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Sample records for striated muscle diseases

  1. Striated Muscle Function, Regeneration, and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadrin, I.Y.; Khodabukus, A.; Bursac, N.

    2016-01-01

    As the only striated muscle tissues in the body, skeletal and cardiac muscle share numerous structural and functional characteristics, while exhibiting vastly different size and regenerative potential. Healthy skeletal muscle harbors a robust regenerative response that becomes inadequate after large muscle loss or in degenerative pathologies and aging. In contrast, the mammalian heart loses its regenerative capacity shortly after birth, leaving it susceptible to permanent damage by acute injury or chronic disease. In this review, we compare and contrast the physiology and regenerative potential of native skeletal and cardiac muscles, mechanisms underlying striated muscle dysfunction, and bioengineering strategies to treat muscle disorders. We focus on different sources for cellular therapy, biomaterials to augment the endogenous regenerative response, and progress in engineering and application of mature striated muscle tissues in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we discuss the challenges and perspectives in translating muscle bioengineering strategies to clinical practice. PMID:27271751

  2. Neurohypophyseal hormones: novel actors of striated muscle development and homeostasis

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    Alessandra Costa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980's, novel functional roles of the neurohypophyseal hormones vasopressin and oxytocin have emerged. Several studies have investigated the effects of these two neurohormones on striated muscle tissues, both in vitro and in vivo. The effects of vasopressin on skeletal myogenic cells, developing muscle and muscle homeostasis have been documented. Oxytocin appears to have a greater influence on cardiomyocite differentiation and heart homeostasis. This review summarizes the studies on these novel roles of the two neurohypophyseal hormones, and open the possibility of new therapeutic approaches for diseases affecting striated muscle.

  3. Dynamic Regulation of Sarcomeric Actin Filaments in Striated Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2010-01-01

    In striated muscle, the actin cytoskeleton is differentiated into myofibrils. Actin and myosin filaments are organized in sarcomeres and specialized for producing contractile forces. Regular arrangement of actin filaments with uniform length and polarity is critical for the contractile function. However, the mechanisms of assembly and maintenance of sarcomeric actin filaments in striated muscle are not completely understood. Live imaging of actin in striated muscle has revealed that actin sub...

  4. Systems Biology Approaches to Discerning Striated Muscle Pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Mukund, Kavitha

    2016-01-01

    The human muscular system represents nearly 75% of the body mass and encompasses two major muscle forms- striated and smooth. Striated muscle, composed broadly of myofibers, accompanying membrane systems, cytoskeletal networks together with the metabolic and regulatory machinery, have revealed complexities in composition, structure and function. A disruption to any component within this complex system of interactions lead to disorders of the muscle, typically characterized by muscle fiber los...

  5. Poorly Understood Aspects of Striated Muscle Contraction

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    Alf Månsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contraction results from cyclic interactions between the contractile proteins myosin and actin, driven by the turnover of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Despite intense studies, several molecular events in the contraction process are poorly understood, including the relationship between force-generation and phosphate-release in the ATP-turnover. Different aspects of the force-generating transition are reflected in the changes in tension development by muscle cells, myofibrils and single molecules upon changes in temperature, altered phosphate concentration, or length perturbations. It has been notoriously difficult to explain all these events within a given theoretical framework and to unequivocally correlate observed events with the atomic structures of the myosin motor. Other incompletely understood issues include the role of the two heads of myosin II and structural changes in the actin filaments as well as the importance of the three-dimensional order. We here review these issues in relation to controversies regarding basic physiological properties of striated muscle. We also briefly consider actomyosin mutation effects in cardiac and skeletal muscle function and the possibility to treat these defects by drugs.

  6. Muscle lim protein isoform negatively regulates striated muscle actin dynamics and differentiation.

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    Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Arvanitis, Demetrios A; Papalouka, Vasiliki; Terzis, Gerasimos; Roumeliotis, Theodoros I; Spengos, Konstantinos; Garbis, Spiros D; Manta, Panagiota; Kranias, Evangelia G; Sanoudou, Despina

    2014-07-01

    Muscle lim protein (MLP) has emerged as a critical regulator of striated muscle physiology and pathophysiology. Mutations in cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3 (CSRP3), the gene encoding MLP, have been directly associated with human cardiomyopathies, whereas aberrant expression patterns are reported in human cardiac and skeletal muscle diseases. Increasing evidence suggests that MLP has an important role in both myogenic differentiation and myocyte cytoarchitecture, although the full spectrum of its intracellular roles has not been delineated. We report the discovery of an alternative splice variant of MLP, designated as MLP-b, showing distinct expression in neuromuscular disease and direct roles in actin dynamics and muscle differentiation. This novel isoform originates by alternative splicing of exons 3 and 4. At the protein level, it contains the N-terminus first half LIM domain of MLP and a unique sequence of 22 amino acids. Physiologically, it is expressed during early differentiation, whereas its overexpression reduces C2C12 differentiation and myotube formation. This may be mediated through its inhibition of MLP/cofilin-2-mediated F-actin dynamics. In differentiated striated muscles, MLP-b localizes to the sarcomeres and binds directly to Z-disc components, including α-actinin, T-cap and MLP. The findings of the present study unveil a novel player in muscle physiology and pathophysiology that is implicated in myogenesis as a negative regulator of myotube formation, as well as in differentiated striated muscles as a contributor to sarcomeric integrity. © 2014 FEBS.

  7. Autoradiographic analysis of protein regeneration in striated skeleton muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadoune, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    An autoradiographic study was conducted of protein regeneration in striated muscles aimed at clarifying the contradictions in the literature: while some authors hold that the regeneration rate is identical for all types of myofibril proteins and the myofibril is thus regenerated as a whole, others claim that the regeneration rate differs depending on the type of the myofibril protein. Tritium-labelled leucine incorporation experiments showed the existence of at least 2 pools of newly formed proteins in striated muscles in both adult and young animals. One pool is regenerated in 1 to 2 weeks, the other roughly in a month. The regeneration of proteins is initially more significant in red fibres; thus the rate of myofibril protein regeneration is not uniform. In adult animals regeneration seems to be slower in filaments than in the sarcoplasm and in the mitochondria. (A.K.)

  8. Contracture of Slow Striated Muscle during Calcium Deprivation

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    Irwin, Richard L.; Hein, Manfred M.

    1963-01-01

    When deprived of calcium the slow striated muscle fibers of the frog develop reversible contractures in either hypertonic or isotonic solutions. While calcium deprivation continues because of a flowing calcium-free solution the muscles relax slowly and completely. Restoration of calcium during contracture relaxes the muscle promptly to initial tension. When relaxed during calcium lack the return of calcium does not change tension and the muscle stays relaxed. When contractures are induced by solutions containing small amounts of calcium relaxation does not occur or requires several hours. The rate of tension development depends upon the rate at which calcium moves outward since the contractures develop slower in low concentrations of calcium and are absent or greatly slowed in a stagnant calcium-free solution. Withdrawal of calcium prevents the contractile responses to ACh, KCl, or electrical stimulation through the nerve. Muscles return to their original excitability after calcium is restored. Origin of the contractures is unrelated to nerve activity since they are maximal during transmission failure from calcium lack, occur in denervated muscles, and are not blocked by high concentrations of d-tubocurarine, procaine, or atropine. The experiments also indicate that the contractures do not originate from repetitive activity of muscle membranes. The findings are most simply explained by relating the outward movement of calcium as a link for initiating contraction in slow type striated muscle. PMID:14065284

  9. Expression of various sarcomeric tropomyosin isoforms in equine striated muscles

    OpenAIRE

    Dube, Syamalima; Chionuma, Henry; Matoq, Amr; Alshiekh-Nasany, Ruham; Abbott, Lynn; Poiesz, Bernard J.; Dube, Dipak K.

    2017-01-01

    In order to better understand the training and athletic activity of horses, we must have complete understanding of the isoform diversity of various myofibrillar protein genes like tropomyosin. Tropomyosin (TPM), a coiled-coil dimeric protein, is a component of thin filament in striated muscles. In mammals, four TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4) generate a multitude of TPM isoforms via alternate splicing and/or using different promoters. Unfortunately, our knowledge of TPM isoform diversi...

  10. Expression of various sarcomeric tropomyosin isoforms in equine striated muscles

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    Syamalima Dube

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to better understand the training and athletic activity of horses, we must have complete understanding of the isoform diversity of various myofibrillar protein genes like tropomyosin. Tropomyosin (TPM, a coiled-coil dimeric protein, is a component of thin filament in striated muscles. In mammals, four TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4 generate a multitude of TPM isoforms via alternate splicing and/or using different promoters. Unfortunately, our knowledge of TPM isoform diversity in the horse is very limited. Hence, we undertook a comprehensive exploratory study of various TPM isoforms from horse heart and skeletal muscle. We have cloned and sequenced two sarcomeric isoforms of the TPM1 gene called TPM1α and TPM1κ, one sarcomeric isoform of the TPM2 and one of the TPM3 gene, TPM2α and TPM3α respectively. By qRT-PCR using both relative expression and copy number, we have shown that TPM1α expression compared to TPM1κ is very high in heart. On the other hand, the expression of TPM1α is higher in skeletal muscle compared to heart. Further, the expression of TPM2α and TPM3α are higher in skeletal muscle compared to heart. Using western blot analyses with CH1 monoclonal antibody we have shown the high expression levels of sarcomeric TPM proteins in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Due to the paucity of isoform specific antibodies we cannot specifically detect the expression of TPM1κ in horse striated muscle. To the best of our knowledge this is the very first report on the characterization of sarcmeric TPMs in horse striated muscle.

  11. Compositional studies of myofibrils from rabbit striated muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etlinger, J.D.; Zak, R.; Fischman, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    The localization of high-molecular-weight (80,000-200,000-daltons) proteins in the sarcomere of striated muscle has been studied by coordinated electron-microscopic and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) gel electrophoretic analysis of native myofilaments and extracted and digested myofibrils. Methods were developed for the isolation of thick and thin filaments and of uncontracted myofibrils which are devoid of endoproteases and membrane fragments. Treatment of crude myofibrils with 0.5% Triton X-100 results in the release of a 110,000-dalton component without affecting the myofibrillar structure. Extraction of uncontracted myofibrils with a relaxing solution of high ionic strength results in the complete disappearance of the A band and M line. In this extract, five other protein bands in addition to myosin are resolved on SDS gels: bands M 1 (190,000 daltons) and M 2 (170,000 daltons), which are suggested to be components of the M line; M 3 (150,000 daltons), a degradation product; and a doublet M 4, M 5 (140,000 daltons), thick-filament protein having the same mobility as C protein.

  12. Overexpression of TEAD-1 in transgenic mouse striated muscles produces a slower skeletal muscle contractile phenotype.

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    Tsika, Richard W; Schramm, Christine; Simmer, Gretchen; Fitzsimons, Daniel P; Moss, Richard L; Ji, Juan

    2008-12-26

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors serve important functional roles during embryonic development and in striated muscle gene expression. Our previous work has implicated a role for TEAD-1 in the fast-to-slow fiber-type transition in response to mechanical overload. To investigate whether TEAD-1 is a modulator of slow muscle gene expression in vivo, we developed transgenic mice expressing hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged TEAD-1 under the control of the muscle creatine kinase promoter. We show that striated muscle-restricted HA-TEAD-1 expression induced a transition toward a slow muscle contractile protein phenotype, slower shortening velocity (Vmax), and longer contraction and relaxation times in adult fast twitch extensor digitalis longus muscle. Notably, HA-TEAD-1 overexpression resulted in an unexpected activation of GSK-3alpha/beta and decreased nuclear beta-catenin and NFATc1/c3 protein. These effects could be reversed in vivo by mechanical overload, which decreased muscle creatine kinase-driven TEAD-1 transgene expression, and in cultured satellite cells by TEAD-1-specific small interfering RNA. These novel in vivo data support a role for TEAD-1 in modulating slow muscle gene expression.

  13. In vivo functional and morphological characterization of bone and striated muscle microcirculation in NSG mice.

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    Haider Mussawy

    Full Text Available Organ-specific microcirculation plays a central role in tumor growth, tumor cell homing, tissue engineering, and wound healing. Mouse models are widely used to study these processes; however, these mouse strains often possess unique microhemodynamic parameters, making it difficult to directly compare experiments. The full functional characterization of bone and striated muscle microcirculatory parameters in non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency/y-chain; NOD-Prkds IL2rg (NSG mice has not yet been reported. Here, we established either a dorsal skinfold chamber or femur window in NSG mice (n = 23, allowing direct analysis of microcirculatory parameters in vivo by intravital fluorescence microscopy at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days after chamber preparation. Organ-specific differences were observed. Bone had a significantly lower vessel density but a higher vessel diameter than striated muscle. Bone also showed higher effective vascular permeability than striated muscle. The centerline velocity values were similar in the femur window and dorsal skinfold chamber, with a higher volumetric blood flow in bone. Interestingly, bone and striated muscle showed similar tissue perfusion rates. Knowledge of physiological microhemodynamic values of bone and striated muscle in NSG mice makes it possible to analyze pathophysiological processes at these anatomic sites, such as tumor growth, tumor metastasis, and tumor microcirculation, as well as the response to therapeutic agents.

  14. Embracing change: striated-for-smooth muscle replacement in esophagus development.

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    Krauss, Robert S; Chihara, Daisuke; Romer, Anthony I

    2016-01-01

    The esophagus functions to transport food from the oropharyngeal region to the stomach via waves of peristalsis and transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. The gastrointestinal tract, including the esophagus, is ensheathed by the muscularis externa (ME). However, while the ME of the gastrointestinal tract distal to the esophagus is exclusively smooth muscle, the esophageal ME of many vertebrate species comprises a variable amount of striated muscle. The esophageal ME is initially composed only of smooth muscle, but its developmental maturation involves proximal-to-distal replacement of smooth muscle with striated muscle. This fascinating phenomenon raises two important questions: what is the developmental origin of the striated muscle precursor cells, and what are the cellular and morphogenetic mechanisms underlying the process? Studies addressing these questions have provided controversial answers. In this review, we discuss the development of ideas in this area and recent work that has shed light on these issues. A working model has emerged that should permit deeper understanding of the role of ME development and maturation in esophageal disorders and in the functional and evolutionary underpinnings of the variable degree of esophageal striated myogenesis in vertebrate species.

  15. Chaperones and the Proteasome System: Regulating the Construction and Demolition of Striated Muscle

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    Casey Carlisle

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein folding factors (chaperones are required for many diverse cellular functions. In striated muscle, chaperones are required for contractile protein function, as well as the larger scale assembly of the basic unit of muscle, the sarcomere. The sarcomere is complex and composed of hundreds of proteins and the number of proteins and processes recognized to be regulated by chaperones has increased dramatically over the past decade. Research in the past ten years has begun to discover and characterize the chaperones involved in the assembly of the sarcomere at a rapid rate. Because of the dynamic nature of muscle, wear and tear damage is inevitable. Several systems, including chaperones and the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS, have evolved to regulate protein turnover. Much of our knowledge of muscle development focuses on the formation of the sarcomere but recent work has begun to elucidate the requirement and role of chaperones and the UPS in sarcomere maintenance and disease. This review will cover the roles of chaperones in sarcomere assembly, the importance of chaperone homeostasis and the cooperation of chaperones and the UPS in sarcomere integrity and disease.

  16. VAPB/ALS8 MSP ligands regulate striated muscle energy metabolism critical for adult survival in caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Sung Min Han

    Full Text Available Mutations in VAPB/ALS8 are associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, two motor neuron diseases that often include alterations in energy metabolism. We have shown that C. elegans and Drosophila neurons secrete a cleavage product of VAPB, the N-terminal major sperm protein domain (vMSP. Secreted vMSPs signal through Roundabout and Lar-like receptors expressed on striated muscle. The muscle signaling pathway localizes mitochondria to myofilaments, alters their fission/fusion balance, and promotes energy production. Here, we show that neuronal loss of the C. elegans VAPB homolog triggers metabolic alterations that appear to compensate for muscle mitochondrial dysfunction. When vMSP levels drop, cytoskeletal or mitochondrial abnormalities in muscle induce elevated DAF-16, the Forkhead Box O (FoxO homolog, transcription factor activity. DAF-16 promotes muscle triacylglycerol accumulation, increases ATP levels in adults, and extends lifespan, despite reduced muscle mitochondria electron transport chain activity. Finally, Vapb knock-out mice exhibit abnormal muscular triacylglycerol levels and FoxO target gene transcriptional responses to fasting and refeeding. Our data indicate that impaired vMSP signaling to striated muscle alters FoxO activity, which affects energy metabolism. Abnormalities in energy metabolism of ALS patients may thus constitute a compensatory mechanism counterbalancing skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction.

  17. Morphology of lesions in striated muscle fibres from the beige mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S

    1982-01-01

    Lesions in striated muscle fibres from the beige mouse are described at both the light- and electronmicroscopical levels. The muscles have two types of lesions, one is well defined cores in the fibres and the other is diffusely enlarged intermyofibrillar spaces (IMS). The cores can be filled...... with membrane-like structures or a fluffy unstructured material. In the areas with enlarged IMS comparatively few organelles are present and the muscle fibres seem to be fragmented....

  18. Embracing change: striated-for-smooth muscle replacement in esophagus development

    OpenAIRE

    Krauss, Robert S.; Chihara, Daisuke; Romer, Anthony I.

    2016-01-01

    The esophagus functions to transport food from the oropharyngeal region to the stomach via waves of peristalsis and transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. The gastrointestinal tract, including the esophagus, is ensheathed by the muscularis externa (ME). However, while the ME of the gastrointestinal tract distal to the esophagus is exclusively smooth muscle, the esophageal ME of many vertebrate species comprises a variable amount of striated muscle. The esophageal ME is initia...

  19. Increased hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in striated muscle of tumor-bearing mice.

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    Devine, Raymond D; Bicer, Sabahattin; Reiser, Peter J; Wold, Loren E

    2017-06-01

    Cancer cachexia is a progressive wasting disease resulting in significant effects on the quality of life and high mortality. Most studies on cancer cachexia have focused on skeletal muscle; however, the heart is now recognized as a major site of cachexia-related effects. To elucidate possible mechanisms, a proteomic study was performed on the left ventricles of colon-26 (C26) adenocarcinoma tumor-bearing mice. The results revealed several changes in proteins involved in metabolism. An integrated pathway analysis of the results revealed a common mediator in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). Work by other laboratories has shown that extensive metabolic restructuring in the C26 mouse model causes changes in gene expression that may be affected directly by HIF-1α, such as glucose metabolic genes. M-mode echocardiography showed progressive decline in heart function by day 19 , exhibited by significantly decreased ejection fraction and fractional shortening, along with posterior wall thickness. Using Western blot analysis, we confirmed that HIF-1α is significantly upregulated in the heart, whereas there were no changes in its regulatory proteins, prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein 2 (PHD2) and von Hippel-Lindau protein (VHL). PHD2 requires both oxygen and iron as cofactors for the hydroxylation of HIF-1α, marking it for ubiquination via VHL and subsequent destruction by the proteasome complex. We examined venous blood gas values in the tumor-bearing mice and found significantly lower oxygen concentration compared with control animals in the third week after tumor inoculation. We also examined select skeletal muscles to determine whether they are similarly affected. In the diaphragm, extensor digitorum longus, and soleus, we found significantly increased HIF-1α in tumor-bearing mice, indicating a hypoxic response, not only in the heart, but also in skeletal muscle. These results indicate that HIF-1α may contribute, in part, to the metabolic changes

  20. Kinetic isoforms of intramembrane charge in intact amphibian striated muscle.

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    Huang, C L

    1996-04-01

    The effects of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists ryanodine and daunorubicin on the kinetic and steady-state properties of intramembrane charge were investigated in intact voltage-clamped frog skeletal muscle fibers under conditions that minimized time-dependent ionic currents. A hypothesis that RyR gating is allosterically coupled to configurational changes in dihydropyridine receptors (DHPRs) would predict that such interactions are reciprocal and that RyR modification should influence intramembrane charge. Both agents indeed modified the time course of charging transients at 100-200-microM concentrations. They independently abolished the delayed charging phases shown by q gamma currents, even in fibers held at fully polarized, -90-mV holding potentials; such waveforms are especially prominent in extracellular solutions containing gluconate. Charge movements consistently became exponential decays to stable baselines in the absence of intervening inward or other time-dependent currents. The steady-state charge transfers nevertheless remained equal through the ON and the OFF parts of test voltage steps. The charge-voltage function, Q(VT), shifted by approximately +10 mV, particularly through those test potentials at which delayed q gamma currents normally took place but retained steepness factors (k approximately 8.0 to 10.6 mV) that indicated persistent, steeply voltage-dependent q gamma contributions. Furthermore, both RyR antagonists preserved the total charge, and its variation with holding potential, Qmax (VH), which also retained similarly high voltage sensitivities (k approximately 7.0 to 9.0 mV). RyR antagonists also preserved the separate identities of q gamma and q beta species, whether defined by their steady-state voltage dependence or inactivation or pharmacological properties. Thus, tetracaine (2 mM) reduced the available steady-state charge movement and gave shallow Q(VT) (k approximately 14 to 16 mV) and Qmax (VH) (k approximately 14 to 17 m

  1. Striated muscle fiber size, composition and capillary density in diabetes in relation to neuropathy and muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Christer Swan; Jensen, Jacob Malte; Jakobsen, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) leads to progressive loss of muscle strength in the lower extremities due to muscular atrophy. Changes in vascularization occur in diabetic striated muscle; however, the relationship between these changes and DPN is as yet unexplored. The aim of the present...... study was to evaluate histologic properties and capillarization of diabetic skeletal muscle in relation to DPN and muscle strength. METHODS: Twenty type 1 and 20 type 2 diabetic (T1D and T2D, respectively) patients underwent biopsy of the gastrocnemic muscle, isokinetic dynamometry at the ankle......, electrophysiological studies, clinical examination, and quantitative sensory examinations. Muscle biopsies were stained immunohistochemically and muscle fiber diameter, fiber type distribution, and capillary density determined. Twenty control subjects were also included in the study. RESULTS: No relationship was found...

  2. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and Their Function in Striated Muscle

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    Schindler, Roland F. R.; Scotton, Chiara; French, Vanessa; Ferlini, Alessandra; Brand, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Popeye domain containing (POPDC) genes encode a novel class of cAMP effector proteins, which are abundantly expressed in heart and skeletal muscle. Here, we will review their role in striated muscle as deduced from work in cell and animal models and the recent analysis of patients carrying a missense mutation in POPDC1. Evidence suggests that POPDC proteins control membrane trafficking of interacting proteins. Furthermore, we will discuss the current catalogue of established protein-protein interactions. In recent years, the number of POPDC-interacting proteins has been rising and currently includes ion channels (TREK-1), sarcolemma-associated proteins serving functions in mechanical stability (dystrophin), compartmentalization (caveolin 3), scaffolding (ZO-1), trafficking (NDRG4, VAMP2/3) and repair (dysferlin) or acting as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho-family GTPases (GEFT). Recent evidence suggests that POPDC proteins might also control the cellular level of the nuclear proto-oncoprotein c-Myc. These data suggest that this family of cAMP-binding proteins probably serves multiple roles in striated muscle. PMID:27347491

  3. Isoform composition, gene expression and sarcomeric protein phosphorylation in striated muscle of mice after space flight

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    Vikhlyantsev, Ivan; Ulanova, Anna; Salmov, Nikolay; Gritsyna, Yulia; Bobylev, Alexandr; Rogachevsky, Vadim; Shenkman, Boris; Podlubnaya, Zoya

    Using RT-PCR and SDS-PAGE, changes in isoform composition, gene expression, titin and nebulin phosphorylation, as well as changes in isoform composition of myosin heavy chains in striated muscles of mice were studied after 30-day-long space flight onboard the Russian spacecraft “BION-M” No. 1. The muscle fibre-type shift from slow-to-fast was observed in m. gastrocnemius and m. tibialis anterior of animals from “Flight” group. A decrease in the content of the NT and N2A titin isoforms and nebulin in the skeletal muscles of animals from “Flight” group was found. Meanwhile, significant differences in gene expression of these proteins in skeletal muscles of mice from “Flight” and “Control” groups were not observed. Using Pro-Q Diamond stain, an increase in titin phosphorylation in m. gastrocnemius of mice from “Flight” group was detected. The content of the NT, N2BA and N2B titin isoforms in cardiac muscle of mice from “Flight” and “Control” groups did not differ, nevertheless an increase in titin gene expression in the myocardium of the “Flight” group animals was found. The observed changes will be discussed in the context of theirs role in contractile activity of striated muscles of mice in conditions of weightlessness. This work was supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grants No. 14-04-32240, 14-04-00112). Acknowledgement. We express our gratitude to the teams of Institute of Biomedical Problems RAS and “PROGRESS” Corporation involved in the preparation of the “BION-M” mission.

  4. Immunocytochemical electron microscopic study and western blot analysis of myosin, paramyosin and miniparamyosin in the striated muscle of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and in obliquely striated and smooth muscles of the earthworm Eisenia foetida.

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    Royuela, M; Fraile, B; Cervera, M; Paniagua, R

    1997-04-01

    Miniparamyosin is a paramyosin isoform (55-60 kDa) that has been isolated in insects (Drosophila) and immunolocalized in several species of arthropods, molluscs, annelids and nematodes. In this study, the presence and distribution of this protein, in comparison with that of paramyosin and myosin, has been examined in the striated muscle (tergal depressor of trochanter) of Drosophila melanogaster, and the obliquely striated muscle (body wall) and the smooth muscle (outer layer of the pseudoheart) of the earthworm Eisenia foetida by means of immunocytochemical electron microscopic study and Western blot analysis miniparamyosin paramyosin and myosin antibodies from Drosophila. In the striated muscle of D. melanogaster, the three proteins were immunolocalized along the length of the thick filaments (A-bands). The distribution of immunogold particles along these filaments was uniform. The relative proportions miniparamyosin/paramyosin/myosin (calculated by counting the number of immunogold particles) were: 1/10/68. In the obliquely striated muscle of E. foetida, immunoreactions to the three proteins were also found in the thick filaments, and the relative proportions miniparamyosin/paramyosin/myosin were 1/2.4/6.9. However, whereas the distribution of both myosin and miniparamyosin along the thick filament length was uniform, paramyosin immunolabelling was more abundant in the extremes of thick filaments (the outer zones of A-bands in the obliquely striated muscle), where the thick filaments become thinner than in the centre (the central zone of A-bands), where these filaments are thicker. The relative proportions of paramyosin in the outer and of paramyosin in the central zones of A-bands were 4/1. This irregular distribution of paramyosin along the thick filament length might be actual but it may also be explained by the fusiform shape of thick filaments in the earthworm: assuming that paramyosin is covered by myosin, paramyosin antigens would be more exposed in the

  5. Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors Are Localized in Striated Muscle Mitochondria and Regulate Mitochondrial Respiration

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    Juan Mendizabal-Zubiaga

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptor is widely distributed in the brain and peripheral organs where it regulates cellular functions and metabolism. In the brain, CB1 is mainly localized on presynaptic axon terminals but is also found on mitochondria (mtCB1, where it regulates cellular respiration and energy production. Likewise, CB1 is localized on muscle mitochondria, but very little is known about it. The aim of this study was to further investigate in detail the distribution and functional role of mtCB1 in three different striated muscles. Immunoelectron microscopy for CB1 was used in skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius and rectus abdominis and myocardium from wild-type and CB1-KO mice. Functional assessments were performed in mitochondria purified from the heart of the mice and the mitochondrial oxygen consumption upon application of different acute delta-9-tetrahidrocannabinol (Δ9-THC concentrations (100 nM or 200 nM was monitored. About 26% of the mitochondrial profiles in gastrocnemius, 22% in the rectus abdominis and 17% in the myocardium expressed CB1. Furthermore, the proportion of mtCB1 versus total CB1 immunoparticles was about 60% in the gastrocnemius, 55% in the rectus abdominis and 78% in the myocardium. Importantly, the CB1 immunolabeling pattern disappeared in muscles of CB1-KO mice. Functionally, acute 100 nM or 200 nM THC treatment specifically decreased mitochondria coupled respiration between 12% and 15% in wild-type isolated mitochondria of myocardial muscles but no significant difference was noticed between THC treated and vehicle in mitochondria isolated from CB1-KO heart. Furthermore, gene expression of key enzymes involved in pyruvate synthesis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and mitochondrial respiratory chain was evaluated in the striated muscle of CB1-WT and CB1-KO. CB1-KO showed an increase in the gene expression of Eno3, Pkm2, and Pdha1, suggesting an increased production of pyruvate. In contrast, no significant

  6. Overexpression of Striated Muscle Activator of Rho Signaling (STARS) Increases C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Marita A; Della Gatta, Paul A; Ahmad Mir, Bilal; Kowalski, Greg M; Kloehn, Joachim; McConville, Malcom J; Russell, Aaron P; Lamon, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle growth and regeneration depend on the activation of satellite cells, which leads to myocyte proliferation, differentiation and fusion with existing muscle fibers. Skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation are tightly coordinated by a continuum of molecular signaling pathways. The striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) is an actin binding protein that regulates the transcription of genes involved in muscle cell growth, structure and function via the stimulation of actin polymerization and activation of serum-response factor (SRF) signaling. STARS mediates cell proliferation in smooth and cardiac muscle models; however, whether STARS overexpression enhances cell proliferation and differentiation has not been investigated in skeletal muscle cells. We demonstrate for the first time that STARS overexpression enhances differentiation but not proliferation in C2C12 mouse skeletal muscle cells. Increased differentiation was associated with an increase in the gene levels of the myogenic differentiation markers Ckm, Ckmt2 and Myh4, the differentiation factor Igf2 and the myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) Myf5 and Myf6. Exposing C2C12 cells to CCG-1423, a pharmacological inhibitor of SRF preventing the nuclear translocation of its co-factor MRTF-A, had no effect on myotube differentiation rate, suggesting that STARS regulates differentiation via a MRTF-A independent mechanism. These findings position STARS as an important regulator of skeletal muscle growth and regeneration.

  7. Revealing t-tubules in striated muscle with new optical super-resolution microscopy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isuru D. Jayasinghe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The t-tubular system plays a central role in the synchronisation of calcium signalling and excitation-contraction coupling in most striated muscle cells. Light microscopy has been used for imaging t-tubules for well over 100 years and together with electron microscopy (EM, has revealed the three-dimensional complexities of the t-system topology within cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibres from a range of species. The emerging super-resolution single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM techniques are offering a near 10-fold improvement over the resolution of conventional fluorescence light microscopy methods, with the ability to spectrally resolve nanometre scale distributions of multiple molecular targets. In conjunction with the next generation of electron microscopy, SMLM has allowed the visualisation and quantification of intricate t-tubule morphologies within large areas of muscle cells at an unprecedented level of detail. In this paper, we review recent advancements in the t-tubule structural biology with the utility of various microscopy techniques. We outline the technical considerations in adapting SMLM to study t-tubules and its potential to further our understanding of the molecular processes that underlie the sub-micron scale structural alterations observed in a range of muscle pathologies.

  8. Detection of a troponin I-like protein in non-striated muscle of the tardigrades (water bears).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obinata, Takashi; Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2011-03-01

    Tardigrades, also known as water bears, have somatic muscle fibers that are responsible for movement of their body and legs. These muscle fibers contain thin and thick filaments in a non-striated pattern. However, the regulatory mechanism of muscle contraction in tardigrades is unknown. In the absence of extensive molecular and genomic information, we detected a protein of 31 kDa in whole lysates of tardigrades that cross-reacted with the antibody raised against nematode troponin I (TnI). TnI is a component of the troponin complex that regulates actin-myosin interaction in a Ca(2+)-dependent and actin-linked manner. This TnI-like protein was co-extracted with actin in a buffer containing ATP and EGTA, which is known to induce relaxation of a troponin-regulated contractile system. The TnI-like protein was specifically expressed in the somatic muscle fibers in adult animals and partially co-localized with actin filaments in a non-striated manner. Interestingly, the pharyngeal muscle did not express this protein. These observations suggest that the non-striated somatic muscle of tardigrades has an actin-linked and troponin-regulated system for muscle contraction.

  9. (−)-EPICATECHIN IMPROVES MITOCHONDRIAL RELATED PROTEIN LEVELS AND AMELIORATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN DYSTROPHIC DELTA SARCOGLYCAN NULL MOUSE STRIATED MUSCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; De los Santos, Sergio; Gonzalez-Basurto, Silvia; Canto, Patricia; Mendoza-Lorenzo, Patricia; Palma-Flores, Carlos; Ceballos-Reyes, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Coral-Vazquez, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies (MD) are a group of heterogeneous genetic disorders characterized by progressive striated muscle wasting and degeneration. Although the genetic basis for many of these disorders has been identified, the exact mechanism for disease pathogenesis remains unclear. The presence of oxidative stress (OS) is known to contribute to the pathophysiology and severity of the MD. Mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in MD and likely represents an important determinant of increased OS. Experimental antioxidant therapies have been implemented with the aim of protecting against disease progression, but results from clinical trials have been disappointing. In this study, we explored the capacity of the cacao flavonoid (−)-epicatechin (Epi) to mitigate OS by acting as a positive regulator of mitochondrial structure/function endpoints and redox balance control systems in skeletal and cardiac muscles of dystrophic, δ-sarcoglycan (δ-SG) null mice. Wild type or δ-SG null 2.5 month old male mice were treated via oral gavage with either water (control animals) or Epi (1 mg/kg, twice/day) for 2 weeks. Results evidence a significant normalization of total protein carbonylation, recovery of reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio) and enhanced superoxide dismutase 2, catalase and citrate synthase activities with Epi treatment. These effects were accompanied by increases in protein levels for thiolredoxin, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase 2, catalase and mitochondrial endpoints. Furthermore, we evidence decreases in heart and skeletal muscle fibrosis, accompanied with an improvement in skeletal muscle function with treatment. These results warrant the further investigation of Epi as a potential therapeutic agent to mitigate MD associated muscle degeneration. PMID:25284161

  10. The ‘Goldilocks Zone’ from a redox perspective - Adaptive versus deleterious responses to oxidative stress in striated muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick J Alleman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Consequences of oxidative stress may be beneficial or detrimental in physiological systems. An organ system’s position on the ‘hormetic curve’ is governed by the source and temporality of reactive oxygen species (ROS production, proximity of ROS to moieties most susceptible to damage, and the capacity of the endogenous cellular ROS scavenging mechanisms. Most importantly, the resilience of the tissue (the capacity to recover from damage is a decisive factor, and this is reflected in the disparate response to ROS in cardiac and skeletal muscle. In myocytes, a high oxidative capacity invariably results in a significant ROS burden which in homeostasis, is rapidly neutralized by the robust antioxidant network. The up-regulation of key pathways in the antioxidant network is a central component of the hormetic response to ROS. Despite such adaptations, persistent oxidative stress over an extended time-frame (e.g. months to years inevitably leads to cumulative damages, maladaptation and ultimately the pathogenesis of chronic diseases. Indeed, persistent oxidative stress in heart and skeletal muscle has been repeatedly demonstrated to have causal roles in the etiology of heart disease and insulin resistance, respectively. Deciphering the mechanisms that underlie the divergence between adaptive and maladaptive responses to oxidative stress remains an active area of research for basic scientists and clinicians alike, as this would undoubtedly lead to novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we provide an overview of major types of ROS in striated muscle and the divergent adaptations that occur in response to them. Emphasis is placed on highlighting newly uncovered areas of research on this topic, with particular focus on the mitochondria, and the diverging roles that ROS play in muscle health (e.g., exercise or preconditioning and disease (e.g., cardiomyopathy, ischemia, metabolic syndrome.

  11. Large-scale Models Reveal the Two-component Mechanics of Striated Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Jarosch

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a comprehensive explanation of striated muscle mechanics and contraction on the basis of filament rotations. Helical proteins, particularly the coiled-coils of tropomyosin, myosin and α-actinin, shorten their H-bonds cooperatively and produce torque and filament rotations when the Coulombic net-charge repulsion of their highly charged side-chains is diminished by interaction with ions. The classical “two-component model” of active muscle differentiated a “contractile component” which stretches the “series elastic component” during force production. The contractile components are the helically shaped thin filaments of muscle that shorten the sarcomeres by clockwise drilling into the myosin cross-bridges with torque decrease (= force-deficit. Muscle stretch means drawing out the thin filament helices off the cross-bridges under passive counterclockwise rotation with torque increase (= stretch activation. Since each thin filament is anchored by four elastic α-actinin Z-filaments (provided with forceregulating sites for Ca2+ binding, the thin filament rotations change the torsional twist of the four Z-filaments as the “series elastic components”. Large scale models simulate the changes of structure and force in the Z-band by the different Z-filament twisting stages A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Stage D corresponds to the isometric state. The basic phenomena of muscle physiology, i. e. latency relaxation, Fenn-effect, the force-velocity relation, the length-tension relation, unexplained energy, shortening heat, the Huxley-Simmons phases, etc. are explained and interpreted with the help of the model experiments.

  12. Splicing transitions of the anchoring protein ENH during striated muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Jumpei; Hashimoto, Taiki; Nakamura, Sho; Aita, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Schlegel, Werner; Takimoto, Koichi; Maturana, Andrés D

    2012-05-04

    The ENH (PDLIM5) protein acts as a scaffold to tether various functional proteins at subcellular sites via PDZ and three LIM domains. Splicing of the ENH primary transcript generates various products with different repertories of protein interaction modules. Three LIM-containing ENH predominates in neonatal cardiac tissue, whereas LIM-less ENHs are abundant in adult hearts, as well as skeletal muscles. Here we examine the timing of splicing transitions of ENH gene products during postnatal heart development and C2C12 myoblast differentiation. Real-time PCR analysis shows that LIM-containing ENH1 mRNA is gradually decreased during postnatal heart development, whereas transcripts with the short exon 5 appear in the late postnatal period and continues to increase until at least one month after birth. The splicing transition from LIM-containing ENH1 to LIM-less ENHs is also observed during the early period of C2C12 differentiation. This transition correlates with the emergence of ENH transcripts with the short exon 5, as well as the expression of myogenin mRNA. In contrast, the shift from the short exon 5 to the exon 7 occurs in the late differentiation period. The timing of this late event corresponds to the appearance of mRNA for the skeletal myosin heavy chain MYH4. Thus, coordinated and stepwise splicing transitions result in the production of specific ENH transcripts in mature striated muscles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Intriguing Dual Lattices of the Myosin Filaments in Vertebrate Striated Muscles: Evolution and Advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep K. Luther

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Myosin filaments in vertebrate striated muscle have a long roughly cylindrical backbone with cross-bridge projections on the surfaces of both halves except for a short central bare zone. In the middle of this central region the filaments are cross-linked by the M-band which holds them in a well-defined hexagonal lattice in the muscle A-band. During muscular contraction the M-band-defined rotation of the myosin filaments around their long axes influences the interactions that the cross-bridges can make with the neighbouring actin filaments. We can visualise this filament rotation by electron microscopy of thin cross-sections in the bare-region immediately adjacent to the M-band where the filament profiles are distinctly triangular. In the muscles of teleost fishes, the thick filament triangular profiles have a single orientation giving what we call the simple lattice. In other vertebrates, for example all the tetrapods, the thick filaments have one of two orientations where the triangles point in opposite directions (they are rotated by 60° or 180° according to set rules. Such a distribution cannot be developed in an ordered fashion across a large 2D lattice, but there are small domains of superlattice such that the next-nearest neighbouring thick filaments often have the same orientation. We believe that this difference in the lattice forms can lead to different contractile behaviours. Here we provide a historical review, and when appropriate cite recent work related to the emergence of the simple and superlattice forms by examining the muscles of several species ranging back to primitive vertebrates and we discuss the functional differences that the two lattice forms may have.

  14. Distribution of Myosin Attachment Times Predicted from Viscoelastic Mechanics of Striated Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley M. Palmer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that viscoelastic mechanics of striated muscle, measured as elastic and viscous moduli, emerge directly from the myosin crossbridge attachment time, tatt, also called time-on. The distribution of tatt was modeled using a gamma distribution with shape parameter, p, and scale parameter, β. At 5 mM MgATP, β was similar between mouse α-MyHC (16.0±3.7 ms and β-MyHC (17.9±2.0 ms, and p was higher (P<0.05 for β-MyHC (5.6±0.4 no units compared to α-MyHC (3.2±0.9. At 1 mM MgATP, p approached a value of 10 in both isoforms, but β rose only in the β-MyHC (34.8±5.8 ms. The estimated mean tatt (i.e., pβ product was longer in the β-MyHC compared to α-MyHC, and became prolonged in both isoforms as MgATP was reduced as expected. The application of our viscoelastic model to these isoforms and varying MgATP conditions suggest that tatt is better modeled as a gamma distribution due to its representing multiple temporal events occurring within tatt compared to a single exponential distribution which assumes only one temporal event within tatt.

  15. Testosterone enhances C-14 2-deoxyglucose uptake by striated muscle. [sex hormones and muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toop, J.; Max, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of testosterone propionate (TP) on C-14 2-deoxyglucose (C-14 2DG) uptake was studied in the rat levator ani muscle in vivo using the autoradiographic technique. Following a delay of 1 to 3 h after injecting TP, the rate of C-14 2DG uptake in experimental animals began to increase and continued to increase for at least 20 h. The label, which corresponds to C-14 2-deoxyglucose 6-phosphate, as demonstrated by chromatographic analysis of muscle extracts, was uniformly distributed over the entire muscle and was predominantly in muscle fibers, although nonmuscular elements were also labeled. The 1 to 3 h time lag suggests that the TP effect may be genomic, acting via androgen receptors, rather than directly on muscle membranes. Acceleration of glucose uptake may be an important early event in the anabolic response of the rat levator ani muscle to androgens.

  16. Immunocytochemical electron microscopic study and Western blot analysis of caldesmon and calponin in striated muscle of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and in several muscle cell types of the earthworm Eisenia foetida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royuela, M; Fraile, B; Picazo, M L; Paniagua, R

    1997-01-01

    Caldesmon and calponin are two proteins that are characteristic of vertebrate smooth muscle. In invertebrates, caldesmon has only been studied in some molluscan muscles, and no previous references to calponin have been found. The aim of this paper was to investigate the presence and distribution of caldesmon and calponin in several invertebrate muscle cell types, classified according to their ultrastructural pattern: transversely striated muscle (flight muscle from Drosophila melanogaster), obliquely striated muscle (muscular body wall and inner muscular layer of the pseudoheart from the earthworm Eisenia foetida), and a muscle of doubtful classification which seems to be intermediate between smooth muscle and obliquely striated muscle (outer muscular layer of the pseudoheart, from E. foetida), using electron microscopy immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis. Immunoreactions to both caldesmon and calponin were observed in the outer muscular layer cells from the earthworm pseudoheart but neither in the transversely striated muscle of D. melanogaster nor in the obliquely striated muscle from the earthworm. Present findings suggest that caldesmon- and calponin-like proteins are also present in invertebrate muscle cells, but only in those that are ultrastructurally similar to the vertebrate smooth muscle cells. Since discrepancies in the classification of some invertebrate muscles are common in the literature, the use of distinctive markers, such as troponin, caldesmon and calponin may improve our understanding of the nature and properties of many invertebrate muscles showing an ultrastructural pattern that does not resemble any of the classic muscle types.

  17. Contracture Coupling of Slow Striated Muscle in Non-Ionic Solutions and Replacement of Calcium, Sodium, and Potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Richard L.; Hein, Manfred M.

    1964-01-01

    The development of contracture related to changes of ionic environment (ionic contracture coupling) has been studied in the slowly responding fibers of frog skeletal muscle. When deprived of external ions for 30 minutes by use of solutions of sucrose, mannitol, or glucose, the slow skeletal muscle fibers, but not the fast, develop pronounced and easily reversible contractures. Partial replacement of the non-ionic substance with calcium or sodium reduces the development of the contractures but replacement by potassium does not. The concentration of calcium necessary to prevent contracture induced by a non-ionic solution is greater than that needed to maintain relaxation in ionic solutions. To suppress the non-ionic-induced contractures to the same extent as does calcium requires several fold higher concentrations of sodium. Two types of ionic contracture coupling occur in slow type striated muscle fibers: (a) a calcium deprivation type which develops maximally at full physiological concentration of external sodium, shows a flow rate dependency for the calcium-depriving fluid, and is lessened when the sodium concentration is decreased by replacement with sucrose; (b) a sodium deprivation type which occurs maximally without external sodium, is lessened by increasing the sodium concentration, and has no flow rate dependency for ion deprivation. Both types of contracture are largely prevented by the presence of sufficient calcium. There thus seem to be calcium- and sodium-linked processes at work in the ionic contracture coupling of slow striated muscle. PMID:14127603

  18. Creatine kinase deficiency in striated mouse muscle : biochemical and physiological studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veld, Frank ter

    2003-01-01

    The balance between ATP energy demand and supply is essential in muscle cells. The creatine kinase system fulfils both a transporting and buffering role in muscle cells, whereby fluctuations in ATP free-energy demand can be counterbalanced. Removal of the creatine kinase proteins with the aid of

  19. Histochemical studies on striated muscle fibres of the beige mutant mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S

    1982-01-01

    A histological study of cylindric structures in skeletal muscle fibres from beige mice with the Chediak-Higashi syndrome was carried out. The muscle tissue was investigated morphologically with a differential interference contrast microscope and stained for glycogen, lipid, and basophile elements...

  20. Esterases in striated muscle from mice with the Chediak-Higashi syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Moe, D

    1981-01-01

    In this paper a localized strong reaction for non-specific esterase forming cylindric structures is described within skeletal muscle fibres from the beige mouse. It seems from zymograms and protein electrophoresis that this esterase is membrane bound, highly reactive and present in rather small...... amounts within the muscle fibres....

  1. Development of Trichosomoides nasalis (Nematoda: Trichinelloidea) in the murid host: evidence for larval growth in striated muscle fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, E.H.; Diagne, M.; Junker, K.; Duplantier, J.M.; Ba, K.; Vallée, I.; Bain, O.

    2012-01-01

    Trichosomoides nasalis (Trichinelloidea) is a parasite of Arvicanthis niloticus (Muridae) in Senegal. Female worms that harbour dwarf males in their uteri, occur in the epithelium of the nasal mucosa. Young laboratory-bred A. niloticus were either fed females containing larvated eggs or intraperitoneally injected with motile first-stage larvae recovered from female uteri. Both resulted in successful infection. Organs examined during rodent necropsy were blood and lymphatic circulatory systems (heart, large vessels, lymphnodes), lungs, liver, kidneys, thoracic and abdominal cavities, thoracic and abdominal muscular walls, diaphragm, tongue, and nasal mucosa. Development to adult nasal stages took three weeks. Recovery of newly hatched larvae from the peritoneal fluid at four-eight hours after oral infection suggests a direct passage from the stomach or intestinal wall to the musculature. However, dissemination through the blood, as observed with Trichinella spiralis, cannot be excluded even though newly hatched larvae of T. nasalis are twice as thick (15 μm). Developing larvae were found in histological sections of the striated muscle of the abdominal and thoracic walls, and larvae in fourth moult were dissected from these sites. Adult females were found in the deep nasal mucosa where mating occurred prior to worms settling in the nasal epithelium. The present study shows a remarkable similarity between T. nasalis and Trichinella species regarding muscle tropism, but the development of T. nasalis is not arrested at the late first-larval stage and does not induce transformation of infected fibres into nurse cells. T. nasalis seems a potential model to study molecular relations between trichinelloid larvae and infected muscle fibres. PMID:22314237

  2. Wheelchair marathon racing causes striated muscle distress in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, M; Tajima, F; Furusawa, K; Mizushima, T; Ogata, H

    1999-03-01

    To assess the effects of wheelchair marathon racing in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) on circulating muscle enzymes and myoglobin. Thirty-one men with SCI, including 25 wheelchair marathon athletes and 6 sedentary men. Serum myoglobin (Mb), creatine kinase (CK) activity, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured in participants of the 1995 Oita International Wheelchair Marathon Race (42.195 km). Blood samples were obtained 24 hours before, immediately after, 24 hours after, and 7 days after the race. Marathon racing resulted in significant increases in serum Mb, total CK activity, and LDH (pathletes with SCI. Completion of the marathon race did not cause cardiac muscle damage, however. Elevated muscle enzyme levels likely resulted from muscle distress rather than from dehydration.

  3. Impaired contractility of the circular striated urethral sphincter muscle may contribute to stress urinary incontinence in female zucker fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung-Chin; Lin, Guiting; Wang, Guifang; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda; Lu, Zhihua; Wang, Lin; Banie, Lia; Lue, Tom F

    2017-08-01

    Obesity has been an independent risk factor for female stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the mechanism of this association remains unknown. The aim of this study is to validate the hypothesis that urethral dysfunction is a possible contributor to SUI in obese women. Ten Zucker Fatty (ZF) (ZUC-Lepr fa 185) and 10 Zucker Lean (ZL) (ZUC-Lepr fa 186) female rats at 12-week-old were used in this experiment. The urethral sphincter rings were harvested from the bladder neck through to the most proximal 2/3 regions. In the organ bath study, single pulses of electrical field stimulation (EFS) were applied. For the fatiguing stimulation, repeated multi-pulse EFS with 70 mA were applied at frequency of 5 Hz for 5 min. Caffeine-containing Krebs' solution was administrated to contract the urethra until the contraction began to reach a plateau for 10 min. We performed immunofluorescence staining of the urethra after the experiment was finished. Compared to ZL controls, ZF rats had significantly impaired muscle contractile activity (MCA) (P female rats had significantly impaired contractile properties of striated urethral sphincter, suggesting urethral dysfunction could be an important contributor to SUI in obesity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Impact of a nickel-reduced stainless steel implant on striated muscle microcirculation: a comparative in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, C N; Burian, B; Perlick, L; Wimmer, M A; Wallny, T; Schmitt, O; Diedrich, O

    2001-12-05

    The impairment of skeletal muscle microcirculation by a biomaterial may have profound consequences. With moderately good physical and corrosion characteristics, implant-quality stainless steel is particularly popular in orthopedic surgery. However, due to the presence of a considerable amount of nickel in the alloy, concern has been voiced in respect to local tissue responses. More recently a stainless steel alloy with a significant reduction of nickel has become commercially available. We, therefore, studied in vivo nutritive perfusion and leukocytic response of striated muscle to this nickel-reduced alloy, and compared these results with those of the materials conventional stainless steel and titanium. Using the hamster dorsal skinfold chamber preparation and intravital microscopy, we could demonstrate that reduction of the nickel quantity in a stainless steel implant has a positive effect on local microvascular parameters. Although the implantation of a conventional stainless steel sample led to a distinct and persistent activation of leukocytes combined with disruption of the microvascular endothelial integrity, marked leukocyte extravasation, and considerable venular dilation, animals with a nickel-reduced stainless steel implant showed only a moderate increase of these parameters, with a clear tendency of recuperation. Titanium implants merely caused a transient increase of leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction within the first 120 min, and no significant change in macromolecular leakage, leukocyte extravasation, or venular diameter. Pending biomechanical and corrosion testing, nickel-reduced stainless steel may be a viable alternative to conventional implant-quality stainless steel for biomedical applications. Concerning tolerance by the local vascular system, titanium currently remains unsurpassed. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 57: 404-412, 2001

  5. Striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) is reduced in ageing human skeletal muscle and targeted by miR-628-5p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, A P; Wallace, M A; Kalanon, M; Zacharewicz, E; Della Gatta, P A; Garnham, A; Lamon, S

    2017-06-01

    The striated muscle activator of Rho signalling (STARS) is a muscle-specific actin-binding protein. The STARS signalling pathway is activated by resistance exercise and is anticipated to play a role in signal mechanotransduction. Animal studies have reported a negative regulation of STARS signalling with age, but such regulation has not been investigated in humans. Ten young (18-30 years) and 10 older (60-75 years) subjects completed an acute bout of resistance exercise. Gene and protein expression of members of the STARS signalling pathway and miRNA expression of a subset of miRNAs, predicted or known to target members of STARS signalling pathway, were measured in muscle biopsies collected pre-exercise and 2 h post-exercise. For the first time, we report a significant downregulation of the STARS protein in older subjects. However, there was no effect of age on the magnitude of STARS activation in response to an acute bout of exercise. Finally, we established that miR-628-5p, a miRNA regulated by age and exercise, binds to the STARS 3'UTR to directly downregulate its transcription. This study describes for the first time the resistance exercise-induced regulation of STARS signalling in skeletal muscle from older humans and identifies a new miRNA involved in the transcriptional control of STARS. © 2016 The Authors. Acta Physiologica published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Physiological Society.

  6. Role of mitochondria-cytoskeleton interactions in respiration regulation and mitochondrial organization in striated muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varikmaa, Minna; Bagur, Rafaela; Kaambre, Tuuli; Grichine, Alexei; Timohhina, Natalja; Tepp, Kersti; Shevchuk, Igor; Chekulayev, Vladimir; Metsis, Madis; Boucher, François; Saks, Valdur; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Guzun, Rita

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work was to study the regulation of respiration and energy fluxes in permeabilized oxidative and glycolytic skeletal muscle fibers, focusing also on the role of cytoskeletal protein tubulin βII isotype in mitochondrial metabolism and organization. By analyzing accessibility of mitochondrial ADP, using respirometry and pyruvate kinase-phosphoenolpyruvate trapping system for ADP, we show that the apparent affinity of respiration for ADP can be directly linked to the permeability of the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). Previous studies have shown that MOM permeability in cardiomyocytes can be regulated by VDAC interaction with cytoskeletal protein, βII tubulin. We found that in oxidative soleus skeletal muscle the high apparent Km for ADP is associated with low MOM permeability and high expression of non-polymerized βII tubulin. Very low expression of non-polymerized form of βII tubulin in glycolytic muscles is associated with high MOM permeability for adenine nucleotides (low apparent Km for ADP). © 2013.

  7. Protein Kinase CK2 Regulates Leukocyte-Endothelial Cell Interactions during Ischemia and Reperfusion in Striated Skin Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampofo, Emmanuel; Widmaier, Daniela; Montenarh, Mathias; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) causes tissue injury by inflammatory processes. This involves the upregulation of endothelial surface proteins by phospho-regulated signaling pathways, resulting in enhanced interactions of leukocytes with endothelial cells. Recently, we found that protein kinase CK2 is a crucial regulator of leukocyte-mediated inflammation. Therefore, in this study we investigated the involvement of CK2 in leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions during I/R injury. We first analyzed the inhibitory action of (E)-3-(2,3,4,5-tetrabromophenyl)acrylic acid (TBCA) and CX-4945 on CK2 kinase activity and the viability of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC). To mimic I/R conditions in vitro, HDMEC were exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation and the expression of adhesion molecules was analyzed by flow cytometry. Moreover, we analyzed in vivo the effect of CK2 inhibition on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in the dorsal skinfold chamber model of I/R injury by means of repetitive intravital fluorescence microscopy and immunohistochemistry. We found that TBCA and CX-4945 suppressed the activity of CK2 in HDMEC without affecting cell viability. This was associated with a significant downregulation of E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 after in vitro hypoxia and reoxygenation. In vivo, CX-4945 treatment significantly decreased the numbers of adherent and transmigrated leukocytes in striated muscle tissue exposed to I/R. Our findings indicate that CK2 is involved in the regulation of leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions during I/R by mediating the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. The striated muscles in pulmonary arterial hypertension: adaptations beyond the right ventricle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, E.; Rain, S.; Bogaard, H.J.; Handoko, M.L.; Stienen, G.J.M.; Vonk Noordegraaf, A.; Ottenheijm, C.A.C.; de Man, F.S.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal lung disease characterised by progressive remodelling of the small pulmonary vessels. The daily-life activities of patients with PAH are severely limited by exertional fatigue and dyspnoea. Typically, these symptoms have been explained by right heart

  9. Structural studies of the waves in striated muscle fibres shortened passively below their slack length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L M; González-Serratos, H; Huxley, A F

    1984-06-01

    Isolated skeletal muscle fibres of Rana pipiens were shortened below their slack length by longitudinal compression in a gelatine block, and examined by light and electron microscopy. Waves appeared sharply when the striation spacing (S) reached a critical value (about 2 microns) and increased in height with further compression down to S = 1.6 microns while the resting band pattern was maintained. The waves were plane, helical or irregular, with wave lengths of 5-15 striations. The Z lines usually ran perpendicular to the direction of the myofibrils to form wedge-shaped sarcomeres. The bending occurred mainly in the I band. The thin filaments ran stiffly for about 30 nm from the Z line and then bent toward the A band. The thick filaments bent very slightly, particularly at their tips. The edges of the A band were indistinct, and there were no dense lines at the A-I junction. The appearance of the individual sarcomeres resembled those in relaxed myofibrils at slack length, with no Cm bands. The H zone was only seen occasionally in the slack and wavy fibres examined. In very thin sections the individual thin filaments were seen to end in the pseudo-H zone, and not to cross the M line. There was a single array of not more than six thin filaments round each thick one in transverse sections of the M-line region. These observations suggest that the narrowing of the bands observed in fresh wavy fibres is due mainly to the obliquity of the myofibrils, and that the sarcomere length measured parallel to their axis is longer than the striation spacing. The relationship between sarcomere length and the length of the thin-filament complex is discussed.

  10. Isoform Composition and Gene Expression of Thick and Thin Filament Proteins in Striated Muscles of Mice after 30-Day Space Flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ulanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in isoform composition, gene expression of titin and nebulin, and isoform composition of myosin heavy chains as well as changes in titin phosphorylation level in skeletal (m. gastrocnemius, m. tibialis anterior, and m. psoas and cardiac muscles of mice were studied after a 30-day-long space flight onboard the Russian spacecraft “BION-M” number 1. A muscle fibre-type shift from slow-to-fast and a decrease in the content of titin and nebulin in the skeletal muscles of animals from “Flight” group was found. Using Pro-Q Diamond staining, an ~3-fold increase in the phosphorylation level of titin in m. gastrocnemius of mice from the “Flight” group was detected. The content of titin and its phosphorylation level in the cardiac muscle of mice from “Flight” and “Control” groups did not differ; nevertheless an increase (2.2 times in titin gene expression in the myocardium of flight animals was found. The observed changes are discussed in the context of their role in the contractile activity of striated muscles of mice under conditions of weightlessness.

  11. Tachykinins are involved in local reflex modulation of vagally mediated striated muscle contractions in the rat esophagus via tachykinin NK1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, T; Shimizu, Y; Boudaka, A; Wörl, J; Takewaki, T

    2006-05-12

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the hypothesis of the presence of a local neural reflex modulating the vagally mediated contractions of striated muscle in the rat esophagus and to determine the possible involvement of tachykinins in such a local neural reflex. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve evoked twitch contractile responses that were abolished by d-tubocurarine (5 microM). Capsaicin (1-100 microM) inhibited the vagally mediated twitch contractions o f the normal rat esophageal preparations concentration-dependently but not those of the neonatally capsaicin-treated ones. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 microM), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, blocked the inhibitory effect of capsaicin and exogenous application of a nitric oxide donor (1 mM) inhibited the vagally mediated twitch contractions. Capsaicin suppressed acetylcholine release from the normal rat esophageal segments evoked by vagus nerve stimulation but not that from the neonatally capsaicin-treated ones. A selective tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist (0.1 or 1 microM) attenuated the inhibitory effect of capsaicin. However, antagonists of tachykinin NK2, tachykinin NK3 and calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors (1 microM) did not have any effect. A tachykinin NK1 receptor agonist (1 or 5 microM) inhibited the vagally mediated twitch contractions, which was prevented by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (100 microM). These data suggest that the rat esophagus might have a local neural reflex inhibiting the vagally mediated striated muscle motility, which consists of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons and myenteric nitrergic neurons, and that tachykinins might be involved in the neural reflex through tachykinin NK1 receptors.

  12. Seasonal changes in isoform composition of giant proteins of thick and thin filaments and titin (connectin) phosphorylation level in striated muscles of bears (Ursidae, Mammalia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmov, N N; Vikhlyantsev, I M; Ulanova, A D; Gritsyna, Yu V; Bobylev, A G; Saveljev, A P; Makariushchenko, V V; Maksudov, G Yu; Podlubnaya, Z A

    2015-03-01

    Seasonal changes in the isoform composition of thick and thin filament proteins (titin, myosin heavy chains (MyHCs), nebulin), as well as in the phosphorylation level of titin in striated muscles of brown bear (Ursus arctos) and hibernating Himalayan black bear (Ursus thibetanus ussuricus) were studied. We found that the changes that lead to skeletal muscle atrophy in bears during hibernation are not accompanied by a decrease in the content of nebulin and intact titin-1 (T1) isoforms. However, a decrease (2.1-3.4-fold) in the content of T2 fragments of titin was observed in bear skeletal muscles (m. gastrocnemius, m. longissimus dorsi, m. biceps) during hibernation. The content of the stiffer N2B titin isoform was observed to increase relative to the content of its more compliant N2BA isoform in the left ventricles of hibernating bears. At the same time, in spite of the absence of decrease in the total content of T1 in the myocardium of hibernating brown bear, the content of T2 fragments decreased ~1.6-fold. The level of titin phosphorylation only slightly increased in the cardiac muscle of hibernating brown bear. In the skeletal muscles of brown bear, the level of titin phosphorylation did not vary between seasons. However, changes in the composition of MyHCs aimed at increasing the content of slow (I) and decreasing the content of fast (IIa) isoforms of this protein during hibernation of brown bear were detected. Content of MyHCs I and IIa in the skeletal muscles of hibernating Himalayan black bear corresponded to that in the skeletal muscles of hibernating brown bear.

  13. Response of the JAK-STAT pathway to mammalian hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrel striated muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Samantha M; Tessier, Shannon N; Tye, Joann; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-03-01

    Over the course of the torpor-arousal cycle, hibernators must make behavioral, physiological, and molecular rearrangements in order to keep a very low metabolic rate and retain organ viability. 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) remain immobile during hibernation, and although the mechanisms of skeletal muscle survival are largely unknown, studies have shown minimal muscle loss in hibernating organisms. Additionally, the ground squirrel heart undergoes cold-stress, reversible cardiac hypertrophy, and ischemia-reperfusion without experiencing fatal impairment. This study examines the role of the Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway in the regulation of cell stress in cardiac and skeletal muscles, comparing euthermic and hibernating ground squirrels. Immunoblots showed a fivefold decrease in JAK3 expression during torpor in skeletal muscle, along with increases in STAT3 and 5 phosphorylation and suppressors of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS1) protein levels. Immunoblots also showed coordinated increases in STAT1, 3 and 5 phosphorylation and STAT1 inhibitor protein expression in cardiac muscle during torpor. PCR analysis revealed that the activation of these pro-survival signaling cascades did not result in coordinate changes in downstream genes such as anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family gene expression. Overall, these results indicate activation of the JAK-STAT pathway in both cardiac and skeletal muscles, suggesting a response to cellular stress during hibernation.

  14. Standardization of metachromatic staining method of myofibrillar ATPase activity of myosin to skeletal striated muscle of mules and donkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora H.F. D'Angelis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at standardizing the pre-incubation and incubation pH and temperature used in the metachromatic staining method of myofibrillar ATPase activity of myosin (mATPase used for asses and mules. Twenty four donkeys and 10 mules, seven females and three males, were used in the study. From each animal, fragments from the Gluteus medius muscle were collected and percutaneous muscle biopsy was performed using a 6.0-mm Bergström-type needle. In addition to the metachromatic staining method of mATPase, the technique of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium reductase (NADH-TR was also performed to confirm the histochemical data. The histochemical result of mATPase for acidic pre-incubation (pH=4.50 and alkaline incubation (pH=10.50, at a temperature of 37ºC, yielded the best differentiation of fibers stained with toluidine blue. Muscle fibers were identified according to the following colors: type I (oxidative, light blue, type IIA (oxidative-glycolytic, intermediate blue and type IIX (glycolytic, dark blue. There are no reports in the literature regarding the characterization and distribution of different types of muscle fibers used by donkeys and mules when performing traction work, cargo transportation, endurance sports (horseback riding and marching competitions. Therefore, this study is the first report on the standardization of the mATPase technique for donkeys and mules.

  15. Multi-tasking role of the mechanosensing protein Ankrd2 in the signaling network of striated muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Belgrano

    Full Text Available Ankrd2 (also known as Arpp together with Ankrd1/CARP and DARP are members of the MARP mechanosensing proteins that form a complex with titin (N2A/calpain 3 protease/myopalladin. In muscle, Ankrd2 is located in the I-band of the sarcomere and moves to the nucleus of adjacent myofibers on muscle injury. In myoblasts it is predominantly in the nucleus and on differentiation shifts from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In agreement with its role as a sensor it interacts both with sarcomeric proteins and transcription factors.Expression profiling of endogenous Ankrd2 silenced in human myotubes was undertaken to elucidate its role as an intermediary in cell signaling pathways. Silencing Ankrd2 expression altered the expression of genes involved in both intercellular communication (cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, endocytosis, focal adhesion, tight junction, gap junction and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and intracellular communication (calcium, insulin, MAPK, p53, TGF-β and Wnt signaling. The significance of Ankrd2 in cell signaling was strengthened by the fact that we were able to show for the first time that Nkx2.5 and p53 are upstream effectors of the Ankrd2 gene and that Ankrd1/CARP, another MARP member, can modulate the transcriptional ability of MyoD on the Ankrd2 promoter. Another novel finding was the interaction between Ankrd2 and proteins with PDZ and SH3 domains, further supporting its role in signaling. It is noteworthy that we demonstrated that transcription factors PAX6, LHX2, NFIL3 and MECP2, were able to bind both the Ankrd2 protein and its promoter indicating the presence of a regulatory feedback loop mechanism.In conclusion we demonstrate that Ankrd2 is a potent regulator in muscle cells affecting a multitude of pathways and processes.

  16. S100A1: A Regulator of Striated Muscle Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ Handling, Sarcomeric, and Mitochondrial Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Völkers

    2010-01-01

    S100A1 has further been detected at different sites within the cardiac sarcomere indicating potential roles in myofilament function. More recently, a study reported a mitochondrial location of S100A1 in cardiomyocytes. Additionally, normalizing the level of S100A1 protein by means of viral cardiac gene transfer in animal heart failure models resulted in a disrupted progression towards cardiac failure and enhanced survival. This brief review is confined to the physiological and pathophysiological relevance of S100A1 in cardiac and skeletal muscle Ca2+ handling with a particular focus on its potential as a molecular target for future therapeutic interventions.

