DWI, with the presence of lactate on spectroscopy, could imply imminent cell death. However, in the context of metabolic decompensation in MSUD, it appears that changes in cell osmolarity and metabolism can reverse completely after metabolic correction. (orig.)

  12. MR diffusion imaging and MR spectroscopy of maple syrup urine disease during acute metabolic decompensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Wajanat; Zimmerman, Robert A; Wang, Zhiyue J; Berry, Gerard T; Kaplan, Paige B; Kaye, Edward M

    2003-06-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism, which affects the brain tissue resulting in impairment or death if untreated. Imaging studies have shown reversible brain edema during acute metabolic decompensation. The purpose of this paper is to describe the diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and spectroscopy findings during metabolic decompensation and to assess the value of these findings in the prediction of patient outcome. Six patients with the diagnosis of MSUD underwent conventional MR imaging with DWI during acute presentation with metabolic decompensation. Spectroscopy with long TE was performed in four of the six patients. Follow-up examinations were performed after clinical and metabolic recovery. DWI demonstrated marked restriction of proton diffusion compatible with cytotoxic or intramyelinic sheath edema in the brainstem, basal ganglia, thalami, cerebellar and periventricular white matter and the cerebral cortex. This was accompanied by the presence of an abnormal branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and branched-chain alpha-keto acids (BCKA) peak at 0.9 ppm as well as elevated lactate on proton spectroscopy in all four patients. The changes in all six patients were reversed with treatment without evidence of volume loss or persistent tissue damage. The presence of cytotoxic or intramyelinic edema as evidenced by restricted water diffusion on DWI, with the presence of lactate on spectroscopy, could imply imminent cell death. However, in the context of metabolic decompensation in MSUD, it appears that changes in cell osmolarity and metabolism can reverse completely after metabolic correction.

  13. Nutrition management guideline for maple syrup urine disease: an evidence- and consensus-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Dianne M; Allgeier, Courtney; Homer, Caroline; Marriage, Barbara J; Ogata, Beth; Rohr, Frances; Splett, Patricia L; Stembridge, Adrya; Singh, Rani H

    2014-07-01

    In an effort to increase harmonization of care and enable outcome studies, the Genetic Metabolic Dietitians International (GMDI) and the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening and Genetics Collaborative (SERC) are partnering to develop nutrition management guidelines for inherited metabolic disorders (IMD) using a model combining both evidence- and consensus-based methodology. The first guideline to be completed is for maple syrup urine disease (MSUD). This report describes the methodology used in its development: formulation of five research questions; review, critical appraisal and abstraction of peer-reviewed studies and unpublished practice literature; and expert input through Delphi surveys and a nominal group process. This report includes the summary statements for each research question and the nutrition management recommendations they generated. Each recommendation is followed by a standardized rating based on the strength of the evidence and consensus used. The application of technology to build the infrastructure for this project allowed transparency during development of this guideline and will be a foundation for future guidelines. Online open access of the full, published guideline allows utilization by health care providers, researchers, and collaborators who advise, advocate and care for individuals with MSUD and their families. There will be future updates as warranted by developments in research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Skin Lesions Associated with Nutritional Management of Maple Syrup Urine Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaraspong Uaariyapanichkul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD is an inborn error of branched chain amino acids (BCAAs metabolism. We report an infant with MSUD who developed 2 episodes of cutaneous lesions as a result of isoleucine deficiency and zinc deficiency, respectively. Case Presentation. A 12-day-old male infant was presented with poor milk intake and lethargy. The diagnosis of MSUD was made based on clinical and biochemical data. Management and Outcome. Specific dietary restriction of BCAAs was given. Subsequently, natural protein was stopped as the patient developed hospital-acquired infections which resulted in an elevation of BCAAs. Acrodermatitis dysmetabolica developed and was confirmed to be from isoleucine deficiency. At the age of 6 months, the patient developed severe lethargy and was on natural protein exclusion for an extended period. Despite enteral supplementation of zinc sulfate, cutaneous manifestations due to zinc deficiency occurred. Discussion. Skin lesions in MSUD patients could arise from multiple causes. Nutritional deficiency including isoleucine and zinc deficiencies can occur and could complicate the treatment course as a result of malabsorption, even while on enteral supplementation. Parenteral nutrition should be considered and initiated accordingly. Clinical status, as well as BCAA levels, should be closely monitored in MSUD patients.

  15. MAPLE Fabricated Fe3O4@Cinnamomum verum Antimicrobial Surfaces for Improved Gastrostomy Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Georgiana Anghel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamomum verum-functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles of 9.4 nm in size were laser transferred by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE technique onto gastrostomy tubes (G-tubes for antibacterial activity evaluation toward Gram positive and Gram negative microbial colonization. X-ray diffraction analysis of the nanoparticle powder showed a polycrystalline magnetite structure, whereas infrared mapping confirmed the integrity of C. verum (CV functional groups after the laser transfer. The specific topography of the deposited films involved a uniform thin coating together with several aggregates of bio-functionalized magnetite particles covering the G-tubes. Cytotoxicity assays showed an increase of the G-tube surface biocompatibility after Fe3O4@CV treatment, allowing a normal development of endothelial cells up to five days of incubation. Microbiological assays on nanoparticle-modified G-tube surfaces have proved an improvement of anti-adherent properties, significantly reducing both Gram negative and Gram positive bacteria colonization.

