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Sample records for stresses computational fluid

  1. A Finite-Volume computational mechanics framework for multi-physics coupled fluid-stress problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, C; Cross, M.; Pericleous, K.

    1998-01-01

    Where there is a strong interaction between fluid flow, heat transfer and stress induced deformation, it may not be sufficient to solve each problem separately (i.e. fluid vs. stress, using different techniques or even different computer codes). This may be acceptable where the interaction is static, but less so, if it is dynamic. It is desirable for this reason to develop software that can accommodate both requirements (i.e. that of fluid flow and that of solid mechanics) in a seamless environment. This is accomplished in the University of Greenwich code PHYSICA, which solves both the fluid flow problem and the stress-strain equations in a unified Finite-Volume environment, using an unstructured computational mesh that can deform dynamically. Example applications are given of the work of the group in the metals casting process (where thermal stresses cause elasto- visco-plastic distortion)

  2. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) insights into agitation stress methods in biopharmaceutical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ge; Bee, Jared S; Biddlecombe, James G; Chen, Quanmin; Leach, W Thomas

    2012-02-28

    Agitation of small amounts of liquid is performed routinely in biopharmaceutical process, formulation, and packaging development. Protein degradation commonly results from agitation, but the specific stress responsible or degradation mechanism is usually not well understood. Characterization of the agitation stress methods is critical to identifying protein degradation mechanisms or specific sensitivities. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to model agitation of 1 mL of fluid by four types of common laboratory agitation instruments, including a rotator, orbital shaker, magnetic stirrer and vortex mixer. Fluid stresses in the bulk liquid and near interfaces were identified, quantified and compared. The vortex mixer provides the most intense stresses overall, while the stir bar system presented locally intense shear proximal to the hydrophobic stir bar surface. The rotator provides gentler fluid stresses, but the air-water interfacial area and surface stresses are relatively high given its low rotational frequency. The orbital shaker provides intermediate-level stresses but with the advantage of a large stable platform for consistent vial-to-vial homogeneity. Selection of experimental agitation methods with targeted types and intensities of stresses can facilitate better understanding of protein degradation mechanisms and predictability for "real world" applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Simultaneous fluid-flow, heat-transfer and solid-stress computation in a single computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, D B [Concentration Heat and Momentum Ltd, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    Computer simulation of flow- and thermally-induced stresses in mechanical-equipment assemblies has, in the past, required the use of two distinct software packages, one to determine the forces and the temperatures, and the other to compute the resultant stresses. The present paper describes how a single computer program can perform both tasks at the same time. The technique relies on the similarity of the equations governing velocity distributions in fluids to those governing displacements in solids. The same SIMPLE-like algorithm is used for solving both. Applications to 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional situations are presented. It is further suggested that Solid-Fluid-Thermal, ie SFT analysis may come to replace CFD on the one hand and the analysis of stresses in solids on the other, by performing the functions of both. (author) 7 refs.

  4. Simultaneous fluid-flow, heat-transfer and solid-stress computation in a single computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, D.B. [Concentration Heat and Momentum Ltd, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    Computer simulation of flow- and thermally-induced stresses in mechanical-equipment assemblies has, in the past, required the use of two distinct software packages, one to determine the forces and the temperatures, and the other to compute the resultant stresses. The present paper describes how a single computer program can perform both tasks at the same time. The technique relies on the similarity of the equations governing velocity distributions in fluids to those governing displacements in solids. The same SIMPLE-like algorithm is used for solving both. Applications to 1-, 2- and 3-dimensional situations are presented. It is further suggested that Solid-Fluid-Thermal, ie SFT analysis may come to replace CFD on the one hand and the analysis of stresses in solids on the other, by performing the functions of both. (author) 7 refs.

  5. Wall Shear Stress Estimation of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Febina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to evaluate the effects of wall shear stress (WSS on thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Aneurysm is an excessive localized swelling of the arterial wall due to many physiological factors and it may rupture causing shock or sudden death. The existing imaging modalities such as MRI and CT assist in the visualization of anomalies in internal organs. However, the expected dynamic behaviour of arterial bulge under stressed condition can only be effectively evaluated through mathematical modelling. In this work, a 3D aneurysm model is reconstructed from the CT scan slices and eventually the model is imported to Star CCM+ (Siemens, USA for intensive CFD analysis. The domain is discretized using polyhedral mesh with prism layers to capture the weakening boundary more accurately. When there is flow reversal in TAA as seen in the velocity vector plot, there is a chance of cell damage causing clots. This is because of the shear created in the system due to the flow pattern. It is observed from the proposed mathematical modelling that the deteriorating WSS is an indicator for possible rupture and its value oscillates over a cardiac cycle as well as over different stress conditions. In this model, the vortex formation pattern and flow reversals are also captured. The non-Newtonian model, including a pulsatile flow instead of a steady average flow, does not overpredict the WSS (15.29 Pa compared to 16 Pa for the Newtonian model. Although in a cycle the flow behaviour is laminar-turbulent-laminar (LTL, utilizing the non-Newtonian model along with LTL model also overpredicted the WSS with a value of 20.1 Pa. The numerical study presented here provides good insight of TAA using a systematic approach to numerical modelling and analysis.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myeong, Hyeon Guk

    1999-06-01

    This book deals with computational fluid dynamics with basic and history of numerical fluid dynamics, introduction of finite volume method using one-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of two-dimensional heat conduction equation, solution of Navier-Stokes equation, fluid with heat transport, turbulent flow and turbulent model, Navier-Stokes solution by generalized coordinate system such as coordinate conversion, conversion of basic equation, program and example of calculation, application of abnormal problem and high speed solution of numerical fluid dynamics.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Hydrodynamics and Stresses in the PhEur/USP Disintegration Tester Under Fed and Fasted Fluid Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindgen, Sarah; Wachtel, Herbert; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Langguth, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Disintegration of oral solid dosage forms is a prerequisite for drug dissolution and absorption and is to a large extent dependent on the pressures and hydrodynamic conditions in the solution that the dosage form is exposed to. In this work, the hydrodynamics in the PhEur/USP disintegration tester were investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Particle image velocimetry was used to validate the CFD predictions. The CFD simulations were performed with different Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, representing fasted and fed states. The results indicate that the current design and operating conditions of the disintegration test device, given by the pharmacopoeias, are not reproducing the in vivo situation. This holds true for the hydrodynamics in the disintegration tester that generates Reynolds numbers dissimilar to the reported in vivo situation. Also, when using homogenized US FDA meal, representing the fed state, too high viscosities and relative pressures are generated. The forces acting on the dosage form are too small for all fluids compared to the in vivo situation. The lack of peristaltic contractions, which generate hydrodynamics and shear stress in vivo, might be the major drawback of the compendial device resulting in the observed differences between predicted and in vivo measured hydrodynamics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  8. Essential Computational Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    This book serves as a complete and self-contained introduction to the principles of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis. It is deliberately short (at approximately 300 pages) and can be used as a text for the first part of the course of applied CFD followed by a software tutorial. The main objectives of this non-traditional format are: 1) To introduce and explain, using simple examples where possible, the principles and methods of CFD analysis and to demystify the `black box’ of a CFD software tool, and 2) To provide a basic understanding of how CFD problems are set and

  9. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  10. Impact of competitive flow on wall shear stress in coronary surgery: computational fluid dynamics of a LIMA-LAD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgaard, Håvard; Swillens, Abigail; Nordhaug, Dag; Kirkeby-Garstad, Idar; Van Loo, Denis; Vitale, Nicola; Segers, Patrick; Haaverstad, Rune; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2010-12-01

    Competitive flow from native coronary vessels is considered a major factor in the failure of coronary bypass grafts. However, the pathophysiological effects are not fully understood. Low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease, like atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. The aim was to investigate the impact of competitive flow on WSS in mammary artery bypass grafts. Using computational fluid dynamics, WSS was calculated in a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft to the left anterior descending artery in a three-dimensional in vivo porcine coronary artery bypass graft model. The following conditions were investigated: high competitive flow (non-significant coronary lesion), partial competitive flow (significant coronary lesion), and no competitive flow (totally occluded coronary vessel). Time-averaged WSS of LIMA at high, partial, and no competitive flow were 0.3-0.6, 0.6-3.0, and 0.9-3.0 Pa, respectively. Further, oscillatory WSS quantified as the oscillatory shear index (OSI) ranged from (maximum OSI = 0.5 equals zero net WSS) 0.15 to 0.35, OSI similar to the no competitive flow condition. Graft flow is highly dependent on the degree of competitive flow. High competitive flow was found to produce unfavourable WSS consistent with endothelial dysfunction and subsequent graft narrowing and failure. Partial competitive flow, however, may be better tolerated as it was found to be similar to the ideal condition of no competitive flow.

  11. A third order accurate Lagrangian finite element scheme for the computation of generalized molecular stress function fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasano, Andrea; Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2017-01-01

    A third order accurate, in time and space, finite element scheme for the numerical simulation of three- dimensional time-dependent flow of the molecular stress function type of fluids in a generalized formu- lation is presented. The scheme is an extension of the K-BKZ Lagrangian finite element me...

  12. Development of a system for measuring wall shear stress in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Keita; Nagao, Taisuke; Okada, Kouji; Miyazaki, Shohei; Yang, Xiaomei; Yamazaki, Youichi; Murase, Kenya

    2008-01-01

    We developed a system for measuring the wall shear stress (WSS) in blood vessels using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The time-dependent velocity at the center of the blood vessel was measured by phase-contrast MRI and was approximated by finite Fourier series, which was used for generating the velocity profile at the inlet for the boundary condition to the CFD method. To validate the CFD method, we compared the WSS obtained by the CFD method with the theoretical value in a straight cylinder with various radii for both steady and pulsatile flows. We also investigated the dependence of the WSS on the inlet velocity profile incorporated into the CFD method. For steady flow, there was a good agreement between the WSS obtained by the CFD method and the theoretical value. For pulsatile flow, there was a relatively good agreement between them when the radius of the cylinder was 2.5 mm and the inlet velocity profile was given by the Womersley solution for fully developed pulsatile flow in a straight circular cylinder. When the radius of the cylinder was 5 mm and/or the inlet velocity profile was assumed to be parabolic, large differences were observed between them, suggesting that the assumption of fully developed flow does not hold true in these cases. In human studies, the vortex due to the secondary blood flow in the carotid arterial sinus was clearly observed. The WSS in the bifurcation was the highest, while that in the carotid arterial sinus was the smallest. In conclusion, the system presented here appears to be useful for measuring the WSS in blood vessels and for analyzing the cause and/or extent of atherosclerosis, and our results suggest that the inlet velocity profile should be carefully considered. (author)

  13. Numerical simulation of temperature and thermal stress for nuclear piping by using computational fluid dynamics analysis and Green’s function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boo, Myung-Hwan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Chang-Kyun; Kim, Hyun-Su [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Choeng-Ryul [ELSOLTEC, Inc., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Owing to the fact that thermal fatigue is a well-known damage mechanism in nuclear power plants, accurate stress and fatigue evaluation are highly important. Operating experience shows that the design condition is conservative compared to the actual one. Therefore, various fatigue monitoring methods have been extensively utilized to consider the actual operating data. However, defining the local temperature in the piping is difficult because temperature-measuring instruments are limited. The purpose of this paper is to define accurate local temperature in the piping and evaluate thermal stress using Green’s function (GF) by performing a series of computational fluid dynamics analyses considering the complex fluid conditions. Also, the thermal stress is determined by adopting GF and comparing it with that of the design condition. The fluid dynamics analysis result indicates that the fluid temperature slowly varies compared to the designed one even when the flow rate changes abruptly. In addition, the resulting thermal stress can significantly decrease when reflecting the actual temperature.

  14. Fluid simulation for computer graphics

    CERN Document Server

    Bridson, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Animating fluids like water, smoke, and fire using physics-based simulation is increasingly important in visual effects, in particular in movies, like The Day After Tomorrow, and in computer games. This book provides a practical introduction to fluid simulation for graphics. The focus is on animating fully three-dimensional incompressible flow, from understanding the math and the algorithms to the actual implementation.

  15. Computational fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, H. A.

    1993-01-01

    Two papers are included in this progress report. In the first, the compressible Navier-Stokes equations have been used to compute leading edge receptivity of boundary layers over parabolic cylinders. Natural receptivity at the leading edge was simulated and Tollmien-Schlichting waves were observed to develop in response to an acoustic disturbance, applied through the farfield boundary conditions. To facilitate comparison with previous work, all computations were carried out at a free stream Mach number of 0.3. The spatial and temporal behavior of the flowfields are calculated through the use of finite volume algorithms and Runge-Kutta integration. The results are dominated by strong decay of the Tollmien-Schlichting wave due to the presence of the mean flow favorable pressure gradient. The effects of numerical dissipation, forcing frequency, and nose radius are studied. The Strouhal number is shown to have the greatest effect on the unsteady results. In the second paper, a transition model for low-speed flows, previously developed by Young et al., which incorporates first-mode (Tollmien-Schlichting) disturbance information from linear stability theory has been extended to high-speed flow by incorporating the effects of second mode disturbances. The transition model is incorporated into a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes solver with a one-equation turbulence model. Results using a variable turbulent Prandtl number approach demonstrate that the current model accurately reproduces available experimental data for first and second-mode dominated transitional flows. The performance of the present model shows significant improvement over previous transition modeling attempts.

  16. Computational modelling in fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauguel, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modelling of the greatest part of environmental or industrial flow problems gives very similar types of equations. The considerable increase in computing capacity over the last ten years consequently allowed numerical models of growing complexity to be processed. The varied group of computer codes presented are now a complementary tool of experimental facilities to achieve studies in the field of fluid mechanics. Several codes applied in the nuclear field (reactors, cooling towers, exchangers, plumes...) are presented among others [fr

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B.

    2008-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design is a new title in the is a new title in the REHVA guidebook series. The guidebook is written for people who need to use and discuss results based on CFD predictions, and it gives insight into the subject for those who are not used to work with CFD...

  18. Principles of computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wesseling, Pieter

    2001-01-01

    The book is aimed at graduate students, researchers, engineers and physicists involved in flow computations. An up-to-date account is given of the present state-of-the-art of numerical methods employed in computational fluid dynamics. The underlying numerical principles are treated with a fair amount of detail, using elementary mathematical analysis. Attention is given to difficulties arising from geometric complexity of the flow domain and of nonuniform structured boundary-fitted grids. Uniform accuracy and efficiency for singular perturbation problems is studied, pointing the way to accurate computation of flows at high Reynolds number. Much attention is given to stability analysis, and useful stability conditions are provided, some of them new, for many numerical schemes used in practice. Unified methods for compressible and incompressible flows are discussed. Numerical analysis of the shallow-water equations is included. The theory of hyperbolic conservation laws is treated. Godunov's order barrier and ho...

  19. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book analyzes finite element theory as applied to computational fluid mechanics. It includes a chapter on using the heat conduction equation to expose the essence of finite element theory, including higher-order accuracy and convergence in a common knowledge framework. Another chapter generalizes the algorithm to extend application to the nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. Other chapters are concerned with the analysis of a specific fluids mechanics problem class, including theory and applications. Some of the topics covered include finite element theory for linear mechanics; potential flow; weighted residuals/galerkin finite element theory; inviscid and convection dominated flows; boundary layers; parabolic three-dimensional flows; and viscous and rotational flows

  20. Computational methods for fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H

    2002-01-01

    In its 3rd revised and extended edition the book offers an overview of the techniques used to solve problems in fluid mechanics on computers and describes in detail those most often used in practice. Included are advanced methods in computational fluid dynamics, like direct and large-eddy simulation of turbulence, multigrid methods, parallel computing, moving grids, structured, block-structured and unstructured boundary-fitted grids, free surface flows. The 3rd edition contains a new section dealing with grid quality and an extended description of discretization methods. The book shows common roots and basic principles for many different methods. The book also contains a great deal of practical advice for code developers and users, it is designed to be equally useful to beginners and experts. The issues of numerical accuracy, estimation and reduction of numerical errors are dealt with in detail, with many examples. A full-feature user-friendly demo-version of a commercial CFD software has been added, which ca...

  1. Principles of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesseling, P.

    2001-01-01

    The book is aimed at graduate students, researchers, engineers and physicists involved in flow computations. An up-to-date account is given of the present state- of-the-art of numerical methods employed in computational fluid dynamics. The underlying numerical principles are treated with a fair amount of detail, using elementary mathematical analysis. Attention is given to difficulties arising from geometric complexity of the flow domain and of nonuniform structured boundary-fitted grids. Uniform accuracy and efficiency for singular perturbation problems is studied, pointing the way to accurate computation of flows at high Reynolds number. Much attention is given to stability analysis, and useful stability conditions are provided, some of them new, for many numerical schemes used in practice. Unified methods for compressible and incompressible flows are discussed. Numerical analysis of the shallow-water equations is included. The theory of hyperbolic conservation laws is treated. Godunov's order barrier and how to overcome it by means of slope-limited schemes is discussed. An introduction is given to efficient iterative solution methods, using Krylov subspace and multigrid acceleration. Many pointers are given to recent literature, to help the reader to quickly reach the current research frontier. (orig.)

  2. Computational fluid dynamics comparisons of wall shear stress in patient-specific coronary artery bifurcation using coronary angiography and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Eric; Thondapu, Vikas; Chin, Cheng; Scheerlinck, Cedric; Zahtila, Tony; Mamon, Chris; Nguyen, Wilson; Ooi, Andrew; Barlis, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Blood flow dynamics directly influence biology of the arterial wall, and are closely linked with the development of coronary artery disease. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers may be employed to analyze the hemodynamic environment in patient-specific reconstructions of coronary arteries. Although coronary X-ray angiography (CA) is the most common medical imaging modality for 3D arterial reconstruction, models reconstructed from CA assume a circular or elliptical cross-sectional area. This limitation can be overcome with a reconstruction technique fusing CA with intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT scans the interior of an artery using near-infrared light, achieving a 10-micron resolution and providing unprecedented detail of vessel geometry. We compared 3D coronary artery bifurcation models generated using CA alone versus OCT-angiography fusion. The model reconstructed from CA alone is unable to identify the detailed geometrical variations of diseased arteries, and also under-estimates the cross-sectional vessel area compared to OCT-angiography fusion. CFD was performed in both models under pulsatile flow in order to identify and compare regions of low wall shear stress, a hemodynamic parameter directly linked with progression of atherosclerosis. Supported by ARC LP150100233 and VLSCI VR0210.

  3. Yield stress fluids slowly yield to analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonn, D.; Denn, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    We are surrounded in everyday life by yield stress fluids: materials that behave as solids under small stresses but flow like liquids beyond a critical stress. For example, paint must flow under the brush, but remain fixed in a vertical film despite the force of gravity. Food products (such as

  4. Using Computers in Fluids Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    Three approaches for using computers to improve basic fluids engineering education are presented. The use of computational fluid dynamics solutions to fundamental flow problems is discussed. The use of interactive, highly graphical software which operates on either a modern workstation or personal computer is highlighted. And finally, the development of 'textbooks' and teaching aids which are used and distributed on the World Wide Web is described. Arguments for and against this technology as applied to undergraduate education are also discussed.

  5. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes Two distinguishing features of the discourse are solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty Matlab codes are presented and discussed for a broad...

  6. Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics: Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner. The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming. This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice. There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes. Two distinguishing features of the discourse are: solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty. Matlab codes are presented and discussed for ...

  7. An introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    1999-01-01

    CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building.......CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building....

  8. Evaluation of Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) code Open FOAM in the study of the pressurized thermal stress of PWR reactors. Comparison with the commercial code Ansys-CFX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, M.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu Martin, G.; Chiva, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this work is proposed to evaluate the potential of the OpenFOAM code for the simulation of typical fluid flows in reactors PWR, in particular for the study of pressurized thermal stress. Test T1-1 has been simulated , within the OECD ROSA project, with the objective of evaluating the performance of the code OpenFOAM and models of turbulence that has implemented to capture the effect of the thrust forces in the case study.

  9. Fluid dynamics computer programs for NERVA turbopump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    During the design of the NERVA turbopump, numerous computer programs were developed for the analyses of fluid dynamic problems within the machine. Program descriptions, example cases, users instructions, and listings for the majority of these programs are presented.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  11. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to the basic theory of fluid mechanics and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical computation. Methods of scientific computing are introduced alongside with theoretical analysis and MATLAB® codes are presented and discussed for a broad range of topics: from interfacial shapes in hydrostatics, to vortex dynamics, to viscous flow, to turbulent flow, to panel methods for flow past airfoils. The third edition includes new topics, additional examples, solved and unsolved problems, and revised images. It adds more computational algorithms and MATLAB programs. It also incorporates discussion of the latest version of the fluid dynamics software library FDLIB, which is freely available online. FDLIB offers an extensive range of computer codes that demonstrate the implementation of elementary and advanced algorithms and provide an invaluable resource for research, teaching, classroom instruction, and self-study. This ...

  12. Inertial effects on the stress generation of active fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatori, S. C.; Brady, J. F.

    2017-09-01

    Suspensions of self-propelled bodies generate a unique mechanical stress owing to their motility that impacts their large-scale collective behavior. For microswimmers suspended in a fluid with negligible particle inertia, we have shown that the virial swim stress is a useful quantity to understand the rheology and nonequilibrium behaviors of active soft matter systems. For larger self-propelled organisms such as fish, it is unclear how particle inertia impacts their stress generation and collective movement. Here we analyze the effects of finite particle inertia on the mechanical pressure (or stress) generated by a suspension of self-propelled bodies. We find that swimmers of all scales generate a unique swim stress and Reynolds stress that impact their collective motion. We discover that particle inertia plays a similar role as confinement in overdamped active Brownian systems, where the reduced run length of the swimmers decreases the swim stress and affects the phase behavior. Although the swim and Reynolds stresses vary individually with the magnitude of particle inertia, the sum of the two contributions is independent of particle inertia. This points to an important concept when computing stresses in computer simulations of nonequilibrium systems: The Reynolds and the virial stresses must both be calculated to obtain the overall stress generated by a system.

  13. Comparison of Four Types of Membrane Bioreactor Systems in Terms of Shear Stress over the Membrane Surface using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Bentzen, Thomas Ruby

    2013-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) have been used successfully in biological wastewater treatment to solve the perennial problem of effective solids–liquid separation. A common problem with MBR systems is clogging of the modules and fouling of the membrane, resulting in frequent cleaning and replacement...... and requires knowledge of the membrane fouling, hydrodynamics and biokinetics. Modern tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to diagnose and understand the two-phase flow in an MBR. Four cases of different MBR configurations are presented in this work, using CFD as a tool to develop...

  14. Yielding to Stress: Recent Developments in Viscoplastic Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmforth, Neil J.; Frigaard, Ian A.; Ovarlez, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The archetypal feature of a viscoplastic fluid is its yield stress: If the material is not sufficiently stressed, it behaves like a solid, but once the yield stress is exceeded, the material flows like a fluid. Such behavior characterizes materials common in industries such as petroleum and chemical processing, cosmetics, and food processing and in geophysical fluid dynamics. The most common idealization of a viscoplastic fluid is the Bingham model, which has been widely used to rationalize experimental data, even though it is a crude oversimplification of true rheological behavior. The popularity of the model is in its apparent simplicity. Despite this, the sudden transition between solid-like behavior and flow introduces significant complications into the dynamics, which, as a result, has resisted much analysis. Over recent decades, theoretical developments, both analytical and computational, have provided a better understanding of the effect of the yield stress. Simultaneously, greater insight into the material behavior of real fluids has been afforded by advances in rheometry. These developments have primed us for a better understanding of the various applications in the natural and engineering sciences.