  17. Microvascular response of striated muscle to metal debris. A comparative in vivo study with titanium and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, C N; Diedrich, O; Burian, B; Schmitt, O; Wimmer, M A

    2003-01-01

    Wear products of metal implants are known to induce biological events which may have profound consequences for the microcirculation of skeletal muscle. Using the skinfold chamber model and intravital microscopy we assessed microcirculatory parameters in skeletal muscle after confrontation with titanium and stainless-steel wear debris, comparing the results with those of bulk materials. Implantation of stainless-steel bulk and debris led to a distinct activation of leukocytes combined with a disruption of the microvascular endothelial integrity and massive leukocyte extravasation. While animals with bulk stainless steel showed a tendency to recuperation, stainless-steel wear debris induced such severe inflammation and massive oedema that the microcirculation broke down within 24 hours after implantation. Titanium bulk caused only a transient increase in leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction within the first 120 minutes and no significant change in macromolecular leakage, leukocyte extravasation or venular diameter. Titanium wear debris produced a markedly lower inflammatory reaction than stainless-steel bulk, indicating that a general benefit of bulk versus debris could not be claimed. Depending on its constituents, wear debris is capable of eliciting acute inflammation which may result in endothelial damage and subsequent failure of microperfusion. Our results indicate that not only the bulk properties of orthopaedic implants but also the microcirculatory implications of inevitable wear debris play a pivotal role in determining the biocompatibility of an implant.

  18. Contractures and muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, R Jon

    2016-08-01

    Contractures are one of a handful of signs in muscle disease, besides weakness and its distribution, whose presence can help guide us diagnostically, a welcome star on the horizon. Contractures are associated with several myopathies, some with important cardiac manifestations, and consequently are important to recognise; their presence may also provide us with a potential satisfying 'penny dropping' diagnostic moment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. MR imaging of muscle diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, W.A.; Zeitler, E.; Schalke, B.C.G.

    1986-01-01

    Because of high soft-tissue contrast, MR imaging is especially suitable for the investigation of muscle diseases. Between March 1984 and March 1986, 76 patients with different types of muscle diseases were examined using a 1-T superconductive magnet (Siemens Magnetom). Studied were 14 patients with progressive muscular dystrophy (including carriers), 32 patients with myositis, four patients with myotonic dystrophy, six patients with spinal muscular atrophy, and 20 patients with other muscle diseases, including metabolic disorders. MR imaging showed typical signal patterns in affected muscle groups. These patterns can be used in the differential diagnosis, in biopsy planning, or in evaluation of response to therapy. The T1/T2 ratio especially seems to indicate very early stages of muscle disease

  20. Nuclear Positioning in Muscle Development and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Eric eFolker; Mary eBaylies

    2013-01-01

    Muscle disease as a group is characterized by muscle weakness, muscle loss, and impaired muscle function. Although the phenotype is the same, the underlying cellular pathologies, and the molecular causes of these pathologies, are diverse. One common feature of many muscle disorders is the mispositioning of myonuclei. In unaffected individuals myonuclei are spaced throughout the periphery of the muscle fiber such that the distance between nuclei is maximized. However, in diseased muscles, th...

  1. Muscle cramps in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shivang S; Fallon, Michael B

    2013-11-01

    Muscle cramps are common in patients with liver disease and adversely influence quality of life. The exact mechanisms by which they occur remain unclear, although a number of pathophysiological events unique to liver disease may contribute. Clinical studies have identified alterations in 3 areas: nerve function, energy metabolism, and plasma volume/electrolytes. Treatments have focused on these particular areas with varied results. This review will focus on the clinical features of muscle cramps in patients with liver disease and review potential mechanisms and current therapies. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Distinctive serum miRNA profile in mouse models of striated muscular pathologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Vignier

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are critically important for disease diagnosis and monitoring. In particular, close monitoring of disease evolution is eminently required for the evaluation of therapeutic treatments. Classical monitoring methods in muscular dystrophies are largely based on histological and molecular analyses of muscle biopsies. Such biopsies are invasive and therefore difficult to obtain. The serum protein creatine kinase is a useful biomarker, which is however not specific for a given pathology and correlates poorly with the severity or course of the muscular pathology. The aim of the present study was the systematic evaluation of serum microRNAs (miRNAs as biomarkers in striated muscle pathologies. Mouse models for five striated muscle pathologies were investigated: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C (LGMD2C, Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM. Two-step RT-qPCR methodology was elaborated, using two different RT-qPCR miRNA quantification technologies. We identified miRNA modulation in the serum of all the five mouse models. The most highly dysregulated serum miRNAs were found to be commonly upregulated in DMD, LGMD2D and LGMD2C mouse models, which all exhibit massive destruction of striated muscle tissues. Some of these miRNAs were down rather than upregulated in the EDMD mice, a model without massive myofiber destruction. The dysregulated miRNAs identified in the HCM model were different, with the exception of one dysregulated miRNA common to all pathologies. Importantly, a specific and distinctive circulating miRNA profile was identified for each studied pathological mouse model. The differential expression of a few dysregulated miRNAs in the DMD mice was further evaluated in DMD patients, providing new candidates of circulating miRNA biomarkers for DMD.

  3. Fiber types in the striated urethral and anal sphincters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Reske-Nielsen, E

    1983-01-01

    Seven normal human striated urethral and anal sphincters obtained by autopsy were examined using histochemical techniques. In both the urethral sphincter and the subcutaneous (s.c.) and superficial part of the anal sphincter a characteristic pattern with two populations of muscle fibers, abundant...

  4. Metabolic Diseases of Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease, composes and produces music in his home studio. He moved from Michigan to California to pursue ... helps recruit and coordinate in-home help MDA’s public health education program helps you stay abreast of ...

  5. Muscle channelopathies and related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Muscle channelopathies and related disorders are neuromuscular disorders predominantly of genetic origin which are caused by mutations in ion channels or genes that play a role in muscle excitability. They include different forms of periodic paralysis which are characterized by acute and reversible attacks of muscle weakness concomitant to changes in blood potassium levels. These disorders may also present as distinguishable myotonic syndromes (slowed muscle relaxation) which have in common lack of involvement of dystrophic changes of the muscle, in contrast to dystrophia myotonica. Recent advances have been made in the diagnosis of these different disorders, which require, in addition to a careful clinical evaluation, detailed EMG and molecular study. Although these diseases are rare, they deserve attention since patients may benefit from drugs which can dramatically improve their condition. Patients may have atypical presentations, sometimes life-threatening, which may delay a proper diagnosis, mostly in the first months of life. The creation of specialized reference centers in the Western world has greatly benefited the proper recognition of these neuromuscular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Respiratory muscle dysfunction in animal models of hypoxic disease: antioxidant therapy goes from strength to strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Halloran KD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ken D O’Halloran,1 Philip Lewis2 1Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland; 2Institute and Policlinic for Occupational Medicine, Environmental Medicine and Preventative Research, University Hospital of Cologne, Germany Abstract: The striated muscles of breathing play a critical role in respiratory homeostasis governing blood oxygenation and pH regulation. Upper airway dilator and thoracic pump muscles retain a remarkable capacity for plasticity throughout life, both in health and disease states. Hypoxia, whatever the cause, is a potent driver of respiratory muscle remodeling with evidence of adaptive and maladaptive outcomes for system performance. The pattern, duration, and intensity of hypoxia are key determinants of respiratory muscle structural-, metabolic-, and functional responses and adaptation. Age and sex also influence respiratory muscle tolerance of hypoxia. Redox stress emerges as the principal protagonist driving respiratory muscle malady in rodent models of hypoxic disease. There is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that antioxidant intervention alleviates hypoxia-induced respiratory muscle dysfunction, and that N-acetyl cysteine, approved for use in humans, is highly effective in preventing hypoxia-induced respiratory muscle weakness and fatigue. We posit that oxygen homeostasis is a key driver of respiratory muscle form and function. Hypoxic stress is likely a major contributor to respiratory muscle malaise in diseases of the lungs and respiratory control network. Animal studies provide an evidence base in strong support of the need to explore adjunctive antioxidant therapies for muscle dysfunction in human respiratory disease. Keywords: respiratory muscle, diaphragm, upper airway, hypoxia, antioxidants, N-acetyl-cysteine, OSA, COPD

  7. Dose-dependent separation of the hypertrophic and myotoxic effects of the β2-adrenergic receptor agonist clenbuterol in rat striated muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burniston, Jatin G; WA, Clark; Tan, Lip-Bun; Goldspink, David F

    2007-01-01

    Muscle growth in response to large doses (i.e., mg.kg-1) of β2-adrenergic receptor agonists has been consistently reported. However, such doses may also induce myocyte death in the heart and skeletal muscles and hence may not be applicable safe doses for humans. Here, we report the hypertrophic and myotoxic effects of different doses of clenbuterol. Rats were infused with clenbuterol (range, 1 μg to 1 mg.kg-1) for 14 days. Muscle protein content, myofiber cross-sectional area and myocyte death were then investigated. Infusions of ≥10 μg.kg-1.d-1 of clenbuterol significantly (Pclenbuterol in the absence of myocyte death. PMID:16411205

  8. The evolutionary origin of bilaterian smooth and striated myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Thibaut; Fischer, Antje HL; Steinmetz, Patrick RH; Lauri, Antonella; Bertucci, Paola; Arendt, Detlev

    2016-01-01

    The dichotomy between smooth and striated myocytes is fundamental for bilaterian musculature, but its evolutionary origin is unsolved. In particular, interrelationships of visceral smooth muscles remain unclear. Absent in fly and nematode, they have not yet been characterized molecularly outside vertebrates. Here, we characterize expression profile, ultrastructure, contractility and innervation of the musculature in the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii and identify smooth muscles around the midgut, hindgut and heart that resemble their vertebrate counterparts in molecular fingerprint, contraction speed and nervous control. Our data suggest that both visceral smooth and somatic striated myocytes were present in the protostome-deuterostome ancestor and that smooth myocytes later co-opted the striated contractile module repeatedly – for example, in vertebrate heart evolution. During these smooth-to-striated myocyte conversions, the core regulatory complex of transcription factors conveying myocyte identity remained unchanged, reflecting a general principle in cell type evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19607.001 PMID:27906129

  9. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Emerson Randolph

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies, such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some muscular dystrophies. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on their embryologic origins and the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease.

  10. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  11. Nuclear Positioning in Muscle Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eFolker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Muscle disease as a group is characterized by muscle weakness, muscle loss, and impaired muscle function. Although the phenotype is the same, the underlying cellular pathologies, and the molecular causes of these pathologies, are diverse. One common feature of many muscle disorders is the mispositioning of myonuclei. In unaffected individuals myonuclei are spaced throughout the periphery of the muscle fiber such that the distance between nuclei is maximized. However, in diseased muscles, the nuclei are often clustered within the center of the muscle cell. Although this phenotype has been acknowledged for several decades, it is often ignored as a contributor to muscle weakness. Rather, these nuclei are taken only as a sign of muscle repair. Here we review the evidence that mispositioned myonuclei are not merely a symptom of muscle disease but also a cause. Additionally, we review the working models for how myonuclei move from two different perspectives, from that of the nucleus and from that of the cytoskeleton. We further compare and contrast these mechanisms with the mechanisms of nuclear movement in other cell types both to draw general themes for nuclear movement and to identify muscle-specific considerations. Finally, we focus on factors that can be linked to muscle disease and find that genes that regulate myonuclear movement and positioning have been linked to muscular dystrophy. Although the cause-effect relationship is largely speculative, recent data indicate that the position of nuclei should no longer be considered only a means to diagnose muscle disease.

  12. Morphoquantitative effects on striated skeletal muscle of Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus subjected to a diet utilized in young children from rural Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Tivane Nhamposse

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mozambique is a country of sub-Saharan Africa where about 55% of the population lives below the absolute poverty line with less than one meal a day hardly surviving based on by donations. Food insecurity and precarious nutrition, especially in children, are factors that induce to levels of 44% of chronic malnutrition (CD in infants. The CD is responsible for one third of deaths in children under five years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphoquantitative effects in gastrocnemius muscle of Wistar rats fed with a diet utilized by people from rural areas of Mozambique. We used 75 Wistar rats weighing approximately 300 g divided in three groups: nourished or control (N, malnourished (D, and Mozambique or experimental group (M, measured at birth and at weaning. The animals were kept under the same housing conditions, temperature, humidity and light, but with different diets depending on the group: Group N with normal protein diet (20% casein, Group D with hypo-proteic diet (5% casein, and Group M with Mozambique diet. In all groups we evaluated the body mass at birth and weaning, and collected the right gastrocnemius muscle of male pups at weaning for analysis. Serial sections of 10 μm were performed in a cryostat prior to histology techniques of hematoxylin and eosin, picrosirius, NADH-tr and analysis in transmission electron microscope. Statistical evaluation was determined by analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey tests. Significant differences were found between groups N, D and M. In group M were observed a great variation of body mass that was approximately similar to group D; Group M also showed the same changes in muscle fiber which exhibited round-shaped contours, and predominance of type III collagen, similarly to malnourished group (D. Ultra-structurally, animals from Mozambique displayed a disorganization of the Z lines of sarcomeres, myofibrils disruption, decreased cross-sectional area and a smaller proportion of

  13. The Time Course of the Loss and Recovery of Contracture Ability in Frog Striated Muscle Following Exposure to Ca-Free Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, J. V.

    1965-01-01

    Using area under the contracture curve to quantitate contractures, the diffusion coefficient of calcium ions within the frog toe muscle during washout in a calcium-free solution and subsequent recovery after reintroduction of calcium to the bathing solution was calculated to be about 2 x 10-6 cm2/sec. The diffusion coefficient measured during washout was found to be independent of temperature or initial calcium ion concentration. During recovery it was found to decrease if the temperature was lowered. This was likely due to the repolarization occurring after the depolarizing effect of the calcium-free solution. The relation between contracture area and [Ca]o was found to be useful over a wider range than that between maximum tension and [Ca]o. The normalized contracture areas were larger at lower calcium concentrations if the contractures were produced with cold potassium solutions or if NO3 replaced Cl in the bathing solutions. Decreasing the potassium concentration of the contracture solution to 50 mM from 115 mM did not change the relation between [Ca]o and the normalized area. If the K concentration of the bathing solution was increased, the areas were decreased at lower concentrations of Ca. PMID:14324991

  14. Interstitial cells of Cajal in the striated musculature of the mouse esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, A; Mignon, S

    2001-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are important regulatory cells in the smooth muscle coats of the digestive tract. Expression of the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase was used in this study as a marker to study their distribution and development in the striated musculature of the mouse esophagus...... scarce in both muscle layers of the thoracic esophagus, while their number increased steeply toward the cardia in the striated portion of the intraabdominal esophagus. They did not form networks and had no relationship with intrinsic myenteric ganglia and motor end-plates. They were often close to nerve...... but absent in adult ICC-deficient KitW-lacZ/KitWv mice. Interstitial cells of Cajal were identified by electron microscopy by their ultrastructure in the striated muscle of the esophagus and exhibited Xgal labeling, while fibroblasts and muscle cells were unlabeled. Interstitial cells of Cajal are scattered...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: rippling muscle disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JP, Fricke B, Meinck HM, Torbergsen T, Engels H, Voss B, Vorgerd M. Homozygous mutations in caveolin-3 cause a severe form of rippling muscle disease. Ann Neurol. 2003 Apr;53(4):512-20. Citation on PubMed Lamb GD. Rippling muscle disease may be caused by " ...

  16. The striated MR nephrogram, not a reflection of pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trout, Andrew T.; Care, Marguerite M.; Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology - MLC 5031, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Zhang, Bin [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We have intermittently observed low signal striations in the kidneys on delayed post-contrast MR exams of the spine. While we suspected these striations were due to concentrated gadolinium, the clinical importance of this finding was uncertain. To describe the striated MR nephrogram (low signal striations in the kidney) and assess its clinical relevance. Retrospective review of delayed post-contrast MRIs of the spine (mean: 45 min after contrast administration). The presence of the striated MR nephrogram was correlated with imaging parameters (field strength, time since contrast), and findings (gadolinium in the bladder, inferior vena cava and aorta diameters) and with clinical factors (history of renal disease, laboratory values). Seven hundred seventy-three exams performed on 229 patients, 8.3 ± 5.3 years of age, were reviewed. The striated MR nephrogram was observed in 102/773 examinations (13.2%) and was present on at least one study in 54/229 patients (23.6%). The presence of striations was associated with the specific magnet on which the exam was performed (P < 0.01) but not with magnet field strength. Serum creatinine was minimally lower in patients with striations (0.43 ± 0.12 vs. 0.49 ± 0.18 mg/dL, P = 0.002), but no other clinical or historical data, including time from contrast administration (P = 0.54), fluid status (P = 0.17) and clinical history of renal disease (P = 0.14), were predictive of the presence of striations. The striated MR nephrogram was observed in 13% of delayed post-contrast MR exams of the spine. Precipitating factors are unclear, but the striated nephrogram does not appear to be a marker of clinically apparent renal dysfunction. (orig.)

  17. Computed tomography of muscles in neuromuscular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serratrice, G.

    1986-01-01

    137 patients with neuromuscular diseases were studied by CT scan. Four levels were chosen: mid-calf, mid-thigh, pelvic girdle, and spinal muscles. The scans were compared with normal control scans taken from the same sites. The patients were divided into those with myogenic diseases and those with neurogenic diseases. Of the 102 patients with myogenic changes, 17 had X-linked dystrophy, 13 had facio-scapulo-humeral dystrophy, 22 had limb girdle dystrophy, 19 had myotonic dystrophy, 14 had inflammatory muscle diseases, and 17 had miscellaneous muscular diseases. Of the 35 patients with neurogenic changes, 8 had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), 16 had chronic spinal amyotrophies, 9 had peripheral neuropathies, and 2 had Friedreich's disease. The analysis of muscles changes (volume, outline, density) was established on the following muscles: tibialis anterior, peroneus, soleus, gastrocnemius mediale, gastrocnemius laterale, quadriceps, semitendinosus, semimembranosus, sartorius, adductor, gracilis, gluteus, spine extensors, and psoas

  18. Disposition of the striated urethral sphincter and its relation to the prostate in human fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano A. Favorito

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the arrangement of the muscle fibers of the striated urethral sphincter and its relationship with the prostate during the fetal period in humans. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We analyzed 17 prostates from well preserved fresh human fetuses ranging in age from 10 to 31 weeks postconception (WPC. Transversal sections were obtained and stained with Gomori's trichrome and immunolabeled with anti alpha-actin antibody. RESULTS: We found that the urethral striated sphincter (rabdosphincter is located on the periphery of the smooth muscle and there was no merge between striated and smooth muscle fibers in any fetal period. In the prostate apex, the striated sphincter shows a circular arrangement and covers completely the urethra externally, whereas adjacent to verumontanum, it looks like a "horseshoe" and covers only the anterior and lateral surfaces of the urethra. Near the bladder neck, in fetuses younger than 20 WPC, we have found striated muscle fibers only at the anterior surface of the prostate, while in fetuses older than 20 WPC, the striated muscle covers the anterior and lateral surfaces of the prostate. CONCLUSIONS: The urethral sphincter muscle covers the anterior and lateral surfaces of the urethra in all fetuses older than 20 WPC, close to the bladder neck and at the distal prostate. In the region of the prostate apex, the urethral sphincter covers completely the urethra circularly. The knowledge of the normal anatomy of the urethral sphincter in fetuses could be important to understand its alterations in congenital anomalies involving the base of the bladder, the bladder neck and the proximal urethra.

  19. Neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wattjes, Mike P.; Kley, Rudolf A.; Fischer, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Driven by increasing numbers of newly identified genetic defects and new insights into the field of inherited muscle diseases, neuromuscular imaging in general and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular are increasingly being used to characterise the severity and pattern of muscle involvement. Although muscle biopsy is still the gold standard for the establishment of the definitive diagnosis, muscular imaging is an important diagnostic tool for the detection and quantification of dystrophic changes during the clinical workup of patients with hereditary muscle diseases. MRI is frequently used to describe muscle involvement patterns, which aids in narrowing of the differential diagnosis and distinguishing between dystrophic and non-dystrophic diseases. Recent work has demonstrated the usefulness of muscle imaging for the detection of specific congenital myopathies, mainly for the identification of the underlying genetic defect in core and centronuclear myopathies. Muscle imaging demonstrates characteristic patterns, which can be helpful for the differentiation of individual limb girdle muscular dystrophies. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of current methods and applications as well as future perspectives in the field of neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases. We also provide diagnostic algorithms that might guide us through the differential diagnosis in hereditary myopathies. (orig.)

  20. Neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattjes, Mike P. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, De Boelelaan 1117, HV, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kley, Rudolf A. [Klinken Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University, Department of Neurology, Neuromuscular Centre Ruhrgebiet, Bochum (Germany); Fischer, Dirk [University Hospital of Basel, Department of Neurology, Basel (Switzerland); University Children' s Hospital Basel, Department of Neuropaediatrics, Basel (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    Driven by increasing numbers of newly identified genetic defects and new insights into the field of inherited muscle diseases, neuromuscular imaging in general and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular are increasingly being used to characterise the severity and pattern of muscle involvement. Although muscle biopsy is still the gold standard for the establishment of the definitive diagnosis, muscular imaging is an important diagnostic tool for the detection and quantification of dystrophic changes during the clinical workup of patients with hereditary muscle diseases. MRI is frequently used to describe muscle involvement patterns, which aids in narrowing of the differential diagnosis and distinguishing between dystrophic and non-dystrophic diseases. Recent work has demonstrated the usefulness of muscle imaging for the detection of specific congenital myopathies, mainly for the identification of the underlying genetic defect in core and centronuclear myopathies. Muscle imaging demonstrates characteristic patterns, which can be helpful for the differentiation of individual limb girdle muscular dystrophies. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive overview of current methods and applications as well as future perspectives in the field of neuromuscular imaging in inherited muscle diseases. We also provide diagnostic algorithms that might guide us through the differential diagnosis in hereditary myopathies. (orig.)

  1. Radioisotope scanning in inflammatory muscle disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.B.; Swift, T.R.; Spies, S.M.

    1976-06-01

    Fourteen whole-body rectilinear bone scans using technetium 99m-polyphosphate were done in nine patients with well-documented inflammatory myopathy (either polymyositis or dermatomyositis). In all nine patients the scans showed evidence of increased muscle labeling. Muscle uptake was markedly increased in one patient, moderately increased in two patients, and minimally increased in six patients. The degree of muscle labeling correlated with the severity of the muscle weakness at the time the scan was done. In four patients, who received high-dose corticosteroid treatment, muscle uptake was decreased following therapy. These findings suggest that radioisotope scanning may be useful in the diagnosis and management of patients with inflammatory muscle diseases.

  2. Quantitative comparison of striated toolmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiker, Martin; Keereweer, Isaac; Pieterman, René; Vermeij, Erwin; van der Weerd, Jaap; Zoon, Peter

    2014-09-01

    A comparison of striated toolmarks by human examiners is dependent on the experience of the expert and includes a subjective judgment within the process. In this article an automated method is presented for objective comparison of striated marks of screwdrivers. The combination of multi-scale registration (alignment) of toolmarks, that accounts for shift and scaling, with global cross correlation as objective toolmark similarity metric renders the approach robust with respect to large differences in angle of attack and moderate toolmark compression. In addition, a strategy to distinguish between relevant and non-relevant spatial frequency ranges (geometric details) is presented. The performance of the method is evaluated using 3D topography scans of experimental toolmarks of 50 unused screwdrivers. Known match and known non-match similarity distributions are estimated including a large range of angles of attack (15, 30, 45, 60 and 75°) for the known matches. It is demonstrated that the system has high discriminatory power, even if the toolmarks are made at a difference in angle of attack of larger than 15°. The probability distributions are subsequently employed to determine likelihood ratios. A comparison of the results of the automated method with the outcome of a toolmark comparison experiment involving three experienced toolmark examiners reveals, that the automated system is more powerful in correctly supporting the hypothesis of common origin for toolmarks with a large difference in angle of attack (30°). In return, the rate of toolmark comparisons that yield incorrect support for the hypothesis of common origin is higher for the automated system. In addition, a comparison between estimating known match and known non-match distributions using 2D and 3D data is presented and it is shown that for toolmarks of unused screwdrivers, relying on 3D is slightly better than relying on 2D data. Finally, a comparison between estimating known match and known non

  3. Diaphragm Muscle Adaptation to Sustained Hypoxia: Lessons from Animal Models with Relevance to High Altitude and Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Lewis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The diaphragm is the primary inspiratory pump muscle of breathing. Notwithstanding its critical role in pulmonary ventilation, the diaphragm like other striated muscles is malleable in response to physiological and pathophysiological stressors, with potential implications for the maintenance of respiratory homeostasis. This review considers hypoxic adaptation of the diaphragm muscle, with a focus on functional, structural, and metabolic remodeling relevant to conditions such as high altitude and chronic respiratory disease. On the basis of emerging data in animal models, we posit that hypoxia is a significant driver of respiratory muscle plasticity, with evidence suggestive of both compensatory and deleterious adaptations in conditions of sustained exposure to low oxygen. Cellular strategies driving diaphragm remodeling during exposure to sustained hypoxia appear to confer hypoxic tolerance at the expense of peak force-generating capacity, a key functional parameter that correlates with patient morbidity and mortality. Changes include, but are not limited to: redox-dependent activation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF and MAP kinases; time-dependent carbonylation of key metabolic and functional proteins; decreased mitochondrial respiration; activation of atrophic signaling and increased proteolysis; and, altered functional performance. Diaphragm muscle weakness may be a signature effect of sustained hypoxic exposure. We discuss the putative role of reactive oxygen species as mediators of both advantageous and disadvantageous adaptations of diaphragm muscle to sustained hypoxia, and the role of antioxidants in mitigating adverse effects of chronic hypoxic stress on respiratory muscle function.

  4. Respiratory muscle function in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterspacher, Stephan; Schlager, Daniel; Walker, David J; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Windisch, Wolfram; Kabitz, Hans-Joachim

    2013-07-01

    Interstitial lung diseases limit daily activities, impair quality of life and result in (exertional) dyspnoea. This has mainly been attributed to a decline in lung function and impaired gas exchange. However, the contribution of respiratory muscle dysfunction to these limitations remains to be conclusively investigated. Interstitial lung disease patients and matched controls performed body plethysmography, a standardised 6-min walk test, volitional tests (respiratory drive (P0.1), global maximal inspiratory mouth occlusion pressure (PImax), sniff nasal pressure (SnPna) and inspiratory muscle load) and nonvolitional tests on respiratory muscle function and strength (twitch mouth and transdiaphragmatic pressure during bilateral magnetic phrenic nerve stimulation (TwPmo and TwPdi)). 25 patients and 24 controls were included in the study. PImax and SnPna remained unaltered (both p>0.05), whereas P0.1 and the load on the inspiratory muscles were higher (both prespiratory muscle strength remains preserved. Central respiratory drive and the load imposed on the inspiratory muscles are increased. Whether impaired respiratory muscle function impacts morbidity and mortality in interstitial lung disease patients needs to be investigated in future studies.

  5. Exercise in muscle glycogen storage diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai Rasmus; Haller, Ronald G; Vissing, John

    2015-01-01

    oxidation. Such changes may be detrimental for persons with GSD from a metabolic perspective. However, exercise may alter skeletal muscle substrate metabolism in ways that are beneficial for patients with GSD, such as improving exercise tolerance and increasing fatty acid oxidation. In addition, a regular......Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase...... in glycogen storage that disrupts contractile function and/or 2) a reduced substrate turnover below the block, which inhibits skeletal muscle ATP production. Immobility is associated with metabolic alterations in muscle leading to an increased dependence on glycogen use and a reduced capacity for fatty acid...

  6. Interstitial cells of Cajal in the striated musculature of the mouse esophagus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, A; Mignon, S

    2001-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are important regulatory cells in the smooth muscle coats of the digestive tract. Expression of the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase was used in this study as a marker to study their distribution and development in the striated musculature of the mouse esophagus. Sec...

  7. Altered pharyngeal muscles in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Liancai; Sobotka, Stanislaw; Chen, Jingming; Su, Hungxi; Sanders, Ira; Adler, Charles H; Shill, Holly A; Caviness, John N; Samanta, Johan E; Beach, Thomas G

    2012-06-01

    Dysphagia (impaired swallowing) is common in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and is related to aspiration pneumonia, the primary cause of death in PD. Therapies that ameliorate the limb motor symptoms of PD are ineffective for dysphagia. This suggests that the pathophysiology of PD dysphagia may differ from that affecting limb muscles, but little is known about potential neuromuscular abnormalities in the swallowing muscles in PD. This study examined the fiber histochemistry of pharyngeal constrictor and cricopharyngeal sphincter muscles in postmortem specimens from 8 subjects with PD and 4 age-matched control subjects. Pharyngeal muscles in subjects with PD exhibited many atrophic fibers, fiber type grouping, and fast-to-slow myosin heavy chain transformation. These alterations indicate that the pharyngeal muscles experienced neural degeneration and regeneration over the course of PD. Notably, subjects with PD with dysphagia had a higher percentage of atrophic myofibers versus with those without dysphagia and controls. The fast-to-slow fiber-type transition is consistent with abnormalities in swallowing, slow movement of food, and increased tone in the cricopharyngeal sphincter in subjects with PD. The alterations in the pharyngeal muscles may play a pathogenic role in the development of dysphagia in subjects with PD.

  8. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal

  9. Calf muscle hypertrophy in late onset pompe's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Suraj Menon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe's disease (glycogen storage disease Type 2, acid maltase deficiency is characterized by a progressive myopathy due to accumulation of glycogen in skeletal muscles in addition to various tissues. Late onset Pompe's disease is characterized by slowly progressive proximal myopathy with respiratory muscle involvement. We present the case of a 16-year-old female presenting with proximal muscle weakness with calf hypertrophy diagnosed to be late onset Pompe's disease. This case highlights the need to consider Pompe's disease in the differential diagnosis of calf muscle hypertrophy, in patients with proximal myopathy even without overt respiratory muscle involvement.

  10. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and efficacy of strength training and aerobic exercise

  11. Abdominal muscle and quadriceps strength in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Man, W. D-C.; Hopkinson, N.S.; Harraf, F.; Nikoletou, D.; Polkey, M. I.; Moxham, J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Quadriceps muscle weakness is common in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but is not observed in a small hand muscle (adductor pollicis). Although this could be explained by reduced activity in the quadriceps, the observation could also be explained by anatomical location of the muscle or fibre type composition. However, the abdominal muscles are of a similar anatomical and fibre type distribution to the quadriceps, although they remain active in COPD. Cough gastric pre...

  12. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal muscle weakness can increase the duration of hospitalization, result in exercise limitation, and contribute to a poor quality of life. Importantly, skeletal muscle atrophy is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality of patients. Therefore, improving our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue in patients is a required first step to develop clinical protocols to prevent these skeletal muscle problems. This review will highlight the consequences and potential mechanisms responsible for skeletal muscle atrophy and fatigue in patients suffering from acute critical illness, cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and neurological disorders. PMID:27128663

  13. Muscle MRI Findings in Childhood/Adult Onset Pompe Disease Correlate with Muscle Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Figueroa-Bonaparte

    Full Text Available Enzyme replacement therapy has shown to be effective for childhood/adult onset Pompe disease (AOPD. The discovery of biomarkers useful for monitoring disease progression is one of the priority research topics in Pompe disease. Muscle MRI could be one possible test but the correlation between muscle MRI and muscle strength and function has been only partially addressed so far.We studied 34 AOPD patients using functional scales (Manual Research Council scale, hand held myometry, 6 minutes walking test, timed to up and go test, time to climb up and down 4 steps, time to walk 10 meters and Motor Function Measure 20 Scale, respiratory tests (Forced Vital Capacity seated and lying, Maximun Inspiratory Pressure and Maximum Expiratory Pressure, daily live activities scales (Activlim and quality of life scales (Short Form-36 and Individualized Neuromuscular Quality of Life questionnaire. We performed a whole body muscle MRI using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging centered on thighs and lower trunk region.T1w whole body muscle MRI showed a homogeneous pattern of muscle involvement that could also be found in pre-symptomatic individuals. We found a strong correlation between muscle strength, muscle functional scales and the degree of muscle fatty replacement in muscle MRI analyzed using T1w and 3-point Dixon imaging studies. Moreover, muscle MRI detected mild degree of fatty replacement in paraspinal muscles in pre-symptomatic patients.Based on our findings, we consider that muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful for diagnosis and follow-up in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic patients under treatment.Muscle MRI correlates with muscle function in patients with AOPD and could be useful to follow-up patients in daily clinic.

  14. Bones, Muscles, and Joints: The Musculoskeletal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skeletal muscles are called striated (pronounced: STRY-ay-ted) because they are made up of fibers that ... blood through your body. When we smile and talk, muscles are helping us communicate, and when we ...

  15. Respiratory and lower limb muscle function in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotou, Marios; Polychronopoulos, Vlasis; Strange, Charlie

    2016-05-01

    Growing evidence suggests that respiratory and limb muscle function may be impaired in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Importantly, muscle dysfunction could promote dyspnoea, fatigue and functional limitation all of which are cardinal features of ILD. This article examines the risk factors for skeletal muscle dysfunction in ILD, reviews the current evidence on overall respiratory and limb muscle function and focuses on the occurrence and implications of skeletal muscle dysfunction in ILD. Research limitations and pathways to address the current knowledge gaps are highlighted. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Pattern analysis in MR imaging of muscle diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, W.A.; Schalke, B.C.G.

    1987-01-01

    Between March 1984 and March 1987, 161 patients with muscle diseases underwent MR imaging performed with a 1.0-T superconductive magnet. Forty-four had progressive muscular dystrophies, 25 had different types of myositis, 19 had spinal or neural muscular atrophies, 16 had myotonic dystrophy, 22 had metabolic disorders, and 35 had other muscle disease, including muscle tumors, posttraumatic muscular atrophies, and postradiation effects. The advantages of MR imaging are the high sensitivity and soft-tissue contrast, as well as the depiction of typical distribution patterns of affected muscle groups, which can be used in diagnosis, biopsy planning, and design of therapy

  17. Immune-mediated rippling muscle disease and myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Mariela; Gonorazky, Hernan; Chaves, Marcelo; Fulgenzi, Ernesto; Figueredo, Alejandra; Christiansen, Silvia; Cristiano, Edgardo; Bertini, Enrico S; Rugiero, Marcelo

    2016-10-15

    Cases of acquired rippling muscle disease in association with myasthenia gravis have been reported. We present three patients with iRMD (immune-mediated rippling muscle disease) and AChR-antibody positive myasthenia gravis. None of them had thymus pathology. They presented exercise-induced muscle rippling combined with generalized myasthenia gravis. One of them had muscle biopsy showing a myopathic pattern and a patchy immunostaining with caveolin antibodies. They were successfully treated steroids and azathioprine. The immune nature of this association is supported by the response to immunotherapies and the positivity of AChR-antibodies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue Triage and Freezing for Models of Skeletal Muscle Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Hui; Janssen, Paul M.L.; Grange, Robert W.; Yang, Lin; Beggs, Alan H.; Swanson, Lindsay C.; Cossette, Stacy A.; Frase, Alison; Childers, Martin K.; Granzier, Henk; Gussoni, Emanuela; Lawlor, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a unique tissue because of its structure and function, which requires specific protocols for tissue collection to obtain optimal results from functional, cellular, molecular, and pathological evaluations. Due to the subtlety of some pathological abnormalities seen in congenital muscle disorders and the potential for fixation to interfere with the recognition of these features, pathological evaluation of frozen muscle is preferable to fixed muscle when evaluating skeletal muscle for congenital muscle disease. Additionally, the potential to produce severe freezing artifacts in muscle requires specific precautions when freezing skeletal muscle for histological examination that are not commonly used when freezing other tissues. This manuscript describes a protocol for rapid freezing of skeletal muscle using isopentane (2-methylbutane) cooled with liquid nitrogen to preserve optimal skeletal muscle morphology. This procedure is also effective for freezing tissue intended for genetic or protein expression studies. Furthermore, we have integrated our freezing protocol into a broader procedure that also describes preferred methods for the short term triage of tissue for (1) single fiber functional studies and (2) myoblast cell culture, with a focus on the minimum effort necessary to collect tissue and transport it to specialized research or reference labs to complete these studies. Overall, this manuscript provides an outline of how fresh tissue can be effectively distributed for a variety of phenotypic studies and thereby provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for pathological studies related to congenital muscle disease. PMID:25078247

  19. Muscle MRI in neutral lipid storage disease (NLSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garibaldi, Matteo; Tasca, Giorgio; Diaz-Manera, Jordi; Ottaviani, Pierfancesco; Laschena, Francesco; Pantoli, Donatella; Gerevini, Simonetta; Fiorillo, Chiara; Maggi, Lorenzo; Tasca, Elisabetta; D'Amico, Adele; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio; Bruno, Claudio; Massa, Roberto; Angelini, Corrado; Bertini, Enrico; Antonini, Giovanni; Pennisi, Elena Maria

    2017-07-01

    Neutral lipid storage disease (NLSD) is a rare inherited disorder of lipid metabolism resulting in lipid droplets accumulation in different tissues. Skeletal muscle could be affected in both two different form of disease: NLSD with myopathy (NLSD-M) and NLSD with ichthyosis (NLSD-I). We present the muscle imaging data of 12 patients from the Italian Network for NLSD: ten patients presenting NLSD-M and two patients with NLSD-I. In NLSD-M gluteus minimus, semimembranosus, soleus and gastrocnemius medialis in the lower limbs and infraspinatus in the upper limbs were the most affected muscles. Gracilis, sartorius, subscapularis, pectoralis, triceps brachii and sternocleidomastoid were spared. Muscle involvement was not homogenous and characteristic "patchy" replacement was observed in at least one muscle in all the patients. Half of the patients showed one or more STIR positive muscles. In both NLSD-I cases muscle involvement was not observed by T1-TSE sequences, but one of them showed positive STIR images in more than one muscle in the leg. Our data provides evidence that muscle imaging can identify characteristic alterations in NLSD-M, characterized by a specific pattern of muscle involvement with "patchy" areas of fatty replacement. Larger cohorts are needed to assess if a distinct pattern of muscle involvement exists also for NLSD-I.

  20. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voet, N.B.M.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Riphagen, I.I.; Lindeman, E.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. This is an update of a review first published in 2004. OBJECTIVES: To examine the safety and

  1. Prospective Study of Muscle Cramps in Charcot Marie Tooth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Sowden, Janet; Dilek, Nuran; Eichinger, Katy; Burns, Joshua; McDermott, Michael P; Shy, Michael E.; Herrmann, David N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to assess the frequency, location, severity, duration, and fluctuation over time of muscle cramps in Charcot Marie Tooth Disease (CMT). Methods Inherited Neuropathies Consortium Contact Registry participants recorded the occurrence and characteristics of muscle cramps using an 11-question survey administered three times over 8-weeks. Results One hundred and ten adult patients with CMT completed the survey. Weekly cramp frequency was 9.3 (SD 12.3) and 23% had daily muscle cramps. Twenty-two percent reported a significant impact on quality of life. Over 8-weeks, the daily frequency and severity of muscle cramps did not change significantly. Conclusions Patients with CMT have muscle cramps that vary little over an eight-week period, and may interfere with quality of life. These data may be useful in the planning of clinical trials of agents to treat adults with CMT-associated muscle cramps. PMID:25042364

  2. Muscle biopsies from human muscle diseases with myopathic pathology reveal common alterations in mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunitha, Balaraju; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Kumar, Manish; Keshava Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya; Nalini, Atchayaram; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Srinivas Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda

    2016-07-01

    Muscle diseases are clinically and genetically heterogeneous and manifest as dystrophic, inflammatory and myopathic pathologies, among others. Our previous study on the cardiotoxin mouse model of myodegeneration and inflammation linked muscle pathology with mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies from muscle disease patients, represented by dysferlinopathy (dysfy) (dystrophic pathology; n = 43), polymyositis (PM) (inflammatory pathology; n = 24), and distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles (DMRV) (distal myopathy; n = 31) were analyzed. Mitochondrial damage (ragged blue and COX-deficient fibers) was revealed in dysfy, PM, and DMRV cases by enzyme histochemistry (SDH and COX-SDH), electron microscopy (vacuolation and altered cristae) and biochemical assays (significantly increased ADP/ATP ratio). Proteomic analysis of muscle mitochondria from all three muscle diseases by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis demonstrated down-regulation of electron transport chain (ETC) complex subunits, assembly factors and Krebs cycle enzymes. Interestingly, 80 of the under-expressed proteins were common among the three pathologies. Assay of ETC and Krebs cycle enzyme activities validated the MS data. Mitochondrial proteins from muscle pathologies also displayed higher tryptophan (Trp) oxidation and the same was corroborated in the cardiotoxin model. Molecular modeling predicted Trp oxidation to alter the local structure of mitochondrial proteins. Our data highlight mitochondrial alterations in muscle pathologies, represented by morphological changes, altered mitochondrial proteome and protein oxidation, thereby establishing the role of mitochondrial damage in human muscle diseases. We investigated whether human muscle diseases display mitochondrial changes. Muscle biopsies

  3. Imaging of respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaar, L; Ciet, P; van der Ploeg, A T; Brusse, E; van der Beek, N A M E; Wielopolski, P A; de Bruijne, M; Tiddens, H A W M; van Doorn, P A

    2018-03-01

    Respiratory muscle weakness frequently occurs in patients with neuromuscular disease. Measuring respiratory function with standard pulmonary function tests provides information about the contribution of all respiratory muscles, the lungs and airways. Imaging potentially enables the study of different respiratory muscles, including the diaphragm, separately. In this review, we provide an overview of imaging techniques used to study respiratory muscles in neuromuscular disease. We identified 26 studies which included a total of 573 patients with neuromuscular disease. Imaging of respiratory muscles was divided into static and dynamic techniques. Static techniques comprise chest radiography, B-mode (brightness mode) ultrasound, CT and MRI, and are used to assess the position and thickness of the diaphragm and the other respiratory muscles. Dynamic techniques include fluoroscopy, M-mode (motion mode) ultrasound and MRI, used to assess diaphragm motion in one or more directions. We discuss how these imaging techniques relate with spirometric values and whether these can be used to study the contribution of the different respiratory muscles in patients with neuromuscular disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Skeletal muscle pathology in Huntington’s Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eZielonka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine stretch within the huntingtin protein (HTT. The neurological symptoms, that involve motor, cognitive and psychiatric disturbances, are caused by neurodegeneration that is particularly widespread in the basal ganglia and cereberal cortex. HTT is ubiquitously expressed and in recent years it has become apparent that HD patients experience a wide array of peripheral organ dysfunction including severe metabolic phenotype, weight loss, HD-related cardiomyopathy and skeletal muscle wasting, . Although skeletal muscles became a hallmark of HD, the mechanisms underlying muscular atrophy in this disorder are unknown. Skeletal muscles account for approximately 40% of body mass and are highly adaptive to physiological and pathological conditions that may result in muscle hypertrophy (due to increased mechanical load or atrophy (inactivity, chronic disease states. The atrophy is caused by degeneration of myofibers and their replacement by fibrotic tissue is the major pathological feature in many genetic muscle disorders. Under normal physiological conditions the muscle function is orchestrated by a network of intrinsic hypertrophic and atrophic signals linked to the functional properties of the motor units that are likely to be imbalanced in HD. In this article, we highlight the emerging field of research with particular focus on the recent studies of the skeletal muscle pathology and the identification of new disease-modifying treatments.

  5. Respiratory muscle strength in children with mild bronchial asthma disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Neumannová

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory muscle strength can be decreased in patients with asthma; however, it is not well-documented whether a mild bronchial asthma disease can affect respiratory muscle strength in children and can be associated with higher presence of breathing difficulties. Objective: The main aim of the present study was to compare respiratory muscle strength between children with asthma and age-matched healthy children. The next aim of this study was to assess the incidence of decreased respiratory muscle strength in children with asthma and healthy children and assess the effect of decreased respiratory muscle strength on the incidence of breathing difficulties. Methods: Children with mild bronchial asthma (n = 167 and age-matched, healthy children (n = 100 were recruited into this study. Pulmonary function tests, maximal inspiratory (PImax and expiratory (PEmax mouth pressures and the incidence of breathing difficulty were evaluated in children with asthma and healthy controls. Results: The inspiratory muscle strength was similar between children with asthma and healthy children. Conversely, the expiratory muscle strength was lower in asthmatic children. There was a statistically significant difference between girls with asthma and healthy girls (PEmax = 81.7 ± 29.8% vs. 100.1 ± 23.7% of predicted, p < .001. PEmax was significantly higher in boys with asthma than in girls with asthma (PEmax = 92.9 ± 26.4 % vs. 81.7 ± 29.8% of predicted, p = .03. A higher incidence of breathing difficulties during physical activity (uphill walking, running, swimming was confirmed in children with asthma with lower respiratory muscle strength. Conclusions: There was a higher prevalence of decreased expiratory muscle strength in children with asthma; therefore, respiratory muscle strength should be tested in these children, especially in those who are symptomatic.

  6. Glutamine Synthetase in Muscle Is Required for Glutamine Production during Fasting and Extrahepatic Ammonia Detoxification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Youji; Hakvoort, Theodorus B. M.; Köhler, S. Eleonore; Vermeulen, Jacqueline L. M.; de Waart, D. Rudi; de Theije, Chiel; ten Have, Gabrie A. M.; van Eijk, Hans M. H.; Kunne, Cindy; Labruyere, Wilhelmina T.; Houten, Sander M.; Sokolovic, Milka; Ruijter, Jan M.; Deutz, Nicolaas E. P.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2010-01-01

    The main endogenous source of glutamine is de novo synthesis in striated muscle via the enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS). The mice in which GS is selectively but completely eliminated from striated muscle with the Cre-loxP strategy (GS-KO/M mice) are, nevertheless, healthy and fertile. Compared with

  7. Insights from diploblasts; the evolution of mesoderm and muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Patrick Michael

    2008-01-15

    The origin of both mesoderm and muscle are central questions in metazoan evolution. The majority of metazoan phyla are triploblasts, possessing three discrete germ layers. Attention has therefore been focused on two outgroups to triploblasts, Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Modern texts describe these taxa as diploblasts, lacking a mesodermal germ layer. However, some members of Medusozoa, one of two subphyla within Cnidaria, possess tissue independent of either the ectoderm or endoderm referred to as the entocodon. Furthermore, members of both Cnidaria and Ctenophora have been described as possessing striated muscle, a mesodermal derivative. While it is widely accepted that the ancestor of Eumetazoa was diploblastic, homology of the entocodon and mesoderm as well as striated muscle within Eumetazoa has been suggested. This implies a potential triploblastic ancestor of Eumetazoa possessing striated muscle. In the following review, I examine the evidence for homology of both muscle and mesoderm. Current data support a diploblastic ancestor of cnidarians, ctenophores, and triploblasts lacking striated muscle.

  8. Effect of Gender, Disease Duration and Treatment on Muscle Strength in Myasthenia Gravis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Cejvanovic, Sanja; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    assessed. METHODS: Muscle strength was tested in 8 muscle groups by manual muscle testing and by hand-held dynamometry in 107 patients with gMG and 89 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Disease duration, severity and treatment history were reviewed and compared with muscle strength. RESULTS......, muscle strength did not correlate with disease duration and treatment intensity. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study show that in patients with gMG; 1) there is significant muscle weakness, 2) muscle weakness is more pronounced in men than women, 3) shoulder abductors, hip flexors, and neck muscles...

  9. Morphometry of extraocular muscles in Basedow disease by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Michiko; Ohtsuka, Kenji; Hashimoto, Masato [Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1996-01-01

    We measured the thickness of extraocular muscles in 35 patients diagnosed as Basedow disease by physicians. We used the coronal images of computed tomography in measuring the thickness at four points for each muscle. The mean thickness was 3.2{+-}1.0 mm for superior rectus, 3.4{+-}0.8 mm for medial rectus and 4.1 mm{+-}13 mm for inferior rectus. These values were significantly larger than in normal eyes (p<0.01). The value for inferior rectus was significantly larger than for the other two muscles (p<0.01). Thickness of inferior rectus at its posterior portion was significantly correlated with limitation of supraduction of the affected eye (r=0.7). (author).

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging patterns of muscle involvement in genetic muscle diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Doris G

    2017-07-01

    A growing body of the literature supports the use of magnetic resonance imaging as a potential biomarker for disease severity in the hereditary myopathies. We performed a systematic review of the medical literature to evaluate patterns of fat infiltration observed in magnetic resonance imaging studies of muscular dystrophy and congenital myopathy. Searches were performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and grey literature databases. Studies that described fat infiltration of muscles in patients with muscular dystrophy or congenital myopathy were selected for full-length review. Data on preferentially involved or spared muscles were extracted for analysis. A total of 2172 titles and abstracts were screened, and 70 publications met our criteria for inclusion in the systematic review. There were 23 distinct genetic disorders represented in this analysis. In most studies, preferential involvement and sparing of specific muscles were reported. We conclude that magnetic resonance imaging studies can be used to identify distinct patterns of muscle involvement in the hereditary myopathies. However, larger studies and standardized methods of reporting are needed to develop imaging as a diagnostic tool in these diseases.

  11. Muscle edema in MR imaging of neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schedel, H.; Reimers, C.D.; Vogl, T.; Witt, T.N.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of muscle edema and the diagnostic usefulness of Gd-DTPA in neuromuscular diseases. 144 consecutive patients with various generalized neuromuscular diseases were examined by MR imaging. Areas of high signal intensity, relative to normal muscle, were seen in 36% of T2-weighted images, whereas the corresponding T1-weighted images showed normal or lower signal intensities. These edema-like abnormalities -enlargement of the extracellular fluid space-were found more often in inflammatory and metabolic myopathies, but were also seen in degenerative myopathies. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images in 25 patients were not more sensitive than plain T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  12. Computed tomography of skeletal muscles in neuromuscular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Kuether, G.

    1985-06-01

    CT-documentation of skeletal muscular lesions caused by neuromuscular diseases implies an essential contribution to conventional techniques in the macroscopic field. Size, distribution and degree of lesions as well as compensatory mechanisms are proved thereby. We report about the different effects on muscle appearance referring to 106 patients of our own experience in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, polyradiculitis, polyneuropathy as well as peripheral traumatic nerve lesions.

  13. Computed tomography of skeletal muscles in neuromuscular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Kuether, G.; Muenchen Univ.

    1985-01-01

    CT-documentation of skeletal muscular lesions caused by neuromuscular diseases implies an essential contribution to conventional techniques in the macroscopic field. Size, distribution and degree of lesions as well as compensatory mechanisms are proved thereby. We report about the different effects on muscle appearance referring to 106 patients of our own experience in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, poliomyelitis, polyradiculitis, polyneuropathy as well as peripheral traumatic nerve lesions. (orig.) [de

  14. Early occurrence of inspiratory muscle weakness in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Baille

    Full Text Available In Parkinson's disease (PD, respiratory insufficiency (including functional and muscle disorders can impact dysarthria and swallowing. Most studies of this topic have been performed retrospectively in populations of patients with advanced PD. The objective of the present study was to characterize lung function (under off-drug conditions in early-stage PD patients at baseline and then again two years later.Forty-one early-stage PD patients (mean ± SD age: 61.7 ± 7.7; mean ± SD disease duration: 1.9 ± 1.7 years were prospectively enrolled and compared with 36 age-matched healthy controls. Neurological evaluations and pulmonary function testing were performed in the off-drug condition at the inclusion visit and then two years later.Pulmonary function testing did not reveal any restrictive or obstructive disorders; at baseline, inspiratory muscle weakness was the only abnormality observed in the PD group (in 53.7% of the patients, vs. 25% in controls; p = 0.0105. The PD patients had a lower mean maximal inspiratory mouth pressure than controls and a lower sniff nasal inspiratory pressure. Two years after the initiation of chronic treatment with antiparkinsonian medications, the maximal inspiratory mouth pressure and the sniff nasal inspiratory pressure tended to be higher. Lastly, overall motor outcomes were not significantly worse in patients with inspiratory muscle weakness than in patients without inspiratory muscle weakness.Inspiratory muscle weakness seems to be common in patients with early-stage PD, and was seen to be stable over a two-year period. Additional long-term follow-up studies are required to specify the impact of this new feature of PD.

  15. Effect of Gender, Disease Duration and Treatment on Muscle Strength in Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Cejvanovic, Sanja; Andersen, Henning; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this observational, cross-sectional study was to quantify the potential presence of muscle weakness among patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG). The influence of gender, treatment intensity and disease duration on muscle strength and disease progression was also assessed. Methods Muscle strength was tested in 8 muscle groups by manual muscle testing and by hand-held dynamometry in 107 patients with gMG and 89 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Disease duration, severity and treatment history were reviewed and compared with muscle strength. Results Patients had reduced strength in all tested muscle group compared to control subjects (p<0.05). Women with gMG were stronger than men (decrease in strength 22.6% vs. 32.7% in men, P<0.05). Regional differences in muscle weakness were also evident, with proximal muscles being more affected. Interestingly, muscle strength did not correlate with disease duration and treatment intensity. Conclusions The results of this study show that in patients with gMG; 1) there is significant muscle weakness, 2) muscle weakness is more pronounced in men than women, 3) shoulder abductors, hip flexors, and neck muscles are the most affected muscle groups and 4) disease duration or treatment intensity alone are not predictors of loss of muscle strength in gMG. PMID:27741232

  16. Firing patterns of muscle vasoconstrictor neurones in respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughan G Macefield

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Because the cardiovascular system and respiration are so intimately coupled, disturbances in respiratory control often lead to disturbances in cardiovascular control. Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD and Bronchiectasis (BE are all associated with a greatly elevated muscle vasoconstrictor drive (muscle sympathetic nerve activity; MSNA. Indeed, the increase in MSNA is comparable to that seen in congestive heart failure (CHF, in which the increase in MSNA compensates for the reduced cardiac output and thereby assists in maintaining blood pressure. However, in OSA – but not COPD or BE – the increase in MSNA can lead to hypertension. Here, the features of the sympathoexcitation in OSA, COPD and BE are reviewed in terms of the firing properties of post-ganglionic muscle vasoconstrictor neurones. Compared to healthy subjects with low levels of resting MSNA, single-unit recordings revealed that the augmented MSNA seen in OSA, BE, COPD and CHF were each associated with an increase in firing probability and mean firing rates of individual neurones. However, unlike patients with heart failure, all patients with respiratory disease exhibited an increase in multiple within-burst firing which, it is argued, reflects an increase in central sympathetic drive. Similar patterns to those seen in OSA, COPD and BE were seen in healthy subjects during an acute increase in muscle vasoconstrictor drive. These observations emphasise the differences by which the sympathetic nervous system grades its output in health and disease, with an increase in firing probability of active neurones and recruitment of additional neurones being the dominant mechanisms.

  17. Striated nephrogram as an incidental finding in MRI examination of children; Streifiges Nephrogramm als Zufallsbefund nach Kontrastmittelgabe bei Kindern in der MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strocka, S.; Sorge, I.; Ritter, L.; Hirsch, F.W. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Radiology

    2016-01-15

    A highly striated contrast pattern of the kidneys occasionally appears in abdominal MRI examinations of children following the administration of gadolinium. As this phenomenon is well known but has not yet been explicitly described in literature, we investigated how frequently and in which clinical context this occurred. 855 abdominal MRI examinations with contrast media of 362 children between 2006 and 2014 were analysed retrospectively. A striated renal parenchyma was found in a total of nine children and eleven examinations (1.3 % of examinations) and did only occur at a field strength of 3 Tesla. Of these children, seven had previously had tumors and chemotherapy. In two children there was no evidence of a previously serious condition with medications or a kidney disease. All of them had a normal renal function. A noticeably striated nephrogram in the later phase of an MRI examination following administration of gadolinium may appear as an incidental finding in examinations at 3 Tesla without pathological relevance.

  18. Epilepsy and McArdle Disease in A Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk incecik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available McArdle's disease, defined by the lack of functional glycogen phosphorylase in striated muscle, is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. Patients typically suffer from reduced exercise tolerance, with muscle cramps and pain provoked by exercise, along with easy fatigability and weakness after exercise. Following prolonged exertion, contractures, rhabdomyolysis, and myoglobinuria may occur. Central nervous system symptoms have rarely been reported in McArdle disease. In this case report, a 13-year-old boy with epilepsy and McArdle's disease is presented. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 5-7

  19. Skeletal muscle metabolism during prolonged exercise in Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pompe disease (glycogenosis type II) is caused by lysosomal alpha-glucosidase deficiency, which leads to a block in intra-lysosomal glycogen breakdown. In spite of enzyme replacement therapy, Pompe disease continues to be a progressive metabolic myopathy. Considering the health benefits...... of exercise, it is important in Pompe disease to acquire more information about muscle substrate use during exercise. METHODS: Seven adults with Pompe disease were matched to a healthy control group (1:1). We determined (1) peak oxidative capacity (VO2peak) and (2) carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism...... during submaximal exercise (33 W) for 1 h, using cycle-ergometer exercise, indirect calorimetry and stable isotopes. RESULTS: In the patients, VO2peak was less than half of average control values; mean difference -1659 mL/min (CI: -2450 to -867, P = 0.001). However, the respiratory exchange ratio...

  20. Immunocytochemical electron microscopic study and western blot analysis of paramyosin in different invertebrate muscle cell types of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the earthworm Eisenia foetida, and the snail Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royuela, M; García-Anchuelo, R; Arenas, M I; Cervera, M; Fraile, B; Paniagua, R

    1996-04-01

    The presence and distribution pattern of paramyosin have been examined in different invertebrate muscle cell types by means of Western blot analysis and electron microscopy immunogold labelling. The muscles studied were: transversely striated muscle with continuous Z lines (flight muscle from Drosophila melanogaster), transversely striated muscle with discontinuous Z lines (heart muscle from the snail Helix aspersa), obliquely striated body wall muscle from the earthworm Eisenia foetida, and smooth muscles (retractor muscle from the snail and pseudoheart outer muscular layer from the earthworm). Paramyosin-like immunoreactivity was localized in thick filaments of all muscles studied. Immunogold particle density was similar along the whole thick filament length in insect flight muscle but it predominated in filament tips of fusiform thick filaments in both snail heart and earthworm body wall musculature when these filaments were observed in longitudinal sections. In obliquely sectioned thick filaments, immunolabelling was more abundant at the sites where filaments disappeared from the section. These results agree with the notion that paramyosin extended along the whole filament length, but that it can only be immunolabelled when it is not covered by myosin. In all muscles examined, immunolabelling density was lower in cross-sectioned myofilaments than in longitudinally sectioned myofilaments. This suggests that paramyosin does not form a continuous filament. The results of a semiquantitative analysis of paramyosin-like immunoreactivity indicated that it was more abundant in striated than in smooth muscles, and that, within striated muscles, transversely striated muscles contain more paramyosin than obliquely striated muscles.

  1. Chloroquine-induced lipidosis mimicking Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albay, Diana; Adler, Sharon G; Philipose, Jaya; Calescibetta, C C; Romansky, Stephen G; Cohen, Arthur H

    2005-05-01

    Intracellular accumulation of phospholipids may be a consequence of inherited or acquired metabolic disorders. In Fabry disease, deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A results in storage of globotriasylceramide in numerous cells including endothelium, striated muscle (skeletal, cardiac), smooth muscle, and renal epithelium among others; the ultrastructural appearance of the inclusions is of whorled layers of alternating dense and pale material ('zebra bodies' or myeline figures). Chloroquine therapy may result in storage of biochemically and ultrastructurally similar inclusions in many of the same cells as Fabry disease and often results in similar clinical manifestations. We report a 56-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis treated with chloroquine, who developed muscle weakness and renal insufficiency; information regarding therapy was not emphasized at the time of renal biopsy, leading to initial erroneous interpretation of Fabry disease. Following muscle biopsy, genetic and enzyme evaluation, and additional studies on the kidney biopsy, a diagnosis of chloroquine toxicity was established. One year following cessation of chloroquine, renal and muscle dysfunction greatly improved. In chloroquine toxicity, inclusions in glomeruli are not only in visceral epithelial, endothelial and mesangial cells but are in infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which are most commonly present in the mesangium. Curvilinear bodies, the ultrastructural features of chloroquine toxicity in striated muscle, are not present in renal cells. This report documents differences in appearance, cells affected and morphological differential diagnostic features to distinguish these two entities.

  2. Diaphragm muscle fiber dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: toward a pathophysiological concept.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottenheijm, C.A.C.; Heunks, L.M.A.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.

    2007-01-01

    Inspiratory muscle weakness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is of major clinical relevance; maximum inspiratory pressure generation is an independent determinant of survival in severe COPD. Traditionally, inspiratory muscle weakness has been ascribed to

  3. Complete genome sequence of maize yellow striate virus, a new cytorhabdovirus infecting maize and wheat crops in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurino, Fernanda; Dumón, Analía D; Llauger, Gabriela; Alemandri, Vanina; de Haro, Luis A; Mattio, M Fernanda; Del Vas, Mariana; Laguna, Irma Graciela; Giménez Pecci, María de la Paz

    2018-01-01

    A rhabdovirus infecting maize and wheat crops in Argentina was molecularly characterized. Through next-generation sequencing (NGS) of symptomatic leaf samples, the complete genome was obtained of two isolates of maize yellow striate virus (MYSV), a putative new rhabdovirus, differing by only 0.4% at the nucleotide level. The MYSV genome consists of 12,654 nucleotides for maize and wheat virus isolates, and shares 71% nucleotide sequence identity with the complete genome of barley yellow striate mosaic virus (BYSMV, NC028244). Ten open reading frames (ORFs) were predicted in the MYSV genome from the antigenomic strand and were compared with their BYSMV counterparts. The highest amino acid sequence identity of the MYSV and BYSMV proteins was 80% between the L proteins, and the lowest was 37% between the proteins 4. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that the MYSV isolates are new members of the genus Cytorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae. Yellow striate, affecting maize and wheat crops in Argentina, is an emergent disease that presents a potential economic risk for these widely distributed crops.

  4. Strength training and aerobic exercise training for muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Nicoline B M; van der Kooi, Elly L; Riphagen, Ingrid I; Lindeman, Eline; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Geurts, Alexander C H

    2013-07-09

    Strength training or aerobic exercise programmes might optimise muscle and cardiorespiratory function and prevent additional disuse atrophy and deconditioning in people with a muscle disease. This is an update of a review first published in 2004. To examine the safety and efficacy of strength training and aerobic exercise training in people with a muscle disease. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register (July 2012), CENTRAL (2012 Issue 3 of 4), MEDLINE (January 1946 to July 2012), EMBASE (January 1974 to July 2012), EMBASE Classic (1947 to 1973) and CINAHL (January 1982 to July 2012). Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing strength training or aerobic exercise programmes, or both, to no training, and lasting at least six weeks, in people with a well-described diagnosis of a muscle disease.We did not use the reporting of specific outcomes as a study selection criterion. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted the data obtained from the full text-articles and from the original investigators. We collected adverse event data from included studies. We included five trials (170 participants). The first trial compared the effect of strength training versus no training in 36 people with myotonic dystrophy. The second trial compared aerobic exercise training versus no training in 14 people with polymyositis and dermatomyositis. The third trial compared strength training versus no training in a factorial trial that also compared albuterol with placebo, in 65 people with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The fourth trial compared combined strength training and aerobic exercise versus no training in 18 people with mitochondrial myopathy. The fifth trial compared combined strength training and aerobic exercise versus no training in 35 people with myotonic dystrophy type 1.In both myotonic dystrophy trials and the dermatomyositis and polymyositis trial there were no significant differences

  5. Congenital heart disease in adolescents with gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Tian; Zhang, Xin-tao; Zha, Zhen-gang; Zhang, Wen-tao

    2015-02-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC), presented with hip abduction and external rotation when crouching, is common in several ethnicities, particularly in Chinese. It remains unclear that the reasons why these children are weak and have no choice to accept repeated intramuscular injection. Here, we found some unique cases which may be useful to explain this question. We describe a series of special GMC patients, who are accompanied with congenital heart disease (CHD). These cases were first observed in preoperative examinations of a patient with atrial septal defect (ASD), which was proved by chest X-ray and cardiac ultrasound. From then on, we gradually identified additional 3 GMC patients with CHD. The original patient with ASD was sent to cardiosurgery department to repair atrial septal first and received arthroscopic surgery later. While the other 3 were cured postoperative of ventricular septal defect (VSD), tetralogy of fallot (TOF), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), respectively, and had surgery directly. The study gives us 3 proposals: (1) as to CHD children, it is essential to decrease the use of intramuscular injection, (2) paying more attention to cardiac examination especially cardiac ultrasound in perioperative period, and (3) taking 3D-CT to reconstruct gluteal muscles for observing contracture bands clearly in preoperation. However, more larger series of patients are called for to confirm these findings.