  16. Theoretical and experimental investigations of efficient light coupling with spatially varied all dielectric striped waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Y. A.; Tandogan, S. E.; Hayran, Z.; Giden, I. H.; Turduev, M.; Kurt, H.

    2017-07-01

    Integrated photonic systems require efficient, compact, and broadband solutions for strong light coupling into and out of optical waveguides. The present work investigates an efficient optical power transferring the problem between optical waveguides having different widths of in/out terminals. We propose a considerably practical and feasible concept to implement and design an optical coupler by introducing gradually index modulation to the coupler section. The index profile of the coupler section is modulated with a Gaussian function by the help of striped waveguides. The effective medium theory is used to replace the original spatially varying index profile with dielectric stripes of a finite length/width having a constant effective refractive index. 2D and 3D finite-difference time-domain analyzes are utilized to investigate the sampling effect of the designed optical coupler and to determine the parameters that play a crucial role in enhancing the optical power transfer performance. Comparing the coupling performance of conventional benchmark adiabatic and butt couplers with the designed striped waveguide coupler, the corresponding coupling efficiency increases from approximately 30% to 95% over a wide frequency interval. In addition, to realize the realistic optical coupler appropriate to integrated photonic applications, the proposed structure is numerically designed on a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The implemented SOI platform based optical coupler operates in the telecom wavelength regime (λ = 1.55 μm), and the dimensions of the striped coupler are kept as 9.77 μm (along the transverse to propagation direction) and 7.69 μm (along the propagation direction) where the unit distance is fixed to be 465 nm. Finally, to demonstrate the operating design principle, the microwave experiments are conducted and the spot size conversion ratio as high as 7.1:1 is measured, whereas a coupling efficiency over 60% in the frequency range of 5.0-16.0 GHz has been also

  17. Familiarity breeds contempt: effects of striped skunk color, shape, and abundance on wild carnivore behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer S. Hunter

    2009-01-01

    Multicomponent aposematic warning signals are generally accepted to function as a deterrent to predatory attacks; however, the relative importance of specific visual cues used by wild predators to recognize defended animals is poorly understood. Here, I use naturally and reciprocally colored taxidermy models of striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) and gray foxes (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) to explore the impact of aposematic coloration and body shape on the behavior of wild mammalian predators. ...

  18. Effective genes for resistance to stripe rust and virulence of Puccinia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results revealed that stripe rust resistance genes Yr3, Yr5, Yr10, Yr15, Yr26, YrSP and YrCV were resistant, while Yr18 showed moderate susceptibility at all locations. Genes YrA-, Yr2, Yr6, Yr7, Yr8, Yr9, Yr17, Yr27 and gene combinations Opata (Yr27+Yr18) and Super Kauz (Yr9, Yr27, Yr18) were found susceptible.

  19. Species Profiles: Life Histories and Environmental Requirements of Coastal Fishes and Invertebrates (South Atlantic). Striped Bass

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    the sides (Werner 1980). Osteological vomer and paiatines (Hardy 1978). differences are also evident in the three species (Woolcott 1957; Harrell 1984...Percichthyidae) by means of osteological patterns, meristics and Holland, B.F., Jr., and G.F. Yelverton. 1973. morphometrics. Ph.D. Dissertation. Uni...1957. Comparative osteology Striped Bass Subcommittee of the House of of serranid fishes of the genus Roccus Representatives. 9 pp. (Mitchill). Copeia

  20. Tiger Stripes and Cassini ISS High-Resolution Imaging of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Paul; Denk, T.; Giese, B.; McEwen, A. S.; Neukum, G.; Perry, J.; Porco, C. C.; Thomas, P. C.; Turtle, E.; Verbiscer, A.; Veverka, J.