  15. Mechanics of couple-stress fluid coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    The formal development of a theory of viscoelastic surface fluids with bending resistance - their kinematics, dynamics, and rheology are discussed. It is relevant to the mechanics of fluid drops and jets coated by a thin layer of immiscible fluid with rather general rheology. This approach unifies the hydrodynamics of two-dimensional fluids with the mechanics of an elastic shell in the spirit of a Cosserat continuum. There are three distinct facets to the formulation of surface continuum mechanics. Outlined are the important ideas and results associated with each: the kinematics of evolving surface geometries, the conservation laws governing the mechanics of surface continua, and the rheological equations of state governing the surface stress and moment tensors.

  16. Colour in visualisation for computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Kinnear, D; Atherton, MA; Collins, MW; Dokhan, J; Karayiannis, TG

    2006-01-01

    Colour is used in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations in two key ways. First it is used to visualise the geometry and allow the engineers to be confident that the model constructed is a good representation of the engineering situation. Once an analysis has been completed, colour is used in post-processing the data from the simulations to illustrate the complex fluid mechanic phenomena under investigation. This paper describes these two uses of colour and provides some examples to il...

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Room Air Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2004-01-01

    on the mass fraction transport equation. The importance of ?false? or numerical diffusion is also addressed in connection with the simple description of a supply opening. The different aspects of boundary conditions in the indoor environment as e.g. the simulation of Air Terminal Devices and the simulation......Nielsen, P.V. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Room Air Movement. Indoor Air, International Journal of Indoor Environment and Health, Vol. 14, Supplement 7, pp. 134-143, 2004. ABSTRACT Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and new developments of CFD in the indoor environment as well as quality...... considerations are important elements in the study of energy consumption, thermal comfort and indoor air quality in buildings. The paper discusses the quality level of Computational Fluid Dynamics and the involved schemes (first, second and third order schemes) by the use of the Smith and Hutton problem...

  18. A Computational Fluid Dynamics Algorithm on a Massively Parallel Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    The discipline of computational fluid dynamics is demanding ever-increasing computational power to deal with complex fluid flow problems. We investigate the performance of a finite-difference computational fluid dynamics algorithm on a massively parallel computer, the Connection Machine. Of special interest is an implicit time-stepping algorithm; to obtain maximum performance from the Connection Machine, it is necessary to use a nonstandard algorithm to solve the linear systems that arise in the implicit algorithm. We find that the Connection Machine ran achieve very high computation rates on both explicit and implicit algorithms. The performance of the Connection Machine puts it in the same class as today's most powerful conventional supercomputers.

  19. Computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Pletcher, Richard H; Anderson, Dale

    2012-01-01

    ""I have always considered this book the best gift from one generation to the next in computational fluid dynamics. I earnestly recommend this book to graduate students and practicing engineers for the pleasure of learning and a handy reference. The description of the basic concepts and fundamentals is thorough and is crystal clear for understanding. And since 1984, two newer editions have kept abreast to the new, relevant, and fully verified advancements in CFD.""-Joseph J.S. Shang, Wright State University""Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer is very well written to be used as a t

  20. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haworth, D.C.; O' Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  1. Engineering Fracking Fluids with Computer Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaqfeh, Eric

    2015-11-01

    There are no comprehensive simulation-based tools for engineering the flows of viscoelastic fluid-particle suspensions in fully three-dimensional geometries. On the other hand, the need for such a tool in engineering applications is immense. Suspensions of rigid particles in viscoelastic fluids play key roles in many energy applications. For example, in oil drilling the ``drilling mud'' is a very viscous, viscoelastic fluid designed to shear-thin during drilling, but thicken at stoppage so that the ``cuttings'' can remain suspended. In a related application known as hydraulic fracturing suspensions of solids called ``proppant'' are used to prop open the fracture by pumping them into the well. It is well-known that particle flow and settling in a viscoelastic fluid can be quite different from that which is observed in Newtonian fluids. First, it is now well known that the ``fluid particle split'' at bifurcation cracks is controlled by fluid rheology in a manner that is not understood. Second, in Newtonian fluids, the presence of an imposed shear flow in the direction perpendicular to gravity (which we term a cross or orthogonal shear flow) has no effect on the settling of a spherical particle in Stokes flow (i.e. at vanishingly small Reynolds number). By contrast, in a non-Newtonian liquid, the complex rheological properties induce a nonlinear coupling between the sedimentation and shear flow. Recent experimental data have shown both the shear thinning and the elasticity of the suspending polymeric solutions significantly affects the fluid-particle split at bifurcations, as well as the settling rate of the solids. In the present work, we use the Immersed Boundary Method to develop computer simulations of viscoelastic flow in suspensions of spheres to study these problems. These simulations allow us to understand the detailed physical mechanisms for the remarkable physical behavior seen in practice, and actually suggest design rules for creating new fluid recipes.

  2. Engineering applications of computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Awang, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis that can be used for conceptual studies of product design, detail product development, process troubleshooting. It demonstrates the benefit of CFD modeling as a cost saving, timely, safe and easy to scale-up methodology.

  3. Three-dimensional multi-phase flow computational fluid dynamics model for analysis of transport phenomena and thermal stresses in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maher, A.R.; Al-Baghdadi, S. [International Technological Univ., London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Haroun, A.K.; Al-Janabi, S. [Babylon Univ., Babylon (Iraq). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Fuel cell technology is expected to play an important role in meeting the growing demand for distributed generation because it can convert the chemical energy of a clean fuel directly into electrical energy. An operating fuel cell has varying local conditions of temperature, humidity, and power generation across the active area of the fuel cell in 3D. This paper presented a model that was developed to improve the basic understanding of the transport phenomena and thermal stresses in PEM fuel cells, and to investigate the behaviour of polymer membrane under hygro and thermal stresses during the cell operation. This comprehensive 3D, multiphase, non-isothermal model accounts for the major transport phenomena in a PEM fuel cell, notably convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer; electrode kinetics; transport and phase change mechanism of water; and potential fields. The model accounts for the liquid water flux inside the gas diffusion layers by viscous and capillary forces and can therefore predict the amount of liquid water inside the gas diffusion layers. This study also investigated the key parameters affecting fuel cell performance including geometry, materials and operating conditions. The model considers the many interacting, complex electrochemical, transport phenomena, thermal stresses and deformation that cannot be studied experimentally. It was concluded that the model can provide a computer-aided tool for the design and optimization of future fuel cells with much higher power density and lower cost. 21 refs., 2 tabs., 14 figs.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics a practical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Liu, Chaoqun

    2018-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics: A Practical Approach, Third Edition, is an introduction to CFD fundamentals and commercial CFD software to solve engineering problems. The book is designed for a wide variety of engineering students new to CFD, and for practicing engineers learning CFD for the first time. Combining an appropriate level of mathematical background, worked examples, computer screen shots, and step-by-step processes, this book walks the reader through modeling and computing, as well as interpreting CFD results. This new edition has been updated throughout, with new content and improved figures, examples and problems.

  5. Graphics supercomputer for computational fluid dynamics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Goang S.

    1994-11-01

    The objective of this project is to purchase a state-of-the-art graphics supercomputer to improve the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) research capability at Alabama A & M University (AAMU) and to support the Air Force research projects. A cutting-edge graphics supercomputer system, Onyx VTX, from Silicon Graphics Computer Systems (SGI), was purchased and installed. Other equipment including a desktop personal computer, PC-486 DX2 with a built-in 10-BaseT Ethernet card, a 10-BaseT hub, an Apple Laser Printer Select 360, and a notebook computer from Zenith were also purchased. A reading room has been converted to a research computer lab by adding some furniture and an air conditioning unit in order to provide an appropriate working environments for researchers and the purchase equipment. All the purchased equipment were successfully installed and are fully functional. Several research projects, including two existing Air Force projects, are being performed using these facilities.

  6. Visualization of unsteady computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimes, Robert

    1994-11-01

    A brief summary of the computer environment used for calculating three dimensional unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) results is presented. This environment requires a super computer as well as massively parallel processors (MPP's) and clusters of workstations acting as a single MPP (by concurrently working on the same task) provide the required computational bandwidth for CFD calculations of transient problems. The cluster of reduced instruction set computers (RISC) is a recent advent based on the low cost and high performance that workstation vendors provide. The cluster, with the proper software can act as a multiple instruction/multiple data (MIMD) machine. A new set of software tools is being designed specifically to address visualizing 3D unsteady CFD results in these environments. Three user's manuals for the parallel version of Visual3, pV3, revision 1.00 make up the bulk of this report.

  7. Zonal methods and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atta, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    Recent advances in developing numerical algorithms for solving fluid flow problems, and the continuing improvement in the speed and storage of large scale computers have made it feasible to compute the flow field about complex and realistic configurations. Current solution methods involve the use of a hierarchy of mathematical models ranging from the linearized potential equation to the Navier Stokes equations. Because of the increasing complexity of both the geometries and flowfields encountered in practical fluid flow simulation, there is a growing emphasis in computational fluid dynamics on the use of zonal methods. A zonal method is one that subdivides the total flow region into interconnected smaller regions or zones. The flow solutions in these zones are then patched together to establish the global flow field solution. Zonal methods are primarily used either to limit the complexity of the governing flow equations to a localized region or to alleviate the grid generation problems about geometrically complex and multicomponent configurations. This paper surveys the application of zonal methods for solving the flow field about two and three-dimensional configurations. Various factors affecting their accuracy and ease of implementation are also discussed. From the presented review it is concluded that zonal methods promise to be very effective for computing complex flowfields and configurations. Currently there are increasing efforts to improve their efficiency, versatility, and accuracy

  8. Yielding to stress: Recent developments in viscoplastic fluid mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    BALMFORTH, Neil; FRIGAARD, Ian A.; OVARLEZ, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    The archetypal feature of a viscoplastic fluid is its yield stress: If the material is not sufficiently stressed, it behaves like a solid, but once the yield stress is exceeded, the material flows like a fluid. Such behavior characterizes materials common in industries such as petroleum and chemical processing, cosmetics, and food processing and in geophysical fluid dynamics. The most common idealization of a viscoplastic fluid is the Bingham model, which has been widely used to rationalize e...

  9. Computing the stresses and deformations of the human eye components due to a high explosive detonation using fluid-structure interaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Razaghi, Reza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu

    2016-05-01

    In spite the fact that a very small human body surface area is comprised by the eye, its wounds due to detonation have recently been dramatically amplified. Although many efforts have been devoted to measure injury of the globe, there is still a lack of knowledge on the injury mechanism due to Primary Blast Wave (PBW). The goal of this study was to determine the stresses and deformations of the human eye components, including the cornea, aqueous, iris, ciliary body, lens, vitreous, retina, sclera, optic nerve, and muscles, attributed to PBW induced by trinitrotoluene (TNT) explosion via a Lagrangian-Eulerian computational coupling model. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was employed to establish a Finite Element (FE) model of the human eye according to a normal human eye. The solid components of the eye were modelled as Lagrangian mesh, while an explosive TNT, air domain, and aqueous were modelled using Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) mesh. Nonlinear dynamic FE simulations were accomplished using the explicit FE code, namely LS-DYNA. In order to simulate the blast wave generation, propagation, and interaction with the eye, the ALE formulation with Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation defining the explosive material were employed. The results revealed a peak stress of 135.70kPa brought about by detonation upsurge on the cornea at the distance of 25cm. The highest von Mises stresses were observed on the sclera (267.3kPa), whereas the lowest one was seen on the vitreous body (0.002kPa). The results also showed a relatively high resultant displacement for the macula as well as a high variation for the radius of curvature for the cornea and lens, which can result in both macular holes, optic nerve damage and, consequently, vision loss. These results may have implications not only for understanding the value of stresses and strains in the human eye components but also giving an outlook about the process of PBW triggers damage to the eye. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  10. Computational fluid dynamics in ventilation design

    CERN Document Server

    Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B; Davidson, Lars; Schälin, Alois

    2007-01-01

    CFD-calculations have been rapidly developed to a powerful tool for the analysis of air pollution distribution in various spaces. However, the user of CFD-calculation should be aware of the basic principles of calculations and specifically the boundary conditions. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) – in Ventilation Design models is written by a working group of highly qualified international experts representing research, consulting and design.

  11. The use of computers for instruction in fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Val

    1987-01-01

    Applications for computers which improve instruction in fluid dynamics are examined. Computers can be used to illustrate three-dimensional flow fields and simple fluid dynamics mechanisms, to solve fluid dynamics problems, and for electronic sketching. The usefulness of computer applications is limited by computer speed, memory, and software and the clarity and field of view of the projected display. Proposed advances in personal computers which will address these limitations are discussed. Long range applications for computers in education are considered.

  12. Revisiting Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics Using Computer Algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, D. G.

    2006-01-01

    This article illustrates how a computer algebra system, such as Maple[R], can assist in the study of theoretical fluid mechanics, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. The continuity equation, the stress equations of motion, the Navier-Stokes equations, and various constitutive equations are treated, using a full, but straightforward,…

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on the new REHVA Guidebook Computational Fluid  Dynamics in Ventilation Design (Nielsen et al. 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis(Nielsen 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis Allard, Hazim B. Awbi, Lars Davidson and Alois Schälin. The guidebook is made for people....... The guidebook introduces rules for good quality prediction work, and it is the purpose of the guidebook to improve the technical level of CFD work in ventilation.......This paper is based on the new REHVA Guidebook Computational Fluid  Dynamics in Ventilation Design (Nielsen et al. 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis(Nielsen 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis Allard, Hazim B. Awbi, Lars Davidson and Alois Schälin. The guidebook is made for people...... who need to use and discuss results based on CFD predictions, and it gives insight into the subject for those who are not used to work with CFD. The guidebook is also written for people working with CFD who have to be more aware of how this numerical method is applied in the area of ventilation...

  14. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-01-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic. (orig.)

  15. Computed tomography of stress fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murcia, M.; Brennan, R.E.; Edeiken, J.

    1982-01-01

    An athletic young female developed gradual onset of pain in the right leg. Plain radiographs demonstrated solid periosteal reaction in the tibia compatible with stress fracture. She stopped sport activites but her pain continued. Follow-up radiographs of the tibia revealed changes suspicious for osteoid osteoma. Computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated periosteal reaction, but in addition, lucent fracture lines in the tibial cortex were evident. CT obviated the need for more invasive diagnostic procedures in this patient. In selected cases CT may be useful to confirm the diagnosis of stress fracture when plain radiographic or routine tomographic studies are not diagnostic

  16. CFDLIB05, Computational Fluid Dynamics Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwa, B.A.; Padial, N.T.; Rauenzahn, R.M.; VanderHeyden, W.B.

    2007-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CFDLib05 is the Los Alamos Computational Fluid Dynamics Library. This is a collection of hydro-codes using a common data structure and a common numerical method, for problems ranging from single-field, incompressible flow, to multi-species, multi-field, compressible flow. The data structure is multi-block, with a so-called structured grid in each block. The numerical method is a Finite-Volume scheme employing a state vector that is fully cell-centered. This means that the integral form of the conversation laws is solved on the physical domain that is represented by a mesh of control volumes. The typical control volume is an arbitrary quadrilateral in 2D and an arbitrary hexahedron in 3D. The Finite-Volume scheme is for time-unsteady flow and remains well coupled by means of time and space centered fluxes; if a steady state solution is required, the problem is integrated forward in time until the user is satisfied that the state is stationary. 2 - Methods: Cells-centered Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (ICE) method

  17. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  18. Artificial Intelligence In Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1991-01-01

    Paper compares four first-generation artificial-intelligence (Al) software systems for computational fluid dynamics. Includes: Expert Cooling Fan Design System (EXFAN), PAN AIR Knowledge System (PAKS), grid-adaptation program MITOSIS, and Expert Zonal Grid Generation (EZGrid). Focuses on knowledge-based ("expert") software systems. Analyzes intended tasks, kinds of knowledge possessed, magnitude of effort required to codify knowledge, how quickly constructed, performances, and return on investment. On basis of comparison, concludes Al most successful when applied to well-formulated problems solved by classifying or selecting preenumerated solutions. In contrast, application of Al to poorly understood or poorly formulated problems generally results in long development time and large investment of effort, with no guarantee of success.

  19. Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries KidsHealth / For Parents / Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries What's in this article? ...

  20. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  1. Verification and validation in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberkampf, William L.; Trucano, Timothy G.

    2002-04-01

    Verification and validation (V&V) are the primary means to assess accuracy and reliability in computational simulations. This paper presents an extensive review of the literature in V&V in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), discusses methods and procedures for assessing V&V, and develops a number of extensions to existing ideas. The review of the development of V&V terminology and methodology points out the contributions from members of the operations research, statistics, and CFD communities. Fundamental issues in V&V are addressed, such as code verification versus solution verification, model validation versus solution validation, the distinction between error and uncertainty, conceptual sources of error and uncertainty, and the relationship between validation and prediction. The fundamental strategy of verification is the identification and quantification of errors in the computational model and its solution. In verification activities, the accuracy of a computational solution is primarily measured relative to two types of highly accurate solutions: analytical solutions and highly accurate numerical solutions. Methods for determining the accuracy of numerical solutions are presented and the importance of software testing during verification activities is emphasized. The fundamental strategy of validation is to assess how accurately the computational results compare with the experimental data, with quantified error and uncertainty estimates for both. This strategy employs a hierarchical methodology that segregates and simplifies the physical and coupling phenomena involved in the complex engineering system of interest. A hypersonic cruise missile is used as an example of how this hierarchical structure is formulated. The discussion of validation assessment also encompasses a number of other important topics. A set of guidelines is proposed for designing and conducting validation experiments, supported by an explanation of how validation experiments are different

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal Article Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Four different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Despite the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways of the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. This greater deposition of spores in the upper airways in the human resulted in lower penetration and deposition in the tracheobronchial airways and the deep lung than that predict

  3. Internal Stress in a Model Elasto-Plastic Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Ooshida, Takeshi; Sekimoto, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Plastic materials can carry memory of past mechanical treatment in the form of internal stress. We introduce a natural definition of the vorticity of internal stress in a simple two-dimensional model of elasto-plastic fluids, which generates the internal stress. We demonstrate how the internal stress is induced under external loading, and how the presence of the internal stress modifies the plastic behavior.

  4. An experimental study on the normal stress of magnetorheological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Jile; Tian, Yu; Ren, Dongxue; Meng, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    The dependence of the normal stress on the shear rate and magnetic field strength in the shear flow of magnetorheological (MR) fluids has been studied experimentally. An obvious normal stress could be observed when the applied magnetic field was higher than a critical value. The normal stress increases considerably with increase of the shear rate and magnetic field, and decreases suddenly and significantly upon the onset of shear thickening in MR fluids. The ratio of shear stress to normal stress, an analogue of the friction coefficient, increases with increase of the shear rate, but decreases with increase of the applied magnetic field. Along with the shear stress, the normal stress in MR fluids could provide a more comprehensive understanding of the MR effect, and the evolution of the particle structure in shear flow, and may have important implications for preparing high performance magnetostrictive elastomers with high force output along the magnetic field direction

  5. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2010-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  6. Fluid dynamics theoretical and computational approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Warsi, ZUA

    2005-01-01

    Important Nomenclature Kinematics of Fluid Motion Introduction to Continuum Motion Fluid Particles Inertial Coordinate Frames Motion of a Continuum The Time Derivatives Velocity and Acceleration Steady and Nonsteady Flow Trajectories of Fluid Particles and Streamlines Material Volume and Surface Relation between Elemental Volumes Kinematic Formulas of Euler and Reynolds Control Volume and Surface Kinematics of Deformation Kinematics of Vorticity and Circulation References Problems The Conservation Laws and the Kinetics of Flow Fluid Density and the Conservation of Mass Prin

  7. Research in Applied Mathematics, Fluid Mechanics and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1998 through March 31, 1999.

  8. [Research activities in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period April 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Blazek, J

    2005-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is an important design tool in engineering and also a substantial research tool in various physical sciences as well as in biology. The objective of this book is to provide university students with a solid foundation for understanding the numerical methods employed in today's CFD and to familiarise them with modern CFD codes by hands-on experience. It is also intended for engineers and scientists starting to work in the field of CFD or for those who apply CFD codes. Due to the detailed index, the text can serve as a reference handbook too. Each chapter includes an extensive bibliography, which provides an excellent basis for further studies. The accompanying companion website contains the sources of 1-D and 2-D Euler and Navier-Stokes flow solvers (structured and unstructured) as well as of grid generators. Provided are also tools for Von Neumann stability analysis of 1-D model equations. Finally, the companion website includes the source code of a dedicated visualisation so...

  10. Computational fluid dynamics in ventilation: Practical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, J. R.

    The potential of computation fluid dynamics (CFD) for conceiving ventilation systems is shown through the simulation of five practical cases. The following examples are considered: capture of pollutants on a surface treating tank equipped with a unilateral suction slot in the presence of a disturbing air draft opposed to suction; dispersion of solid aerosols inside fume cupboards; performances comparison of two general ventilation systems in a silkscreen printing workshop; ventilation of a large open painting area; and oil fog removal inside a mechanical engineering workshop. Whereas the two first problems are analyzed through two dimensional numerical simulations, the three other cases require three dimensional modeling. For the surface treating tank case, numerical results are compared to laboratory experiment data. All simulations are carried out using EOL, a CFD software specially devised to deal with air quality problems in industrial ventilated premises. It contains many analysis tools to interpret the results in terms familiar to the industrial hygienist. Much experimental work has been engaged to validate the predictions of EOL for ventilation flows.

  11. Giant intracranial aneurysm embolization with a yield stress fluid material: insights from CFD analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weixiong; Graziano, Francesca; Russo, Vittorio; Ulm, Arthur J; De Kee, Daniel; Khismatullin, Damir B

    2013-01-01

    The endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms remains a challenge, especially when the aneurysm is large in size and has irregular, non-spherical geometry. In this paper, we use computational fluid dynamics to simulate blood flow in a vertebro-basilar junction giant aneurysm for the following three cases: (1) an empty aneurysm, (2) an aneurysm filled with platinum coils, and (3) an aneurysm filled with a yield stress fluid material. In the computational model, blood and the coil-filled region are treated as a non-Newtonian fluid and an isotropic porous medium, respectively. The results show that yield stress fluids can be used for aneurysm embolization provided the yield stress value is 20 Pa or higher. Specifically, flow recirculation in the aneurysm and the size of the inflow jet impingement zone on the aneurysm wall are substantially reduced by yield stress fluid treatment. Overall, this study opens up the possibility of using yield stress fluids for effective embolization of large-volume intracranial aneurysms.

  12. Fluid-Thermal-Structural Coupled Analysis of a Radial Inflow Micro Gas Turbine Using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Solid Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional fluid-thermal-structural coupled analysis for a radial inflow micro gas turbine is conducted. First, a fluid-thermal coupled analysis of the flow and temperature fields of the nozzle passage and the blade passage is performed by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The flow and heat transfer characteristics of different sections are analyzed in detail. The thermal load and the aerodynamic load are then obtained from the temperature field and the pressure distribution. The stress distributions of the blade are finally studied by using computational solid mechanics (CSM considering three cases of loads: thermal load, aerodynamics load combined with centrifugal load, and all the three types of loads. The detailed parameters of the flow, temperature, and the stress are obtained and analyzed. The numerical results obtained provide a useful knowledge base for further exploration of radial gas turbine design.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods and Their Applications in Medical Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalewski Wojciech

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As defined by the National Institutes of Health: “Biomedical engineering integrates physical, chemical, mathematical, and computational sciences and engineering principles to study biology, medicine, behavior, and health”. Many issues in this area are closely related to fluid dynamics. This paper provides an overview of the basic concepts concerning Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications in medicine.

  14. Savoir Fluide. A newsletter on computational hydraulics and fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter reports on computational works performed by the National Laboratory of Hydraulics (LNH) from Electricite de France (EdF). Two papers were selected which concern the simulation of the Paluel nuclear power plant plume and the computation of particles and droplets inside a cooling tower. (J.S.)