  6. Emerging new tools to study and treat muscle pathologies: genetics and molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in our body, is responsible for generating the force required for movement, and is also an important thermogenic organ. Skeletal muscle is an enigmatic tissue because while on the one hand, skeletal muscle regeneration after injury is arguably one of the best-studied stem cell-dependent regenerative processes, on the other hand, skeletal muscle is still subject to many degenerative disorders with few therapeutic options in the clinic. It is important to develop new regenerative medicine-based therapies for skeletal muscle. Future therapeutic strategies should take advantage of rapidly developing technologies enabling the differentiation of skeletal muscle from human pluripotent stem cells, along with precise genome editing, which will go hand in hand with a steady and focused approach to understanding underlying mechanisms of skeletal muscle development, regeneration, and disease. In this review, I focus on highlighting the recent advances that particularly have relied on developmental and molecular biology approaches to understanding muscle development and stem cell function. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Virtual and simulated striated toolmarks for forensic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiker, Martin; Petraco, Nicholas D K; Gambino, Carol; Pieterman, René; Shenkin, Peter; Zoon, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Large numbers of experimental toolmarks of screwdrivers are often required in casework of toolmark examiners and in research environments alike, to be able to recover the angle of attack of a crime scene mark and to determine statistically meaningful properties of toolmarks respectively. However, in practice the number of marks is limited by the time needed to create them. In this article, we present an approach to predict how a striated mark of a particular tool would look like, using 3D surface datasets of screwdrivers. We compare these virtual toolmarks qualitatively and quantitatively with real experimental marks in wax and show that they are very similar. In addition we study toolmark similarity, dependent on the angle of attack, with a very high angular resolution of 1°. The results show that for the tested type of screwdriver, our toolmark comparison framework yields known match similarity scores that are above the mean known non-match similarity scores, even for known match differences in angle of attack of up to 40°. In addition we demonstrate an approach to automatically recover the angle of attack of an experimental toolmark and experiments yield high accuracy and precision of 0.618 ± 4.179°. Furthermore, we present a strategy to study the structural elements of striated toolmarks using wavelet analysis, and show how to use the results to simulate realistic toolmarks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Computed tomography of the skeletal muscles in neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Hideo; Takahashi, Mitsugi; Habara, Shinji; Nagai, Yoshinao; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans of the shoulder girdle, upper arm, waist, pelvic girdle, thigh, and lower leg were obtained in a total of 21 patients with neuromuscular diseases, including 10 with Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD), 3 with Fukushima type congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD), 3 with Werdnig-Hoffmann's disease (WH), 3 with autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy in childhood (childhood MC), one with nemaline myopathy (NM), and one with myositis ossificans circumscripta (MOC). Age-dependent changes in CT findings were examined in the 10 DMD patients ranging in age from 3 to 15 years. Each muscle of the shoulder girdle and upper arm was seen as a low density area on CT in patients 9 years of age when the arms are difficult to elevate. Changes in the m. quadriceps femoris occurring in all the patients were visible earlist on CT, followed by those in the m. gluteus maximus, m. gastrocnemius, and m. soleus. CT scans of the thigh was thus considered most useful in diagnosing DMD. CT scans of the lower leg showed low density areas in the m. gastrocnemius and m. soleus in both WH and FCMD patients, while a low density area seen in the m. gluteus maximum on CT was restricted to FCMD patients. This suggests the potential of CT in the differentiation of WH from FCMD. In patients with childhood ARMD, there were various CT findings including normal and extremely low density areas. CT findings in NM patients were similar to those in DMD patients. High density areas were seen along the fascia of the trunk in MOC patients. (Namekawa, K.)

  9. Intradialytic Muscle Cramp and its Association with Peripheral Arterial Disease in End Stage Renal Disease Patients on Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, M; Sharma, S K; Chimoriya, R; Das, G C

    2014-01-01

     Muscle cramp is a common intradialytic complication observed in hemodialysis patients. Similarly Peripheral arterial disease is a common condition in the hemodialysis population.  Fifty patients with a diagnosis of End Stage Renal Disease who were on hemodialysis were studied over a period of one year. Muscle cramp was defined clinically as contractions of a large muscle group and Peripheral arterial disease was diagnosed on the basis of the ankle -brachial index (ABI).  A total of 50 End Stage Renal Disease patients were analyzed. The major causes of End Stage Renal Disease in the study population was Chronic Glomerulonephritis 40 % (n=20). Muscle cramps were present in 26% (n=13) cases. Peripheral arterial disease was present in 30% (n=15) of patients. However there was no statistically significant association between the presence of Intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease (p value =0.18) CONCLUSIONS: Intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease were common occurrence in end stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis patients, however there was no association between the presence of intradialytic Muscle cramps and peripheral arterial disease.

  10. Determinants of Extraocular Muscle Volume in Patients with Graves' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer El-Kaissi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. To examine factors contributing to extraocular muscle (EOM volume enlargement in patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism. Methods. EOM volumes were measured with orbital magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in 39 patients with recently diagnosed Graves’ disease, and compared to EOM volumes of 13 normal volunteers. Thyroid function tests, uptake on thyroid scintigraphy, anti-TSH-receptor antibody positivity and other parameters were then evaluated in patients with EOM enlargement. Results. 31/39 patients had one or more enlarged EOM, of whom only 2 patients had clinical EOM dysfunction. Compared to Graves’ disease patients with normal EOM volumes, those with EOM enlargement had significantly higher mean serum TSH (0.020±0.005 versus 0.007±0.002 mIU/L; P value 0.012, free-T4 (52.9±3.3 versus 41.2±1.7 pmol/L; P value 0.003 and technetium uptake on thyroid scintigraphy (13.51±1.7% versus 8.55±1.6%; P value 0.045. There were no differences between the 2 groups in anti-TSH-receptor antibody positivity, the proportion of males, tobacco smokers, or those with active ophthalmopathy. Conclusions. Patients with recently diagnosed Graves’ disease and EOM volume enlargement have higher serum TSH and more severe hyperthyroidism than patients with normal EOM volumes, with no difference in anti-TSH-receptor antibody positivity between the two groups.

  11. MicroRNA in skeletal muscle development, growth, atrophy, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovanda, Anja; Režen, Tadeja; Rogelj, Boris

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that are important global- as well as tissue- and cell-type-specific regulators of gene expression. Muscle-specific miRNAs or myomirs have been shown to control various processes in skeletal muscles, from myogenesis and muscle homeostasis to different responses to environmental stimuli, such as exercise. Importantly, myomirs are also involved in the development of muscle atrophy arising from aging, immobility, prolonged exposure to microgravity, or muscular and neuromuscular disorders. Additionally, muscle atrophy is both induced by and exacerbates many important chronic and infectious diseases. As global yet specific muscle regulators, myomirs are also good candidates for therapeutic use. Understanding the dynamics of myomirs expression and their role in the development of disease is necessary to determine their potential for muscle atrophy prevention. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Prevalence of adult Pompe disease in patients with proximal myopathic syndrome and undiagnosed muscle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsari, Amir; Nasimzadah, Arzoo; Thomalla, Götz; Keller, Sarah; Gerloff, Christian; Magnus, Tim

    2018-03-01

    We examined patients with limb-girdle muscle weakness and/or hyper-CKaemia and undiagnosed muscle biopsy for late onset Pompe disease (LOPD). Patients with an inconclusive limb-girdle muscle weakness who presented at our neuromuscular centre between 2005 and 2015 with undiagnosed muscle biopsies were examined by dry blood spot testing (DBS) including determination of the enzyme activity of acid alpha-glucosidase (GAA). In the case of depressed enzyme activity, additional gene testing of the GAA gene was carried out. Of the 340 evaluated muscle biopsies, 69 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were examined with DBS. Among those patients, 76% showed a limb-girdle muscle weakness and 14% showed a hyper-CKaemia. A diagnosis of LOPD could be established in the case of two patients (2.9%) with reduced GAA enzyme activity and proof of mutations in the GAA gene. One of the two patients presents in the muscle biopsy suggestive features of Pompe disease including vacuoles with positive acid phosphatase reaction. In summary, our results show that a muscle biopsy can be helpful in identifying LOPD patients, but vacuolation with glycogen storage can also be absent. An inconspicuous muscle biopsy does not rule out Pompe disease. Consequently, all patients with limb-girdle muscle weakness should be examined by DBS before conducting a muscle biopsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Muscle protein analysis. II. Two-dimensional electrophoresis of normal and diseased human skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giometti, C.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Barany, M.; Danon, M.J.; Anderson, N.G.

    1980-07-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to analyze the major proteins of normal and pathological human-muscle samples. The normal human-muscle pattern contains four myosin light chains: three that co-migrate with the myosin light chains from rabbit fast muscle (extensor digitorum longus), and one that co-migrates with the light chain 2 from rabbit slow muscle (soleus). Of seven Duchenne muscular dystrophy samples, four yielded patterns with decreased amounts of actin and myosin relative to normal muscle, while three samples gave patterns comparable to that for normal muscle. Six samples from patients with myotonic dystrophy also gave normal patterns. In nemaline rod myopathy, in contrast, the pattern was deficient in two of the fast-type myosin light chains.

  14. Huntington disease skeletal muscle is hyperexcitable owing to chloride and potassium channel dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Christopher W; Varuzhanyan, Grigor; Talmadge, Robert J; Voss, Andrew A

    2013-05-28

    Huntington disease is a progressive and fatal genetic disorder with debilitating motor and cognitive defects. Chorea, rigidity, dystonia, and muscle weakness are characteristic motor defects of the disease that are commonly attributed to central neurodegeneration. However, no previous study has examined the membrane properties that control contraction in Huntington disease muscle. We show primary defects in ex vivo adult skeletal muscle from the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of Huntington disease. Action potentials in diseased fibers are more easily triggered and prolonged than in fibers from WT littermates. Furthermore, some action potentials in the diseased fibers self-trigger. These defects occur because of decreases in the resting chloride and potassium conductances. Consistent with this, the expression of the muscle chloride channel, ClC-1, in Huntington disease muscle was compromised by improper splicing and a corresponding reduction in total Clcn1 (gene for ClC-1) mRNA. Additionally, the total Kcnj2 (gene for the Kir2.1 potassium channel) mRNA was reduced in disease muscle. The resulting muscle hyperexcitability causes involuntary and prolonged contractions that may contribute to the chorea, rigidity, and dystonia that characterize Huntington disease.

  15. Study of the striated nature of a glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez A, M.

    1995-01-01

    In an investigation in progress here, plasma diagnostics and detection of standing and moving striations is being made in a discharge in Argon at pressures of 2 x 10 -1 to 9 x 10 -1 mb and currents of 2 to 9 m-amp inside an discharge tube. Measurement of the temperature of the electrons, the concentration of electrons and the plasma potential are obtained in different places of the discharge by the double probe method, together with the computation system reported in [1]. In similar way an experimental work of the striated column in a discharge plasma to find the regimen of appearance of the standing and moving striations show some properties of moving striations (frequency and velocity) and standing striations. Two different oscilations are observed in motion in contrary directions along the discharge tube with a photomultiplier. (Author)

  16. Alpha-actinin in different invertebrate muscle cell types of Drosophila melanogaster, the earthworm Eisenia foetida, and the snail Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royuela, M; Astier, C; Fraile, B; Paniagua, R

    1999-01-01

    The presence and distribution of alpha-actinin has been studied in several invertebrate muscle cell types. These comprised transversely striated muscle (flight muscle) from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, transversely striated muscle (heart muscle) from the snail Helix aspersa, obliquely striated muscle (body wall muscle) from the earthworm Eisenia foetida, smooth muscle (retractor muscle) from H. aspersa, and smooth muscle (outer muscular layer of the pseudoheart) from E. foetida. The study was carried by means of Western blot analysis, ELISA, and immunohistochemical electron microscopy, using anti alpha-actinin antibody. Immunoreaction for a protein with the same molecular weight as that of mammalian alpha-actinin was detected in all muscle types studied, although the amount and intensity of immunoreaction varied among them. In the insect muscle, immunolabelling was found along the whole Z-line. In both the transversely striated muscle from the snail and the obliquely striated muscle from the earthworm, immunolabelling did not occupy the whole Z-line but showed discontinuous, orderly arranged patches along the Z-line course. In the two smooth muscles studied (snail and earthworm), immunolabelling was limited to small patches which did not show an apparently ordered distribution. Since it is assumed that alpha-actinin is located at the anchorage sites for actin filaments, present observations suggest that, only in the Drosophila muscle, actin filaments are parallelly arranged in all their course, whereas in the other invertebrate muscles studied these filaments converge on discontinuously distributed anchorage sites.

  17. Calcium ion in skeletal muscle: its crucial role for muscle function, plasticity, and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, M W; Brinkmeier, H; Müntener, M

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscle shows an enormous variability in its functional features such as rate of force production, resistance to fatigue, and energy metabolism, with a wide spectrum from slow aerobic to fast anaerobic physiology. In addition, skeletal muscle exhibits high plasticity that is based...

  18. Sporadic inclusion-body myositis: A degenerative muscle disease associated with aging, impaired muscle protein homeostasis and abnormal mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King; Nogalska, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM) is the most common degenerative muscle disease in which aging appears to be a key risk factor. In this review we focus on several cellular molecular mechanisms responsible for multiprotein aggregation and accumulations within s-IBM muscle fibers, and their possible consequences. Those include mechanisms leading to: a) accumulation in the form of aggregates within the muscle fibers, of several proteins, including amyloid-β42 and its oligomers, and phosphorylated tau in the form of paired helical filaments, and we consider their putative detrimental influence; and b) protein misfolding and aggregation, including evidence of abnormal myoproteostasis, such as increased protein transcription, inadequate protein disposal, and abnormal posttranslational modifications of proteins. Pathogenic importance of our recently demonstrated abnormal mitophagy is also discussed. The intriguing phenotypic similarities between s-IBM muscle fibers and the brains of Alzheimer and Parkinson's disease patients, the two most common neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging, are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Muscle glycogen storage disease 0 presenting recurrent syncope with weakness and myalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukigara, Sayuri; Liang, Wen-Chen; Komaki, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Tokiko; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Saito, Takashi; Saito, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Sugie, Hideo; Sasaki, Masayuki; Nishino, Ichizo

    2012-02-01

    Muscle glycogen storage disease 0 (GSD0) is caused by glycogen depletion in skeletal and cardiac muscles due to deficiency of glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1), which is encoded by the GYS1 gene. Only two families with this disease have been identified. We report a new muscle GSD0 patient, a Japanese girl, who had been suffering from recurrent attacks of exertional syncope accompanied by muscle weakness and pain since age 5 years until she died of cardiac arrest at age 12. Muscle biopsy at age 11 years showed glycogen depletion in all muscle fibers. Her loss of consciousness was gradual and lasted for hours, suggesting that the syncope may not be simply caused by cardiac event but probably also contributed by metabolic distress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of skeletal muscle in lung development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguma-Nibasheka, Mark; Gugic, Dijana; Saraga-Babic, Mirna; Kablar, Boris

    2012-07-01

    Skeletal (striated) muscle is one of the four basic tissue types, together with the epithelium, connective and nervous tissues. Lungs, on the other hand, develop from the foregut and among various cell types contain smooth, but not skeletal muscle. Therefore, during earlier stages of development, it is unlikely that skeletal muscle and lung depend on each other. However, during the later stages of development, respiratory muscle, primarily the diaphragm and the intercostal muscles, execute so called fetal breathing-like movements (FBMs), that are essential for lung growth and cell differentiation. In fact, the absence of FBMs results in pulmonary hypoplasia, the most common cause of death in the first week of human neonatal life. Most knowledge on this topic arises from in vivo experiments on larger animals and from various in vitro experiments. In the current era of mouse mutagenesis and functional genomics, it was our goal to develop a mouse model for pulmonary hypoplasia. We employed various genetically engineered mice lacking different groups of respiratory muscles or lacking all the skeletal muscle and established the criteria for pulmonary hypoplasia in mice, and therefore established a mouse model for this disease. We followed up this discovery with systematic subtractive microarray analysis approach and revealed novel functions in lung development and disease for several molecules. We believe that our approach combines elements of both in vivo and in vitro approaches and allows us to study the function of a series of molecules in the context of lung development and disease and, simultaneously, in the context of lung's dependence on skeletal muscle-executed FBMs.

  1. Diagnostic Utility of Auto-Antibodies in Inflammatory Muscle Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenbach, Y; Benveniste, O

    2015-01-01

    To date, there are four main groups of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM): polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) and sporadic inclusion body myositis; based on clinical presentation and muscle pathology. Nevertheless, important phenotypical differences (either muscular and/or extra-muscular manifestations) within a group persist. In recent years, the titration of different myositis-specific (or associated) auto-antibodies as a diagnostic tool has increased. This is an important step forward since it may facilitate, at a viable cost, the differential diagnosis between IIM and other myopathies. We have now routine access to assays for the detection of different antibodies. For example, IMNM are related to the presence of anti-SRP or anti-HMGCR. PM is associated with anti-synthetase antibodies (anti-Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, OJ, and EJ) and DM with anti-Mi-2, anti-SAE, anti-TIF-1-γ and anti-NXP2 (both associated with cancer) or anti-MDA5 antibodies (associated with interstitial lung disease). Today, over 30 myositis specific and associated antibodies have been characterised, and all groups of myositis may present one of those auto-antibodies. Most of them allow identification of homogenous patient groups, more precisely than the classical international classifications of myositis. This implies that classification criteria could be modified accordingly, since these auto-antibodies delineate groups of patients suffering from myositis with consistent clinical phenotype (muscular and extra-muscular manifestations), common prognostic (cancer association, presence of interstitial lung disease, mortality and risk of relapse) and treatment responses. Nevertheless, since numerous auto-antibodies have been recently characterised, the exact prevalence of myositis specific antibodies remains to be documented, and research of new auto-antibodies in the remaining seronegative group is still needed.

  2. Muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: update on causes and biological findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Sergi; Casadevall, Carme; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and/or limb muscle dysfunction, which are frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, contribute to their disease prognosis irrespective of the lung function. Muscle dysfunction is caused by the interaction of local and systemic factors. The key deleterious etiologic factors are pulmonary hyperinflation for the respiratory muscles and deconditioning secondary to reduced physical activity for limb muscles. Nonetheless, cigarette smoke, systemic inflammation, nutritional abnormalities, exercise, exacerbations, anabolic insufficiency, drugs and comorbidities also seem to play a relevant role. All these factors modify the phenotype of the muscles, through the induction of several biological phenomena in patients with COPD. While respiratory muscles improve their aerobic phenotype (percentage of oxidative fibers, capillarization, mitochondrial density, enzyme activity in the aerobic pathways, etc.), limb muscles exhibit the opposite phenotype. In addition, both muscle groups show oxidative stress, signs of damage and epigenetic changes. However, fiber atrophy, increased number of inflammatory cells, altered regenerative capacity; signs of apoptosis and autophagy, and an imbalance between protein synthesis and breakdown are rather characteristic features of the limb muscles, mostly in patients with reduced body weight. Despite that significant progress has been achieved in the last decades, full elucidation of the specific roles of the target biological mechanisms involved in COPD muscle dysfunction is still required. Such an achievement will be crucial to adequately tackle with this relevant clinical problem of COPD patients in the near-future. PMID:26623119

  3. Nutrient modulation in the management of disease-induced muscle wasting: evidence from human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Matthew S; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Atherton, Philip J

    2017-11-01

    In addition to being essential for movement, skeletal muscles act as both a store and source of key macronutrients. As such, muscle is an important tissue for whole body homeostasis, undergoing muscle wasting in times of starvation, disease, and stress, for example, to provide energy substrates for other tissues. Yet, muscle wasting is also associated with disability, comorbidities, and mortality. As nutrition is so crucial to maintaining muscle homeostasis 'in health', it has been postulated that muscle wasting in cachexia syndromes may be alleviated by nutritional interventions. This review will highlight recent work in this area in relation to muscle kinetics, the acute metabolic (e.g. dietary protein), and longer-term effects of dietary interventions. Whole body and skeletal muscle protein synthesis invariably exhibit deranged kinetics (favouring catabolism) in wasting states; further, many of these conditions harbour blunted anabolic responses to protein nutrition compared with healthy controls. These derangements underlie muscle wasting. Recent trials of essential amino acid and protein-based nutrition have shown some potential for therapeutic benefit. Nutritional modulation, particularly of dietary amino acids, may have benefits to prevent or attenuate disease-induced muscle wasting. Nonetheless, there remains a lack of recent studies exploring these key concepts to make conclusive recommendations.

  4. CONGENITAL NUTRITIONAL MYODEGENERATION (WHITE MUSCLE DISEASE) IN A GIRAFFE ( GIRAFFA CAMELOPARDALIS) CALF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Jan H; Klip, Fokko C; Kik, Marja J L

    2017-12-01

    It is well known that vitamin E and selenium deficiencies in domestic ruminants can lead to white muscle disease. After a clinically normal gestation period at Ouwehand Zoo in the Netherlands, a newborn giraffe ( Giraffa camelopardalis) calf showed clinical signs of white muscle disease almost immediately after birth. The calf was rejected by the mother and was euthanized 3 days later because of deterioration of clinical signs. At necropsy, pulmonary edema and pallor of skeletal and heart muscles was noted. Histologically, there was hyaline degeneration of skeletal muscle myocytes and pulmonary edema. Blood concentrations of vitamin E were ≤ 0.7 mg/L. Based on clinical, biochemical, and gross and microscopic pathological findings, congenital nutritional myodegeneration was diagnosed. This case of neonatal white muscle disease is particularly remarkable given that the diet of the dam contained more than the recommended amount of vitamin E.

  5. Muscular dystrophy in a dish: engineered human skeletal muscle mimetics for disease modeling and drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alec S.T.; Davis, Jennifer; Lee, Gabsang; Mack, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Engineered in vitro models using human cells, particularly patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), offer a potential solution to issues associated with the use of animals for studying disease pathology and drug efficacy. Given the prevalence of muscle diseases in human populations, an engineered tissue model of human skeletal muscle could provide a biologically accurate platform to study basic muscle physiology, disease progression, and drug efficacy and/or toxicity. Such platforms could be used as phenotypic drug screens to identify compounds capable of alleviating or reversing congenital myopathies, such as Duchene muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here, we review current skeletal muscle modeling technologies with a specific focus on efforts to generate biomimetic systems for investigating the pathophysiology of dystrophic muscle. PMID:27109386

  6. Clinical management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with muscle dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Carme; Pascual, Sergi; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Barreiro, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Muscle dysfunction is frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, contributing to their exercise limitation and a worsening prognosis. The main factor leading to limb muscle dysfunction is deconditioning, whereas respiratory muscle dysfunction is mostly the result of pulmonary hyperinflation. However, both limb and respiratory muscles are also influenced by other negative factors, including smoking, systemic inflammation, nutritional abnormalities, exacerbations and some drugs. Limb muscle weakness is generally diagnosed through voluntary isometric maneuvers such as handgrip or quadriceps muscle contraction (dynamometry); while respiratory muscle loss of strength is usually recognized through a decrease in maximal static pressures measured at the mouth. Both types of measurements have validated reference values. Respiratory muscle strength can also be evaluated determining esophageal, gastric and transdiaphragmatic maximal pressures although there is a lack of widely accepted reference equations. Non-volitional maneuvers, obtained through electrical or magnetic stimulation, can be employed in patients unable to cooperate. Muscle endurance can also be assessed, generally using repeated submaximal maneuvers until exhaustion, but no validated reference values are available yet. The treatment of muscle dysfunction is multidimensional and includes improvement in lifestyle habits (smoking abstinence, healthy diet and a good level of physical activity, preferably outside), nutritional measures (diet supplements and occasionally, anabolic drugs), and different modalities of general and muscle training. PMID:28066619

  7. Effects of breathing maneuver and sitting posture on muscle activity in inspiratory accessory muscles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ki-song; Byun, Min-kwang; Lee, Won-hwee; Cynn, Heon-seock; Kwon, Oh-yun; Yi, Chung-hwi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background To determine the influence of breathing maneuver and sitting posture on tidal volume (TV), respiratory rate (RR), and muscle activity of the inspiratory accessory muscles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Twelve men with COPD participated in the study. Inductive respiratory plethysmography and surface electromyography were used to simultaneously measure TV, RR, and muscle activity of the inspiratory accessory muscles [the scalenus (SM),...

  8. Deficits in muscle strength, mass, quality and mobility in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roig, Marc; Eng, Janice J; MacIntyre, Donna L

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Midthigh intramuscular fat (IF), a feature of reduced muscle quality, is an important predictor of self-reported mobility loss in the elderly. This study compared measures of muscle strength, mass, IF, and mobility in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and healthy...

  9. An unusual presentation of muscle-eye-brain disease: severe eye abnormalities with mild muscle and brain involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ercan; Gucuyener, Kivilcim; Akturk, Aysima; Talim, Beril; Konus, Oznur; Del Bo, Roberto; Ghezzi, Serena; Comi, Giacomo P

    2009-10-01

    Muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) is characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain malformations and eye abnormalities. We report a MEB case whose presenting sign was congenital blindness. She was investigated primarily for eye abnormalities at onset. She had bilateral retinal detachment and microphthalmia. Mild axial hypotonia and motor retardation were attributed to cerebral disorder in another center. Muscle biopsy showed mild myopathic changes and significant alpha-dystroglycan deficiency. Analysis of the POMGnT1 showed a novel homozygous mutation 1814G>C, causing p.Arg605Pro change. This case expands the clinical spectrum of MEB with unusually severe eye abnormalities compared to mild skeletal muscle and brain involvement.

  10. Muscle glucose metabolism in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho-Muñoz, Antonio; Trampal, Carlos; Pascual, Sergi; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Chalela, Roberto; Gea, Joaquim; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio

    2014-06-01

    Muscle dysfunction is one of the most extensively studied manifestations of COPD. Metabolic changes in muscle are difficult to study in vivo, due to the lack of non-invasive techniques. Our aim was to evaluate metabolic activity simultaneously in various muscle groups in COPD patients. Thirty-nine COPD patients and 21 controls with normal lung function, due to undergo computed axial and positron emission tomography for staging of localized lung lesions were included. After administration of 18-fluordeoxyglucose, images of 2 respiratory muscles (costal and crural diaphragm, and rectus abdominus) and 2 peripheral muscles (brachial biceps and quadriceps) were obtained, using the standard uptake value as the glucose metabolism index. Standard uptake value was higher in both portions of the diaphragm than in the other muscles of all subjects. Moreover, the crural diaphragm and rectus abdominus showed greater activity in COPD patients than in the controls (1.8±0.7 vs 1.4±0.8; and 0.78±0.2 vs 0.58±0.1; respectively, P<.05). A similar trend was observed with the quadriceps. In COPD patients, uptake in the two respiratory muscles and the quadriceps correlated directly with air trapping (r=0.388, 0.427 and 0.361, respectively, P<.05). There is greater glucose uptake and metabolism in the human diaphragm compared to other muscles when the subject is at rest. Increased glucose metabolism in the respiratory muscles (with a similar trend in their quadriceps) of COPD patients is confirmed quantitatively, and is directly related to the mechanical loads confronted. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA methylation dynamics in muscle development and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira eCarrio

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is an essential epigenetic modification for mammalian development and is crucial for the establishment and maintenance of cellular identity. Traditionally, DNA methylation has been considered as a permanent repressive epigenetic mark. However, the application of genome-wide approaches has allowed the analysis of DNA methylation in different genomic contexts revealing a more dynamic regulation than originally thought, since active DNA methylation and demethylation occur during cellular differentiation and tissue specification. Satellite cells are the primary stem cells in adult skeletal muscle and are responsible for postnatal muscle growth, hypertrophy, and muscle regeneration. This review outlines the published data regarding DNA methylation changes along the skeletal muscle program, in both physiological and pathological conditions, to better understand the epigenetic mechanisms that control myogenesis

  12. Reduced muscle power is associated with slower walking velocity and falls in people with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, N E; Sherrington, C; Canning, C G; Fung, V S C

    2010-05-01

    Muscle strength (force) and power (force x velocity) are reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD). Reduced muscle power is associated with slower walking velocity and falls in the older population, but these associations in people with PD have not previously been investigated. This study investigated the relationships between leg extensor muscle power and strength with walking speed and past falls in people with PD. Forty people with mild to moderate PD were assessed. Walking velocity was measured over 10 m and the number of falls the participant reported having in the past 12 months was recorded. Leg extensor muscle power and strength were measured using a Keiser leg press machine. Muscle power explained more than half of the variance (R(2) = 0.54) in walking velocity and remained significantly (p velocity in models which included Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor scores. Participants with low muscle power were 6 times more likely to report multiple falls in the past year than those with high muscle power (OR = 6.0, 95% CI 1.1 to 33.3), though this association between falls and power was no longer significant in models which included UPDRS motor scores (p = 0.09). Muscle power is a significant determinant of walking velocity in PD even after adjusting for UPDRS motor score. Muscle power training warrants investigation in people with PD. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease : assessment of respiratory muscle activity and the benefits of noninvasive ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duiverman, Marieke Leontine

    2008-01-01

    This thesis deals with two main topics. First, we investigated respiratory muscle function in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) by surface electromyography. Second, we focused on the benefits of noninvasive ventilation in patients with respiratory failure, both in restrictive pulmonary

  14. Prospective study of muscle cramps in Charcot-Marie-tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas E; Sowden, Janet; Dilek, Nuran; Eichinger, Katy; Burns, Joshua; Mcdermott, Michael P; Shy, Michael E; Herrmann, David N

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to assess the frequency, location, severity, duration, and fluctuation over time of muscle cramps in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). Inherited Neuropathies Consortium Contact Registry participants recorded the occurrence and characteristics of muscle cramps using an 11-question survey administered 3 times over 8 weeks. A total of 110 adult patients with CMT completed the survey. Weekly cramp frequency was 9.3 (SD 12.3), and 23% had daily muscle cramps. Twenty-two percent reported a significant impact on quality of life. Over 8 weeks, the daily frequency and severity of muscle cramps did not change significantly. Patients with CMT have muscle cramps that vary little over an 8-week period, and they may interfere with quality of life. These data may be useful in the planning of clinical trials of agents to treat adults with CMT-associated muscle cramps. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Skeletal muscle myofilament adaptations to aging, disease and disuse and their effects on whole muscle performance in older adult humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Stuart Miller

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle contractile function declines with aging, disease and disuse. In vivo muscle contractile function depends on a variety of factors, but force, contractile velocity and power generating capacity ultimately derive from the summed contribution of single muscle fibers. The contractile performance of these fibers are, in turn, dependent upon the isoform and function of myofilament proteins they express, with myosin protein expression and its mechanical and kinetic characteristics playing a predominant role. Alterations in myofilament protein biology, therefore, may contribute to the development of functional limitations and disability in these conditions. Recent studies suggest that these conditions are associated with altered single fiber performance due to decreased expression of myofilament proteins and/or changes in myosin-actin cross-bridge interactions. Furthermore, cellular and myofilament-level adaptations are related to diminished whole muscle and whole body performance. Notably, the effect of these various conditions on myofilament and single fiber function tends to be larger in older women compared to older men, which may partially contribute to their higher rates of disability. To maintain functionality and provide the most appropriate and effective countermeasures to aging, disease and disuse in both sexes, a more thorough understanding is needed of the contribution of myofilament adaptations to functional disability in older men and women and their contribution to tissue level function and mobility impairment.

  16. Blocked muscle fat oxidation during exercise in neutral lipid storage disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laforêt, Pascal; Ørngreen, Mette; Preisler, Nicolai

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether impaired exercise capacity in neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy is solely caused by muscle weakness or whether a defect in energy metabolism (blocked fat oxidation) may also play a role.......To determine whether impaired exercise capacity in neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy is solely caused by muscle weakness or whether a defect in energy metabolism (blocked fat oxidation) may also play a role....

  17. A systems biology approach identifies molecular networks defining skeletal muscle abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nil Turan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is an inflammatory process of the lung inducing persistent airflow limitation. Extensive systemic effects, such as skeletal muscle dysfunction, often characterize these patients and severely limit life expectancy. Despite considerable research efforts, the molecular basis of muscle degeneration in COPD is still a matter of intense debate. In this study, we have applied a network biology approach to model the relationship between muscle molecular and physiological response to training and systemic inflammatory mediators. Our model shows that failure to co-ordinately activate expression of several tissue remodelling and bioenergetics pathways is a specific landmark of COPD diseased muscles. Our findings also suggest that this phenomenon may be linked to an abnormal expression of a number of histone modifiers, which we discovered correlate with oxygen utilization. These observations raised the interesting possibility that cell hypoxia may be a key factor driving skeletal muscle degeneration in COPD patients.

  18. Pharmacological Inhibition of PKCθ Counteracts Muscle Disease in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marrocco

    2017-02-01

    Research in context: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a severe muscle disease affecting 1:3500 male births. DMD is caused by a mutation in dystrophin gene, coding for a protein required for skeletal and cardiac muscle integrity. Lack of a functional dystrophin is primarily responsible for the muscle eccentric contraction-induced muscle damage, observed in dystrophic muscle. However, inflammation plays a considerable role in the progression of DMD. Glucocorticoids, which have anti-inflammatory properties, are being used to treat DMD with some success; however, long term treatment with these drugs induces muscle atrophy and wasting, outweighing their benefit. The identification of specific targets for anti-inflammatory therapies is one of the ongoing therapeutic options. Although blunting inflammation would not be a “cure” for the disease, the emerging clue is that multiple strategies, addressing different aspects of the pathology, which may eventually converge, may be successful. In this context, we previously showed that genetic ablation of Protein Kinase C θ (PKCθ, an enzyme known to be involved in immune response, in mdx, the mouse model of DMD, improves muscle healing and regeneration, preventing massive inflammation. To establish whether pharmacological targeting of PKCθ in DMD can be proposed as a therapeutic option, in this study we treated young mdx mice with the PKCθ inhibitor Compound 20 (C20. We show that C20 treatment led to a significant reduction in muscle damage associated with reduced immune cells infiltration, reduced inflammatory pathways activation, and maintained muscle regeneration. Importantly, C20 treatment is efficient in recovering muscle performance in mdx mice, by preserving muscle integrity. Together, these results provide proof of principle that pharmacological inhibition of PKCθ in DMD can be considered an attractive strategy to modulate immune response and prevent the progression of the disease.

  19. Practical Recommendations for Diagnosis and Management of Respiratory Muscle Weakness in Late-Onset Pompe Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Boentert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease is an autosomal-recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by progressive myopathy with proximal muscle weakness, respiratory muscle dysfunction, and cardiomyopathy (in infants only. In patients with juvenile or adult disease onset, respiratory muscle weakness may decline more rapidly than overall neurological disability. Sleep-disordered breathing, daytime hypercapnia, and the need for nocturnal ventilation eventually evolve in most patients. Additionally, respiratory muscle weakness leads to decreased cough and impaired airway clearance, increasing the risk of acute respiratory illness. Progressive respiratory muscle weakness is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in late-onset Pompe disease even if enzyme replacement therapy has been established. Practical knowledge of how to detect, monitor and manage respiratory muscle involvement is crucial for optimal patient care. A multidisciplinary approach combining the expertise of neurologists, pulmonologists, and intensive care specialists is needed. Based on the authors’ own experience in over 200 patients, this article conveys expert recommendations for the diagnosis and management of respiratory muscle weakness and its sequelae in late-onset Pompe disease.

  20. Impairment of gradual muscle adjustment during wrist circumduction in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien M Toxopeus

    Full Text Available Purposeful movements are attained by gradually adjusted activity of opposite muscles, or synergists. This requires a motor system that adequately modulates initiation and inhibition of movement and selectively activates the appropriate muscles. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD initiation and inhibition of movements are impaired which may manifest itself in e.g. difficulty to start and stop walking. At single-joint level, impaired movement initiation is further accompanied by insufficient inhibition of antagonist muscle activity. As the motor symptoms in PD primarily result from cerebral dysfunction, quantitative investigation of gradually adjusted muscle activity during execution of purposeful movement is a first step to gain more insight in the link between impaired modulation of initiation and inhibition at the levels of (i cerebrally coded task performance and (ii final execution by the musculoskeletal system. To that end, the present study investigated changes in gradual adjustment of muscle synergists using a manipulandum that enabled standardized smooth movement by continuous wrist circumduction. Differences between PD patients (N = 15, off-medication and healthy subjects (N = 16 concerning the relation between muscle activity and movement performance in these groups were assessed using kinematic and electromyographic (EMG recordings. The variability in the extent to which a particular muscle was active during wrist circumduction--defined as muscle activity differentiation--was quantified by EMG. We demonstrated that more differentiated muscle activity indeed correlated positively with improved movement performance, i.e. higher movement speed and increased smoothness of movement. Additionally, patients employed a less differentiated muscle activity pattern than healthy subjects. These specific changes during wrist circumduction imply that patients have a decreased ability to gradually adjust muscles causing a decline in

  1. MRI of lumbar trunk muscles in patients with Parkinson's disease and camptocormia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margraf, N G; Rohr, A; Granert, O; Hampel, J; Drews, A; Deuschl, G

    2015-07-01

    Camptocormia in Parkinson's disease (PD) is an axial postural disorder usually accompanied by histopathological changes in the paravertebral muscles of unknown etiology. The diagnostic potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of back muscles in camptocormia has not been systematically assessed. Our objective was to characterize pathological muscle changes with MRI and to develop radiological criteria for camptocormia. The criteria edema, swelling and fatty degeneration in 20 idiopathic PD patients with camptocormia were assessed using MRI (T1w and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences) of the lumbar trunk muscles and compared with 20 group-matched PD patients without camptocormia. Edema and fatty degeneration of the paravertebral muscles were significantly more frequent in camptocormia. Edema correlated negatively and fatty degeneration positively with the duration of camptocormia and not PD. Swelling of the paravertebral muscles, edema and swelling of the quadratus lumborum muscle and rare edema of the psoas muscle were only found in camptocormia patients. In this case-control study the defined MRI criteria distinguish the group of PD patients with camptocormia versus those without. Our findings suggest dynamic changes in the MRI signals over time in the paravertebral muscles: edema and swelling are found initially, followed by fatty atrophic degeneration 2-3 years after the beginning of camptocormia. Muscle MRI qualifies as a tool for categorizing phases of camptocormia as acute or chronic, with potential consequences for therapeutic approaches. The involvement of muscles beyond an isolated impairment of the paravertebral muscles implies a more systemic view with a deregulation of lumbar trunk muscles.

  2. Diseased muscles that lack dystrophin or laminin-α2 have altered compositions and proliferation of mononuclear cell populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller Jeffrey

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple types of mononucleate cells reside among the multinucleate myofibers in skeletal muscles and these mononucleate cells function in muscle maintenance and repair. How neuromuscular disease might affect different types of muscle mononucleate cells had not been determined. In this study, therefore, we examined how two neuromuscular diseases, dystrophin-deficiency and laminin-α2-deficiency, altered the proliferation and composition of different subsets of muscle-derived mononucleate cells. Methods We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting combined with bromodeoxyuridine labeling to examine proliferation rates and compositions of mononuclear cells in diseased and healthy mouse skeletal muscle. We prepared mononucleate cells from muscles of mdx (dystrophin-deficient or Lama2-/- (laminin-α2-deficient mice and compared them to cells from healthy control muscles. We enumerated subsets of resident muscle cells based on Sca-1 and CD45 expression patterns and determined the proliferation of each cell subset in vivo by BrdU incorporation. Results We found that the proliferation and composition of the mononucleate cells in dystrophin-deficient and laminin-α2-deficient diseased muscles are different than in healthy muscle. The mdx and Lama2-/- muscles showed similar significant increases in CD45+ cells compared to healthy muscle. Changes in proliferation, however, differed between the two diseases with proliferation increased in mdx and decreased in Lama2-/- muscles compared to healthy muscles. In particular, the most abundant Sca-1-/CD45- subset, which contains muscle precursor cells, had increased proliferation in mdx muscle but decreased proliferation in Lama2-/- muscles. Conclusion The similar increases in CD45+ cells, but opposite changes in proliferation of muscle precursor cells, may underlie aspects of the distinct pathologies in the two diseases.

  3. Respiratory muscle function and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charususin, Noppawan; Dacha, Sauwaluk; Gosselink, Rik; Decramer, Marc; Von Leupoldt, Andreas; Reijnders, Thomas; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Langer, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory muscle dysfunction is common and contributes to dyspnea and exercise limitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Improving dynamic function of respiratory muscles during exercise might help to reduce symptoms and improve exercise capacity. Areas covered: The aims of this review are to 1) summarize physiological mechanisms linking respiratory muscle dysfunction to dyspnea and exercise limitation; 2) provide an overview of available therapeutic approaches to better maintain load-capacity balance of respiratory muscles during exercise; and 3) to summarize current knowledge on potential mechanisms explaining effects of interventions aimed at optimizing dynamic respiratory muscle function with a special focus on inspiratory muscle training. Expert commentary: Several mechanisms which are potentially linking improvements in dynamic respiratory muscle function to symptomatic and functional benefits have not been studied so far in COPD patients. Examples of underexplored areas include the study of neural processes related to the relief of acute dyspnea and the competition between respiratory and peripheral muscles for limited energy supplies during exercise. Novel methodologies are available to non-invasively study these mechanisms. Better insights into the consequences of dynamic respiratory muscle dysfunction will hopefully contribute to further refine and individualize therapeutic approaches in patients with COPD.

  4. Roles of the troponin isoforms during indirect flight muscle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Troponin proteins in cooperative interaction with tropomyosin are responsible for controlling the contraction of the striated muscles in response to changes in the intracellular calcium concentration. Contractility of the muscle is determined by the constituent protein isoforms, and the isoforms can switch over from one form to ...

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction in calf muscles of patients with combined peripheral arterial disease and diabetes type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard Pedersen, Brian; Bækgaard, Niels; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study elucidate the effects on muscle mitochondrial function in patients suffering from combined peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the relation to patient symptoms and treatment. METHODS: Near Infra Red Spectroscopy (NIRS) calf muscle exercise tests...... were conducted on Forty subjects, 15 (PAD), 15 (PAD+T2D) and 10 healthy age matched controls (CTRL) recruited from the vascular outpatient clinic at Gentofte County Hospital, Denmark. Calf muscle biopsies (~ 80 mg) (Gastrocnemius and Anterior tibial muscles) were sampled and mitochondrial function...... tested applying high resolution oxygraphy on isolated muscle fibers. RESULTS: The NIRS exercise tests showed evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in the PAD+T2D group by a longer recovery of the deoxygenation resulting from exercise in spite of a higher exercise oxygenation level compared to the PAD...

  6. Muscle diseases with prominent joint contractures: Main entities and diagnostic strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eymard, B; Ferreiro, A; Ben Yaou, R; Stojkovic, T

    2013-01-01

    Muscle diseases may have various clinical manifestations including muscle weakness, atrophy or hypertrophy and joint contractures. A spectrum of non-muscular manifestations (cardiac, respiratory, cutaneous, central and peripheral nervous system) may be associated. Few of these features are specific. Limb joint contractures or spine rigidity, when prevailing over muscle weakness in ambulant patients, are of high diagnostic value for diagnosis orientation. Within this context, among several disorders, four groups of diseases should systematically come to mind including the collagen VI-related myopathies, the Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophies, the SEPN1 and FHL1 related myopathies. More rarely other genetic or acquired myopathies may present with marked contractures. Diagnostic work-up should include a comprehensive assessment including family history, neurological, cardiologic and respiratory evaluations. Paraclinical investigations should minimally include muscle imaging and electromyography. Muscle and skin biopsies as well as protein and molecular analyses usually help to reach a precise diagnosis. We will first describe the main muscle and neuromuscular junction diseases where contractures are typically a prominent symptom of high diagnostic value for diagnosis orientation. In the following chapters, we will present clues for the diagnostic strategy and the main measures to be taken when, at the end of the diagnostic work-up, no definite muscular disease has been identified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased IGF-IEc expression and mechano-growth factor production in intestinal muscle of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease and smooth muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Vu, Kent; Hazelgrove, Krystina; Kuemmerle, John F

    2015-12-01

    The igf1 gene is alternatively spliced as IGF-IEa and IGF-IEc variants in humans. In fibrostenotic Crohn's disease, the fibrogenic cytokine TGF-β1 induces IGF-IEa expression and IGF-I production in intestinal smooth muscle and results in muscle hyperplasia and collagen I production that contribute to stricture formation. Mechano-growth factor (MGF) derived from IGF-IEc induces skeletal and cardiac muscle hypertrophy following stress. We hypothesized that increased IGF-IEc expression and MGF production mediated smooth muscle hypertrophy also characteristic of fibrostenotic Crohn's disease. IGF-IEc transcripts and MGF protein were increased in muscle cells isolated from fibrostenotic intestine under regulation by endogenous TGF-β1. Erk5 and MEF2C were phosphorylated in vivo in fibrostenotic muscle; both were phosphorylated and colocalized to nucleus in response to synthetic MGF in vitro. Smooth muscle-specific protein expression of α-smooth muscle actin, γ-smooth muscle actin, and smoothelin was increased in affected intestine. Erk5 inhibition or MEF2C siRNA blocked smooth muscle-specific gene expression and hypertrophy induced by synthetic MGF. Conditioned media of cultured fibrostenotic muscle induced muscle hypertrophy that was inhibited by immunoneutralization of endogenous MGF or pro-IGF-IEc. The results indicate that TGF-β1-dependent IGF-IEc expression and MGF production in patients with fibrostenotic Crohn's disease regulates smooth muscle cell hypertrophy a critical factor that contributes to intestinal stricture formation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Bilateral metastatic melanoma to the extraocular-muscles simulating thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Ana Catarina; Fung, Adrian; Guedes, Marta Esteves; Costa, João Marques

    2012-10-30

    We report a case of bilateral metastatic melanoma to the extraocular muscles that simulated thyroid eye disease. A 71-year-old man presented with bilateral painless axial proptosis, lid retraction and left gaze restriction. Orbital CT scan demonstrated enlargement of the extraocular muscles with tendon sparing, consistent with thyroid eye disease. However, thyroid function tests and antithyroid antibodies were normal. Systemic review including orbital MRI scan determined the correct diagnosis of metastatic melanoma to the orbit. Metastatic melanoma to the orbit can simulate thyroid eye disease.

  9. Quantitative muscle MRI as an assessment tool for monitoring disease progression in LGMD2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willis, Tracey A; Hollingsworth, Kieren G; Coombs, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Outcome measures for clinical trials in neuromuscular diseases are typically based on physical assessments which are dependent on patient effort, combine the effort of different muscle groups, and may not be sensitive to progression over short trial periods in slow-progressing diseases. We hypoth...

  10. Effects of training and weight support on muscle activation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Martin H; Løkkegaard, Annemette; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Jensen, Bente R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-intensity locomotor training on knee extensor and flexor muscle activation and adaptability to increased body-weight (BW) support during walking in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirteen male patients with idiopathic PD and eight healthy participants were included. The PD patients completed an 8-week training program on a lower-body, positive-pressure treadmill. Knee extensor and flexor muscles activation during steady treadmill walking (3 km/h) were measured before, at the mid-point, and after training. Increasing BW support decreased knee extensor muscle activation (normalization) and increased knee flexor muscle activation (abnormal) in PD patients when compared to healthy participants. Training improved flexor peak muscle activation adaptability to increased (BW) support during walking in PD patients. During walking without BW support shorter knee extensor muscle off-activation time and increased relative peak muscle activation was observed in PD patients and did not improve with 8 weeks of training. In conclusion, patients with PD walked with excessive activation of the knee extensor and flexor muscles when compared to healthy participants. Specialized locomotor training may facilitate adaptive processes related to motor control of walking in PD patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Technique of the computed tomography examination of skeletal muscle in neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.; Kuether, G.; Technische Univ. Muenchen

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography provides a complete view of morphological alterations in skeletal muscle caused by neuromuscular diseases. A good image quality of the lower as well as of the upper limbs is obtained by choosing a small scanning-field and an appropriate scanning-position. The arms are best examined one by one. In follow-up studies muscular atrophy can be documented by planimetric and densimetric measurements. Furthermore CT-scanning is a convenient method for selecting suitable muscles for muscle biopsy. (orig.) [de

  12. The role of exercise-induced myokines in muscle homeostasis and the defense against chronic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Claus; Pedersen, Bente K

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, and tumour growth. Regular exercise offers protection against type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, colon cancer, breast cancer, and dementia. Evidence suggests that the protective...... to our theory, such effects may in part be mediated via muscle-derived peptides, so-called "myokines". Contracting skeletal muscles release myokines with endocrine effects, mediating direct anti-inflammatory effects, and/or specific effects on visceral fat. Other myokines work locally within the muscle...

  13. Ultrasound guided needle biopsy of skeletal muscle in neuromuscular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindequist, S; Schrøder, H D; Larsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Guided by ultrasonography percutaneous needle biopsy of skeletal muscle was performed in 24 patients, using the one hand held Biopty system and a 2 mm Tru-Cut needle. The specimens were graded with regard to diagnostic quality and utility and almost all specimens (96%) were of highest quality....... The use of ultrasonography was helpful in selecting a suitable area for the biopsy and vascular structures could be avoided. The procedure was well tolerated and easy to perform, and no complications were recorded....

  14. Analysis of ultrasound pulse-echo images for characterization of muscle disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Sidney; Heckmatt, John Z.

    1996-04-01

    This study aims to extract quantifiable indices characterizing ultrasound propagation and scattering in skeletal muscle, from data acquired using a real-time linear array scanner in a paediatric muscle clinic, in order to establish early diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in young children, as well as to chart the progressive severity of the disease. Approximately 40 patients with gait disorders, aged between 1 and 11 years, were scanned with a real-time linear array ultrasound scanner, at 5 MHz. A control group consisted of approximately 50 boys, in the same age range, with no evidence or history of muscle disease. Results show that ultrasound quantitative methods can provide a tight clustering of normal data, and also provide a basis for charting the degree of change in diseased muscle. The most significant (quantitative) parameters derive from the frequency of the attenuation and the muscle echogenicity. The approach provides a discrimination method that is more sensitive than visual assessment of the corresponding image by even an experienced observer. There are also indications that the need for traumatic muscle biopsy may be obviated in some cases.

  15. Inspiratory muscle training improves respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Irene Carlos de Medeiros

    2017-04-01

    Registration: PROSPERO (CRD 42015029986. [de Medeiros AIC, Fuzari HKB, Rattesa C, Brandão DC, de Melo Marinho PÉ (2017 Inspiratory muscle training improves respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy 63: 76–83

  16. Distinct disease phases in muscles of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy patients identified by MR detected fat infiltration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara H Janssen

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an untreatable disease, characterized by asymmetric progressive weakness of skeletal muscle with fatty infiltration. Although the main genetic defect has been uncovered, the downstream mechanisms causing FSHD are not understood. The objective of this study was to determine natural disease state and progression in muscles of FSHD patients and to establish diagnostic biomarkers by quantitative MRI of fat infiltration and phosphorylated metabolites. MRI was performed at 3T with dedicated coils on legs of 41 patients (28 men/13 women, age 34-76 years, of which eleven were re-examined after four months of usual care. Muscular fat fraction was determined with multi spin-echo and T1 weighted MRI, edema by TIRM and phosphorylated metabolites by 3D (31P MR spectroscopic imaging. Fat fractions were compared to clinical severity, muscle force, age, edema and phosphocreatine (PCr/ATP. Longitudinal intramuscular fat fraction variation was analyzed by linear regression. Increased intramuscular fat correlated with age (p<0.05, FSHD severity score (p<0.0001, inversely with muscle strength (p<0.0001, and also occurred sub-clinically. Muscles were nearly dichotomously divided in those with high and with low fat fraction, with only 13% having an intermediate fat fraction. The intramuscular fat fraction along the muscle's length, increased from proximal to distal. This fat gradient was the steepest for intermediate fat infiltrated muscles (0.07±0.01/cm, p<0.001. Leg muscles in this intermediate phase showed a decreased PCr/ATP (p<0.05 and the fastest increase in fatty infiltration over time (0.18±0.15/year, p<0.001, which correlated with initial edema (p<0.01, if present. Thus, in the MR assessment of fat infiltration as biomarker for diseased muscles, the intramuscular fat distribution needs to be taken into account. Our results indicate that healthy individual leg muscles become diseased by entering a progressive

  17. McArdle disease does not affect skeletal muscle fibre type profiles in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tertius Abraham Kohn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients suffering from glycogen storage disease V (McArdle disease were shown to have higher surface electrical activity in their skeletal muscles when exercising at the same intensity as their healthy counterparts, indicating more muscle fibre recruitment. To explain this phenomenon, this study investigated whether muscle fibre type is shifted towards a predominance in type I fibres as a consequence of the disease. Muscle biopsies from the Biceps brachii (BB (n = 9 or Vastus lateralis (VL (n = 8 were collected over a 13-year period from male and female patients diagnosed with McArdle disease, analysed for myosin heavy chain (MHC isoform content using SDS-PAGE, and compared to healthy controls (BB: n = 3; VL: n = 10. All three isoforms were expressed and no difference in isoform expression in VL was found between the McArdle patients and healthy controls (MHC I: 33±19% vs. 43±7%; MHC IIa: 52±9% vs. 40±7%; MHC IIx: 15±18% vs. 17±9%. Similarly, the BB isoform content was also not different between the two groups (MHC I: 33±14% vs. 30±11%; MHC IIa: 46±17% vs. 39±5%; MHC IIx: 21±13% vs. 31±14%. In conclusion, fibre type distribution does not seem to explain the higher surface EMG in McArdle patients. Future studies need to investigate muscle fibre size and contractility of McArdle patients.

  18. Skeletal muscle water T2 as a biomarker of disease status and exercise effects in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, Ami; Azzabou, Noura; Bulea, Thomas; Reyngoudt, Harmen; Shimellis, Hirity; Ren, Yupeng; Kim, Eunhee; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Carlier, Pierre G

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine exercise effects on muscle water T 2 in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In 12 DMD subjects and 19 controls, lower leg muscle fat (%) was measured by Dixon and muscle water T 2 and R 2 (1/T 2 ) by the tri-exponential model. Muscle water R 2 was measured again at 3 hours after an ankle dorsiflexion exercise. The muscle fat fraction was higher in DMD participants than in controls (p < .001) except in the tibialis posterior muscle. Muscle water T 2 was measured independent of the degree of fatty degeneration in DMD muscle. At baseline, muscle water T 2 was higher in all but the extensor digitorum longus muscles of DMD participants than controls (p < .001). DMD participants had a lower muscle torque (p < .001) and exerted less power (p < .01) during exercise than controls. Nevertheless, muscle water R 2 decreased (T 2 increased) after exercise from baseline in DMD subjects and controls with greater changes in the target muscles of the exercise than in ankle plantarflexor muscles. Skeletal muscle water T 2 is a sensitive biomarker of the disease status in DMD and of the exercise response in DMD patients and controls. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Anaesthesia for diagnostic muscle biopsy in an infant with Pompe's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, K R; Broadman, L M

    1986-11-01

    The anaesthetic management of children with glycogen-storage disease type IIa (Pompe's disease) presents a variety of challenges. A modification of a femoral nerve block, the inguinal paravascular block, as described by Winnie, was used in conjunction with intravenous ketamine to provide anaesthesia for a diagnostic muscle biopsy in a 5.5-month-old infant with Pompe's disease. A peripheral nerve stimulator was used to locate the femoral nerve in lieu of eliciting a paraesthesia.

  20. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a home-based inspiratory muscle training programme in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using multiple inspiratory muscle tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoletou, Dimitra; Man, William D-C; Mustfa, Naveed; Moore, Julie; Rafferty, Gerrard; Grant, Robert L; Johnson, Lorna; Moxham, John

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based inspiratory muscle training (IMT) programme using multiple inspiratory muscle tests. Sixty-eight patients (37 M) with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (Mean [SD], FEV1 36.1 [13.6]% pred.; FEV1/FVC 35.7 [11.2]%) were randomised into an experimental or control group and trained with a threshold loading device at intensity >30% maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax) or inspiratory nasal pressure (SNIP), diaphragm contractility (Pdi,tw), incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT), respiratory muscle endurance (RME), chronic respiratory disease questionnaire (CRDQ), the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) and the SF-36. Between-group changes were assessed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). PImax and perception of well-being improved significantly post-IMT [p = 0.04 and muscle function post-IMT. A seven-week, home-based inspiratory muscle training programme improves maximal inspiratory pressure and perception of well-being in patients with moderate to severe COPD but not sniff nasal inspiratory pressure or diaphragm contractility, respiratory muscle endurance and exercise capacity. Multiple tests are recommended for a more comprehensive assessment of changes in muscle function following inspiratory muscle training programmes. Therapists need to explore different community-based inspiratory muscle training regimes for COPD patients and identify the optimal exercise protocol that is likely to lead to improvements in diaphragm contractility and exercise capacity.

  1. Invited review: Stem cells and muscle diseases: advances in cell therapy strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, Elisa; Gidaro, Teresa; Bigot, Anne; Butler-Browne, Gillian S; Mouly, Vincent; Trollet, Capucine

    2015-04-01

    Despite considerable progress to increase our understanding of muscle genetics, pathophysiology, molecular and cellular partners involved in muscular dystrophies and muscle ageing, there is still a crucial need for effective treatments to counteract muscle degeneration and muscle wasting in such conditions. This review focuses on cell-based therapy for muscle diseases. We give an overview of the different parameters that have to be taken into account in such a therapeutic strategy, including the influence of muscle ageing, cell proliferation and migration capacities, as well as the translation of preclinical results in rodent into human clinical approaches. We describe recent advances in different types of human myogenic stem cells, with a particular emphasis on myoblasts but also on other candidate cells described so far [CD133+ cells, aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive cells (ALDH+), muscle-derived stem cells (MuStem), embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS)]. Finally, we provide an update of ongoing clinical trials using cell therapy strategies. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  2. Effects of breathing maneuver and sitting posture on muscle activity in inspiratory accessory muscles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ki-song

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the influence of breathing maneuver and sitting posture on tidal volume (TV, respiratory rate (RR, and muscle activity of the inspiratory accessory muscles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Methods Twelve men with COPD participated in the study. Inductive respiratory plethysmography and surface electromyography were used to simultaneously measure TV, RR, and muscle activity of the inspiratory accessory muscles [the scalenus (SM, sternocleidomastoid (SCM, and pectoralis major (PM muscles] during quiet natural breathing (QB and pursed-lips breathing (PLB in three sitting postures: neutral position (NP, with armm support (WAS, and with arm and head support (WAHS. Results Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was employed. In a comparison of breathing patterns, PLB significantly increased TV and decreased RR compared to QB. Muscle activity in the SM and SCM increased significantly in PLB compared to QB. In a comparison of sitting postures, the muscle activity of the SM, SCM, and PM increased in the forward-leaning position. Conclusions The results suggest that in COPD, PLB induced a favorable breathing pattern (increased TV and reduced RR compared to QB. Additionally, WAS and WAHS positions increased muscle activity of the inspiratory accessory muscles during inspiration versus NP. Differential involvement of accessory respiratory muscles can be readily studied in COPD patients, allowing monitoring of respiratory load during pulmonary rehabilitation.

  3. Reduced nuclear translocation of serum response factor is associated with skeletal muscle atrophy in a cigarette smoke-induced mouse model of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma R

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ran Ma, Xuefang Gong, Hua Jiang, Chunyi Lin, Yuqin Chen, Xiaoming Xu, Chenting Zhang, Jian Wang, Wenju Lu, Nanshan ZhongGuangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease, State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Diseases, The 1st Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Skeletal muscle atrophy and dysfunction are common complications in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. Serum response factor (SRF is a transcription factor which is critical in myocyte differentiation and growth. In this study, we established a mouse COPD model induced by cigarette smoking (CS exposure for 24 weeks, with apparent pathophysiological changes, including increased airway resistance, enlarged alveoli, and skeletal muscle atrophy. Levels of upstream regulators of SRF, striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS, and ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA were decreased in quadriceps muscle of COPD mice. Meanwhile, the nucleic location of SRF was diminished along with its cytoplasmic accumulation. There was a downregulation of the target muscle-specific gene, Igf1. These results suggest that the CS is one of the major cause for COPD pathogenesis, which induces the COPD-associated skeletal muscle atrophy which is closely related to decreasing SRF nucleic translocation, consequently downregulating the SRF target genes involved in muscle growth and nutrition. The STARS/RhoA signaling pathway might contribute to this course by impacting SRF subcellular distribution. Keywords: SRF, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, skeletal muscle atrophy, cigarette smoking

  4. The relationship between lower limb muscle strength and lower extremity function in HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Mhariwa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV negatively impacts muscle strength and function. This study aimed to establish the relationship between lower limb muscle strength and lower extremity function in HIV disease.Method: A cross-sectional study was undertaken with a sample of 113 HIV-positive participants. Lower limb muscle strength and self-reported function were established using dynamometry and the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS, respectively. Muscle strength and functional status were established in a subset of 30 HIV-negative participants to determine normative values.Results: Muscle strength for participants with HIV ranged from an ankle dorsiflexion mean of 9.33 kg/m2 to 15.79 kg/m2 in hip extensors. In the HIV-negative group, ankle dorsiflexors recorded 11.17 kg/m2, whereas hip extensors were the strongest, generating 17.68 kg/m2. In the HIV-positive group, linear regression showed a positive relationship between lower limb muscle strength and lower extremity function (r = 0.71, p = 0.00. Fifty per cent of the changes in lower extremity function were attributable to lower limb muscle strength. A simple linear regression model showed that lower limb ankle plantar flexors contributed the most to lower extremity function in this cohort, contrary to the literature which states that hip and trunk muscles are the most active in lower limb functional activities.Conclusion: Lower extremity strength impacts perceived function in individuals stabilised on antiretroviral therapy for HIV disease. These findings demonstrate that ankle plantar flexors produce more force over hip flexors. Careful attention should be paid to the implications for strength training in this population.

  5. Exercise training reverses skeletal muscle atrophy in an experimental model of VCP disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Nalbandian

    Full Text Available The therapeutic effects of exercise resistance and endurance training in the alleviation of muscle hypertrophy/atrophy should be considered in the management of patients with advanced neuromuscular diseases. Patients with progressive neuromuscular diseases often experience muscle weakness, which negatively impact independence and quality of life levels. Mutations in the valosin containing protein (VCP gene lead to Inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD and more recently affect 2% of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS-diagnosed cases.The present investigation was undertaken to examine the effects of uphill and downhill exercise training on muscle histopathology and the autophagy cascade in an experimental VCP mouse model carrying the R155H mutation. Progressive uphill exercise in VCP(R155H/+ mice revealed significant improvement in muscle strength and performance by grip strength and Rotarod analyses when compared to the sedentary mice. In contrast, mice exercised to run downhill did not show any significant improvement. Histologically, the uphill exercised VCP(R155H/+ mice displayed an improvement in muscle atrophy, and decreased expression levels of ubiquitin, P62/SQSTM1, LC3I/II, and TDP-43 autophagy markers, suggesting an alleviation of disease-induced myopathy phenotypes. There was also an improvement in the Paget-like phenotype.Collectively, our data highlights that uphill exercise training in VCP(R155H/+ mice did not have any detrimental value to the function of muscle, and may offer effective therapeutic options for patients with VCP-associated diseases.

  6. Deficits in muscle strength, mass, quality, and mobility in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig, Marc; Eng, Janice J; MacIntyre, Donna L; Road, Jeremy D; Reid, Wendy D

    2011-01-01

    Midthigh intramuscular fat (IF), a feature of reduced muscle quality, is an important predictor of self-reported mobility loss in the elderly. This study compared measures of muscle strength, mass, IF, and mobility in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and healthy subjects. Associations between measures of muscle strength, mass, IF, and mobility were explored. Knee extensor muscle strength was assessed with an isokinetic dynamometer. Cross-sectional area and IF of the thigh muscles were measured with computerized tomography. Mobility was assessed with the repetitive sit-to-stand, self-selected gait speed, and 6-minute walk tests. Patients with COPD (n = 21, age 71.3 ± 8.1 years, and a percentage predicted force expiratory volume in 1 second of 47.2 ± 12.9) and 21 healthy subjects matched for age (67.4 ± 8.6 years), gender, and body mass participated in the study. Patients with COPD showed reduced average knee extensor strength (29%, P = .016) cross-sectional area of the thigh muscles (17%, P = .007) and mobility measures (~23%, P ≤ .001). Knee extensor and flexor IF was 2-folds greater in people with COPD (P ≤ .005). Measures of knee extensor muscle strength, mass, and IF were not associated with mobility measures. Compared with healthy controls, patients with moderate to severe COPD show marked deficits in muscle strength, mass, quality, and mobility. More studies with larger sample size are required to elucidate whether any of these muscle deficits can explain mobility impairments in COPD.

  7. ALS-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins in Denervated Skeletal Muscle: Implications for Motor Neuron Disease Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, C M; Bushuven, E; Tripathi, P; Chandrasekar, A; Simon, C M; Drepper, C; Yamoah, A; Dreser, A; Katona, I; Johann, S; Beyer, C; Wagner, S; Grond, M; Nikolin, S; Anink, J; Troost, D; Sendtner, M; Goswami, A; Weis, J

    2017-11-01

    Alpha-motoneurons and muscle fibres are structurally and functionally interdependent. Both cell types particularly rely on endoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) functions. Mutations of the ER proteins VAPB, SigR1 and HSP27 lead to hereditary motor neuron diseases (MNDs). Here, we determined the expression profile and localization of these ER proteins/chaperons by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting in biopsy and autopsy muscle tissue of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurogenic muscular atrophies (NMAs) and compared these patterns to mouse models of neurogenic muscular atrophy. Postsynaptic neuromuscular junction staining for VAPB was intense in normal human and mouse muscle and decreased in denervated Nmd 2J mouse muscle fibres. In contrast, VAPB levels together with other chaperones and autophagy markers were increased in extrasynaptic regions of denervated muscle fibres of patients with MNDs and other NMAs, especially at sites of focal myofibrillar disintegration (targets). These findings did not differ between NMAs due to ALS and other causes. G93A-SOD1 mouse muscle fibres showed a similar pattern of protein level increases in denervated muscle fibres. In addition, they showed globular VAPB-immunoreactive structures together with misfolded SOD1 protein accumulations, suggesting a primary myopathic change. Our findings indicate that altered expression and localization of these ER proteins and autophagy markers are part of the dynamic response of muscle fibres to denervation. The ER is particularly prominent and vulnerable in both muscle fibres and alpha-motoneurons. Thus, ER pathology could contribute to the selective build-up of degenerative changes in the neuromuscular axis in MNDs. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  8. Impaired autophagy contributes to muscle atrophy in glycogen storage disease type II patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Fanin, Marina; Masiero, Eva; Angelini, Corrado; Sandri, Marco

    2012-11-01

    The autophagy-lysosome system is essential for muscle cell homeostasis and its dysfunction has been linked to muscle disorders that are typically distinguished by massive autophagic buildup. Among them, glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) is characterized by the presence of large glycogen-filled lysosomes in the skeletal muscle, due to a defect in the lysosomal enzyme acid α-glucosidase (GAA). The accumulation of autophagosomes is believed to be detrimental for myofiber function. However, the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of GSDII is still unclear. To address this issue we monitored autophagy in muscle biopsies and myotubes of early and late-onset GSDII patients at different time points of disease progression. Moreover we also analyzed muscles from patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Our data suggest that autophagy is a protective mechanism that is required for myofiber survival in late-onset forms of GSDII. Importantly, our findings suggest that a normal autophagy flux is important for a correct maturation of GAA and for the uptake of recombinant human GAA. In conclusion, autophagy failure plays an important role in GSDII disease progression, and the development of new drugs to restore the autophagic flux should be considered to improve ERT efficacy.