    2008-09-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms of Enceladus’ plumes is one of the most important and challenging tasks for planetary science. Cassini has provided a wealth of data by remote and in-situ data collection, but fundamental details of the vents and their context remain elusive. Three flybys of Enceladus by Cassini in 2008, on August 11 (altitude: 50km), October 9 (30km), and October 31 (200 km) are designed to further our knowledge of Enceladus’ geology and geophysics. Anticipated data include images as good as 7 m/pixel of parts of the geologically active South Polar Terrain (SPT). We targeted six different known eruption sites (Spitale and Porco 2007, Nature 449, 695-697) along Cairo Sulcus, Baghdad Suclus, and Damascus Sulcus, as well as non-active portions of the the "tiger stripes" and bright grooved terrain in between. On each of the three flybys we also plan contiguous ISS broadband multi-spectral mosaics of the entire SPT region so that we can search for volcanically and tectonically driven temporal changes and construct detailed digital terrain maps. Previous images of the tiger stripes and other rift systems on Enceladus resolve geomorphic structures on hundred meter scales or larger. Within those resolution limits, tiger stripes are morphologically distinguished most strongly from comparably sized young looking rifts elsewhere on Enceladus by their prominent upturned flanks, the muted appearance of their surface relief, and their relative absence of distinct cliff faces, probably of solid ice along scarps. The anticipated new high-resolution images will provide critical structural details needed to identify the extent to which unique attributes of tiger stripes are caused by mantling by plume fallout, tectonic deformation, seismic disruption, or perhaps thermal processes. Here, we present a first analysis of the August 11 close flyby images.

  1. Cytogenetics and stripe rust resistance of wheat-Thinopyrum elongatum hybrid derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daiyan; Long, Dan; Li, Tinghui; Wu, Yanli; Wang, Yi; Zeng, Jian; Xu, Lili; Fan, Xing; Sha, Lina; Zhang, Haiqin; Zhou, Yonghong; Kang, Houyang

    2018-01-01

    Amphidiploids generated by distant hybridization are commonly used as genetic bridge to transfer desirable genes from wild wheat species into cultivated wheat. This method is typically used to enhance the resistance of wheat to biotic or abiotic stresses, and to increase crop yield and quality. Tetraploid Thinopyrum elongatum exhibits strong adaptability, resistance to stripe rust and Fusarium head blight, and tolerance to salt, drought, and cold. In the present study, we produced hybrid derivatives by crossing and backcrossing the Triticum durum-Th. elongatum partial amphidiploid ( Trititrigia 8801, 2 n  = 6 ×  = 42, AABBEE) with wheat cultivars common to the Sichuan Basin. By means of cytogenetic and disease resistance analyses, we identified progeny harboring alien chromosomes and measured their resistance to stripe rust. Hybrid progenies possessed chromosome numbers ranging from 40 to 47 (mean = 42.72), with 40.0% possessing 42 chromosomes. Genomic in situ hybridization revealed that the number of alien chromosomes ranged from 1 to 11. Out of the 50 of analyzed lines, five represented chromosome addition (2 n  = 44 = 42 W + 2E) and other five were chromosome substitution lines (2 n  = 42 = 40 W + 2E). Importantly, a single chromosome derived from wheat- Th. elongatum intergenomic Robertsonian translocations chromosome was occurred in 12 lines. Compared with the wheat parental cultivars ('CN16' and 'SM482'), the majority (70%) of the derivative lines were highly resistant to strains of stripe rust pathogen known to be prevalent in China. The findings suggest that these hybrid-derivative lines with stripe rust resistance could potentially be used as germplasm sources for further wheat improvement.

  2. Eliminating Vertical Stripe Defects on Silicon Steel Surface by L1/2 Regularization

    OpenAIRE

    Jing, Wenfeng; Meng, Deyu; Qiao, Chen; Peng, Zhiming

    2011-01-01

    The vertical stripe defects on silicon steel surface seriously affect the appearance and electromagnetic properties of silicon steel products. Eliminating such defects is adifficult and urgent technical problem. This paper investigates the relationship between the defects and their influence factors by classification methods. However, when the common classification methods are used in the problem, we cannot obtain a classifier with high accuracy. Byanalysis of the data set, we find that it is...

  3. Sustained eruptions on Enceladus explained by turbulent dissipation in tiger stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Edwin S.; Rubin, Allan M.

    2016-04-01

    Spacecraft observations suggest that the plumes of Saturn’s moon Enceladus draw water from a subsurface ocean, but the sustainability of conduits linking ocean and surface is not understood. Observations show eruptions from “tiger stripe” fissures that are sustained (although tidally modulated) throughout each orbit, and since the 2005 discovery of the plumes. Peak plume flux lags peak tidal extension by ˜1 rad, suggestive of resonance. Here, we show that a model of the tiger stripes as tidally flexed slots that puncture the ice shell can simultaneously explain the persistence of the eruptions through the tidal cycle, the phase lag, and the total power output of the tiger stripe terrain, while suggesting that eruptions are maintained over geological timescales. The delay associated with flushing and refilling of O(1)-m-wide slots with ocean water causes erupted flux to lag tidal forcing and helps to buttress slots against closure, while tidally pumped in-slot flow leads to heating and mechanical disruption that staves off slot freezeout. Much narrower and much wider slots cannot be sustained. In the presence of long-lived slots, the 106-y average power output of the tiger stripes is buffered by a feedback between ice melt-back and subsidence to O(1010) W, which is similar to observed power output, suggesting long-term stability. Turbulent dissipation makes testable predictions for the final flybys of Enceladus by Cassini. Our model shows how open connections to an ocean can be reconciled with, and sustain, long-lived eruptions. Turbulent dissipation in long-lived slots helps maintain the ocean against freezing, maintains access by future Enceladus missions to ocean materials, and is plausibly the major energy source for tiger stripe activity.