  15. High-pressure fluid phase equilibria phenomenology and computation

    CERN Document Server

    Deiters, Ulrich K

    2012-01-01

    The book begins with an overview of the phase diagrams of fluid mixtures (fluid = liquid, gas, or supercritical state), which can show an astonishing variety when elevated pressures are taken into account; phenomena like retrograde condensation (single and double) and azeotropy (normal and double) are discussed. It then gives an introduction into the relevant thermodynamic equations for fluid mixtures, including some that are rarely found in modern textbooks, and shows how they can they be used to compute phase diagrams and related properties. This chapter gives a consistent and axiomatic approach to fluid thermodynamics; it avoids using activity coefficients. Further chapters are dedicated to solid-fluid phase equilibria and global phase diagrams (systematic search for phase diagram classes). The appendix contains numerical algorithms needed for the computations. The book thus enables the reader to create or improve computer programs for the calculation of fluid phase diagrams. introduces phase diagram class...

  16. Self-study manual for introduction to computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Nabatov, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is the branch of Fluid Mechanics and Computational Physics that plays a decent role in modern Mechanical Engineering Design process due to such advantages as relatively low cost of simulation comparing with conduction of real experiment, an opportunity to easily correct the design of a prototype prior to manufacturing of the final product and a wide range of application: mixing, acoustics, cooling and aerodynamics. This makes CFD particularly and Computation...

  17. Description of a method for computing fluid-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantenbein, F.

    1982-02-01

    A general formulation allowing computation of structure vibrations in a dense fluid is described. It is based on fluid modelisation by fluid finite elements. For each fluid node are associated two variables: the pressure p and a variable π defined as p=d 2 π/dt 2 . Coupling between structure and fluid is introduced by surface elements. This method is easy to introduce in a general finite element code. Validation was obtained by analytical calculus and tests. It is widely used for vibrational and seismic studies of pipes and internals of nuclear reactors some applications are presented [fr

  18. Computational fluid dynamics incompressible turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kajishima, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents numerical solution techniques for incompressible turbulent flows that occur in a variety of scientific and engineering settings including aerodynamics of ground-based vehicles and low-speed aircraft, fluid flows in energy systems, atmospheric flows, and biological flows. This book encompasses fluid mechanics, partial differential equations, numerical methods, and turbulence models, and emphasizes the foundation on how the governing partial differential equations for incompressible fluid flow can be solved numerically in an accurate and efficient manner. Extensive discussions on incompressible flow solvers and turbulence modeling are also offered. This text is an ideal instructional resource and reference for students, research scientists, and professional engineers interested in analyzing fluid flows using numerical simulations for fundamental research and industrial applications. • Introduces CFD techniques for incompressible flow and turbulence with a comprehensive approach; • Enr...

  19. A future for computational fluid dynamics at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Battistin, M

    2005-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is an analysis of fluid flow, heat transfer and associated phenomena in physical systems using computers. CFD has been used at CERN since 1993 by the TS-CV group, to solve thermo-fluid related problems, particularly during the development, design and construction phases of the LHC experiments. Computer models based on CFD techniques can be employed to reduce the effort required for prototype testing, saving not only time and money but offering possibilities of additional investigations and design optimisation. The development of a more efficient support team at CERN depends on to two important factors: available computing power and experienced engineers. Available computer power IS the limiting resource of CFD. Only the recent increase of computer power had allowed important high tech and industrial applications. Computer Grid is already now (OpenLab at CERN) and will be more so in the future natural environment for CFD science. At CERN, CFD activities have been developed by...

  20. Analysis of the static yield stress for giant electrorheological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Youngwook P.; Choi, Hyoung Jin; Seo, Yongsok

    2017-08-01

    Cheng et al. (2010)'s experimental results for the static yield stress of giant electrorheological (GER) fluids over the full range of electric field strengths were reanalyzed by applying Seo's scaling function which could include both the polarization and the conductivity models. The Seo's scaling function could correctly fit the yield stress behavior of GER suspensions behavior after if a proper normalization of the yield stress data was taken which collapse them onto a single curve. The model predictions were also contrasted with recently proposed Choi et al.'s scaling function to rouse the attention for a proper consideration of the GER fluid mechanisms.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Two MBR Configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Thomas Ruby; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    made for both systems and compared to CFD results. In general there was found a good agreement between experimental measurements and CFD results (error less than 20 %). Due to the fact the shear stress measurements were not perform, they were extracted from the CFD simulations, as the CFD simulation...... was validated against velocity data. The results of shear stress shows that the RCF system has larger (up to 10 times) shear values compared to hollow sheet (HS) systems. However, the shear stress in the RCF system is not homogeneously distributes, as for the HS system....

  2. Computation of thermodynamic equilibrium in systems under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2016-04-01

    Metamorphic reactions may be partly controlled by the local stress distribution as suggested by observations of phase assemblages around garnet inclusions related to an amphibolite shear zone in granulite of the Bergen Arcs in Norway. A particular example presented in fig. 14 of Mukai et al. [1] is discussed here. A garnet crystal embedded in a plagioclase matrix is replaced on the left side by a high pressure intergrowth of kyanite and quartz and on the right side by chlorite-amphibole. This texture apparently represents disequilibrium. In this case, the minerals adapt to the low pressure ambient conditions only where fluids were present. Alternatively, here we compute that this particular low pressure and high pressure assemblage around a stressed rigid inclusion such as garnet can coexist in equilibrium. To do the computations we developed the Thermolab software package. The core of the software package consists of Matlab functions that generate Gibbs energy of minerals and melts from the Holland and Powell database [2] and aqueous species from the SUPCRT92 database [3]. Most up to date solid solutions are included in a general formulation. The user provides a Matlab script to do the desired calculations using the core functions. Gibbs energy of all minerals, solutions and species are benchmarked versus THERMOCALC, PerpleX [4] and SUPCRT92 and are reproduced within round off computer error. Multi-component phase diagrams have been calculated using Gibbs minimization to benchmark with THERMOCALC and Perple_X. The Matlab script to compute equilibrium in a stressed system needs only two modifications of the standard phase diagram script. Firstly, Gibbs energy of phases considered in the calculation is generated for multiple values of thermodynamic pressure. Secondly, for the Gibbs minimization the proportion of the system at each particular thermodynamic pressure needs to be constrained. The user decides which part of the stress tensor is input as thermodynamic

  3. Prospects for Computational Fluid Dynamics in Room Air Contaminant Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    The fluid dynamics research is strongly influenced by the increasing computer power which has been available for the last decades. This development is obvious from the curve in figure 1 which shows the computation cost as a function of years. It is obvious that the cost for a given job will decre...

  4. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of light water reactor flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.; Weber, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), turbulence simulation, and parallel computing have made feasible the development of three-dimensional (3-D) single-phase and two-phase flow CFD codes that can simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in realistic reactor geometries with significantly reduced reliance, especially in single phase, on empirical correlations. The objective of this work was to assess the predictive power and computational efficiency of a CFD code in the analysis of a challenging single-phase light water reactor problem, as well as to identify areas where further improvements are needed

  5. An Introduction to Computational Fluid Mechanics by Example

    CERN Document Server

    Biringen, Sedat

    2011-01-01

    This new book builds on the original classic textbook entitled: An Introduction to Computational Fluid Mechanics by C. Y. Chow which was originally published in 1979. In the decades that have passed since this book was published the field of computational fluid dynamics has seen a number of changes in both the sophistication of the algorithms used but also advances in the computer hardware and software available. This new book incorporates the latest algorithms in the solution techniques and supports this by using numerous examples of applications to a broad range of industries from mechanical

  6. Unsteady computational fluid dynamics in aeronautics

    CERN Document Server

    Tucker, P G

    2014-01-01

    The field of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and hybrids is a vibrant research area. This book runs through all the potential unsteady modelling fidelity ranges, from low-order to LES. The latter is probably the highest fidelity for practical aerospace systems modelling. Cutting edge new frontiers are defined.  One example of a pressing environmental concern is noise. For the accurate prediction of this, unsteady modelling is needed. Hence computational aeroacoustics is explored. It is also emerging that there is a critical need for coupled simulations. Hence, this area is also considered and the tensions of utilizing such simulations with the already expensive LES.  This work has relevance to the general field of CFD and LES and to a wide variety of non-aerospace aerodynamic systems (e.g. cars, submarines, ships, electronics, buildings). Topics treated include unsteady flow techniques; LES and hybrids; general numerical methods; computational aeroacoustics; computational aeroelasticity; coupled simulations and...

  7. Fluid dynamics parallel computer development at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James C.; Zang, Thomas A.; Dwoyer, Douglas L.

    1987-01-01

    To accomplish more detailed simulations of highly complex flows, such as the transition to turbulence, fluid dynamics research requires computers much more powerful than any available today. Only parallel processing on multiple-processor computers offers hope for achieving the required effective speeds. Looking ahead to the use of these machines, the fluid dynamicist faces three issues: algorithm development for near-term parallel computers, architecture development for future computer power increases, and assessment of possible advantages of special purpose designs. Two projects at NASA Langley address these issues. Software development and algorithm exploration is being done on the FLEX/32 Parallel Processing Research Computer. New architecture features are being explored in the special purpose hardware design of the Navier-Stokes Computer. These projects are complementary and are producing promising results.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics for sport simulation

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    All over the world sport plays a prominent role in society: as a leisure activity for many, as an ingredient of culture, as a business and as a matter of national prestige in such major events as the World Cup in soccer or the Olympic Games. Hence, it is not surprising that science has entered the realm of sports, and, in particular, that computer simulation has become highly relevant in recent years. This is explored in this book by choosing five different sports as examples, demonstrating that computational science and engineering (CSE) can make essential contributions to research on sports topics on both the fundamental level and, eventually, by supporting athletes’ performance.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Ventilation Airflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2014-01-01

    the principle behind CFD, the development in numerical schemes and computer size since the 1970s. Special attention is given to the selection of the correct governing equations, to the understanding of low turbulent flow, to the selection of turbulence models, and to addressing situations with more steady...

  10. Occupational stress in human computer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M J; Conway, F T; Karsh, B T

    1999-04-01

    There have been a variety of research approaches that have examined the stress issues related to human computer interaction including laboratory studies, cross-sectional surveys, longitudinal case studies and intervention studies. A critical review of these studies indicates that there are important physiological, biochemical, somatic and psychological indicators of stress that are related to work activities where human computer interaction occurs. Many of the stressors of human computer interaction at work are similar to those stressors that have historically been observed in other automated jobs. These include high workload, high work pressure, diminished job control, inadequate employee training to use new technology, monotonous tasks, por supervisory relations, and fear for job security. New stressors have emerged that can be tied primarily to human computer interaction. These include technology breakdowns, technology slowdowns, and electronic performance monitoring. The effects of the stress of human computer interaction in the workplace are increased physiological arousal; somatic complaints, especially of the musculoskeletal system; mood disturbances, particularly anxiety, fear and anger; and diminished quality of working life, such as reduced job satisfaction. Interventions to reduce the stress of computer technology have included improved technology implementation approaches and increased employee participation in implementation. Recommendations for ways to reduce the stress of human computer interaction at work are presented. These include proper ergonomic conditions, increased organizational support, improved job content, proper workload to decrease work pressure, and enhanced opportunities for social support. A model approach to the design of human computer interaction at work that focuses on the system "balance" is proposed.

  11. Piping stress analysis with personal computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The growing market of the personal computers is providing an increasing number of professionals with unprecedented and surprisingly inexpensive computing capacity, which if using with powerful software, can enhance immensely the engineers capabilities. This paper focuses on the possibilities which opened in piping stress analysis by the widespread distribution of personal computers, on the necessary changes in the software and on the limitations of using personal computers for engineering design and analysis. Reliability and quality assurance aspects of using personal computers for nuclear applications are also mentioned. The paper resumes with personal views of the author and experiences gained during interactive graphic piping software development for personal computers. (orig./GL)

  12. Fluid dynamics applications of the Illiac IV computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccormack, R. W.; Stevens, K. G., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The Illiac IV is a parallel-structure computer with computing power an order of magnitude greater than that of conventional computers. It can be used for experimental tasks in fluid dynamics which can be simulated more economically, for simulating flows that cannot be studied by experiment, and for combining computer and experimental simulations. The architecture of Illiac IV is described, and the use of its parallel operation is demonstrated on the example of its solution of the one-dimensional wave equation. For fluid dynamics problems, a special FORTRAN-like vector programming language was devised, called CFD language. Two applications are described in detail: (1) the determination of the flowfield around the space shuttle, and (2) the computation of transonic turbulent separated flow past a thick biconvex airfoil.

  13. Applied Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Terry L.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has advanced to the point where it can now be used for many applications in fluid mechanics research and aerospace vehicle design. A few applications being explored at NASA Ames Research Center will be presented and discussed. The examples presented will range in speed from hypersonic to low speed incompressible flow applications. Most of the results will be from numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes or Euler equations in three space dimensions for general geometry applications. Computational results will be used to highlight the presentation as appropriate. Advances in computational facilities including those associated with NASA's CAS (Computational Aerosciences) Project of the Federal HPCC (High Performance Computing and Communications) Program will be discussed. Finally, opportunities for future research will be presented and discussed. All material will be taken from non-sensitive, previously-published and widely-disseminated work.

  14. Review of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) researches on nano fluid flow through micro channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, Satish Kumar

    2018-05-01

    Nanofluid is becoming a promising heat transfer fluids due to its improved thermo-physical properties and heat transfer performance. Micro channel heat transfer has potential application in the cooling high power density microchips in CPU system, micro power systems and many such miniature thermal systems which need advanced cooling capacity. Use of nanofluids enhances the effectiveness of t=scu systems. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a very powerful tool in computational analysis of the various physical processes. It application to the situations of flow and heat transfer analysis of the nano fluids is catching up very fast. Present research paper gives a brief account of the methodology of the CFD and also summarizes its application on nano fluid and heat transfer for microchannel cases.

  15. Computer simulations of a rough sphere fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyklema, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer simulation is described on rough hard spheres with a continuously variable roughness parameter, including the limits of smooth and completely rough spheres. A system of 500 particles is simulated with a homogeneous mass distribution at 8 different densities and for 5 different values of the roughness parameter. For these 40 physically different situations the intermediate scattering function for 6 values of the wave number, the orientational correlation functions and the velocity autocorrelation functions have been calculated. A comparison has been made with a neutron scattering experiment on neopentane and agreement was good for an intermediate value of the roughness parameter. Some often made approximations in neutron scattering experiments are also checked. The influence of the variable roughness parameter on the correlation functions has been investigated and three simple stochastic models studied to describe the orientational correlation function which shows the most pronounced dependence on the roughness. (Auth.)

  16. Computational fluid dynamics on a massively parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Dennis C.; Levit, Creon

    1989-01-01

    A finite difference code was implemented for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations on the Connection Machine, a massively parallel computer. The code is based on the ARC2D/ARC3D program and uses the implicit factored algorithm of Beam and Warming. The codes uses odd-even elimination to solve linear systems. Timings and computation rates are given for the code, and a comparison is made with a Cray XMP.

  17. Computational Fluid and Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory System

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Traditional research methodologies in the human respiratory system have always been challenging due to their invasive nature. Recent advances in medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have accelerated this research. This book compiles and details recent advances in the modelling of the respiratory system for researchers, engineers, scientists, and health practitioners. It breaks down the complexities of this field and provides both students and scientists with an introduction and starting point to the physiology of the respiratory system, fluid dynamics and advanced CFD modeling tools. In addition to a brief introduction to the physics of the respiratory system and an overview of computational methods, the book contains best-practice guidelines for establishing high-quality computational models and simulations. Inspiration for new simulations can be gained through innovative case studies as well as hands-on practice using pre-made computational code. Last but not least, students and researcher...

  18. Analysis of heat transfer and stress in the pipe with hot fluid flowing through

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charoensri, Apisara; Pichestapong, Pipat; Rodthongkom, Chouvana

    2003-10-01

    At incomplete mixing area of high temperature and low temperature liquid near the surface of structures, temperature fluctuation of liquid gives thermal fatigue damage to wall structure. This phenomenon is called thermal striping. For designing of piping system, it is important to know thermal stresses of structure due to heat convection. In this study, authors proposed a simplified evaluation method to predict thermal stress from temperature fluctuation, for rational design against thermal striping. It is required to estimate structural responses to temperature fluctuation of fluid. The attenuation process is a thermal coupling problem between fluids and structures and has a sensitive characteristics to frequencies of temperature fluctuations were analyzed by FINAS, which is a computer program based on the finite element method by comparisons of theoretical method. When the inner surface of the pipe is due to heat convection of contained fluid with sinusoidal temperature fluctuation and the outer surface is kept insulated, temperature distribution of structure is analyzed by solving the equation of transient heat conduction. From these temperature distributions, induced thermal stresses in the structure are calculated by thermal elastic analysis. Frequency response characteristics of structures and its mechanism were investigated by both numerical and theoretical methods. Based on above investigation, a structural response diagram was derived, which can predict stress amplitude of structures from temperature amplitude and frequency of fluids

  19. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of displacement natural ventilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Yingchun

    2005-01-01

    Natural ventilation is widely recognised as contributing towards low-energy building design. The requirement to reduce energy usage in new buildings has rejuvenated interest in natural ventilation. This thesis deals with computer modelling of natural displacement ventilation driven either by buoyancy or buoyancy combined with wind forces. Two benchmarks have been developed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in order to evaluate the accuracy with which CFD is able to mo...

  20. Multi-dimensional two-fluid flow computation. An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carver, M.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a repertoire of three-dimensional computer programs developed to perform critical analysis of single-phase, two-phase and multi-fluid flow in reactor components. The basic numerical approach to solving the governing equations common to all the codes is presented and the additional constitutive relationships required for closure are discussed. Particular applications are presented for a number of computer codes. (author). 12 refs

  1. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of hot air flow ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation of air flow distribution, air velocity and pressure field pattern as it will affect moisture transient in a cabinet tray dryer is performed using SolidWorks Flow Simulation (SWFS) 2014 SP 4.0 program. The model used for the drying process in this experiment was designed with Solid ...

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Tryggvason, Tryggvi

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...

  3. Modelling Emission from Building Materials with Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter V.; Heiselberg, Per

    This paper presents a numerical model that by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is capable of dealing with both pollutant transport across the boundary layer and internal diffusion in the source without prior knowledge of which is the limiting process. The model provides the concentration...

  4. Computer program for calculating thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Braon, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    Computer code has been developed to provide thermodynamic and transport properties of liquid argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, helium, methane, neon, nitrogen, oxygen, and parahydrogen. Equation of state and transport coefficients are updated and other fluids added as new material becomes available.

  5. On Computational Fluid Dynamics Tools in Architectural Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Hougaard, Mads; Stærdahl, Jesper Winther

    engineering computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation program ANSYS CFX and a CFD based representative program RealFlow are investigated. These two programs represent two types of CFD based tools available for use during phases of an architectural design process. However, as outlined in two case studies...

  6. HAMOC: a computer program for fluid hammer analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, H.G.

    1975-12-01

    A computer program has been developed for fluid hammer analysis of piping systems attached to a vessel which has undergone a known rapid pressure transient. The program is based on the characteristics method for solution of the partial differential equations of motion and continuity. Column separation logic is included for situations in which pressures fall to saturation values

  7. Multiscale methods in computational fluid and solid mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, de R.; Hulshoff, S.J.; Lenz, S.; Munts, E.A.; Brummelen, van E.H.; Wall, W.; Wesseling, P.; Onate, E.; Periaux, J.

    2006-01-01

    First, an attempt is made towards gaining a more systematic understanding of recent progress in multiscale modelling in computational solid and fluid mechanics. Sub- sequently, the discussion is focused on variational multiscale methods for the compressible and incompressible Navier-Stokes

  8. THERMOREGULATION IN CHILDREN: EXERCISE, HEAT STRESS & FLUID BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawnda A. Morrison

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the specific physiological strategies of thermoregulation in children, a brief literary update relating exercise to heat stress in girls and boys as well as a discussion on fluid balance strategies for children who are performing exercise in the heat. Both sport performance and thermoregulation can be affected by the body’s water and electrolyte content. The recommendations for pre-pubertal fluid intake have been generalized from adult literature, including a limited concession for the physiological differences between adults and children. Considering these body fluid shifts, carbohydrate-electrolyte drinks are thought to be an essential tool in combating dehydration as a result of active hyperthermia (i.e. exercise, thus we examine current hydration practices in exercising children. Finally, this review summarizes research which examines the relationship between cognition and hypohydration on young athletes’ performance.

  9. Computational modelling of the mechanics of trabecular bone and marrow using fluid structure interaction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, E; Grogan, J A; Niebur, G L; McNamara, L M; McHugh, P E

    2013-04-01

    Bone marrow found within the porous structure of trabecular bone provides a specialized environment for numerous cell types, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Studies have sought to characterize the mechanical environment imposed on MSCs, however, a particular challenge is that marrow displays the characteristics of a fluid, while surrounded by bone that is subject to deformation, and previous experimental and computational studies have been unable to fully capture the resulting complex mechanical environment. The objective of this study was to develop a fluid structure interaction (FSI) model of trabecular bone and marrow to predict the mechanical environment of MSCs in vivo and to examine how this environment changes during osteoporosis. An idealized repeating unit was used to compare FSI techniques to a computational fluid dynamics only approach. These techniques were used to determine the effect of lower bone mass and different marrow viscosities, representative of osteoporosis, on the shear stress generated within bone marrow. Results report that shear stresses generated within bone marrow under physiological loading conditions are within the range known to stimulate a mechanobiological response in MSCs in vitro. Additionally, lower bone mass leads to an increase in the shear stress generated within the marrow, while a decrease in bone marrow viscosity reduces this generated shear stress.

  10. Morphing-Based Shape Optimization in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Yannick; Men'Shov, Igor; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    In this paper, a Morphing-based Shape Optimization (MbSO) technique is presented for solving Optimum-Shape Design (OSD) problems in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The proposed method couples Free-Form Deformation (FFD) and Evolutionary Computation, and, as its name suggests, relies on the morphing of shape and computational domain, rather than direct shape parameterization. Advantages of the FFD approach compared to traditional parameterization are first discussed. Then, examples of shape and grid deformations by FFD are presented. Finally, the MbSO approach is illustrated and applied through an example: the design of an airfoil for a future Mars exploration airplane.

  11. On the Use of Computers for Teaching Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Several approaches for improving the teaching of basic fluid mechanics using computers are presented. There are two objectives to these approaches: to increase the involvement of the student in the learning process and to present information to the student in a variety of forms. Items discussed include: the preparation of educational videos using the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations, the analysis of CFD flow solutions using workstation based post-processing graphics packages, and the development of workstation or personal computer based simulators which behave like desk top wind tunnels. Examples of these approaches are presented along with observations from working with undergraduate co-ops. Possible problems in the implementation of these approaches as well as solutions to these problems are also discussed.