  9. Comparative Statistical Mechanics of Muscle and Non-Muscle Contractile Systems: Stationary States of Near-Equilibrium Systems in A Linear Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Lecarpentier

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A. Huxley’s equations were used to determine the mechanical properties of muscle myosin II (MII at the molecular level, as well as the probability of the occurrence of the different stages in the actin–myosin cycle. It was then possible to use the formalism of statistical mechanics with the grand canonical ensemble to calculate numerous thermodynamic parameters such as entropy, internal energy, affinity, thermodynamic flow, thermodynamic force, and entropy production rate. This allows us to compare the thermodynamic parameters of a non-muscle contractile system, such as the normal human placenta, with those of different striated skeletal muscles (soleus and extensor digitalis longus as well as the heart muscle and smooth muscles (trachea and uterus in the rat. In the human placental tissues, it was observed that the kinetics of the actin–myosin crossbridges were considerably slow compared with those of smooth and striated muscular systems. The entropy production rate was also particularly low in the human placental tissues, as compared with that observed in smooth and striated muscular systems. This is partly due to the low thermodynamic flow found in the human placental tissues. However, the unitary force of non-muscle myosin (NMII generated by each crossbridge cycle in the myofibroblasts of the human placental tissues was similar in magnitude to that of MII in the myocytes of both smooth and striated muscle cells. Statistical mechanics represents a powerful tool for studying the thermodynamics of all contractile muscle and non-muscle systems.

  10. Hanging on for the ride: adhesion to the extracellular matrix mediates cellular responses in skeletal muscle morphogenesis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Michelle F; Sher, Roger B; Henry, Clarissa A

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle specification and morphogenesis during early development are critical for normal physiology. In addition to mediating locomotion, skeletal muscle is a secretory organ that contributes to metabolic homeostasis. Muscle is a highly adaptable tissue, as evidenced by the ability to increase muscle cell size and/or number in response to weight bearing exercise. Conversely, muscle wasting can occur during aging (sarcopenia), cancer (cancer cachexia), extended hospital stays (disuse atrophy), and in many genetic diseases collectively known as the muscular dystrophies and myopathies. It is therefore of great interest to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate skeletal muscle development and adaptation. Muscle morphogenesis transforms short muscle precursor cells into long, multinucleate myotubes that anchor to tendons via the myotendinous junction. This process requires carefully orchestrated interactions between cells and their extracellular matrix microenvironment. These interactions are dynamic, allowing muscle cells to sense biophysical, structural, organizational, and/or signaling changes within their microenvironment and respond appropriately. In many musculoskeletal diseases, these cell adhesion interactions are disrupted to such a degree that normal cellular adaptive responses are not sufficient to compensate for accumulating damage. Thus, one major focus of current research is to identify the cell adhesion mechanisms that drive muscle morphogenesis, with the hope that understanding how muscle cell adhesion promotes the intrinsic adaptability of muscle tissue during development may provide insight into potential therapeutic approaches for muscle diseases. Our objectives in this review are to highlight recent studies suggesting conserved roles for cell-extracellular matrix adhesion in vertebrate muscle morphogenesis and cellular adaptive responses in animal models of muscle diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. Actin nemaline myopathy mouse reproduces disease, suggests other actin disease phenotypes and provides cautionary note on muscle transgene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianina Ravenscroft

    Full Text Available Mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1 cause congenital myopathies including nemaline myopathy, actin aggregate myopathy and rod-core disease. The majority of patients with ACTA1 mutations have severe hypotonia and do not survive beyond the age of one. A transgenic mouse model was generated expressing an autosomal dominant mutant (D286G of ACTA1 (identified in a severe nemaline myopathy patient fused with EGFP. Nemaline bodies were observed in multiple skeletal muscles, with serial sections showing these correlated to aggregates of the mutant skeletal muscle α-actin-EGFP. Isolated extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles were significantly weaker than wild-type (WT muscle at 4 weeks of age, coinciding with the peak in structural lesions. These 4 week-old mice were ~30% less active on voluntary running wheels than WT mice. The α-actin-EGFP protein clearly demonstrated that the transgene was expressed equally in all myosin heavy chain (MHC fibre types during the early postnatal period, but subsequently became largely confined to MHCIIB fibres. Ringbinden fibres, internal nuclei and myofibrillar myopathy pathologies, not typical features in nemaline myopathy or patients with ACTA1 mutations, were frequently observed. Ringbinden were found in fast fibre predominant muscles of adult mice and were exclusively MHCIIB-positive fibres. Thus, this mouse model presents a reliable model for the investigation of the pathobiology of nemaline body formation and muscle weakness and for evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions. The occurrence of core-like regions, internal nuclei and ringbinden will allow analysis of the mechanisms underlying these lesions. The occurrence of ringbinden and features of myofibrillar myopathy in this mouse model of ACTA1 disease suggests that patients with these pathologies and no genetic explanation should be screened for ACTA1 mutations.

  12. Actin Nemaline Myopathy Mouse Reproduces Disease, Suggests Other Actin Disease Phenotypes and Provides Cautionary Note on Muscle Transgene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Jackaman, Connie; Sewry, Caroline A.; McNamara, Elyshia; Squire, Sarah E.; Potter, Allyson C.; Papadimitriou, John; Griffiths, Lisa M.; Bakker, Anthony J.; Davies, Kay E.; Laing, Nigel G.; Nowak, Kristen J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the skeletal muscle α-actin gene (ACTA1) cause congenital myopathies including nemaline myopathy, actin aggregate myopathy and rod-core disease. The majority of patients with ACTA1 mutations have severe hypotonia and do not survive beyond the age of one. A transgenic mouse model was generated expressing an autosomal dominant mutant (D286G) of ACTA1 (identified in a severe nemaline myopathy patient) fused with EGFP. Nemaline bodies were observed in multiple skeletal muscles, with serial sections showing these correlated to aggregates of the mutant skeletal muscle α-actin-EGFP. Isolated extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles were significantly weaker than wild-type (WT) muscle at 4 weeks of age, coinciding with the peak in structural lesions. These 4 week-old mice were ∼30% less active on voluntary running wheels than WT mice. The α-actin-EGFP protein clearly demonstrated that the transgene was expressed equally in all myosin heavy chain (MHC) fibre types during the early postnatal period, but subsequently became largely confined to MHCIIB fibres. Ringbinden fibres, internal nuclei and myofibrillar myopathy pathologies, not typical features in nemaline myopathy or patients with ACTA1 mutations, were frequently observed. Ringbinden were found in fast fibre predominant muscles of adult mice and were exclusively MHCIIB-positive fibres. Thus, this mouse model presents a reliable model for the investigation of the pathobiology of nemaline body formation and muscle weakness and for evaluation of potential therapeutic interventions. The occurrence of core-like regions, internal nuclei and ringbinden will allow analysis of the mechanisms underlying these lesions. The occurrence of ringbinden and features of myofibrillar myopathy in this mouse model of ACTA1 disease suggests that patients with these pathologies and no genetic explanation should be screened for ACTA1 mutations. PMID:22174871

  13. Parkinson Disease: Treating Symptoms Unrelated to Muscle Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It is a common nervous system disease in older adults. Younger adults sometimes develop PD. However, it rarely ... is common for men with PD to experience erectile dysfunction (ED), where there is difficulty having or maintaining ...

  14. Quantification of muscle activity during sleep for patients with neurodegenerative diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanif, Umaer; Trap, Lotte; Jennum, Poul

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder (iRBD) is a very strong predictor for later development of Parkinson's disease (PD), and is characterized by REM sleep without atonia (RSWA), resulting in increased muscle activity during REM sleep. Abundant studies have shown the loss of atonia during REM...

  15. Congenital nutritional myodegeneration (white muscle disease) in a Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) calf

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.H.; Klip, Fokko C; Kik, M.J.L.

    2017-01-01

    © Copyright 2017 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians. It is well known that vitamin E and selenium deficiencies in domestic ruminants can lead to white muscle disease. After a clinically normal gestation period at Ouwehand Zoo in the Netherlands, a newborn giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis)

  16. Effects of training and weight support on muscle activation in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Martin Høyer; Løkkegaard, Annemette; Sonne-Holm, Stig

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-intensity locomotor training on knee extensor and flexor muscle activation and adaptability to increased body-weight (BW) support during walking in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Thirteen male patients with idiopathic PD and eig...

  17. White muscle disease in foals : focus on selenium soil content. A case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delesalle, Catherine; de Bruijn, Marco; Wilmink, Sanne; Vandendriessche, Hilde; Mol, Gerben; Boshuizen, Berit; Plancke, Lukas; Grinwis, Guy

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: White muscle disease (WMD) is a nutritional myopathy caused by selenium (Se) deficiency. In most soils, Se is present in low concentrations, sometimes even below 0.2 mg/kg, a trend which is seen in many countries. Apart from total soil Se concentrations, soil conditions may be such that

  18. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Arterial Blood Oxygen Saturation in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhshandeh Bavarsad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the problems of the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the weakness of the respiratory muscles that causes oxygen desaturation at rest and activity and decreases exercise tolerance. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2. Patients and Methods Forty patients with mild to very severe COPD were recruited for this study, which is a randomized control trail. The patients were randomized to IMT (inspiratory muscle training and control group. Training was performed with Respivol (a kind of inspiratory muscle trainer for 8 weeks (15 min/d for 6 d/week. SPSS software version 16 was used to analyze the data by performing independent t test, paired t test, and Fisher exact test. Results Results showed that, after 8 weeks of inspiratory muscle training, there was a little increase (but not statistically significant improvement in SPO2 (from 92.6 ± 8.71 % to 95.13 ± 7.08 %, with P = 0.06, whereas it remained unchanged in the control group (from 96.0 ± 3.46 % to 96.4 ± 3.35 % with P = 0.51. No statistically significant difference was seen between the two groups (P > 0.05. Conclusions Although inspiratory muscles training can prevent desaturation, which is caused by activity, it fails to improve it.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction in calf muscles of patients with combined peripheral arterial disease and diabetes type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindegaard Pedersen, Brian; Bækgaard, Niels; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2017-10-01

    This study elucidates the effects on muscle mitochondrial function in patients suffering from combined peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the relation to patient symptoms and treatment. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) calf muscle exercise tests were conducted on 40 subjects, 15 (PAD), 15 (PAD+T2D) and 10 healthy age matched controls (CTRL) recruited from the vascular outpatient clinic at Gentofte County Hospital, Denmark. Calf muscle biopsies (~80 mg, gastrocnemius and anterior tibial muscles) were sampled and mitochondrial function tested applying high resolution oxygraphy on isolated muscle fibers. The NIRS exercise tests showed evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction in the PAD+T2D group by a longer recovery of the deoxygenation resulting from exercise in spite of a higher exercise oxygenation level compared to the PAD group. This was confirmed by a ~30% reduction in oxygen consumption in the muscle biopsy tests for the PAD+T2D compared to the PAD group (P<0.05). We claim that this mitochondrial dysfunction partly explains the ~30% reduction in tread mill walking distance for the PAD+T2D group observed in this study. These findings support the use of early surgical revascularization in the PAD+T2D group, in order to obtain better walking performance and probably reduced risk of permanent mitochondrial damage.

  20. Therapeutic effects of anabolic androgenic steroids on chronic diseases associated with muscle wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerdeman, Jorn; de Ronde, Willem

    2011-01-01

    A variety of clinical conditions are complicated by loss of weight and skeletal muscle which may contribute to morbidity and mortality. Anabolic androgenic steroids have been demonstrated to increase fat-free mass, muscle mass and strength in healthy men and women without major adverse events and therefore could be beneficial in these conditions. This review provides an overview of clinical trials with anabolic androgenic steroids in the treatment of chronic diseases including HIV-wasting, chronic renal failure, chronic obstructive lung disease, muscular disease, alcoholic liver disease, burn injuries and post operative recovery. Relevant studies were identified in PubMed (years 1950 - 2010), bibliographies of the identified studies and the Cochrane database. Although the beneficial effects of AAS in chronic disorders are promising, clinically relevant endpoints such as quality of life, improved physical functioning and survival were mainly missing or not significant, except for burn injuries. Therefore, more studies are needed to confirm their long term safety and efficacy.

  1. Isolation and individual electrical stimulation of single smooth-muscle cells from the urinary bladder of the pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Glerum (Jacobus); R. van Mastrigt (Ron); J.C. Romijn (Johannes); D.J. Griffiths (Derek)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractIn contrast to striated muscle, measurements on strips of smooth muscle cannot be uniquely interpreted in terms of an array of contractile units. Therefore scaling down to the single-cell level is necessary to gain detailed understanding of the contractile process in this type of muscle.

  2. The Role of Skeletal Muscle in Development of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sung Moon

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is closely correlated with abnormal accumulation of visceral fat, but the role of skeletal muscle remains unclear. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of skeletal muscle in development of NAFLD.MethodsAmong 11,116 subjects (6,242 males, we examined the effects of skeletal muscle mass and visceral fat area (VFA, by bioelectric impedance analysis on NAFLD using by the fatty liver index (FLI.ResultsOf the total subjects (9,565 total, 5,293 males included, 1,848 were classified as having NALFD (FLI ≥60. Body mass index, lipid profile, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c, prevalence of type 2 diabetes (DM, hypertension (HTN, and metabolic syndrome were higher in males than females, but FLI showed no significant difference. The low FLI group showed the lowest VFA and highest skeletal muscle mass of all the groups. Skeletal muscle to visceral fat ratio (SVR and skeletal muscle index had inverse correlations with FLI, when adjusted for age and gender. In multivariate regression analysis, SVR was negatively associated with FLI. Among SVR quartiles, the highest quartile showed very low risk of NAFLD when adjusted for age, gender, lipid profile, DM, HTN, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein from the lowest quartiles (odds ratio, 0.037; 95% confidence interval, 0.029 to 0.049.ConclusionSkeletal muscle mass was inversely associated with visceral fat area, and higher skeletal muscle mass may have a beneficial effect in preventing NAFLD. These results suggest that further studies are needed to ameliorate or slow the progression of sarcopenia.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Wheat Yellow Striate Virus, a Novel Leafhopper-Transmitted Nucleorhabdovirus Infecting Wheat

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    Yan Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A new wheat viral disease was found in China. Bullet-shaped viral particles within the nucleus of the infected wheat leave cells, which possessed 180–210 nm length and 35–40 nm width, were observed under transmission electron microscopy. A putative wheat-infecting rhabdovirus vectored by the leafhopper Psammotettix alienus was identified and tentatively named wheat yellow striate virus (WYSV. The full-length nucleotide sequence of WYSV was determined using transcriptome sequencing and RACE analysis of both wheat samples and leafhoppers P. alienus. The negative-sense RNA genome of WYSV contains 14,486 nucleotides (nt and seven open reading frames (ORFs encode deduced proteins in the order N-P-P3-M-P6-G-L on the antisense strand. In addition, WYSV genome has a 76-nt 3′ leader RNA and a 258-nt 5′ trailer, and the ORFs are separated by conserved intergenic sequences. The entire genome sequence shares 58.1 and 57.7% nucleotide sequence identity with two strains of rice yellow stunt virus (RYSV-A and RYSV-B genomes, respectively. The highest amino acid sequence identity was 63.8% between the L proteins of the WYSV and RYSV-B, but the lowest was 29.5% between the P6 proteins of these viruses. Phylogenetic analysis firmly established WYSV as a new member of the genus Nucleorhabdovirus. Collectively, this study provided evidence that WYSV is likely the first nucleorhabdovirus described infecting wheat via leafhopper P. alienus transmission.

  4. MRI findings, patterns of disease distribution, and muscle fat fraction calculation in five patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 F disease

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    Gaeta, Michele; Mileto, Achille; Minutoli, Fabio; Settineri, Nicola; Donato, Rocco; Ascenti, Giorgio; Blandino, Alfredo [Policlinico ' ' G. Martino' ' , Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Messina (Italy); Mazzeo, Anna; Di Leo, Rita [Policlinico ' ' G. Martino' ' , Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Scienze Psichiatriche ed Anestesiologiche, Messina (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression in five patients with late-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 F, due to a previously unknown mutation. Five patients (three males, two females) underwent MRI of the lower limbs to define the pattern of muscle involvement and evaluate the muscle fat fraction (MFF) of residual thigh muscle with gradient-echo (GRE) dual-echo dual-flip angle technique. Evaluation of fatty infiltration both by visual inspection and MFF calculation was performed. A proximal-to-distal gradient of muscle involvement was depicted in male patients with extensive muscle wasting of lower legs, less severe impairment of distal thigh muscles, and sparing of proximal thigh muscles. A peculiar phenotype finding was that no or only slight muscle abnormalities could be found in the two female patients. We described the pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression in a family with CMT disease type 2 F. GRE dual-echo dual-flip angle MRI technique is a valuable technique to obtain a rapid quantification of MFF. (orig.)

  5. MRI findings, patterns of disease distribution, and muscle fat fraction calculation in five patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 F disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeta, Michele; Mileto, Achille; Minutoli, Fabio; Settineri, Nicola; Donato, Rocco; Ascenti, Giorgio; Blandino, Alfredo; Mazzeo, Anna; Di Leo, Rita

    2012-01-01

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression in five patients with late-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 2 F, due to a previously unknown mutation. Five patients (three males, two females) underwent MRI of the lower limbs to define the pattern of muscle involvement and evaluate the muscle fat fraction (MFF) of residual thigh muscle with gradient-echo (GRE) dual-echo dual-flip angle technique. Evaluation of fatty infiltration both by visual inspection and MFF calculation was performed. A proximal-to-distal gradient of muscle involvement was depicted in male patients with extensive muscle wasting of lower legs, less severe impairment of distal thigh muscles, and sparing of proximal thigh muscles. A peculiar phenotype finding was that no or only slight muscle abnormalities could be found in the two female patients. We described the pattern of muscle involvement and disease progression in a family with CMT disease type 2 F. GRE dual-echo dual-flip angle MRI technique is a valuable technique to obtain a rapid quantification of MFF. (orig.)

  6. Ursolic acid increases skeletal muscle and brown fat and decreases diet-induced obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D Kunkel

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle Akt activity stimulates muscle growth and imparts resistance to obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease. We recently found that ursolic acid increases skeletal muscle Akt activity and stimulates muscle growth in non-obese mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ursolic acid might increase skeletal muscle Akt activity in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. We studied mice that consumed a high fat diet lacking or containing ursolic acid. In skeletal muscle, ursolic acid increased Akt activity, as well as downstream mRNAs that promote glucose utilization (hexokinase-II, blood vessel recruitment (Vegfa and autocrine/paracrine IGF-I signaling (Igf1. As a result, ursolic acid increased skeletal muscle mass, fast and slow muscle fiber size, grip strength and exercise capacity. Interestingly, ursolic acid also increased brown fat, a tissue that shares developmental origins with skeletal muscle. Consistent with increased skeletal muscle and brown fat, ursolic acid increased energy expenditure, leading to reduced obesity, improved glucose tolerance and decreased hepatic steatosis. These data support a model in which ursolic acid reduces obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver disease by increasing skeletal muscle and brown fat, and suggest ursolic acid as a potential therapeutic approach for obesity and obesity-related illness.

  7. Sub-cellular localisation of fukutin related protein in different cell lines and in the muscle of patients with MDC1C and LGMD2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torelli, Silvia; Brown, Susan C; Brockington, Martin

    2005-01-01

    MDC1C and LGMD2I are two allelic forms of muscular dystrophies caused by mutations in the gene encoding for fukutin related protein (FKRP). FKRP encodes for a putative glycosyltransferase, the precise function of which is unknown. However, the marked reduction of alpha-dystroglycan glycosylation...... and in transverse sections of normal skeletal and cardiac muscle, endogenous FKRP surrounded the myonuclei. This localisation was unaffected in the skeletal muscle of patients with MDC1C and LGMD2I carrying various FKRP mutations. These observations imply a specific role for FKRP during striated muscle, neuronal...... and glial development and suggest that protein mis-localisation is not a common mechanism of disease in FKRP-related dystrophies....

  8. Bilateral extraocular muscles enlargement from Kimura′s disease of the orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Christian Pieroni Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kimura′s disease (KD is a rare chronic inflammatory disease of unclear etiology, characterized by subcutaneous nodules, mainly in the head and neck region, frequently associated with regional lymphadenopathy. Orbital involvement is infrequent and when it occurs, usually affects the eyelid or the lacrimal gland. We report a case of a 44-year-old man that presented with bilateral slowly progressive proptosis that was initially misdiagnosed as Graves′ Ophthalmopathy. 15 months of worsening proptosis and the development of facial and temporal swelling led to further investigation. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed enlargement of all recti muscles and diffuse orbital infiltration. An orbital biopsy was performed and was consistent with the diagnosis of KD. Long term oral corticosteroid showed marked improvement of proptosis and facial swelling. This case serves to emphasize that KD should be included in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory diseases of the orbit, even when characterized by predominant involvement of the extraocular muscles.

  9. Relationship between skeletal muscle mass and swallowing function in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Daisuke; Hirano, Hirohiko; Watanabe, Yutaka; Edahiro, Ayako; Ohara, Yuki; Yoshida, Hideyo; Kim, Hunkyung; Murakami, Kohji; Hironaka, Shouji

    2017-03-01

    The present study verified the hypothesis that decreased skeletal muscle in older adults with Alzheimer's disease is related to Alzheimer's disease progression and decreased oral or swallowing function. We investigated 232 patients with Alzheimer's disease (31 men, 201 women, average age 85.4 ± 5.9 years) in two regions in Japan. The patients provided basic information (sex and age), and were assessed for skeletal muscle index, dementia severity (clinical dementia rating), activities of daily living, nutritional status, oral status and swallowing function. Stratification by clinical dementia rating was as follows: clinical dementia rating 0.5:21 patients (9.0%), clinical dementia rating 1:85 patients (36.6%), clinical dementia rating 2:88 patients (37.9%) and clinical dementia rating 3:38 patients (16.3%). Alzheimer's disease severity was significantly related to skeletal muscle index. Logistic regression analysis showed that clinical dementia rating 3 (odds ratio 11.68, 95% confidence interval 4.52-30.20), body mass index Alzheimer's disease requires strategies to manage swallowing dysfunction. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 17: 402-409. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  10. Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; a Rare Form of Syndromic Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosal Gurinder S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by muscular hypotonia since birth and the histologic features of muscular dystrophy. Syndromic congenital muscular dystrophies are clinically similar autosomal recessive disorders characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, lissencephaly, and eye anomalies. We present a case of a rare form of syndromic congenital muscular dystrophy in an eight year old girl, born of first- degree consanguinity. She had: global developmental delay; a seizure disorder; hypotonia; progressive muscle contractures including bilateral symmetrical flexion contractures of hips, knees, equinus contracture and thoracolumbar scoliosis; diminished deep tendon reflexes: bilateral premature cataract; pseudophakia; and nystagmus. The patient was also highly myopic. Based on clinical features, muscle biopsy and MRI of the brain, a diagnosis of muscle- eye- brain disease was made. Identification of these patients may help to prevent this crippling disorder in the future siblings of probands by utilizing genetic counselling and mutation analysis.

  11. [The pulmonary function and respiratory muscle power in multiple systemic atrophy and Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Zhang, Ying-dong; Gao, Li; Lu, Jie; Gu, Hao; Sun, Li-hua; Tan, Yan; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Jian-ping

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the characteristics of pulmonary function and respiratory muscle performance in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength were evaluated in 16 MSA patients and 20 PD patients. Another 17 age and sex-matched healthy volunteers were recruited as controls. Carbon monoxide diffusion capacity (DLCO) was significantly decreased in MSA group compared with PD group [(62.86 ± 15.66)% vs (76.67 ± 18.98)%, respectively, P respiratory dysfunction is involved in MSA and PD. The reduction of respiratory muscle strength is remarkable. The insufficiency of pulmonary diffusion function is more severe in MSA than in PD. More attention should be paid to the compromised respiratory function in neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. A new muscle glycogen storage disease associated with glycogenin-1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfatti, Edoardo; Nilsson, Johanna; Hedberg-Oldfors, Carola; Hernandez-Lain, Aurelio; Michel, Fabrice; Dominguez-Gonzalez, Cristina; Viennet, Gabriel; Akman, H Orhan; Kornblum, Cornelia; Van den Bergh, Peter; Romero, Norma B; Engel, Andrew G; DiMauro, Salvatore; Oldfors, Anders

    2014-12-01

    We describe a slowly progressive myopathy in 7 unrelated adult patients with storage of polyglucosan in muscle fibers. Genetic investigation revealed homozygous or compound heterozygous deleterious variants in the glycogenin-1 gene (GYG1). Most patients showed depletion of glycogenin-1 in skeletal muscle, whereas 1 showed presence of glycogenin-1 lacking the C-terminal that normally binds glycogen synthase. Our results indicate that either depletion of glycogenin-1 or impaired interaction with glycogen synthase underlies this new form of glycogen storage disease that differs from a previously reported patient with GYG1 mutations who showed profound glycogen depletion in skeletal muscle and accumulation of glycogenin-1. © 2014 The Authors Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  13. Lower extremity nerve function, calf skeletal muscle characteristics, and functional performance in peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Parveen K; Liu, Kiang; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Criqui, Michael H; Tian, Lu; Sufit, Robert; Nishida, Takashi; Tao, Huimin; Liao, Yihua; McDermott, Mary M

    2011-10-01

    To determine whether poor lower extremity nerve function is associated with less-favorable calf muscle characteristics and greater functional impairment in people with and without peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Cross-sectional. Three Chicago-area medical centers. Four hundred thirteen participants with PAD (ankle-brachial index (ABI) Calf muscle cross-sectional area and percentage fat were measured using computed tomography at 66.7% of the distance between the distal and proximal tibia. Six-minute walk performance was measured. Adjusting for age, sex, race, ABI, leg symptoms, smoking, physical activity, comorbidities, and other covariates, lower peroneal nerve conduction velocity (NCV) was associated with lower calf muscle area (first quartile 4,770.3 mm(2) , fourth quartile 5,571 mm(2) , P calf muscle area (first quartile 5,166.0 mm(2) , fourth quartile 6,003.8 mm(2) , P = .01) and poorer 6-minute walk distance (first quartile 866.4 feet, fourth quartile 1,082.5 feet, P = .01) in participants with diabetes mellitus and PAD as well. In participants without PAD, lower peroneal NCV was not associated with lower calf muscle area but was associated with poorer 6-minute walk distance only in participants without diabetes mellitus (first quartile 1,317.0 feet, fourth quartile 1,570.4 feet, P-trend calf muscle area and greater functional impairment in individuals with PAD. Future study is needed to determine whether improving peroneal NCV prevents loss of calf muscle and functional decline in people with PAD. © 2011, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  14. Endogenous testosterone, muscle strength, and fat-free mass in men with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigarrán, Secundino; Pousa, Montserrat; Castro, María Jesús; González, Berta; Martínez, Aurelia; Barril, Guillermina; Aguilera, Abelardo; Coronel, Francisco; Stenvinkel, Peter; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2013-09-01

    Testosterone deficiency is a common finding in men with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Testosterone is thought to play an important anabolic role in muscle synthesis, and muscle wasting is an important and deleterious characteristic of protein-energy wasting (PEW) in CKD. It is presently unknown if reduced endogenous testosterone associates with features of muscle wasting in men with CKD. This was a cross-sectional observational study of 267 men with CKD stages 2-4 (mean ± standard deviation age 67 ± 13 years, estimated glomerular filtration rate 42.9 [interquartile range 30.2-56.7] mL/min/1.73 m²) with measurements of endogenous testosterone and surrogates of PEW such as albumin, prealbumin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) and normalized protein nitrogen appearance (nPNA). Fat-free mass was estimated by bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) and muscle strength by handgrip dynamometry. Across decreasing thirds of testosterone distribution, patients were incrementally older and CRP levels rose significantly. Prealbumin, hemoglobin, nPNA, handgrip strength, and BIVA estimated surrogates of muscle mass and nutritional status (fat-free mass, body cell mass, and phase angle) were progressively reduced (P testosterone significantly and independently contributed to explain the variances of handgrip strength and fat-free mass (P testosterone independently associates with muscle strength and fat-free mass in men with moderate CKD. It is plausible that the reduction in testosterone levels that accompanies CKD may further contribute to the procatabolic environment leading to muscle wasting. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Relationship between expiratory muscle dysfunction and dynamic hyperinflation in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Susana; Güell, Rosa; Barreiro, Esther; Casan, Pere; Gea, Joaquim; Sanchis, Joaquín

    2009-10-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) and expiratory flow limitation (EFL) are physiologically linked and seem to be involved in the genesis of dyspnea and the quality of life (QL) impairment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Advanced COPD patients often show expiratory muscles dysfunction that could be involved in DH development. Study the relationships between expiratory muscle dysfunction and DH, and their association with dyspnea and QL, in advanced COPD. In 25 patients we measured lung function, exercise capacity (incremental ergometry and walking test), EFL and end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) at rest and during exercise, respiratory muscles strength and endurance, dyspnea and QL (Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire, SGRQ). The patients (mean FEV(1)=31% predicted) showed a moderate decrease of respiratory muscles strength and endurance. Nineteen patients exhibited EFL at rest and 24 at 70% of maximal workload (W(max)). The EELV increased from rest to 70% W(max) (9% of predicted FVC). At 70% W(max) EELV correlated inversely with the EFL amount (rho=-0.42), the inspiratory and expiratory muscles endurance (rho=-0.43 and -0.42 respectively) and y VO(2max) (rho=-0.52). The EELV increase from resting to 70% W(max) correlated with dyspnea (rho=0.53) and the amount of EFL at 70%W(max) with the activity score of SGRQ. The FEV(1,) expiratory muscles endurance and LFE amount were independent predictors of EELV at 70% W(max). In advanced COPD a poorer expiratory muscles endurance is related with higher DH during exercise (and lower EFL), which is correlated with higher dyspnea and worse QL.

  16. Inclusion-body myositis, a multifactorial muscle disease associated with aging: current concepts of pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askanas, Valerie; Engel, W King

    2007-11-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis, the most common muscle disease of older persons, has no known cause or persistently beneficial treatment. The unfolding pathogenesis could lead to new treatment strategies and it is now of growing interest among clinicians and basic scientists. About 100 papers related to the subject were published in 2006 and the first part of 2007 (we cite only articles most relevant to this review). This review focuses on the current concepts of the pathogenesis of sporadic inclusion-body myositis. Both degeneration and mononuclear-cell inflammation are components of the pathology, but how each relates to the pathogenesis remains unclear. We suggest that an intramuscle fiber degenerative component is primary, leading to muscle-fiber destruction, while the lymphocytic inflammatory component may only slightly contribute to sporadic inclusion-body myositis muscle-fiber damage. Intracellular accumulation of amyloid-beta precursor protein, amyloid-beta, and amyloid-beta oligomers in an aging muscle-fiber cellular milieu, and other abnormalities, appear to be key pathogenic factors. We summarize intracellular molecular events and their consequences, and correlate findings in sporadic inclusion-body myositis muscle biopsies with inclusion-body myositis experimental models in tissue culture and in transgenic mice. Treatment of sporadic inclusion-body myositis remains a challenge. Antiinflammatory approaches used so far are without major or enduring benefit. Possible new treatment avenues are suggested.

  17. A striated muscle on the hard palate of rodents and rabbits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíková, H.; Witter, Kirsti; Míšek, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 33, - (2004), s. 96-99 ISSN 0340-2096 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP304/01/P021; GA ČR GA304/02/0448; GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : hard palate * rabbits * rodents Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 0.625, year: 2004

  18. Inspiratory muscle training for children and adolescents with neuromuscular diseases: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human, Anri; Corten, Lieselotte; Jelsma, Jennifer; Morrow, Brenda

    2017-06-01

    Patients with neuromuscular diseases are at risk of morbidity and mortality due to respiratory compromise caused by respiratory muscle weakness. A systematic review was performed using pre-specified search strategies to determine the safety of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) and whether it has an impact on inspiratory muscle strength and endurance, exercise capacity, pulmonary function, dyspnoea and health-related quality of life. Randomised, quasi-randomised, cross-over and clinical controlled trials were included if they assessed the use of an external IMT device compared to no, sham/placebo, or alternative IMT treatment in children aged 5-18 years with neuromuscular diseases. Seven full-text articles and two on-going trials (n = 168) were included. Most studies used threshold IMT devices over a medium to long-term period, and none reported any adverse events. Studies differed regarding intensity, repetitions, frequency, rest intervals and duration of IMT. Six studies reported no significant improvement in pulmonary function tests following IMT. Two comparable studies reported significant improvement in inspiratory muscle endurance and four studies reported significantly greater improvement in inspiratory muscle strength in experimental groups. The latter was confirmed in a meta-analysis of two comparable studies (overall effect p < 0.00001). Other outcome measures could not be pooled. There is currently insufficient evidence to guide clinical IMT practice, owing to the limited number of included studies; small sample sizes; data heterogeneity; and risk of bias amongst included studies. Large sample randomised controlled trials are needed to determine safety and efficacy of IMT in paediatric and adolescent patients with neuromuscular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cross-sectional retrospective study of muscle function in patients with glycogen storage disease type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decostre, Valérie; Laforêt, Pascal; Nadaj-Pakleza, Aleksandra; De Antonio, Marie; Leveugle, Sylvain; Ollivier, Gwenn; Canal, Aurélie; Kachetel, Kahina; Petit, François; Eymard, Bruno; Behin, Anthony; Wahbi, Karim; Labrune, Philippe; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2016-09-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III is an inherited metabolic disorder characterized by liver and muscle impairment. This study aimed to identify promising muscle function measures for future studies on natural disease progression and therapeutic trials. The age-effect on the manual muscle testing (MMT), the hand-held dynamometry (HHD), the motor function measure (MFM) and the Purdue pegboard test was evaluated by regression analysis in a cross-sectional retrospective single site study. In patients aged between 13 and 56 years old, the Purdue pegboard test and dynamometry of key pinch and knee extension strength were age-sensitive with annual losses of 1.49, 1.10 and 0.70% of the predicted values (%pred), respectively. The MFM score and handgrip strength were also age-sensitive but only in patients older than 29 and 37 years old with annual losses of 1.42 and 1.84%pred, respectively. Muscle strength assessed by MMT and elbow extension measured by HHD demonstrated an annual loss of less than 0.50%pred and are thus unlikely to be promising outcome measures for future clinical trials. In conclusion, our results identified age-sensitive outcomes from retrospective data and may serve for future longitudinal studies in which an estimation of the minimal number of subjects is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Retention of acetylcarnitine in chronic kidney disease causes insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yasunori; Miyazaki, Teruo; Honda, Akira; Shimohata, Homare; Hirayama, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Masaki

    2016-11-01

    Insulin resistance occurs frequently in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, the mechanisms of insulin resistance associated with chronic kidney disease are unclear. It is known that an increase in the mitochondrial acetyl-CoA (AcCoA)/CoA ratio causes insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, and this ratio is regulated by carnitine acetyltransferase that exchanges acetyl moiety between CoA and carnitine. Because excess acetyl moiety of AcCoA is excreted in urine as acetylcarnitine, we hypothesized that retention of acetylcarnitine might be a cause of insulin resistance in chronic kidney disease patients. Serum acetylcarnitine concentrations were measured in chronic kidney disease patients, and were significantly increased with reduction of renal function. The effects of excess extracellular acetylcarnitine on insulin resistance were studied in cultured skeletal muscle cells (C2C12 and human myotubes), and insulin-dependent glucose uptake was significantly and dose-dependently inhibited by addition of acetylcarnitine. The added acetylcarnitine was converted to carnitine via reverse carnitine acetyltransferase reaction, and thus the AcCoA concentration and AcCoA/CoA ratio in mitochondria were significantly elevated. The results suggest that increased serum acetylcarnitine in CKD patients causes AcCoA accumulation in mitochondria by stimulating reverse carnitine acetyltransferase reaction, which leads to insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  1. Does skeletal muscle have an 'epi'-memory? The role of epigenetics in nutritional programming, metabolic disease, aging and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharples, Adam P; Stewart, Claire E; Seaborne, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle mass, quality and adaptability are fundamental in promoting muscle performance, maintaining metabolic function and supporting longevity and healthspan. Skeletal muscle is programmable and can 'remember' early-life metabolic stimuli affecting its function in adult life. In this review, the authors pose the question as to whether skeletal muscle has an 'epi'-memory? Following an initial encounter with an environmental stimulus, we discuss the underlying molecular and epigenetic mechanisms enabling skeletal muscle to adapt, should it re-encounter the stimulus in later life. We also define skeletal muscle memory and outline the scientific literature contributing to this field. Furthermore, we review the evidence for early-life nutrient stress and low birth weight in animals and human cohort studies, respectively, and discuss the underlying molecular mechanisms culminating in skeletal muscle dysfunction, metabolic disease and loss of skeletal muscle mass across the lifespan. We also summarize and discuss studies that isolate muscle stem cells from different environmental niches in vivo (physically active, diabetic, cachectic, aged) and how they reportedly remember this environment once isolated in vitro. Finally, we will outline the molecular and epigenetic mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle memory and review the epigenetic regulation of exercise-induced skeletal muscle adaptation, highlighting exercise interventions as suitable models to investigate skeletal muscle memory in humans. We believe that understanding the 'epi'-memory of skeletal muscle will enable the next generation of targeted therapies to promote muscle growth and reduce muscle loss to enable healthy aging. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Regulation and dysregulation of esophageal peristalsis by the integrated function of circular and longitudinal muscle layers in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-09-01

    Muscularis propria throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract including the esophagus is comprised of circular and longitudinal muscle layers. Based on the studies conducted in the colon and the small intestine, for more than a century, it has been debated whether the two muscle layers contract synchronously or reciprocally during the ascending contraction and descending relaxation of the peristaltic reflex. Recent studies in the esophagus and colon prove that the two muscle layers indeed contract and relax together in almost perfect synchrony during ascending contraction and descending relaxation of the peristaltic reflex, respectively. Studies in patients with various types of esophageal motor disorders reveal temporal disassociation between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers. We suggest that the discoordination between the two muscle layers plays a role in the genesis of esophageal symptoms, i.e., dysphagia and esophageal pain. Certain pathologies may selectively target one and not the other muscle layer, e.g., in eosinophilic esophagitis there is a selective dysfunction of the longitudinal muscle layer. In achalasia esophagus, swallows are accompanied by the strong contraction of the longitudinal muscle without circular muscle contraction. The possibility that the discoordination between two muscle layers plays a role in the genesis of esophageal symptoms, i.e., dysphagia and esophageal pain are discussed. The purpose of this review is to summarize the regulation and dysregulation of peristalsis by the coordinated and discoordinated function of circular and longitudinal muscle layers in health and diseased states.

  3. Acute calcific tendonitis of dorsal interosseous muscles of the hand: uncommon site of a frequent disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Schneider

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute calcific tendinopathy is one of the manifestations of hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease. While it is more frequent in the shoulder, it has been described in virtually all areas of the body, but rarely in the muscles of the hand. Its etiopathogenesis is not yet fully understood and despite being a fairly frequent condition, it is commonly misdiagnosed. The onset of the disease is usually acute and resolves spontaneously. Acute calcific tendinitis of the interosseous tendons of the hand is an uncommon site of a frequent condition. The clinical presentation is similar to other entities, thus errors in diagnosis frequently occur, resulting in over-treatment or unnecessary tests. We describe a case of acute calcific tendinitis of the interosseous muscles of the hand with a brief review of the current literature with emphasis on diagnostic imaging methods.

  4. Muscle afferent receptors engaged in augmented sympathetic responsiveness in peripheral artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua eLi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The exercise pressor reflex (EPR is a neural control mechanism responsible for the cardiovascular responses to exercise. As exercise is initiated, thin fiber muscle afferent nerves are activated by mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising in the contracting muscles. This leads to reflex increases in arterial blood pressure and heart rate primarily through activation of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. Studies of humans and animals have indicated that the EPR is exaggerated in a number of cardiovascular diseases. For the last several years, studies have specifically employed a rodent model to examine the mechanisms at receptor and cellular levels by which responses of SNA and blood pressure to static exercise are heightened in peripheral artery disease (PAD, one of the most common cardiovascular disorders. A rat model of this disease has well been established. Specifically, femoral artery occlusion is used to study intermittent claudication that is observed in human PAD. The receptors on thin fiber muscle afferents that are engaged in this disease include transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1, purinergic P2X and acid sensing ion channel (ASIC. The role played by nerve growth factor (NGF in regulating those sensory receptors in the processing of amplified EPR was also investigated. The purpose of this review is to focus on a theme namely that PAD accentuates autonomic reflex responses to exercise and further address regulatory mechanisms leading to abnormal sympathetic responsiveness. This review will present some of recent results in regard with several receptors in muscle sensory neurons in contribution to augmented autonomic reflex responses in PAD. Review of the findings from recent studies would lead to a better understanding in integrated processing of sympathetic nervous system in PAD.

  5. Efficacy of a Novel Method for Inspiratory Muscle Training in People With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Daniel; Charususin, Noppawan; Jácome, Cristina; Hoffman, Mariana; McConnell, Alison; Decramer, Marc; Gosselink, Rik

    2015-09-01

    Most inspiratory muscle training (IMT) interventions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been implemented as fully supervised daily training for 30 minutes with controlled training loads using mechanical threshold loading (MTL) devices. Recently, an electronic tapered flow resistive loading (TFRL) device was introduced that has a different loading profile and stores training data during IMT sessions. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a brief, largely unsupervised IMT protocol conducted using either traditional MTL or TFRL on inspiratory muscle function in patients with COPD. Twenty patients with inspiratory muscle weakness who were clinically stable and participating in a pulmonary rehabilitation program were randomly allocated to perform 8 weeks of either MTL IMT or TFRL IMT. Participants performed 2 daily home-based IMT sessions of 30 breaths (3-5 minutes per session) at the highest tolerable intensity, supported by twice-weekly supervised sessions. Adherence, progression of training intensity, increases in maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (Pimax), and endurance capacity of inspiratory muscles (Tlim) were evaluated. More than 90% of IMT sessions were completed in both groups. The TFRL group tolerated higher loads during the final 3 weeks of the IMT program, with similar effort scores on the 10-Item Borg Category Ratio (CR-10) Scale, and achieved larger improvements in Pimax and Tlim than the MTL group. A limitation of the study was the absence of a study arm involving a sham IMT intervention. The short and largely home-based IMT protocol significantly improved inspiratory muscle function in both groups and is an alternative to traditional IMT protocols in this population. Participants in the TFRL group tolerated higher training loads and achieved larger improvements in inspiratory muscle function than those in the MTL group. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  6. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING CONTRAST ENHANCEMENT OF EXTRA-OCULAR MUSCLES IN DOGS WITH NO CLINICAL EVIDENCE OF ORBITAL DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOSLYN, S.; Richards, S.; Boroffka, S.A.E.B.; Mitchell, M.; Hammond, G.; Sullivan, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancement of extra-ocular muscles has been reported in cases of orbital pathology in both veterinary and medical magnetic resonance imaging.We have also observed this finding in the absence of orbital disease. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe extra-ocular muscle contrast

  7. Time-Course of Muscle Mass Loss, Damage, and Proteolysis in Gastrocnemius following Unloading and Reloading: Implications in Chronic Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Chacon-Cabrera

    Full Text Available Disuse muscle atrophy is a major comorbidity in patients with chronic diseases including cancer. We sought to explore the kinetics of molecular mechanisms shown to be involved in muscle mass loss throughout time in a mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy and recovery following immobilization.Body and muscle weights, grip strength, muscle phenotype (fiber type composition and morphometry and muscle structural alterations, proteolysis, contractile proteins, systemic troponin I, and mitochondrial content were assessed in gastrocnemius of mice exposed to periods (1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days of non-invasive hindlimb immobilization (plastic splint, I cohorts and in those exposed to reloading for different time-points (1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days, R cohorts following a seven-day period of immobilization. Groups of control animals were also used.Compared to non-exposed controls, muscle weight, limb strength, slow- and fast-twitch cross-sectional areas, mtDNA/nDNA, and myosin content were decreased in mice of I cohorts, whereas tyrosine release, ubiquitin-proteasome activity, muscle injury and systemic troponin I levels were increased. Gastrocnemius reloading following splint removal improved muscle mass loss, strength, fiber atrophy, injury, myosin content, and mtDNA/nDNA, while reducing ubiquitin-proteasome activity and proteolysis.A consistent program of molecular and cellular events leading to reduced gastrocnemius muscle mass and mitochondrial content and reduced strength, enhanced proteolysis, and injury, was seen in this non-invasive mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy. Unloading of the muscle following removal of the splint significantly improved the alterations seen during unloading, characterized by a specific kinetic profile of molecular events involved in muscle regeneration. These findings have implications in patients with chronic diseases including cancer in whom physical activity may be severely compromised.

  8. Time-Course of Muscle Mass Loss, Damage, and Proteolysis in Gastrocnemius following Unloading and Reloading: Implications in Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Cabrera, Alba; Lund-Palau, Helena; Gea, Joaquim; Barreiro, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Background Disuse muscle atrophy is a major comorbidity in patients with chronic diseases including cancer. We sought to explore the kinetics of molecular mechanisms shown to be involved in muscle mass loss throughout time in a mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy and recovery following immobilization. Methods Body and muscle weights, grip strength, muscle phenotype (fiber type composition and morphometry and muscle structural alterations), proteolysis, contractile proteins, systemic troponin I, and mitochondrial content were assessed in gastrocnemius of mice exposed to periods (1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days) of non-invasive hindlimb immobilization (plastic splint, I cohorts) and in those exposed to reloading for different time-points (1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days, R cohorts) following a seven-day period of immobilization. Groups of control animals were also used. Results Compared to non-exposed controls, muscle weight, limb strength, slow- and fast-twitch cross-sectional areas, mtDNA/nDNA, and myosin content were decreased in mice of I cohorts, whereas tyrosine release, ubiquitin-proteasome activity, muscle injury and systemic troponin I levels were increased. Gastrocnemius reloading following splint removal improved muscle mass loss, strength, fiber atrophy, injury, myosin content, and mtDNA/nDNA, while reducing ubiquitin-proteasome activity and proteolysis. Conclusions A consistent program of molecular and cellular events leading to reduced gastrocnemius muscle mass and mitochondrial content and reduced strength, enhanced proteolysis, and injury, was seen in this non-invasive mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy. Unloading of the muscle following removal of the splint significantly improved the alterations seen during unloading, characterized by a specific kinetic profile of molecular events involved in muscle regeneration. These findings have implications in patients with chronic diseases including cancer in whom physical activity may be severely compromised. PMID

  9. Comparative Biomechanics of Thick Filaments and Thin Filaments with Functional Consequences for Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark S. Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The scaffold of striated muscle is predominantly comprised of myosin and actin polymers known as thick filaments and thin filaments, respectively. The roles these filaments play in muscle contraction are well known, but the extent to which variations in filament mechanical properties influence muscle function is not fully understood. Here we review information on the material properties of thick filaments, thin filaments, and their primary constituents; we also discuss ways in which mechanical properties of filaments impact muscle performance.

  10. A novel neuromuscular form of glycogen storage disease type IV with arthrogryposis, spinal stiffness and rare polyglucosan bodies in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfatti, Edoardo; Barnerias, Christine; Hedberg-Oldfors, Carola; Gitiaux, Cyril; Benezit, Audrey; Oldfors, Anders; Carlier, Robert-Yves; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Romero, Norma B

    2016-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is an autosomal recessive disorder causing polyglucosan storage in various tissues. Neuromuscular forms present with fetal akinesia deformation sequence, lethal myopathy, or mild hypotonia and weakness. A 3-year-old boy presented with arthrogryposis, motor developmental delay, weakness, and rigid spine. Whole body MRI revealed fibroadipose muscle replacement but sparing of the sartorius, gracilis, adductor longus and vastus intermedialis muscles. Polyglucosan bodies were identified in muscle, and GBE1 gene analysis revealed two pathogenic variants. We describe a novel neuromuscular GSD IV phenotype and confirm the importance of muscle morphological studies in early onset neuromuscular disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Muscle Ultrasound in Patients with Glycogen Storage Disease Types I and III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek, Renate J; Sentner, Christiaan P; Smit, G Peter A; Maurits, Natasha M; Derks, Terry G J; van der Hoeven, Johannes H; Sival, Deborah A

    2016-01-01

    In glycogen storage diseases (GSDs), improved longevity has resulted in the need for neuromuscular surveillance. In 12 children and 14 adults with the "hepatic" (GSD-I) and "myopathic" (GSD-III) phenotypes, we cross-sectionally assessed muscle ultrasound density (MUD) and muscle force. Children with both "hepatic" and "myopathic" GSD phenotypes had elevated MUD values (MUD Z-scores: GSD-I > 2.5 SD vs. GSD-III > 1 SD, p GSD-III children, p < 0.05), concurring with pronounced muscle weakness (GSD-III adults vs. GSD-I adults, p < 0.05) of myopathic distribution. Children with "hepatic" and "myopathic" GSD phenotypes were both found to have myopathy. Myopathy stabilizes in "hepatic" GSD-I adults, whereas it progresses in "myopathic" GSD-III adults. Muscle ultrasonography provides an excellent, non-invasive tool for neuromuscular surveillance per GSD phenotype. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Exercise-Induced Myokines in Muscle Homeostasis and the Defense against Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Brandt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, and tumour growth. Regular exercise offers protection against type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, colon cancer, breast cancer, and dementia. Evidence suggests that the protective effect of exercise may to some extent be ascribed to the antiinflammatory effect of regular exercise. Here we suggest that exercise may exert its anti-inflammatory effect via a reduction in visceral fat mass and/or by induction of an anti-inflammatory environment with each bout of exercise. According to our theory, such effects may in part be mediated via muscle-derived peptides, so-called “myokines”. Contracting skeletal muscles release myokines with endocrine effects, mediating direct anti-inflammatory effects, and/or specific effects on visceral fat. Other myokines work locally within the muscle and exert their effects on signalling pathways involved in fat oxidation and glucose uptake. By mediating anti-inflammatory effects in the muscle itself, myokines may also counteract TNF-driven insulin resistance. In conclusion, exercise-induced myokines appear to be involved in mediating both systemic as well as local anti-inflammatory effects.

  13. The gaseous plasmonic response of a one-dimensional photonic crystal composed of striated plasma layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Righetti, F.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    We present simulations of the response of a one-dimensional striated plasma slab to incident electromagnetic waves that span regions both above and below the plasma frequency, ωp. Photonic bandgap modes are present throughout these regions, and volume and surface plasmon modes facilitate the response below ωp, where the dielectric constant, ɛp application of these structures as ultra-narrow tunable microwave transmission filters.

  14. Neural correlates of visual motion processing without awareness in patients with striate cortex and pulvinar lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barleben, Maria; Stoppel, Christian M; Kaufmann, Jörn; Merkel, Christian; Wecke, Thoralf; Goertler, Michael; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Hopf, Jens-Max; Schoenfeld, Mircea A

    2015-04-01

    Patients with striate cortex lesions experience visual perception loss in the contralateral visual field. In few patients, however, stimuli within the blind field can lead to unconscious (blindsight) or even conscious perception when the stimuli are moving (Riddoch syndrome). Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the neural responses elicited by motion stimulation in the sighted and blind visual fields of eight patients with lesions of the striate cortex. Importantly, repeated testing ensured that none of the patients exhibited blindsight or a Riddoch syndrome. Three patients had additional lesions in the ipsilesional pulvinar. For blind visual field stimulation, great care was given that the moving stimulus was precisely presented within the borders of the scotoma. In six of eight patients, the stimulation within the scotoma elicited hemodynamic activity in area human middle temporal (hMT) while no activity was observed within the ipsilateral lesioned area of the striate cortex. One of the two patients in whom no ipsilesional activity was observed had an extensive lesion including massive subcortical damage. The other patient had an additional focal lesion within the lateral inferior pulvinar. Fiber-tracking based on anatomical and functional markers (hMT and Pulvinar) on individual diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data from each patient revealed the structural integrity of subcortical pathways in all but the patient with the extensive subcortical lesion. These results provide clear evidence for the robustness of direct subcortical pathways from the pulvinar to area hMT in patients with striate cortex lesions and demonstrate that ipsilesional activity in area hMT is completely independent of conscious perception. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Inspiratory muscle training protocol for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (IMTCO study): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charususin, N.; Gosselink, R.; Decramer, M.; McConnell, A.; Saey, D.; Maltais, F.; Derom, E.; Vermeersch, S.; Helvoort, H.A. van; Heijdra, Y.F.; Klaassen, M.; Glockl, R.; Kenn, K.; Langer, D.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been applied during pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unclear if the addition of IMT to a general exercise training programme leads to additional clinically relevant

  16. [An analysis of quadriceps muscle force in boys with Osgood-Schlatter disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, K

    1988-05-01

    Osgood-Schlatter disease is thought to be a consequence of microavulsions caused by repeated traction on the tibial tuberosity. For determination of the etiologic factor of this disease, concentric and eccentric force of the quadriceps muscle was measured in the unaffected side and compared with that of normal boys and girls, normal men and women, and patients with cruciate ligament injury of the knee. The relation between the maximum force and its angle velocity was approximated and the ratio of the eccentric force to the concentric force was calculated at 90 deg/sec. In the group with Osgood-Schlatter disease, the eccentric force was especially strong and this group had the highest ratio among all groups. This finding suggests that the increased eccentric force in the extensor mechanism of the knee is an etiologic factor in the disease.

  17. PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE RELAXATION INCREASE PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW RATE ON CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintin Sukartini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Limited progressive air flow in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD can caused by small airway disease (bronchiolitis obstructive and loss of elasticity of the lung (emphysema. Further it can be decreasing the quality of life in COPD patients because dyspnea and uncomfortable in activity. Progressive muscle relaxation (PMR is one of the relaxation technique that can repair pulmonary ventilation by decreasing chronic constriction of the respiratory muscles. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on raised peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR. Method: A pre-experimental one group pre-post test design was used in this study. Population was all of the COPD patients at Pulmonary Specialist Polyclinic Dr Mohamad Soewandhie Surabaya. There were 8 respondents taken by using purposive sampling. PEFR was counted by using peak flow meter every six day. Data were analyzed by using Paired t-Test with significance level  p≤0.05. Result: The result showed that PMR had significance level on increasing of PEFR (p=0.012. Discussion: It can be concluded that PMR has an effect on raise PEFR. Further studies are recommended to measure the effect of PMR on respiratory rate (RR, heart rate (HR subjective dyspnoe symptoms, forced expiration volume on the first minute (FEV1 and mid maximum flow rate (MMFR in COPD patients.

  18. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for muscle weakness in adults with advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sarah; Man, William D-C; Gao, Wei; Higginson, Irene J; Wilcock, Andrew; Maddocks, Matthew

    2016-10-17

    This review is an update of a previously published review in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews Issue 1, 2013 on Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for muscle weakness in adults with advanced disease.Patients with advanced progressive disease often experience muscle weakness, which can impact adversely on their ability to be independent and their quality of life. In those patients who are unable or unwilling to undertake whole-body exercise, neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) may be an alternative treatment to enhance lower limb muscle strength. Programmes of NMES appear to be acceptable to patients and have led to improvements in muscle function, exercise capacity, and quality of life. However, estimates regarding the effectiveness of NMES based on individual studies lack power and precision. Primary objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of NMES on quadriceps muscle strength in adults with advanced disease. Secondary objectives: to examine the safety and acceptability of NMES, and its effect on peripheral muscle function (strength or endurance), muscle mass, exercise capacity, breathlessness, and health-related quality of life. We identified studies from searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), and Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (the Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OVID), Embase (OVID), CINAHL (EBSCO), and PsycINFO (OVID) databases to January 2016; citation searches, conference proceedings, and previous systematic reviews. We included randomised controlled trials in adults with advanced chronic respiratory disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, or HIV/AIDS comparing a programme of NMES as a sole or adjunct intervention to no treatment, placebo NMES, or an active control. We imposed no language restriction. Two review authors independently extracted data on study design, participants, interventions, and outcomes. We assessed risk of bias using

  19. Higher body mass index is associated with more adverse changes in calf muscle characteristics in peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Zankhana; Liu, Kiang; Tian, Lu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Liao, Yihua; Criqui, Michael H; McDermott, Mary M

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated whether higher body mass index (BMI) is associated with more adverse lower extremity muscle characteristics at baseline and more adverse changes in muscle over time among participants with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This was a longitudinal, observational study of 425 men and women with PAD and 261 without PAD. Computed tomography was used to measure calf muscle characteristics at baseline and every 2 years. Knee extension isometric strength, power, and 6-minute walk distance were measured at baseline and annually. Baseline BMI (kg/m(2)) categories were ideal (20-25), overweight (>25-30), and obese (>30). Analyses adjust for age, race, sex, ankle brachial index, comorbidities, and other covariates. At baseline, higher BMI among participants with PAD was associated with greater calf muscle area (ideal BMI: 5181 mm(2); overweight: 5513 mm(2); obese: 5695 mm(2); P = .0009 for trend), higher calf muscle percentage of fat (6.38%, 10.28%, 17.44%, respectively, P calf muscle density (P calf muscle area (P = .030 for trend) and greater increases in calf muscle percentage of fat (P = .023 for trend). Among participants without PAD, there were no significant associations of baseline BMI with changes in lower extremity muscle outcomes over time. Among PAD participants, higher BMI is associated with greater calf muscle area at baseline. However, higher BMI is associated with more adverse calf muscle density and calf muscle percentage of fat at baseline and greater declines in calf muscle area over time. Copyright © 2012 Society for Vascular Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. Reduced levels of skeletal muscle Na+K+ -ATPase in McArdle disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, R. G.; Clausen, T.; Vissing, J.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that impaired sarcolemmal function associated with exaggerated potassium release, impaired potassium uptake, or both may contribute to exertional fatigue and abnormal circulatory responses to exercise in McArdle disease (MD). The cellular mechanism of exertional fatigue and muscle injury in MD is unknown but likely involves impaired function of the ATPases that couple ATP hydrolysis to cellular work, including the muscle sodium potassium pump (Na+K+-ATPase). However, the concentration of muscle Na+K+ pumps in MD is not known, and no studies have related exercise increases in blood potassium concentrations to muscle Na+K+ pump levels. We measured muscle Na+K+ pumps (3H-ouabain binding) and plasma K+ in response to 20 minutes of cycle exercise in six patients with MD and in six sex-, age-, and weight-matched sedentary individuals. MD patients had lower levels of 3H-ouabain binding (231 +/- 18 pmol/g w.w., mean +/- SD, range, 210 to 251) than control subjects (317 +/- 37, range, 266 to 371, p Na+K+ pump levels are low in MD patients compared with healthy subjects and identify a limitation of potassium reuptake that could result in sarcolemmal failure during peak rates of membrane activation and may promote exaggerated potassium-activated circulatory responses to submaximal exercise. The mechanism of the low Na+K+ pump concentrations in MD is unknown but may relate to deconditioning or to disruption of a close functional relationship between membrane ion transport and glycolysis.

  1. Reduced levels of skeletal muscle Na+K+ -ATPase in McArdle disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, R. G.; Clausen, T.; Vissing, J.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that impaired sarcolemmal function associated with exaggerated potassium release, impaired potassium uptake, or both may contribute to exertional fatigue and abnormal circulatory responses to exercise in McArdle disease (MD). The cellular mechanism of exertional fatigue and muscle injury in MD is unknown but likely involves impaired function of the ATPases that couple ATP hydrolysis to cellular work, including the muscle sodium potassium pump (Na+K+-ATPase). However, the concentration of muscle Na+K+ pumps in MD is not known, and no studies have related exercise increases in blood potassium concentrations to muscle Na+K+ pump levels. We measured muscle Na+K+ pumps (3H-ouabain binding) and plasma K+ in response to 20 minutes of cycle exercise in six patients with MD and in six sex-, age-, and weight-matched sedentary individuals. MD patients had lower levels of 3H-ouabain binding (231 +/- 18 pmol/g w.w., mean +/- SD, range, 210 to 251) than control subjects (317 +/- 37, range, 266 to 371, p < 0.0004), higher peak increases in plasma potassium in response to 45 +/- 7 W cycle exercise (MD, 1.00 +/- 0.15 mmol/L; control subjects, 0.48 +/- 0.09; p < 0.0001), and mean exercise heart rate responses to exercise that were 45 +/- 12 bpm greater than control subjects. Our results indicate that Na+K+ pump levels are low in MD patients compared with healthy subjects and identify a limitation of potassium reuptake that could result in sarcolemmal failure during peak rates of membrane activation and may promote exaggerated potassium-activated circulatory responses to submaximal exercise. The mechanism of the low Na+K+ pump concentrations in MD is unknown but may relate to deconditioning or to disruption of a close functional relationship between membrane ion transport and glycolysis.

  2. Ca2+handling abnormalities in early-onset muscle diseases: Novel concepts and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, Susan; Jungbluth, Heinz; Voermans, Nicol; Muntoni, Francesco; Zorzato, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    The physiological process by which Ca 2+ is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum is called excitation-contraction coupling; it is initiated by an action potential which travels deep into the muscle fiber where it is sensed by the dihydropyridine receptor, a voltage sensing L-type Ca 2+ channel localized on the transverse tubules. Voltage-induced conformational changes in the dihydropyridine receptor activate the ryanodine receptor Ca 2+ release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The released Ca 2+ binds to troponin C, enabling contractile thick-thin filament interactions. The Ca 2+ is subsequently transported back into the sarcoplasmic reticulum by specialized Ca 2+ pumps (SERCA), preparing the muscle for a new cycle of contraction. Although other proteins are involved in excitation-contraction coupling, the mechanism described above emphasizes the unique role played by the two Ca 2+ channels (the dihydropyridine receptor and the ryanodine receptor), the SERCA Ca 2+ pumps and the exquisite spatial organization of the membrane compartments endowed with the proteins responsible for this mechanism to function rapidly and efficiently. Research over the past two decades has uncovered the fine details of excitation-contraction coupling under normal conditions while advances in genomics have helped to identify mutations in novel genes in patients with neuromuscular disorders. While it is now clear that many patients with congenital muscle diseases carry mutations in genes encoding proteins directly involved in Ca 2+ homeostasis, it has become apparent that mutations are also present in genes encoding for proteins not thought to be directly involved in Ca 2+ regulation. Ongoing research in the field now focuses on understanding the functional effect of individual mutations, as well as understanding the role of proteins not specifically located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum which nevertheless are involved in Ca 2+ regulation or excitation-contraction coupling. The

  3. Muscle MRI at the time of questionable disease flares in Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Rabheh; Yu, Chack-Yung; Adler, Brent; Bout-Tabaku, Sharon; Lintner, Katherine E; Moore-Clingenpeel, Melissa; Spencer, Charles H

    2017-04-12

    The course of JDM has improved substantially over the last 70 years with early and aggressive treatments. Yet it remains difficult to detect disease flares as symptoms may be mild; signs of rash and muscle weakness vary widely and are often equivocal; laboratory tests of muscle enzyme levels are often normal; electromyography and muscle biopsy are invasive. Alternative tools are needed to help decide if more aggressive treatment is needed. Our objective is to determine the effectiveness of muscle Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in detecting JDM flares, and how an MRI affects physician's decision-making regarding treatment. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of Nationwide Children's Hospital. JDM patients were consulted between 1/2005 and 6/2015. MRIs were performed on both lower extremities without contrast sequentially: axial T1, axial T2 fat saturation, axial and coronal inversion recovery, and axial diffusion weighted. The physician decision that a JDM patient was in a flare was considered the gold standard. MRI results were compared with physician's decisions on whether a relapse had occurred, and if there was a concordance between the assessment methods. Forty-five JDM patients were studied. Eighty percent had weakness at diagnosis, 100% typical rash, and 73% typical nail-fold capillary changes. At diagnosis, muscle enzymes were compatible with JDM generally (CK 52%, LDH 62%, aldolase 72%, AST 54% abnormal). EMG was abnormal in 3/8, muscle biopsy typical of JDM in 10/11, and MRI abnormal demonstrating myositis in 31/40. Thirteen patients had a repeat MRI for possible flares with differing indications. Three repeat MRI's were abnormal, demonstrating myositis. There was moderate agreement about flares between MRI findings and physician's treatment decisions (kappa = 0.59). In each abnormal MRI case the physician decided to increase treatment (100% probability for flares). MRI was negative for myositis in 10 patients, by which 7

  4. Inspiratory muscle training improves respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Ana Irene Carlos; Fuzari, Helen Kerlen Bastos; Rattesa, Catarina; Brandão, Daniella Cunha; de Melo Marinho, Patrícia Érika

    2017-04-01

    Does inspiratory muscle training improve respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity, lung function and quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease? Does inspiratory muscle training improve these outcomes more than breathing exercises? Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials. People with chronic kidney disease undergoing dialysis treatment. The primary outcomes were: maximal inspiratory pressure, maximal expiratory pressure, and distance covered on the 6-minute walk test. The secondary outcomes were: forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV 1 ), and quality of life. The search identified four eligible studies. The sample consisted of 110 participants. The inspiratory muscle training used a Threshold ® or PowerBreathe ® device, with a load ranging from 30 to 60% of the maximal inspiratory pressure and lasting from 6 weeks to 6 months. The studies showed moderate to high risk of bias, and the quality of the evidence was rated low or very low, due to the studies' methodological limitations. The meta-analysis showed that inspiratory muscle training significantly improved maximal inspiratory pressure (MD 23 cmH 2 O, 95% CI 16 to 29) and the 6-minute walk test distance (MD 80m, 95% CI 41 to 119) when compared with controls. Significant benefits in lung function and quality of life were also identified. When compared to breathing exercises, significant benefits were identified in maximal expiratory pressure (MD 6 cmH 2 O, 95% CI 2 to 10) and FEV 1 (MD 0.24litres 95% CI 0.14 to 0.34), but not maximal inspiratory pressure or forced vital capacity. In patients with chronic renal failure on dialysis, inspiratory muscle training with a fixed load significantly improves respiratory muscle strength, functional capacity, lung function and quality of life. The evidence for these benefits may be influenced by some sources of bias. PROSPERO (CRD 42015029986). [de Medeiros AIC, Fuzari HKB, Rattesa C, Brandão DC, de

  5. Enhanced Efficacy of Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Pompe Disease Through Mannose-6-Phosphate Receptor Expression in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Dwight D.; Luo, Xiaoyan; Sun, Baodong; McVie-Wylie, Alison; Dai, Jian; Li, Songtao; Banugaria, Suhrad G.; Chen, Y-T; Bali, Deeksha S.