  4. Effects of Emulsion-Based Resonant Infrared Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (RIR-MAPLE on the Molecular Weight of Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Lenhardt

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The molecular weight of a polymer determines key optoelectronic device characteristics, such as internal morphology and charge transport. Therefore, it is important to ensure that polymer deposition techniques do not significantly alter the native polymer molecular weight. This work addresses polymers deposited by resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE. By using a novel emulsion-based target technique, the deposition of smooth, contiguous films with no evidence of chemical degradation have been enabled. However, structural degradation via a reduction in molecular weight remains an open question. The common polymer standard, PMMA, and the optoelectronic polymers, P3HT and MEH-PPV, have been characterized before and after emulsion-based RIR-MAPLE deposition via gel permeation chromatography to determine if RIR-MAPLE affects the deposited polymer molecular weight. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements have also been conducted to verify the absence of chemical degradation. These measurements verify that there is no chemical degradation of the polymers, and that PMMA and P3HT show no structural degradation, but MEH-PPV exhibits a halving of the weight-averaged molecular weight after RIR-MAPLE deposition. Compared with competing laser deposition techniques, RIR-MAPLE is shown to have the least effect on the molecular weight of the resulting thin films.

  5. Deposition of antibacterial of poly(1,3-bis-(p-carboxyphenoxy propane)-co-(sebacic anhydride)) 20:80/gentamicin sulfate composite coatings by MAPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristescu, R.; Popescu, C.; Socol, G.; Visan, A.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Gittard, S. D.; Miller, P. R.; Martin, T. N.; Narayan, R. J.; Andronie, A.; Stamatin, I.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2011-04-01

    We report on thin film deposition of poly(1,3-bis-(p-carboxyphenoxy propane)-co-sebacic anhydride)) 20:80 thin films containing several gentamicin concentrations by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A pulsed KrF* excimer laser was used to deposit the polymer-drug composite thin films. Release of gentamicin from these MAPLE-deposited polymer conjugate structures was assessed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that the functional groups of the MAPLE-transferred materials were not changed by the deposition process nor were new functional groups formed. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that MAPLE may be used to fabricate thin films of good morphological quality. The activity of gentamicin-doped films against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was demonstrated using disk diffusion and antibacterial drop test. Our studies indicate that deposition of polymer-drug composite thin films prepared by MAPLE is a suitable technique for performing controlled drug delivery. Antimicrobial thin film coatings have several medical applications, including use for indwelling catheters and implanted medical devices.

  6. Impact of Resonant Infrared Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) on Morphology and Charge Conduction in Conjugated Polymer and Bulk Heterojunction Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiff-Roberts, Adrienne; McCormick, Ryan; Atewologun, Ayomide

    2014-03-01

    An approach to improve organic photovoltaic efficiency is to increase vertical charge conduction by promoting out-of-plane π- π stacking in conjugated polymers. Resonant infrared matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (RIR-MAPLE) features multiple growth parameters that can be varied to achieve a desired organic thin film property. In addition, RIR-MAPLE enables nanoscale domains in blended polymeric films and multi-layer polymeric films regardless of constituent solubility. Thus, RIR-MAPLE deposition is compared to solution-cast films as a possible approach to increase out-of-plane charge transport in polymers and bulk heterojunctions. Two common, solar cell polymers are investigated: P3HT and PCPDTBT. Materials characterization includes grazing-incidence, wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS) for structural information and two techniques to determine hole mobility: organic field effect transistors to measure in-plane mobility and charge extraction by linearly increasing voltage to measure out-of-plane mobility. Initial indications are that the RIR-MAPLE films have a fundamentally different morphology compared to solution-cast films. In the case of P3HT, an enhancement in out-of-plane π- π stacking was observed by GIWAXS in RIR-MAPLE films compared to solution-cast films. A portion of this research was conducted at CNMS at ORNL.

  7. Deposition of antibacterial of poly(1,3-bis-(p-carboxyphenoxy propane)-co-(sebacic anhydride)) 20:80/gentamicin sulfate composite coatings by MAPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, R.; Popescu, C.; Socol, G.; Visan, A.; Mihailescu, I.N.; Gittard, S.D.; Miller, P.R.; Martin, T.N.; Narayan, R.J.; Andronie, A.; Stamatin, I.; Chrisey, D.B.

    2011-01-01

    We report on thin film deposition of poly(1,3-bis-(p-carboxyphenoxy propane)-co-sebacic anhydride)) 20:80 thin films containing several gentamicin concentrations by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A pulsed KrF* excimer laser was used to deposit the polymer-drug composite thin films. Release of gentamicin from these MAPLE-deposited polymer conjugate structures was assessed. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that the functional groups of the MAPLE-transferred materials were not changed by the deposition process nor were new functional groups formed. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that MAPLE may be used to fabricate thin films of good morphological quality. The activity of gentamicin-doped films against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria was demonstrated using disk diffusion and antibacterial drop test. Our studies indicate that deposition of polymer-drug composite thin films prepared by MAPLE is a suitable technique for performing controlled drug delivery. Antimicrobial thin film coatings have several medical applications, including use for indwelling catheters and implanted medical devices.