  12. Evidence of nonuniqueness and oscillatory solutions in computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunziato, J.W.; Gartling, D.K.; Kipp, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    We will review some of our recent experiences in computing solutions for nonlinear fluids in relatively simple, two-dimensional geometries. The purpose of this discussion will be to display by example some of the interesting but difficult questions that arise when ill-behaved solutions are obtained numerically. We will consider two examples. As the first example, we will consider a nonlinear elastic (compressible) fluid with chemical reactions and discuss solutions for detonation and detonation failure in a two-dimensional cylinder. In this case, the numerical algorithm utilizes a finite-difference method with artificial viscosity (von Neumann-Richtmyer method) and leads to two, distinctly different, stable solutions depending on the time step criterion used. The second example to be considered involves the convection of a viscous fluid in a rectangular container as a result of an exothermic polymerization reaction. A solidification front develops near the top of the container and propagates down through the fluid, changing the aspect ratio of the region ahead of the front. Using a Galerkin-based finite element method, a numerical solution of the partial differential equations is obtained which tracks the front and correctly predicts the fluid temperatures near the walls. However, the solution also exhibits oscillatory behavior with regard to the number of cells in the fluid ahead of the front and in the strength of the cells. More definitive experiments and analysis are required to determine whether this oscillatory phenomena is a numerical artifact or a physical reality. 20 refs., 14 figs

  13. Application of computational fluid mechanics to atmospheric pollution problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Smith, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most noticeable effects of air pollution on the properties of the atmosphere is the reduction in visibility. This paper reports the results of investigations of the fluid dynamical and microphysical processes involved in the formation of advection fog on aerosols from combustion-related pollutants, as condensation nuclei. The effects of a polydisperse aerosol distribution, on the condensation/nucleation processes which cause the reduction in visibility are studied. This study demonstrates how computational fluid mechanics and heat transfer modeling can be applied to simulate the life cycle of the atmosphereic pollution problems.

  14. Using artificial intelligence to control fluid flow computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsey, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Computational simulation is an essential tool for the prediction of fluid flow. Many powerful simulation programs exist today. However, using these programs to reliably analyze fluid flow and other physical situations requires considerable human effort and expertise to set up a simulation, determine whether the output makes sense, and repeatedly run the simulation with different inputs until a satisfactory result is achieved. Automating this process is not only of considerable practical importance but will also significantly advance basic artificial intelligence (AI) research in reasoning about the physical world.

  15. Symposium on computational fluid dynamics: technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A symposium on the technology and applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was held in Pretoria from 21-23 Nov 1988. The following aspects were covered: multilevel adaptive methods and multigrid solvers in CFD, a symbolic processing approach to CFD, interplay between CFD and analytical approximations, CFD on a transfer array, the application of CFD in high speed aerodynamics, numerical simulation of laminar blood flow, two-phase flow modelling in nuclear accident analysis, and the finite difference scheme for the numerical solution of fluid flow

  16. Computer program for computing the properties of seventeen fluids. [cryogenic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, J. A.; Friend, D. G.; Arp, V. D.; Mccarty, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The present study describes modifications and additions to the MIPROPS computer program for calculating the thermophysical properties of 17 fluids. These changes include adding new fluids, new properties, and a new interface to the program. The new program allows the user to select the input and output parameters and the units to be displayed for each parameter. Fluids added to the MIPROPS program are carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, deuterium, helium, normal hydrogen, and xenon. The most recent modifications to the MIPROPS program are the addition of viscosity and thermal conductivity correlations for parahydrogen and the addition of the fluids normal hydrogen and xenon. The recently added interface considerably increases the program's utility.

  17. The transverse mobility of yield-stress fluids in fibrous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, Setareh; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2015-11-01

    The pressure-drop/flow-rate relationship for fluids that exhibit a yield stress and a shear dependent viscosity flowing through fibrous media is studied numerically. The Cauchy momentum equation along with the Bingham or Herschel-Bulkley constitutive equations are solved for flow transverse to a periodic array of fibers and systematic parametric studies are used to understand the individual roles of geometrical characteristics and fluid rheological properties. We develop a scaling model to predict the fluid mobility as a function of the medium porosity and the Bingham number. In addition, using this scaling model we estimate the width of the unyielded region between two adjacent fibers. Numerical computations are combined with the scaling model to obtain a criterion for the critical pressure gradient required to drive flow. Variations in the size of the yielded zones, the velocity profiles and the resulting stress fields are investigated for the limiting cases of (i) densely packed fiber arrays and (ii) very sparsely distributed fibers, and the hydrodynamic transition between these configurations is investigated. While this work focuses on the flow of inelastic fluids, the methodology can be extended to consider more complex rheology such as flow of elasto-visco-plastic fluids.

  18. A computational model for doctoring fluid films in gravure printing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hariprasad, Daniel S., E-mail: dshari@unm.edu [Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States); Grau, Gerd [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1770 (United States); Schunk, P. Randall [Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States); Advanced Materials Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0826 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States); Tjiptowidjojo, Kristianto [Center for Micro-Engineered Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131-0001 (United States)

    2016-04-07

    The wiping, or doctoring, process in gravure printing presents a fundamental barrier to resolving the micron-sized features desired in printed electronics applications. This barrier starts with the residual fluid film left behind after wiping, and its importance grows as feature sizes are reduced, especially as the feature size approaches the thickness of the residual fluid film. In this work, various mechanical complexities are considered in a computational model developed to predict the residual fluid film thickness. Lubrication models alone are inadequate, and deformation of the doctor blade body together with elastohydrodynamic lubrication must be considered to make the model predictive of experimental trends. Moreover, model results demonstrate that the particular form of the wetted region of the blade has a significant impact on the model's ability to reproduce experimental measurements.

  19. Second law analysis for hydromagnetic couple stress fluid flow through a porous channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.O. Kareem

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the combined effects of magnetic field and ohmic heating on the entropy generation rate in the flow of couple stress fluid through a porous channel are investigated. The equations governing the fluid flow are formulated, non-dimensionalised and solved using a rapidly convergent semi-analytical Adomian decomposition method (ADM. The result of the computation shows a significant dependence of fluid’s thermophysical parameters on Joule’s dissipation as well as decline in the rate of change of fluid momentum due to the interplay between Lorentz and viscous forces. Moreover, the rate of entropy generation in the flow system drops as the magnitude of the magnetic field increases.

  20. Stresses in non-equilibrium fluids: Exact formulation and coarse-grained theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Matthias; Solon, Alexandre; Démery, Vincent; Rohwer, Christian M.; Dean, David S.

    2018-02-01

    Starting from the stochastic equation for the density operator, we formulate the exact (instantaneous) stress tensor for interacting Brownian particles and show that its average value agrees with expressions derived previously. We analyze the relation between the stress tensor and forces due to external potentials and observe that, out of equilibrium, particle currents give rise to extra forces. Next, we derive the stress tensor for a Landau-Ginzburg theory in generic, non-equilibrium situations, finding an expression analogous to that of the exact microscopic stress tensor, and discuss the computation of out-of-equilibrium (classical) Casimir forces. Subsequently, we give a general form for the stress tensor which is valid for a large variety of energy functionals and which reproduces the two mentioned cases. We then use these relations to study the spatio-temporal correlations of the stress tensor in a Brownian fluid, which we compute to leading order in the interaction potential strength. We observe that, after integration over time, the spatial correlations generally decay as power laws in space. These are expected to be of importance for driven confined systems. We also show that divergence-free parts of the stress tensor do not contribute to the Green-Kubo relation for the viscosity.

  1. Data Point Averaging for Computational Fluid Dynamics Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Jr., David (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system and method for generating fluid flow parameter data for use in aerodynamic heating analysis. Computational fluid dynamics data is generated for a number of points in an area on a surface to be analyzed. Sub-areas corresponding to areas of the surface for which an aerodynamic heating analysis is to be performed are identified. A computer system automatically determines a sub-set of the number of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas and determines a value for each of the number of sub-areas using the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The value is determined as an average of the data for the sub-set of points corresponding to each of the number of sub-areas. The resulting parameter values then may be used to perform an aerodynamic heating analysis.

  2. Distributed interactive graphics applications in computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, S.E.; Buning, P.G.; Merritt, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Implementation of two distributed graphics programs used in computational fluid dynamics is discussed. Both programs are interactive in nature. They run on a CRAY-2 supercomputer and use a Silicon Graphics Iris workstation as the front-end machine. The hardware and supporting software are from the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation project. The supercomputer does all numerically intensive work and the workstation, as the front-end machine, allows the user to perform real-time interactive transformations on the displayed data. The first program was written as a distributed program that computes particle traces for fluid flow solutions existing on the supercomputer. The second is an older post-processing and plotting program modified to run in a distributed mode. Both programs have realized a large increase in speed over that obtained using a single machine. By using these programs, one can learn quickly about complex features of a three-dimensional flow field. Some color results are presented

  3. Fast reactor safety and computational thermo-fluid dynamics approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, Hisashi; Shimizu, Takeshi

    1993-01-01

    This article provides a brief description of the safety principle on which liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) is based and the roles of computations in the safety practices. A number of thermohydraulics models have been developed to date that successfully describe several of the important types of fluids and materials motion encountered in the analysis of postulated accidents in LMFBRs. Most of these models use a mixture of implicit and explicit numerical solution techniques in solving a set of conservation equations formulated in Eulerian coordinates, with special techniques included to specific situations. Typical computational thermo-fluid dynamics approaches are discussed in particular areas of analyses of the physical phenomena relevant to the fuel subassembly thermohydraulics design and that involve describing the motion of molten materials in the core over a large scale. (orig.)

  4. Cardioplegia heat exchanger design modelling using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, M R

    2000-11-01

    A new cardioplegia heat exchanger has been developed by Sorin Biomedica. A three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) model was optimized using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling. CFD optimization techniques have commonly been applied to velocity flow field analysis, but CFD analysis was also used in this study to predict the heat exchange performance of the design before prototype fabrication. The iterative results of the optimization and the actual heat exchange performance of the final configuration are presented in this paper. Based on the behaviour of this model, both the water and blood fluid flow paths of the heat exchanger were optimized. The simulation predicted superior heat exchange performance using an optimal amount of energy exchange surface area, reducing the total contact surface area, the device priming volume and the material costs. Experimental results confirm the empirical results predicted by the CFD analysis.

  5. Quality control of computational fluid dynamics in indoor environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Nielsen, P. V.

    2003-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used routinely to predict air movement and distributions of temperature and concentrations in indoor environments. Modelling and numerical errors are inherent in such studies and must be considered when the results are presented. Here, we discuss modelling as...... the quality of CFD calculations, as well as guidelines for the minimum information that should accompany all CFD-related publications to enable a scientific judgment of the quality of the study....

  6. Computer methods for transient fluid-structure analysis of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belytschko, T.; Liu, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems in nuclear engineering are categorized according to the dominant physical phenomena and the appropriate computational methods. Linear fluid models that are considered include acoustic fluids, incompressible fluids undergoing small disturbances, and small amplitude sloshing. Methods available in general-purpose codes for these linear fluid problems are described. For nonlinear fluid problems, the major features of alternative computational treatments are reviewed; some special-purpose and multipurpose computer codes applicable to these problems are then described. For illustration, some examples of nuclear reactor problems that entail coupled fluid-structure analysis are described along with computational results

  7. Interface between computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and plant analysis computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffield, R.D.; Dunckhorst, F.F.; Tomlinson, E.T.; Welch, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can provide valuable input to the development of advanced plant analysis computer codes. The types of interfacing discussed in this paper will directly contribute to modeling and accuracy improvements throughout the plant system and should result in significant reduction of design conservatisms that have been applied to such analyses in the past

  8. Multitasking the code ARC3D. [for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, John T.; Hsiung, Christopher C.

    1986-01-01

    The CRAY multitasking system was developed in order to utilize all four processors and sharply reduce the wall clock run time. This paper describes the techniques used to modify the computational fluid dynamics code ARC3D for this run and analyzes the achieved speedup. The ARC3D code solves either the Euler or thin-layer N-S equations using an implicit approximate factorization scheme. Results indicate that multitask processing can be used to achieve wall clock speedup factors of over three times, depending on the nature of the program code being used. Multitasking appears to be particularly advantageous for large-memory problems running on multiple CPU computers.

  9. Permeability - Fluid Pressure - Stress Relationship in Fault Zones in Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, P.; Guglielmi, Y.; Morereau, A.; Seguy, S.; Castilla, R.; Nussbaum, C.; Dick, P.; Durand, J.; Jaeggi, D.; Donze, F. V.; Tsopela, A.

    2016-12-01

    Fault permeability is known to depend strongly on stress and fluid pressures. Exponential relationships between permeability and effective pressure have been proposed to approximate fault response to fluid pressure variations. However, the applicability of these largely empirical laws remains questionable, as they do not take into account shear stress and shear strain. A series of experiments using mHPP probes have been performed within fault zones in very low permeability (less than 10-19 m2) Lower Jurassic shale formations at Tournemire (France) and Mont Terri (Switzerland) underground laboratories. These probes allow to monitor 3D displacement between two points anchored to the borehole walls at the same time as fluid pressure and flow rate. In addition, in the Mont-Terri experiment, passive pressure sensors were installed in observation boreholes. Fracture transmissivity was estimated from single borehole pulse test, constant pressure injection tests, and cross-hole tests. It is found that the transmissivity-pressure dependency can be approximated with an exponential law, but only above a pressure threshold that we call the Fracture Opening Threshold (F.O.P). The displacement data show a change of the mechanical response across the F.O.P. The displacement below the F.O.P. is dominated by borehole response, which is mostly elastic. Above F.O.P., the poro-elasto-plastic response of the fractures dominates. Stress determinations based on previous work and on the analysis of slip data from mHPPP probe indicate that the F.O.P. is lower than the least principal stress. Below the F.O.P., uncemented fractures retain some permeability, as pulse tests performed at low pressures yield diffusivities in the range 10-2 to 10-5 m2/s. Overall, this dual behavior appears consistent with the results of CORK experiments performed in accretionary wedge decollements. Results suggest (1) that fault zones become highly permeable when approaching the critical Coulomb threshold (2

  10. The Efficient Use of Vector Computers with Emphasis on Computational Fluid Dynamics : a GAMM-Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Gentzsch, Wolfgang

    1986-01-01

    The GAMM Committee for Numerical Methods in Fluid Mechanics organizes workshops which should bring together experts of a narrow field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to exchange ideas and experiences in order to speed-up the development in this field. In this sense it was suggested that a workshop should treat the solution of CFD problems on vector computers. Thus we organized a workshop with the title "The efficient use of vector computers with emphasis on computational fluid dynamics". The workshop took place at the Computing Centre of the University of Karlsruhe, March 13-15,1985. The participation had been restricted to 22 people of 7 countries. 18 papers have been presented. In the announcement of the workshop we wrote: "Fluid mechanics has actively stimulated the development of superfast vector computers like the CRAY's or CYBER 205. Now these computers on their turn stimulate the development of new algorithms which result in a high degree of vectorization (sca1ar/vectorized execution-time). But w...

  11. Magneto thermal convection in a compressible couple-stress fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mahinder [Lovely School of Science, Dept. of Mathematics, Lovely Professional Univ., Phagwara (India); Kumar, Pardeep [Dept. of Mathematics, ICDEOL, H.P. Univ., Shimla (India)

    2010-03-15

    The problem of thermal instability of compressible, electrically conducting couple-stress fluids in the presence of a uniform magnetic field is considered. Following the linearized stability theory and normal mode analysis, the dispersion relation is obtained. For stationary convection, the compressibility, couple-stress, and magnetic field postpone the onset of convection. Graphs have been plotted by giving numerical values of the parameters to depict the stability characteristics. The principle of exchange of stabilities is found to be satisfied. The magnetic field introduces oscillatory modes in the system that were non-existent in its absence. The case of overstability is also studied wherein a sufficient condition for the non-existence of overstability is obtained. (orig.)

  12. Prolonged effect of fluid flow stress on the proliferative activity of mesothelial cells after abrupt discontinuation of fluid streaming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigehisa; Ikeda, Satoshi; Takezawa, Toshiaki; Kishi, Tomoya; Makino, Junichi; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Matsunobu, Aki; Noguchi, Mitsuru; Sugihara, Hajime; Toda, Shuji

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Late-onset peritoneal fibrosis leading to EPS remains to be elucidated. ► Fluid streaming is a potent factor for peritoneal fibrosis in PD. ► We focused on the prolonged effect of fluid streaming on mesothelial cell kinetics. ► A history of fluid streaming exposure promoted mesothelial proliferative activity. ► We have thus identified a potent new factor for late-onset peritoneal fibrosis. -- Abstract: Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) often develops after transfer to hemodialysis and transplantation. Both termination of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and transplantation-related factors are risks implicated in post-PD development of EPS, but the precise mechanism of this late-onset peritoneal fibrosis remains to be elucidated. We previously demonstrated that fluid flow stress induced mesothelial proliferation and epithelial–mesenchymal transition via mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Therefore, we speculated that the prolonged bioactive effect of fluid flow stress may affect mesothelial cell kinetics after cessation of fluid streaming. To investigate how long mesothelial cells stay under the bioactive effect brought on by fluid flow stress after removal of the stress, we initially cultured mesothelial cells under fluid flow stress and then cultured the cells under static conditions. Mesothelial cells exposed to fluid flow stress for a certain time showed significantly high proliferative activity compared with static conditions after stoppage of fluid streaming. The expression levels of protein phosphatase 2A, which dephosphorylates MAPK, in mesothelial cells changed with time and showed a biphasic pattern that was dependent on the duration of exposure to fluid flow stress. There were no differences in the fluid flow stress-related bioactive effects on mesothelial cells once a certain time had passed. The present findings show that fluid flow stress exerts a prolonged bioactive effect on mesothelial cells after termination

  13. The start of ebullition in quiescent, yield-stress fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, David J., E-mail: djsherwo@bechtel.com [URS Corporation, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project, 2435 Stevens Center Place, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Eduardo Sáez, A. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Nuclear waste slurries evolve gases from radiochemical reactions. • Evolved gases form bubbles that rise in the yield-stress slurry. • Bubble buoyancy leads to expansion and ebullition, processes modeled here. - Abstract: Non-Newtonian rheology is typical for the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) slurries to be processed in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Hydrogen and other flammable gases are generated in the aqueous phase by radiolytic and chemical reactions. HLW slurries have a capacity for retaining gas characterized by the shear strength holding the bubbles still. The sizes and degassing characteristics of flammable gas bubbles in the HLW slurries, expected to be processed by the WTP are important considerations for designing equipment and operating procedures. Slurries become susceptible to degassing as the bubble concentration increases over a maximum value that depends on shear strength. This susceptibility and the process of ebullitive bubble enlargement are described here. When disturbed, the fluid undergoes localized flow around neighboring bubbles which are dragged together and coalesce, producing an enlarged bubble. For the conditions considered in this work, bubble size increase is enough to displace the weight required to overcome the fluid shear strength and yield the surroundings. The buoyant bubble ascends and accumulates others within a zone of influence, enlarging by a few orders of magnitude. This process describes how the first bubbles appear on the surface of a 7 Pa shear strength fluid a few seconds after being jarred.

  14. Issues in computational fluid dynamics code verification and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1997-09-01

    A broad range of mathematical modeling errors of fluid flow physics and numerical approximation errors are addressed in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is strongly believed that if CFD is to have a major impact on the design of engineering hardware and flight systems, the level of confidence in complex simulations must substantially improve. To better understand the present limitations of CFD simulations, a wide variety of physical modeling, discretization, and solution errors are identified and discussed. Here, discretization and solution errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential, or integral, conservation equations representing the physical process, to algebraic equations and their solution on a computer. The impact of boundary conditions on the solution of the partial differential equations and their discrete representation will also be discussed. Throughout the article, clear distinctions are made between the analytical mathematical models of fluid dynamics and the numerical models. Lax`s Equivalence Theorem and its frailties in practical CFD solutions are pointed out. Distinctions are also made between the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the partial differential equations as opposed to the discrete equations. Two techniques are briefly discussed for the detection and quantification of certain types of discretization and grid resolution errors.

  15. Computer stress study of bone with computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, M.J.; Marom, S.A.; Linden, C.N.

    1986-01-01

    A computer processing tool has been developed which, together with a finite element program, determines the stress-deformation pattern in a long bone, utilizing Computed Tomography (CT) data files for the geometry and radiographic density information. The geometry, together with mechanical properties and boundary conditions: loads and displacements, comprise the input of the Finite element (FE) computer program. The output of the program is the stresses and deformations in the bone. The processor is capable of developing an accurate three-dimensional finite element model from a scanned human long bone due to the CT high pixel resolution and the local mechanical properties determined from the radiographic densities of the scanned bone. The processor, together with the finite element program, serves first as an analysis tool towards improved understanding of bone function and remodelling. In this first stage, actual long bones may be scanned and analyzed under applied loads and displacements, determined from existing gait analyses. The stress-deformation patterns thus obtained may be used for studying the biomechanical behavior of particular long bones such as bones with implants and with osteoporosis. As a second stage, this processor may serve as a diagnostic tool for analyzing the biomechanical response of a specific patient's long long bone under applied loading by utilizing a CT data file of the specific bone as an input to the processor with the FE program

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of a Heisenberg Vortex Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunge, Carl; Sitaraman, Hariswaran; Leachman, Jake

    2017-11-01

    A 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of a Heisenberg Vortex Tube (HVT) is performed to estimate cooling potential with cryogenic hydrogen. The main mechanism driving operation of the vortex tube is the use of fluid power for enthalpy streaming in a highly turbulent swirl in a dual-outlet tube. This enthalpy streaming creates a temperature separation between the outer and inner regions of the flow. Use of a catalyst on the peripheral wall of the centrifuge enables endothermic conversion of para-ortho hydrogen to aid primary cooling. A κ- ɛ turbulence model is used with a cryogenic, non-ideal equation of state, and para-orthohydrogen species evolution. The simulations are validated with experiments and strategies for parametric optimization of this device are presented.

  17. FAST - A multiprocessed environment for visualization of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bancroft, G.V.; Merritt, F.J.; Plessel, T.C.; Kelaita, P.G.; Mccabe, R.K.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents the Flow Analysis Software Toolset (FAST) to be used for fluid-mechanics analysis. The design criteria for FAST including the minimization of the data path in the computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) process, consistent user interface, extensible software architecture, modularization, and the isolation of three-dimensional tasks from the application programmer are outlined. Each separate process communicates through the FAST Hub, while other modules such as FAST Central, NAS file input, CFD calculator, surface extractor and renderer, titler, tracer, and isolev might work together to generate the scene. An interprocess communication package making it possible for FAST to operate as a modular environment where resources could be shared among different machines as well as a single host is discussed. 20 refs

  18. Computational fluid dynamics study of viscous fingering in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subraveti, Sai Gokul; Nikrityuk, Petr; Rajendran, Arvind

    2018-01-26

    Axi-symmetric numerical simulations are carried out to study the dynamics of a plug introduced through a mixed-stream injection in supercritical fluid chromatographic columns. The computational fluid dynamics model developed in this work takes into account both the hydrodynamics and adsorption equilibria to describe the phenomena of viscous fingering and plug effect that contribute to peak distortions in mixed-stream injections. The model was implemented into commercial computational fluid dynamics software using user-defined functions. The simulations describe the propagation of both the solute and modifier highlighting the interplay between the hydrodynamics and plug effect. The simulated peaks showed good agreement with experimental data published in the literature involving different injection volumes (5 μL, 50 μL, 1 mL and 2 mL) of flurbiprofen on Chiralpak AD-H column using a mobile phase of CO 2 and methanol. The study demonstrates that while viscous fingering is the main source of peak distortions for large-volume injections (1 mL and 2 mL) it has negligible impact on small-volume injections (5 μL and 50 μL). Band broadening in small-volume injections arise mainly due to the plug effect. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High-Performance Java Codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christopher; Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The computational science community is reluctant to write large-scale computationally -intensive applications in Java due to concerns over Java's poor performance, despite the claimed software engineering advantages of its object-oriented features. Naive Java implementations of numerical algorithms can perform poorly compared to corresponding Fortran or C implementations. To achieve high performance, Java applications must be designed with good performance as a primary goal. This paper presents the object-oriented design and implementation of two real-world applications from the field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): a finite-volume fluid flow solver (LAURA, from NASA Langley Research Center), and an unstructured mesh adaptation algorithm (2D_TAG, from NASA Ames Research Center). This work builds on our previous experience with the design of high-performance numerical libraries in Java. We examine the performance of the applications using the currently available Java infrastructure and show that the Java version of the flow solver LAURA performs almost within a factor of 2 of the original procedural version. Our Java version of the mesh adaptation algorithm 2D_TAG performs within a factor of 1.5 of its original procedural version on certain platforms. Our results demonstrate that object-oriented software design principles are not necessarily inimical to high performance.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme 1995- 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haekkinen, R.J.; Hirsch, C.; Krause, E.; Kytoemaa, H.K. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The report is a mid-term evaluation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme started by Technology Development Centre Finland (TEKES) in 1995 as a five-year initiative to be concluded in 1999. The main goal of the programme is to increase the know-how and application of CFD in Finnish industry, to coordinate and thus provide a better basis for co-operation between national CFD activities and encouraging research laboratories and industry to establish co-operation with the international CFD community. The projects of the programme focus on the following areas: (1) studies of modeling the physics and dynamics of the behaviour of fluid material, (2) expressing the physical models in a numerical mode and developing a computer codes, (3) evaluating and testing current physical models and developing new ones, (4) developing new numerical algorithms, solvers, and pre- and post-processing software, and (5) applying the new computational tools to problems relevant to their ultimate industrial use. The report consists of two sections. The first considers issues concerning the whole programme and the second reviews each project

  1. Couple stress fluid flow in a rotating channel with peristalsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd elmaboud, Y.; Abdelsalam, Sara I.; Mekheimer, Kh. S.