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with acid α-glucosidase has become available for Pompe disease; however, the response of skeletal muscle, as opposed to the heart, has been attenuated. The poor response of skeletal muscle has been attributed to the low abundance of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) in skeletal muscle compared to heart. To further understand the role of CI-MPR in Pompe disease, muscle-specific CI-MPR conditional knockout (KO) mice were crossed with GAA-KO (Pompe disease) mice. We evaluated the impact of CI-MPR-mediated uptake of GAA by evaluating ERT in CI-MPR-KO/GAA-KO (double KO) mice. The essential role of CI-MPR was emphasized by the lack of efficacy of ERT as demonstrated by markedly reduced biochemical correction of GAA deficiency and of glycogen accumulations in double KO mice, in comparison with administration of the same therapeutic doses in GAA-KO mice. Clenbuterol, a selective β2-agonist, enhanced CI-MPR expression in skeletal tissue and also increased efficacy from GAA therapy, thereby confirming the key role of CI-MPR with regard to enzyme replacement therapy in Pompe disease. Biochemical correction improved in both muscle and non-muscle tissues, indicating that therapy could be similarly enhanced in other lysosomal storage disorders. In summary, enhanced CI-MPR expression might improve the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy in Pompe disease through enhancing receptor-mediated uptake of GAA. PMID:21397538

  6. Membrane-stabilizing copolymers confer marked protection to dystrophic skeletal muscle in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne M Houang

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a fatal disease of striated muscle deterioration. A unique therapeutic approach for DMD is the use of synthetic membrane stabilizers to protect the fragile dystrophic sarcolemma against contraction-induced mechanical stress. Block copolymer-based membrane stabilizer poloxamer 188 (P188 has been shown to protect the dystrophic myocardium. In comparison, the ability of synthetic membrane stabilizers to protect fragile DMD skeletal muscles has been less clear. Because cardiac and skeletal muscles have distinct structural and functional features, including differences in the mechanism of activation, variance in sarcolemma phospholipid composition, and differences in the magnitude and types of forces generated, we speculated that optimized membrane stabilization could be inherently different. Our objective here is to use principles of pharmacodynamics to evaluate membrane stabilization therapy for DMD skeletal muscles. Results show a dramatic differential effect of membrane stabilization by optimization of pharmacodynamic-guided route of poloxamer delivery. Data show that subcutaneous P188 delivery, but not intravascular or intraperitoneal routes, conferred significant protection to dystrophic limb skeletal muscles undergoing mechanical stress in vivo. In addition, structure-function examination of synthetic membrane stabilizers further underscores the importance of copolymer composition, molecular weight, and dosage in optimization of poloxamer pharmacodynamics in vivo.

  7. Structure, function and evolution of insect flight muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Iwamoto, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    Insects, the largest group of animals on the earth, owe their prosperity to their ability of flight and small body sizes. The ability of flight provided means for rapid translocation. The small body size allowed access to unutilized niches. By acquiring both features, however, insects faced a new problem: They were forced to beat their wings at enormous frequencies. Insects have overcome this problem by inventing asynchronous flight muscle, a highly specialized form of striated muscle capable...

  8. Oxygen dependence of respiration in rat spinotrapezius muscle in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Golub, Aleksander S.; Pittman, Roland N.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen dependence of respiration in striated muscle in situ was studied by measuring the rate of decrease of interstitial Po2 [oxygen disappearance curve (ODC)] following rapid arrest of blood flow by pneumatic tissue compression, which ejected red blood cells from the muscle vessels and made the ODC independent from oxygen bound to hemoglobin. After the contribution of photo-consumption of oxygen by the method was evaluated and accounted for, the corrected ODCs were converted into the Po...

  9. Non-muscle myosin II in disease: mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Newell-Litwa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The actin motor protein non-muscle myosin II (NMII acts as a master regulator of cell morphology, with a role in several essential cellular processes, including cell migration and post-synaptic dendritic spine plasticity in neurons. NMII also generates forces that alter biochemical signaling, by driving changes in interactions between actin-associated proteins that can ultimately regulate gene transcription. In addition to its roles in normal cellular physiology, NMII has recently emerged as a critical regulator of diverse, genetically complex diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancers and vascular disease. In the context of these disorders, NMII regulatory pathways can be directly mutated or indirectly altered by disease-causing mutations. NMII regulatory pathway genes are also increasingly found in disease-associated copy-number variants, particularly in neuronal disorders such as autism and schizophrenia. Furthermore, manipulation of NMII-mediated contractility regulates stem cell pluripotency and differentiation, thus highlighting the key role of NMII-based pharmaceuticals in the clinical success of stem cell therapies. In this Review, we discuss the emerging role of NMII activity and its regulation by kinases and microRNAs in the pathogenesis and prognosis of a diverse range of diseases, including neuronal disorders, cancer and vascular disease. We also address promising clinical applications and limitations of NMII-based inhibitors in the treatment of these diseases and the development of stem-cell-based therapies.

  10. Extra-ocular muscle MRI in genetically-defined mitochondrial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitceathly, Robert D.S.; Morrow, Jasper M.; Hanna, Michael G. [UCL Institute of Neurology and National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, London (United Kingdom); Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Thornton, John S. [UCL Institute of Neurology and National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Neurology, Neuroradiological Academic Unit, Department of Brain Repair and Rehabilitation, London (United Kingdom); Woodward, Cathy; Sweeney, Mary G. [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Neurogenetics Unit, London (United Kingdom); Rahman, Shamima [UCL Institute of Neurology and National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, London (United Kingdom); UCL Institute of Child Health, Mitochondrial Research Group, Clinical and Molecular Genetics Unit, London (United Kingdom); Plant, Gordon T.; Ali, Nadeem [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Department of Neuro-ophthalmology, London (United Kingdom); Moorfields Eye Hospital, Department of Neuro-ophthalmology, London (United Kingdom); Bremner, Fion [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Department of Neuro-ophthalmology, London (United Kingdom); Davagnanam, Indran [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, The Lysholm Department of Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Conventional and quantitative MRI was performed in patients with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease, to characterise MRI findings in the extra-ocular muscles (EOMs) and investigate whether quantitative MRI provides clinically relevant measures of disease. Patients with CPEO due to single mitochondrial DNA deletions were compared with controls. Range of eye movement (ROEM) measurements, peri-orbital 3 T MRI T1-weighted (T1w) and short-tau-inversion-recovery (STIR) images, and T2 relaxation time maps were obtained. Blinded observers graded muscle atrophy and T1w/STIR hyperintensity. Cross-sectional areas and EOM mean T2s were recorded and correlated with clinical parameters. Nine patients and nine healthy controls were examined. Patients had reduced ROEM (patients 13.3 , controls 49.3 , p < 0.001), greater mean atrophy score and increased T1w hyperintensities. EOM mean cross-sectional area was 43 % of controls and mean T2s were prolonged (patients 75.6 ± 7.0 ms, controls 55.2 ± 4.1 ms, p < 0.001). ROEM correlated negatively with EOM T2 (rho = -0.89, p < 0.01), whilst cross-sectional area failed to correlate with any clinical measures. MRI demonstrates EOM atrophy, characteristic signal changes and prolonged T2 in CPEO. Correlation between elevated EOM T2 and ROEM impairment represents a potential measure of disease severity that warrants further evaluation. (orig.)

  11. Extra-ocular muscle MRI in genetically-defined mitochondrial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitceathly, Robert D.S.; Morrow, Jasper M.; Hanna, Michael G.; Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Thornton, John S.; Woodward, Cathy; Sweeney, Mary G.; Rahman, Shamima; Plant, Gordon T.; Ali, Nadeem; Bremner, Fion; Davagnanam, Indran

    2016-01-01

    Conventional and quantitative MRI was performed in patients with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO), a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease, to characterise MRI findings in the extra-ocular muscles (EOMs) and investigate whether quantitative MRI provides clinically relevant measures of disease. Patients with CPEO due to single mitochondrial DNA deletions were compared with controls. Range of eye movement (ROEM) measurements, peri-orbital 3 T MRI T1-weighted (T1w) and short-tau-inversion-recovery (STIR) images, and T2 relaxation time maps were obtained. Blinded observers graded muscle atrophy and T1w/STIR hyperintensity. Cross-sectional areas and EOM mean T2s were recorded and correlated with clinical parameters. Nine patients and nine healthy controls were examined. Patients had reduced ROEM (patients 13.3 , controls 49.3 , p < 0.001), greater mean atrophy score and increased T1w hyperintensities. EOM mean cross-sectional area was 43 % of controls and mean T2s were prolonged (patients 75.6 ± 7.0 ms, controls 55.2 ± 4.1 ms, p < 0.001). ROEM correlated negatively with EOM T2 (rho = -0.89, p < 0.01), whilst cross-sectional area failed to correlate with any clinical measures. MRI demonstrates EOM atrophy, characteristic signal changes and prolonged T2 in CPEO. Correlation between elevated EOM T2 and ROEM impairment represents a potential measure of disease severity that warrants further evaluation. (orig.)

  12. Higher oxidative stress in skeletal muscle of McArdle disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan J. Kaczor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available McArdle disease (MCD is an autosomal recessive condition resulting from skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylase deficiency. The resultant block in glycogenolysis leads to an increased flux through the xanthine oxidase pathway (myogenic hyperuricemia and could lead to an increase in oxidative stress. We examined markers of oxidative stress (8-isoprostane and protein carbonyls, NAD(PH-oxidase, xanthine oxidase and antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity in skeletal muscle of MCD patients (N = 12 and controls (N = 12. Eight-isoprostanes and protein carbonyls were higher in MCD patients as compared to controls (p < 0.05. There was a compensatory up-regulation of catalase protein content and activity (p < 0.05, mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD protein content (p < 0.01 and activity (p < 0.05 in MCD patients, yet this increase was not sufficient to protect the muscle against elevated oxidative damage. These results suggest that oxidative stress in McArdle patients occurs and future studies should evaluate a potential role for oxidative stress contributing to acute pathology (rhabdomyolysis and possibly later onset fixed myopathy.

  13. Changes in motor cortex excitability associated with muscle fatigue in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović Slađan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a standard technique for noninvasive assessment of changes in central nervous system excitability. The aim of this study was to examine changes in responses to TMS in patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease (PD during sustained submaximal isometric voluntary contraction [60% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC] of the adductor pollicis muscle, as well as during a subsequent recovery period. Methods. Cortical excitability was tested by single TMS pulses of twice of the motor threshold intensity applied over the vertex. Testing was carried out during the sustained contraction phase every 10 s before and every 5 s after the endurance point, as well as at rest and during brief 60% MVC contractions before (control, immediately after the sustained contraction, and at 5 min intervals during the recovery period. Results. Although the PD patients could sustain the contraction at the required level for as long period of time as the healthy subjects (though contraction level subsided more rapidly after the endurance point, effects of muscle fatigue on the responses to TMS were different. In contrast to the findings observed in the healthy people where motor evoked potentials (MEP and EMG silent period (SP in fatigued muscle gradually diminished during contraction up to the endurance point, and increased thereafter, in the majority of patients no changes occurred in MEP size (peak and area of the adductor pollicis muscle, either before or after the endurance point. On the other hand, changes in the SP of this muscle differed among the subjects, showing a gradual increase, a decrease or no changes in duration. The trends of changes in both MEP size and SP duration in the musculus brachioradialis varied among the tested PD patients, without any consistent pattern, which was in contrast with the findings in the healthy people where both measures showed a gradual increase from the beginning of

  14. Factors associated with impairment of quadriceps muscle function in Chinese patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunrong Ju

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Quadriceps muscle dysfunction is well confirmed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and reported to be related to a higher risk of mortality. Factors contributing to quadriceps dysfunction have been postulated, while not one alone could fully explain it and there are few reports on it in China. This study was aimed to investigate the severity of quadriceps dysfunction in patients with COPD, and to compare quadriceps muscle function in COPD and the healthy elderly. METHODS: Quadriceps strength and endurance capabilities were investigated in 71 COPD patients and 60 age-matched controls; predicted values for quadriceps strength and endurance were calculated using regression equations (incorporating age, gender, anthropometric measurements and physical activities, based on the data from controls. Potential parameters related to quadriceps dysfunction in COPD were identified by stepwise regression analysis. RESULTS: Mean values of quadriceps strength was 46% and endurance was 38% lower, in patients with COPD relative to controls. Gender, physical activities and anthropometric measurements were predictors to quadriceps function in the controls. While in COPD, forced expiratory volume in 1 second percentage of predicted value (FEV1% pred, nutritional depletion, gender and physical inactivity were identified as independent factors to quadriceps strength (R(2 = 0.72; FEV1%pred, thigh muscle mass, serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and gender were correlated to quadriceps endurance variance, with each p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Quadriceps strength and endurance capabilities are both substantially impaired in Chinese COPD patients, with strength most affected. For the controls, physical activity is most important for quadriceps function. While for COPD patients, quadriceps dysfunction is related to multiple factors, with airflow limitation, malnutrition and muscle disuse being the main ones.

  15. Alterations in the muscle-to-capillary interface in patients with different degrees of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Halim Samy M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is hypothesized that decreased capillarization of limb skeletal muscle is implicated in the decreased exercise tolerance in COPD patients. We have recently demonstrated decreased number of capillaries per muscle fibre (CAF but no changes in CAF in relation to fibre area (CAFA, which is based on the diffusion distance between the capillary and muscle fibre. The aim of the current study is to investigate the muscle-to-capillary interface which is an important factor involved in oxygen supply to the muscle that has previously been suggested to be a more sensitive marker for changes in the capillary bed compared to CAF and CAFA. Methods 23 COPD patients and 12 age-matched healthy subjects participated in the study. Muscle-to-capillary interface was assessed in muscle biopsies from the tibialis anterior muscle using the following parameters: 1 The capillary-to-fibre ratio (C:Fi which is defined as the sum of the fractional contributions of all capillary contacts around the fibre 2 The ratio between C:Fi and the fibre perimeter (CFPE-index 3 The ratio between length of capillary and fibre perimeter (LC/PF which is also referred to as the index of tortuosity. Exercise capacity was determined using the 6-min walking test. Results A positive correlation was found between CFPE-index and ascending disease severity with CFPE-index for type I fibres being significantly lower in patients with moderate and severe COPD. Furthermore, a positive correlation was observed between exercise capacity and CFPE-index for both type I and type IIa fibres. Conclusion It can be concluded that the muscle-to-capillary interface is disturbed in the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with COPD and that interface is strongly correlated to increased disease severity and to decreased exercise capacity in this patient group.

  16. The human cardiac and skeletal muscle proteomes defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindskog, Cecilia; Linne, Jerker; Fagerberg, Linn

    2015-01-01

    Background: To understand cardiac and skeletal muscle function, it is important to define and explore their molecular constituents and also to identify similarities and differences in the gene expression in these two different striated muscle tissues. Here, we have investigated the genes and prot......Background: To understand cardiac and skeletal muscle function, it is important to define and explore their molecular constituents and also to identify similarities and differences in the gene expression in these two different striated muscle tissues. Here, we have investigated the genes...... genes are well in line with the physiological functions of cardiac and skeletal muscle, such as contraction, ion transport, regulation of membrane potential and actomyosin structure organization. A large fraction of the transcripts in both cardiac and skeletal muscle correspond to mitochondrial proteins...

  17. Quantitative muscle MRI as an assessment tool for monitoring disease progression in LGMD2I: A multicentre longitudinal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, Tracey A.; Eagle, Michelle; Mayhew, Anna; Bushby, Kate; Lochmuller, Hanns; Straub, Volker; Hollingsworth, Kieren G.; Coombs, Anna; Sveen, Marie-Louise; Andersen, Soren; Vissing, John; Stojkovic, Tanya; Sousa, Paulo L. de; Carlier, Pierre G.; Dewar, Liz; Morrow, Jasper M.; Sinclair, Christopher D.J.; Thornton, John S.; Hanna, Michael G.; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Outcome measures for clinical trials in neuromuscular diseases are typically based on physical assessments which are dependent on patient effort, combine the effort of different muscle groups, and may not be sensitive to progression over short trial periods in slow-progressing diseases. We hypothesised that quantitative fat imaging by MRI (Dixon technique) could provide more discriminating quantitative, patient-independent measurements of the progress of muscle fat replacement within individual muscle groups. To determine whether quantitative fat imaging could measure disease progression in a cohort of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I (LGMD2I) patients over a 12 month period. 32 adult patients (17 male;15 female) from 4 European tertiary referral centres with the homozygous c.826C≥A mutation in the fukutin-related protein gene (FKRP) completed baseline and follow up measurements 12 months later. Quantitative fat imaging was performed and muscle fat fraction change was compared with (i) muscle strength and function assessed using standardized physical tests and (ii) standard T1-weighted MRI graded on a 6 point scale. There was a significant increase in muscle fat fraction in 9 of the 14 muscles analyzed using the quantitative MRI technique from baseline to 12 months follow up. Changes were not seen in the conventional longitudinal physical assessments or in qualitative scoring of the T 1 w images. Quantitative muscle MRI, using the Dixon technique, could be used as an important longitudinal outcome measure to assess muscle pathology and monitor therapeutic efficacy in patients with LGMD2I. (authors)

  18. Late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD): correlations between respiratory muscles CT and MRI features and pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Michele; Barca, Emanuele; Ruggeri, Paolo; Minutoli, Fabio; Rodolico, Carmelo; Mazziotti, Silvio; Milardi, Demetrio; Musumeci, Olimpia; Toscano, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    Late onset Pompe disease (LOPD) is a rare muscle disorder often characterized, along the disease course, by severe respiratory failure. We describe herein respiratory muscles and lung abnormalities in LOPD patients using MR imaging and CT examinations correlated to pulmonary function tests. Ten LOPD patients were studied: 6 with a limb-girdle muscle weakness, 1 with myalgias, 2 with exertional dyspnoea and 1 with isolated hyperckemia. Respiratory function was measured using forced vital capacity (FVC) in both upright and supine positions, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) and peak cough flow (PCF) tests. The involvement (atrophy) of diaphragms, abdominal respiratory muscles and intercostal muscles was ranked by CT and MRI examinations using appropriate scales. Height of lungs and band-like atelectasis presence were also recorded. Seven out of 10 patients showed a functional diaphragmatic weakness (FVC drop percentage >25%). In 8 out of 10 patients, involvement of both diaphragms and of other respiratory muscles was seen. The mean height of lungs in patients was significantly reduced when compared to a control group. Marked elevation of the diaphragms (lung height respiratory insufficiency in LOPD patients. Early recognition of respiratory muscles involvement, using imaging data, could allow an early start of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in LOPD. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Systematic review of clinical applications of monitoring muscle tissue oxygenation with near-infrared spectroscopy in vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boezeman, Reinout P E; Moll, Frans L.; Ünlü, Çağdaş; de Vries, Jean Paul P M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of wavelengths of the near-infrared region by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been studied for several applications in vascular disease. This systematic review aims to explore the clinical relevance of monitoring muscle tissue oxygenation in vascular disease with NIRS.

  20. Hypogonadism in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: relationship with airflow limitation, muscle weakness and systemic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Galal Daabis

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Hypogonadism is highly prevalent in clinically stable COPD patients and is particularly related to the severity of the airway obstruction. Systemic inflammation is present in stable COPD patients and its intensity is related to the severity of the underlying disease and it predisposes to skeletal muscle weakness and exercise intolerance. However, we failed to find a significant association between hypogonadism and muscle weakness or systemic inflammation.

  1. Skeletal Muscle Ultrasonography in Nutrition and Functional Outcome Assessment of Critically Ill Children: Experience and Insights From Pediatric Disease and Adult Critical Care Studies [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Chengsi; Lee, Jan Hau; Leow, Melvin K S; Puthucheary, Zudin A

    2017-09-01

    Evidence suggests that critically ill children develop muscle wasting, which could affect outcomes. Muscle ultrasound has been used to track muscle wasting and association with outcomes in critically ill adults but not children. This review aims to summarize methodological considerations of muscle ultrasound, structural findings, and possibilities for its application in the assessment of nutrition and functional outcomes in critically ill children. Medline, Embase, and CINAHL databases were searched up until April 2016. Articles describing skeletal muscle ultrasound in children and critically ill adults were analyzed qualitatively for details on techniques and findings. Thickness and cross-sectional area of various upper and lower body muscles have been studied to quantify muscle mass and detect muscle changes. The quadriceps femoris muscle is one of the most commonly measured muscles due to its relation to mobility and is sensitive to changes over time. However, the margin of error for quadriceps thickness is too wide to reliably detect muscle changes in critically ill children. Muscle size and its correlation with strength and function also have not yet been studied in critically ill children. Echogenicity, used to detect compromised muscle structure in neuromuscular disease, may be another property worth studying in critically ill children. Muscle ultrasound may be useful in detecting muscle wasting in critically ill children but has not been shown to be sufficiently reliable in this population. Further study of the reliability and correlation with functional outcomes and nutrition intake is required before muscle ultrasound is routinely employed in critically ill children.

  2. Increased serum inflammatory markers in the absence of clinical and skeletal muscle inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piehl-Aulin, Karin; Jones, Ian; Lindvall, Björn; Magnuson, Anders; Abdel-Halim, Samy M

    2009-01-01

    Muscle wasting and cachexia are common occurrences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The current study aimed to investigate markers of inflammation in the circulation and skeletal muscle that might be associated with development of muscle wasting. Three groups of patients with mild, moderate and severe COPD and matched healthy controls were recruited. Serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP), IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), leptin and ghrelin were analysed. Skeletal muscle inflammation was investigated microscopically using a panel of antibodies and standard staining for inflammatory cell infiltration. All COPD patients were clinically stable, with no sign of inflammation and normal CRP values. Compared to controls, significantly increased hs-CRP levels were observed in all COPD patient groups. Significant rises in IL-6 levels were first observed in moderate COPD, while IL-8 levels were significantly elevated at the late severe stage. Circulating levels of TNF-alpha, cortisol, IGF-1, leptin and ghrelin were similar to control levels. No microscopic signs of skeletal muscle inflammation were observed. Our results identify hs-CRP as an early marker of inflammation that is significantly increased in the circulation even in mild COPD. Serum interleukin levels appear to be increased with disease progress. These changes were manifested in the absence of any clinical signs of disease exacerbation, evidence of skeletal muscle inflammation or hormonal changes.

  3. The pelvic floor muscles: muscle thickness in healthy and urinary-incontinent women measured by perineal ultrasonography with reference to the effect of pelvic floor training. Estrogen receptor studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Inge Thomsen

    1997-01-01

    depends on the structural components in the urethral wall, the position of the bladder neck and proximal urethra, the periurethral striated muscles, and the pelvic floor muscles. By means of pudendal blockade and simultaneous recordings of pressure and cross-sectional area in the urethra, it has been...... demonstrated that the striated periurethral muscles and the pelvic floor muscles are of paramount importance for the closure function. This emphasizes the importance of well-functioning pelvic floor muscles to obtain continence, and probably explains the rationale for the effect of pelvic floor training...... in treating urinary incontinence. This study presents a review of the literature on female urinary incontinence, continence mechanisms, pelvic floor muscles, and pelvic floor training. Furthermore, a review of the literature on estrogen receptors in the pelvic floor muscles is given. Perineal ultrasonography...

  4. Urinary creatinine excretion, an indirect measure of muscle mass, is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and mortality in the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, Leendert H.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Schouten, Jan P.; de Jong, Paul E.; Gans, Reinold O. B.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Low muscle mass often indicates poor health, but the relation with cardiovascular disease (CVD) is unknown. Skeletal muscles are responsible for approximately 75% of insulin stimulated whole body glucose disposal and therefore insulin resistance could underlie the relation between muscle

  5. Blood pressure and calf muscle oxygen extraction during plantar flexion exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, J Carter; Miller, Amanda J; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F; Proctor, David N; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Muller, Matthew D

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects 200 million people worldwide. Although PAD primarily affects large arteries, it is also associated with microvascular dysfunction, an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise, and high cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that fatiguing plantar flexion exercise that evokes claudication elicits a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation (SmO 2 ) and a higher rise in BP in PAD compared with age-matched healthy subjects, but low-intensity steady-state plantar flexion elicits similar responses between groups. In the first experiment, eight patients with PAD and eight healthy controls performed fatiguing plantar flexion exercise (from 0.5 to 7 kg for up to 14 min). In the second experiment, seven patients with PAD and seven healthy controls performed low-intensity plantar flexion exercise (2.0 kg for 14 min). BP, heart rate (HR), and SmO 2 were measured continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). SmO 2 is the ratio of oxygenated hemoglobin to total hemoglobin, expressed as a percent. At fatigue, patients with PAD had a greater increase in mean arterial BP (18 ± 2 vs. vs. 10 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.029) and HR (14 ± 2 vs. 6 ± 2 beats/min, P = 0.033) and a greater reduction in SmO 2 (-54 ± 10 vs. -12 ± 4%, P = 0.001). However, both groups had similar physiological responses to low-intensity, nonpainful plantar flexion exercise. These data suggest that patients with PAD have altered oxygen uptake and/or utilization during fatiguing exercise coincident with an augmented BP response. NEW & NOTEWORTHY In this laboratory study, patients with peripheral artery disease performed plantar flexion exercise in the supine posture until symptoms of claudication occurred. Relative to age- and sex-matched healthy subjects we found that patients had a higher blood pressure response, a higher heart rate response, and a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation as

  6. Isokinetic muscle evaluation of quadriceps in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Vieira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Muscle debility has a significant impact on health-related quality of life in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and is correlated to exacerbation and even mortality. Assessing muscle strength is extremely relevant. Lack of standardisation in numbers of sets and rest interval in isokinetic test protocol can lead to distinct results, making com prehension and comparisons among studies difficult. Aim: To analyse the effect of two sets and three different rest intervals on isokinetic strength measurement of quadriceps tests, in order to define the adequate test protocol. Methods: Subjects with severe or very severe COPD underwent three isokinetic tests to evaluate knee extensor muscle strength, at an angular velocity of 60°·s-1, with rest intervals of 30, 60 and 120 seconds. Each test consisted of two sets of five repetitions, during which peak torque, total work and fatigue index were measured. Results: In 20 studied subjects (66.1 ± 7.4 years, 70 ± 10.8kg, 167.4 ± 6.2cm, FEV1 36.5 ± 10.1%, there were no significant differences in peak torque, total work and fatigue index, independent of number of sets or rest interval between sets. Conclusion: In subjects with severe or very severe COPD, quadriceps muscle strength can be evaluated by an isokinetic protocol with one set of five repetitions. If two sets are performed, a rest interval of 30 seconds is enough to ensure muscle recovery between sets. Resumo: Contexto: A debilidade muscular tem impacto significativo na qualidade de vida do indivíduo com doenca pulmonar obstrutiva cronica (DPOC, correlacio nando-se com o numero de exacerbacoes e a mortalidade. Medir a forca muscular torna-se, portanto, de extrema importancia. A ausencia de padronizacao quanto ao numero de series e intervalo de recuperacao no protocolo de avaliacao isocinetica pode gerar resultados dispares, dificultando a compreensao e a comparacao a entre os

  7. Clinical, radiological, and genetic survey of patients with muscle-eye-brain disease caused by mutations in POMGNT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiş, Uluç; Uyanik, Gökhan; Rosendahl, Deborah Morris; Carman, Kürşat Bora; Bayram, Erhan; Heise, Marisol; Cömertpay, Gamze; Kurul, Semra Hız

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate clinical, genetic, and radiologic features of our patients with muscle-eye-brain disease. The data of patients who were diagnosed with muscle-eye-brain disease from a cohort of patients with congenital muscular dystrophy in the Division of Pediatric Neurology of Dokuz Eylül University School of Medicine and Gaziantep Children's Hospital between 2005 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. From a cohort of 34 patients with congenital muscular dystrophy, 12 patients from 10 families were diagnosed with muscle-eye-brain disease. The mean age of the patients was 9 ± 5.5 years (2-19 years). Mean serum creatine kinase value was 2485.80 ± 1308.54 IU/L (700-4267 IU/L). All patients presented with muscular hypotonia at birth followed by varying degrees of spasticity and exaggerated deep tendon reflexes in later stages of life. Three patients were able to walk. The most common ophthalmologic and radiologic abnormalities were cataracts, retinal detachment, periventricular white matter abnormalities, ventriculomegaly, pontocerebellar hypoplasia, and multiple cerebellar cysts. All of the patients had mutations in the POMGNT1 gene. The most common mutation detected in 66% of patients was c.1814 G > A (p.R605H). Two novel mutations were identified. We suggest that muscle-eye-brain disease is a relatively common muscular dystrophy in Turkey. It should be suspected in patients with muscular hypotonia, increased creatine kinase, and structural eye and brain abnormalities. The c.1814 G > A mutation in exon 21 of the POMGNT1 gene is apparently a common mutation in the Turkish population. Individuals with this mutation show classical features of muscle-eye-brain disease, but others may exhibit a milder phenotype and retain the ability to walk independently. Congenital muscular dystrophy patients from Turkey carrying the clinical and radiologic features of muscle-eye-brain disease should be evaluated for mutations in POMGNT1 gene. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  8. Inspiratory muscle training during pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, M; Mialon, P; Le Ber-Moy, C; Lochon, C; Péran, L; Pichon, R; Gut-Gobert, C; Leroyer, C; Morelot-Panzini, C; Couturaud, F

    2015-11-01

    Although recommended by international guidelines, the benefit of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in addition to rehabilitation remains uncertain. The objective was to demonstrate the effectiveness of IMT on dyspnea using Borg scale and multidimensional dyspnea profile questionnaire at the end of a 6-minute walk test (6MWT) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with preserved average maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax) of 85 cm H2O (95% of predicted (pred.) value) and admitted for a rehabilitation program in a dedicated center. In a randomized trial, comparing IMT versus no IMT in 32 COPD patients without inspiratory muscle weakness (PImax >60 cm H2O) who were admitted for pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) for 3 weeks, we evaluated the effect of IMT on dyspnea, using both Borg scale and multidimensional dyspnea profile (MDP) at the end of the 6MWT, and on functional parameters included inspiratory muscle function (PImax) and 6MWT. All testings were performed at the start and the end of PR. In unadjusted analysis, IMT was not found to be associated with an improvement of either dyspnea or PImax. After adjustment on confounders (initial Borg score) and variables of interaction (forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)), we found a trend toward an improvement of "dyspnea sensory intensity", items from MDP and a significant improvement on the variation in the 2 items of MDP ("tight or constricted" and "breathing a lot"). In the subgroup of patients with FEV1 50% pred. IMT did not significantly improve dyspnea or functional parameter in COPD patients with PImax > 60 cm H2O. However, in the subgroup of patients with FEV1 < 50% pred., MDP was significantly improved. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Increased peripheral vascular disease risk progressively constrains perfusion adaptability in the skeletal muscle microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Joshua T.; Frisbee, Stephanie J.; Olfert, I. Mark; Chantler, Paul D.; Tabone, Lawrence E.; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C.; Shrader, Carl D.; Goodwill, Adam G.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Brooks, Steven D.; Brock, Robert W.; Lombard, Julian H.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the impact of progressive elevations in peripheral vascular disease (PVD) risk on microvascular function, we utilized eight rat models spanning “healthy” to “high PVD risk” and used a multiscale approach to interrogate microvascular function and outcomes: healthy: Sprague-Dawley rats (SDR) and lean Zucker rats (LZR); mild risk: SDR on high-salt diet (HSD) and SDR on high-fructose diet (HFD); moderate risk: reduced renal mass-hypertensive rats (RRM) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR); high risk: obese Zucker rats (OZR) and Dahl salt-sensitive rats (DSS). Vascular reactivity and biochemical analyses demonstrated that even mild elevations in PVD risk severely attenuated nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and caused progressive shifts in arachidonic acid metabolism, increasing thromboxane A2 levels. With the introduction of hypertension, arteriolar myogenic activation and adrenergic constriction were increased. However, while functional hyperemia and fatigue resistance of in situ skeletal muscle were not impacted with mild or moderate PVD risk, blood oxygen handling suggested an increasingly heterogeneous perfusion within resting and contracting skeletal muscle. Analysis of in situ networks demonstrated an increasingly stable and heterogeneous distribution of perfusion at arteriolar bifurcations with elevated PVD risk, a phenomenon that was manifested first in the distal microcirculation and evolved proximally with increasing risk. The increased perfusion distribution heterogeneity and loss of flexibility throughout the microvascular network, the result of the combined effects on NO bioavailability, arachidonic acid metabolism, myogenic activation, and adrenergic constriction, may represent the most accurate predictor of the skeletal muscle microvasculopathy and poor health outcomes associated with chronic elevations in PVD risk. PMID:26702145

  10. Enlargement of the superior rectus and superior oblique muscles causes intorsion in Graves' eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yan; Kang, Xiao Li; Del Monte, Monte A

    2016-09-01

    To review the prevalence of preoperative and postoperative intorsion in patients with strabismus and Graves' eye disease (GED), and to correlate the intorsion with coexisting superior rectus (SR) and superior oblique (SO) muscle enlargement as a possible mechanism causing intorsion in these patients. Charts of consecutive patients with GED who underwent strabismus surgery between 1 January 2010 and 1 April 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Of these, patients with orbital CT or MRI scan were identified for further analysis. Clinical characteristics documented included age, gender, horizontal and vertical deviation, subjective torsional deviation, specific extraocular muscles (EOMs) operated upon, EOM enlargement on CT/MRI scans and width and thickness of SO, SR group and inferior rectus (IR). Charts of 45 patients (14 males and 31 females) were reviewed. Mean age was 56.8±12.5 years. Of these, seven (15.6%) patients demonstrated intorsion, and 38 (84.4%) patients demonstrated extorsion preoperatively. But after strabismus surgery, 15 (39.5%) of the 38 patients with preoperative extorsion demonstrated postoperative intorsion and 23 (60.5%) patients continued to show postoperative extorsion. On analysis of CT/MRI scans in these patients, only an increase in the thickness of SR group and the thickness/width of SO muscle were significantly associated with preoperative and postoperative intorsion; while age, gender, preoperative horizontal or vertical deviation and IR recession were unrelated to preoperative or postoperative intorsion. Postoperative intorsion was also associated with smaller degrees of preoperative extorsion (extorsion (<3.5°) in the presence of tight IRs should be carefully evaluated for possible SR and/or SO involvement by CT or MRI scan to predict those at risk for and plan for prevention/treatment of postoperative intorsion. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  11. Muscle expression of mutant androgen receptor accounts for systemic and motor neuron disease phenotypes in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Constanza J; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Guo, Ling T; Hung, Gene; Tsunemi, Taiji; Ly, Linda; Tokunaga, Seiya; Lopez, Edith; Sopher, Bryce L; Bennett, C Frank; Shelton, G Diane; Cleveland, Don W; La Spada, Albert R

    2014-04-16

    X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by adult-onset muscle weakness and lower motor neuron degeneration. SBMA is caused by CAG-polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Pathological findings include motor neuron loss, with polyQ-AR accumulation in intranuclear inclusions. SBMA patients exhibit myopathic features, suggesting a role for muscle in disease pathogenesis. To determine the contribution of muscle, we developed a BAC mouse model featuring a floxed first exon to permit cell-type-specific excision of human AR121Q. BAC fxAR121 mice develop systemic and neuromuscular phenotypes, including shortened survival. After validating termination of AR121 expression and full rescue with ubiquitous Cre, we crossed BAC fxAR121 mice with Human Skeletal Actin-Cre mice. Muscle-specific excision prevented weight loss, motor phenotypes, muscle pathology, and motor neuronopathy and dramatically extended survival. Our results reveal a crucial role for muscle expression of polyQ-AR in SBMA and suggest muscle-directed therapies as effective treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis regulates quadriceps muscle atrophy and fiber-type alteration in a rat model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jun-Juan; Wang, Qing; Xie, Li Hua; Zhang, Qiang; Sun, Sheng Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), weakness and muscle mass loss of the quadriceps muscle has been demonstrated to predict survival and mortality rates of patients. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), as a member of the TNF superfamily, has recently been identified as a key regulator of skeletal muscle wasting and metabolic dysfunction. So our aim was to study the role of TWEAK during quadriceps muscle atrophy and fiber-type transformat...

  13. MyoScreen, a High-Throughput Phenotypic Screening Platform Enabling Muscle Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joanne; Margaron, Yoran; Fernandes, Mathieu; Duchemin-Pelletier, Eve; Michaud, Joris; Flaender, Mélanie; Lorintiu, Oana; Degot, Sébastien; Poydenot, Pauline

    2018-03-01

    Despite the need for more effective drug treatments to address muscle atrophy and disease, physiologically accurate in vitro screening models and higher information content preclinical assays that aid in the discovery and development of novel therapies are lacking. To this end, MyoScreen was developed: a robust and versatile high-throughput high-content screening (HT/HCS) platform that integrates a physiologically and pharmacologically relevant micropatterned human primary skeletal muscle model with a panel of pertinent phenotypic and functional assays. MyoScreen myotubes form aligned, striated myofibers, and they show nerve-independent accumulation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) properties characteristic of adult skeletal muscle and contraction in response to chemical stimulation. Reproducibility and sensitivity of the fully automated MyoScreen platform are highlighted in assays that quantitatively measure myogenesis, hypertrophy and atrophy, AChR clusterization, and intracellular calcium release dynamics, as well as integrating contractility data. A primary screen of 2560 compounds to identify stimulators of myofiber regeneration and repair, followed by further biological characterization of two hits, validates MyoScreen for the discovery and testing of novel therapeutics. MyoScreen is an improvement of current in vitro muscle models, enabling a more predictive screening strategy for preclinical selection of the most efficacious new chemical entities earlier in the discovery pipeline process.

  14. Mitochondrial affinity for ADP is twofold lower in creatine kinase knock-out muscles - Possible role in rescuing cellular energy homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Veld, F; Jeneson, JAL; Nicolay, K

    Adaptations of the kinetic properties of mitochondria in striated muscle lacking cytosolic (M) and/or mitochondrial (Mi) creatine kinase (CK) isoforms in comparison to wild-type (WT) were investigated in vitro. Intact mitochondria were isolated from heart and gastrocnemius muscle of WT and single-

  15. Skeletal muscle metabolism is impaired during exercise in glycogen storage disease type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Laforêt, Pascal; Madsen, Karen Lindhardt

    2015-01-01

    in the patients on another day. RESULTS: Total fatty acid oxidation rates during exercise were higher in patients than controls, 32.1 (SE 1.2) vs 20.7 (SE 0.5; range 15.8-29.3) μmol/kg/min (p = 0.048), and oxidation of carbohydrates was lower in patients, 1.0 (SE 5.4) vs 38.4 (SE 8.0; range 23.0-77.1) μmol....../kg/min (p = 0.024). Fructose ingestion improved exercise tolerance in the patients. CONCLUSION: Similar to patients with McArdle disease, in whom muscle glycogenolysis is also impaired, GSDIIIa is associated with a reduced skeletal muscle oxidation of carbohydrates and a compensatory increase in fatty acid...... myopathy. METHODS: We challenged metabolism with cycle-ergometer exercise and measured substrate turnover and oxidation rates using stable isotope methodology and indirect calorimetry in 3 patients and 6 age-matched controls on 1 day, and examined the effect of fructose ingestion on exercise tolerance...

  16. White muscle disease in foals: focus on selenium soil content. A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delesalle, Catherine; de Bruijn, Marco; Wilmink, Sanne; Vandendriessche, Hilde; Mol, Gerben; Boshuizen, Berit; Plancke, Lukas; Grinwis, Guy

    2017-05-03

    White muscle disease (WMD) is a nutritional myopathy caused by selenium (Se) deficiency. In most soils, Se is present in low concentrations, sometimes even below 0.2 mg/kg, a trend which is seen in many countries. Apart from total soil Se concentrations, soil conditions may be such that the bio-availability of Se is so low that it causes very low uptake in plants which can ultimately lead to deficiency problems in animals. This is the first case series to report clinical WMD in foals in areas deficient in Se, in the Netherlands. The aim of the current report is to provide an overview of the clinical history, symptoms and (clinical) pathology of 8 newborn foals living at 4 different premises and suffering from WMD together with the effectiveness of Se and vitamin E (Vit E) supplementation in the affected foals, their dams and herd members. Hands on practical information is provided to apply a correct and effective Se supplementation management in horses and which pitfalls need to be avoided for a successful approach. Case features and history were mapped out for all foals. Se and Vit E status were assessed for the foals, their dams and herd members, at admission and after 3 months of Vit E/Se supplementation. Common symptoms were muscle weakness, inability to rise, lethargy and inadequate suckle reflex together with increased serum muscle enzymes and low glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and low to normal serum vit E levels. Necropsy revealed necrosis of skeletal muscles consistent with nutritional myopathy. Se status of the dams and herd members correlated well with the Se status of the foals. All surviving foals (n = 6) showed normal Vit E and GSH-Px levels after supplementation, likewise, all horses tested at premises 1, 3 and 4. However, dams and herd members in premises 2 showed no normalization. Horses of that premises were diagnosed with pyrrolizidine intoxication one year prior to the study. Certain regions in the Netherlands are sufficiently Se deficient

  17. The effects of inspiratory muscle training based on the perceptions of patients with advanced lung disease: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Mariana; Assis, Marcella G; Augusto, Valéria Maria; Silveira, Bruna Mara F; Parreira, Verônica F

    2017-12-08

    Advanced lung disease is a chronic non-neoplastic disease that compromises activities of daily living. Treatment includes pulmonary rehabilitation and inspiratory muscle training. Studies have shown the effectiveness of inspiratory muscle training in lung disease patients, but literature is scarce on the patients' perceptions about this topic. To explore the perceptions of patients with advanced lung disease about inspiratory muscle training. Qualitative study. Interviews were conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire regarding topics on the participation of patients in inspiratory muscle training and on daily activities performed before and after training. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed according to thematic content analysis. Ten patients (eight women and 2 men, ranging in age from 27 to 89 years) with inspiratory muscle weakness (maximal inspiratory pressure=44±13.9cmH 2 O) were included. Five patients were diagnosed with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, two with bronchiectasis and three with pulmonary fibrosis. All patients completed at least 80% of the total training sessions. The reports were grouped into four thematic categories: (1) impact of inspiratory muscle training on breathlessness (e.g., "I wasn't feeling as tired as I previously felt."); (2) change in daily activities (e.g., "I needed to go to the supermarket, I felt less tired doing it."); (3) improved mobility (e.g., "I could not stand for long periods […] walking, for example […] Now I stand more, I have more capability."); and (4) increased communication (e.g., "More power, right? Even in speaking […] When I could, I felt my voice coming out better."). There were improvements in breathlessness, daily activities, mobility, and communication, which positively affected the psychological and social aspects of the patients. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  18. An Official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society Statement: Update on Limb Muscle Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, François; Decramer, Marc; Casaburi, Richard; Barreiro, Esther; Burelle, Yan; Debigaré, Richard; Dekhuijzen, P. N. Richard; Franssen, Frits; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Gea, Joaquim; Gosker, Harry R.; Gosselink, Rik; Hayot, Maurice; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Janssens, Wim; Polkey, Micheal I.; Roca, Josep; Saey, Didier; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Spruit, Martijn A.; Steiner, Michael; Taivassalo, Tanja; Troosters, Thierry; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Wagner, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) statement on limb muscle dysfunction, important progress has been made on the characterization of this problem and on our understanding of its pathophysiology and clinical implications. Purpose: The purpose of this document is to update the 1999 ATS/ERS statement on limb muscle dysfunction in COPD. Methods: An interdisciplinary committee of experts from the ATS and ERS Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Clinical Problems assemblies determined that the scope of this document should be limited to limb muscles. Committee members conducted focused reviews of the literature on several topics. A librarian also performed a literature search. An ATS methodologist provided advice to the committee, ensuring that the methodological approach was consistent with ATS standards. Results: We identified important advances in our understanding of the extent and nature of the structural alterations in limb muscles in patients with COPD. Since the last update, landmark studies were published on the mechanisms of development of limb muscle dysfunction in COPD and on the treatment of this condition. We now have a better understanding of the clinical implications of limb muscle dysfunction. Although exercise training is the most potent intervention to address this condition, other therapies, such as neuromuscular electrical stimulation, are emerging. Assessment of limb muscle function can identify patients who are at increased risk of poor clinical outcomes, such as exercise intolerance and premature mortality. Conclusions: Limb muscle dysfunction is a key systemic consequence of COPD. However, there are still important gaps in our knowledge about the mechanisms of development of this problem

  19. Quantifying disease activity in fatty-infiltrated skeletal muscle by IDEAL-CPMG in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankodi, Ami; Bishop, Courtney A; Auh, Sungyoung; Newbould, Rexford D; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Janiczek, Robert L

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of iterative decomposition of water and fat with echo asymmetry and least-squares estimation Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (IDEAL-CPMG) to simultaneously measure skeletal muscle apparent fat fraction and water T 2 (T 2,w ) in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In twenty healthy volunteer boys and thirteen subjects with DMD, thigh muscle apparent fat fraction was measured by Dixon and IDEAL-CPMG, with the IDEAL-CPMG also providing T 2,w as a measure of muscle inflammatory activity. A subset of subjects with DMD was followed up during a 48-week clinical study. The study was in compliance with the Patient Privacy Act and approved by the Institutional Review Board. Apparent fat fraction in the thigh muscles of subjects with DMD was significantly increased compared to healthy volunteer boys (p <0.001). There was a strong correlation between Dixon and IDEAL-CPMG apparent fat fraction. Muscle T 2,w measured by IDEAL-CPMG was independent of changes in apparent fat fraction. Muscle T 2,w was higher in the biceps femoris and vastus lateralis muscles of subjects with DMD (p <0.05). There was a strong correlation (p <0.004) between apparent fat fraction in all thigh muscles and six-minute walk distance (6MWD) in subjects with DMD. IDEAL-CPMG allowed independent and simultaneous quantification of skeletal muscle fatty degeneration and disease activity in DMD. IDEAL-CPMG apparent fat fraction and T 2,w may be useful as biomarkers in clinical trials of DMD as the technique disentangles two competing biological processes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Gait Difficulty, Postural Instability, and Muscle Weakness Are Associated with Fear of Falling in People with Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret K. Y. Mak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to examine the contribution of gait impairment, postural stability and muscle weakness to the level of fear of falling in people with Parkinson's disease (PD. Fifty-seven community-dwelling individuals with PD completed the study. Fear of falling was assessed by the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC scale. Postural stability and gait difficulty were determined by the posture and gait subscores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-PG. A Cybex dynamometer was used to measure isokinetic knee muscle strength. Individuals with PD achieved a mean ABC score of 73.6±19.3. In the multiple regression analysis, after accounting for basic demographics, fall history and disease severity, the UPDRS-PG score remained independently associated with the ABC score, accounting for 13.4% of the variance (P<0.001. The addition of knee muscle strength significantly improved the prediction model and accounted for an additional 7.3% of the variance in the ABC score (P<0.05. This is the first study to demonstrate that the UPDRS-PG score and knee muscle strength are important and independent determinants of the level of fear of falling in individuals with PD. Improving balance, gait stability and knee muscle strength could be crucial in promoting balance confidence in the appropriately targeted PD population.

  1. Deep breathing heart rate variability is associated with respiratory muscle weakness in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Michel Silva Reis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A synchronism exists between the respiratory and cardiac cycles. However, the influence of the inspiratory muscle weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD on cardiac autonomic control is unknown. The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the influence of respiratory muscle strength on autonomic control in these patients. METHODS: Ten chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients (69±9 years; FEV1/FVC 59±12% and FEV1 41±11% predicted and nine age-matched healthy volunteers (64±5 years participated in this study. Heart-rate variability (HRV was obtained at rest and during respiratory sinusal arrhythmia maneuver (RSA-M by electrocardiograph. RESULTS: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients demonstrated impaired cardiac autonomic modulation at rest and during RSA-M when compared with healthy subjects (p<0.05. Moreover, significant and positive correlations between maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP and the inspiratory-expiratory difference (ΔIE (r = 0.60, p<0.01 were found. CONCLUSION: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented impaired sympathetic-vagal balance at rest. In addition, cardiac autonomic control of heart rate was associated with inspiratory muscle weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Based on this evidence, future research applications of respiratory muscle training may bring to light a potentially valuable target for rehabilitation.

  2. Novel interactions of ankyrins-G at the costameres: The muscle-specific Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD) binds plectin and filamin C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiweilidan, Yimingjiang; Klauza, Izabela; Kordeli, Ekaterini, E-mail: ekaterini.kordeli@inserm.fr

    2011-04-01

    Ankyrins, the adapters of the spectrin skeleton, are involved in local accumulation and stabilization of integral proteins to the appropriate membrane domains. In striated muscle, tissue-dependent alternative splicing generates unique Ank3 gene products (ankyrins-G); they share the Obscurin/Titin-Binding-related Domain (OTBD), a muscle-specific insert of the C-terminal domain which is highly conserved among ankyrin genes, and binds obscurin and titin to Ank1 gene products. We previously proposed that OTBD sequences constitute a novel domain of protein-protein interactions which confers ankyrins with specific cellular functions in muscle. Here we searched for muscle proteins binding to ankyrin-G OTBD by yeast two hybrid assay, and we found plectin and filamin C, two organizing elements of the cytoskeleton with essential roles in myogenesis, muscle cell cytoarchitecture, and muscle disease. The three proteins coimmunoprecipitate from skeletal muscle extracts and colocalize at costameres in adult muscle fibers. During in vitro myogenesis, muscle ankyrins-G are first expressed in postmitotic myocytes undergoing fusion to myotubes. In western blots of subcellular fractions from C2C12 cells, the majority of muscle ankyrins-G appear associated with membrane compartments. Occasional but not extensive co-localization at nascent costameres suggested that ankyrin-G interactions with plectin and filamin C are not involved in costamere assembly; they would rather reinforce stability and/or modulate molecular interactions in sarcolemma microdomains by establishing novel links between muscle-specific ankyrins-G and the two costameric dystrophin-associated glycoprotein and integrin-based protein complexes. These results report the first protein-protein interactions involving the ankyrin-G OTBD domain and support the hypothesis that OTBD sequences confer ankyrins with a gain of function in vertebrates, bringing further consolidation and resilience of the linkage between sarcomeres

  3. Entropic elasticity in the generation of muscle Force - A theoretical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2002-01-01

    A novel simplified structural model of sarcomeric force production in striate muscle is presented. Using some simple assumptions regarding the distribution of myosin spring lengths at different sliding velocities it is possible to derive a very simple expression showing the main components...

  4. Quantitative analysis of skeletal muscle mass in patients with rheumatic diseases under glucocorticoid therapy--comparison among bioelectrical impedance analysis, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosono, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Noritada; Shimizu, Noriaki; Kiryu, Shigeru; Uehara, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Matsumiya, Ryo; Kuribara, Akiko; Maruyama, Takako; Tanaka, Hirotoshi

    2015-03-01

    To determine the availability of bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for measurement of skeletal muscle mass in patients with rheumatic diseases and quantitatively assess skeletal muscle loss after glucocorticoid (GC) treatment. The data from 22 patients with rheumatic diseases were retrospectively obtained. The muscle mass of body segments was measured with a BIA device in terms of skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). Cross-sectional area (CSA) was obtained from CT and MRI scans at the mid-thigh level using the image analysis program. We further assessed the data of three different measurements before and after GC treatment in 7 patients with rheumatic diseases. SMI of whole body was significantly correlated with estimated muscle volume and mid-thigh muscle CSA with CT and MRI (p rheumatic diseases, and CT and MRI appeared to be more accurate than BIA.

  5. Does peripheral arterial occlusive disease influence muscle strength and exercise capacity in COPD patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Angélica da Fonseca Miranda

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is complex and understanding of it has been changing in recent years, with regard to its multisystemic manifestations, especially peripheral dysfunction and its influence on intolerance to exercise. Objectives To evaluate the relationship between peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD and peripheral muscle strength and exercise capacity in COPD patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 35 patients with COPD who were evaluated with the Ankle-Brachial Index, handgrip strength test, 1 repetition maximum (1RM of knee extensors and flexors, and distance covered in the incremental shuttle walking test (dISWT. Results COPD patients with coexisting PAOD had lower dominant handgrip strength test results (33.00 vs. 26.66 kgf, p = 0.02 and worse performance in the dISWT (297.32 vs. 219.41 m, p = 0.02 when compared to the COPD patients without PAOD. Strong correlations were found between the result of the handgrip strength test and both the dISWT (r = 0.78; p < 0.001 and the 1RM/knee extension (r = 0.71; p = 0.03; and also between the dISWT and both the 1RM/knee extension (r = 0.72; p = 0.02 and the 1RM/knee flexion (r = 0.92; p < 0.001. The linear regression model showed that the dISWT variable alone explains 15.3% of the Ankle-Brachial Index result (p = 0.01. Conclusion COPD patients with PAOD exhibit reduced muscle strength and lower exercise capacity than COPD patients without PAOD.

  6. Rapid Alleviation of Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms via Electrostimulation of Intrinsic Auricular Muscle Zones

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    Yusuf O. Cakmak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS and the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN significantly improve cardinal motor symptoms and postural instability and gait difficulty, respectively, in Parkinson’s disease (PD.Objective and Hypothesis: Intrinsic auricular muscle zones (IAMZs allow the potential to simultaneously stimulate the C2 spinal nerve, the trigeminal nerve, the facial nerve, and sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves in addition to providing muscle feedback and control areas including the STN, the PPN and mesencephalic locomotor regions. Our aim was to observe the clinical responses to IAMZ stimulation in PD patients.Method: Unilateral stimulation of an IAMZ, which includes muscle fibers for proprioception, the facial nerve, and C2, trigeminal and autonomic nerve fibers, at 130 Hz was performed in a placebo- and sham-controlled, double-blinded, within design, two-armed study of 24 PD patients.Results: The results of the first arm (10 patients of the present study demonstrated a substantial improvement in Unified Parkinson’s Disease Ratings Scale (UPDRS motor scores due to 10 min of IAMZ electrostimulation (p = 0.0003, power: 0.99 compared to the placebo control (p = 0.130. A moderate to large clinical difference in the improvement in UPDRS motor scores was observed in the IAMZ electrostimulation group. The results of the second arm (14 patients demonstrated significant improvements with dry needling (p = 0.011 and electrostimulation of the IAMZ (p < 0.001 but not with sham electrostimulation (p = 0.748. In addition, there was a significantly greater improvement in UPDRS motor scores in the IAMZ electrostimulation group compared to the IAMZ dry needling group (p < 0.001 and the sham electrostimulation (p < 0.001 groups. The improvement in UPDRS motor scores of the IAMZ electrostimulation group (ΔUPDRS = 5.29 reached moderate to high clinical significance, which was not the case for the dry needling

  7. Spasmodic muscle cramps and weakness as presenting symptoms in Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, John M; Kuntz, Nancy; Melin-Aldana, Hector; Bass, Lee M

    2013-10-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive disorder of hepatic copper metabolism that has tremendous variability in its presentation. Phenotypic diversity of the disease can lead to delayed diagnosis. We describe a case of WD in a 10-year-old boy presenting with 3 months of increasingly intense, spasmodic lower extremity muscle cramps. Physical examination revealed tenderness on calf palpation and dark flat lesions over his ankles, knees, and elbows. Initial testing revealed creatine kinase of 302 IU/L (normal 24-248 IU/L), hemoglobin of 8.9 g/dL (11.5-15.5 g/dL), aspartate aminotransferase of 114 IU/L (16-52 IU/L), alanine aminotransferase of 54 IU/L (2-30 IU/L), and myoglobinuria. Extensive evaluation of his myopathy, including MRI and muscle biopsy, was negative. Additional laboratory tests revealed a prothrombin time of 21.3 seconds (11.8-15.5 seconds), total bilirubin of 1.4 mg/dL (<1 mg/dL), direct bilirubin of 0.5 mg/dL (<0.3 mg/dL), albumin of 2.1 g/dL (3.1-4.6 g/dL), a reticulocyte percentage of 4.5% (0.5%-2.5%), a negative Coombs direct antibody test, ceruloplasmin of 3 mg/dL (21-51 mg/dL), and 24-h urine copper of 393 μg/24 h (15-60 μg/24 h). Liver biopsy showed patchy advanced fibrosis, mild inflammation, positive staining for copper, and a tissue copper concentration of 768 µg/g (10-35 μg/g). Brain MRI revealed symmetric intrinsic T1 shortening within bilateral basal ganglia. Trientene therapy was initiated for WD. Symptoms and laboratory abnormalities resolved and remain normal at 21 months' follow-up. Musculoskeletal involvement in WD is uncommon and typically defined as bone demineralization, arthropathy, or hypokalemic muscle weakness. In patients with unexplained musculoskeletal symptoms and hepatic abnormalities, a diagnosis of WD should be considered and appropriate evaluation initiated.

  8. The role of exercise-induced myokines in muscle homeostasis and the defense against chronic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Claus; Pedersen, Bente K

    2010-01-01

    to our theory, such effects may in part be mediated via muscle-derived peptides, so-called "myokines". Contracting skeletal muscles release myokines with endocrine effects, mediating direct anti-inflammatory effects, and/or specific effects on visceral fat. Other myokines work locally within the muscle...

  9. Characterization of muscle contraction with second harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prent, Nicole

    Muscle cells have the ability to change length and generate force due to orchestrated action of myosin nanomotors that cause sliding of actin filaments along myosin filaments in the sarcomeres, the fundamental contractile units, of myocytes. The correlated action of hundreds of sarcomeres is needed to produce the myocyte contractions. This study probes the molecular structure of the myofilaments and investigates the movement correlations between sarcomeres during contraction. In this study, second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy is employed for imaging striated myocytes. Myosin filaments in striated myocytes inherently have a nonzero second-order susceptibility, [special characters omitted] and therefore generate efficient SHG. Employing polarization-in polarization-out (PIPO) SHG microscopy allows for the accurate determination of the characteristic ratio, [special characters omitted] in birefringent myocytes, which describes the structure of the myosin filament. Analysis shows that the b value at the centre of the myosin filament, where the nonlinear dipoles are better aligned, is slightly lower than the value at the edges of the filament, where there is more disorder in orientation of the nonlinear dipoles from the myosin heads. Forced stretching of myocytes resulted in an SHG intensity increase with the elongation of the sarcomere. SHG microscopy captured individual sarcomeres during contraction, allowing for the measurement of sarcomere length (SL) and SHG intensity (SI) fluctuations. The fluctuations also revealed higher SHG intensity in elongated sarcomeres. The sarcomere synchronization model (SSM) for contracting and quiescent myocytes was developed, and experimentally verified for three cases (isolated cardiomyocyte, embryonic chicken cardiomyocyte, and larva myocyte). During contraction, the action of SLs and SIs between neighbouring sarcomeres partially correlated, whereas in quiescent myocytes the SLs show an anti-correlation and the SIs have no

  10. Lower-limb pain, disease, and injury burden as determinants of muscle strength deficit after hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portegijs, Erja; Rantanen, Taina; Kallinen, Mauri; Heinonen, Ari; Alen, Markku; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Sipilä, Sarianna

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hip fracture may result in an asymmetrical lower-limb strength deficit. The deficit may be related to the trauma, surgical treatment, pain, or disuse of the fractured limb. However, disease and injury burden or musculoskeletal pain in the other limb may reduce muscle strength on that

  11. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: update on limb muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maltais, F.; Decramer, M.; Casaburi, R.; Barreiro, E.; Burelle, Y.; Debigare, R.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Franssen, F.; Gayan-Ramirez, G.; Gea, J.; Gosker, H.R.; Gosselink, R.; Hayot, M.; Hussain, S.N.; Janssens, W.; Polkey, M.I.; Roca, J.; Saey, D.; Schols, A.M.W.J.; Spruit, M.A.; Steiner, M.; Taivassalo, T.; Troosters, T.; Vogiatzis, I.; Wagner, P.D.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limb muscle dysfunction is prevalent in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and it has important clinical implications, such as reduced exercise tolerance, quality of life, and even survival. Since the previous American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS)

  12. Hygienic and technological value of meat of turkey raw meat originating from flocks with green muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuszczak-Frak, M; Uradziński, J

    2009-01-01

    Breeding selection of slaughter poultry aimed at assuring fast body weight gains of birds has resulted in the occurrence of various forms of chronic diseases, including deep pectoral myopathy, also known as green muscle disease. The objective of the study was to determine the hygienic and technological value of meat of turkeys originating from flocks with diagnosed green muscle disease. The experimental material comprised 376 samples of the major and minor pectoral muscle from post-production turkey hens. The samples were subjected to microbiological analyses as well as determinations of pH, water binding capacity, color and chemical composition (fat, protein, water). The results obtained enabled concluding that, in terms of microbiological assessment, the meat originating from turkeys affected by the green muscle disease may be acknowledged as suitable for consumption. In turn, due to negligibly diminished technological value, resulting from deviations in pH value, water binding capacity, color and chemical composition, the authors postulate considering the advisability of stipulating separate qualitative standards for meat originating from post-production turkey hens.

  13. Structural functional associations of the orbit in thyroid eye disease: Kalman filters to track extraocular rectal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Shikha; Nelson, Katrina; Mundy, Kevin; Luo, Yifu; Harrigan, Robert L.; Damon, Steve; Fabbri, Daniel; Mawn, Louise; Landman, Bennett

    2016-03-01

    Pathologies of the optic nerve and orbit impact millions of Americans and quantitative assessment of the orbital structures on 3-D imaging would provide objective markers to enhance diagnostic accuracy, improve timely intervention, and eventually preserve visual function. Recent studies have shown that the multi-atlas methodology is suitable for identifying orbital structures, but challenges arise in the identification of the individual extraocular rectus muscles that control eye movement. This is increasingly problematic in diseased eyes, where these muscles often appear to fuse at the back of the orbit (at the resolution of clinical computed tomography imaging) due to inflammation or crowding. We propose the use of Kalman filters to track the muscles in three-dimensions to refine multi-atlas segmentation and resolve ambiguity due to imaging resolution, noise, and artifacts. The purpose of our study is to investigate a method of automatically generating orbital metrics from CT imaging and demonstrate the utility of the approach by correlating structural metrics of the eye orbit with clinical data and visual function measures in subjects with thyroid eye disease. The pilot study demonstrates that automatically calculated orbital metrics are strongly correlated with several clinical characteristics. Moreover, it is shown that the superior, inferior, medial and lateral rectus muscles obtained using Kalman filters are each correlated with different categories of functional deficit. These findings serve as foundation for further investigation in the use of CT imaging in the study, analysis and diagnosis of ocular diseases, specifically thyroid eye disease.

  14. Measuring muscle strength for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: retest reliability of hand-held dynamometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Simone D; Taylor, Nicholas F; Paratz, Jennifer D

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the retest reliability and quantify the degree of measurement error when measuring isometric muscle strength with a hand-held dynamometer for people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Retest reliability of hand-held dynamometry for 4 muscle groups was assessed on 2 occasions separated by a 2-week interval. Community rehabilitation center. Eight men and 4 women (mean age +/- standard deviation, 71.4+/-10.3y) with moderately severe COPD (percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 41.5%+/-17.7%). Not applicable. Muscle strength (in kilograms). Statistical analysis was conducted by calculating intraclass correlation coefficients and 95% confidence intervals for both group and individual scores. All reliability coefficients were greater than .79. Muscle strength would need to increase by between 4% and 18% in groups of people with COPD and between 34% and 58% in a person with COPD to be 95% confident of detecting real changes. Hand-held dynamometry is suitable for monitoring change in muscle strength and testing hypotheses for groups of people with COPD. However, hand-held dynamometry is not likely to detect changes in muscle strength for a person with COPD.

  15. Cell division in Apicomplexan parasites is organized by a homolog of the striated rootlet fiber of algal flagella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Francia

    Full Text Available Apicomplexa are intracellular parasites that cause important human diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. During host cell infection new parasites are formed through a budding process that parcels out nuclei and organelles into multiple daughters. Budding is remarkably flexible in output and can produce two to thousands of progeny cells. How genomes and daughters are counted and coordinated is unknown. Apicomplexa evolved from single celled flagellated algae, but with the exception of the gametes, lack flagella. Here we demonstrate that a structure that in the algal ancestor served as the rootlet of the flagellar basal bodies is required for parasite cell division. Parasite striated fiber assemblins (SFA polymerize into a dynamic fiber that emerges from the centrosomes immediately after their duplication. The fiber grows in a polarized fashion and daughter cells form at its distal tip. As the daughter cell is further elaborated it remains physically tethered at its apical end, the conoid and polar ring. Genetic experiments in Toxoplasma gondii demonstrate two essential components of the fiber, TgSFA2 and 3. In the absence of either of these proteins cytokinesis is blocked at its earliest point, the initiation of the daughter microtubule organizing center (MTOC. Mitosis remains unimpeded and mutant cells accumulate numerous nuclei but fail to form daughter cells. The SFA fiber provides a robust spatial and temporal organizer of parasite cell division, a process that appears hard-wired to the centrosome by multiple tethers. Our findings have broader evolutionary implications. We propose that Apicomplexa abandoned flagella for most stages yet retained the organizing principle of the flagellar MTOC. Instead of ensuring appropriate numbers of flagella, the system now positions the apical invasion complexes. This suggests that elements of the invasion apparatus may be derived from flagella or flagellum associated structures.