  8. Numerical investigation on thermal stratification and striping phenomena in various coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumao Yang; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2000-02-01

    It is important to study thermal stratification and striping phenomena for they can induce thermal fatigue failure of structures. This presentation uses the AQUA code, which has been developed in Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), to investigate the characteristics of these thermal phenomena in water, liquid sodium, liquid lead and carbon dioxide gas. There are altogether eight calculated cases with same Richardson number and initial inlet hot velocity in thermal stratification calculations, in which four cases have same velocity difference between inlet hot and cold fluid, the other four cases with same temperature difference. The calculated results show: (1) The fluid's properties and initial conditions have considerable effects on thermal stratification, which is decided by the combination of such as thermal conduction, viscous dissipation and buoyant force, etc., and (2) The gas has distinctive thermal stratification characteristics from those of liquid because for horizontal flow in the transportation of momentum and energy, the drastic exchange usually happens at the hot-cold interface for liquid, however, the buoyancy and natural convection make the quick exchange position depart from the hot-cold interface for gas. In thermal striping analysis, only the first step work has been finished. The calculated results show: (1) the vertical flow has some difference in thermal stratification characteristics from those of horizontal flow, and (2) For deep thermal striping analysis in the calculated area, more attention should be paid to the center area along Z-direction for liquid and small velocity area for gas. (author)

  9. Aleutian Disease: An Emerging Disease in Free-Ranging Striped Skunks (Mephitis mephitis) From California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDouceur, E E B; Anderson, M; Ritchie, B W; Ciembor, P; Rimoldi, G; Piazza, M; Pesti, D; Clifford, D L; Giannitti, F

    2015-11-01

    Aleutian disease virus (ADV, Amdovirus, Parvoviridae) primarily infects farmed mustelids (mink and ferrets) but also other fur-bearing animals and humans. Three Aleutian disease (AD) cases have been described in captive striped skunks; however, little is known about the relevance of AD in free-ranging carnivores. This work describes the pathological findings and temporospatial distribution in 7 cases of AD in free-ranging striped skunks. All cases showed neurologic disease and were found in a 46-month period (2010-2013) within a localized geographical region in California. Lesions included multisystemic plasmacytic and lymphocytic inflammation (ie, interstitial nephritis, myocarditis, hepatitis, meningoencephalitis, pneumonia, and splenitis), glomerulonephritis, arteritis with or without fibrinoid necrosis in several organs (ie, kidney, heart, brain, and spleen), splenomegaly, ascites/hydrothorax, and/or encephalomalacia with cerebral microangiopathy. ADV infection was confirmed in all cases by specific polymerase chain reaction and/or in situ hybridization. The results suggest that AD is an emerging disease in free-ranging striped skunks in California. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Pathogen dynamics and morbidity of striped skunks in the absence of rabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrt, Stanley D; Kinsel, Michael J; Anchor, Chris

    2010-04-01

    Parasites have the potential to influence the population dynamics of mammalian hosts, either as a single devastating pathogen or as a community effect. Striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) are typically host to rabies, which often regulates population numbers. We assessed micro- and macroparasite dynamics in striped skunk populations in the absence of rabies, to determine if a single pathogen, or community, was responsible for a majority of skunk deaths. We monitored mortality due to pathogens, and prevalence of pathogens via serology and necropsy, in two populations of striped skunks in northern Illinois during 1998-2004. Transmissible pathogens requiring direct transmission (i.e., canine distemper virus, canine parvovirus) exhibited high annual variability in prevalence. In contrast, those pathogens employing a more indirect, environmental route of transmission (i.e., Leptospira interrogans and Toxoplasma gondii) appeared to exhibit relatively less annual variability in prevalence. Skunks were diagnosed with infections from an average of 4.08 (SD=2.52, n=32) species of endoparasites, with a range of 1-11. Macroparasite prevalence and intensity did not vary among seasons, or sex or age of host. Severe infections occurred with multiple parasite species, and patterns of aggregation suggested some parasite species, or more likely the parasite community, act as a limiting mechanism in skunk populations.

  11. Summer habitat selection by striped bass, Morone Saxatilis, in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddle, H.R.; Coutant, C.C.; Wilson, J.L.