    2018-04-01

    This article describes a new model for obtaining closed-form semi-analytical solutions of peristaltic flow induced by sinusoidal wave trains propagating with constant speed on the walls of a two-dimensional rotating infinite channel. The channel rotates with a constant angular speed about the z - axis and is filled with couple stress fluid. The governing equations of the channel deformation and the flow rate inside the channel are derived using the lubrication theory approach. The resulting equations are solved, using the homotopy perturbation method (HPM), for exact solutions to the longitudinal velocity distribution, pressure gradient, flow rate due to secondary velocity, and pressure rise per wavelength. The effect of various values of physical parameters, such as, Taylor's number and couple stress parameter, together with some interesting features of peristaltic flow are discussed through graphs. The trapping phenomenon is investigated for different values of parameters under consideration. It is shown that Taylor's number and the couple stress parameter have an increasing effect on the longitudinal velocity distribution till half of the channel, on the flow rate due to secondary velocity, and on the number of closed streamlines circulating the bolus.

  2. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  3. A computer model for dispersed fluid-solid turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.H.; Tulig, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    A computer model is being developed to simulate two-phase turbulent flow phenomena in fluids containing finely dispersed solids. The model is based on a dual-continuum picture of the individual phases and an extension of a two-equation turbulence closure theory. The resulting set of nonlinear partial differential equations are solved using a finite difference procedure with special treatment to promote convergence. The model has been checked against a number of idealized flow problems with known solutions. The authors are currently comparing model predictions with measurements to determine a proper set of turbulence parameters needed for simulating two-phase turbulent flows

  4. Modeling fires in adjacent ship compartments with computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Cole, J.K.; Koski, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the thermal effects on radioactive (RAM) transportation pack ages with a fire in an adjacent compartment. An assumption for this analysis is that the adjacent hold fire is some sort of engine room fire. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis tools were used to perform the analysis in order to include convective heat transfer effects. The analysis results were compared to experimental data gathered in a series of tests on the United States Coast Guard ship Mayo Lykes located at Mobile, Alabama. (authors)

  5. Computational fluid dynamics in fire engineering theory, modelling and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Yuen, Kwok Kit

    2009-01-01

    Fire and combustion presents a significant engineering challenge to mechanical, civil and dedicated fire engineers, as well as specialists in the process and chemical, safety, buildings and structural fields. We are reminded of the tragic outcomes of 'untenable' fire disasters such as at King's Cross underground station or Switzerland's St Gotthard tunnel. In these and many other cases, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is at the forefront of active research into unravelling the probable causes of fires and helping to design structures and systems to ensure that they are less likely in the f

  6. Torque converter transient characteristics prediction using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T; Tanaka, K

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this research is to investigate the transient torque converter performance used in an automobile. A new technique in computational fluid dynamics is introduced, which includes the inertia of the turbine in a three dimensional simulation of the torque converter during a launch condition. The simulation results are compared to experimental test data with good agreement across the range of data. In addition, the simulated flow structure inside the torque converter is visualized and compared to results from a steady-state calculation.

  7. Approaching multiphase flows from the perspective of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banas, A.O.

    1992-01-01

    Thermalhydraulic simulation methodologies based on subchannel and porous-medium concepts are briefly reviewed and contrasted with the general approach of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). An outline of the advanced CFD methods for single-phase turbulent flows is followed by a short discussion of the unified formulation of averaged equations for turbulent and multiphase flows. Some of the recent applications of CFD at Chalk River Laboratories are discussed, and the complementary role of CFD with regard to the established thermalhydraulic methods of analysis is indicated. (author). 8 refs

  8. Techniques for animation of CFD results. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Jay; Hanson, Jeffery C.

    1992-01-01

    Video animation is becoming increasingly vital to the computational fluid dynamics researcher, not just for presentation, but for recording and comparing dynamic visualizations that are beyond the current capabilities of even the most powerful graphic workstation. To meet these needs, Lewis Research Center has recently established a facility to provide users with easy access to advanced video animation capabilities. However, producing animation that is both visually effective and scientifically accurate involves various technological and aesthetic considerations that must be understood both by the researcher and those supporting the visualization process. These considerations include: scan conversion, color conversion, and spatial ambiguities.

  9. Fluid mechanics of human fetal right ventricles from image-based computational fluid dynamics using 4D clinical ultrasound scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiputra, Hadi; Lai, Chang Quan; Lim, Guat Ling; Heng, Joel Jia Wei; Guo, Lan; Soomar, Sanah Merchant; Leo, Hwa Liang; Biwas, Arijit; Mattar, Citra Nurfarah Zaini; Yap, Choon Hwai

    2016-12-01

    There are 0.6-1.9% of US children who were born with congenital heart malformations. Clinical and animal studies suggest that abnormal blood flow forces might play a role in causing these malformation, highlighting the importance of understanding the fetal cardiovascular fluid mechanics. We performed computational fluid dynamics simulations of the right ventricles, based on four-dimensional ultrasound scans of three 20-wk-old normal human fetuses, to characterize their flow and energy dynamics. Peak intraventricular pressure gradients were found to be 0.2-0.9 mmHg during systole, and 0.1-0.2 mmHg during diastole. Diastolic wall shear stresses were found to be around 1 Pa, which could elevate to 2-4 Pa during systole in the outflow tract. Fetal right ventricles have complex flow patterns featuring two interacting diastolic vortex rings, formed during diastolic E wave and A wave. These rings persisted through the end of systole and elevated wall shear stresses in their proximity. They were observed to conserve ∼25.0% of peak diastolic kinetic energy to be carried over into the subsequent systole. However, this carried-over kinetic energy did not significantly alter the work done by the heart for ejection. Thus, while diastolic vortexes played a significant role in determining spatial patterns and magnitudes of diastolic wall shear stresses, they did not have significant influence on systolic ejection. Our results can serve as a baseline for future comparison with diseased hearts. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Integrating aerodynamic surface modeling for computational fluid dynamics with computer aided structural analysis, design, and manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the development of a NASA Geometry Exchange Specification for transferring aerodynamic surface geometry between LeRC systems and grid generation software used for computational fluid dynamics research. The proposed specification is based on a subset of the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). The presentation will include discussion of how the NASA-IGES standard will accommodate improved computer aided design inspection methods and reverse engineering techniques currently being developed. The presentation is in viewgraph format.

  11. Generalized added masses computation for fluid structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazzeri, L.; Cecconi, S.; Scala, M.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of this paper a description of a method to simulate the dynamic effect of a fluid between two structures by means of an added mass and an added stiffness. The method is based on a potential theory which assumes the fluid is inviscid and incompressible (the case of compressibility is discussed); a solution of the corresponding field equation is given as a superposition of elementary conditions (i.e. applicable to elementary boundary conditions). Consequently the pressure and displacements of the fluid on the boundary are given as a function of the series coefficients; the ''work lost'' (i.e. the work done by the pressures on the difference between actual and estimated displacements) is minimized, in this way the expansion coefficients are related to the displacements on the boundaries. Virtual work procedures are then used to compute added masses. The particular case of a free surface (with gravity effects) is discussed, it is shown how the effect can be modelled by means of an added stiffness term. Some examples relative to vibrations in reservoirs are given and discussed. (orig.)

  12. Computational transport phenomena of fluid-particle systems

    CERN Document Server

    Arastoopour, Hamid; Abbasi, Emad

    2017-01-01

    This book concerns the most up-to-date advances in computational transport phenomena (CTP), an emerging tool for the design of gas-solid processes such as fluidized bed systems. The authors examine recent work in kinetic theory and CTP and illustrate gas-solid processes’ many applications in the energy, chemical, pharmaceutical, and food industries. They also discuss the kinetic theory approach in developing constitutive equations for gas-solid flow systems and how it has advanced over the last decade as well as the possibility of obtaining innovative designs for multiphase reactors, such as those needed to capture CO2 from flue gases. Suitable as a concise reference and a textbook supplement for graduate courses, Computational Transport Phenomena of Gas-Solid Systems is ideal for practitioners in industries involved with the design and operation of processes based on fluid/particle mixtures, such as the energy, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and food processing. Explains how to couple the population balance e...

  13. Application of a distributed network in computational fluid dynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.; Deshpande, Ashish

    1994-01-01

    A general-purpose 3-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes algorithm is implemented on a network of concurrently operating workstations using parallel virtual machine (PVM) and compared with its performance on a CRAY Y-MP and on an Intel iPSC/860. The problem is relatively computationally intensive, and has a communication structure based primarily on nearest-neighbor communication, making it ideally suited to message passing. Such problems are frequently encountered in computational fluid dynamics (CDF), and their solution is increasingly in demand. The communication structure is explicitly coded in the implementation to fully exploit the regularity in message passing in order to produce a near-optimal solution. Results are presented for various grid sizes using up to eight processors.

  14. Hydromagnetic effect on inclined peristaltic flow of a couple stress fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.C. Shit

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have investigated the effect of channel inclination on the peristaltic transport of a couple stress fluid in the presence of externally applied magnetic field. The slip velocity at the channel wall has been taken into account. Under the long wave length and low-Reynolds number assumptions, the analytical solutions for axial velocity, stream function, pressure gradient and pressure rise are obtained. The computed results are presented graphically by taking valid numerical data for non-dimensional physical parameters available in the existing scientific literatures. The results revealed that the trapping fluid can be eliminated and the central line axial velocity can be reduced with a considerable extent by the application of magnetic field. The flow phenomena for the pumping characteristics, trapping and reflux are furthermore investigated. The study shows that the slip parameter and Froude number play an important role in controlling axial pressure gradient.

  15. Computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics for geosystems management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Scott; Alger, Nicholas; Turner, Daniel Zack; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Carnes, Brian; Martinez, Mario J.; Notz, Patrick K.; Klise, Katherine A.; Stone, Charles Michael; Field, Richard V., Jr.; Newell, Pania; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Red-Horse, John Robert; Bishop, Joseph E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Hopkins, Polly L.; Mesh, Mikhail; Bean, James E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Yoon, Hongkyu

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes research performed under the SNL LDRD entitled - Computational Mechanics for Geosystems Management to Support the Energy and Natural Resources Mission. The main accomplishment was development of a foundational SNL capability for computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics analysis of geosystems. The code was developed within the SNL Sierra software system. This report summarizes the capabilities of the simulation code and the supporting research and development conducted under this LDRD. The main goal of this project was the development of a foundational capability for coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) simulation of heterogeneous geosystems utilizing massively parallel processing. To solve these complex issues, this project integrated research in numerical mathematics and algorithms for chemically reactive multiphase systems with computer science research in adaptive coupled solution control and framework architecture. This report summarizes and demonstrates the capabilities that were developed together with the supporting research underlying the models. Key accomplishments are: (1) General capability for modeling nonisothermal, multiphase, multicomponent flow in heterogeneous porous geologic materials; (2) General capability to model multiphase reactive transport of species in heterogeneous porous media; (3) Constitutive models for describing real, general geomaterials under multiphase conditions utilizing laboratory data; (4) General capability to couple nonisothermal reactive flow with geomechanics (THMC); (5) Phase behavior thermodynamics for the CO2-H2O-NaCl system. General implementation enables modeling of other fluid mixtures. Adaptive look-up tables enable thermodynamic capability to other simulators; (6) Capability for statistical modeling of heterogeneity in geologic materials; and (7) Simulator utilizes unstructured grids on parallel processing computers.

  16. CFD: computational fluid dynamics or confounding factor dissemination? The role of hemodynamics in intracranial aneurysm rupture risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, J; Tutino, V M; Snyder, K V; Meng, H

    2014-10-01

    Image-based computational fluid dynamics holds a prominent position in the evaluation of intracranial aneurysms, especially as a promising tool to stratify rupture risk. Current computational fluid dynamics findings correlating both high and low wall shear stress with intracranial aneurysm growth and rupture puzzle researchers and clinicians alike. These conflicting findings may stem from inconsistent parameter definitions, small datasets, and intrinsic complexities in intracranial aneurysm growth and rupture. In Part 1 of this 2-part review, we proposed a unifying hypothesis: both high and low wall shear stress drive intracranial aneurysm growth and rupture through mural cell-mediated and inflammatory cell-mediated destructive remodeling pathways, respectively. In the present report, Part 2, we delineate different wall shear stress parameter definitions and survey recent computational fluid dynamics studies, in light of this mechanistic heterogeneity. In the future, we expect that larger datasets, better analyses, and increased understanding of hemodynamic-biologic mechanisms will lead to more accurate predictive models for intracranial aneurysm risk assessment from computational fluid dynamics. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of High Injection Pressure Blended Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Amir; Jaat, Norrizam; Faisal Hushim, Mohd; Manshoor, Bukhari; Zaman, Izzuddin; Sapit, Azwan; Razali, Azahari

    2017-08-01

    Biodiesel have great potential for substitution with petrol fuel for the purpose of achieving clean energy production and emission reduction. Among the methods that can control the combustion properties, controlling of the fuel injection conditions is one of the successful methods. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of high injection pressure of biodiesel blends on spray characteristics using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Injection pressure was observed at 220 MPa, 250 MPa and 280 MPa. The ambient temperature was kept held at 1050 K and ambient pressure 8 MPa in order to simulate the effect of boost pressure or turbo charger during combustion process. Computational Fluid Dynamics were used to investigate the spray characteristics of biodiesel blends such as spray penetration length, spray angle and mixture formation of fuel-air mixing. The results shows that increases of injection pressure, wider spray angle is produced by biodiesel blends and diesel fuel. The injection pressure strongly affects the mixture formation, characteristics of fuel spray, longer spray penetration length thus promotes the fuel and air mixing.

  18. Application of GPU to computational multiphase fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatake, T; Kunugi, T

    2010-01-01

    The MARS (Multi-interfaces Advection and Reconstruction Solver) [1] is one of the surface volume tracking methods for multi-phase flows. Nowadays, the performance of GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) is much higher than the CPU (Central Processing Unit). In this study, the GPU was applied to the MARS in order to accelerate the computation of multi-phase flows (GPU-MARS), and the performance of the GPU-MARS was discussed. From the performance of the interface tracking method for the analyses of one-directional advection problem, it is found that the computing time of GPU(single GTX280) was around 4 times faster than that of the CPU (Xeon 5040, 4 threads parallelized). From the performance of Poisson Solver by using the algorithm developed in this study, it is found that the performance of the GPU showed around 30 times faster than that of the CPU. Finally, it is confirmed that the GPU showed the large acceleration of the fluid flow computation (GPU-MARS) compared to the CPU. However, it is also found that the double-precision computation of the GPU must perform with very high precision.

  19. Development of real-time visualization system for Computational Fluid Dynamics on parallel computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Kazuhiro; Otani, Takayuki; Matsumoto, Hideki; Takei, Toshifumi; Doi, Shun

    1998-03-01

    A real-time visualization system for computational fluid dynamics in a network connecting between a parallel computing server and the client terminal was developed. Using the system, a user can visualize the results of a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation on the parallel computer as a client terminal during the actual computation on a server. Using GUI (Graphical User Interface) on the client terminal, to user is also able to change parameters of the analysis and visualization during the real-time of the calculation. The system carries out both of CFD simulation and generation of a pixel image data on the parallel computer, and compresses the data. Therefore, the amount of data from the parallel computer to the client is so small in comparison with no compression that the user can enjoy the swift image appearance comfortably. Parallelization of image data generation is based on Owner Computation Rule. GUI on the client is built on Java applet. A real-time visualization is thus possible on the client PC only if Web browser is implemented on it. (author)

  20. Computing bulk and shear viscosities from simulations of fluids with dissipative and stochastic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Gerhard, E-mail: jungge@uni-mainz.de; Schmid, Friederike, E-mail: friederike.schmid@uni-mainz.de [Institut für Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Staudingerweg 9, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2016-05-28

    Exact values for bulk and shear viscosity are important to characterize a fluid, and they are a necessary input for a continuum description. Here we present two novel methods to compute bulk viscosities by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of steady-state systems with periodic boundary conditions — one based on frequent particle displacements and one based on the application of external bulk forces with an inhomogeneous force profile. In equilibrium simulations, viscosities can be determined from the stress tensor fluctuations via Green-Kubo relations; however, the correct incorporation of random and dissipative forces is not obvious. We discuss different expressions proposed in the literature and test them at the example of a dissipative particle dynamics fluid.

  1. Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics 2007 : Implementations and Experiences on Large Scale and Grid Computing

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    At the 19th Annual Conference on Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics held in Antalya, Turkey, in May 2007, the most recent developments and implementations of large-scale and grid computing were presented. This book, comprised of the invited and selected papers of this conference, details those advances, which are of particular interest to CFD and CFD-related communities. It also offers the results related to applications of various scientific and engineering problems involving flows and flow-related topics. Intended for CFD researchers and graduate students, this book is a state-of-the-art presentation of the relevant methodology and implementation techniques of large-scale computing.

  2. Effect of the induced magnetic field on peristaltic flow of a couple stress fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mekheimer, Kh.S.

    2008-01-01

    We have analyzed the MHD flow of a conducting couple stress fluid in a slit channel with rhythmically contracting walls. In this analysis we are taking into account the induced magnetic field. Analytical expressions for the stream function, the magnetic force function, the axial pressure gradient, the axial induced magnetic field and the distribution of the current density across the channel are obtained using long wavelength approximation. The results for the pressure rise, the frictional force per wave length, the axial induced magnetic field and distribution of the current density across the channel have been computed numerically and the results were studied for various values of the physical parameters of interest, such as the couple stress parameter γ, the Hartmann number M, the magnetic Reynolds number R m and the time averaged mean flow rate θ. Contour plots for the stream and magnetic force functions are obtained and the trapping phenomena for the flow field is discussed

  3. Ten iterative steps for model development and evaluation applied to Computational Fluid Dynamics for Environmental Fluid Mechanic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blocken, B.J.E.; Gualtieri, C.

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used to study a wide variety of complex Environmental Fluid Mechanics (EFM) processes, such as water flow and turbulent mixing of contaminants in rivers and estuaries and wind flow and air pollution dispersion in urban areas. However, the accuracy

  4. Efficient Parallel Kernel Solvers for Computational Fluid Dynamics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xian-He

    1997-01-01

    Distributed-memory parallel computers dominate today's parallel computing arena. These machines, such as Intel Paragon, IBM SP2, and Cray Origin2OO, have successfully delivered high performance computing power for solving some of the so-called "grand-challenge" problems. Despite initial success, parallel machines have not been widely accepted in production engineering environments due to the complexity of parallel programming. On a parallel computing system, a task has to be partitioned and distributed appropriately among processors to reduce communication cost and to attain load balance. More importantly, even with careful partitioning and mapping, the performance of an algorithm may still be unsatisfactory, since conventional sequential algorithms may be serial in nature and may not be implemented efficiently on parallel machines. In many cases, new algorithms have to be introduced to increase parallel performance. In order to achieve optimal performance, in addition to partitioning and mapping, a careful performance study should be conducted for a given application to find a good algorithm-machine combination. This process, however, is usually painful and elusive. The goal of this project is to design and develop efficient parallel algorithms for highly accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations and other engineering applications. The work plan is 1) developing highly accurate parallel numerical algorithms, 2) conduct preliminary testing to verify the effectiveness and potential of these algorithms, 3) incorporate newly developed algorithms into actual simulation packages. The work plan has well achieved. Two highly accurate, efficient Poisson solvers have been developed and tested based on two different approaches: (1) Adopting a mathematical geometry which has a better capacity to describe the fluid, (2) Using compact scheme to gain high order accuracy in numerical discretization. The previously developed Parallel Diagonal Dominant (PDD) algorithm

  5. Cepstrum analysis and applications to computational fluid dynamic solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Kristine R.

    1990-04-01

    A novel approach to the problem of spurious reflections introduced by artificial boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) solutions is proposed. Instead of attempting to derive non-reflecting boundary conditions, the approach is to accept the fact that spurious reflections occur, but to remove these reflections with cepstrum analysis, a signal processing technique which has been successfully used to remove echoes from experimental data. First, the theory of the cepstrum method is presented. This includes presentation of two types of cepstra: The Power Cepstrum and the Complex Cepstrum. The definitions of the cepstrum methods are applied theoretically and numerically to the analytical solution of sinusoidal plane wave propagation in a duct. One-D and 3-D time dependent solutions to the Euler equations are computed, and hard-wall conditions are prescribed at the numerical boundaries. The cepstrum method is applied, and the reflections from the boundaries are removed from the solutions. One-D and 3-D solutions are computed with so called nonreflecting boundary conditions, and these solutions are compared to those obtained by prescribing hard wall conditions and processing with the cepstrum.

  6. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  7. DYNAPO 4 - a fluid system and frames analysis computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefter, J.D.; Ahdout, H.

    1982-01-01

    DYNAPO 4 is a user oriented specialized computer program, capable of analyzing three-dimensional linear elastic piping systems or frames for static loads, dynamic loads represented by acceleration response spectra, transient dynamic loads represented by harmonic, polynomial of second order, and time history forcing functions. DYNAPO 4 has plotting capability, which plots the input configuration of the piping system or of the structure and also plots its deformed shape after the load is applied. DYNAPO 4 performs the analysis for ASME Section III Class 1, Class 2, and 3, piping, and provides the user with stress reports as per ASME and ANSI Code requirements. 3 refs

  8. Computational multi-fluid dynamics predictions of critical heat flux in boiling flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimouni, S.; Baudry, C.; Guingo, M.; Lavieville, J.; Merigoux, N.; Mechitoua, N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new mechanistic model dedicated to DNB has been implemented in the Neptune_CFD code. • The model has been validated against 150 tests. • Neptune_CFD code is a CFD tool dedicated to boiling flows. - Abstract: Extensive efforts have been made in the last five decades to evaluate the boiling heat transfer coefficient and the critical heat flux in particular. Boiling crisis remains a major limiting phenomenon for the analysis of operation and safety of both nuclear reactors and conventional thermal power systems. As a consequence, models dedicated to boiling flows have being improved. For example, Reynolds Stress Transport Model, polydispersion and two-phase flow wall law have been recently implemented. In a previous work, we have evaluated computational fluid dynamics results against single-phase liquid water tests equipped with a mixing vane and against two-phase boiling cases. The objective of this paper is to propose a new mechanistic model in a computational multi-fluid dynamics tool leading to wall temperature excursion and onset of boiling crisis. Critical heat flux is calculated against 150 tests and the mean relative error between calculations and experimental values is equal to 8.3%. The model tested covers a large physics scope in terms of mass flux, pressure, quality and channel diameter. Water and R12 refrigerant fluid are considered. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity to the grid refinement was acceptable.