  16. Effects of exercise training on calf muscle oxygen extraction and blood flow in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Wesley B; Li, Zhe; Schenkel, Steven S; Chandra, Malavika; Busch, David R; Englund, Erin K; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Yodh, Arjun G; Floyd, Thomas F; Mohler, Emile R

    2017-12-01

    We employed near-infrared optical techniques, diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), and frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (FD-NIRS) to test the hypothesis that supervised exercise training increases skeletal muscle microvascular blood flow and oxygen extraction in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) who experience claudication. PAD patients ( n = 64) were randomly assigned to exercise and control groups. Patients in the exercise group received 3 mo of supervised exercise training. Calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction were optically monitored before, during, and after performance of a graded treadmill protocol at baseline and at 3 mo in both groups. Additionally, measurements of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) and peak walking time (PWT) to maximal claudication were made during each patient visit. Supervised exercise training was found to increase the maximal calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction levels during treadmill exercise by 29% (13%, 50%) and 8% (1%, 12%), respectively [ P group population were significantly higher than corresponding changes in the control group ( P training also increased PWT by 49% (18%, 101%) ( P = 0.01). However, within statistical error, the ABI, resting calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction, and the recovery half-time for hemoglobin\\myoglobin desaturation following cessation of maximal exercise were not altered by exercise training. The concurrent monitoring of both blood flow and oxygen extraction with the hybrid DCS/FD-NIRS instrument revealed enhanced muscle oxidative metabolism during physical activity from exercise training, which could be an underlying mechanism for the observed improvement in PWT. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We report on noninvasive optical measurements of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction dynamics before/during/after treadmill exercise in peripheral artery disease patients who experience claudication. The measurements tracked the effects of a 3-mo supervised

  17. Muscle cramps and neuropathies in patients with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Peter D; Wolff, Daniel; Grauer, Oliver; Angstwurm, Klemens; Jarius, Sven; Wandinger, Klaus P; Holler, Ernst; Schulte-Mattler, Wilhelm; Kleiter, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is an immune-mediated multisystemic disorder and the leading cause of morbidity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Peripheral nervous system manifestations of GVHD are rare but often disabling. Whereas immune-mediated neuropathies are an established feature of GVHD, muscle cramps are not well characterized. In a single-centre retrospective cohort we studied 27 patients (age 23 to 69 years) with GVHD (acute n = 6, chronic n = 21) who complained of symptoms suggestive of peripheral nervous system complications. Clinical, laboratory and neurophysiological findings were evaluated by descriptive statistics and regression analysis to detect factors associated with muscle cramps. Patient's sera were examined for anti-neuronal antibodies. Nine patients had polyneuropathy, 4 had muscle cramps, and 14 had both. Median onset of polyneuropathy and muscle cramps was 6 and 9 months after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, respectively. Neurophysiology revealed a predominantly axonal polyneuropathy in 20 of 26 patients. In 4 of 19 patients electromyography showed signs of myopathy or myositis. Muscle cramps were more frequent during chronic than acute GVHD and affected muscles other than calves in 15 of 18 patients. They typically occurred daily, lasted 1 to 10 minutes with medium to severe pain intensity, compromised daily activity or sleep in 12, and were refractory to therapy in 4 patients. Muscle cramps were less likely with tacrolimus treatment and signs of severe polyneuropathy, but more likely with myopathic changes in electromyography and with incipient demyelinating polyneuropathy, shown by increased high frequency attenuation of the tibial nerve. Serological studies revealed antinuclear or antimitochondrial antibodies in a subset of patients. Two of 16 patients had a serum reactivity against peripheral nervous tissue. Muscle cramps are associated with chronic GVHD, often compromise daily

  18. Effect of distribution of striated laser hardening tracks on dry sliding wear resistance of biomimetic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Zhou, Ti; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong; Li, Hui

    2018-01-01

    Some biological surfaces were proved to have excellent anti-wear performance. Being inspired, Nd:YAG pulsed laser was used to create striated biomimetic laser hardening tracks on medium carbon steel samples. Dry sliding wear tests biomimetic samples were performed to investigate specific influence of distribution of laser hardening tracks on sliding wear resistance of biomimetic samples. After comparing wear weight loss of biomimetic samples, quenched sample and untreated sample, it can be suggested that the sample covered with dense laser tracks (3.5 mm spacing) has lower wear weight loss than the one covered with sparse laser tracks (4.5 mm spacing); samples distributed with only dense laser tracks or sparse laser tracks (even distribution) were proved to have better wear resistance than samples distributed with both dense and sparse tracks (uneven distribution). Wear mechanisms indicate that laser track and exposed substrate of biomimetic sample can be regarded as hard zone and soft zone respectively. Inconsecutive striated hard regions, on the one hand, can disperse load into small branches, on the other hand, will hinder sliding abrasives during wear. Soft regions with small range are beneficial in consuming mechanical energy and storing lubricative oxides, however, soft zone with large width (>0.5 mm) will be harmful to abrasion resistance of biomimetic sample because damages and material loss are more obvious on surface of soft phase. As for the reason why samples with even distributed bionic laser tracks have better wear resistance, it can be explained by the fact that even distributed laser hardening tracks can inhibit severe worn of local regions, thus sliding process can be more stable and wear extent can be alleviated as well.

  19. Congenital Muscle Disease Study of Patient and Family Reported Medical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-05

    Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (Including Unspecified/Undiagnosed); Dystroglycanopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Congenital Myopathy (Including Unspecified/Undiagnosed); Collagen VI CMD (Ullrich CMD, Intermediate, Bethlem Myopathy); Laminin Alpha 2 Related Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; LAMA2-CMD/Merosin Deficient/MDC1A; Walker-Warburg Syndrome; Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; Fukuyama/Fukutin Related Muscular Dystrophy; Integrin Alpha 7 Deficiency; Integrin Alpha 9 Deficiency; LMNA-CMD/Lamin A/C/Laminopathy; SEPN1-Related Myopathy; Bethlem Myopathy; Actin Aggregation Myopathy; Cap Disease; Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Core Rod Myopathy; Hyaline Body Myopathy; Multiminicore Myopathy; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Tubular Aggregate Myopathy; Zebra Body Myopathy; Reducing Body Myopathy; Spheroid Body Myopathy; LGMD1B (LMNA); LGMD1E (DES); LGMD2G (TCAP); LGMD2H (TRIM32); LGMD2I (FKRP); LGMD2J (TTN); LGMD2K (POMT1); LGMD2M (FKTN); LGMD2N (POMT2); LGMD2O (POMGnT1); LGMD2P (DAG1); LGMD2Q (PLEC1); LGMD2R (DES); LGMD2S (TRAPPC11); LGMD2T (GMPPB); LGMD2U (ISPD); LGMD2V (GAA); Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy; Titinopathy; Choline Kinase B Receptor; Emery-Dreifuss Muscular Dystrophy; RYR1 Related Myopathy; SYNE1/Nesprin Related Muscular Dystrophy; Telethonin Related Muscular Dystrophy (TCAP/Titin-Cap); Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome; Escobar Syndrome; Myofibrillar Myopathy; Malignant Hyperthermia; Alpha-Dystroglycan Related Muscular Dystrophy (DAG1, DPM1, DPM2, DPM3, FKRP, FKTN); Alpha-Dystroglycan Related Muscular Dystrophy (GAA, ISPD, LARGE, POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1); Alpha-Dystroglycan Related Muscular Dystrophy (Unspecified/Undiagnosed/Other)

  20. Creatine, L-carnitine, and ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation from healthy to diseased skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antona, Giuseppe; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Micheletti, Piero; Di Lorenzo, Arianna; Aquilani, Roberto; Nisoli, Enzo; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Daglia, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Myopathies are chronic degenerative pathologies that induce the deterioration of the structure and function of skeletal muscle. So far a definitive therapy has not yet been developed and the main aim of myopathy treatment is to slow the progression of the disease. Current nonpharmacological therapies include rehabilitation, ventilator assistance, and nutritional supplements, all of which aim to delay the onset of the disease and relieve its symptoms. Besides an adequate diet, nutritional supplements could play an important role in the treatment of myopathic patients. Here we review the most recent in vitro and in vivo studies investigating the role supplementation with creatine, L-carnitine, and ω3 PUFAs plays in myopathy treatment. Our results suggest that these dietary supplements could have beneficial effects; nevertheless continued studies are required before they could be recommended as a routine treatment in muscle diseases.

  1. Pericytes: multitasking cells in the regeneration of injured, diseased, and aged skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbrair, Alexander; Zhang, Tan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria L; Mintz, Akiva; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    Pericytes are perivascular cells that envelop and make intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells. Recent studies show that they may have a profound impact in skeletal muscle regeneration, innervation, vessel formation, fibrosis, fat accumulation, and ectopic bone formation throughout life. In this review, we summarize and evaluate recent advances in our understanding of pericytes' influence on adult skeletal muscle pathophysiology. We also discuss how further elucidating their biology may offer new approaches to the treatment of conditions characterized by muscle wasting.

  2. The effects of threshold inspiratory muscle training in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomised experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Han-Yu; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Fang, Yueh-Yen; Guo, Su-Er

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the effects of threshold inspiratory muscle training in patients with stages II through IV chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using maximum inspiratory pressure, baseline dyspnoea index, 6-minute walk test and quality of life. A threshold inspiratory muscle training device provides pressure for inspiratory muscle strength, but there is limited information on the effects of threshold inspiratory muscle training starting at low pressure training. Randomised experimental design. A total of 55 patients completed this study between September 2013-April 2014. The experimental group (n = 27) was provided medical treatment and routine care, along with five sessions of threshold inspiratory muscle training per week (21-30 min per session), accompanied by a progressive increase in the pressure threshold over a period of 8 weeks. The control group (n = 28) was provided medical treatment and routine care only, without intervention. In the inferential analysis, p values inspiratory pressure improved by -17.6 ± 0.18 cmH 2 O, mean 6-minute walk test improved by 47.8 ± 1.46 m, and the baseline dyspnoea index increased from 4.48 ± 2.12 points to 9.0 ± 2.27 points. These data and quality of life were statistically different between the experimental and the control groups (p inspiratory muscle training can reduce patients' difficulties with respect to daily activities, thereby reducing the burden on the family, and improving prognosis in patients with moderate-to-very severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Differential Muscle Involvement in Mice and Humans Affected by McArdle Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O; Pinós, Tomàs; Nielsen, Tue L

    2016-01-01

    , variations in fiber size, vacuoles, and some internal nuclei associated with cytosolic glycogen accumulation and ongoing regeneration; structural damage was seen only in a minority of human patients. Neither liver nor brain isoforms of glycogen phosphorylase were upregulated in muscles, thus providing...... no substitution for the missing muscle isoform. In the mice, the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were invariably more damaged than the quadriceps muscles. This may relate to a 7-fold higher level of myophosphorylase in TA compared to quadriceps in wild-type mice and suggests higher glucose turnover in the TA. Thus...

  4. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in the Process of Rehabilitation of Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska-Pulsakowska, M; Wytrychowski, K; Rożek-Piechura, K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) adversely affects the quality of life and life expectancy of patients. Shortness of breath, cough, and fatigue in lower limbs are the main reasons limiting physical activities of patients. The lack of physical activity results in poorer muscle strength. The latest guidelines regarding breathing rehabilitation in COPD patients emphasize a significant role of inspiratory muscle exercises. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week long inspiratory muscle training, interval training on a cycle ergometer, and training combining both kinds of rehabilitation, on pulmonary function, health-related quality of life, and the tolerance to exercise in patients with COPD. The study was conducted in a group of 43 patients with diagnosed COPD stage II and III according to GOLD. They were randomly divided into four training groups: inspiratory muscle training (Group 1), cycle ergometer training (Group 2), cycle ergometer and inspiratory muscle training (Group 3), control group - patients who did not participate in any rehabilitation programs (Group 4 - control). Before the rehabilitation process and after its completion the patients were medically examined, they completed a health-related quality of life questionnaire, performed a 6-min walk test, spirometry, and a treadmill exercise test according to the modified Bruce protocol. The results demonstrate a significant improvement in the quality of life measured for Group 3 in comparison with the control group.

  5. Peripheral muscle training in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: novel approaches and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisca, Gianna W; Camillo, Carlos A; Cavalheri, Vinicius; Pitta, Fabio; Osadnik, Christian R

    2017-05-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is one of the most effective non-pharmacological management options for individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Exercise training is the cornerstone of pulmonary rehabilitation, however considerable variability exists regarding the way it is delivered across the world. It is widely accepted that efforts should be made to tailor specific therapeutic approaches to individuals' needs. This applies as much to respiratory medicine as it does to respiratory rehabilitation. Areas covered: This narrative review examines the emerging literature evaluating advancements of exercise training modalities targeting peripheral muscle function in people with COPD. It aims to highlight practical considerations regarding the delivery key evidence regarding clinical effectiveness, as well as highlight some of the and evaluation of their effectiveness to inform clinical practice. Expert commentary: Although novel therapies may offer advantages over more 'traditional' training methods under specific circumstances, challenges regarding the potential impact upon clinical rehabilitation, the identification of the best candidates for such therapy and access to equipment may pose realistic barriers to their more widespread clinical implementation. Future directions regarding the ways in which these barriers could be overcome will be discussed, including identification of the key research priorities to optimize evidence-based practice in this area.

  6. YAP-mediated mechanotransduction in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eFischer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is not only translating chemical energy into mechanical work, it is also a highly adaptive and regenerative tissue whose architecture and functionality is determined by its mechanical and physical environment. Processing intra- and extracellular mechanical signaling cues contributes to the regulation of cell growth, survival, migration and differentiation. Yes-associated Protein (YAP, a transcriptional coactivator downstream of the Hippo pathway and its paralogue, the transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ, were recently found to play a key role in mechanotransduction in various tissues including skeletal muscle. Furthermore, YAP/TAZ modulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration and abnormal YAP activity has been reported in muscular dystrophy and rhabdomyosarcoma. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of mechanosensing and -signaling in striated muscle. We highlight the role of YAP signaling and discuss the different routes and hypotheses of its regulation in the context of mechanotransduction.

  7. [Muscle-wasting in end stage renal disease in dialysis treatment: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Yuri; Galeano, Dario; Cojocaru, Elena; Fiorini, Fulvio; Forcellini, Silvia; Zanoli, Luca; Storari, Alda; Granata, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Progressive and generalized loss of muscle mass (muscle wasting) is a frequent complication in dialysis patients. Common uremic signs and symptoms such as insulin-resistance, increase in glucocorticoid activity, metabolic acidosis, malnutrition, inflammation and dialysis per se contribute to muscle wasting by modulating proteolytic intracellular mechanisms (ubiquitin-proteasome system, activation of caspase-3 and IGF-1/PI3K/Akt pathway). Since muscle wasting is associated with an increase in mortality, bone fractures and worsening in life quality, a prompt and personalised diagnostic and therapeutic approach seems to be essential in dialysis patients. At present, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), computed tomography (CT), dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), impedance analysis, bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) and anthropometric measurements are the main tools used to assess skeletal muscle mass. Aerobic and anaerobic training programmes and treatment of uremic complications reduce muscle wasting and increase muscle strength in uremic patients. The present review analyses the most recent data about the physiopathology, diagnosis, therapy and future perspectives of treatment of muscle wasting in dialysis patients.

  8. Skeletal Muscle Remodelling as a Function of Disease Progression in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L; Jørgensen, L H; Bech, R D

    2016-01-01

    Muscle weakness is considered the pivotal sign of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Knowledge about the skeletal muscle degeneration/regeneration process and the myogenic potential is limited in ALS patients. Therefore, we investigate these processes in a time course perspective by analysing...

  9. Therapeutic effects of anabolic androgenic steroids on chronic diseases associated with muscle wasting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdeman, J.T.; de Ronde, W.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A variety of clinical conditions are complicated by loss of weight and skeletal muscle which may contribute to morbidity and mortality. Anabolic androgenic steroids have been demonstrated to increase fat-free mass, muscle mass and strength in healthy men and women without major adverse

  10. Muscle microanatomy and its changes during contraction: the legacy of William Bowman (1816-1892).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frixione, Eugenio

    2006-01-01

    Striated muscle fine structure began to be really understood following a comprehensive survey of the matter carried out by William Bowman in the late 1830s. The publications resulting from such a study, the first of which earned for the author a precocious election as Fellow of the Royal Society, are herewith examined in the context of contemporary views on the subject as well as of their subsequent repercussion and current knowledge today. It is shown that not only Bowman succeeded in establishing the true architecture of striated muscle fibres to the extent possible with the most advanced technology available in his day--explaining and eradicating alternative erroneous concepts in the process--but also in correctly describing the basic microstructural changes associated with contraction. In addition, although unrecognized by him or others at the time, his experiments with muscle provided direct evidence for the existence of a selectively permeable cell membrane--in the present meaning of the word--over half a century before its officially accepted discovery. Yet, in spite of these remarkable advances, Bowman arrived at the conclusion that the structure of striated muscle fibres is essentially irrelevant for the mechanism of contraction. Possible reasons behind Bowman's breakthrough accomplishments as a pioneer of modern muscle research, and his failure to understand their significance for muscle physiology, are discussed.

  11. Muscle ultrasound quantifies disease progression over time in infants and young boys with duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman, Craig M; Malkus, Elizabeth C; Connolly, Anne M

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative muscle ultrasound (QUS) in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) shows increased echointensity as muscle is replaced with fat and fibrosis. Studies of quantitative ultrasound in infants/young boys with DMD over time have not been reported. We used calibrated muscle backscatter (cMB), a reproducible measure of ultrasound echointensity, to quantify muscle pathology in 5 young boys with DMD (ages 0.5-2.8 years) over 17-29 months. We compared the results with repeated assessments of function (n = 4) and with muscle ultrasound images from a cross-section of 6 male controls (0.6-3.1 years). cMB in boys with DMD increased (worsened) over time (P assessment of young boys with DMD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The use of ultrasound in the evaluation of the efficacy of calf muscle pump function in primary chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisóstomo, R S S; Candeias, M S; Armada-da-Siva, P A S

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate popliteal vein blood flow during calf muscle contraction in chronic venous disease (CVD) patients and healthy controls using ultrasound imaging and to investigate the relationship between venous blood flow and gastrocnemius muscle (GM) morphology. Thirty-one subjects participated in this study (mean age: 40.3 [11.8] years), 15 healthy controls and 16 with CVD (clinical classification: C₁₋₄). Popliteal vein cross-sectional area and venous blood flow velocity (FV) were evaluated by Doppler ultrasound at baseline and during three sets of 10 tip-toe movement repetitions. Muscle thickness, muscle fascicle length and pennation angle of both medial and lateral GM were measured by ultrasound. Measures were repeated a week later in 17 participants in order to assess reproducibility with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman analysis. Peak FV was lower in CDV group compared with Control group for both first (40.6 [11.8] versus 62.4 (22.1) cm²/second; P = 0.021) and last (30.4 [9.1] versus 49.5 (22.7) cm²/second; P = 0.024) contraction. In CVD group, peak FV during first contraction increased with GM's muscle fascicle length (r = 0.63; P = 0.041). Popliteal FV also increased with rising range of muscle fascicles pennation change between ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion (r = 0.70; P = 0.025). No associations were found between haemodynamics and medial or lateral GM thickness. Calf muscular architecture was similar in both CVD and control participants. Test-retest reliability of FV measured in the same session was high (ICC≈0.70) for measures taken in the first contraction of the set but lowered when using the last contraction (ICCcalf pump is acceptable within the same session but is unsatisfactory when testing in separate days. Patients with moderate CVD have lower FV during calf muscles contraction but similar muscle anatomical characteristics compared with healthy controls. Changes in calf muscles flexibility and fatigue

  13. T₂ mapping provides multiple approaches for the characterization of muscle involvement in neuromuscular diseases: a cross-sectional study of lower leg muscles in 5-15-year-old boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpan, Ishu; Forbes, Sean C; Lott, Donovan J; Senesac, Claudia R; Daniels, Michael J; Triplett, William T; Deol, Jasjit K; Sweeney, H Lee; Walter, Glenn A; Vandenborne, Krista

    2013-03-01

    Skeletal muscles of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) show enhanced susceptibility to damage and progressive lipid infiltration, which contribute to an increase in the MR proton transverse relaxation time (T₂). Therefore, the examination of T₂ changes in individual muscles may be useful for the monitoring of disease progression in DMD. In this study, we used the mean T₂, percentage of elevated pixels and T₂ heterogeneity to assess changes in the composition of dystrophic muscles. In addition, we used fat saturation to distinguish T₂ changes caused by edema and inflammation from fat infiltration in muscles. Thirty subjects with DMD and 15 age-matched controls underwent T₂ -weighted imaging of their lower leg using a 3-T MR system. T₂ maps were developed and four lower leg muscles were manually traced (soleus, medial gastrocnemius, peroneal and tibialis anterior). The mean T₂ of the traced regions of interest, width of the T₂ histograms and percentage of elevated pixels were calculated. We found that, even in young children with DMD, lower leg muscles showed elevated mean T₂, were more heterogeneous and had a greater percentage of elevated pixels than in controls. T₂ measures decreased with fat saturation, but were still higher (P tissue in children with DMD, even in the early stages of the disease. Therefore, T₂ mapping may prove to be clinically useful in the monitoring of muscle changes caused by the disease process or by therapeutic interventions in DMD. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Muscle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, G; Bugiardini, E; Cardani, R

    2012-04-01

    Muscle biopsy is required to provide a definitive diagnosis in many neuromuscular disorders. It can be performed through an open or needle technique under local anesthesia. The major limitations of the needle biopsy technique are the sample size, which is smaller than that obtained with open biopsy, and the impossibility of direct visualization of the sampling site. However, needle biopsy is a less invasive procedure than open biopsy and is particularly indicated for diagnosis of neuromuscular disease in infancy and childhood. The biopsied muscle should be one affected by the disease but not be too weak or too atrophic. Usually, in case of proximal muscle involvement, the quadriceps and the biceps are biopsied, while under suspicion of mitochondrial disorder, the deltoid is preferred. The samples must be immediately frozen or fixed after excision to prevent loss of enzymatic reactivity, DNA depletion or RNA degradation. A battery of stainings is performed on muscle sections from every frozen muscle biopsy arriving in the pathology laboratory. Histological, histochemical, and histoenzymatic stainings are performed to evaluate fiber atrophy, morphological, and structural changes and metabolic disorders. Moreover, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting analysis may be used for expression analysis of muscle proteins to obtain a specific diagnosis. There are myopathies that do not need muscle biopsy since a genetic test performed on a blood sample is enough for definitive diagnosis. Muscle biopsy is a useful technique which can make an enormous contribution in the field of neuromuscular disorders but should be considered and interpreted together with the patient's family and clinical history.

  15. Involvement of the Interosseous and Lumbrical Muscle-Tendon Units in the Lateral and Spiral Cords in Dupuytren's Disease of the Middle Fingers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Achilleas; Karpinski, Marta

    2017-07-01

    The nature of intrinsic muscle involvement in Dupuytren's disease of the middle fingers (long and ring) remains poorly characterized. Over the years, the authors have observed that both the spiral and lateral digital cords in the middle fingers receive contribution from intrinsic muscle-tendon units. This report describes the anatomical characteristics and frequency of intrinsic muscle-tendon unit involvement in Dupuytren's disease of the middle fingers. Intrinsic muscle involvement in the middle digits was recorded in the operative reports of patients undergoing Dupuytren's surgery between October of 2013 and February of 2016. The anatomical variations of diseased fascia were delineated and classified. Of the 113 digits with Dupuytren's contracture operated on during this period, 52 involved the middle fingers (12 long and 40 ring fingers). Intrinsic muscles were found to be involved in the contracture of 14 of these digits. Two unique contracture patterns were identified: type I contracture, which involves a lateral digital cord originating from intrinsic muscle-tendon units and contracting only the proximal interphalangeal joint; and type II contracture, which involves a spiral cord receiving contribution from intrinsic muscle-tendon units and contracting both the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints. The frequency of type I and type II contractures was 6 percent and 12 percent, respectively. Intrinsic hand muscles may contribute to Dupuytren's disease in the middle digits, and the authors suggest resecting cords as close as possible to their musculotendinous origin to improve postoperative outcomes.

  16. Effects of striated laser tracks on thermal fatigue resistance of cast iron samples with biomimetic non-smooth surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Xin; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Min; Dai, Ming-jiang

    2011-01-01

    In order to enhance the thermal fatigue resistance of cast iron materials, the samples with biomimetic non-smooth surface were processed by Neodymium:Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. With self-controlled thermal fatigue test method, the thermal fatigue resistance of smooth and non-smooth samples was investigated. The effects of striated laser tracks on thermal fatigue resistance were also studied. The results indicated that biomimetic non-smooth surface was benefit for improving thermal fatigue resistance of cast iron sample. The striated non-smooth units formed by laser tracks which were vertical with thermal cracks had the best propagation resistance. The mechanisms behind these influences were discussed, and some schematic drawings were introduced to describe them.

  17. Ultrasonography for the diagnosis of diseases of the tendon and tendon sheath of the biceps brachii muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, M; Gerwing, M; Sheppard, C; Schimke, E

    2001-01-01

    To describe the ultrasonographic appearance of the normal and diseased biceps brachii tendon and its tendon sheath in dogs. A prospective clinical study. One hundred twenty client-owned dogs. In the first part of the study, the ultrasonographic appearance of the normal biceps brachii muscle and the surrounding soft tissue was determined in 27 healthy dogs. Standard views were described and established. In the second part, 120 dogs with suspected pathology of the biceps brachii muscle were examined ultrasonographically. Fifty-five of these dogs had no sonographic changes, and 65 dogs had sonographically detectable pathologic changes of the tendon or the tendon sheath or both. The mean age of the affected dogs was 3.7 years. The ratio of males to females was 1.95:1. Sedation or anesthesia of the dogs was required because of the extreme movements of the leg necessary for the examination. To achieve a perpendicular view of the tendon and the tendon sheath, the area of the shoulder joint was rotated outward and abducted as far as possible. Examination of the muscle-tendon apparatus of the biceps brachii muscle was divided into 4 main sections. Linear transducers (7.5-10 MHz) allowed the soft tissue structures to be easily visualized with ultrasonography. Pathologic changes of the tendon and tendon sheath were visualized sonographically by using high-frequency linear probes. Partial or complete tendon rupture, medial luxation of the tendon, corpora libera in the tendon sheath, and tenosynovitis were clearly shown. High-frequency ultrasonography using linear transducers allows the examiner to accurately define the pathologic changes in the region of the biceps brachii tendon in dogs. The use of sonography for diagnosis of disease processes of the tendon and tendon sheath of the biceps brachii muscle complements clinical and radiographic examination findings.

  18. Pericytes: Multitasking Cells in the Regeneration of Injured, Diseased, and Aged Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eBirbrair

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pericytes are perivascular cells that envelop and make intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells. Recent studies show that they may have a profound impact in skeletal muscle regeneration, innervation, vessel formation, fibrosis, fat accumulation, and ectopic bone formation throughout life. In this review, we summarize and evaluate recent advances in our understanding of pericytes’ influence on adult skeletal muscle pathophysiology. We also discuss how further elucidating their biology may offer new approaches to the treatment of conditions characterized by muscle wasting.

  19. The regulation of catch in molluscan muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, B M

    1967-07-01

    Molluscan catch muscles are smooth muscles. As with mammalian smooth muscles, there is no transverse ordering of filaments or dense bodies. In contrast to mammalian smooth muscles, two size ranges of filaments are present. The thick filaments are long as well as large in diameter and contain paramyosin. The thin filaments contain actin and appear to run into and join the dense bodies. Vesicles are present which may be part of a sarcoplasmic reticulum. Neural activation of contraction in Mytilus muscle is similar to that observed in mammalian smooth muscles, and in some respects to frog striated muscle. The relaxing nerves, which reduce catch, are unique to catch muscles. 5-Hydroxytryptamine, which appears to mediate relaxation, specifically blocks catch tension but increases the ability of the muscle to fire spikes. It is speculated that Mytilus muscle actomyosin is activated by a Ca(++)-releasing mechanism, and that 5-hydroxytryptamine may reduce catch and increase excitability by influencing the rate of removal of intracellular free Ca(++).

  20. Objectively measured muscle fatigue in Crohn's disease: correlation with self-reported fatigue and associated factors for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Langenberg, D R; Della Gatta, P; Warmington, S A; Kidgell, D J; Gibson, P R; Russell, A P

    2014-02-01

    The association of fatigue with decreased physical performance and underlying mechanisms are poorly understood in Crohn's disease (CD). We aimed to measure and compare self-reported fatigue with skeletal muscle fatigue in CD subjects and healthy controls, and to identify associated factors that may be amenable to change. Demographic and clinical data were collected and fatigue assessed using the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS) in 27 consecutive CD patients and 22 matched healthy controls. Circulating cytokines and growth factors were measured. The rate of quadriceps muscle fatigue was assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer as the decrement of force with 30 contractions performed over a 5-minute period. Compared with healthy controls, CD patients reported greater levels of fatigue (mean global FIS score 45.3 vs 10.5, physical dimension score 12.3 vs 2.7 respectively; each pmuscle fatigue (-5.2 vs -1.3 Nm min(-1); pmuscle fatigue (all p ≤ 0.05). Subjects with CD had more muscle fatigue than matched healthy controls and this correlated well with self-reported fatigue. Of circulating factors that were independently associated with increased muscle fatigue, vitamin D, magnesium and IGF-1 could be targeted in future studies to reduce fatigue and improve physical performance. © 2013.

  1. Blood oxygenation level-dependent MRI of the skeletal muscle during ischemia in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potthast, Silke [Unispital Basel, Inst. fuer Radiologie (Switzerland); Schulte, A. [Univ. Hospital Ulm (Germany). Clinic for Radiation Therapy and Radiooncology; Kos, S.; Bilecen, D. [Unispital Basel, Interventional Radiology (Switzerland); Aschwanden, M. [Unispital Basel (Switzerland). Angiologie

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: to compare calf muscle Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) response during ischemia in patients suffering from peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) and age-matched non-PAOD subjects. Materials and methods: PAOD patients with symptoms of intermittent calf claudication and an age-matched control group underwent T2*-weighted single-shot multi-echo planar imaging on a whole-body MR scanner at 1.5 T. The muscle BOLD signal in the calf was acquired during 60 sec of baseline and 240 sec of ischemia induced by cuff compression. T2* time courses in four calf muscles were evaluated. Results: significant differences in the mean T2* values were noted after 150 sec of measurement (p < 0.05). Patients with PAOD revealed a significantly reduced BOLD signal decrease compared to an age-matched control group. Conclusion: potential cause for this observation may be changes in the structure and/or the metabolic turnover of the muscle in PAOD patients. (orig.)

  2. A functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of visual hallucinations in the human striate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Hina; Ahmad, Fayyaz; Lee, Soo Y; Park, Hyun W; Im, Dongmi; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Chaudhary, Safee U

    2016-11-29

    Human beings frequently experience fear, phobia, migraine and hallucinations, however, the cerebral mechanisms underpinning these conditions remain poorly understood. Towards this goal, in this work, we aim to correlate the human ocular perceptions with visual hallucinations, and map them to their cerebral origins. An fMRI study was performed to examine the visual cortical areas including the striate, parastriate and peristriate cortex in the occipital lobe of the human brain. 24 healthy subjects were enrolled and four visual patterns including hallucination circle (HCC), hallucination fan (HCF), retinotopy circle (RTC) and retinotopy cross (RTX) were used towards registering their impact in the aforementioned visual related areas. One-way analysis of variance was used to evaluate the significance of difference between induced activations. Multinomial regression and and K-means were used to cluster activation patterns in visual areas of the brain. Significant activations were observed in the visual cortex as a result of stimulus presentation. The responses induced by visual stimuli were resolved to Brodmann areas 17, 18 and 19. Activation data clustered into independent and mutually exclusive clusters with HCC registering higher activations as compared to HCF, RTC and RTX. We conclude that small circular objects, in rotation, tend to leave greater hallucinating impressions in the visual region. The similarity between observed activation patterns and those reported in conditions such as epilepsy and visual hallucinations can help elucidate the cortical mechanisms underlying these conditions. Trial Registration 1121_GWJUNG.

  3. Effects of Spinal Stabilization Exercise on the Cross-sectional Areas of the Lumbar Multifidus and Psoas Major Muscles, Pain Intensity, and Lumbar Muscle Strength of Patients with Degenerative Disc Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seongho; Kim, Hyungguen; Chung, Jaeyeop

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using spinal stabilizing exercise to reduce atrophy of the multifidus and psoas major muscles, reduce the levels of pain and disability, and increase paraspinal muscle strength in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD). [Subjects and Methods] In 33 patients (Age range: 25–65 years) diagnosed with DDD, spinal stabilization exercise was conducted for 8 weeks. The levels of pain and disability were measured before and after e...

  4. Evolving mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle contraction highlight key targets in vascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongwei; Khalil, Raouf A

    2018-02-13

    Vascular smooth muscle (VSM) plays an important role in the regulation of vascular function. Identifying the mechanisms of VSM contraction has been a major research goal in order to determine the causes of vascular dysfunction and exaggerated vasoconstriction in vascular disease. Major discoveries over several decades have helped to better understand the mechanisms of VSM contraction. Ca 2+ has been established as a major regulator of VSM contraction, and its sources, cytosolic levels, homeostatic mechanisms and subcellular distribution have been defined. Biochemical studies have also suggested that stimulation of Gq protein-coupled membrane receptors activates phospholipase C and promotes the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids into inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP 3 ) and diacylglycerol (DAG). IP 3 stimulates initial Ca 2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and is buttressed by Ca 2+ influx through voltage-dependent, receptor-operated, transient receptor potential and store-operated channels. In order to prevent large increases in cytosolic Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] c ), Ca 2+ removal mechanisms promote Ca 2+ extrusion via the plasmalemmal Ca 2+ pump and Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger, and Ca 2+ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, and the coordinated activities of these Ca 2+ handling mechanisms help to create subplasmalemmal Ca 2+ domains. Threshold increases in [Ca 2+ ] c form a Ca 2+ -calmodulin complex, which activates myosin light chain (MLC) kinase, and causes MLC phosphorylation, actin-myosin interaction, and VSM contraction. Dissociations in the relationships between [Ca 2+ ] c , MLC phosphorylation, and force have suggested additional Ca 2+ sensitization mechanisms. DAG activates protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms, which directly or indirectly via mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylate the actin-binding proteins calponin and caldesmon and thereby enhance the myofilaments force sensitivity to Ca 2+ . PKC-mediated phosphorylation

  5. Clinical features and molecular characterization of a patient with muscle-eye-brain disease: a novel mutation in the POMGNT1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducu, Madalina; Cotarelo, Rocío P; Simón, Rogelio; Camacho, Ana; Rubio-Fernández, Marcos; Hernández-Laín, Aurelio; Cruces, Jesús

    2014-02-01

    Muscle-eye-brain disease is a congenital muscular dystrophy characterized by structural brain and eye defects. Here, we describe a 12-year-old boy with partial agenesis of corpus callosum, ventriculomegaly, flattened brain stem, diffuse pachygyria, blindness, profound cognitive deficiencies, and generalized muscle weakness, yet without a clear dystrophic pattern on muscle biopsy. There was no glycosylation of α-dystroglycan and the genetic screening revealed a novel truncating mutation, c.1545delC (p.Tyr516Thrfs*21), and a previously identified missense mutation, c.1469G>A (p.Cys490Tyr), in the protein O-mannose beta-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 (POMGNT1) gene. These findings broaden the clinical spectrum of muscle-eye-brain disease to include pronounced hypotonia with severe brain and eye malformations, yet with mild histopathologic changes in the muscle specimen, despite the absence of glycosylated α-dystroglycan.

  6. An Electron Microscopic Study of the Irradiation Effects on the Striated Duct Cells of the Submandibular Gland in Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Lee, Sang Rae

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of irradiation on the striated duct cells of the rat submandibular gland ductal tissues which control the characteristics of saliva. For this study, the experimental group was composed of 36 irradiated Sprague Dawley strain rats divided into 8 subgroups- 1 hour, 2 hours, 3 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours, 72 hours after irradiation. 4 non-irradiated rats were used as the control group. The experimental animals were singly irradiated with a dose of 18 Gy gamma ray to their head and neck region by the Co-6-teletherapy unit and sacrificed after each experimental duration. The specimens were examined with a light microscope with an H-E stain and with a transmission electron microscope. The results of this study were as follows. 1. In the light micrograph, a severe atrophic change occurred in the striated duct cells at 2 hours after irradiation and gradual recovery occurred from 6 hours after irradiation. 2. The nuclear chromosomes of the striated duct cells were changed granular at 2 hours after irradiation. Recovery was observed at 6 hours after irradiation. Nuclear bodies were also observed from 3 hours after irradiation. 3. The mitochondria of the striated duct cells had indistinct cristae at 2 hours after irradiation, and were degenerated or swollen at 3 hours after irradiation. They recovered, however, from 6 hours, with an increasing number at 48 hours a regular arrangement was observed at 72 hours after irradiation. 4. The microvilli showed atrophic changes at 2 hours after irradiation and were almost lost at 3 hours after irradiation. They were observed again from 48 hours after irradiation. 5. The rough endoplasmic reticulum and golgi body were not apparent at 1 hours after irradiation and were dilated with degeneration 2 hours after, but intact rough endoplasmic reticulum were observed from 3 hours after irradiation and developed well at 24 hours after irradiation. By the result of this

  7. How to minimize ischemic complication related to swollen temporalis muscle following indirect revascularization surgery in moyamoya disease: a technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Sun; Moon, Hyung Sik

    2014-05-01

    There are several reports in the literature of postoperative ischemic events due to swelling of the temporalis muscle after indirect revascularization surgery. Here, we report our surgical technique for preventing ischemic events during the acute postoperative recovery period in moyamoya patients. We used various types of titanium mesh to cover the bony defect area in 8 patients (10 operations) with moyamoya disease. The mesh was cut and manipulated according to the shape of the bony defect. Surgical results were favorable, with no newly developed ischemic event or infarction in the acute recovery period. The mesh formed an outer table of skull, so there was no compressive effect on the temporalis muscle and no cosmetic defects. The titanium mesh appears to be effective and useful for prevention of ischemic insult in the treatment of moyamoya disease. The choice of this procedure depends on both the operative findings of temporalis muscle thickness and the status of ischemic vulnerability of moyamoya brain. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Inspiratory muscle training protocol for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (IMTCO study): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charususin, Noppawan; Gosselink, Rik; Decramer, Marc; McConnell, Alison; Saey, Didier; Maltais, Francois; Derom, Eric; Vermeersch, Stefanie; van Helvoort, Hanneke; Heijdra, Yvonne; Klaassen, Mariska; Glöckl, Rainer; Kenn, Klaus; Langer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Inspiratory muscle training (IMT) has been applied during pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, it remains unclear if the addition of IMT to a general exercise training programme leads to additional clinically relevant improvements in patients with COPD. In this study, we will investigate whether the addition of IMT to a general exercise training programme improves 6 min walking distance, health-related quality of life, daily physical activity and inspiratory muscle function in patients with COPD with inspiratory muscle weakness. Methods and analysis Patients with COPD (n=170) with inspiratory muscle weakness (Pi,max training programme, in combination with home-based IMT. IMT will be performed with a recently developed device (POWERbreathe KH1). This device applies an inspiratory load that is provided by an electronically controlled valve (variable flow resistive load). The intervention group (n=85) will undertake an IMT programme at a high intensity (≥50% of their Pi,max), whereas the placebo group (n=85) will undertake IMT at a low training intensity (≤10% of Pi,max). Total daily IMT time for both groups will be 21 min (6 cycles of 30 breaths). Improvement in the 6 min walking distance will be the primary outcome. Inspiratory muscle function, health-related quality of life and daily physical activity will be assessed as secondary outcomes. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been obtained from relevant centre committees and the study has been registered in a publicly accessible clinical trial database. The results will be easily interpretable and should immediately be communicated to healthcare providers, patients and the general public. Results This can be incorporated into evidence-based treatment recommendations for clinical practice. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01397396. PMID:23921069

  9. Inspiratory muscle strength training in infants with congenital heart disease and prolonged mechanical ventilation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara K; Bleiweis, Mark S; Neel, Cimaron R; Martin, A Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Inspiratory muscle strength training (IMST) has been shown to improve maximal pressures and facilitate ventilator weaning in adults with prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV). The purposes of this case report are: (1) to describe the rationale for IMST in infants with MV dependence and (2) to summarize the device modifications used to administer training. Two infants with congenital heart disease underwent corrective surgery and were referred for inspiratory muscle strength evaluation after repeated weaning failures. It was determined that IMST was indicated due to inspiratory muscle weakness and a rapid, shallow breathing pattern. In order to accommodate small tidal volumes of infants, 2 alternative training modes were devised. For infant 1, IMST consisted of 15-second inspiratory occlusions. Infant 2 received 10-breath sets of IMST through a modified positive end-expiratory pressure valve. Four daily IMST sets separated by 3 to 5 minutes of rest were administered 5 to 6 days per week. The infants' IMST tolerance was evaluated by vital signs and daily clinical reviews. Maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP) and rate of pressure development (dP/dt) were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome measures included the resting breathing pattern and MV weaning. There were no adverse events associated with IMST. Infants generated training pressures through the adapted devices, with improved MIP, dP/dt, and breathing pattern. Both infants weaned from MV to a high-flow nasal cannula, and neither required subsequent reintubation during their hospitalization. This case report describes pediatric adaptations of an IMST technique used to improve muscle performance and facilitate weaning in adults. Training was well tolerated in 2 infants with postoperative weaning difficulty and inspiratory muscle dysfunction. Further systematic examination will be needed to determine whether IMST provides a significant performance or weaning benefit.

  10. A near infrared spectroscopy-based test of calf muscle function in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Brian Lindegaard; Bækgaard, Niels; Quistorff, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    test runs. Intraclass correlation constant (ICC) was used to describe reproducibility. The ICC was calculated using the area under the NIRS oxygenated hemoglobin (Hbox) curve, the initial velocity of the Hbox recovery curve, force measurements, and walking time. Results The ICC of the GAS was between 0...... and two age-matched patients without claudication. Each patient was tested with an isometric ergometer pedal test and a treadmill test applying NIRS measurements of the anterior tibial and the gastrocnemius muscles (GAS). Tests were repeated three times with randomly selected intervals between individual.......92-0.95 (foot-pedal) and 0.70-0.98 (tread mill) and of the anterior tibial muscle was between 0.87-0.96 (foot-pedal) and 0.67-0.79 (tread mill). Conclusion In this study, we contribute a new apparatus and test protocol for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) applying NIRS technique and controlled physical...

  11. Infection of the muscle tissue of the filter-feeding cichlid, Chaetobranchopsis orbicularis Steindachner, 1875, by Kudoa orbicularis (Myxozoa: Multivalvulidae on Marajó Island in the Brazilian Amazon region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Sindeaux-Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study describes aspects of infections caused by the myxosporidian Kudoa orbicularis in filter-feeding cichlids, Chaetobranchopsis orbicularis, caught in the Arari River in the municipality of Cachoeira do Arari, on Marajó Island, Pará, Brazil. The parasite forms pseudocysts scattered throughout the striated epaxial and hypaxial muscles. Samples embedded in paraffin were analyzed histologically using hematoxylin-eosin, Gömöri, Ziehl-Neelsen, and Giemsa staining. Necropsy of the C. orbicularis specimens revealed that 100% (50/50 were infected with K. orbicularis. The specimens presented grossly abnormal muscle texture, resulting in extensive inconsistencies and weakness. Progressive softening of the muscles was observed during necropsy, indicating the rapid enzymatic autolysis of the tissue. The parasite found in the muscle tissue of C. orbicularis was identified as K. orbicularis, with clinical signs of disease being observed in the fish. The necropsy revealed extensive damage to the host organism, with well-established fibrocystic infections in the muscle fibers, associated with post mortem myoliquefaction.

  12. Striated muscle microvascular response to silver implants: A comparative in vivo study with titanium and stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, C N; Hansis, M; Arens, S; Menger, M D; Vollmar, B

    2000-02-01

    Local microvascular perfusion is the primary line of defense of tissue against microorganisms and plays a considerable role in reparative processes. The impairment of the microcirculation by a biomaterial may therefore have profound consequences. Silver is known to have excellent antimicrobial activity and, although regional and systemic toxic effects have been described, silver is regularly discussed as an implant material in bone surgery. Because little is known about the influence of silver implants on the adjacent host tissue microvasculature, we studied in vivo nutritive perfusion and leukocytic response, and compared these results with those of the conventionally used materials titanium and stainless steel. Using the hamster dorsal skinfold chamber preparation and intravital microscopy, the implantation of a commercially pure silver sample led to a distinct and persistent activation of leukocytes combined with a marked disruption of the microvascular endothelial integrity, massive leukocyte extravasation, and considerable venular dilation. Whereas animals with stainless-steel implants showed a moderate increase in these parameters with a tendency to recuperate, titanium implants caused only a transient increase of leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction within the first 120 min and no significant change in macromolecular leakage, leukocyte extravasation and venular diameter. After 3 days, five of six preparations with silver samples showed severe inflammation and massive edema. Thus, the use of silver as an implant material should be critically judged despite its bactericidal properties. The implant material titanium seems to be well tolerated by the local vascular system and currently represents the golden standard. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Action of lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin on sterol synthesis and their antiproliferative effect in cultured myoblasts from human striated muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, A.K. van; Nègre-Arrariou, P.; Thiel, G.C.F. van; Bolhuis, P.A.; Cohen, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    Lovastatin, simvastatin, and pravastatin are fairly strong inhibitors of sterol synthesis in human myoblasts in culture. Lovastatin and simvastatin have IC50 values of 19 ± 6 nM and 4.0 ± 2.3 nM, respectively. Pravastatin is a weaker inhibitor of sterol synthesis (IC50 value of 110 ± 38 nM). Through

  14. Respiratory muscle training on pulmonary and swallowing function in patients with Huntington's disease: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Alvaro; Cruickshank, Travis; Nosaka, Kazunori; Ziman, Mel

    2015-10-01

    To examine the effects of 4-month of respiratory muscle training on pulmonary and swallowing function, exercise capacity and dyspnoea in manifest patients with Huntington's disease. A pilot randomised controlled trial. Home based training program. Eighteen manifest Huntington's disease patients with a positive genetic test and clinically verified disease expression, were randomly assigned to control group (n=9) and training group (n=9). Both groups received home-based inspiratory (5 sets of 5 repetitions) and expiratory (5 sets of 5 repetitions) muscle training 6 times a week for 4 months. The control group used a fixed resistance of 9 centimeters of water, and the training group used a progressively increased resistance from 30% to 75% of each patient's maximum respiratory pressure. Spirometric indices, maximum inspiratory pressure, maximum expiratory pressure, six minutes walk test, dyspnoea, water-swallowing test and swallow quality of life questionnaire were assessed before, at 2 and 4 months after training. The magnitude of increases in maximum inspiratory (d=2.9) and expiratory pressures (d=1.5), forced vital capacity (d=0.8), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (d=0.9) and peak expiratory flow (d=0.8) was substantially greater for the training group in comparison to the control group. Changes in swallowing function, dyspnoea and exercise capacity were small (d ≤ 0.5) for both groups without substantial differences between groups. A home-based respiratory muscle training program appeared to be beneficial to improve pulmonary function in manifest Huntington's disease patients but provided small effects on swallowing function, dyspnoea and exercise capacity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. The impact of prolonged hyperinsulinaemia on glucose transport in equine skeletal muscle and digital lamellae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, M A; Clement, C K; Sillence, M N; McGowan, C M; Pollitt, C C; Lacombe, V A

    2015-07-01

    An increased incidence of metabolic disease in horses has led to heightened recognition of the pathological consequences of insulin resistance. Laminitis, failure of the weightbearing digital lamellae, is an important consequence. Altered trafficking of specialised glucose transporters (GLUTs), responsible for glucose uptake, is central to the dysregulation of glucose metabolism and may play a role in the pathophysiology of laminitis. We hypothesised that prolonged hyperinsulinaemia alters the regulation of glucose transport in insulin-sensitive tissue and digital lamellae. Our objectives were to compare the relative protein expression of major GLUT isoforms in striated muscle and digital lamellae in healthy horses and during marked and moderate hyperinsulinaemia. Randomised, controlled study. Prolonged hyperinsulinaemia and lamellar damage were induced by a prolonged euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp or a prolonged glucose infusion, and results were compared with those of electrolyte-treated control animals. Protein expression of GLUTs was examined with immunoblotting. Lamellar tissue contained more GLUT1 protein than skeletal muscle (P = 0.002) and less GLUT4 than the heart (P = 0.037). During marked hyperinsulinaemia and acute laminitis (induced by the prolonged euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp), GLUT1 protein expression was decreased in skeletal muscle (P = 0.029) but unchanged in the lamellae, while novel GLUTs (8 and 12) were increased in the lamellae (P = 0.03) but not in skeletal muscle. However, moderate hyperinsulinaemia and subclinical laminitis (induced by the prolonged glucose infusion) did not cause differential GLUT protein expression in the lamellae compared with control horses. The results suggest that lamellar tissue functions independently of insulin and that insulin resistance may not be an essential component of the aetiology of laminitis. Marked differences in GLUT expression exist between insulin-sensitive and insulin-independent tissues

  16. Effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson's disease. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 18 patients who received simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training and 15 patients who received expiratory muscle strength training only. Postural techniques were conducted in the order of chin tucking, head rotation, head tilting, bending head back, and lying down, while expiratory muscle strength training was conducted at a resistance level of about 70% of the maximal expiratory pressure. Swallowing recovery was assessed by using the Functional Dysphagia Scale based on videofluoroscopic studies. [Results] The mean value obtained in the videofluoroscopic studies for both groups decreased after the treatment. In the postural techniques plus expiratory muscle strength training group, the decrease was significantly greater than that in the expiratory muscle strength training-only group. [Conclusion] The results imply that simultaneous performance of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training is more effective than expiratory muscle strength training alone when applied in the swallowing rehabilitation for patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson's disease.

  17. The extraocular muscle stem cell niche is resistant to ageing and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formicola, Luigi; Marazzi, Giovanna; Sassoon, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Specific muscles are spared in many degenerative myopathies. Most notably, the extraocular muscles (EOMs) do not show clinical signs of late stage myopathies including the accumulation of fibrosis and fat. It has been proposed that an altered stem cell niche underlies the resistance of EOMs in these pathologies, however, to date, no reports have provided a detailed characterization of the EOM stem cell niche. PW1/Peg3 is expressed in progenitor cells in all adult tissues including satellite cells and a subset of interstitial non-satellite cell progenitors in muscle. These PW1-positive interstitial cells (PICs) include a fibroadipogenic progenitor population (FAP) that give rise to fat and fibrosis in late stage myopathies. PICs/FAPs are mobilized following injury and FAPs exert a promyogenic role upon myoblasts in vitro but require the presence of a minimal population of satellite cells in vivo. We and others recently described that FAPs express promyogenic factors while satellite cells express antimyogenic factors suggesting that PICs/FAPs act as support niche cells in skeletal muscle through paracrine interactions. We analyzed the EOM stem cell niche in young adult and aged wild-type mice and found that the balance between PICs and satellite cells within the EOM stem cell niche is maintained throughout life. Moreover, in the adult mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the EOM stem cell niche is unperturbed compared to normal mice, in contrast to Tibialis Anterior (TA) muscle, which displays signs of ongoing degeneration/regeneration. Regenerating mdx TA shows increased levels of both PICs and satellite cells, comparable to normal unaffected EOMs. We propose that the increase in PICs that we observe in normal EOMs contributes to preserving the integrity of the myofibers and satellite cells. Our data suggest that molecular cues regulating muscle regeneration are intrinsic properties of EOMs. PMID:25520657

  18. The extraocular muscle stem cell niche is resistant to ageing and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eFormicola

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Specific muscles are spared in many degenerative myopathies. Most notably, the extraocular muscles (EOMs do not show clinical signs of late stage myopathies including the accumulation of fibrosis and fat. It has been proposed that an altered stem cell niche underlies the resistance of EOMs in these pathologies, however, to date, no reports have provided a detailed characterization of the EOM stem cell niche. PW1/Peg3 is expressed in progenitor cells in all adult tissues including satellite cells and a subset of interstitial non-satellite cell progenitors in muscle. These PW1-positive interstitial cells (PICs include a fibroadipogenic progenitor population (FAPs that give rise to fat and fibrosis in late stage myopathies. PICs/FAPs are mobilized following injury and FAPs exert a promyogenic role upon myoblasts in vitro but require the presence of a minimal population of satellite cells in vivo. We and others recently described that FAPs express promyogenic factors while satellite cells express antimyogenic factors suggesting that PICs/FAPs act as support niche cells in skeletal muscle through paracrine interactions. We analyzed the EOM stem cell niche in young adult and aged wild-type mice and found that the balance between PICs and satellite cells within the EOM stem cell niche is maintained throughout life. Moreover, in the adult mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the EOM stem cell niche is unperturbed compared to normal mice, in contrast to Tibialis Anterior (TA muscle, which displays signs of ongoing degeneration/regeneration. Regenerating mdx TA shows increased levels of both PICs and satellite cells, comparable to normal unaffected EOMs. We propose that the increase in PICs that we observe in normal EOMs contributes to preserving the integrity of the myofibers and satellite cells. Our data suggest that molecular cues regulating muscle regeneration are intrinsic properties of EOMs.

  19. Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease manifesting as bilateral tonsillar hypertrophy on MRI images: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mee Hyun; Woo, Ji Young; Lee, Yul; Yoon, Dae Young; Hong, Hye Sook; Hong, Min Eui [Hallym University College of Medicine, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Immunoglobulin G4-related sclerosing disease (IgG4-SD) is currently recognized as a distinct systemic disease involving various organs. We reported the imaging findings of a case of pathologically confirmed IgG4-SD involving bilateral palatine tonsils. CT and MRI showed diffuse enlargement of both palatine tonsils with homogeneous contrast enhancement. Focal contour bulging was noted in the right palatine tonsil. Lesions appeared as isointense on T1-weighted and slightly hyperintense on T2-weighted MRI images, as compared with muscle. The T2-weighted MRI image showed a striated pattern in both tonsils. Despite its rare occurrence, IgG4-SD should be included in the differential diagnoses of patients with symptomatic bilateral tonsillar hypertrophy that is non-responsive to medication.

  20. Poor muscle strength and function in physically inactive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus despite very mild disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Jéssica Pinto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare muscle strength (i.e. lower- and upper-body strength and function between physically inactive childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus patients (C-SLE and healthy controls (CTRL. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study and the sample consisted of 19 C-SLE (age between 9 and 18 years and 15 CTRL matched by age, sex, body mass index (BMI, and physical activity levels (assessed by accelerometry. Lower- and upper-body strength was assessed by the one-repetition-maximum (1-RM test. Isometric strength was assessed through a handgrip dynamometer. Muscle function was evaluated by the timed-stands test (TST and the timed-up-and-go test (TUG. Results: When compared with CTRL, C-SLE showed lower leg-press and bench-press 1-RM (p = 0.026 and p = 0.008, respectively, and a tendency toward lower handgrip strength (p = 0.052. C-SLE showed lower TST scores (p = 0.036 and a tendency toward higher TUG scores (p = 0.070 when compared with CTRL. Conclusion: Physically inactive C-SLE patients with very mild disease showed reduced muscle strength and functionality when compared with healthy controls matched by physical activity levels. These findings suggest C-SLE patients may greatly suffer from a physically inactive lifestyle than healthy controls do. Moreover, some sub-clinical “residual” effect of the disease or its pharmacological treatment seems to affect C-SLE patients even with a well-controlled disease.

  1. Expression of Muscle-Specific MiRNA 206 in the Progression of Disease in a Murine SMA Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Valsecchi

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a severe neuromuscular disease, the most common in infancy, and the third one among young people under 18 years. The major pathological landmark of SMA is a selective degeneration of lower motor neurons, resulting in progressive skeletal muscle denervation, atrophy, and paralysis. Recently, it has been shown that specific or general changes in the activity of ribonucleoprotein containing micro RNAs (miRNAs play a role in the development of SMA. Additionally miRNA-206 has been shown to be required for efficient regeneration of neuromuscular synapses after acute nerve injury in an ALS mouse model. Therefore, we correlated the morphology and the architecture of the neuromuscular junctions (NMJs of quadriceps, a muscle affected in the early stage of the disease, with the expression levels of miRNA-206 in a mouse model of intermediate SMA (SMAII, one of the most frequently used experimental model. Our results showed a decrease in the percentage of type II fibers, an increase in atrophic muscle fibers and a remarkable accumulation of neurofilament (NF in the pre-synaptic terminal of the NMJs in the quadriceps of SMAII mice. Furthermore, molecular investigation showed a direct link between miRNA-206-HDAC4-FGFBP1, and in particular, a strong up-regulation of this pathway in the late phase of the disease. We propose that miRNA-206 is activated as survival endogenous mechanism, although not sufficient to rescue the integrity of motor neurons. We speculate that early modulation of miRNA-206 expression might delay SMA neurodegenerative pathway and that miRNA-206 could be an innovative, still relatively unexplored, therapeutic target for SMA.

  2. Automated multiscale morphometry of muscle disease from second harmonic generation microscopy using tensor-based image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, Christoph S; Buttgereit, Andreas; Schürmann, Sebastian; Friedrich, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Practically, all chronic diseases are characterized by tissue remodeling that alters organ and cellular function through changes to normal organ architecture. Some morphometric alterations become irreversible and account for disease progression even on cellular levels. Early diagnostics to categorize tissue alterations, as well as monitoring progression or remission of disturbed cytoarchitecture upon treatment in the same individual, are a new emerging field. They strongly challenge spatial resolution and require advanced imaging techniques and strategies for detecting morphological changes. We use a combined second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy and automated image processing approach to quantify morphology in an animal model of inherited Duchenne muscular dystrophy (mdx mouse) with age. Multiphoton XYZ image stacks from tissue slices reveal vast morphological deviation in muscles from old mdx mice at different scales of cytoskeleton architecture: cell calibers are irregular, myofibrils within cells are twisted, and sarcomere lattice disruptions (detected as "verniers") are larger in number compared to samples from healthy mice. In young mdx mice, such alterations are only minor. The boundary-tensor approach, adapted and optimized for SHG data, is a suitable approach to allow quick quantitative morphometry in whole tissue slices. The overall detection performance of the automated algorithm compares very well with manual "by eye" detection, the latter being time consuming and prone to subjective errors. Our algorithm outperfoms manual detection by time with similar reliability. This approach will be an important prerequisite for the implementation of a clinical image databases to diagnose and monitor specific morphological alterations in chronic (muscle) diseases. © 2011 IEEE

  3. Myalgias and muscle contractures as the presenting signs of Addison's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, M. S.; Trebich, C.; Shilo, L.; Shenkman, L.

    1988-01-01

    Severe generalized myalgias and muscle contractures of the lower extremities were the major initial manifestations of adrenal insufficiency in a 26 year old black male. The intensity of increased skin pigmentation was not fully appreciated until the patient's skin colour was compared to that of his brother. Replacement with physiological doses of gluco- and mineralocorticoids was associated with complete amelioration of symptomatology.

  4. Genome-wide DNA methylation changes with age in disease-free human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykovich, Artem; Hubbard, Alan; Flynn, James M; Tarnopolsky, Mark; Fraga, Mario F; Kerksick, Chad; Ogborn, Dan; MacNeil, Lauren; Mooney, Sean D; Melov, Simon

    2014-01-01

    A decline in skeletal muscle mass and function with aging is well recognized, but remains poorly characterized at the molecular level. Here, we report for the first time a genome-wide study of DNA methylation dynamics in skeletal muscle of healthy male individuals during normal human aging. We predominantly observed hypermethylation throughout the genome within the aged group as compared to the young subjects. Differentially methylated CpG (dmCpG) nucleotides tend to arise intragenically and are underrepresented in promoters and are overrepresented in the middle and 3′ end of genes. The intragenic methylation changes are overrepresented in genes that guide the formation of the junction of the motor neuron and myofibers. We report a low level of correlation of gene expression from previous studies of aged muscle with our current analysis of DNA methylation status. For those genes that had both changes in methylation and gene expression with age, we observed a reverse correlation, with the exception of intragenic hypermethylated genes that were correlated with an increased gene expression. We suggest that a minimal number of dmCpG sites or select sites are required to be altered in order to correlate with gene expression changes. Finally, we identified 500 dmCpG sites that perform well in discriminating young from old samples. Our findings highlight epigenetic links between aging postmitotic skeletal muscle and DNA methylation. PMID:24304487

  5. Leg muscle activation during gait in Parkinson's disease : Adaptation and interlimb coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietz, [No Value; Zijlstra, W; Prokop, T; Berger, W

    1995-01-01

    Adaptation in leg muscle activity and coordination between lower limbs were studied during walking on a treadmill with split belts in one group of parkinsonian patients and one of age-matched healthy subjects. Four different belt speeds (0.25/0.5/0.75/1.0 m/sec) were applied in selected combinations

  6. Differences in the EMG pattern of lea muscle activation during locomotion in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albani, G; Sandrini, G; Kunig, G; Martin-Soelch, C; Mauro, A; Pignatti, R; Pacchetti, C; Dietz, [No Value; Leenders, KL

    2003-01-01

    In this pilot study, EMG patterns of leg muscle activation were studied in five parkinsonian patients with (B1) and five without (B2) freezing. Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and tibialis anterior (TA) activity was analysed, by means of surface electromyography (EMG), during treadmill walking at two

  7. Ca2+ handling abnormalities in early-onset muscle diseases: Novel concepts and perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treves, S.; Jungbluth, H.; Voermans, N.C.; Muntoni, F.; Zorzato, F.

    2017-01-01

    The physiological process by which Ca2+ is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum is called excitation-contraction coupling; it is initiated by an action potential which travels deep into the muscle fiber where it is sensed by the dihydropyridine receptor, a voltage sensing L-type Ca2+channel

  8. The role of deconditioning in the end-stage renal disease myopathy: physical exercise improves altered resting muscle oxygen consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Fabio; Lamberti, Nicola; Malagoni, Anna Maria; Felisatti, Michele; Zuccalà, Alessandro; Torino, Claudia; Tripepi, Giovanni; Catizone, Luigi; Mallamaci, Francesca; Zoccali, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction and poor exercise tolerance are hallmarks of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Noninvasively measured (near-infrared spectroscopy, NIRS) resting muscle oxygen consumption (rmVO2) is a biomarker of muscle dysfunction, which can be applied to study the severity and the reversibility of ESRD myopathy. We tested the hypothesis that deconditioning is a relevant factor in ESRD myopathy. The whole dialysis population (n = 59) of two of the eight centers participating into the EXCITE study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01255969), a randomized trial evaluating the effect of a home-based exercise program on the functional capacity of these patients was studied. Thirty-one patients were in the active arm (exercise group) and 28 in the control arm (no intervention). Normative data for rmVO2 were obtained from a group of 19 healthy subjects. rmVO2 was twice higher (p Deconditioning has a major role in ESRD myopathy. rmVO2 is a marker of physical deconditioning and has the potential for monitoring re-conditioning programs based on physical exercise in the ESRD population. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Behavioural modes of adherence to inspiratory muscle training in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Christensen, Marie Ernst

    2018-01-05

    Our aim was to develop a theoretical account of the behavioural pattern of adherence to home-based inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), performed as two daily sessions of 30 breaths with mechanical threshold loading. This was a qualitative study based on the classic grounded theory method. We conducted interviews with people living with COPD recruited after completion of 6 weeks of outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program in 2015. Concurrently, we generated data and performed analyses by means of constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling that focused on the behavioural characteristics of adherence to IMT. We achieved theoretical saturation of substantive codes with 33 interviews, nine of which were with men. The participants' mean age and forced expired volume in the first second were 65 (SD 8) years and 59.1 (SD 13.9) percent of predicted, respectively. Seventeen participated in face-to-face interviews, and 16 participated in telephone interviews. The core category "Preserving Integrity" emerged as representative of the primary pattern of behaviour related to the inspiratory muscle-training regimen. Through this pattern, the participants resolved the main concern of losing integrity. Preserving Integrity involved three behavioural modes of adherence to home-based IMT: evading, misgiving, and involving modes. The participants' behavioural modes regarding adherence revealed patterns of both intended and unintended nonadherence. In particular, support offered by healthcare professionals should target people with unintended nonadherence and scepticism about the effects of IMT to maximise the possibility of adherence. Implications for rehabilitation When implementing inspiratory muscle training, healthcare professionals should be prepared to spend considerable time providing attention and support to participants who feel challenged during the execution of inspiratory muscle training. Support

  10. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Mussi, Thais C.; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  11. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)], E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org; Mussi, Thais C. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melamed, Jonathan [Dept. of Pathology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C. [Dept. of Urology, Div. of Urologic Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  12. Chronic kidney disease as a risk factor for recurrence and progression in patients with primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobatake, Kohei; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Black, Peter C; Goto, Keisuke; Sentani, Kazuhiro; Kaneko, Mayumi; Yasui, Wataru; Mita, Koji; Teishima, Jun; Matsubara, Akio

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between chronic kidney disease and primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Disease outcomes were analyzed in 418 patients treated with transurethral resection for primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, and were correlated to traditional risk factors as well as chronic kidney disease stage according to estimated glomerular filtration rate: ≥60 (G1-2), 45-59 (G3a) or chronic kidney disease, respectively. T1 tumor was present in 29.6% of G1-2, 43.9% of G3a and 51.4% of G3b-5 chronic kidney disease (P = 0.004). The proportion of histological grade 3 non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer was higher in G3a and G3b-5 than G1-2 (P chronic kidney disease stage was associated with worse recurrence-free (P Chronic kidney disease stage was also strongly associated with the European Association of Urology bladder cancer risk groups (P Chronic kidney disease predicts the clinical outcome of primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Adding chronic kidney disease to the conventional risk factors might increase the accuracy of risk stratification. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  13. Unique exercise lactate profile in muscle phosphofructokinase deficiency (Tarui disease; difference compared with McArdle disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi Liisa Piirilä

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Glycogen storage disease V (GSDV, McArdle disease and GSDVII (Tarui disease are the most common of the rare disorders of glycogen metabolism. Both are associated with low lactate levels on exercise. Our aim was to find out whether lactate response associated with exercise testing could distinguish between these disorders.Methods. Two siblings with Tarui disease, two patients with McArdle disease and eight healthy controls were tested on spiroergometric exercise tests with follow-up of venous lactate and ammonia. Results. A late increase of lactate about 3 times the basal level was seen 10-30 minutes after exercise in patients with Tarui disease being higher than in McArdle disease and lower than in the controls. Ammonia was increased in Tarui disease. Discussion. Our results suggest that follow up of lactate associated with exercise testing can be utilized in diagnostics to distinguish between different GSD diseases.