    1980-02-01

    Summer habitat selection patterns of 18 adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Cherokee Reservoir were monitored with externally attached temperature-sensing acoustic or radio transmitters from June through September 1977. Mortalities of adult striped bass in this reservoir were hypothesized to be related to high summer temperatures and low dissolved oxygen (DO). The inhabited areas or refuges differed from noninhabited areas by maintaining temperatures less than or equal to 22 C and DO concentrations greater than 5 mg/liter. Total water hardness, pH, and water transparency were not significantly different among refuges and noninhabited areas. Movement of fish outside refuges occurred more frequently and for longer periods during June when the summer pattern of high temperatures and low DO was less severe. Fish experienced temperatures between 15 and 27 C with mean temperatures of individuals ranging from 18.5 to 22.0 C. Several tagged fish migrated outside the refuges and selected the lowest available temperature, generally near 21 C, even though DO concentrations at these temperatures were 3 mg/liter or less. Long-term survival of tagged and nontagged fish outside refuges was undetermined because no fish were tracked outside a refuge for more than 12 days without being lost. This study indicates that temperature strongly influences the behavior of striped bass and that adults of this species may have a thermal preferendum of approximately 21 C.

  12. Eliminating Vertical Stripe Defects on Silicon Steel Surface by L1/2 Regularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Jing

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The vertical stripe defects on silicon steel surface seriously affect the appearance and electromagnetic properties of silicon steel products. Eliminating such defects is adifficult and urgent technical problem. This paper investigates the relationship between the defects and their influence factors by classification methods. However, when the common classification methods are used in the problem, we cannot obtain a classifier with high accuracy. Byanalysis of the data set, we find that it is imbalanced and inconsistent. Because the common classification methods are based on accuracy-maximization criterion, they are not applicable to imbalanced and inconsistent data set. Thus, we propose asupport-degree-maximization criterion and anovel cost-sensitive loss function and also establish an improved L1/2 regularization approach for solution of the problem. Moreover, by employing reweighted iteration gradient boosting algorithm, we obtain a linear classifier with a high support degree. Through analyzing the classifier, we formulate a rule under which the silicon steel vertical stripe defects do not occur in the existing production environment. By applying the proposed rule to 50TW600 silicon steel production, the vertical stripe defects of the silicon steel products have been greatly decreased.

  13. Stripes developed at the strong limit of nematicity in FeSe film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Peng; Xu, Zhilin; Mo, S.-K.; Yi, Ming; Ding, Hao; Hashimoto, M.; Moore, R. G.; Lu, D.-H.; Chen, Xi; Shen, Z.-X.; Xue, Qi-Kun

    2017-10-01

    A single monolayer of iron selenide grown on strontium titanate shows an impressive enhancement of superconductivity compared with the bulk, as well as a novel Fermi surface topology, extreme two-dimensionality, and the possibility of phonon-enhanced electron pairing. For films thicker than one unit cell, however, the electronic structure is markedly different, with a drastically suppressed superconductivity and strong nematicity appearing. The physics driving this extraordinary dichotomy of superconducting behaviour is far from clear. Here, we use low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy to study multilayers of iron selenide grown by molecular beam epitaxy, and find a stripe-type charge ordering instability that develops beneath the nematic state. The charge ordering is visible and pinned in the vicinity of impurities. And as it emerges in the strong limit of nematicity, it suggests that a magnetic fluctuation with a rather small wavevector may be competing with the ordinary collinear antiferromagnetic ordering in multilayer films. The existence of stripes in iron-based superconductors, which resemble the stripe order in cuprates, not only suggests that electronic anisotropy and correlation are playing an important role, but also provides a platform for probing the complex interactions between nematicity, charge ordering, magnetism and superconductivity in high-temperature superconductors.

  14. Reduction of Uncorrelated Striping Noise—Applications for Hyperspectral Pushbroom Acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rogass

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral images are of increasing importance in remote sensing applications. Imaging spectrometers provide semi-continuous spectra that can be used for physics based surface cover material identification and quantification. Preceding radiometric calibrations serve as a basis for the transformation of measured signals into physics based units such as radiance. Pushbroom sensors collect incident radiation by at least one detector array utilizing the photoelectric effect. Temporal variations of the detector characteristics that differ with foregoing radiometric calibration cause visually perceptible along-track stripes in the at-sensor radiance data that aggravate succeeding image-based analyses. Especially, variations of the thermally induced dark current dominate and have to be reduced. In this work, a new approach is presented that efficiently reduces dark current related stripe noise. It integrates an across-effect gradient minimization principle. The performance has been evaluated using artificially degraded whiskbroom (reference and real pushbroom acquisitions from EO-1 Hyperion and AISA DUAL that are significantly covered by stripe noise. A set of quality indicators has been used for the accuracy assessment. They clearly show that the new approach outperforms a limited set of tested state-of-the-art approaches and achieves a very high accuracy related to ground-truth for selected tests. It may substitute recent algorithms in the Reduction of Miscalibration Effects (ROME framework that is broadly used to reduce radiometric miscalibrations of pushbroom data takes.