  9. Computational multi-fluid dynamics predictions of critical heat flux in boiling flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimouni, S., E-mail: stephane.mimouni@edf.fr; Baudry, C.; Guingo, M.; Lavieville, J.; Merigoux, N.; Mechitoua, N.

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • A new mechanistic model dedicated to DNB has been implemented in the Neptune-CFD code. • The model has been validated against 150 tests. • Neptune-CFD code is a CFD tool dedicated to boiling flows. - Abstract: Extensive efforts have been made in the last five decades to evaluate the boiling heat transfer coefficient and the critical heat flux in particular. Boiling crisis remains a major limiting phenomenon for the analysis of operation and safety of both nuclear reactors and conventional thermal power systems. As a consequence, models dedicated to boiling flows have being improved. For example, Reynolds Stress Transport Model, polydispersion and two-phase flow wall law have been recently implemented. In a previous work, we have evaluated computational fluid dynamics results against single-phase liquid water tests equipped with a mixing vane and against two-phase boiling cases. The objective of this paper is to propose a new mechanistic model in a computational multi-fluid dynamics tool leading to wall temperature excursion and onset of boiling crisis. Critical heat flux is calculated against 150 tests and the mean relative error between calculations and experimental values is equal to 8.3%. The model tested covers a large physics scope in terms of mass flux, pressure, quality and channel diameter. Water and R12 refrigerant fluid are considered. Furthermore, it was found that the sensitivity to the grid refinement was acceptable.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of a miniaturized dissolution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenning, G; Ahnfelt, E; Sjögren, E; Lennernäs, H

    2017-04-15

    Dissolution testing is an important tool that has applications ranging from fundamental studies of drug-release mechanisms to quality control of the final product. The rate of release of the drug from the delivery system is known to be affected by hydrodynamics. In this study we used computational fluid dynamics to simulate and investigate the hydrodynamics in a novel miniaturized dissolution method for parenteral formulations. The dissolution method is based on a rotating disc system and uses a rotating sample reservoir which is separated from the remaining dissolution medium by a nylon screen. Sample reservoirs of two sizes were investigated (SR6 and SR8) and the hydrodynamic studies were performed at rotation rates of 100, 200 and 400rpm. The overall fluid flow was similar for all investigated cases, with a lateral upward spiraling motion and central downward motion in the form of a vortex to and through the screen. The simulations indicated that the exchange of dissolution medium between the sample reservoir and the remaining release medium was rapid for typical screens, for which almost complete mixing would be expected to occur within less than one minute at 400rpm. The local hydrodynamic conditions in the sample reservoirs depended on their size; SR8 appeared to be relatively more affected than SR6 by the resistance to liquid flow resulting from the screen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of a Vibrating Turbine Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama N. Alshroof

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the numerical fluid-structure interaction (FSI modelling of a vibrating turbine blade using the commercial software ANSYS-12.1. The study has two major aims: (i discussion of the current state of the art of modelling FSI in gas turbine engines and (ii development of a “tuned” one-way FSI model of a vibrating turbine blade to investigate the correlation between the pressure at the turbine casing surface and the vibrating blade motion. Firstly, the feasibility of the complete FSI coupled two-way, three-dimensional modelling of a turbine blade undergoing vibration using current commercial software is discussed. Various modelling simplifications, which reduce the full coupling between the fluid and structural domains, are then presented. The one-way FSI model of the vibrating turbine blade is introduced, which has the computational efficiency of a moving boundary CFD model. This one-way FSI model includes the corrected motion of the vibrating turbine blade under given engine flow conditions. This one-way FSI model is used to interrogate the pressure around a vibrating gas turbine blade. The results obtained show that the pressure distribution at the casing surface does not differ significantly, in its general form, from the pressure at the vibrating rotor blade tip.

  12. Review of computational fluid dynamics applications in biotechnology processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C; Malhotra, D; Rathore, A S

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is well established as a tool of choice for solving problems that involve one or more of the following phenomena: flow of fluids, heat transfer,mass transfer, and chemical reaction. Unit operations that are commonly utilized in biotechnology processes are often complex and as such would greatly benefit from application of CFD. The thirst for deeper process and product understanding that has arisen out of initiatives such as quality by design provides further impetus toward usefulness of CFD for problems that may otherwise require extensive experimentation. Not surprisingly, there has been increasing interest in applying CFD toward a variety of applications in biotechnology processing in the last decade. In this article, we will review applications in the major unit operations involved with processing of biotechnology products. These include fermentation,centrifugation, chromatography, ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and freeze drying. We feel that the future applications of CFD in biotechnology processing will focus on establishing CFD as a tool of choice for providing process understanding that can be then used to guide more efficient and effective experimentation. This article puts special emphasis on the work done in the last 10 years. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Building Energy Performance Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Tryggvason, T.

    1998-01-01

    An interconnection between a building energy performance simulation program and a Computational Fluid Dynamics program (CFD) for room air distribution will be introduced for improvement of the predictions of both the energy consumption and the indoor environment. The building energy performance...... simulation program requires a detailed description of the energy flow in the air movement which can be obtained by a CFD program. The paper describes an energy consumption calculation in a large building, where the building energy simulation program is modified by CFD predictions of the flow between three...... zones connected by open areas with pressure and buoyancy driven air flow. The two programs are interconnected in an iterative procedure. The paper shows also an evaluation of the air quality in the main area of the buildings based on CFD predictions. It is shown that an interconnection between a CFD...

  14. Modeling centrifugal cell washers using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellet, Beth E; Han, Binbing; Dandy, David S; Wickramasinghe, S Ranil

    2004-11-01

    Reinfusion of shed blood during surgery could avoid the need for blood transfusions. Prior to reinfusion of the red blood cells, the shed blood must be washed in order to remove leukocytes, platelets, and other contaminants. Further, the hematocrit of the washed blood must be increased. The feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to guide the design of better centrifuges for processing shed blood is explored here. The velocity field within a centrifuge bowl and the rate of protein removal from the shed blood has been studied. The results obtained indicate that CFD could help screen preliminary centrifuge bowl designs, thus reducing the number of initial experimental tests required when developing new centrifuge bowls. Although the focus of this work is on washing shed blood, the methods developed here are applicable to the design of centrifuge bowls for other blood-processing applications.

  15. Personal Computer (PC) based image processing applied to fluid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y.-C.; Mclachlan, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    A PC based image processing system was employed to determine the instantaneous velocity field of a two-dimensional unsteady flow. The flow was visualized using a suspension of seeding particles in water, and a laser sheet for illumination. With a finite time exposure, the particle motion was captured on a photograph as a pattern of streaks. The streak pattern was digitized and processed using various imaging operations, including contrast manipulation, noise cleaning, filtering, statistical differencing, and thresholding. Information concerning the velocity was extracted from the enhanced image by measuring the length and orientation of the individual streaks. The fluid velocities deduced from the randomly distributed particle streaks were interpolated to obtain velocities at uniform grid points. For the interpolation a simple convolution technique with an adaptive Gaussian window was used. The results are compared with a numerical prediction by a Navier-Stokes computation.

  16. Improving coal flotation recovery using computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Koh [CSIRO Minerals (Australia)

    2009-06-15

    This work involves using the latest advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to increase understanding of the hydrodynamics in coal flotation and to identify any opportunities to improve design and operation of both the Microcel column and Jameson cell. The CSIRO CFD model incorporates micro-processes from cell hydrodynamics that affect particle-bubble attachments and detachments. CFD simulation results include the liquid velocities, turbulent dissipation rates, gas hold-up, particle-bubble attachment rates and detachment rates. This work has demonstrated that CFD modelling is a cost effective means of developing an understanding of particle-bubble attachments and detachments, and can be used to identify and test potential cell or process modifications.

  17. Simulation of Tailrace Hydrodynamics Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to investigate hydrodynamic flow fields surrounding the tailrace zone below large hydraulic structures. Previous and ongoing studies using CFD tools to simulate gradually varied flow with multiple constituents and forebay/intake hydrodynamics have shown that CFD tools can provide valuable information for hydraulic and biological evaluation of fish passage near hydraulic structures. These studies however are incapable of simulating the rapidly varying flow fields that involving breakup of the free-surface, such as those through and below high flow outfalls and spillways. Although the use of CFD tools for these types of flow are still an active area of research, initial applications discussed in this report show that these tools are capable of simulating the primary features of these highly transient flow fields.

  18. Qweak Data Analysis for Target Modeling Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Covrig, Silviu

    2015-04-01

    The 2.5 kW liquid hydrogen (LH2) target used in the Qweak parity violation experiment is the highest power LH2 target in the world and the first to be designed with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at Jefferson Lab. The Qweak experiment determined the weak charge of the proton by measuring the parity-violating elastic scattering asymmetry of longitudinally polarized electrons from unpolarized liquid hydrogen at small momentum transfer (Q2 = 0 . 025 GeV2). This target met the design goals of bench-marked with the Qweak target data. This work is an essential ingredient in future designs of very high power low noise targets like MOLLER (5 kW, target noise asymmetry contribution < 25 ppm) and MESA (4.5 kW).

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of an Evaporative Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapilan N.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of chlorofluorocarbon based refrigerants in the air-conditioning system increases the global warming and causes the climate change. The climate change is expected to present a number of challenges for the built environment and an evaporative cooling system is one of the simplest and environmentally friendly cooling system. The evaporative cooling system is most widely used in summer and in rural and urban areas of India for human comfort. In evaporative cooling system, the addition of water into air reduces the temperature of the air as the energy needed to evaporate the water is taken from the air. Computational fluid dynamics is a numerical analysis and was used to analyse the evaporative cooling system. The CFD results are matches with the experimental results.

  20. Uncertainty quantification in computational fluid dynamics and aircraft engines

    CERN Document Server

    Montomoli, Francesco; D'Ammaro, Antonio; Massini, Michela; Salvadori, Simone

    2015-01-01

    This book introduces novel design techniques developed to increase the safety of aircraft engines. The authors demonstrate how the application of uncertainty methods can overcome problems in the accurate prediction of engine lift, caused by manufacturing error. This in turn ameliorates the difficulty of achieving required safety margins imposed by limits in current design and manufacturing methods. This text shows that even state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are not able to predict the same performance measured in experiments; CFD methods assume idealised geometries but ideal geometries do not exist, cannot be manufactured and their performance differs from real-world ones. By applying geometrical variations of a few microns, the agreement with experiments improves dramatically, but unfortunately the manufacturing errors in engines or in experiments are unknown. In order to overcome this limitation, uncertainty quantification considers the probability density functions of manufacturing errors...

  1. Simulating Smoke Filling in Big Halls by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Chow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many tall halls of big space volume were built and, to be built in many construction projects in the Far East, particularly Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Smoke is identified to be the key hazard to handle. Consequently, smoke exhaust systems are specified in the fire code in those areas. An update on applying Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD in smoke exhaust design will be presented in this paper. Key points to note in CFD simulations on smoke filling due to a fire in a big hall will be discussed. Mathematical aspects concerning of discretization of partial differential equations and algorithms for solving the velocity-pressure linked equations are briefly outlined. Results predicted by CFD with different free boundary conditions are compared with those on room fire tests. Standards on grid size, relaxation factors, convergence criteria, and false diffusion should be set up for numerical experiments with CFD.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Choanoflagellate Filter-Feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadzadeh, Seyed Saeed; Walther, Jens; Nielsen, Lasse Tore; Kiorboe, Thomas; Dolger, Julia; Andersen, Anders

    2017-11-01

    Choanoflagellates are unicellular aquatic organisms with a single flagellum that drives a feeding current through a funnel-shaped collar filter on which bacteria-sized prey are caught. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) we model the beating flagellum and the complex filter flow of the choanoflagellate Diaphanoeca grandis. Our CFD simulations based on the current understanding of the morphology underestimate the experimentally observed clearance rate by more than an order of magnitude: The beating flagellum is simply unable to draw enough water through the fine filter. Our observations motivate us to suggest a radically different filtration mechanism that requires a flagellar vane (sheet), and addition of a wide vane in our CFD model allows us to correctly predict the observed clearance rate.

  3. Study of blast wave overpressures using the computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. COSTA NETO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The threats of bomb attacks by criminal organizations and accidental events involving chemical explosives are a danger to the people and buildings. Due the severity of these issues and the need of data required for a safety design, more research is required about explosions and shock waves. This paper presents an assessment of blast wave overpressures using a computational fluid dynamics software. Analyses of phenomena as reflection of shock waves and channeling effects were done and a comparison between numerical results and analytical predictions has been executed, based on the simulation on several models. The results suggest that the common analytical predictions aren’t accurate enough for an overpressure analysis in small stand-off distances and that poorly designed buildings may increase the shock wave overpressures due multiple blast wave reflections, increasing the destructive potential of the explosions.

  4. Mapping flow distortion on oceanographic platforms using computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O'Sullivan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wind speed measurements over the ocean on ships or buoys are affected by flow distortion from the platform and by the anemometer itself. This can lead to errors in direct measurements and the derived parametrisations. Here we computational fluid dynamics (CFD to simulate the errors in wind speed measurements caused by flow distortion on the RV Celtic Explorer. Numerical measurements were obtained from the finite-volume CFD code OpenFOAM, which was used to simulate the velocity fields. This was done over a range of orientations in the test domain from −60 to +60° in increments of 10°. The simulation was also set up for a range of velocities, ranging from 5 to 25 m s−1 in increments of 0.5 m s−1. The numerical analysis showed close agreement to experimental measurements.

  5. Helicopter fuselage drag - combined computational fluid dynamics and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batrakov, A.; Kusyumov, A.; Mikhailov, S.; Pakhov, V.; Sungatullin, A.; Valeev, M.; Zherekhov, V.; Barakos, G.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, wind tunnel experiments are combined with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) aiming to analyze the aerodynamics of realistic fuselage configurations. A development model of the ANSAT aircraft and an early model of the AKTAI light helicopter were employed. Both models were tested at the subsonic wind tunnel of KNRTU-KAI for a range of Reynolds numbers and pitch and yaw angles. The force balance measurements were complemented by particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigations for the cases where the experimental force measurements showed substantial unsteadiness. The CFD results were found to be in fair agreement with the test data and revealed some flow separation at the rear of the fuselages. Once confidence on the CFD method was established, further modifications were introduced to the ANSAT-like fuselage model to demonstrate drag reduction via small shape changes.

  6. Flow and Stress Field Analysis of Different Fluids and Blades for Fermentation Process

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Chi Wang; Po-Jen Cheng; Kuo-Chi Liu; Ming-Yi Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Fermentation techniques are applied for the biotechnology and are widely used for food manufacturing, materials processing, chemical reaction, and so forth. Different fluids and types of blades in the tank for fermentation cause distinct flow and stress field distributions on the surface between fluid and blade and various flow reactions in the tank appear. This paper is mainly focused on the analysis of flow field with different fluid viscosities and also studied the stress field acting on t...

  7. Numerical computation of fluid flow in different nonferrous metallurgical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lackner, A.

    1996-10-01

    Heat, mass and fluid flow phenomena in metallurgical reactor systems such as smelting cyclones or electrolytic cells are complex and intricately linked through the governing equations of fluid flow, chemical reaction kinetics and chemical thermodynamics. The challenges for the representation of flow phenomena in such reactors as well as the transfers of these concepts to non-specialist modelers (e.g. plant operators and management personnel) can be met through scientific flow visualization techniques. In the first example the fluid flow of the gas phase and of concentrate particles in a smelting cyclone for copper production are calculated three dimensionally. The effect of design parameters (length and diameter of reactor, concentrate feeding tangentially or from the top, ..) and operating conditions are investigated. Single particle traces show, how to increase particle retention time before the particles reach the liquid film flowing down the cyclone wall. Cyclone separators are widely used in the metallurgical and chemical industry for collection of large quantities of dust. Most of the empirical models, which today are applied for the design, are lacking in being valid in the high temperature region. Therefore the numerical prediction of the collection efficiency of dust particles is done. The particle behavior close to the wall is considered by applying a particle restitution model, which calculates individual particle restitution coefficients as functions of impact velocity and impact angle. The effect of design parameters and operating are studied. Moreover, the fluid flow inside a copper refining electrolysis cell is modeled. The simulation is based on density variations in the boundary layer at the electrode surface. Density and thickness of the boundary layer are compared to measurements in a parametric study. The actual inhibitor concentration in the cell is calculated, too. Moreover, a two-phase flow approach is developed to simulate the behavior of

  8. Predicting the Noise of High Power Fluid Targets Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael; Covrig Dusa, Silviu

    The 2.5 kW liquid hydrogen (LH2) target used in the Qweak parity violation experiment is the highest power LH2 target in the world and the first to be designed with Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) at Jefferson Lab. The Qweak experiment determined the weak charge of the proton by measuring the parity-violating elastic scattering asymmetry of longitudinally polarized electrons from unpolarized liquid hydrogen at small momentum transfer (Q2 = 0 . 025 GeV2). This target satisfied the design goals of bench-marked with the Qweak target data. This work is an essential component in future designs of very high power low noise targets like MOLLER (5 kW, target noise asymmetry contribution < 25 ppm) and MESA (4.5 kW).

  9. Fluid-Induced Vibration Analysis for Reactor Internals Using Computational FSI Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jong Sung; Yi, Kun Woo; Sung, Ki Kwang; Im, In Young; Choi, Taek Sang [KEPCO E and C, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper introduces a fluid-induced vibration analysis method which calculates the response of the RVI to both deterministic and random loads at once and utilizes more realistic pressure distribution using the computational Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) method. As addressed above, the FIV analysis for the RVI was carried out using the computational FSI method. This method calculates the response to deterministic and random turbulence loads at once. This method is also a simple and integrative method to get structural dynamic responses of reactor internals to various flow-induced loads. Because the analysis of this paper omitted the bypass flow region and Inner Barrel Assembly (IBA) due to the limitation of computer resources, it is necessary to find an effective way to consider all regions in the RV for the FIV analysis in the future. Reactor coolant flow makes Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) vibrate and may affect the structural integrity of them. U. S. NRC Regulatory Guide 1.20 requires the Comprehensive Vibration Assessment Program (CVAP) to verify the structural integrity of the RVI for Fluid-Induced Vibration (FIV). The hydraulic forces on the RVI of OPR1000 and APR1400 were computed from the hydraulic formulas and the CVAP measurements in Palo Verde Unit 1 and Yonggwang Unit 4 for the structural vibration analyses. In this method, the hydraulic forces were divided into deterministic and random turbulence loads and were used for the excitation forces of the separate structural analyses. These forces are applied to the finite element model and the responses to them were combined into the resultant stresses.

  10. Defective fluid shear stress mechanotransduction mediates hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Larrivée, Bruno; Ola, Roxana; Hayward-Piatkowskyi, Brielle; Dubrac, Alexandre; Huang, Billy; Ross, Tyler D.; Coon, Brian G.; Min, Elizabeth; Tsarfati, Maya; Tong, Haibin; Eichmann, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Morphogenesis of the vascular system is strongly modulated by mechanical forces from blood flow. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an inherited autosomal-dominant disease in which arteriovenous malformations and telangiectasias accumulate with age. Most cases are linked to heterozygous mutations in Alk1 or Endoglin, receptors for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) 9 and 10. Evidence suggests that a second hit results in clonal expansion of endothelial cells to form lesions with poor mural cell coverage that spontaneously rupture and bleed. We now report that fluid shear stress potentiates BMPs to activate Alk1 signaling, which correlates with enhanced association of Alk1 and endoglin. Alk1 is required for BMP9 and flow responses, whereas endoglin is only required for enhancement by flow. This pathway mediates both inhibition of endothelial proliferation and recruitment of mural cells; thus, its loss blocks flow-induced vascular stabilization. Identification of Alk1 signaling as a convergence point for flow and soluble ligands provides a molecular mechanism for development of HHT lesions. PMID:27646277

  11. Class of reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin methods in computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hong; Xia, Yidong; Nourgaliev, Robert

    2011-01-01

    A class of reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods is presented to solve compressible flow problems on arbitrary grids. The idea is to combine the efficiency of the reconstruction methods in finite volume methods and the accuracy of the DG methods to obtain a better numerical algorithm in computational fluid dynamics. The beauty of the resulting reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin (RDG) methods is that they provide a unified formulation for both finite volume and DG methods, and contain both classical finite volume and standard DG methods as two special cases of the RDG methods, and thus allow for a direct efficiency comparison. Both Green-Gauss and least-squares reconstruction methods and a least-squares recovery method are presented to obtain a quadratic polynomial representation of the underlying linear discontinuous Galerkin solution on each cell via a so-called in-cell reconstruction process. The devised in-cell reconstruction is aimed to augment the accuracy of the discontinuous Galerkin method by increasing the order of the underlying polynomial solution. These three reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin methods are used to compute a variety of compressible flow problems on arbitrary meshes to assess their accuracy. The numerical experiments demonstrate that all three reconstructed discontinuous Galerkin methods can significantly improve the accuracy of the underlying second-order DG method, although the least-squares reconstructed DG method provides the best performance in terms of both accuracy, efficiency, and robustness. (author)

  12. Algorithms for computational fluid dynamics n parallel processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Velde, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    A study of parallel algorithms for the numerical solution of partial differential equations arising in computational fluid dynamics is presented. The actual implementation on parallel processors of shared and nonshared memory design is discussed. The performance of these algorithms is analyzed in terms of machine efficiency, communication time, bottlenecks and software development costs. For elliptic equations, a parallel preconditioned conjugate gradient method is described, which has been used to solve pressure equations discretized with high order finite elements on irregular grids. A parallel full multigrid method and a parallel fast Poisson solver are also presented. Hyperbolic conservation laws were discretized with parallel versions of finite difference methods like the Lax-Wendroff scheme and with the Random Choice method. Techniques are developed for comparing the behavior of an algorithm on different architectures as a function of problem size and local computational effort. Effective use of these advanced architecture machines requires the use of machine dependent programming. It is shown that the portability problems can be minimized by introducing high level operations on vectors and matrices structured into program libraries

  13. Benchmarking Computational Fluid Dynamics for Application to PWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.D. III; Conner, M.E.; Liu, B.; Dzodzo, B.; Paramonov, D.V.; Beasley, D.E.; Langford, H.M.; Holloway, M.V.

    2002-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a process used to develop confidence in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as a tool to investigate flow and temperature distributions in a PWR fuel bundle. The velocity and temperature fields produced by a mixing spacer grid of a PWR fuel assembly are quite complex. Before using CFD to evaluate these flow fields, a rigorous benchmarking effort should be performed to ensure that reasonable results are obtained. Westinghouse has developed a method to quantitatively benchmark CFD tools against data at conditions representative of the PWR. Several measurements in a 5 x 5 rod bundle were performed. Lateral flow-field testing employed visualization techniques and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Heat transfer testing involved measurements of the single-phase heat transfer coefficient downstream of the spacer grid. These test results were used to compare with CFD predictions. Among the parameters optimized in the CFD models based on this comparison with data include computational mesh, turbulence model, and boundary conditions. As an outcome of this effort, a methodology was developed for CFD modeling that provides confidence in the numerical results. (authors)

  14. An Automated High Aspect Ratio Mesher for Computational Fluid Dynamics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are routinely used while designing, analyzing, and optimizing air- and spacecraft. An important component of CFD...

  15. Probabilistic Methods for the Quantification of Uncertainty and Error in Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Faragher, John

    2004-01-01

    ... conservatism to allow for them. This report examines the feasibility of using a probabilistic approach for modelling the component temperatures in an engine using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics).

  16. Unsteady Helical Flows of a Size-Dependent Couple-Stress Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Rubbab, Qammar; Mirza, Itrat Abbas; Siddique, Imran; Irshad, Saadia

    2017-01-01

    The helical flows of couple-stress fluids in a straight circular cylinder are studied in the framework of the newly developed, fully determinate linear couple-stress theory. The fluid flow is generated by the helical motion of the cylinder with time-dependent velocity. Also, the couple-stress vector is given on the cylindrical surface and the nonslip condition is considered. Using the integral transform method, analytical solutions to the axial velocity, azimuthal velocity, nonsymmetric force...