  14. Mesodermal iPSC–derived progenitor cells functionally regenerate cardiac and skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Swinnen, Melissa; Giacomazzi, Giorgia; Camps, Jordi; Barthélemy, Ines; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Caluwé, Ellen; Grosemans, Hanne; Thorrez, Lieven; Pelizzo, Gloria; Muijtjens, Manja; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Blot, Stephane; Janssens, Stefan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as muscular dystrophies (MDs) that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles would benefit from therapeutic strategies that enable regeneration of both of these striated muscle types. Protocols have been developed to promote induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate toward cardiac or skeletal muscle; however, there are currently no strategies to simultaneously target both muscle types. Tissues exhibit specific epigenetic alterations; therefore, source-related lineage biases have the potential to improve iPSC-driven multilineage differentiation. Here, we determined that differential myogenic propensity influences the commitment of isogenic iPSCs and a specifically isolated pool of mesodermal iPSC-derived progenitors (MiPs) toward the striated muscle lineages. Differential myogenic propensity did not influence pluripotency, but did selectively enhance chimerism of MiP-derived tissue in both fetal and adult skeletal muscle. When injected into dystrophic mice, MiPs engrafted and repaired both skeletal and cardiac muscle, reducing functional defects. Similarly, engraftment into dystrophic mice of canine MiPs from dystrophic dogs that had undergone TALEN-mediated correction of the MD-associated mutation also resulted in functional striatal muscle regeneration. Moreover, human MiPs exhibited the same capacity for the dual differentiation observed in murine and canine MiPs. The findings of this study suggest that MiPs should be further explored for combined therapy of cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:26571398

  15. Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI disease diagnosed on a British Columbia salmon farm through a longitudinal farm study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Di Cicco

    Full Text Available Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI is an emerging disease of marine-farmed Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar, first recognized in 1999 in Norway, and later also reported in Scotland and Chile. We undertook a longitudinal study involving health evaluation over an entire marine production cycle on one salmon farm in British Columbia (Canada. In previous production cycles at this farm site and others in the vicinity, cardiac lesions not linked to a specific infectious agent or disease were identified. Histologic assessments of both live and moribund fish samples collected at the farm during the longitudinal study documented at the population level the development, peak, and recovery phases of HSMI. The fish underwent histopathological evaluation of all tissues, Twort's Gram staining, immunohistochemistry, and molecular quantification in heart tissue of 44 agents known or suspected to cause disease in salmon. Our analysis showed evidence of HSMI histopathological lesions over an 11-month timespan, with the prevalence of lesions peaking at 80-100% in sampled fish, despite mild clinical signs with no associated elevation in mortalities reported at the farm level. Diffuse mononuclear inflammation and myodegeneration, consistent with HSMI, was the predominant histologic observation in affected heart and skeletal muscle. Infective agent monitoring identified three agents at high prevalence in salmon heart tissue, including Piscine orthoreovirus (PRV, and parasites Paranucleospora theridion and Kudoa thyrsites. However, PRV alone was statistically correlated with the occurrence and severity of histopathological lesions in the heart. Immunohistochemical staining further localized PRV throughout HSMI development, with the virus found mainly within red blood cells in early cases, moving into the cardiomyocytes within or, more often, on the periphery of the inflammatory reaction during the peak disease, and reducing to low or undetectable levels later in

  16. A role for muscle LIM protein (MLP) in vascular remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Qinglu; Adhikari, Neeta; Hall, Jennifer L

    2006-04-01

    Given the well-defined role of LIM-motif containing proteins in cytoskeletal organization, cell fate, and differentiation, we hypothesized that the regulation of LIM proteins played an integral role in vascular remodeling. We screened a compendium of cDNA microarray data from rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) for novel LIM-containing targets and identified muscle LIM protein (MLP), a gene previously thought to be only in striated muscle. Sequence analysis, RTQPCR and Western blotting reconfirmed expression of MLP in VSMC. MLP was elevated>10-fold 7 days following balloon injury in the rat carotid artery. Wire injury led to a significantly increased intima/media ratio in MLP -/- mice compared to wild-type controls (PMLP deficient VSMC (n=6, PMLP significantly restored apoptotic response (N=6, PMLP in vascular smooth muscle and demonstrate that it plays a critical role in vascular remodeling. This is consistent with earlier findings demonstrating a role for MLP in striated muscle remodeling in response to load and stretch.

  17. The transcription coactivator ASC-1 is a regulator of skeletal myogenesis, and its deficiency causes a novel form of congenital muscle disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davignon, Laurianne; Chauveau, Claire; Julien, Cédric; Dill, Corinne; Duband-Goulet, Isabelle; Cabet, Eva; Buendia, Brigitte; Lilienbaum, Alain; Rendu, John; Minot, Marie Christine; Guichet, Agnès; Allamand, Valérie; Vadrot, Nathalie; Fauré, Julien; Odent, Sylvie; Lazaro, Leïla; Leroy, Jean Paul; Marcorelles, Pascale; Dubourg, Odile; Ferreiro, Ana

    2016-04-15

    Despite recent progress in the genetic characterization of congenital muscle diseases, the genes responsible for a significant proportion of cases remain unknown. We analysed two branches of a large consanguineous family in which four patients presented with a severe new phenotype, clinically marked by neonatal-onset muscle weakness predominantly involving axial muscles, life-threatening respiratory failure, skin abnormalities and joint hyperlaxity without contractures. Muscle biopsies showed the unreported association of multi-minicores, caps and dystrophic lesions. Genome-wide linkage analysis followed by gene and exome sequencing in patients identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in TRIP4 encoding Activating Signal Cointegrator-1 (ASC-1), a poorly characterized transcription coactivator never associated with muscle or with human inherited disease. This mutation resulted in TRIP4 mRNA decay to around 10% of control levels and absence of detectable protein in patient cells. ASC-1 levels were higher in axial than in limb muscles in mouse, and increased during differentiation in C2C12 myogenic cells. Depletion of ASC-1 in cultured muscle cells from a patient and in Trip4 knocked-down C2C12 led to a significant reduction in myotube diameter ex vivo and in vitro, without changes in fusion index or markers of initial myogenic differentiation. This work reports the first TRIP4 mutation and defines a novel form of congenital muscle disease, expanding their histological, clinical and molecular spectrum. We establish the importance of ASC-1 in human skeletal muscle, identify transcriptional co-regulation as novel pathophysiological pathway, define ASC-1 as a regulator of late myogenic differentiation and suggest defects in myotube growth as a novel myopathic mechanism. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Comparative cardiac pathological changes of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) affected with heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yousaf, Muhammad Naveed; Koppang, Erling Olaf; Skjødt, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    muscle, liver and pancreas. The main findings of these diseases are necrosis and inflammatory cells infiltrates affecting different regions of the heart. In order to better characterize the cardiac pathology, study of the inflammatory cell characteristics and cell cycle protein expression was undertaken......The heart is considered the powerhouse of the cardiovascular system. Heart and skeletal muscle inflammation (HSMI), cardiomyopathy syndrome (CMS) and pancreas disease (PD) are cardiac diseases of marine farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) which commonly affect the heart in addition to the skeletal...

  19. A comparative study of various electrodes in electromyography of the striated urethral and anal sphincter in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K K; Kristensen, E S; Qvist, N

    1985-01-01

    The series comprised 41 children aged 6 to 14 years consecutively referred with recurrent urinary tract infection and/or enuresis. Carbon dioxide cystometry was carried out in the supine and the erect position and combined with simultaneous electromyography (EMG). The external urethral sphincter...... was examined with a ring electrode mounted on a urethral catheter, while recordings from the striated anal sphincter were based on an anal plug electrode and perianal electrocardiographic (ECG) skin electrodes: 211 EMG and cystometric examinations were performed and all three methods gave satisfactory results...

  20. Exercise capacity and muscle strength and risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia in 1.1 million young Swedish men: cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kasper; Rasmussen, Finn; Held, Claes; Neovius, Martin; Tynelius, Per; Sundström, Johan

    2015-09-16

    To investigate the associations of exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence with risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia. Cohort study. General population in Sweden. 1.1 million men who participated in mandatory military conscription between 1 August 1972 and 31 December 1995, at a median age of 18.2 years. Participants were followed until 31 December 2010. Associations between exercise capacity and muscle strength with risk of vascular disease and subgroups (ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and cardiovascular death) and risk of arrhythmia and subgroups (atrial fibrillation or flutter, bradyarrhythmia, supraventricular tachycardia, and ventricular arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death). Maximum exercise capacity was estimated by the ergometer bicycle test, and muscle strength was measured as handgrip strength by a hand dynamometer. High exercise capacity or muscle strength was deemed as above the median level. During a median follow-up of 26.3 years, 26 088 vascular disease events and 17 312 arrhythmia events were recorded. Exercise capacity was inversely associated with risk of vascular disease and its subgroups. Muscle strength was also inversely associated with vascular disease risk, driven by associations of higher muscle strength with lower risk of heart failure and cardiovascular death. Exercise capacity had a U shaped association with risk of arrhythmia, driven by a direct association with risk of atrial fibrillation and a U shaped association with bradyarrhythmia. Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of arrhythmia (specifically, lower risk of bradyarrhythmia and ventricular arrhythmia). The combination of high exercise capacity and high muscle strength was associated with a hazard ratio of 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.70) for vascular events and 0.92 (0.88 to 0.97) for arrhythmia compared with the combination of low exercise capacity and low muscle strength. Exercise capacity and muscle strength

  1. New Advances in Molecular Therapy for Muscle Repair After Diseases and Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    an antiparasitic and antineoplastic agent, can inhibit TGF-β1’s ability to bind to its receptors and has been shown to enhance muscle regeneration...1997;20:433-434. 43. Stein CA. Suramin: a novel antineoplastic agent with multiple poten- tial mechanisms of action. Cancer Res. 1993;53(10 Suppl...mentioning that the irreversible genetic manipulations can result in compensatory up -regulations of o ther p roteins, developmental defects, and other

  2. Correlation between mild hypoxaemia and limb skeletal muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite Rodrigues, Sérgio; Melo e Silva, César Augusto; Ferreira Amorim, César; Lima, Terezinha; Almeida Ribeiro, Fernanda; de Assis Viegas, Carlos Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Exercise capacity in COPD patients depends on the degree of airflow obstruction, the severity of the hypoxaemia and skeletal muscle function. Muscle atrophy and weakness are considered systemic consequences of COPD and are associated with reduced exercise capacity. To investigate the correlation between mild hypoxaemia and muscular strength, muscular fatigue and functional capacity in COPD patients. Ten patients enrolled on a PRP at the Hospital Universitário de Brasília - HUB were included in this study. Lung function was evaluated by spirometry and arterial blood gas analysis. Functional evaluation was made using the 6MWT and using isometric contraction of deltoid and quadriceps muscles. There were positive correlations between PaO2, quadriceps strength (r2 = 0.61 and p = 0.007) and PaO2 and the 6MWT (r2 = 0.96, p = 0.001). There were negative correlations between PaO2 and median frequency of quadriceps (r2 = -0.42 and p = 0.04). We observed significant correlation between quadriceps strength and the 6MWT (r2 = 0.67 and p = 0.001). There was negative correlation between median frequency of quadriceps and the 6MWT (r2 = -0.42 and p = 0.04). We did not observe any correlation between PaO2 and strength or median frequency of deltoid muscle. PaO2 has important correlations with muscular function variables. The main negative impact of mild hypoxaemia and precocious limb muscular disability on COPD patients is decreased functional capacity.

  3. The structure of Mytilus smooth muscle and the electrical constants of the resting muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, B M; Dewey, M M; Hidaka, T

    1973-02-01

    The individual muscle fibers of the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis L. are uninucleate, 1.2-1.8 mm in length, 5 microm in diameter, and organized into bundles 100-200 microm in diameter, surrounded by connective tissue. Some bundles run the length of the whole muscle. Adjacent muscle cell membranes are interconnected by nexuses at frequent intervals. Specialized attachments exist between muscle fibers and connective tissue. Electrical constants of the resting muscle membrane were measured with intracellular recording electrodes and both extracellular and intracellular current-passing electrodes. With an intracellular current-passing electrode, the time constant tau, was 4.3 +/- 1.5 ms. With current delivered via an extracellular electrode tau was 68.3 +/- 15 ms. The space constant, lambda, was 1.8 mm +/- 0.4. The membrane input resistance, R(eff), ranged from 23 to 51 MOmega. The observations that values of tau depend on the method of passing current, and that the value of lambda is large relative to fiber length and diameter are considered evidence that the individual muscle fibers are electrically interconnected within bundles in a three-dimensional network. Estimations are made of the membrane resistance, R(m), to compare the values to fast and slow striated muscle fibers and mammalian smooth muscles. The implications of this study in reinterpreting previous mechanical and electrical studies are discussed.

  4. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayraud, Cyrielle; Alié, Alexandre; Jager, Muriel; Chang, Patrick; Le Guyader, Hervé; Manuel, Michaël; Quéinnec, Eric

    2012-07-02

    Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII) is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa) and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb). Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa) has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa…) and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2) has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular expression of the other paralogue, PpiMHCIIb1, was

  5. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII) is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa) and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb). Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Results We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa) has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa…) and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. Conclusion MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2) has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular expression of the

  6. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayraud Cyrielle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb. Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Results We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa… and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. Conclusion MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2 has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular

  7. The length-tension curve in muscle depends on lattice spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C. D.; Salcedo, M. K.; Irving, T. C.; Regnier, M.; Daniel, T. L.

    2013-07-10

    Classic interpretations of the striated muscle length–tension curve focus on how force varies with overlap of thin (actin) and thick (myosin) filaments. New models of sarcomere geometry and experiments with skinned synchronous insect flight muscle suggest that changes in the radial distance between the actin and myosin filaments, the filament lattice spacing, are responsible for between 20% and 50% of the change in force seen between sarcomere lengths of 1.4 and 3.4 µm. Thus, lattice spacing is a significant force regulator, increasing the slope of muscle's force–length dependence.

  8. Abnormal pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength findings in Chinese patients with Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy--comparison with normal elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Shao, Wei-bo; Gao, Li; Lu, Jie; Gu, Hao; Sun, Li-hua; Tan, Yan; Zhang, Ying-dong

    2014-01-01

    There have been limited comparative data regarding the investigations on pulmonary and respiratory muscle function in the patients with different parkinsonism disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA) versus normal elderly. The present study is aiming to characterize the performance of pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength in PD and MSA, and to investigate the association with severity of motor symptoms and disease duration. Pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength tests were performed in 30 patients with PD, 27 with MSA as well as in 20 age-, sex-, height-, weight-matched normal elderly controls. All the patients underwent United Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS) or united multiple system atrophy rating scale (UMSARS) separately as diagnosed. Vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity decreased, residual volume and ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity increased in both PD and MSA groups compared to controls (pRespiratory muscle strength was lower in both PD and MSA groups than in controls (pfunction and respiratory muscle strength were found to have a negative linear correlation with mean score of UPDRS-III in PD and mean score of UMSARS-I in MSA. Respiratory muscle strength showed a negative linear correlation with the mean score of UMSARS-II and disease duration in MSA patients. These findings suggest that respiratory dysfunction is involved in PD and MSA. Respiratory muscle strength is remarkably reduced, and some of the parameters correlate with disease duration and illness severity. The compromised respiratory function in neurodegenerative disorders should be the focus of further researches.

  9. Human skeletal muscle fibroblasts stimulate in vitro myogenesis and in vivo muscle regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail L.; Magnan, Mélanie; Chazaud, Bénédicte

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of skeletal muscle extracellular matrix is an unfavourable characteristic of many muscle diseases, muscle injury and sarcopenia. In addition to the indispensable role satellite cells play in muscle regeneration, there is emerging evidence in rodents for a regulatory influence...

  10. Muscle α-adrenergic responsiveness during exercise and ATP-induced vasodilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iepsen, U W; Munch, G W; Ryrsø, C K; Secher, N H; Lange, P; Thaning, P; Pedersen, B K; Mortensen, S P

    2018-02-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstriction is blunted in exercising muscle (functional sympatholysis) but becomes attenuated with age. We tested the hypothesis that functional sympatholysis is further impaired in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. We determined leg blood flow and calculated leg vascular conductance (LVC) during 1) femoral-arterial Tyramine infusion (evokes endogenous norepinephrine release, 1 µmol·min -1 ·kg leg mass -1 ), 2) one-legged knee extensor exercise with and without Tyramine infusion [10 W and 20% of maximal workload (WL max )], 3) ATP (0.05 µmol·min -1 ·kg leg mass -1 ) and Tyramine infusion, and 4) incremental ATP infusions (0.05, 0.3, and 3.0 µmol·min -1 ·kg leg mass -1 ). We included 10 patients with moderate to severe COPD and 8 age-matched healthy control subjects. Overall, leg blood flow and LVC were lower in COPD patients during exercise ( P Incremental ATP infusions induced dose-dependent vasodilation with no difference between groups, and, in addition, the vasoconstrictor response to Tyramine infused together with ATP was not different between groups (COPD: -0.03 ± 0.01 l·min -1 ·kg leg mass -1 vs. -0.04 ± 0.01 l·min -1 ·kg leg mass -1 , P > 0.05). Compared with age-matched healthy control subjects, the vasodilatory response to ATP is intact in COPD patients and their ability to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction (functional sympatholysis) as evaluated by intra-arterial Tyramine during exercise or ATP infusion is maintained. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The ability to blunt sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising muscle and ATP-induced dilation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients remains unexplored. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients demonstrated similar sympathetic vasoconstriction in response to intra-arterial Tyramine during exercise and ATP-induced vasodilation compared with age-matched healthy control subjects.

  11. Vascular smooth muscle dysfunction induced by monomethylarsonous acid (MMA III): a contributing factor to arsenic-associated cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Lim, Eun-Kyung; Lim, Kyung-Min; Noh, Ji-Yoon; Chung, Seung-Min; Lee, Moo-Yeol; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Lee, Jun-Ho; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2008-11-01

    While arsenic in drinking water is known to cause various cardiovascular diseases in human, exact mechanism still remains elusive. Recently, trivalent-methylated arsenicals, the metabolites of inorganic arsenic, were shown to have higher cytotoxic potential than inorganic arsenic. To study the role of these metabolites in arsenic-induced cardiovascular diseases, we investigated the effect of monomethylarsonous acid (MMA III), a major trivalent-methylated arsenical, on vasomotor tone of blood vessels. In isolated rat thoracic aorta and small mesenteric arteries, MMA III irreversibly suppressed normal vasoconstriction induced by three distinct agonists of phenylephrine (PE), serotonin and endothelin-1. Inhibition of vasoconstriction was retained in aortic rings without endothelium, suggesting that MMA III directly impaired the contractile function of vascular smooth muscle. The effect of MMA III was mediated by inhibition of PE-induced Ca2+ increase as found in confocal microscopy and fluorimeter in-lined organ chamber technique. The attenuation of Ca2+ increase was from concomitant inhibition of release from intracellular store and extracellular Ca2+ influx via L-type Ca2+ channel, which was blocked by MMA III as shown in voltage-clamp assay in Xenopus oocytes. MMA III did not affect downstream process of Ca2+, as shown in permeabilized arterial strips. In in vivo rat model, MMA III attenuated PE-induced blood pressure increase indeed, supporting the clinical relevance of these in vitro findings. In conclusion, MMA III-induced smooth muscle dysfunction through disturbance of Ca2+ regulation, which results in impaired vasoconstriction and aberrant blood pressure change. This study will provide a new insight into the role of trivalent-methylated arsenicals in arsenic-associated cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Literature-aided meta-analysis of microarray data: a compendium study on muscle development and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Ommen Gert-Jan B

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative analysis of expression microarray studies is difficult due to the large influence of technical factors on experimental outcome. Still, the identified differentially expressed genes may hint at the same biological processes. However, manually curated assignment of genes to biological processes, such as pursued by the Gene Ontology (GO consortium, is incomplete and limited. We hypothesised that automatic association of genes with biological processes through thesaurus-controlled mining of Medline abstracts would be more effective. Therefore, we developed a novel algorithm (LAMA: Literature-Aided Meta-Analysis to quantify the similarity between transcriptomics studies. We evaluated our algorithm on a large compendium of 102 microarray studies published in the field of muscle development and disease, and compared it to similarity measures based on gene overlap and over-representation of biological processes assigned by GO. Results While the overlap in both genes and overrepresented GO-terms was poor, LAMA retrieved many more biologically meaningful links between studies, with substantially lower influence of technical factors. LAMA correctly grouped muscular dystrophy, regeneration and myositis studies, and linked patient and corresponding mouse model studies. LAMA also retrieves the connecting biological concepts. Among other new discoveries, we associated cullin proteins, a class of ubiquitinylation proteins, with genes down-regulated during muscle regeneration, whereas ubiquitinylation was previously reported to be activated during the inverse process: muscle atrophy. Conclusion Our literature-based association analysis is capable of finding hidden common biological denominators in microarray studies, and circumvents the need for raw data analysis or curated gene annotation databases.

  13. Age-related fat deposition in multifidus muscle could be a marker for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitajima, Yoichiro; Eguchi, Yuichiro; Ishibashi, Eriko

    2010-01-01

    Although nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with visceral obesity, the relationship between visceral fat accumulation and skeletal muscle steatosis in patients with NAFLD has not been established. We evaluated: the relationship between multifidus muscular tissue steatosis, visceral fat accumulation, and biochemical data in a cross-sectional study, and the influence of weight reduction on multifidus muscular tissue steatosis in a longitudinal study. Three hundred thirty-three NAFLD patients were enrolled. Hepatic steatosis, visceral fat area, and the multifidus muscle/subcutaneous fat attenuation ratio (MM/F ratio) were evaluated by computed tomography. To evaluate how weight reduction produced by diet and exercise affected the MM/F ratio, changes in the MM/F ratio were compared between weight reduction and non-weight reduction groups. There was a gender difference in MM/F ratios. The MM/F ratio was significantly correlated with age (male r=0.613, P<0.01; female r=0.440, P<0.01). The MM/F ratio was positively correlated with visceral fat area (male: r=0.262, P<0.01; female: r=0.214, P<0.01). A decrease in the MM/F ratio, concomitant with reduced visceral fat accumulation, led to alleviation of hepatic steatosis in 20 patients with weight reduction, but not in 22 patients without weight reduction. The MM/F ratio was closely related to aging and visceral fat accumulation. The MM/F ratio was improved by weight reduction, indicating that fat accumulation in the multifidus muscle evaluated by computed tomography might be a therapeutic indicator of NAFLD. (author)

  14. Detection and Localization of PrPSc in the Skeletal Muscle of Patients with Variant, Iatrogenic, and Sporadic Forms of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden, Alexander H.; Ritchie, Diane L.; Head, Mark W.; Ironside, James W.

    2006-01-01

    Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) differs from other human prion diseases in that the pathogenic prion protein PrPSc can be detected to a greater extent at extraneuronal sites throughout the body, principally within lymphoid tissues. However, a recent study using a high-sensitivity Western blotting technique revealed low levels of PrPSc in skeletal muscle from a quarter of Swiss patients with sporadic CJD (sCJD). This posed the question of whether PrPSc in muscle could also be detected in vCJD, sCJD, and iatrogenic (iCJD) patients from other populations. Therefore, we have used the same high-sensitivity Western blotting technique, in combination with paraffin-embedded tissue blotting, to screen for PrPSc in muscle tissue specimens taken at autopsy from 49 CJD patients in the United Kingdom. These techniques identified muscle PrPSc in 8 of 17 vCJD, 7 of 26 sCJD, and 2 of 5 iCJD patients. Paraffin-embedded tissue blotting analysis showed PrPSc in skeletal muscle in localized anatomical structures that had the morphological and immunohistochemical characteristics of nerve fibers. The detection of PrPSc in muscle tissue from all forms of CJD indicates the possible presence of infectivity in these tissues, suggesting important implications for assessing the potential risk of iatrogenic spread via contaminated surgical instruments. PMID:16507908

  15. The effects of RSR13 on microvascular Po2 kinetics and muscle contractile performance in the rat arterial ligation model of peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Aiko; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2017-10-01

    Exercise intolerance and claudication are symptomatic of peripheral arterial disease. There is a close relationship between muscle O 2 delivery, microvascular oxygen partial pressure (P mv O 2 ), and contractile performance. We therefore hypothesized that a reduction of hemoglobin-oxygen affinity via RSR13 would maintain a higher P mv O 2 and enhance blood-muscle O 2 transport and contractile function. In male Wistar rats (12 wk of age), we created hindlimb ischemia via right-side iliac artery ligation (AL). The contralateral (left) muscle served as control (CONT). Seven days after AL, phosphorescence-quenching techniques were used to measure P mv O 2 at rest and during contractions (electrical stimulation; 1 Hz, 300 s) in tibialis anterior muscle (TA) under saline ( n = 10) or RSR13 ( n = 10) conditions. RSR13 at rest increased TA P mv O 2 in CONT (13.9 ± 1.6 to 19.3 ± 1.9 Torr, P < 0.05) and AL (9.0 ± 0.5 to 9.9 ± 0.7 Torr, P < 0.05). Furthermore, RSR13 extended maintenance of the initial TA force (i.e., improved contractile performance) such that force was not decreased significantly until contraction 240 vs. 150 in CONT and 80 vs. 20 in AL. This improved muscle endurance with RSR13 was accompanied by a greater ΔP mv O 2 (P mv O 2 decrease from baseline) (CONT, 7.4 ± 1.0 to 11.2 ± 1.3; AL, 6.9 ± 0.5 to 8.6 ± 0.6 Torr, both P < 0.05). Whereas RSR13 did not alter the kinetics profile of P mv O 2 (i.e., mean response time) substantially during contractions, muscle force was elevated, and the ratio of muscle force to P mv O 2 increased. In conclusion, reduction of hemoglobin-oxygen affinity via RSR13 in AL increased P mv O 2 and improved muscle contractile performance most likely via enhanced blood-muscle O 2 diffusion. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first investigation to examine the effect of RSR13 (erythrocyte allosteric effector) on skeletal muscle microvascular oxygen partial pressure kinetics and contractile function using an arterial ligation model of

  16. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease connections with fat-free tissues: A focus on bone and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Donini, Lorenzo Maria; Lenzi, Andrea; Chiesa, Claudio; Pacifico, Lucia

    2017-03-14

    The estimates of global incidence and prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are worrisome, due to the parallel burden of obesity and its metabolic complications. Indeed, excess adiposity and insulin resistance represent two of the major risk factors for NAFLD; interestingly, in the last years a growing body of evidence tended to support a novel mechanistic perspective, in which the liver is at the center of a complex interplay involving organs and systems, other than adipose tissue and glucose homeostasis. Bone and the skeletal muscle are fat- free tissues which appeared to be independently associated with NAFLD in several cross-sectional studies. The deterioration of bone mineral density and lean body mass, leading to osteoporosis and sarcopenia, respectively, are age-related processes. The prevalence of NAFLD also increases with age. Beyond physiological aging, the three conditions share some common underlying mechanisms, and their elucidations could be of paramount importance to design more effective treatment strategies for the management of NAFLD. In this review, we provide an overview on epidemiological data as well as on potential contributors to the connections of NAFLD with bone and skeletal muscle.

  17. Essential Amino Acids and Exercise Tolerance in Elderly Muscle-Depleted Subjects with Chronic Diseases: A Rehabilitation without Rehabilitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Aquilani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise intolerance remains problematic in subjects with chronic heart failure (CHF and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Recent studies show that supplemented essential amino acids (EAAs may exert beneficial effects on CHF/COPD physical capacity. The results from 3 investigations (2 conducted on CHF and 1 on COPD subjects served as the basis for this paper. The 3 studies consistently showed that elderly CHF and COPD improved exercise intolerance after 1–3 months of EAA supplementation (8 g/d. In CHF exercise capacity increased 18.7% to 23% (watts; bicycle test, and 12% to 22% (meters in 6 min walking test. Moreover, patients reduced their resting plasma lactate levels (by 25% and improved tissue insulin sensitivity by 16% (HOMA index. COPD subjects enjoyed similar benefits as CHF ones. They increased physical autonomy by 78.6% steps/day and decreased resting plasma lactate concentrations by 23%. EAA mechanisms explaining improved exercise intolerance could be increases in muscle aerobic metabolism, mass and function, and improvement of tissue insulin sensitivity (the latter only for the CHF population. These mechanisms could be accounted for by EAA’s intrinsic physiological activity which increases myofibrils and mitochondria genesis in skeletal muscle and myocardium and glucose control. Supplemented EAAs can improve the physical autonomy of subjects with CHF/COPD.

  18. Isolated abscess in superior rectus muscle in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushank Ashok Bhalerao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyomyositis is a primary bacterial infection of striated muscles nearly always caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Development of the intramuscular abscess involving the extra-ocular muscles (EOMs remains an extremely rare process. We herein present a case of isolated EOM pyomyositis involving superior rectus muscle in a 2-year male child who was referred with complaints of swelling in left eye (LE and inability to open LE since last 1-month. Orbital computed tomography (CT scan showed a well-defined, hypo-dense, peripheral rim-enhancing lesion in relation to left superior rectus muscle suggestive of left superior rectus abscess. The abscess was drained through skin approach. We concluded that pyomyositis of EOM should be considered in any patient presenting with acute onset of orbital inflammation and characteristic CT or magnetic resonance imaging features. Management consists of incision and drainage coupled with antibiotic therapy.

  19. Transdural herniated lumbar disc disease with muscle patch for closure of durotomy - A Brief review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huliyappa, Harsha A; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Jaiswal, Manish; Jaiswal, Somil; Srivastava, Chhitij; Ojha, Balkrishna; Chandra, Anil; Chhabra, Satnam

    Intradural migration of disc (IDMD) is a rare clinical entity accounting for 0.27-0.33% of all herniated disc diseases. Flimsy or dense adhesion between the ventral dural surface and the opposing posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) is the principal pathology for intradural migrated disc. The most commonly affected lumbar segments are L4-5 (55%), L3-4 (16%), L5-S1 (10%) and less commonly L2L3 and L1L2. No imaging feature is characteristic and the management protocol of durotomy via an endoscopic method is unclear. An L5S1 disc disease was operated by endoscopic method. Difficulty in separating the dural sac from PLL, dense adhesions prompting sharp dissection at this location and a calcified disc are the earliest evidence of intradural migration. MRI features of an intradural location are loss of continuity of posterior longitudinal ligament, beak-like appearance also known as "Hawk-beak sign", peripheral enhancement around an intradural disc, fluid-filled intradural cyst. Magnification either by Microscope or Endoscope is of importance when dissecting the intradural disc so as to avoid the nerve root injury. Liberal use of fibrin glue and augmentation with muscle patch was performed. Ambulated by 48h and discharged by 5th day. Two and 9 months follow up showed no evidence of pseudomeningocoele. Autologous muscle patch with fibrin glue for dural rent closure is a simple and effective method which can be performed by endoscopic or minimally invasive approaches. Suturing the dura, being a tedious and cumbersome procedure can be avoided. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  20. Skeletal muscle atrophy and the E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehr, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle RING finger 1 (MuRF1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx)/atrogin-1 were identified more than 10 years ago as two muscle-specific E3 ubiquitin ligases that are increased transcriptionally in skeletal muscle under atrophy-inducing conditions, making them excellent markers of muscle atrophy. In the past 10 years much has been published about MuRF1 and MAFbx with respect to their mRNA expression patterns under atrophy-inducing conditions, their transcriptional regulation, and their putative substrates. However, much remains to be learned about the physiological role of both genes in the regulation of mass and other cellular functions in striated muscle. Although both MuRF1 and MAFbx are enriched in skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle, this review will focus on the current understanding of MuRF1 and MAFbx in skeletal muscle, highlighting the critical questions that remain to be answered. PMID:25096180

  1. Abnormal lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle tissue of patients with muscular dystrophy: In vitro, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy based observation in early phase of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Niraj Kumar; Yadav, Ramakant; Mukherjee, Somnath; Pal, Lily; Sinha, Neeraj

    2017-05-01

    Qualitative (assignment of lipid components) and quantitative (quantification of lipid components) analysis of lipid components were performed in skeletal muscle tissue of patients with muscular dystrophy in early phase of the disease as compared to control/normal subjects. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy based experiment was performed on the lipid extract of skeletal muscle tissue of patients with muscular dystrophy in early phase of the disease and normal individuals for the analysis of lipid components [triglycerides, phospholipids, total cholesterol and unsaturated fatty acids (arachidonic, linolenic and linoleic acid)]. Specimens of muscle tissue were obtained from patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) [n=11; Age, Mean±SD; 9.2±1.4years; all were males], Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) [n=12; Age, Mean±SD; 21.4±5.0years; all were males], facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) [n=11; Age, Mean±SD; 23.7±7.5years; all were males] and limb girdle muscular dystrophy-2B (LGMD-2B) [n=18; Age, Mean±SD; 24.2±4.1years; all were males]. Muscle specimens were also obtained from [n=30; Mean age±SD 23.1±6.0years; all were males] normal/control subjects. Assigned lipid components in skeletal muscle tissue were triglycerides (TG), phospholipids (PL), total cholesterol (CHOL) and unsaturated fatty acids (arachidonic, linolenic and linoleic acid)]. Quantity of lipid components was observed in skeletal muscle tissue of DMD, BMD, FSHD and LGMD-2B patients as compared to control/normal subjects. TG was significantly elevated in muscle tissue of DMD, BMD and LGMD-2B patients. Increase level of CHOL was found only in muscle of DMD patients. Level of PL was found insignificant for DMD, BMD and LGMD-2B patients. Quantity of TG, PL and CHOL was unaltered in the muscle of patients with FSHD as compared to control/normal subjects. Linoleic acids were significantly reduced in muscle tissue of DMD, BMD, FSHD and LGMD-2B as compared to normal

  2. Muscle pain in myophosphorylase deficiency (McArdle's disease): the role of gender, genotype, and pain-related coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Oliver; Kley, Rudolf A; Dekomien, Gabriele; Epplen, Jörg T; Vorgerd, Matthias; Hasenbring, Monika

    2006-10-01

    Pain characteristics were examined in 24 patients with myophosphorylase deficiency (McArdle's disease). Pain parameters were related to mutation analyses as well as psychosocial data using a pain questionnaire including an assessment of psychosocial distress and coping measures (Beck Depression Inventory BDI; Kiel Pain Inventory KPI, Multidimensional Fatique Inventory MFI). Twenty-three patients complained of pain, which was intermittent and exercise-induced in 15 patients. Eight patients complained of permanent pain, which was superimposed by exercise-induced pain in 7 patients. Patients reported 3-7 different pain characters and various localisations. Patients with permanent pain were significantly more frequently female, experienced higher impact on general activities and sleep as well as higher scores on the MFI. Furthermore, these patients revealed higher scores regarding several psychosocial risk factors including avoidance behavior whereas patients with intermittent pain predominantly showed endurance coping. There was no correlation between age or disease duration, pain intensity as well as mutation type and development of permanent or intermittent pain. In addition, severity of the clinical phenotype did not correlate with ACE polymorphism. Although McArdle's disease is a muscle glycogenosis with marked biochemical homogeneity, the clinical presentation can be quite heterogeneous. A substantial number of patients revealed permanent pain as a major clinical symptom. As permanent pain is not related to age or disease duration, it might be a clinically important subgroup of McArdle's disease. Gender-related genetic factors as well as maladaptive pain-related coping may contribute to the development of such a chronic pain symptom.

  3. Prenatal Co 60-irradiation effects on visual acuity, maturation of the fovea in the retina, and the striate cortex of squirrel monkey offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordy, J.M.; Brizzee, K.R.; Young, R.

    1982-01-01

    In the present study, foveal striate cortex depth increased significantly from 1400 μm to 1650 μm by 90 days, whereas prenatal 100 rad exposure resulted in a significant reduction of foveal striate cortex thickness at 90 days of age. From birth to 90 days, cell packing density decreased, whereas overall neuropil density increased in both control and 100 rad exposed offspring. Regarding the effects of prenatal radiation on Meynert cells, there was a significant difference in the time course of early postnatal spine frequency reduction on apical dendrites of Meynert cells, particularly in laminae V and IV. It seems possible that the significant differences in the time course of perinatal increases and subsequent decreases of spines and synapses on such pyramidal neurons as Meynert cells in the deep layers of the striate cortex may play an important role in the development of binocular acuity. Future follow-up studies will be essential from 90 days to 1 and 2 years to determine the extent of recovery from, and persistence of visual acuity impairments in relation to structural alterations in the foveal projection of the retino-geniculo-striate system of diurnal primates. (orig./MG)

  4. Expression of neurotrophic factors in diabetic muscle--relation to neuropathy and muscle strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, C S; Jakobsen, J; Flyvbjerg, A; Andersen, H

    2009-10-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy can lead to atrophy and weakness of distally located striated muscles due to denervation. Lack of neurotrophic support is believed to contribute to the development of diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we measured the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), neurotrophin 4 (NT-4) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in muscle biopsies taken from the gastrocnemic and deltoid muscles in 42 diabetic patients and 20 healthy control subjects. To express the distal neuropathic gradient and to reduce interindividual variation, a distal/proximal ratio between expression levels in the gastrocnemic and deltoid muscles was calculated for all neurotrophic factors. Neuropathic status was determined by clinical examination, electrophysiological studies and quantitative sensory examination in diabetic patients, and muscle strength at both the shoulder and ankle was assessed by isokinetic dynamometry. Distal/proximal ratios for NT-3 were lower in diabetic patients [median (range) 110.7 (39.8-546.8)] than in controls [157.6 (63.3-385.4); (P < 0.05)], and in neuropathic diabetic patients [107.1 (39.8-326.0)] versus patients without neuropathy [134.5 (46.6-546.8); (P < 0.005)]. Further, ratios for NT-3 were related to muscle strength (r(s) = 0.41, P < 0.01) and showed a tendency towards a negative relationship to the combined score of all measures of neuropathy [Neuropathy rank-sum score (NRSS)] (r(s) = -0.27, P = 0.09). Similar trends were observed for ratios for NT-4. Ratios for NGF (r(s) = -0.32, P < 0.05) and BDNF (r(s) = -0.32, P < 0.05) were related to NRSS, but not to muscle strength. Ratios for CNTF were higher in diabetic patients [64.6 (23.7-258.7)] compared with controls [50.2 (27.2-186.4); (P < 0.05)], but showed no relationship to neither NRSS nor muscle strength. Our results show that the expression of NT-3 is reduced in striated muscles in diabetic patients and is related to

  5. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  6. Association of body size and muscle strength with incidence of coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular diseases: a population-based cohort study of one million Swedish men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Tynelius, Per; Batty, G David; Rasmussen, Finn

    2009-02-01

    Muscle strength and body size may be associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke risk. However, perhaps because of a low number of cases, existing evidence is inconsistent. Height, weight, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), elbow flexion, hand grip and knee extension strength were measured in young adulthood in 1 145 467 Swedish men born between 1951 and 1976. Information on own and parental social position was derived from censuses. During the register-based follow-up until the end of 2006, 12 323 CHD and 8865 stroke cases emerged, including 1431 intracerebral haemorrhage, 1316 subarachoid haemorrhage and 2944 intracerebral infarction cases. Hazard ratios (HR) per 1 SD in the exposures of interest were computed using Cox proportional hazard model. Body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) showed increased risk with CHD and intracerebral infarction, whereas for intracerebral and subarachoid haemorrhage both under- and overweight was associated with increased risk. Height was inversely associated with CHD and all types of stroke. After adjustment for height, BMI, SBP, DBP and social position, all strength indicators were inversely associated with disease risk. For CHD and intracerebral infarction, grip strength showed the strongest association (HR = 0.89 and 0.91, respectively) whereas for intracerebral and subarachoid haemorrhage, knee extension strength was the best predictor (HR = 0.88 and 0.92, respectively). Body size and muscle strength in young adulthood are important predictors of risk of CHD and stroke in later life. In addition to adiposity, underweight needs attention since it may predispose to cerebrovascular complications.

  7. [Inspiratory muscle training followed by non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu-Qian; Li, Xiao-Ying; Li, Yun; Guo, Bing-Peng; Guan, Li-Li; Chen, Xin; Luo, Yu-Wen; Luo, Peng; Chen, Rong-Chang

    2016-08-20

    To investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle training followed by non-invasive positive pressure ventilation in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This investigator-initiated randomized, controlled trial recruited 88 patients with stable GOLD stage IV COPD, who were randomized into 4 equal groups to continue oxygen therapy (control group) or to receive inspiratory muscle training followed by non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (IMT-NPPV group), inspiratory muscle training only (IMT group), or noninvasive positive pressure ventilation only (NPPV group) for at least 8 weeks. The outcomes of the patients were assessed including the quality of life (SRI scores), maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximum expiratory pressure (MEP), dyspnea (MRC scores), 6-min walking distance (6MWD) and lung function. s Compared to baseline values, SRI scores, 6MWT and MRC scores increased significantly after 8 weeks in IMT-NPPV, IMT and NPPV groups, and the improvements were significantly greater in IMT-NPPV group than in IMT and NPPV groups (Ptraining (P0.05). Inspiratory muscle training followed by non-invasive positive pressure ventilation, compared with inspiratory muscle training or non-invasive positive pressure ventilation alone, can better enhance the quality of life, strengthen the respiratory muscles, improve exercise tolerance and relieve the dyspnea in patients with COPD.

  8. Muscle strength and executive function as complementary parameters for the assessment of impairment in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannyel Barbirato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the relationship between the quantitative results of functional and cognitive performance of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD and disease severity; and to study the relationship between patients' functional and cognitive capacity and motor impairment (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale - UPDRS III. Method Twenty-nine subjects clinically diagnosed with PD were classified into three groups according to disease severity using the modified Hoehn and Yahr Scale (H&Y. They were submitted to functional (Senior Fitness Test and neuropsychological tests. Stepwise regression analysis showed a significant association between H&Y and upper limb strength (r 2 =0.30; p=0.005 and executive function (r 2 =0.37; p=0.004. In relation to UPDRS III, there was a significant association between lower limb strength (r 2 =0.27; p=0.010 and global cognitive status (r 2 =0.24; p=0.024. Conclusion The implementation of simple tests of functional capacity associated with neuropsychological testing can help to assess disease severity and motor impairment, and can be used to monitor the response to treatment in PD.

  9. High-resolution respirometry of fine-needle muscle biopsies in pre-manifest Huntington's disease expansion mutation carriers shows normal mitochondrial respiratory function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Buck

    Full Text Available Alterations in mitochondrial respiration are an important hallmark of Huntington's disease (HD, one of the most common monogenetic causes of neurodegeneration. The ubiquitous expression of the disease causing mutant huntingtin gene raises the prospect that mitochondrial respiratory deficits can be detected in skeletal muscle. While this tissue is readily accessible in humans, transgenic animal models offer the opportunity to cross-validate findings and allow for comparisons across organs, including the brain. The integrated respiratory chain function of the human vastus lateralis muscle was measured by high-resolution respirometry (HRR in freshly taken fine-needle biopsies from seven pre-manifest HD expansion mutation carriers and nine controls. The respiratory parameters were unaffected. For comparison skeletal muscle isolated from HD knock-in mice (HdhQ111 as well as a broader spectrum of tissues including cortex, liver and heart muscle were examined by HRR. Significant changes of mitochondrial respiration in the HdhQ knock-in mouse model were restricted to the liver and the cortex. Mitochondrial mass as quantified by mitochondrial DNA copy number and citrate synthase activity was stable in murine HD-model tissue compared to control. mRNA levels of key enzymes were determined to characterize mitochondrial metabolic pathways in HdhQ mice. We demonstrated the feasibility to perform high-resolution respirometry measurements from small human HD muscle biopsies. Furthermore, we conclude that alterations in respiratory parameters of pre-manifest human muscle biopsies are rather limited and mirrored by a similar absence of marked alterations in HdhQ skeletal muscle. In contrast, the HdhQ111 murine cortex and liver did show respiratory alterations highlighting the tissue specific nature of mutant huntingtin effects on respiration.

  10. Treadmill exercise ameliorates the regulation of energy metabolism in skeletal muscle of NSE/PS2mtransgenic mice with Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yook, Jang-Soo; Cho, Joon-Yong

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is classified as a progressive neurological disorder, which not only causes cognitive impairment but also abnormal weight loss, with a reduction of muscle mass related to the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in skeletal muscle. Thus, we investigated the effect of treadmill exercise on Aβ deposition, and p-AMPK, p-ACC, BDNF, and GLUT4 protein levels the regulation of muscle energy metabolism using an AD mouse. [Methods] At 13 months of age, NSE/PS2m mice (Tg) and control mice (non-Tg) were assigned to non-exercise control (Con) and exercise groups (Exe). The four groups were as follows: non-Tg Con, non-Tg Exe, Tg Con, and Tg Exe. The treadmill exercise was carried out for 12 weeks. [Results] The highest levels of Aβ expression in the skeletal muscle were in the Tg Con group. Aβ expression was significantly reduced in the Tg Exe group, compared to the Tg Con group. Congo red staining showed remarkable diffuse red amyloid deposition in the Tg Con group, while Aβ-deposition in the skeletal was reduced with muscle exercise in the Tg Exe group. Exercise also increased AMPK and ACC phosphorylation and BDNF and GLUT4 expression in the skeletal muscle of non-Tg and Tg mice. [Conclusion] Treadmill exercise reduces Aβ-deposition in the skeletal muscle and improves the regulation of energy metabolism. Thus, collectively, these results suggest that exercise could be a positive therapeutic strategy for skeletal muscle dysfunction in AD patients. PMID:28712264

  11. Role of Adipose Tissue in Determining Muscle Mass in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVE: Malnutrition is a powerful predictor of mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, its etiology is unclear. We hypothesized that the adipocyte-derived proteins leptin and adiponectin, inflammation (as measured by C-reactive protein, CRP), and insulin resistance (as measured by ho...

  12. The relationship between lower limb muscle strength and lower extremity function in HIV disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Mhariwa

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Lower extremity strength impacts perceived function in individuals stabilised on antiretroviral therapy for HIV disease. These findings demonstrate that ankle plantar flexors produce more force over hip flexors. Careful attention should be paid to the implications for strength training in this population.

  13. Impaired LRP6-TCF7L2 Activity Enhances Smooth Muscle Cell Plasticity and Causes Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshni Srivastava

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in Wnt-signaling coreceptor LRP6 have been linked to coronary artery disease (CAD by unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that reduced LRP6 activity in LRP6R611C mice promotes loss of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC differentiation, leading to aortic medial hyperplasia. Carotid injury augmented these effects and led to partial to total vascular obstruction. LRP6R611C mice on high-fat diet displayed dramatic obstructive CAD and exhibited an accelerated atherosclerotic burden on LDLR knockout background. Mechanistically, impaired LRP6 activity leads to enhanced non-canonical Wnt signaling, culminating in diminished TCF7L2 and increased Sp1-dependent activation of PDGF signaling. Wnt3a administration to LRP6R611C mice improved LRP6 activity, led to TCF7L2-dependent VSMC differentiation, and rescued post-carotid-injury neointima formation. These findings demonstrate the critical role of intact Wnt signaling in the vessel wall, establish a causal link between impaired LRP6/TCF7L2 activities and arterial disease, and identify Wnt signaling as a therapeutic target against CAD.

  14. Evaluation of Respiratory Muscle Strength and Pulmonary Function in Patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcez, Catarina Andrade; Neves, Eduardo Luis Aquino; Melo, Saulo Maia D''avila; Nunes, Paula Santos; Barreto, Lidiane Carine Lima; Costa, Iandra Maria Pinheiro; Souza, Cynthia Coelho; Rezende, Rejane Lenier; Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Souza

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary condition in a large family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Eighteen participants diagnosed with CMT2 and 20 healthy individuals were evaluated by spirometry and maximal expiratory and maximal inspiratory pressures (MEP and MIP, respectively). Clinical disability was measured with CMT neuropathy score (CMTNS; range 0-36). One control group (CG) comprising 20 individuals, matched for age, sex and body mass index, were used for comparison. Eight patients were female (44.5%) and 10 patients were male (55.5%); mean age was 31.8 years (range 11-79) and CMTNS range was 6-26. Differences between CMT2 and CG in the spirometry and respiratory muscle strength were statistically significant for all dimensions. There were significant correlations between CMTNS and MIP (Pearson = -0.581) and MEP (Pearson = -0.5090). The results of this study show that patients with CMT, in spite of not showing clinical signs of advanced respiratory impairment, may present subclinical respiratory changes. The respiratory comprise in the CMT disease can be silent and insidious without presenting characteristic clinical signals. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The Expression of NOX4 in Smooth Muscles of Small Airway Correlates with the Disease Severity of COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianyan; Hao, Binwei; Ma, Ailing; He, Jinxi; Liu, Xiaoming; Chen, Juan

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) remodeling is a hallmark in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (NOXs) produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in COPD pathogenesis. In the present study, the expression of NOX4 and its correlation with the ASM hypertrophy/hyperplasia, clinical pulmonary functions, and the expression of transforming growth factor β (TGF- β ) in the ASM of COPD small airways were investigated by semiquantitative morphological and/or immunohistochemistry staining methods. The results showed that an elevated expression of NOX4 and TGF- β , along with an increased volume of ASM mass, was found in the ASM of small airways in COPD patients. The abundance of NOX4 protein in the ASM was increased with disease severity and inversely correlated with the pulmonary functions in COPD patients. In addition, the expression of NOX4 and ASM marker α -SMA was colocalized, and the increased NOX4 expression was found to accompany an upregulated expression of TGF- β in the ASM of small airways of COPD lung. These results indicate that NOX4 may be a key regulator in ASM remodeling of small airway, in part through a mechanism interacting with TGF- β signaling in the pathogenesis of COPD, which warrants further investigation.

  16. The obesity paradox in men with coronary heart disease and heart failure: the role of muscle mass and leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannamethee, S Goya; Shaper, A Gerald; Whincup, Peter H; Lennon, Lucy; Papacosta, Olia; Sattar, Naveed

    2014-01-15

    We have investigated the role of muscle mass, natriuretic peptides and adipokines in explaining the obesity paradox. The obesity paradox relates to the association between obesity and increased survival in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) or heart failure (HF). Prospective study of 4046 men aged 60-79 years followed up for a mean period of 11 years, during which 1340 deaths occurred. The men were divided according to the presence of doctor diagnosed CHD and HF: (i) no CHD or HF ii), with CHD (no HF) and (iii) with HF. Overweight (BMI 25-9.9 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) were associated with lower mortality risk compared to men with normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)) in those with CHD [hazards ratio (HR) 0.71 (0.56,0.91) and 0.77 (0.57,1.04); p=0.04 for trend] and in those with HF [HR 0.57 (0.28,1.16) and 0.41 (0.16,1.09; p=0.04 for trend). Adjustment for muscle mass and NT-proBNP attenuated the inverse association in those with CHD (no HF) [HR 0.78 (0.61,1.01) and 0.96 (0.68,1.36) p=0.60 for trend) but made minor differences to those with HF [p=0.05]. Leptin related positively to mortality in men without HF but inversely to mortality in those with HF; adjustment for leptin abolished the BMI mortality association in men with HF [HR 0.82 (0.31,2.20) and 0.99 (0.27,3.71); p=0.98 for trend]. The lower mortality risk associated with excess weight in men with CHD without HF may be due to higher muscle mass. In men with HF, leptin (possibly reflecting cachexia) explain the inverse association. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Reproducibility and absolute quantification of muscle glycogen in patients with glycogen storage disease by 13C NMR spectroscopy at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinicke, Katja; Dimitrov, Ivan E; Romain, Nadine; Cheshkov, Sergey; Ren, Jimin; Malloy, Craig R; Haller, Ronald G

    2014-01-01

    Carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) offers a noninvasive method to assess glycogen levels in skeletal muscle and to identify excess glycogen accumulation in patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD). Despite the clinical potential of the method, it is currently not widely used for diagnosis or for follow-up of treatment. While it is possible to perform acceptable 13C MRS at lower fields, the low natural abundance of 13C and the inherently low signal-to-noise ratio of 13C MRS makes it desirable to utilize the advantage of increased signal strength offered by ultra-high fields for more accurate measurements. Concomitant with this advantage, however, ultra-high fields present unique technical challenges that need to be addressed when studying glycogen. In particular, the question of measurement reproducibility needs to be answered so as to give investigators insight into meaningful inter-subject glycogen differences. We measured muscle glycogen levels in vivo in the calf muscle in three patients with McArdle disease (MD), one patient with phosphofructokinase deficiency (PFKD) and four healthy controls by performing 13C MRS at 7T. Absolute quantification of the MRS signal was achieved by using a reference phantom with known concentration of metabolites. Muscle glycogen concentration was increased in GSD patients (31.5±2.9 g/kg w. w.) compared with controls (12.4±2.2 g/kg w. w.). In three GSD patients glycogen was also determined biochemically in muscle homogenates from needle biopsies and showed a similar 2.5-fold increase in muscle glycogen concentration in GSD patients compared with controls. Repeated inter-subject glycogen measurements yield a coefficient of variability of 5.18%, while repeated phantom measurements yield a lower 3.2% system variability. We conclude that noninvasive ultra-high field 13C MRS provides a valuable, highly reproducible tool for quantitative assessment of glycogen levels in health and disease.

  18. Adjunctive β2-agonist treatment reduces glycogen independently of receptor-mediated acid α-glucosidase uptake in the limb muscles of mice with Pompe disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Benjamin L.; Madden, Lauran; Li, Songtao; Nance, Sierra; Bird, Andrew; Bursac, Nenad; Yen, Paul M.; Young, Sarah P.; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme or gene replacement therapy with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) has achieved only partial efficacy in Pompe disease. We evaluated the effect of adjunctive clenbuterol treatment on cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR)-mediated uptake and intracellular trafficking of GAA during muscle-specific GAA expression with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in GAA-knockout (KO) mice. Clenbuterol, which increases expression of CI-MPR in muscle, was administered with the AAV vector. This combination therapy increased latency during rotarod and wirehang testing at 12 wk, in comparison with vector alone. The mean urinary glucose tetrasaccharide (Glc4), a urinary biomarker, was lower in GAA-KO mice following combination therapy, compared with vector alone. Similarly, glycogen content was lower in cardiac and skeletal muscle following 12 wk of combination therapy in heart, quadriceps, diaphragm, and soleus, compared with vector alone. These data suggested that clenbuterol treatment enhanced trafficking of GAA to lysosomes, given that GAA was expressed within myofibers. The integral role of CI-MPR was demonstrated by the lack of effectiveness from clenbuterol in GAA-KO mice that lacked CI-MPR in muscle, where it failed to reverse the high glycogen content of the heart and diaphragm or impaired wirehang performance. However, the glycogen content of skeletal muscle was reduced by the addition of clenbuterol in the absence of CI-MPR, as was lysosomal vacuolation, which correlated with increased AKT signaling. In summary, β2-agonist treatment enhanced CI-MPR-mediated uptake and trafficking of GAA in mice with Pompe disease, and a similarly enhanced benefit might be expected in other lysosomal storage disorders.—Farah, B. L., Madden, L., Li, S., Nance, S., Bird, A., Bursac, N., Yen, P. M., Young, S. P., Koeberl, D. D. Adjunctive β2-agonist treatment reduces glycogen independently of receptor-mediated acid α-glucosidase uptake in the limb muscles of mice with

  19. Dynamic characteristics of T2*-weighted signal in calf muscles of peripheral artery disease during low-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhijun; Muller, Matthew D; Wang, Jianli; Sica, Christopher T; Karunanayaka, Prasanna; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Yang, Qing X

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the dynamic characteristics of T2* -weighted signal change in exercising skeletal muscle of healthy subjects and peripheral artery disease (PAD) patients under a low-intensity exercise paradigm. Nine PAD patients and nine age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers underwent a low-intensity exercise paradigm while magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (3.0T) was obtained. T2*-weighted signal time-courses in lateral gastrocnemius, medial gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis anterior were acquired and analyzed. Correlations were performed between dynamic T2*-weighted signal and changes in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, leg pain, and perceived exertion. A significant signal decrease was observed during exercise in soleus and tibialis anterior of healthy participants (P = 0.0007-0.04 and 0.001-0.009, respectively). In PAD, negative signals were observed (P = 0.008-0.02 and 0.003-0.01, respectively) in soleus and lateral gastrocnemius during the early exercise stage. Then the signal gradually increased above the baseline in the lateral gastrocnemius during and after exercise in six of the eight patients who completed the study. This signal increase in patients' lateral gastrocnemius was significantly greater than in healthy subjects' during the later exercise stage (two-sample t-tests, P = 0.001-0.03). Heart rate and mean arterial pressure responses to exercise were significantly higher in PAD than healthy subjects (P = 0.036 and 0.008, respectively) and the patients experienced greater leg pain and exertion (P = 0.006 and P = 0.0014, respectively). During low-intensity exercise, there were different dynamic T2*-weighted signal behavior in the healthy and PAD exercising muscles. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2017;46:40-48. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Effects of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty on muscle BOLD-MRI in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huegli, Rolf W. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)]|[Kantonsspital Bruderholz, Department of Radiology, Bruderholz (Switzerland); Schulte, Anja-Carina [University of Basel, Biocenter, Basel (Switzerland); Aschwanden, Markus; Thalhammer, Christoph [University Hospital Basel, Department of Angiology, Basel (Switzerland); Kos, Sebastian; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Bilecen, Deniz [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2009-02-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the effect of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) on the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal change in the calf musculature of patients with intermittent claudication. Ten patients (mean age, 63.4 {+-} 11.6 years) with symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) caused by SFA stenoses were investigated before and after PTA. Patients underwent BOLD-MRI 1 day before and 6 weeks after PTA. A T2*-weighted single-shot multi-echo echo-planar MR-imaging technique was applied. The BOLD measurements were acquired at mid-calf level during reactive hyperaemia at 1.5 T. This transient hyperperfusion of the muscle tissue was provoked by suprasystolic cuff compression. Key parameters describing the BOLD signal curve included maximum T2*(T2*{sub max}), time-to-peak to reach T2*{sub max} (TTP) and T2* end value (EV) after 600 s of hyperemia. Paired t-tests were applied for statistic comparison. Between baseline and post-PTA, T2*{sub max} increased from 11.1{+-}3.6% to 12.3{+-}3.8% (p=0.51), TTP decreased from 48.5{+-}20.8 s to 35.3{+-}11.6 s (p=0.11) and EV decreased from 6.1{+-}6.4% to 5.0{+-}4.2% (p=0.69). In conclusion, BOLD-MRI reveals changes of the key parameters T2*{sub max}, TTP, and EV after successful PTA of the calf muscles during reactive hyperaemia. (orig.)

  1. Managing Patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: Old Disease, New Ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Uno Malmström

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prof Per-Uno Malmström opened this symposium on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC by describing the medical and economic burden caused by the increasing incidence of bladder cancer and the lack of new therapeutic options available to address the challenges of the management of NMIBC. Prof Marko Babjuk followed with a presentation that demonstrated that risk stratification using European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO risk scores remains a useful tool for determining the best individual treatment options for patients. The next presentation, given by Dr Carsten Ohlmann, described the use of mitomycin C (MMC for low and intermediate-risk patients as per the European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines. However, despite a favourable safety profile, single case reports of severe adverse events following treatment with MMC should not be dismissed. MMC should therefore be given with care, with an emphasis on performing high quality transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB. Prof Bernard Malavaud then presented details of newer diagnostic methods, such as photodynamic diagnosis (PDD and narrow band imaging (NBI, which offer better optical tumour recognition for the surgeon than the old standard of white light cystoscopy. The uptake of PDD and NBI in the future will facilitate an increase in the quality of TURB. Finally, Prof Ashish Kamat explained that recurrence of bladder cancer after bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG treatment (‘BCG failure’ needs to be more clearly defined and stratified. He stated that optimal recognition of timing with relation to BCG immunotherapy is critical to determine the next steps. For example, in the past, patients with late recurrence who may have benefitted from challenge with BCG may have been overlooked.

  2. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle cramps are sudden, involuntary contractions or spasms in one or more of your muscles. They often occur after ... It is a very common muscle problem. Muscle cramps can be caused by nerves that malfunction. Sometimes ...

  3. A flexible electrode array for muscle impedance measurements in the mouse hind limb: A tool to speed research in neuromuscular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Rutkove, S. B.

    2013-04-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a bioelectrical impedance technique focused on the assessment of neuromuscular diseases using tetrapolar surface arrays. Recently, we have shown that reproducible and sensitive EIM measurements can be made on the gastrocnemius muscle of the mouse hind limb and that these are sensitive to disease alterations. A dedicated array would help speed data acquisition and provide additional sensitivity to disease-induced alterations. A flexible electrode array was developed with electrode sizes of 1mm × 1mm by Parlex, Inc. Tetrapolar electrode sets were arranged both parallel to (longitudinal) and orthogonally to (transverse) the major muscle fiber direction of the gastrocnemius muscle. Measurements were made with a dedicated EIM system. A total of 11 healthy animals and 7 animals with spinal muscular atrophy (a form of motor neuron disease) were evaluated after the fur was completely removed with a depilatory agent from the hind limb. Standard electrophysiologic testing (compound motor action potential amplitude and motor unit number estimation) was also performed. The flexible electrode array demonstrated high repeatability in both the longitudinal and transverse directions in the healthy and diseased animals (with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.94 and 0.89, respectively, for phase angle measured transversely). In addition, differences between healthy and diseased animals were identifiable. For example, the 50 kHz transverse phase angle was higher in the healthy as compared to the SMA animals (16.8° ± 0.5 vs. 14.3° ± 0.7, respectively) at 21 weeks of age (p = 0.01). Differences in anisotropy were also identifiable. Correlations to several standard neurophysiologic parameters also appeared promising. This novel flexible tetrapolar electrode array can be used on the mouse hind limb and provides multidirectional data that can be used to assess muscle health. This technique has the potential of finding widespread use in

  4. A flexible electrode array for muscle impedance measurements in the mouse hind limb: A tool to speed research in neuromuscular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J; Rutkove, S B

    2013-01-01

    Electrical impedance myography (EIM) is a bioelectrical impedance technique focused on the assessment of neuromuscular diseases using tetrapolar surface arrays. Recently, we have shown that reproducible and sensitive EIM measurements can be made on the gastrocnemius muscle of the mouse hind limb and that these are sensitive to disease alterations. A dedicated array would help speed data acquisition and provide additional sensitivity to disease-induced alterations. A flexible electrode array was developed with electrode sizes of 1mm × 1mm by Parlex, Inc. Tetrapolar electrode sets were arranged both parallel to (longitudinal) and orthogonally to (transverse) the major muscle fiber direction of the gastrocnemius muscle. Measurements were made with a dedicated EIM system. A total of 11 healthy animals and 7 animals with spinal muscular atrophy (a form of motor neuron disease) were evaluated after the fur was completely removed with a depilatory agent from the hind limb. Standard electrophysiologic testing (compound motor action potential amplitude and motor unit number estimation) was also performed. The flexible electrode array demonstrated high repeatability in both the longitudinal and transverse directions in the healthy and diseased animals (with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.94 and 0.89, respectively, for phase angle measured transversely). In addition, differences between healthy and diseased animals were identifiable. For example, the 50 kHz transverse phase angle was higher in the healthy as compared to the SMA animals (16.8° ± 0.5 vs. 14.3° ± 0.7, respectively) at 21 weeks of age (p = 0.01). Differences in anisotropy were also identifiable. Correlations to several standard neurophysiologic parameters also appeared promising. This novel flexible tetrapolar electrode array can be used on the mouse hind limb and provides multidirectional data that can be used to assess muscle health. This technique has the potential of finding widespread use in

  5. Preparation of developing Xenopus muscle for sarcomeric protein localization by high-resolution imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nworu, Chinedu U; Krieg, Paul A; Gregorio, Carol C

    2014-04-01

    Mutations in several sarcomeric proteins have been linked to various human myopathies. Therefore, having an in vivo developmental model available that develops quickly and efficiently is key for investigators to elucidate the critical steps, components and signaling pathways involved in building a myofibril; this is the pivotal foundation for deciphering disease mechanisms as well as the development of myopathy-related therapeutics. Although striated muscle cell culture studies have been extremely informative in providing clues to both the distribution and functions of sarcomeric proteins, myocytes in vivo develop in an irreproducible 3D environment. Xenopus laevis (frog) embryos are cost effective, compliant to protein level manipulations and develop relatively quickly (⩽ a week) in a petri dish, thus providing a powerful system for de novo myofibrillogenesis studies. Although fluorophore-conjugated phalloidin labeling is the gold standard approach for investigating actin-thin filament architecture, it is well documented that phalloidin-labeling can be challenging and inconsistent within Xenopus embryos. Therefore we highlight several techniques that can be utilized to preserve both antibody and fluorophore-conjugated phalloidin labeling within Xenopus embryos for high-resolution fluorescence microscopy. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Presence and seeding activity of pathological prion protein (PrP(TSE in skeletal muscles of white-tailed deer infected with chronic wasting disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin L Daus

    Full Text Available Chronic wasting disease (CWD is a contagious, rapidly spreading transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE, or prion disease, occurring in cervids such as white tailed-deer (WTD, mule deer or elk in North America. Despite efficient horizontal transmission of CWD among cervids natural transmission of the disease to other species has not yet been observed. Here, we report for the first time a direct biochemical demonstration of pathological prion protein PrP(TSE and of PrP(TSE-associated seeding activity, the static and dynamic biochemical markers for biological prion infectivity, respectively, in skeletal muscles of CWD-infected cervids, i. e. WTD for which no clinical signs of CWD had been recognized. The presence of PrP(TSE was detected by Western- and postfixed frozen tissue blotting, while the seeding activity of PrP(TSE was revealed by protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA. Semi-quantitative Western blotting indicated that the concentration of PrP(TSE in skeletal muscles of CWD-infected WTD was approximately 2000-10,000-fold lower than in brain tissue. Tissue-blot-analyses revealed that PrP(TSE was located in muscle-associated nerve fascicles but not, in detectable amounts, in myocytes. The presence and seeding activity of PrP(TSE in skeletal muscle from CWD-infected cervids suggests prevention of such tissue in the human diet as a precautionary measure for food safety, pending on further clarification of whether CWD may be transmissible to humans.