  15. Implications of white striping and wooden breast abnormalities on quality traits of raw and marinated chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalal, S; Lorenzi, M; Soglia, F; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2015-04-01

    One of the consequences of intense genetic selection for growth of poultry is the recent appearance of abnormalities in chicken breast muscles, such as white striping (characterised by superficial white striations) and wooden breast (characterised by pale and bulged areas with substantial hardness). The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality traits of chicken fillets affected by white striping and wooden breast abnormalities. In two replications, 192 fillets were divided into the following four classes: normal (n=48; absence of any visual defects), white striping (n=48, presence of white striations), wooden breast (n=48; diffusely presence of hardened areas) and white striping/wooden breast (n=48; fillets affected by both abnormalities). Morphology, raw meat texture and technological properties were assessed in both unprocessed (pH, colour, drip loss, cooking loss and cooked meat shear force) and marinated meat (marinade uptake, purge loss, cooking loss and cooked meat shear force). Fillets affected by white striping, wooden breast or both abnormalities exhibited higher breast weights compared with normal fillets (305.5, 298.7, 318.3 and 244.7 g, respectively; Pmeat hardness compared with both normal and the white striping abnormality, for which there was no difference. Overall, the occurrence of the individual and combined white striping and wooden breast abnormalities resulted in substantial reduction in the quality of breast meat, although these abnormalities are associated with distinct characteristics. Wooden breast fillets showed lower marinade uptake and higher cooking losses than white-striped fillets for both unprocessed and marinated meats. On the other hand, white-striped fillets showed a moderate decline in marinade and cooking yield. Fillets affected by both abnormalities had the highest (Pmeat, drip loss, purge loss and cooked meat shear force were negligible or relatively low and of little practical importance. Thus, the presence of white

  16. Hematologic and plasma chemistry RIs for cultured Striped catfish (Pangasius hypophthalmus) in recirculating aquaculture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galagarza, Oscar A; Kuhn, David D; Smith, Stephen A; Hrubec, Terry C

    2017-09-01

    Striped catfish (Pangasius hypophthalmus) is a valuable aquaculture fish species produced primarily in Southeast Asia. In the United States, it is bred as an ornamental species. Striped catfish has high productivity and great demand in numerous countries around the world, yet little is known about its normal physiology. The objective of this study was to establish hematologic and blood chemistry RIs for healthy juvenile Striped catfish. Blood samples were collected from 70 Striped catfish raised in recirculating aquaculture systems. Whole blood and plasma samples were analyzed for multiple hematologic and chemistry variables using standard techniques. The RIs for hematology were as follows: PCV 23.5-35.9%, MCV 106.3-156.6 fL, RBC count 1.79-2.75 × 10 6 cells/μL, thrombocytes 26,318-73,333 cells/μL, total WBC count 36,294-94,286 cells/μL, total lymphocytes 18,997-59,998 cells/μL, small lymphocytes 13,763-51,490 cells/μL, large lymphocytes 715-21,200 cells/μL, granulocytes 4504-18,291 cells/μL, and monocytes 0-7549 cells/μL. Plasma chemistry RIs were the following: ALP 32.7-74.6 U/L, AST 20.3-1235.8 U/L, sodium 135.2-147.7 mmol/L, potassium 3.3-5.0 mmol/L, chloride 120.1-133.6 mmol/L, calcium 2.7-3.6 mmol/L, magnesium 0.9-1.3 mmol/L, phosphorous 1.4-2.7 mmol/L, glucose 4.6-7.6 mmol/L, cholesterol 2.8-5.3 mmol/L, total protein 30-42 g/L, albumin 7-11 g/L, globulin 22-32 g/L, albumin:globulin ratio 0.27-0.37, creatinine 0-8 μmol/L, and osmolality 251.8-327.9 mOsm/kg. Reference intervals reported here can help veterinarians and fish health specialists monitor the health status of Striped catfish under recirculating aquaculture conditions for research, exhibition, and production purposes. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  17. The STRIPES trial--support to rural India's public education system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eble, Alex; Mann, Vera; Bhakta, Preetha; Lakshminarayana, Rashmi; Frost, Chris; Elbourne, Diana; Boone, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Performance of primary school students in India lags far below government expectations, and major disparity exists between rural and urban areas. The Naandi Foundation has designed and implemented a programme using community members to deliver after-school academic support for children in over 1,100 schools in five Indian states. Assessments to date suggest that it might have a substantial effect. This trial aims to evaluate the impact of this programme in villages of rural Andhra Pradesh and will compare test scores for children in three arms: a control and two intervention arms. In both intervention arms additional after-school instruction and learning materials will be offered to all eligible children and in one arm girls will also receive an additional 'kit' with a uniform and clothes. The trial is a cluster-randomised controlled trial conducted in conjunction with the CHAMPION trial. In the CHAMPION trial 464 villages were randomised so that half receive health interventions aiming to reduce neonatal mortality. STRIPES will be introduced in those CHAMPION villages which have a public primary school attended by at least 15 students at the time of a baseline test in 2008. 214 villages of the 464 were found to fulfil above criteria, 107 belonging to the control and 107 to the intervention arm of the CHAMPION trial. These latter 107 villages will serve as control villages in the STRIPES trial. A further randomisation will be carried out within the 107 STRIPES intervention villages allocating half to receive an additional kit for girls on the top of the instruction and learning materials. The primary outcome of the trial is a composite maths and language test score. The study is designed to measure (i) whether the educational intervention affects the exam score of children compared to the control arm, (ii) if the exam scores of girls who receive the additional kit are different from those of girls living in the other STRIPES intervention arm. One of the goals of