  17. Analysis of sponge zones for computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodony, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of sponge regions, or sponge zones, which add the forcing term -σ(q - q ref ) to the right-hand-side of the governing equations in computational fluid mechanics as an ad hoc boundary treatment is widespread. They are used to absorb and minimize reflections from computational boundaries and as forcing sponges to introduce prescribed disturbances into a calculation. A less common usage is as a means of extending a calculation from a smaller domain into a larger one, such as in computing the far-field sound generated in a localized region. By analogy to the penalty method of finite elements, the method is placed on a solid foundation, complete with estimates of convergence. The analysis generalizes the work of Israeli and Orszag [M. Israeli, S.A. Orszag, Approximation of radiation boundary conditions, J. Comp. Phys. 41 (1981) 115-135] and confirms their findings when applied as a special case to one-dimensional wave propagation in an absorbing sponge. It is found that the rate of convergence of the actual solution to the target solution, with an appropriate norm, is inversely proportional to the sponge strength. A detailed analysis for acoustic wave propagation in one-dimension verifies the convergence rate given by the general theory. The exponential point-wise convergence derived by Israeli and Orszag in the high-frequency limit is recovered and found to hold over all frequencies. A weakly nonlinear analysis of the method when applied to Burgers' equation shows similar convergence properties. Three numerical examples are given to confirm the analysis: the acoustic extension of a two-dimensional time-harmonic point source, the acoustic extension of a three-dimensional initial-value problem of a sound pulse, and the introduction of unstable eigenmodes from linear stability theory into a two-dimensional shear layer

  18. Apparent stress-strain relationships in experimental equipment where magnetorheological fluids operate under compression mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazlan, S A; Ekreem, N B; Olabi, A G

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of two different magnetorheological (MR) fluids, namely, water-based and hydrocarbon-based MR fluids in compression mode under various applied currents. Finite element method magnetics was used to predict the magnetic field distribution inside the MR fluids generated by a coil. A test rig was constructed where the MR fluid was sandwiched between two flat surfaces. During the compression, the upper surface was moved towards the lower surface in a vertical direction. Stress-strain relationships were obtained for arrangements of equipment where each type of fluid was involved, using compression test equipment. The apparent compressive stress was found to be increased with the increase in magnetic field strength. In addition, the apparent compressive stress of the water-based MR fluid showed a response to the compressive strain of greater magnitude. However, during the compression process, the hydrocarbon-based MR fluid appeared to show a unique behaviour where an abrupt pressure drop was discovered in a region where the apparent compressive stress would be expected to increase steadily. The conclusion is drawn that the apparent compressive stress of MR fluids is influenced strongly by the nature of the carrier fluid and by the magnitude of the applied current

  19. Advances in engineering turbulence modeling. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, T.-H.

    1992-01-01

    Some new developments in two equation models and second order closure models are presented. In this paper, modified two equation models are proposed to remove shortcomings such as computing flows over complex geometries and the ad hoc treatment near the separation and reattachment points. The calculations using various two equation models are compared with direct numerical solutions of channel flows and flat plate boundary layers. Development of second order closure models will also be discussed with emphasis on the modeling of pressure related correlation terms and dissipation rates in the second moment equations. All existing models poorly predict the normal stresses near the wall and fail to predict the three dimensional effect of mean flow on the turbulence. The newly developed second order near-wall turbulence model to be described in this paper is capable of capturing the near-wall behavior of turbulence as well as the effect of three dimension mean flow on the turbulence.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on the fetal aortic coarctation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue; Zhang, Yutao; Wang, Jingying

    2018-03-01

    Blood flows in normal and coarctate fetal aortas are simulated by the CFD technique using T-rex grids. The three-dimensional (3-D) digital model of the fetal arota is reconstructed by the computer-aided design (CAD) software based on two-dimensional (2-D) ultrasono tomographic images. Simulation results displays the development and enhancement of the secondary flow structure in the coarctate fetal arota. As the diameter narrow ratio rises greater than 45%, the pressure and wall shear stress (WSS) of the aorta arch increase exponentially, which is consistent with the conventional clinical concept. The present study also demonstrates that CFD is a very promising assistant technique to investigate human cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Quinoa - Adaptive Computational Fluid Dynamics, 0.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-09-22

    Quinoa is a set of computational tools that enables research and numerical analysis in fluid dynamics. At this time it remains a test-bed to experiment with various algorithms using fully asynchronous runtime systems. Currently, Quinoa consists of the following tools: (1) Walker, a numerical integrator for systems of stochastic differential equations in time. It is a mathematical tool to analyze and design the behavior of stochastic differential equations. It allows the estimation of arbitrary coupled statistics and probability density functions and is currently used for the design of statistical moment approximations for multiple mixing materials in variable-density turbulence. (2) Inciter, an overdecomposition-aware finite element field solver for partial differential equations using 3D unstructured grids. Inciter is used to research asynchronous mesh-based algorithms and to experiment with coupling asynchronous to bulk-synchronous parallel code. Two planned new features of Inciter, compared to the previous release (LA-CC-16-015), to be implemented in 2017, are (a) a simple Navier-Stokes solver for ideal single-material compressible gases, and (b) solution-adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), which enables dynamically concentrating compute resources to regions with interesting physics. Using the NS-AMR problem we plan to explore how to scale such high-load-imbalance simulations, representative of large production multiphysics codes, to very large problems on very large computers using an asynchronous runtime system. (3) RNGTest, a test harness to subject random number generators to stringent statistical tests enabling quantitative ranking with respect to their quality and computational cost. (4) UnitTest, a unit test harness, running hundreds of tests per second, capable of testing serial, synchronous, and asynchronous functions. (5) MeshConv, a mesh file converter that can be used to convert 3D tetrahedron meshes from and to either of the following formats: Gmsh

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Human Pulmonary Arteries with Experimental Validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordones, Alifer D; Leroux, Matthew; Kheyfets, Vitaly O; Wu, Yu-An; Chen, Chia-Yuan; Finol, Ender A

    2018-05-21

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a chronic progressive disease characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure, caused by an increase in pulmonary arterial impedance. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to identify metrics representative of the stage of PH disease. However, experimental validation of CFD models is often not pursued due to the geometric complexity of the model or uncertainties in the reproduction of the required flow conditions. The goal of this work is to validate experimentally a CFD model of a pulmonary artery phantom using a particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Rapid prototyping was used for the construction of the patient-specific pulmonary geometry, derived from chest computed tomography angiography images. CFD simulations were performed with the pulmonary model with a Reynolds number matching those of the experiments. Flow rates, the velocity field, and shear stress distributions obtained with the CFD simulations were compared to their counterparts from the PIV flow visualization experiments. Computationally predicted flow rates were within 1% of the experimental measurements for three of the four branches of the CFD model. The mean velocities in four transversal planes of study were within 5.9 to 13.1% of the experimental mean velocities. Shear stresses were qualitatively similar between the two methods with some discrepancies in the regions of high velocity gradients. The fluid flow differences between the CFD model and the PIV phantom are attributed to experimental inaccuracies and the relative compliance of the phantom. This comparative analysis yielded valuable information on the accuracy of CFD predicted hemodynamics in pulmonary circulation models.

  3. Analytical solutions of couple stress fluid flows with slip boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devakar M.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present article, the exact solutions for fundamental flows namely Couette, Poiseuille and generalized Couette flows of an incompressible couple stress fluid between parallel plates are obtained using slip boundary conditions. The effect of various parameters on velocity for each problem is discussed. It is found that, for each of the problems, the solution in the limiting case as couple stresses approaches to zero is similar to that of classical viscous Newtonian fluid. The results indicate that, the presence of couple stresses decreases the velocity of the fluid.

  4. Drag on a slip spherical particle moving in a couple stress fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Ashmawy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The creeping motion of a rigid slip sphere in an unbounded couple stress fluid is investigated. The linear slip boundary condition and the vanishing couple stress condition are applied on the surface of the sphere. A simple formula for the drag force acting on a slip sphere translating in an unbounded couple stress fluid is obtained. Special cases of the deduced drag formula are concluded and compared with analogous results in the literature. The normalized drag force experienced by the fluid on the slip sphere is represented graphically and the effects of slip parameter and viscosity coefficients are discussed.

  5. Erosion Evaluation of a Slurry Mixer Tank with Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to understand and characterize erosion of the floor and internal structures in the slurry mixing vessels in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. An initial literature survey helped identify the principal drivers of erosion for a solids laden fluid: the solids content of the working fluid, the regions of recirculation and particle impact with the walls, and the regions of high wall shear. A series of CFD analyses was performed to characterize slurry-flow profiles, wall shear, and particle impingement distributions in key components such as coil restraints and the vessel floor. The calculations showed that the primary locations of high erosion resulting from abrasion were at the leading edge of the coil guide, the tank floor below the insert plate of the coil guide support, and the upstream lead-in plate. These modeling results based on the calculated high shear regions were in excellent agreement with the observed erosion sites in both location and the degree of erosion. Loss of the leading edge of the coil guide due to the erosion damage during the slurry mixing operation did not affect the erosion patterns on the tank floor. Calculations for a lower impeller speed showed similar erosion patterns but significantly reduced wall shear stresses

  6. A unified momentum equation approach for computing thermal residual stresses during melting and solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Haram; Ki, Hyungson

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we present a novel numerical method for computing thermal residual stresses from a viewpoint of fluid-structure interaction (FSI). In a thermal processing of a material, residual stresses are developed as the material undergoes melting and solidification, and liquid, solid, and a mixture of liquid and solid (or mushy state) coexist and interact with each other during the process. In order to accurately account for the stress development during phase changes, we derived a unified momentum equation from the momentum equations of incompressible fluids and elastoplastic solids. In this approach, the whole fluid-structure system is treated as a single continuum, and the interaction between fluid and solid phases across the mushy zone is naturally taken into account in a monolithic way. For thermal analysis, an enthalpy-based method was employed. As a numerical example, a two-dimensional laser heating problem was considered, where a carbon steel sheet was heated by a Gaussian laser beam. Momentum and energy equations were discretized on a uniform Cartesian grid in a finite volume framework, and temperature-dependent material properties were used. The austenite-martensite phase transformation of carbon steel was also considered. In this study, the effects of solid strains, fluid flow, mushy zone size, and laser heating time on residual stress formation were investigated.

  7. Computational and Experimental Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Gologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, Geoffrey [Alfred Univ., NY (United States)

    2017-04-05

    United States Department of Energy grant DE-FG02-10ER16128, “Computational and Spectroscopic Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces” (Geoffrey M. Bowers, P.I.) focused on developing a molecular-scale understanding of processes that occur in fluids and at solid-fluid interfaces using the combination of spectroscopic, microscopic, and diffraction studies with molecular dynamics computer modeling. The work is intimately tied to the twin proposal at Michigan State University (DOE DE-FG02-08ER15929; same title: R. James Kirkpatrick, P.I. and A. Ozgur Yazaydin, co-P.I.).

  8. Design of airborne wind turbine and computational fluid dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbreen, Faiqa

    Wind energy is a promising alternative to the depleting non-renewable sources. The height of the wind turbines becomes a constraint to their efficiency. Airborne wind turbine can reach much higher altitudes and produce higher power due to high wind velocity and energy density. The focus of this thesis is to design a shrouded airborne wind turbine, capable to generate 70 kW to propel a leisure boat with a capacity of 8-10 passengers. The idea of designing an airborne turbine is to take the advantage of higher velocities in the atmosphere. The Solidworks model has been analyzed numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software StarCCM+. The Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Simulation (URANS) with K-epsilon turbulence model has been selected, to study the physical properties of the flow, with emphasis on the performance of the turbine and the increase in air velocity at the throat. The analysis has been done using two ambient velocities of 12 m/s and 6 m/s. At 12 m/s inlet velocity, the velocity of air at the turbine has been recorded as 16 m/s. The power generated by the turbine is 61 kW. At inlet velocity of 6 m/s, the velocity of air at turbine increased to 10 m/s. The power generated by turbine is 25 kW.

  9. Improving flow distribution in influent channels using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, No-Suk; Yoon, Sukmin; Jeong, Woochang; Lee, Seungjae

    2016-10-01

    Although the flow distribution in an influent channel where the inflow is split into each treatment process in a wastewater treatment plant greatly affects the efficiency of the process, and a weir is the typical structure for the flow distribution, to the authors' knowledge, there is a paucity of research on the flow distribution in an open channel with a weir. In this study, the influent channel of a real-scale wastewater treatment plant was used, installing a suppressed rectangular weir that has a horizontal crest to cross the full channel width. The flow distribution in the influent channel was analyzed using a validated computational fluid dynamics model to investigate (1) the comparison of single-phase and two-phase simulation, (2) the improved procedure of the prototype channel, and (3) the effect of the inflow rate on flow distribution. The results show that two-phase simulation is more reliable due to the description of the free-surface fluctuations. It should first be considered for improving flow distribution to prevent a short-circuit flow, and the difference in the kinetic energy with the inflow rate makes flow distribution trends different. The authors believe that this case study is helpful for improving flow distribution in an influent channel.

  10. Introducing Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation into Olfactory Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Takamichi

    An olfactory display is a device that delivers various odors to the user's nose. It can be used to add special effects to movies and games by releasing odors relevant to the scenes shown on the screen. In order to provide high-presence olfactory stimuli to the users, the display must be able to generate realistic odors with appropriate concentrations in a timely manner together with visual and audio playbacks. In this paper, we propose to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations in conjunction with the olfactory display. Odor molecules released from their source are transported mainly by turbulent flow, and their behavior can be extremely complicated even in a simple indoor environment. In the proposed system, a CFD solver is employed to calculate the airflow field and the odor dispersal in the given environment. An odor blender is used to generate the odor with the concentration determined based on the calculated odor distribution. Experimental results on presenting odor stimuli synchronously with movie clips show the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  11. Unsteady computational fluid dynamics in front crawl swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Mathias; Bernard, Anthony; Monnet, Tony; Lacouture, Patrick; David, Laurent

    2017-05-01

    The development of codes and power calculations currently allows the simulation of increasingly complex flows, especially in the turbulent regime. Swimming research should benefit from these technological advances to try to better understand the dynamic mechanisms involved in swimming. An unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study is conducted in crawl, in order to analyse the propulsive forces generated by the hand and forearm. The k-ω SST turbulence model and an overset grid method have been used. The main objectives are to analyse the evolution of the hand-forearm propulsive forces and to explain this relative to the arm kinematics parameters. In order to validate our simulation model, the calculated forces and pressures were compared with several other experimental and numerical studies. A good agreement is found between our results and those of other studies. The hand is the segment that generates the most propulsive forces during the aquatic stroke. As the pressure component is the main source of force, the orientation of the hand-forearm in the absolute coordinate system is an important kinematic parameter in the swimming performance. The propulsive forces are biggest when the angles of attack are high. CFD appears as a very valuable tool to better analyze the mechanisms of swimming performance and offers some promising developments, especially for optimizing the performance from a parametric study.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics for turbomachinery internal air systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, John W; Hills, Nicholas J

    2007-10-15

    Considerable progress in development and application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for aeroengine internal flow systems has been made in recent years. CFD is regularly used in industry for assessment of air systems, and the performance of CFD for basic axisymmetric rotor/rotor and stator/rotor disc cavities with radial throughflow is largely understood and documented. Incorporation of three-dimensional geometrical features and calculation of unsteady flows are becoming commonplace. Automation of CFD, coupling with thermal models of the solid components, and extension of CFD models to include both air system and main gas path flows are current areas of development. CFD is also being used as a research tool to investigate a number of flow phenomena that are not yet fully understood. These include buoyancy-affected flows in rotating cavities, rim seal flows and mixed air/oil flows. Large eddy simulation has shown considerable promise for the buoyancy-driven flows and its use for air system flows is expected to expand in the future.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beach, Robert [IBACOS Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Prahl, Duncan [IBACOS Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Lange, Rich [IBACOS Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  14. Doppler optical coherence tomography imaging of local fluid flow and shear stress within microporous scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yali; Bagnaninchi, Pierre O.; Yang, Ying; Haj, Alicia El; Hinds, Monica T.; Kirkpatrick, Sean J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2009-05-01

    Establishing a relationship between perfusion rate and fluid shear stress in a 3D cell culture environment is an ongoing and challenging task faced by tissue engineers. We explore Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) as a potential imaging tool for in situ monitoring of local fluid flow profiles inside porous chitosan scaffolds. From the measured fluid flow profiles, the fluid shear stresses are evaluated. We examine the localized fluid flow and shear stress within low- and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds, which are subjected to a constant input flow rate of 0.5 ml.min-1. The DOCT results show that the behavior of the fluid flow and shear stress in micropores is strongly dependent on the micropore interconnectivity, porosity, and size of pores within the scaffold. For low-porosity and high-porosity chitosan scaffolds examined, the measured local fluid flow and shear stress varied from micropore to micropore, with a mean shear stress of 0.49+/-0.3 dyn.cm-2 and 0.38+/-0.2 dyn.cm-2, respectively. In addition, we show that the scaffold's porosity and interconnectivity can be quantified by combining analyses of the 3D structural and flow images obtained from DOCT.

  15. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  16. A computational approach for fluid queues driven by truncated birth-death processes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenin, R.B.; Parthasarathy, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze fluid queues driven by truncated birth-death processes with general birth and death rates. We compute the equilibrium distribution of the content of the fluid buffer by providing efficient numerical procedures to compute the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the

  17. Fluid Analysis and Improved Structure of an ATEG Heat Exchanger Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Z. B.; Deng, Y. D.; Su, C. Q.; Yuan, X. H.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a numerical model has been employed to analyze the internal flow field distribution in a heat exchanger applied for an automotive thermoelectric generator based on computational fluid dynamics. The model simulates the influence of factors relevant to the heat exchanger, including the automotive waste heat mass flow velocity, temperature, internal fins, and back pressure. The result is in good agreement with experimental test data. Sensitivity analysis of the inlet parameters shows that increase of the exhaust velocity, compared with the inlet temperature, makes little contribution (0.1 versus 0.19) to the heat transfer but results in a detrimental back pressure increase (0.69 versus 0.21). A configuration equipped with internal fins is proved to offer better thermal performance compared with that without fins. Finally, based on an attempt to improve the internal flow field, a more rational structure is obtained, offering a more homogeneous temperature distribution, higher average heat transfer coefficient, and lower back pressure.

  18. A finite volume procedure for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Jagad, P. I.; Puranik, B. P.; Date, A. W.

    2018-01-01

    A unified cell-centered unstructured mesh finite volume procedure is presented for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis. An in-house procedure (A. W. Date, Solution of Transport Equations on Unstructured Meshes with Cell

  19. Analysis of Nanoparticle Additive Couple Stress Fluids in Three-layered Journal Bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, T V V L N; Sufian, S; Mohamed, N M

    2013-01-01

    The present theoretical study investigates the load capacity and friction coefficient in a three-layered journal bearing lubricated with nanoparticle additive couple stress fluids. The couple stresses effects are analyzed based on Stokes micro-continuum theory. The nondimensional pressure and shear stress expressions are derived using modified Reynolds equation. The nondimensional load capacity increases and the coefficient of friction decreases using nanoparticle additive lubricants with couple stress effects. The three-layered journal bearing performance characteristics are improved with increase in both (i) surface adsorbent fluid film layer thickness and (ii) dynamic viscosity ratio of surface to core layer.

  20. TECHNICAL NOTE: The strengthening effect of guar gum on the yield stress of magnetorheological fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei Ping; Zhao, Bin Yuan; Wu, Qing; Chen, LeSheng; Hu, Ke Ao

    2006-08-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach for producing obvious strengthening of the magnetorheological (MR) effect of MR fluids. Carbonyl iron powders coated with guar gum were used as magnetic particles in the MR fluid. Experimental results showed that inducing a guar gum coating not only greatly improved the sedimentation stability but also strengthened the yield stress of the MR fluid. An intermolecular force based model was proposed for explaining the strengthening effect.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of momentum transport in rotating wall perfused bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut N; Tığli, R Seda; Beşkardeş, Işil Gerçek; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe; Colak, Uner

    2010-11-01

    In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of a rotating-wall perfused-vessel (RWPV) bioreactor is performed to characterize the complex hydrodynamic environment for the simulation of cartilage development in RWPV bioreactor in the presence of tissue-engineered cartilage constructs, i.e., cell-chitosan scaffolds. Shear stress exerted on chitosan scaffolds in bioreactor was calculated for different rotational velocities in the range of 33-38 rpm. According to the calculations, the lateral and lower surfaces were exposed to 0.07926-0.11069 dyne/cm(2) and 0.05974-0.08345 dyne/cm(2), respectively, while upper surfaces of constructs were exposed to 0.09196-0.12847 dyne/cm(2). Results validate adequate hydrodynamic environment for scaffolds in RWPV bioreactor for cartilage tissue development which concludes the suitability of operational conditions of RWPV bioreactor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models for Shock Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, James R.; Oberkampf, William L.; Wolf, Richard T.; Orkwis, Paul D.; Turner, Mark G.; Babinsky, Holger

    2011-01-01

    A workshop on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) prediction of shock boundary-layer interactions (SBLIs) was held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. As part of the workshop numerous CFD analysts submitted solutions to four experimentally measured SBLIs. This paper describes the assessment of the CFD predictions. The assessment includes an uncertainty analysis of the experimental data, the definition of an error metric and the application of that metric to the CFD solutions. The CFD solutions provided very similar levels of error and in general it was difficult to discern clear trends in the data. For the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods the choice of turbulence model appeared to be the largest factor in solution accuracy. Large-eddy simulation methods produced error levels similar to RANS methods but provided superior predictions of normal stresses.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of coal/biomass co-firing in pulverised fuel boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghtaderi, B.; Meesri, C. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). CRC for Coal in Sustainable Development, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2002-07-01

    The present study is concerned with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of coal/biomass blends co-fired under conditions pertinent to pulverised fuel (PF) boilers. The attention is particularly focused on the near burner zone to examine the impact of biomass on the flame geometry and temperature. The predictions are obtained by numerical solution of the conservation equations for the gas and particle phases. The gas phase is solved in the Eulerian domain using steady-state time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations while the solution of the particle phase is obtained from a series of Lagrangian particle tracking equations. Turbulence is modelled using the {kappa}-{epsilon} and Reynolds Stress models. The comparison between the predictions and experimental measurement reported in the literature resulted in a good agreement. Other influences of biomass co-firing are observed for fuel devolatilisation and burnout. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Exact solutions for MHD flow of couple stress fluid with heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Alam Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at presenting exact solutions for MHD flow of couple stress fluid with heat transfer. The governing partial differential equations (PDEs for an incompressible MHD flow of couple stress fluid are reduced to ordinary differential equations by employing wave parameter. The methodology is implemented for linearizing the flow equations without extra transformation and restrictive assumptions. Comparison is made with the result obtained previously.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Computations With Zonal Navier-Stokes Flow Solver (ZNSFLOW) Common High Performance Computing Scalable Software Initiative (CHSSI) Software

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edge, Harris

    1999-01-01

    ...), computational fluid dynamics (CFD) 6 project. Under the project, a proven zonal Navier-Stokes solver was rewritten for scalable parallel performance on both shared memory and distributed memory high performance computers...