  7. Peripheral arterial disease decreases muscle torque and functional walking capacity in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubek, Wioletta; Bulińska, Katarzyna; Stefańska, Małgorzata; Woźniewski, Marek; Kropielnicka, Katarzyna; Jasiński, Tomasz; Jasiński, Ryszard; Pilch, Urszula; Dąbrowska, Grażyna; Skórkowska-Telichowska, Katarzyna; Wojcieszczyk-Latos, Joanna; Kałka, Dariusz; Janus, Agnieszka; Zywar, Katarzyna; Paszkowski, Rafał; Szuba, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare values of force-velocity and functional walking capacity in elderly patients with intermittent claudication with respect to the control group. The study involved 135 individuals: 85-peripheral arterial disease (PAD) group diagnosed with stage II chronic lower limb ischemia, according to Fontaine's classification, and 50-control group. The studies included an assessment of walking capacity using a six-minute walk test (6MWT) and measurement of force-velocity parameters (peak torque-PTQ, total work-TW, average power-AVGP) of the lower limbs obtained by means of a functional dynamometry under isokinetic conditions. The peripheral arterial disease group is characterized by significantly lower values of force-velocity parameters compared to the control group (pmuscle strength in the isokinetic test. Mean values of all force-velocity parameters and walk distance were significantly higher in the control group than in the peripheral arterial disease group. In the PAD group, in both men and women, the value of the agonist/antagonist ratio of both lower limbs are lower in men and women comparing to the control group. A rehabilitation program for patients with intermittent claudication must consider exercises improving strength, exercise capacity, and endurance in patients with PAD. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Muscle differentiation in a colonial ascidian: organisation, gene expression and evolutionary considerations

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    Burighel Paolo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ascidians are tunicates, the taxon recently proposed as sister group to the vertebrates. They possess a chordate-like swimming larva, which metamorphoses into a sessile adult. Several ascidian species form colonies of clonal individuals by asexual reproduction. During their life cycle, ascidians present three muscle types: striated in larval tail, striated in the heart, and unstriated in the adult body-wall. Results In the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, we investigated organisation, differentiation and gene expression of muscle beginning from early buds to adults and during zooid regression. We characterised transcripts for troponin T (BsTnT-c, adult muscle-type (BsMA2 and cytoplasmic-type (BsCA1 actins, followed by in situ hybridisation (ISH on sections to establish the spatio-temporal expression of BsTnT-c and BsMA2 during asexual reproduction and in the larva. Moreover, we characterised actin genomic sequences, which by comparison with other metazoans revealed conserved intron patterns. Conclusion Integration of data from ISH, phalloidin staining and TEM allowed us to follow the phases of differentiation of the three muscle kinds, which differ in expression pattern of the two transcripts. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses provided evidence for the close relationship between tunicate and vertebrate muscle genes. The characteristics and plasticity of muscles in tunicates are discussed.

  9. Muscle Fibre Types, Ubiquinone Content and Exercise Capacity in Hypertension and Effort Angina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Jan; Diamant, Bertil; Folkers, Karl

    1991-01-01

    Farmakologi, hypertension, IHD, skeletal muscle fibre composition, muscle coenzyme Q10, ischaemic heart disease, effort angina, muscle fibre lesion, muscle ubiquinone......Farmakologi, hypertension, IHD, skeletal muscle fibre composition, muscle coenzyme Q10, ischaemic heart disease, effort angina, muscle fibre lesion, muscle ubiquinone...

  10. Assessment of trunk muscle density using CT and its association with degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebro, Ronnie; O'Brien, Liam; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate the association of trunk muscle density assessed by computed tomography (CT) with age, gender, and BMI and (2) to evaluate the association between trunk muscle CT density and degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine. The study was IRB approved and HIPAA compliant. The study group comprised 100 subjects (mean age 44.4 ± 22.2 years, 51 % male) who underwent CT of the abdomen and pelvis without intravenous contrast. Exclusion criteria included prior abdominal or spine surgery, active malignancy and scoliosis. CTs were reviewed and the attenuation of the rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis, internal and external obliques, psoas, multifidus, longissimus and gluteus maximus were measured bilaterally at consistent levels. Degenerative disc and bilateral facet joint disease were scored using established methods. Univariate analyses were performed using linear regression. Multivariate linear regression was performed to adjust for age, gender and BMI. CT density of each trunk muscle correlated inversely with age (p degenerative disc and facet joint disease in the univariate analyses (p degenerative disc and facet joint disease respectively in the multivariate analysis. Fatty infiltration of trunk musculature increases with age and BMI. Fatty infiltration of the gluteus maximus and transverse abdominis are associated with degenerative disc and facet joint disease, independent of age, gender and BMI.

  11. Total hip replacement infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by Addison disease and psoas muscle abscess: a case report

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    De Nardo Pasquale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is occasionally encountered in clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a prosthetic joint infection due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complicated by psoas abscesses and secondary Addison disease. Case presentation A 67-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian woman underwent total left hip arthroplasty because of osteoarthritis. After 18 months, she underwent arthroplasty revision for a possible prosthetic infection. Periprosthetic tissue specimens for bacteria were negative, and empirical antibiotic therapy was unsuccessful. She was then admitted to our department because of complications arising 22 months after arthroplasty. A physical examination revealed a sinus tract overlying her left hip and skin and mucosal pigmentation. Her levels of C-reactive protein, basal cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and sodium were out of normal range. Results of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-TB Gold test were positive. Computed tomography revealed a periprosthetic abscess and the inclusion of the left psoas muscle. Results of microbiological tests were negative, but polymerase chain reaction of a specimen taken from the hip fistula was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our patient's condition was diagnosed as prosthetic joint infection and muscle psoas abscess due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and secondary Addison disease. She underwent standard treatment with rifampicin, ethambutol, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide associated with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone. At 15 months from the beginning of therapy, she was in good clinical condition and free of symptoms. Conclusions Prosthetic joint infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is uncommon. A differential diagnosis of tuberculosis should be considered when dealing with prosthetic joint infection, especially when repeated smears and histology examination from infected

  12. Muscle biopsy in Pompe disease Biópsia muscular na doença de Pompe

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    Lineu Cesar Werneck

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease (PD can be diagnosed by measuring alpha-glucosidase levels or by identifying mutations in the gene enzyme. Muscle biopsies can aid diagnosis in doubtful cases. Methods: A review of muscle biopsy from 19 cases of PD (infantile, 6 cases; childhood, 4 cases; and juvenile/adult, 9 cases. Results: Vacuoles with or without glycogen storage were found in 18 cases. All cases had increased acid phosphatase activity. The vacuole frequency varied (almost all fibers in the infantile form to only a few in the juvenile/adult form. Atrophy of type 1 and 2 fibers was frequent in all forms. Atrophic angular fibers in the NADH-tetrazolium reductase and nonspecific esterase activity were observed in 4/9 of the juvenile/adult cases. Conclusion: Increased acid phosphatase activity and vacuoles were the primary findings. Most vacuoles were filled with glycogen, and the adult form of the disease had fewer fibers with vacuoles than the infantile or childhood forms.O diagnóstico da doença de Pompe (PD pode ser feito pela dosagem da enzima alfa-glicosidase ou pela mutação do seu gene codificador. A biópsia muscular pode ajudar em casos duvidosos. Métodos: Revisão das biópsias musculares de 19 casos de PD (forma infantil, 6 casos; infantil tardia, 4; e juvenil/adulto, 9. Resultados: Encontrados vacúolos em 18 casos, com ou sem depósito de glicogênio. Todos mostraram aumento da fosfatase ácida. Os vacúolos estavam presentes na maioria das fibras nas formas infantis, menos frequentes nas formas juvenil e mais raros nas formas do adulto. A atrofia de fibras dos tipos 1 e 2 ocorreram em todas as formas. Fibras atróficas na NADH-tetrazolium redutase e esterase não específica foram observadas em 4/9 das formas infantil tardia/adulta. Conclusões: Os dados mais frequentes foram vacúolos, preenchidos por glicogênio com atividade aumentada da fosfatase ácida. A forma adulta apresenta menor número de vacúolos que as formas infantil e infantil

  13. Impact of sleep quality on functional capacity, peripheral muscle strength and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

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    Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Saglam, Melda; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Arikan, Hulya; Coplu, Lutfi

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of quality of sleep on functional capacity, peripheral muscle strength and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Forty patients with COPD (61.6 ± 8.28 years) were included in this study. Subjective sleep quality (Pittsburgh sleep quality index), quality of life (Nottingham health profile), quadriceps muscle strength (QMS) and functional capacity (6-min walk test) were assessed. Poor sleep quality (Pittsburgh sleep quality index total >5) was present in 57% of the patients. Patients with a poor sleep quality had significantly lower QMS and higher exercise heart rate (p sleep quality index total score was associated with QMS, Nottingham health profile physical mobility and sleep scores, exercise fatigue and dyspnea (p Sleep quality is affected in a majority of patients with COPD. It is related with symptoms, functional capacity, peripheral muscle strength and general quality of life.

  14. Systemic and pulmonary inflammation is independent of skeletal muscle changes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Barker BL

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bethan L Barker,1 Susan McKenna,1 Vijay Mistry,1 Mitesh Pancholi,1 Hemu Patel,2 Koirobi Haldar,3 Michael R Barer,3 Ian D Pavord,4 Michael C Steiner,1 Christopher E Brightling,1 Mona Bafadhel4 1Institute for Lung Health, NIHR Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom; 2Department of Clinical Microbiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, United Kingdom; 3Department of Infection, Immunity, and Inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom; 4Respiratory Medicine Unit, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus, Oxford, United Kingdom Background: Nutritional depletion is an important manifestation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, which has been related to systemic inflammation. It remains unclear to what degree airway inflammation contributes to the presence or progression of nutritional depletion. Objectives: To determine whether airway inflammation and lung bacterial colonization are related to nutritional status or predict progressive weight loss and muscle atrophy in patients with COPD. Methods: Body composition using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, indices of airway inflammation, and bacterial colonization were measured in 234 COPD patients. Systemic inflammation was assessed from serum C reactive protein (CRP and circulating total and differential leukocyte counts. Nutritional depletion was defined as a body mass index (BMI less than 21 kg/m2 and/or fat-free mass index (FFMI less than 15 or 17 kg/m2 in women and men, respectively. FFMI was calculated as the fat-free mass (FFM corrected for body surface area. Measurements were repeated in 94 patients after a median 16-month follow-up. Regression analysis was used to assess the relationships of weight change and FFM change with indices of bacterial colonization and airway and systemic inflammation

  15. Lack of Glycogenin Causes Glycogen Accumulation and Muscle Function Impairment.

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    Testoni, Giorgia; Duran, Jordi; García-Rocha, Mar; Vilaplana, Francisco; Serrano, Antonio L; Sebastián, David; López-Soldado, Iliana; Sullivan, Mitchell A; Slebe, Felipe; Vilaseca, Marta; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Guinovart, Joan J

    2017-07-05

    Glycogenin is considered essential for glycogen synthesis, as it acts as a primer for the initiation of the polysaccharide chain. Against expectations, glycogenin-deficient mice (Gyg KO) accumulate high amounts of glycogen in striated muscle. Furthermore, this glycogen contains no covalently bound protein, thereby demonstrating that a protein primer is not strictly necessary for the synthesis of the polysaccharide in vivo. Strikingly, in spite of the higher glycogen content, Gyg KO mice showed lower resting energy expenditure and less resistance than control animals when subjected to endurance exercise. These observations can be attributed to a switch of oxidative myofibers toward glycolytic metabolism. Mice overexpressing glycogen synthase in the muscle showed similar alterations, thus indicating that this switch is caused by the excess of glycogen. These results may explain the muscular defects of GSD XV patients, who lack glycogenin-1 and show high glycogen accumulation in muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of inspiratory and expiratory loads on abdominal muscle activity during breathing in subjects "at risk" for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and healthy.

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    Mesquita Montes, António; Crasto, Carlos; de Melo, Cristina Argel; Santos, Rita; Pereira, Susana; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2017-06-01

    The abdominal muscle activity has been shown to be variable in subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) when respiratory demand increases and their recruitment pattern may change the mechanics, as well as the work and cost of breathing. The scientific evidence in subjects "at risk" for the development of COPD may be important to understand the natural history of this disease. This study aims to evaluate the effect of inspiratory and expiratory loads on the abdominal muscle activity during breathing in subjects "at risk" for the development of COPD and healthy. Thirty-one volunteers, divided in "At Risk" for COPD (n=17; 47.71±5.11years) and Healthy (n=14; 48.21±6.87years) groups, breathed at the same rhythm without load and with 10% of the maximal inspiratory or expiratory pressures, in standing. Surface electromyography was performed to assess the activation intensity of rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique and transversus abdominis/internal oblique (TrA/IO) muscles, during inspiration and expiration. During inspiration, in "At Risk" for COPD group, RA muscle activation was higher with loaded expiration (p=0.016); however, in Healthy group it was observed a higher activation of external oblique and TrA/IO muscles (pmuscle activation was higher with loaded inspiration (p=0.009), in Healthy group TrA/IO muscle showed a higher activation (p=0.025). Subjects "at risk" for the development of COPD seemed to have a specific recruitment of the superficial layer of ventrolateral abdominal wall for the mechanics of breathing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The New Unified Theory of ATP Synthesis/Hydrolysis and Muscle Contraction, Its Manifold Fundamental Consequences and Mechanistic Implications and Its Applications in Health and Disease

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    Sunil Nath

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Complete details of the thermodynamics and molecular mechanisms of ATP synthesis/hydrolysis and muscle contraction are offered from the standpoint of the torsional mechanism of energy transduction and ATP synthesis and the rotation-uncoiling-tilt (RUT energy storage mechanism of muscle contraction. The manifold fundamental consequences and mechanistic implications of the unified theory for oxidative phosphorylation and muscle contraction are explained. The consistency of current mechanisms of ATP synthesis and muscle contraction with experiment is assessed, and the novel insights of the unified theory are shown to take us beyond the binding change mechanism, the chemiosmotic theory and the lever arm model. It is shown from first principles how previous theories of ATP synthesis and muscle contraction violate both the first and second laws of thermodynamics, necessitating their revision. It is concluded that the new paradigm, ten years after making its first appearance, is now perfectly poised to replace the older theories. Finally, applications of the unified theory in cell life and cell death are outlined and prospects for future research are explored. While it is impossible to cover each and every specific aspect of the above, an attempt has been made here to address all the pertinent details and what is presented should be sufficient to convince the reader of the novelty, originality, breakthrough nature and power of the unified theory, its manifold fundamental consequences and mechanistic implications, and its applications in health and disease.

  18. Assessment of muscle mass and its association with protein intake in a multi-ethnic Asian population: relevance in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon Wee; Toh, Qi Chun; Chan, Xue Wei; Xu, Hui; Li, Jia Liang; Lee, Evan Jc

    2014-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend objective nutritional assessments in managing chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients but were developed while referencing to a North-American population. Specific recommendations for assessing muscle mass were suggested (mid-arm circumference, MAC; corrected mid-arm muscle area, cAMA; mid-arm muscle circumference, MAMC). This study aimed to assess correlation and association of these assessments with dietary protein intake in a multi-ethnic Asian population of healthy and CKD patients. We analyzed 24-hour urine collections of selected participants to estimate total protein intake (TPI; g/day). Ideal body weight (IDW; kg) was calculated and muscle assessments conducted. Analyses involved correlation and linear regression, taking significance at ppatients and 103 healthy participants comprising of 51.0% male, 38.5% Chinese, 29.6% Malay, 23.6% Indian, and 8.4% others. The mean TPI was 58.9 ± 18.4 g/day in healthy participants and 53.6 ± 19.4 g/day in CKD patients. When normalized to ideal body weight, TPI-IDW (g/kg/day) was similar in healthy and CKD participants. Overall, TPI was associated with MAC (r=0.372, ppatients. Total protein intake was associated with muscle assessments in all participants. TPI normalized to IDW should only be used in CKD patients.

  19. Muscle cramp in pediatric Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Monique M.; Ouvrier, Robert A.; Burns, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To identify correlates of calf cramp in children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A). Methods: Throughout Australia, 81 children aged 2–16 years with CMT1A were recruited. Measures of strength, ankle range, foot posture, balance, agility, endurance, gait, and neurophysiology were collected. Post hoc logistic regression analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of calf cramp. Results: Of the 81 children, 26 (32%) reported calf cramp, and 1 child each reported toe, quadriceps, or arm cramp. Calf cramp was associated (p cramp. Conclusion: Calf cramps are common in children with CMT1A and worsen with age. This study revealed a previously unrecognized link between cramp and hand tremor in children with CMT1A. Further investigation of proposed mechanisms and risk factors common to both cramp and tremor will contribute to our understanding of these common complications of CMT1A. PMID:22131544

  20. Muscle cramp in pediatric Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A: prevalence and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyton, Fiona; Ryan, Monique M; Ouvrier, Robert A; Burns, Joshua

    2011-12-13

    To identify correlates of calf cramp in children with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A). Throughout Australia, 81 children aged 2-16 years with CMT1A were recruited. Measures of strength, ankle range, foot posture, balance, agility, endurance, gait, and neurophysiology were collected. Post hoc logistic regression analyses were performed to identify independent predictors of calf cramp. Of the 81 children, 26 (32%) reported calf cramp, and 1 child each reported toe, quadriceps, or arm cramp. Calf cramp was associated (p cramp. Calf cramps are common in children with CMT1A and worsen with age. This study revealed a previously unrecognized link between cramp and hand tremor in children with CMT1A. Further investigation of proposed mechanisms and risk factors common to both cramp and tremor will contribute to our understanding of these common complications of CMT1A.

  1. Bioreactors as Engineering Support to Treat Cardiac Muscle and Vascular Disease

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    Diana Massai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. The inability of fully differentiated, load-bearing cardiovascular tissues to in vivo regenerate and the limitations of the current treatment therapies greatly motivate the efforts of cardiovascular tissue engineering to become an effective clinical strategy for injured heart and vessels. For the effective production of organized and functional cardiovascular engineered constructs in vitro, a suitable dynamic environment is essential, and can be achieved and maintained within bioreactors. Bioreactors are technological devices that, while monitoring and controlling the culture environment and stimulating the construct, attempt to mimic the physiological milieu. In this study, a review of the current state of the art of bioreactor solutions for cardiovascular tissue engineering is presented, with emphasis on bioreactors and biophysical stimuli adopted for investigating the mechanisms influencing cardiovascular tissue development, and for eventually generating suitable cardiovascular tissue replacements.

  2. Characterization of the in vitro expressed autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of human titin encoded by TTN exons 248-249

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, L. [Biomedical Sciences Program, Kent State University, Kent, OH (United States); McCann, S.; Budde, J.; Sethi, S.; Guidos, M.; Giles, R. [Center for Applied Chemical Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Walker, G.R., E-mail: grwalker@ysu.edu [Center for Applied Chemical Biology, Department of Biological Sciences, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Biomedical Sciences Program, Kent State University, Kent, OH (United States)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Affinity purification of the autoimmune rippling muscle disease immunogenic domain of titin. {yields} Partial sequence analysis confirms that the peptides is in the I band region of titin. {yields} This region of the human titin shows high degree of homology to mouse titin N2-A. -- Abstract: Autoimmune rippling muscle disease (ARMD) is an autoimmune neuromuscular disease associated with myasthenia gravis (MG). Past studies in our laboratory recognized a very high molecular weight skeletal muscle protein antigen identified by ARMD patient antisera as the titin isoform. These past studies used antisera from ARMD and MG patients as probes to screen a human skeletal muscle cDNA library and several pBluescript clones revealed supporting expression of immunoreactive peptides. This study characterizes the products of subcloning the titin immunoreactive domain into pGEX-3X and the subsequent fusion protein. Sequence analysis of the fusion gene indicates the cloned titin domain (GenBank ID: (EU428784)) is in frame and is derived from a sequence of N2-A spanning the exons 248-250 an area that encodes the fibronectin III domain. PCR and EcoR1 restriction mapping studies have demonstrated that the inserted cDNA is of a size that is predicted by bioinformatics analysis of the subclone. Expression of the fusion protein result in the isolation of a polypeptide of 52 kDa consistent with the predicted inferred amino acid sequence. Immunoblot experiments of the fusion protein, using rippling muscle/myasthenia gravis antisera, demonstrate that only the titin domain is immunoreactive.

  3. Ultrasound-guided myofascial trigger point injection into brachialis muscle for rotator cuff disease patients with upper arm pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Mi Ri; Chang, Won Hyuk; Choi, Hyo Seon; Lee, Sang Chul

    2014-10-01

    To assess the efficacy of trigger point injection into brachialis muscle for rotator cuff disease patients with upper arm pain. A prospective, randomized, and single-blinded clinical pilot trial was performed at university rehabilitation hospital. Twenty-one patients clinically diagnosed with rotator cuff disease suspected of having brachialis myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) were randomly allocated into two groups. Effect of ultrasound (US)-guided trigger point injection (n=11) and oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) (n=10) was compared by visual analog scale (VAS). US-guided trigger point injection of brachialis muscle resulted in excellent outcome compared to the oral NSAID group. Mean VAS scores decreased significantly after 2 weeks of treatment compared to the baseline in both groups (7.3 vs. 4.5 in the injection group and 7.4 vs. 5.9 in the oral group). The decrease of the VAS score caused by injection (ДVAS=-2.8) was significantly larger than caused by oral NSAID (ДVAS=-1.5) (ptrigger point injection of the brachialis muscle is safe and effective for both diagnosis and treatment when the cause of pain is suspected to be originated from the muscle.

  4. Assessment of trunk muscle density using CT and its association with degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebro, Ronnie; O'Brien, Liam; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate the association of trunk muscle density assessed by computed tomography (CT) with age, gender, and BMI and (2) to evaluate the association between trunk muscle CT density and degenerative disc and facet joint disease of the lumbar spine. The study was IRB approved and HIPAA compliant. The study group comprised 100 subjects (mean age 44.4 ± 22.2 years, 51 % male) who underwent CT of the abdomen and pelvis without intravenous contrast. Exclusion criteria included prior abdominal or spine surgery, active malignancy and scoliosis. CTs were reviewed and the attenuation of the rectus abdominis, transverse abdominis, internal and external obliques, psoas, multifidus, longissimus and gluteus maximus were measured bilaterally at consistent levels. Degenerative disc and bilateral facet joint disease were scored using established methods. Univariate analyses were performed using linear regression. Multivariate linear regression was performed to adjust for age, gender and BMI. CT density of each trunk muscle correlated inversely with age (p < 0.001) and BMI (p < 0.001). CT density of each trunk muscle correlated inversely with degenerative disc and facet joint disease in the univariate analyses (p < 0.001); however, only the gluteus maximus and the transverse abdominis remained significant predictors of degenerative disc and facet joint disease respectively in the multivariate analysis. Fatty infiltration of trunk musculature increases with age and BMI. Fatty infiltration of the gluteus maximus and transverse abdominis are associated with degenerative disc and facet joint disease, independent of age, gender and BMI. (orig.)

  5. Altered expression pattern of molecular factors involved in colonic smooth muscle functions: an immunohistochemical study in patients with diverticular disease.

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    Letizia Mattii

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of diverticular disease (DD is thought to result from complex interactions among dietary habits, genetic factors and coexistence of other bowel abnormalities. These conditions lead to alterations in colonic pressure and motility, facilitating the formation of diverticula. Although electrophysiological studies on smooth muscle cells (SMCs have investigated colonic motor dysfunctions, scarce attention has been paid to their molecular abnormalities, and data on SMCs in DD are lacking. Accordingly, the main purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of molecular factors involved in the contractile functions of SMCs in the tunica muscularis of colonic specimens from patients with DD.By means of immunohistochemistry and image analysis, we examined the expression of Cx26 and Cx43, which are prominent components of gap junctions in human colonic SMCs, as well as pS368-Cx43, PKCps, RhoA and αSMA, all known to regulate the functions of gap junctions and the contractile activity of SMCs. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed significant abnormalities in DD samples, concerning both the expression and distribution patterns of most of the investigated molecular factors.This study demonstrates, for the first time, that an altered pattern of factors involved in SMC contractility is present at level of the tunica muscularis of DD patients. Moreover, considering that our analysis was conducted on colonic tissues not directly affected by diverticular lesions or inflammatory reactions, it is conceivable that these molecular alterations may precede and predispose to the formation of diverticula, rather than being mere consequences of the disease.

  6. Altered Expression Pattern of Molecular Factors Involved in Colonic Smooth Muscle Functions: An Immunohistochemical Study in Patients with Diverticular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattii, Letizia; Ippolito, Chiara; Segnani, Cristina; Battolla, Barbara; Colucci, Rocchina; Dolfi, Amelio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Blandizzi, Corrado; Bernardini, Nunzia

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of diverticular disease (DD) is thought to result from complex interactions among dietary habits, genetic factors and coexistence of other bowel abnormalities. These conditions lead to alterations in colonic pressure and motility, facilitating the formation of diverticula. Although electrophysiological studies on smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have investigated colonic motor dysfunctions, scarce attention has been paid to their molecular abnormalities, and data on SMCs in DD are lacking. Accordingly, the main purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of molecular factors involved in the contractile functions of SMCs in the tunica muscularis of colonic specimens from patients with DD. Methods and Findings By means of immunohistochemistry and image analysis, we examined the expression of Cx26 and Cx43, which are prominent components of gap junctions in human colonic SMCs, as well as pS368-Cx43, PKCps, RhoA and αSMA, all known to regulate the functions of gap junctions and the contractile activity of SMCs. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed significant abnormalities in DD samples, concerning both the expression and distribution patterns of most of the investigated molecular factors. Conclusion This study demonstrates, for the first time, that an altered pattern of factors involved in SMC contractility is present at level of the tunica muscularis of DD patients. Moreover, considering that our analysis was conducted on colonic tissues not directly affected by diverticular lesions or inflammatory reactions, it is conceivable that these molecular alterations may precede and predispose to the formation of diverticula, rather than being mere consequences of the disease. PMID:23437299

  7. Effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by parkinson?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Byeon, Haewon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effect of simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training on the enhancement of the swallowing function of patients with dysphagia caused by Parkinson?s disease. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 18 patients who received simultaneous application of postural techniques and expiratory muscle strength training and 15 patients who received expiratory muscle strength training only. Postural t...

  8. PENYAKIT EKOR PUTIH (WHITE MUSCLE DISEASE PADA UDANG GALAH (Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man

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    Ikhsan Khasani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu keunggulan sistem budidaya udang galah yang selama ini diyakini para pembudidaya adalah belum munculnya permasalahan penyakit serius sebagaimana pada sistem budidaya udang windu dan vaname, yang disebabkan oleh infeksi virus. Akan tetapi, pada lima tahun terakhir infeksi virus mulai dilaporkan mewabah pada sistem budidaya udang galah di dunia, dan menjadi masalah yang serius. Penyakit ekor putih (white tail disease, WTD merupakan salah satu penyakit serius pada kegiatan pembenihan udang galah, karena dapat menyebabkan kematian hingga 100% pada fase pembenihan, dan akhir-akhir ini juga telah terjadi di beberapa hatcheri di Indonesia. Pada tahun 2011, WTD telah terjadi di hatcheri Balai Pengembangan Teknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Samas, Jogjakarta, dan disusul pada tahun 2012 di hatcheri Balai Penelitian Pemuliaan Ikan (BPPI Sukamandi. Makalah ini merupakan gambaran mengenai virus MrNV (Macrobrachium rosenbergii Noda Virus, dampak yang ditimbulkan, serta upaya-upaya penanganan.

  9. Effect of inspiratory muscle training on exercise performance and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Ahmed Saad Elmorsi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: For PImax, PEmax, and 6MWD; IMT provides additional benefits to peripheral muscle exercise training in COPD patients. However, this did not translate into additional improvement in dyspnea and quality of life compared with what is achieved by peripheral muscle exercise alone.

  10. Resistance exercise training improves heart rate variability and muscle performance: a randomized controlled trial in coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, F R; Arena, R; Phillips, S A; Bonjorno, J C; Mendes, R G; Arakelian, V M; Bassi, D; Nogi, C; Borghi-Silva, A

    2015-06-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is an important part of cardiac rehabilitation. However, it is not known about the low intensity of RE training that could modify the heart rate variability (HRV), muscular strength and endurance in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). To investigate the effects of high repetition/low load resistance training (HR/LL-RT) program on HRV and muscular strength and endurance in CAD patients. Randomized and controlled trial. Patients seen at the Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Laboratory between May 2011 and November 2013. Twenty male patients with CAD were randomized to a training group (61.3±5.2 years) or control group (61±4.4 years). 1 repetition maximum (1-RM) maneuver, discontinuous exercise test on the leg press (DET-L), and resting HRV were performed before and after 8 weeks of HR/LL-RT on a 45° leg press. RMSSD, SD1, mean HR and ApEn indices were calculated. The HR/LL-RT program consisted of a lower limb exercise using a 45° leg press; 3 sets of 20 repetitions, two times a week. The initial load was set at 30% of the 1-RM load and the duration of the HR/LL-RT program was performed for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks of HR/LL-RT there were significant increases of RMSSD and SD1 indices in the training group only (P<0.05). There was a significant decrease in mean HR after HR/LL-RT in the training group (P<0.05). There was a significantly higher ApEn after in the training group (P<0.05). There were significantly higher values in the training group in contrast to the control group (P<0.05). These results show positive improvements on HRV, as well as muscle strength and endurance in CAD patients. Eight weeks of HR/LL-RT is an effective sufficient to beneficially modify important outcomes as HRV, muscle strength and endurance in CAD patients.

  11. Synergistic Activities of Abdominal Muscles Are Required for Efficient Micturition in Anesthetized Female Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Yingchun; Cruz, Yolanda; Boone, Timothy B; Munoz, Alvaro

    2018-03-01

    To characterize the electromyographic activity of abdominal striated muscles during micturition in urethane-anesthetized female mice, and to quantitatively evaluate the contribution of abdominal responses to efficient voiding. Cystometric and multichannel electromyographic recordings were integrated to enable a comprehensive evaluation during micturition in urethane-anesthetized female mice. Four major abdominal muscle domains were evaluated: the external oblique, internal oblique, and superior and inferior rectus abdominis. To further characterize the functionality of the abdominal muscles, pancuronium bromide (25 μg/mL or 50 μg/mL, abdominal surface) was applied as a blocking agent of neuromuscular junctions. We observed a robust activation of the abdominal muscles during voiding, with a consistent onset/offset concomitant with the bladder pressure threshold. Pancuronium was effective, in a dose-dependent fashion, for partial and complete blockage of abdominal activity. Electromyographic discharges during voiding were significantly inhibited by applying pancuronium. Decreased cystometric parameters were recorded, including the peak pressure, pressure threshold, intercontractile interval, and voiding duration, suggesting that the voiding efficiency was significantly compromised by abdominal muscle relaxation. The relevance of the abdominal striated musculature for micturition has remained a topic of debate in human physiology. Although the study was performed on anesthetized mice, these results support the existence of synergistic abdominal electromyographic activity facilitating voiding in anesthetized mice. Further, our study presents a rodent model that can be used for future investigations into micturition-related abdominal activity.

  12. Validity of Estimation of Pelvic Floor Muscle Activity from Transperineal Ultrasound Imaging in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Ryan E; Coughlin, Geoff; Lutton, Nicholas J; Hodges, Paul W

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between displacement of pelvic floor landmarks observed with transperineal ultrasound imaging and electromyography of the muscles hypothesised to cause the displacements. Three healthy men participated in this study, which included ultrasound imaging of the mid-urethra, urethra-vesical junction, ano-rectal junction and bulb of the penis. Fine-wire electromyography electrodes were inserted into the puborectalis and bulbocavernosus muscles and a transurethral catheter electrode recorded striated urethral sphincter electromyography. A nasogastric sensor recorded intra-abdominal pressure. Tasks included submaximal and maximal voluntary contractions, and Valsalva. The relationship between each of the parameters measured from ultrasound images and electromyography or intra-abdominal pressure amplitudes was described with nonlinear regression. Strong, non-linear relationships were calculated for each predicted landmark/muscle pair for submaximal contractions (R2-0.87-0.95). The relationships between mid-urethral displacement and striated urethral sphincter electromyography, and bulb of the penis displacement and bulbocavernosus electromyography were strong during maximal contractions (R2-0.74-0.88). Increased intra-abdominal pressure prevented shortening of puborectalis, which resulted in weak relationships between electromyography and anorectal and urethravesical junction displacement during all tasks. Displacement of landmarks in transperineal ultrasound imaging provides meaningful measures of activation of individual pelvic floor muscles in men during voluntary contractions. This method may aid assessment of muscle function or feedback for training.

  13. Validity of Estimation of Pelvic Floor Muscle Activity from Transperineal Ultrasound Imaging in Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan E Stafford

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between displacement of pelvic floor landmarks observed with transperineal ultrasound imaging and electromyography of the muscles hypothesised to cause the displacements.Three healthy men participated in this study, which included ultrasound imaging of the mid-urethra, urethra-vesical junction, ano-rectal junction and bulb of the penis. Fine-wire electromyography electrodes were inserted into the puborectalis and bulbocavernosus muscles and a transurethral catheter electrode recorded striated urethral sphincter electromyography. A nasogastric sensor recorded intra-abdominal pressure. Tasks included submaximal and maximal voluntary contractions, and Valsalva. The relationship between each of the parameters measured from ultrasound images and electromyography or intra-abdominal pressure amplitudes was described with nonlinear regression.Strong, non-linear relationships were calculated for each predicted landmark/muscle pair for submaximal contractions (R2-0.87-0.95. The relationships between mid-urethral displacement and striated urethral sphincter electromyography, and bulb of the penis displacement and bulbocavernosus electromyography were strong during maximal contractions (R2-0.74-0.88. Increased intra-abdominal pressure prevented shortening of puborectalis, which resulted in weak relationships between electromyography and anorectal and urethravesical junction displacement during all tasks.Displacement of landmarks in transperineal ultrasound imaging provides meaningful measures of activation of individual pelvic floor muscles in men during voluntary contractions. This method may aid assessment of muscle function or feedback for training.

  14. Safety and efficacy of exercise training in adults with Pompe disease: evalution of endurance, muscle strength and core stability before and after a 12?week training program

    OpenAIRE

    van den Berg, Linda E. M.; Favejee, Marein M.; Wens, Stephan C. A.; Kruijshaar, Michelle E.; Praet, Stephan F. E.; Reuser, Arnold J. J.; Bussmann, Johannes B. J.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; van der Ploeg, Ans T.

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pompe disease is a proximal myopathy. We investigated whether exercise training is a safe and useful adjuvant therapy for adult Pompe patients, receiving enzyme replacement therapy. Methods: Training comprised 36 sessions of standardized aerobic, resistance and core stability exercises over 12 weeks. Before and after, the primary outcome measures safety, endurance (aerobic exercise capacity and distance walked on the 6 min walk test) and muscle strength, and secondary ...

  15. Effects of resistance training on muscle strength, exercise capacity, and mobility in middle-aged and elderly patients with coronary artery disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Hotta, Kazuki; Ota, Erika; Mori, Rintaro; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Resistance training (RT) is a core component of cardiac rehabilitation. We investigated the effects of RT on exercise capacity, muscle strength, and mobility in middle-aged and elderly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We searched for randomized controlled trials of RT versus usual care, or combined RT and aerobic training (AT) versus AT alone, and identified 440 trials in total from inception to January 2014. Participants who had myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization, angina pectoris or CAD were included in the analysis. Those who had heart failure, heart transplants with either cardiac resynchronization therapy or implantable defibrillators were excluded. Twenty-two trials totaling 1095 participants were analyzed. We performed random-effects meta-analysis. In middle-aged participants, RT increased lower extremity muscle strength [standardized mean difference (SMD): 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.35 to 0.95], upper extremity muscle strength (SMD: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.48 to 0.99) and peak oxygen consumption (VO2) [weight mean difference (WMD): 0.92mL/kg/min, 95% CI: 0.12 to 1.72], but did not improve mobility compared with the control. In elderly participants, RT increased lower extremity muscle strength (SMD: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.05 to 1.21), upper extremity muscle strength (SMD: 1.18, 95% CI: 0.56 to 1.80), and peak VO2 (WMD: 0.70mL/kg/min, 95% CI: 0.03 to 1.37), and improved mobility (SMD: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.21 to 1.01) compared with the control. Resistance training could increase exercise capacity and muscle strength in middle-aged and elderly patients, and mobility in elderly patients, with CAD. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Spinal Stabilization Exercise on the Cross-sectional Areas of the Lumbar Multifidus and Psoas Major Muscles, Pain Intensity, and Lumbar Muscle Strength of Patients with Degenerative Disc Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongho; Kim, Hyungguen; Chung, Jaeyeop

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using spinal stabilizing exercise to reduce atrophy of the multifidus and psoas major muscles, reduce the levels of pain and disability, and increase paraspinal muscle strength in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD). [Subjects and Methods] In 33 patients (Age range: 25-65 years) diagnosed with DDD, spinal stabilization exercise was conducted for 8 weeks. The levels of pain and disability were measured before and after exercise using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Paraspinal muscular strength in four directions was evaluated with a CENTAUR 3D Spatial Rotation Device. Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of both the left and right multifidus and the psoas major at the upper endplate of L4 were measured before and after exercise using computed tomography (CT). [Results] After 8 weeks of spinal stabilization exercise, the pain and lumbar disability in subjects decreased significantly from 6.12±1.24 to 2.43±1.14. The ODI score also improved from 20.18±7.14 to 8.81±5.73. In addition, paraspinal muscle strength increased significantly, while the CSAs of the left and right multifidus and psoas major widened as compared with the pre-exercise size. [Conclusion] Spinal stabilization exercise was effective for reducing pain and disability in DDD patients. It was an effective adjunct to aid rehabilitation in these cases.

  17. A striated, far travelled clast of rhyolitic tuff from Thames river deposits at Ardleigh, Essex, England : evidence for early Middle Pleistocene glaciation in the Thames catchment

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, J.; Carney, J.N.; Silva, B.N.; Booth, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the discovery of an in-situ striated, far-travelled, oversized clast in the Ardleigh Gravels of the Kesgrave Sands and Gravels of the River Thames at Ardleigh, east of Colchester in Essex, eastern England. The morphology, petrography and geochemistry of the clast, and the sedimentology of the host deposit are described. The striations are interpreted, on the basis of their sub-parallelism and the shape and subroundedness of the clast, as glacial and the clast is pr...

  18. Muscle Mass, Strength, Mobility, Quality of Life, and Disease Severity in Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Chan; Lee, Yeong Guk; Park, Si-Bog; Kim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Kyu Hoon

    2017-12-01

    To determine if there is muscle mass reduction in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared to the general population and to examine the relationship between skeletal muscle mass, quality of life (QOL), strength, and mobility in patients with AS. A total of 30 AS patients were enrolled in this study. Skeletal muscle mass was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and it was expressed as the skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). QOL was assessed using the EuroQOL (EQ-5D). To measure mobility, the modified Schöber test and chest expansion test were used. To measure grip strength as a measure of muscle strength, we used the hydraulic hand dynamometer. Additionally, we divided the patients into two groups according to the degree of X-ray finding and compared the differences between the two groups. There was no significant reduction in skeletal muscle mass in patients with AS compared to the general population. Also, there was no significant correlation between SMI and QOL. On the other hand, there was a significant positive correlation between SMI and mobility, and grip strength. A significant positive correlation was found between mobility and QOL. Additionally, there was a statistically significant difference in mobility between the two groups according to the degree of X-ray finding. Maintaining muscle mass in AS patients may not be helpful for improving QOL, but it may contribute to achieving adequate mobility and strength.

  19. Arterial spin labeling MR imaging reproducibly measures peak-exercise calf muscle perfusion: a study in patients with peripheral arterial disease and healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Amy W; Meyer, Craig H; Epstein, Frederick H; Jiji, Ronny S; Hunter, Jennifer R; Dimaria, Joseph M; Christopher, John M; Kramer, Christopher M

    2012-12-01

    This study hypothesized that arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 3-T would be a reliable noncontrast technique for measuring peak exercise calf muscle blood flow in both healthy volunteers and patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and will discriminate between these groups. Prior work demonstrated the utility of first-pass gadolinium-enhanced calf muscle perfusion MR imaging in patients with PAD. However, patients with PAD often have advanced renal disease and cannot receive gadolinium. PAD patients had claudication and an ankle brachial index of 0.4 to 0.9. Age-matched normal subjects (NL) had no PAD risk factors and were symptom-free with exercise. All performed supine plantar flexion exercise in a 3-T MR imaging scanner using a pedal ergometer until exhaustion or limiting symptoms and were imaged at peak exercise with 15 averaged ASL images. Peak perfusion was measured from ASL blood flow images by placing a region of interest in the calf muscle region with the greatest signal intensity. Perfusion was compared between PAD patients and NL and repeat testing was performed in 12 subjects (5 NL, 7 PAD) for assessment of reproducibility. Peak exercise calf perfusion of 15 NL (age: 54 ± 9 years) was higher than in 15 PAD patients (age: 64 ± 5 years, ankle brachial index: 0.70 ± 0.14) (80 ± 23 ml/min - 100 g vs. 49 ± 16 ml/min/100 g, p calf muscle. Independent of exercise time, ASL discriminates between NL and PAD patients. This technique may prove useful for clinical trials of therapies for improving muscle perfusion, especially in patients unable to receive gadolinium. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adjunctive β2-agonist treatment reduces glycogen independently of receptor-mediated acid α-glucosidase uptake in the limb muscles of mice with Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Benjamin L; Madden, Lauran; Li, Songtao; Nance, Sierra; Bird, Andrew; Bursac, Nenad; Yen, Paul M; Young, Sarah P; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2014-05-01

    Enzyme or gene replacement therapy with acid α-glucosidase (GAA) has achieved only partial efficacy in Pompe disease. We evaluated the effect of adjunctive clenbuterol treatment on cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR)-mediated uptake and intracellular trafficking of GAA during muscle-specific GAA expression with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector in GAA-knockout (KO) mice. Clenbuterol, which increases expression of CI-MPR in muscle, was administered with the AAV vector. This combination therapy increased latency during rotarod and wirehang testing at 12 wk, in comparison with vector alone. The mean urinary glucose tetrasaccharide (Glc4), a urinary biomarker, was lower in GAA-KO mice following combination therapy, compared with vector alone. Similarly, glycogen content was lower in cardiac and skeletal muscle following 12 wk of combination therapy in heart, quadriceps, diaphragm, and soleus, compared with vector alone. These data suggested that clenbuterol treatment enhanced trafficking of GAA to lysosomes, given that GAA was expressed within myofibers. The integral role of CI-MPR was demonstrated by the lack of effectiveness from clenbuterol in GAA-KO mice that lacked CI-MPR in muscle, where it failed to reverse the high glycogen content of the heart and diaphragm or impaired wirehang performance. However, the glycogen content of skeletal muscle was reduced by the addition of clenbuterol in the absence of CI-MPR, as was lysosomal vacuolation, which correlated with increased AKT signaling. In summary, β2-agonist treatment enhanced CI-MPR-mediated uptake and trafficking of GAA in mice with Pompe disease, and a similarly enhanced benefit might be expected in other lysosomal storage disorders.

  1. Liver steatosis is associated with insulin resistance in skeletal muscle rather than in the liver in Japanese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ken-Ichiro; Takeshita, Yumie; Misu, Hirofumi; Zen, Yoh; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2015-03-01

    To examine the association between liver histological features and organ-specific insulin resistance indices calculated from 75-g oral glucose tolerance test data in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Liver biopsy specimens were obtained from 72 patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and were scored for steatosis, grade and stage. Hepatic and skeletal muscle insulin resistance indices (hepatic insulin resistance index and Matsuda index, respectively) were calculated from 75-g oral glucose tolerance test data, and metabolic clearance rate was measured using the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp method. The degree of hepatic steatosis, and grade and stage of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis were significantly correlated with Matsuda index (steatosis r = -0.45, P hepatic insulin resistance index. Multiple regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index and each histological score showed that the degree of hepatic steatosis (coefficient = -0.22, P steatosis and metabolic clearance rate (coefficient = -0.62, P = 0.059). Liver steatosis is associated with insulin resistance in skeletal muscle rather than in the liver in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, suggesting a central role of fatty liver in the development of peripheral insulin resistance and the existence of a network between the liver and skeletal muscle.

  2. Geologic continuous casting below continental and deep-sea detachment faults and at the striated extrusion of Sacsayhuaman, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    In the common type of industrial continuous casting, partially molten metal is extruded from a vessel through a shaped orifice called a mold in which the metal assumes the cross-sectional form of the mold as it cools and solidifies. Continuous casting can be sustained as long as molten metal is supplied and thermal conditions are maintained. I propose that a similar process produced parallel sets of grooves in three geologic settings, as follows: (1) corrugated metamorphic core complexes where mylonized mid-crustal rocks were exhumed by movement along low-angle normal faults known as detachment faults; (2) corrugated submarine surfaces where ultramafic and mafic rocks were exhumed by normal faulting within oceanic spreading centers; and (3) striated magma extrusions exemplified by the famous grooved outcrops at the Inca fortress of Sacsayhuaman in Peru. In each case, rocks inferred to have overlain the corrugated surface during corrugation genesis molded and shaped a plastic to partially molten rock mass as it was extruded from a moderate- to high-temperature reservoir.

  3. Muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statland, Jeffrey; Phillips, Lauren; Trivedi, Jaya R

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle channelopathies are rare heterogeneous diseases with marked genotypic and phenotypic variability. Despite advances in understanding of the molecular pathology of these disorders, the diverse phenotypic manifestations remain a challenge in diagnosis and therapeutics. These disorders can cause lifetime disability and affect quality of life. There is no treatment of these disorders approved by the US Food and Drug Administration at this time. Recognition and treatment of symptoms might reduce morbidity and improve quality of life. This article summarizes the clinical manifestations, diagnostic studies, pathophysiology, and treatment options in nondystrophic myotonia, congenital myasthenic syndrome, and periodic paralyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  5. Mindfulness meditation lowers muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure in African-American males with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeanie; Lyles, Robert H; Bauer-Wu, Susan

    2014-07-01

    Mindfulness meditation (MM) is a stress-reduction technique that may have real biological effects on hemodynamics but has never previously been tested in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. In addition, the mechanisms underlying the potential blood pressure (BP)-lowering effects of MM are unknown. We sought to determine whether MM acutely lowers BP in CKD patients, and whether these hemodynamic changes are mediated by a reduction in sympathetic nerve activity. In 15 hypertensive African-American (AA) males with CKD, we conducted a randomized, crossover study in which participants underwent 14 min of MM or 14 min of BP education (control intervention) during two separate random-order study visits. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), beat-to-beat arterial BP, heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) were continuously measured at baseline and during each intervention. A subset had a third study visit to undergo controlled breathing (CB) to determine whether a reduction in RR alone was sufficient in exacting hemodynamic changes. We observed a significantly greater reduction in systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and HR, as well as a significantly greater reduction in MSNA, during MM compared with the control intervention. Participants had a significantly lower RR during MM; however, in contrast to MM, CB alone did not reduce BP, HR, or MSNA. MM acutely lowers BP and HR in AA males with hypertensive CKD, and these hemodynamic effects may be mediated by a reduction in sympathetic nerve activity. RR is significantly lower during MM, but CB alone without concomitant meditation does not acutely alter hemodynamics or sympathetic activity in CKD.

  6. 31P-MR-spectroscopy of the skeletal muscles under load: demonstration of normal energy metabolism compared to different neuromuscular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, W.; Traeber, F.; Kuhl, C.K.; Keller, E.; Rink, H.; Schild, H.H.; Karitzky, J.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: 31 P-MR spectroscopy of skeletal muscle under ecercise was used to obtain the range of normal variation and comparison was made for different neuromascular diseases. Methods: 41 examinations of 24 volunteers and 41 investigations in 35 patients were performed on 1.5 T MR systems (Gyroscan S15 und S15/ACSII, Philips). Localised 31 P-MR spectra of the calf muscle were obtained in time series with a resolution of 12 s. Results: Two types of muscle energy metabolism were identified from the pattern of spectroscopic time course in volunteers: While the first group was characterised by a remarkable decline to lower pH values during exercise, the second group showed only small pH shifts (minimum pH: 6.48±0.13 vs 6.87±0.07, p -6 ) although comparable workload conditions were maintained. The pH-values correlated well with blood lactate analysis. Patients with metabolic disorders and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) showed decreased resting values of PCr/(PCr+P i ) and increased pH levels during exercise. PCr recovery was significantly delayed (0.31 vs 0.65 min -1 , p i ), altered pH time courses, and decreased PCr recovery seem to be helpful indicators for diagnosis of metabolic muscle disorders. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Chronic 5-Aminoimidazole-4-Carboxamide-1-β-d-Ribofuranoside Treatment Induces Phenotypic Changes in Skeletal Muscle, but Does Not Improve Disease Outcomes in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-France Paré

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative genetic disorder characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. It is well established that regular physical activity supports brain health, benefiting cognitive function, mental health as well as brain structure and plasticity. Exercise mimetics (EMs are a group of drugs and small molecules that target signaling pathways in skeletal muscle known to be activated by endurance exercise. The EM 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR has been shown to induce cognitive benefits in healthy mice. Since AICAR does not readily cross the blood–brain barrier, its beneficial effect on the brain has been ascribed to its impact on skeletal muscle. Our objective, therefore, was to examine the effect of chronic AICAR treatment on the muscular and neurological pathology in a mouse model of HD. To this end, R6/2 mice were treated with AICAR for 8 weeks and underwent regular neurobehavioral testing. Under our conditions, AICAR increased expression of PGC-1α, a powerful phenotypic modifier of muscle, and induced the expected shift toward a more oxidative muscle phenotype in R6/2 mice. However, this treatment failed to induce benefits on HD progression. Indeed, neurobehavioral deficits, striatal, and muscle mutant huntingtin aggregate density, as well as muscle atrophy were not mitigated by the chronic administration of AICAR. Although the muscle adaptations seen in HD mice following AICAR treatment may still provide therapeutically relevant benefits to patients with limited mobility, our findings indicate that under our experimental conditions, AICAR had no effect on several hallmarks of HD.

  8. Absence of calf muscle metabolism alterations in active cystic fibrosis adults with mild to moderate lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decorte, N; Gruet, M; Camara, B; Quetant, S; Mely, L; Vallier, J M; Verges, S; Wuyam, B

    2017-01-01

    Specific alterations in skeletal muscle related to genetic defects may be present in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF). Limb muscle dysfunction may contribute to physical impairment in CF. We hypothesized that adults with CF would have altered calf muscle metabolism during exercise. Fifteen adults with CF and fifteen healthy controls matched for age, gender and physical activity performed a maximal cycling test and an evaluation of calf muscle energetics by 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy before, during and after plantar flexions to exhaustion. Maximal cycling test revealed lower exercise capacities in CF (VO 2peak 2.44±0.11 vs. 3.44±0.23L·Min -1 , P=0.03). At rest, calf muscle phosphorus metabolites and pHi were similar in CF and controls (P>0.05). Maximal power output during plantar flexions was significantly lower in CF compared to controls (7.8±1.2 vs. 6.6±2.4W; P=0.013). At exhaustion, PCr concentration was similarly reduced in both groups (CF -33±7%, controls -34±6%, P=0.44), while PCr degradation at identical absolute workload was greater in CF patients (P=0.04). These differences disappeared when power output was normalized for differences in calf size (maximal power output: 0.10±0.02 vs. 0.10±0.03W/cm 2 ; P=0.87). Pi/PCr ratio and pHi during exercise as well as PCr recovery after exercise were similar between groups. Similar metabolic calf muscle responses during exercise and recovery were found in CF adults and controls. Overall, muscle anabolism rather than specific metabolic dysfunction may be critical regarding muscle function in CF. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Transdiaphragmatic pressure and neural respiratory drive measured during inspiratory muscle training in stable patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu W

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Weiliang Wu,1 Xianming Zhang,2 Lin Lin,1 Yonger Ou,1 Xiaoying Li,1 Lili Guan,1 Bingpeng Guo,1 Luqian Zhou,1 Rongchang Chen1 1State Key Laboratory of Respiratory Disease, Guangzhou Institute of Respiratory Disease, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Inspiratory muscle training (IMT is a rehabilitation therapy for stable patients with COPD. However, its therapeutic effect remains undefined due to the unclear nature of diaphragmatic mobilization during IMT. Diaphragmatic mobilization, represented by transdiaphragmatic pressure (Pdi, and neural respiratory drive, expressed as the corrected root mean square (RMS of the diaphragmatic electromyogram (EMGdi, both provide vital information to select the proper IMT device and loads in COPD, therefore contributing to the curative effect of IMT. Pdi and RMS of EMGdi (RMSdi% were measured and compared during inspiratory resistive training and threshold load training in stable patients with COPD.Patients and methods: Pdi and neural respiratory drive were measured continuously during inspiratory resistive training and threshold load training in 12 stable patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s ± SD was 26.1%±10.2% predicted.Results: Pdi was significantly higher during high-intensity threshold load training (91.46±17.24 cmH2O than during inspiratory resistive training (27.24±6.13 cmH2O in stable patients with COPD, with P<0.01 for each. Significant difference was also found in RMSdi% between high-intensity threshold load training and inspiratory resistive training (69.98%±16.78% vs 17.26%±14.65%, P<0.01.Conclusion: We concluded that threshold load training shows greater mobilization of Pdi and neural respiratory drive than inspiratory resistive training in stable patients with COPD. Keywords: diaphragmatic

  10. Reproducibility and absolute quantification of muscle glycogen in patients with glycogen storage disease by 13C NMR spectroscopy at 7 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Heinicke

    Full Text Available Carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS offers a noninvasive method to assess glycogen levels in skeletal muscle and to identify excess glycogen accumulation in patients with glycogen storage disease (GSD. Despite the clinical potential of the method, it is currently not widely used for diagnosis or for follow-up of treatment. While it is possible to perform acceptable 13C MRS at lower fields, the low natural abundance of 13C and the inherently low signal-to-noise ratio of 13C MRS makes it desirable to utilize the advantage of increased signal strength offered by ultra-high fields for more accurate measurements. Concomitant with this advantage, however, ultra-high fields present unique technical challenges that need to be addressed when studying glycogen. In particular, the question of measurement reproducibility needs to be answered so as to give investigators insight into meaningful inter-subject glycogen differences. We measured muscle glycogen levels in vivo in the calf muscle in three patients with McArdle disease (MD, one patient with phosphofructokinase deficiency (PFKD and four healthy controls by performing 13C MRS at 7T. Absolute quantification of the MRS signal was achieved by using a reference phantom with known concentration of metabolites. Muscle glycogen concentration was increased in GSD patients (31.5±2.9 g/kg w. w. compared with controls (12.4±2.2 g/kg w. w.. In three GSD patients glycogen was also determined biochemically in muscle homogenates from needle biopsies and showed a similar 2.5-fold increase in muscle glycogen concentration in GSD patients compared with controls. Repeated inter-subject glycogen measurements yield a coefficient of variability of 5.18%, while repeated phantom measurements yield a lower 3.2% system variability. We conclude that noninvasive ultra-high field 13C MRS provides a valuable, highly reproducible tool for quantitative assessment of glycogen levels in health and disease.

  11. Analysis of fatty infiltration and inflammation of the pelvic and thigh muscles in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD): grading of disease involvement on MR imaging and correlation with clinical assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Merrow, Arnold C; Shiraj, Sahar; Wong, Brenda L; Horn, Paul S; Laor, Tal

    2013-10-01

    Prior reports focus primarily on muscle fatty infiltration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, the significance of muscle edema is uncertain. To evaluate the frequency and degree of muscle fat and edema, and correlate these with clinical function. Forty-two boys (ages 5-19 years) with DMD underwent pelvic MRI. Axial T1- and fat-suppressed T2-weighted images were evaluated to grade muscle fatty infiltration (0-4) and edema (0-3), respectively. Degree and frequency of disease involvement were compared to clinical evaluations. Gluteus maximus had the greatest mean fatty infiltration score, followed by adductor magnus and gluteus medius muscles, and had the most frequent and greatest degree of fatty infiltration. Gluteus maximus also had the greatest mean edema score, followed by vastus lateralis and gluteus medius muscles. These muscles had the most frequent edema, although the greatest degree of edema was seen in other muscles. There was correlation between cumulative scores of fatty infiltration and all clinical evaluations (P < 0.05). In DMD, the muscles with the most frequent fatty infiltration had the greatest degree of fatty infiltration and correlated with patient function. However, the muscles with the most frequent edema were different from those with the greatest degree of edema. Thus, edema may not predict patient functional status.

  12. The Popeye domain containing 2 (popdc2) gene in zebrafish is required for heart and skeletal muscle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchmaier, Bettina C.; Poon, Kar Lai; Schwerte, Thorsten; Huisken, Jan; Winkler, Christoph; Jungblut, Benno; Stainier, Didier Y.; Brand, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode a family of transmembrane proteins with an evolutionary conserved Popeye domain. These genes are abundantly expressed in striated muscle tissue, however their function is not well understood. In this study we have investigated the role of the popdc2 gene in zebrafish. Popdc2 transcripts were detected in the embryonic myocardium and transiently in the craniofacial and tail musculature. Morpholino oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of popdc2 resulted in aberrant development of skeletal muscle and heart. Muscle segments in the trunk were irregularly shaped and craniofacial muscles were severely reduced or even missing. In the heart, pericardial edema was prevalent in the morphants and heart chambers were elongated and looping was abnormal. These pathologies in muscle and heart were alleviated after reducing the morpholino concentration. However the heart still was abnormal displaying cardiac arrhythmia at later stages of development. Optical recordings of cardiac contractility revealed irregular ventricular contractions with a 2:1, or 3:1 atrial/ventricular conduction ratio, which caused a significant reduction in heart frequency. Recordings of calcium transients with high spatiotemporal resolution using a transgenic calcium indicator line (Tg(cmlc2:gCaMP)s878) and SPIM microscopy confirmed the presence of a severe arrhythmia phenotype. Our results identify popdc2 as a gene important for striated muscle differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis. In addition it is required for the development of the cardiac conduction system. PMID:22290329

  13. Natural history of skeletal muscle mass changes in chronic kidney disease stage 4 and 5 patients: an observational study.

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    Stephen G John

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional studies in dialysis demonstrate muscle wasting associated with loss of function, increased morbidity and mortality. The relative drivers are poorly understood. There is a paucity of data regarding interval change in muscle in pre-dialysis and dialysis-dependant patients. This study aimed to examine muscle and fat mass change and elucidate associations with muscle wasting in advanced CKD. 134 patients were studied (60 HD, 28 PD, 46 CKD 4-5 and followed up for two years. Groups were similar in age, sex and diabetes prevalence. Soft tissue cross-sectional area (CSA was measured annually on 3 occasions by a standardised multi-slice CT thigh. Potential determinants of muscle and fat CSA were assessed. Functional ability was assessed by sit-to-stand testing. 88 patients completed follow-up (40 HD, 16 PD, 32 CKD. There was a significant difference in percentage change in muscle CSA (MCSA over year 1, dependant on treatment modality (χ(2 = 6.46; p = 0.039. Muscle loss was most pronounced in pre-dialysis patients. Muscle loss during year 1 was partially reversed in year 2 in 39%. Incident dialysis patients significantly lost MCSA during the year which they commenced dialysis, but not the subsequent year. Baseline MCSA, change in MCSA during year 1 and dialysis modality predicted year 2 change in MCSA (adjusted R(2 = 0.77, p<0.001. There was no correlation between muscle or fat CSA change and any other factors. MCSA correlated with functional testing, although MCSA change correlated poorly with change in functional ability. These data demonstrate marked variability in MCSA over 2 years. Loss of MCSA in both pre-dialysis and established dialysis patients is reversible. Factors previously cross-sectionally shown to correlate with MCSA did not correlate with wasting progression. The higher rate of muscle loss in undialysed CKD patients, and its reversal after dialysis commencement, suggests that conventional indicators may not

  14. Effect of keto amino acids on asymmetric dimethyl arginine, muscle and fat tissue in chronic kidney disease

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    Vladimir Teplan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Levels of endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA are elevated in chronic kidney disease (CKD and may contribute to vascular complications. In this study we tested the hypothesis that elevated ADMA can be reduced in CKD patients by long-term administration of low-protein diet (LPD supplemented with keto amino acids (KA. In a long-term prospective double blind placebo controlled randomized trial, we evaluated a total of 120 CKD patients (62/58F aged 22-76 yrs with creatinine clearance 22-40mL/min/1.73m2 for a period of 36 months. All patients were on low-protein diet containing 0.6 protein/kg/IBW/day and 120-125/kJ/kg/IBW/day. LPD was randomly supplemented with KA at dosage of 100 mg/kg/IBW/day (61 patients, Group I while 59 patients (Group II received placebo. During the study period, glomerular filtration rate (GFR slightly decreased (Ccr from 34.2±11.6 to 29.9±9.2 mL/min and 33.5±11.6 to 22.2±10.4 mL/min in Group I and II, respectively; this however was more marked in Group II (p<0.01. Fat in muscle measured by MR spectroscopy (MRS, m.tibialis anterior significantly decreased in Group I and was linked to reduced volume of visceral fat measured by MRI (p<0.01. Reduction of fat in Group II was not significant. In Group I, there was a significant decrease in the plasma level of ADMA (from 2.4±0.4 to 1.2±0.3 μmol/L, p<0.01, but ADMA remained unchanged in Group II. A further remarkable finding was reduction in the plasma concentration of pentosidine (from 486±168 to 325±127 μg/L, p<0.01 and decrease of proteinuria (from 3.7±2.20 to 1.6±1.2 g/24hrs, p<0.01 in Group I. Plasma adiponectin (ADPN in Group I rose (p<0.01. Analysis of lipid spectrum revealed a mild yet significant decrease in total cholesterol and LPD-cholesterol (p<0.01, more pronounced in Group I. In Group I, there was a decrease in plasma triglycerides (from 3.8±1.5 down to 2.3±0.5 mmol/L, p<0.01, whereas glycated hemoglobin (HbAc1

  15. Application of neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the lower limb skeletal muscles in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Ewa Barbara Kucio

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing physical activity is a widely-known method of rehabilitation of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, what kind of procedure is to be applied if a patient suffers from advanced heart or respiratory failure, cannot undertake physical exercise due to locomotor system disorders or is currently undergoing respiratorotherapy? Recent research shows that neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the lower limb skeletal muscles (NMES may comprise an alternative to physical training in patients with CHF and COPD. The aim of this study is to summarize the current state of knowledge on the use of NMES in cardiac rehabilitation of patients with CHF and pulmonary rehabilitation of patients with COPD. As demonstrated in recent research on the topic, NMES – due to forcing the muscles to activate – increases exercise tolerance, muscle mass and endurance in patients with CHF and COPD. The beneficial effect of NMES on blood circulation in the muscles, aerobic enzymes activity, functioning of the vascular endothelium, reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines concentration and increased quality of life has also been presented. It is to be accentuated that NMES treatment, due to lesser physical exertion and, in turn, a decreased feeling of dyspnea are more comfortable for the patient than traditional physical training. Moreover, NMES treatment, after foregoing training, can be applied at home. Potential side effects include transient muscle pain and minor skin damage due to improper positioning of the electrodes. To summarize, NMES treatment is well received by CHF and COPD patients and brings about increased exercise tolerance, as well as better quality of life. Devices used for NMES therapy, due to progressive miniaturization, are easily accessible and relatively inexpensive.

  16. Walking performance is positively correlated to calf muscle fiber size in peripheral artery disease subjects, but fibers show aberrant mitophagy: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sarah H; McDermott, Mary M; Sufit, Robert L; Kosmac, Kate; Bugg, Alex W; Gonzalez-Freire, Marta; Ferrucci, Luigi; Tian, Lu; Zhao, Lihui; Gao, Ying; Kibbe, Melina R; Criqui, Michael H; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2016-09-29

    Patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) have decreased mobility, which is not fully explained by impaired blood supply to the lower limb. Additionally, reports are conflicted regarding fiber type distribution patterns in PAD, but agree that skeletal muscle mitochondrial respiration is impaired. To test the hypothesis that reduced muscle fiber oxidative activity and type I distribution are negatively associated with walking performance in PAD, calf muscle biopsies from non-PAD (n = 7) and PAD participants (n = 26) were analyzed immunohistochemically for fiber type and size, oxidative activity, markers of autophagy, and capillary density. Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance. There was a wide range in fiber type distribution among subjects with PAD (9-81 % type I fibers) that did not correlate with walking performance. However, mean type I fiber size correlated with 4-min normal- and fastest-paced walk velocity (r = 0.4940, P = 0.010 and r = 0.4944, P = 0.010, respectively). Although intensity of succinate dehydrogenase activity staining was consistent with fiber type, up to 17 % of oxidative fibers were devoid of mitochondria in their cores, and the core showed accumulation of the autophagic marker, LC3, which did not completely co-localize with LAMP2, a lysosome marker. Calf muscle type I fiber size positively correlates with walking performance in PAD. Accumulation of LC3 and a lack of co-localization of LC3 with LAMP2 in the area depleted of mitochondria in PAD fibers suggests impaired clearance of damaged mitochondria, which may contribute to reduced muscle oxidative capacity. Further study is needed to determine whether defective mitophagy is associated with decline in function over time, and whether interventions aimed at preserving mitochondrial function and improving autophagy can improve walking performance in PAD.

  17. β2-Adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle does not modulate disease severity in the rodent meniscectomy model of osteoarthritis

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    Tonge, D.P.; Jones, S.W.; Parr, T.; Bardsley, R.; Doherty, M.; Maciewicz, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine whether β2-adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle can modulate the severity of osteoarthritis (OA) in the rodent meniscectomy (MNX) model. Methods Male Lewis rats were subcutaneously administered with 1.5 mg/kg/day clenbuterol hydrochloride