  18. The working out of a design rule in case of structures submitted to thermal striping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lejeail, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal striping is a complex phenomenon involving incomplete mixing of hot and cold jets of fluid near a component surface, thus submitted to random fast temperature fluctuations. Because of his nature, the zones where thermal striping can occur in a fast breeder reactor are well known; these areas can suffer fatigue damage. It has been studied by several authors and some thermomechanical design rules against this fatigue damage have been proposed. In the french point of view, the problem is the determination of the margin between the mean and the design strain controlled fatigue curves, giving the allowable maximum temperature range that a component can sustain during his life without crack initiation. The purpose of this paper is the presentation of literature results (particularly on uniaxial smooth specimens) concerning the effects of different factors such as surface finish, environment, weldments, ageing, scatter of fatigue results, prior high strain cycling...on the high temperature fatigue life, which are of first importance for the determination of design factors in case of thermal striping. The remaining question is the combination of these factors. For the analysis of thermal striping test results, it is of great interest and importance to compare the crack initiation cycles and to use a coherent strain for uniaxial and equibiaxial fatigue results, as we show in the interpretation of FAENA and SPLASH tests (performed respectively by Y. Bergamaschi and B. Marini). An analysis based on elastic calculations as proposed in the RCCMR design code gives a good correlation, despite the ambiguous choice of some coefficients in best fit analysis. This problem disappears entirely in case of high cycles/low temperature variations. Then we present a strategy for the accomplishment of simplified thermal striping tests on the FAENA sodium loop in view of acquiring a better design factor knowledge. With this experimental program, we intend to study the interaction of

  19. Analisis Peta Persepsi Pemilihan Atribut Produk Laptop Di Kalangan Mahasiswa Universitas Telkom Kota Bandung (Studi Pada Laptop Acer, Asus, Lenovo, Toshiba, HP, Samsung dan Apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwik Melwinda

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to find out laptop brand selection perceptual map of among Telkom University students. The object of this research study are some of incoming laptop brand in Top Brand 2016 which are Acer, Lenovo, Asus, Toshiba, HP, Samsung and Apple. The attributes of the study are design instrument, operation system, variation, feature set, specification, processor, battery resistance, product price, price resale, warranty, LCD display, storage capacity, product quality, sustainability to defect, and keyboard quality. This research used quantitative method. Research instrument used was a questionnaire, which distributed to 100 respondent sample area of the object of research. In taking a sample of this study, the researcher used Non-Probability technique by using purposive sampling method. The data analysis that used is multidimensional scalling analysis, this analysis gives perception map picture, appeared the position of each laptop brand that is close together or far apart. Laptop brand that showed in a perceptual map will display rank of the best position than another laptop brand. As perception, Apple occupies the first best position among another best laptop brands. That is proved by the rank position from respondents preference based on overall attributes which is more excellent in design, operation system, variation, feature set, specification, processor, battery resistance, product quality, and keyboard quality. For price product attribute is occupied by Lenovo as the cheapest rather than another laptop brands. Meanwhile, for the LCD display attribute, price resale, and storage capacity are occupied by Asus which get the second best rank based overall attribute.

  20. The acropetal effects of indole-3-acetic acid in isolated shoot segments of Acer pseudoplatanus L. II. Possible regulation by a vectorial fieid of auxin waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek A. Adamczyk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The acropetal effects of auxin on elongation of axillary buds and on modulation of the wave-like pattern of basipetal efflux of natural auxin to agar from Acer pseudoplatanus L. shoots were studied. When synthetic IAA was applied to cut surfaces of one of two branches the elongation growth of buds situated on the opposite branch was retarded, suggesting regulation independent of the direct action of the molecules of the applied IAA. Oscillations in basipetal transport of natural auxin along the stem segments were observed corroborating the results of other authors using different tree species. Apical application of synthetic IAA for 1 hour to the lateral branch caused a phase shift of the wave-like pattern of basipetal efflux of natural auxin, when the stem segment above the treated branch was sectioned. The same effect was observed evoked by the laterally growing branch which is interpreted as an effect of natural auxin produced by the actively growing shoot. These modulations could be propagated acropetally at a rate excluding direct action of auxin molecules at the sites of measurement. The results seem to corroborate the hypothesis suggesting that auxin is involved in acropetal regulation of shoot apex growth through its effect upon modulation of the vectorial field which arises when the auxin-waves translocate in cambium.