  6. Oxidative stress biomarkers in amniotic fluid of pregnant women with hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Tanja R; Dolicanin, Zana C; Djordjevic, Natasa Z

    2017-11-15

    Hypothyroidism in pregnancy is the serious state that may lead to fetal morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress biomarkers in the amniotic fluid can provide important information on the health, development and maturation of the fetus during pregnancy. In this study, we examined whether maternal hypothyroidism contributes to increased oxidative stress biomarkers in the amniotic fluid during the first trimester of pregnancy. The study was conducted on healthy pregnant women and pregnant women with hypothyroidism (gestational age: 16-18 weeks). Oxidative stress biomarkers, such as superoxide anion (O 2 •- ), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), nitric oxide (NO), peroxynitrite (ONOO - ), lipid peroxide (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were assayed in the amniotic fluid. The results of this study indicated that concentrations of O 2 •- and NO are significantly higher, while the concentration of H 2 O 2 is significantly lower in the amniotic fluid of pregnant women with hypothyroidism in comparison to healthy pregnant women. There were no differences in concentrations of LPO, GSH and GSSG among tested groups. Also, we found that amniotic fluid concentration of O 2 •- is negatively correlated with the body weight and Apgar score values of the newborns. These results suggest that pregnancy hypothyroidism is characterized by the amniotic fluid oxidative stress. Incorporation of the oxidative stress biomarkers measurement in the amniotic fluid may be of clinical importance in the management of pregnancy hypothyroidism.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for Saltstone Vault 4 Vapor Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Si Young

    2005-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns for vapor space inside the Saltstone Vault No.4 under different operating scenarios. The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations. A CFD model took three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the boundary conditions as provided by the customer. The present model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference baseline case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics: Hemodynamic Changes in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm After Stent-Graft Implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenfelder, Thomas; Lotfey, Mourad; Boehm, Thomas; Wildermuth, Simon

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate quantitatively and qualitatively the hemodynamic changes in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) after stent-graft placement based on multidetector CT angiography (MDCT-A) datasets using the possibilities of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Eleven patients with AAA and one patient with left-side common iliac aneurysm undergoing MDCT-A before and after stent-graft implantation were included. Based on the CT datasets, three-dimensional grid-based models of AAA were built. The minimal size of tetrahedrons was determined for grid-independence simulation. The CFD program was validated by comparing the calculated flow with an experimentally generated flow in an identical, anatomically correct silicon model of an AAA. Based on the results, pulsatile flow was simulated. A laminar, incompressible flow-based inlet condition, zero traction-force outlet boundary, and a no-slip wall boundary condition was applied. The measured flow volume and visualized flow pattern, wall pressure, and wall shear stress before and after stent-graft implantation were compared. The experimentally and numerically generated streamlines are highly congruent. After stenting, the simulation shows a reduction of wall pressure and wall shear stress and a more equal flow through both external iliac arteries after stenting. The postimplantation flow pattern is characterized by a reduction of turbulences. New areas of high pressure and shear stress appear at the stent bifurcation and docking area. CFD is a versatile and noninvasive tool to demonstrate changes of flow rate and flow pattern caused by stent-graft implantation. The desired effect and possible complications of a stent-graft implantation can be visualized. CFD is a highly promising technique and improves our understanding of the local structural and fluid dynamic conditions for abdominal aortic stent placement

  9. A two-dimensional continuum model of biofilm growth incorporating fluid flow and shear stress based detachment

    KAUST Repository

    Duddu, Ravindra

    2009-05-01

    We present a two-dimensional biofilm growth model in a continuum framework using an Eulerian description. A computational technique based on the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the level set method is used to simulate the growth of the biofilm. The model considers fluid flow around the biofilm surface, the advection-diffusion and reaction of substrate, variable biomass volume fraction and erosion due to the interfacial shear stress at the biofilm-fluid interface. The key assumptions of the model and the governing equations of transport, biofilm kinetics and biofilm mechanics are presented. Our 2D biofilm growth results are in good agreement with those obtained by Picioreanu et al. (Biotechnol Bioeng 69(5):504-515, 2000). Detachment due to erosion is modeled using two continuous speed functions based on: (a) interfacial shear stress and (b) biofilm height. A relation between the two detachment models in the case of a 1D biofilm is established and simulated biofilm results with detachment in 2D are presented. The stress in the biofilm due to fluid flow is evaluated and higher stresses are observed close to the substratum where the biofilm is attached. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Computing the influences of different Intraocular Pressures on the human eye components using computational fluid-structure interaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Razaghi, Reza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    Intraocular Pressure (IOP) is defined as the pressure of aqueous in the eye. It has been reported that the normal range of IOP should be within the 10-20 mmHg with an average of 15.50 mmHg among the ophthalmologists. Keratoconus is an anti-inflammatory eye disorder that debilitated cornea unable to reserve the normal structure contrary to the IOP in the eye. Consequently, the cornea would bulge outward and invoke a conical shape following by distorted vision. In addition, it is known that any alterations in the structure and composition of the lens and cornea would exceed a change of the eye ball as well as the mechanical and optical properties of the eye. Understanding the precise alteration of the eye components' stresses and deformations due to different IOPs could help elucidate etiology and pathogenesis to develop treatments not only for keratoconus but also for other diseases of the eye. In this study, at three different IOPs, including 10, 20, and 30 mmHg the stresses and deformations of the human eye components were quantified using a Three-Dimensional (3D) computational Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) model of the human eye. The results revealed the highest amount of von Mises stress in the bulged region of the cornea with 245 kPa at the IOP of 30 mmHg. The lens was also showed the von Mises stress of 19.38 kPa at the IOPs of 30 mmHg. In addition, by increasing the IOP from 10 to 30 mmHg, the radius of curvature in the cornea and lens was increased accordingly. In contrast, the sclera indicated its highest stress at the IOP of 10 mmHg due to over pressure phenomenon. The variation of IOP illustrated a little influence in the amount of stress as well as the resultant displacement of the optic nerve. These results can be used for understanding the amount of stresses and deformations in the human eye components due to different IOPs as well as for clarifying significant role of IOP on the radius of curvature of the cornea and the lens.

  11. Collision of the glass shards with the eye: A computational fluid-structure interaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Razaghi, Reza; Biglari, Hasan; Sera, Toshihiro; Kudo, Susumu

    2017-12-27

    The main stream of blunt trauma injuries has been reported to be related to the automobile crashes, sporting activities, and military operations. Glass shards, which can be induced due to car accident, earthquake, gunshot, etc., might collide with the eye and trigger substantial scarring and, consequently, permanently affect the vision. The complications as a result of the collision with the eye and its following injuries on each component of the eye are difficult to be diagnosed. The objective of this study was to employ a Three-Dimensional (3D) computational Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) model of the human eye to assess the results of the glass shards collision with the eye. To do this, a rigid steel-based object hit a Smoothed-Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) glass wall at the velocities of 100, 150, and 200 m/s and, subsequently, the resultant glass shards moved toward the eye. The amount of injury, then, quantified in terms of the stresses and strains. The results revealed the highest amount of stress in the cornea while the lowest one was observed in the vitreous body. It was also found that increasing the speed of the glass shards amplifies the amount of the stress in the components which are located in the central anterior zone of the eye, such as the cornea, aqueous body, and iris. However, regarding those components located in the peripheral/posterior side of the eye, especially the optic nerve, by increasing the amount of velocity a reduction in the stresses was observed and the optic nerve is hardly damaged. These findings have associations not only for understanding the amount of stresses/strains in the eye components at three different velocities, but also for providing preliminary information for the ophthalmologists to have a better diagnosis after glass shards (small objects impact) injuries to the eye. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Computer simulations of equilibrium magnetization and microstructure in magnetic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, A. P.; Abade, G. C.; Cunha, F. R.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics simulations are developed to compute the equilibrium magnetization of a magnetic fluid under action of a homogeneous applied magnetic field. The particles are free of inertia and modeled as hard spheres with the same diameters. Two different periodic boundary conditions are implemented: the minimum image method and Ewald summation technique by replicating a finite number of particles throughout the suspension volume. A comparison of the equilibrium magnetization resulting from the minimum image approach and Ewald sums is performed by using Monte Carlo simulations. The Monte Carlo simulations with minimum image and lattice sums are used to investigate suspension microstructure by computing the important radial pair-distribution function go(r), which measures the probability density of finding a second particle at a distance r from a reference particle. This function provides relevant information on structure formation and its anisotropy through the suspension. The numerical results of go(r) are compared with theoretical predictions based on quite a different approach in the absence of the field and dipole-dipole interactions. A very good quantitative agreement is found for a particle volume fraction of 0.15, providing a validation of the present simulations. In general, the investigated suspensions are dominated by structures like dimmer and trimmer chains with trimmers having probability to form an order of magnitude lower than dimmers. Using Monte Carlo with lattice sums, the density distribution function g2(r) is also examined. Whenever this function is different from zero, it indicates structure-anisotropy in the suspension. The dependence of the equilibrium magnetization on the applied field, the magnetic particle volume fraction, and the magnitude of the dipole-dipole magnetic interactions for both boundary conditions are explored in this work. Results show that at dilute regimes and with moderate dipole

  13. Optimization of MR fluid Yield stress using Taguchi Method and Response Surface Methodology Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, S. K.; Sharma, Vivek

    2018-02-01

    Magneto rheological fluids belong to a class of smart materials whose rheological characteristics such as yield stress, viscosity etc. changes in the presence of applied magnetic field. In this paper, optimization of MR fluid constituents is obtained with on-state yield stress as response parameter. For this, 18 samples of MR fluids are prepared using L-18 Orthogonal Array. These samples are experimentally tested on a developed & fabricated electromagnet setup. It has been found that the yield stress of MR fluid mainly depends on the volume fraction of the iron particles and type of carrier fluid used in it. The optimal combination of the input parameters for the fluid are found to be as Mineral oil with a volume percentage of 67%, iron powder of 300 mesh size with a volume percentage of 32%, oleic acid with a volume percentage of 0.5% and tetra-methyl-ammonium-hydroxide with a volume percentage of 0.7%. This optimal combination of input parameters has given the on-state yield stress as 48.197 kPa numerically. An experimental confirmation test on the optimized MR fluid sample has been then carried out and the response parameter thus obtained has found matching quite well (less than 1% error) with the numerically obtained values.

  14. Complex fluids in biological systems experiment, theory, and computation

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book serves as an introduction to the continuum mechanics and mathematical modeling of complex fluids in living systems. The form and function of living systems are intimately tied to the nature of surrounding fluid environments, which commonly exhibit nonlinear and history dependent responses to forces and displacements. With ever-increasing capabilities in the visualization and manipulation of biological systems, research on the fundamental phenomena, models, measurements, and analysis of complex fluids has taken a number of exciting directions. In this book, many of the world’s foremost experts explore key topics such as: Macro- and micro-rheological techniques for measuring the material properties of complex biofluids and the subtleties of data interpretation Experimental observations and rheology of complex biological materials, including mucus, cell membranes, the cytoskeleton, and blood The motility of microorganisms in complex fluids and the dynamics of active suspensions Challenges and solut...

  15. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a mixed flow pump impeller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ATHARVA

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... From the CFD analysis software and advanced post processing tools the complex flow inside the ... The numerical simulation can provide quite accurate information on the fluid ...

  16. Using Computational Fluid Dynamics to examine airflow characteristics in Empty Nose Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Tim; Esmaily-Moghadam, Mahdi; Thamboo, Andrew; Velasquez, Nathalia; Nayak, Jayakar V.; Sellier, Mathieu; Moin, Parviz

    2016-11-01

    The enigmatic disorder, empty nose syndrome (ENS), presents with a complex subjective symptom profile despite objectively patent nasal airways, and recent reports suggest that surgical augmentation of the nasal airway can improve quality of life and ENS-related complaints. In this study, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was performed both prior to, and following, inferior turbinate augmentation to model the resultant changes in airflow patterns and better understand the pathophysiology of ENS. An ENS patient with marked reduction in ENS symptoms following turbinate augmentation was identified, and pre- and post-operative CT imaging was collected. A Finite element framework with the variational multiscale method (Esmaily-Moghadam, Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg. 2015) was used to compute the airflow, temperature, and moisture transport through the nasal cavity. Comparison of the CFD results following corrective surgery showed higher levels of airflow turbulence. Augmentation produced 50%, 25%, and 25% increases in root mean square pressure, wall shear stress, and heat flux respectively. These results provide insight into the changes in nasal airflow characteristics attainable through surgical augmentation, and by extension, how nasal airflow patterns may be distorted in the 'overly patent' airway of ENS patients. Supported by Stanford University CTR and Fulbright New Zealand.

  17. Estimates of fluid pressure and tectonic stress in hydrothermal/volcanic areas:a methodological approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Vilardo

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available An analytical approach to estimate the relative contribution of the fluid pressure and tectonic stress in hydrothermal/ volcanic areas is proposed assuming a Coulomb criterion of failure. The analytical procedure requires the coefficient of internal friction, cohesion, rock density, and thickness of overburden to be known from geological data. In addition, the orientation of the principal stress axes and the stress ratio must be determined from the inversion of fault-slip or seismic data (focal mechanisms. At first, the stress magnitude is calculated assuming that faulting occurs in 'dry' conditions (fluid pressure=0. In a second step, the fluid pressure is introduced performing a grid search over the orientation of 1 fault planes that slip by shear failure or 2 cracks that open under different values of fluid pressure and calculating the consistency with the observed fault planes (i.e. strike and dip of faults, cracks, nodal planes from focal mechanisms. The analytical method is applied using fault-slip data from the Solfatara volcano (Campi Flegrei, Italy and seismic data (focal mechanisms from the Vesuvius volcano (Italy. In these areas, the fluid pressure required to activate faults (shear fractures and cracks (open fractures is calculated. At Solfatara, the ratio between the fluid pressure and the vertical stress ?is very low for faults ( ?=0.16 and relatively high for cracks ( ?=0.5. At Vesuvius, ?=0.6. Limits and uncertainties of the method are also discussed.

  18. STAFAN, Fluid Flow, Mechanical Stress in Fractured Rock of Nuclear Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyakorn, P.; Golis, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: STAFAN (Stress And Flow Analysis) is a two-dimensional, finite-element code designed to model fluid flow and the interaction of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a fractured rock surrounding a nuclear waste repository. STAFAN considers flow behavior of a deformable fractured system with fracture-porous matrix interactions, the coupling effects of fluid pressure and mechanical stresses in a medium containing discrete joints, and the inelastic response of the individual joints of the rock mass subject to the combined fluid pressure and mechanical loading. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: STAFAN does not presently contain thermal coupling, and it is unable to simulate inelastic deformation of the rock mass and variably saturated or two-phase flow in the fractured porous medium system

  19. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  20. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes various abstracts and presentations given at the 13th Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center April 25-27 1995. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  1. Computational fluid-dynamic model of laser-induced breakdown in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dors, Ivan G.; Parigger, Christian G.

    2003-01-01

    Temperature and pressure profiles are computed by the use of a two-dimensional, axially symmetric, time-accurate computational fluid-dynamic model for nominal 10-ns optical breakdown laser pulses. The computational model includes a kinetics mechanism that implements plasma equilibrium kinetics in ionized regions and nonequilibrium, multistep, finite-rate reactions in nonionized regions. Fluid-physics phenomena following laser-induced breakdown are recorded with high-speed shadowgraph techniques. The predicted fluid phenomena are shown by direct comparison with experimental records to agree with the flow patterns that are characteristic of laser spark decay

  2. Bubble Formation in Yield Stress Fluids Using Flow-Focusing and T-Junction Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborie, Benoit; Rouyer, Florence; Angelescu, Dan E; Lorenceau, Elise

    2015-05-22

    We study the production of bubbles inside yield stress fluids (YSFs) in axisymmetric T-junction and flow-focusing devices. Taking advantage of yield stress over capillary stress, we exhibit a robust break-up mechanism reminiscent of the geometrical operating regime in 2D flow-focusing devices for Newtonian fluids. We report that when the gas is pressure driven, the dynamics is unsteady due to hydrodynamic feedback and YSF deposition on the walls of the channels. However, the present study also identifies pathways for potential steady-state production of bubbly YSFs at large scale.

  3. Computer Anxiety, Academic Stress, and Academic Procrastination on College Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Rahardjo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Academic procrastination is fairly and commonly found among college students. The lack of understanding in making the best use of computer technology may lead to anxiety in terms of operating computer hence cause postponement in completing course assignments related to computer operation. On the other hand, failure in achieving certain academic targets as expected by parents and/or the students themselves also makes students less focused and leads to tendency of postponing many completions of course assignments. The aim of this research is to investigate contribution of anxiety in operating computer and academic stress toward procrastination on students. As much as 65 students majoring in psychology became participants in this study. The results showed that anxiety in operating computer and academic stress play significant role in influencing academic procrastination among social sciences students. In terms of academic procrastination tendencies, anxiety in operating computer and academic stress, male students have higher percentage than female students.

  4. PREFACE: Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsuya

    2011-08-01

    This issue includes a special section on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in memory of the late Professor Kunio Kuwahara, who passed away on 15 September 2008, at the age of 66. In this special section, five articles are included that are based on the lectures and discussions at `The 7th International Nobeyama Workshop on CFD: To the Memory of Professor Kuwahara' held in Tokyo on 23 and 24 September 2009. Professor Kuwahara started his research in fluid dynamics under Professor Imai at the University of Tokyo. His first paper was published in 1969 with the title 'Steady Viscous Flow within Circular Boundary', with Professor Imai. In this paper, he combined theoretical and numerical methods in fluid dynamics. Since that time, he made significant and seminal contributions to computational fluid dynamics. He undertook pioneering numerical studies on the vortex method in 1970s. From then to the early nineties, he developed numerical analyses on a variety of three-dimensional unsteady phenomena of incompressible and compressible fluid flows and/or complex fluid flows using his own supercomputers with academic and industrial co-workers and members of his private research institute, ICFD in Tokyo. In addition, a number of senior and young researchers of fluid mechanics around the world were invited to ICFD and the Nobeyama workshops, which were held near his villa, and they intensively discussed new frontier problems of fluid physics and fluid engineering at Professor Kuwahara's kind hospitality. At the memorial Nobeyama workshop held in 2009, 24 overseas speakers presented their papers, including the talks of Dr J P Boris (Naval Research Laboratory), Dr E S Oran (Naval Research Laboratory), Professor Z J Wang (Iowa State University), Dr M Meinke (RWTH Aachen), Professor K Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor U Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor F Hussain (University of Houston), Professor M Farge (École Normale Superieure), Professor J Y Yong (National

  5. Performance of Infinitely Wide Parabolic and Inclined Slider Bearings Lubricated with Couple Stress or Magnetic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladeinde, Mobolaji Humphrey; Akpobi, John Ajokpaoghene

    2011-10-01

    The hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) lubrication problem of infinitely wide inclined and parabolic slider bearings is solved numerically using the finite element method. The bearing configurations are discretized into three-node isoparametric quadratic elements. Stiffness integrals obtained from the weak form of the governing equations are solved using Gauss quadrature to obtain a finite number of stiffness matrices. The global system of equations obtained from enforcing nodal continuity of pressure for the bearings are solved using the Gauss-Seidel iterative scheme with a convergence criterion of 10-10. Numerical computations reveal that, when compared for similar profile and couple stress parameters, greater pressure builds up in a parabolic slider compared to an inclined slider, indicating a greater wedge effect in the parabolic slider. The parabolic slider bearing is also shown to develop a greater load capacity when lubricated with magnetic fluids. The superior performance of parabolic slider bearing is more pronounced at greater Hartmann numbers for identical bearing structural parameters. It is also shown that when load carrying capacity is the yardstick for comparison, the parabolic slider bearings are superior to the inclined bearings when lubricated with couple stress or magnetic lubricants.

  6. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Jing; Wang Jiangan; Wu Ronghua, E-mail: caojing981@126.com [Col. of Electronic Eng., Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm{sup 2}. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  7. Flow and Stress Field Analysis of Different Fluids and Blades for Fermentation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chi Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation techniques are applied for the biotechnology and are widely used for food manufacturing, materials processing, chemical reaction, and so forth. Different fluids and types of blades in the tank for fermentation cause distinct flow and stress field distributions on the surface between fluid and blade and various flow reactions in the tank appear. This paper is mainly focused on the analysis of flow field with different fluid viscosities and also studied the stress field acting on the blades with different scales and shapes of them under specific rotational speed. The results show that the viscosity of fluid influences the flow field and stress distributions on the blades. The maximum stress that acts on the blade is increased with the increasing of viscosity. On the other hand, the ratio of blade length to width influences stress distributions on the blade. At the same time, the inclined angle of blade is also the key parameter for the consideration of design and appropriate inclined angle of blade will decrease the maximum stress. The results provide effective means of gaining insights into the flow and stress distribution of fermentation process.

  8. A computational approach for a fluid queue driven by a truncated birth-death process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenin, R.B.; Parthasarathy, P.R.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a fluid queue driven by a truncated birth-death process with general birth and death rates. We find the equilibrium distribution of the content of the fluid buffer by computing the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of an associated real tridiagonal matrix. We provide efficient

  9. Computer program TMOC for calculating of pressure transients in fluid filled piping networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siikonen, T.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of a pressure wave in fluid filles tubes is significantly affected by the pipe wall motion and vice versa. A computer code TMOC (Transients by the Method of Characteristics) is being developed for the analysis of the coupled fluid and pipe wall transients. Because of the structural feedback, the pressure can be calculated more accurately than in the programs commonly used. (author)

  10. Computational fluid mechanics qualification calculations for the code TEACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGrazia, M.C.; Fitzsimmons, L.B.; Reynolds, J.T.

    1979-11-01

    KAPL is developing a predictive method for three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent fluid flow configurations typically encountered in the thermal-hydraulic design of a nuclear reactor. A series of experiments has been selected for analysis to investigate the adequacy of the two-equation turbulence model developed at Imperial College, London, England for predicting the flow patterns in simple geometries. The analysis of these experiments is described with the two-dimensional (2-D) turbulent fluid flow code TEACH. This work qualifies TEACH for a variety of geometries and flow conditions

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Analysis of a Generic Missile With Grid Fins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeSpirito, James

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study demonstrating an approach for using viscous computational fluid dynamic simulations to calculate the flow field and aerodynamic coefficients for a missile with grid fin...

  12. Performance of a Sequential and Parallel Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Solver on a Missile Body Configuration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hisley, Dixie

    1999-01-01

    .... The goals of this report are: (1) to investigate the performance of message passing and loop level parallelization techniques, as they were implemented in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD...

  13. Computation of shrinkage stresses in prestressed concrete containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, R.F.; Ouyang, H.

    1989-01-01

    According to a survey, surface cracking on PCRVs and PCCs under the investigations is confined to drying shrinkage and thermal strain effects and no instances of structurally significant cracking was been found. In this paper, the authors use FEM to compute humidity distribution in drying concrete and shrinkage stresses by internal restraint. Since PCC is built segment by segment in several years, a computational model taking into account construction sequence is presented and shrinkage stresses by external restraints are calculated with the model

  14. Some safety studies of the MEGAPIE spallation source target performed using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.L.

    2011-01-01

    Such a target forms part of the evolutionary Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) concept in which neutrons are generated in an otherwise sub-critical core by spallation reactions resulting from bombardment by a proton beam. The international project MEGAPIE had the objective of demonstrating the feasibility of the spallation process for a particular target design under strict test conditions. The test was carried over a period of four months at the end of 2006 at the SINQ facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The design studies carried out for the MEGAPIE target prior to irradiation using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) resulted in an optimum flow configuration being defined for the coolant circulation. Simultaneously, stresses in the structural components were examined using Finite Element Method (FEM) techniques. To this purpose, an interface program was written which enabled different specialist groups to carry out the thermal hydraulics and structural mechanics analyses within the project with fully consistent model data. Results for steady-state operation of the target show that the critical lower target components are adequately cooled, and that stresses and displacements are well within tolerances. Transient analyses were also performed to demonstrate the robustness of the design in the event of abnormal operation, including pump failure and burn-through of the target casing by the proton beam. In the latter case, the CFD analyses complemented and extended full-scale tests. (author)

  15. Some safety studies of the MEGAPIE spallation source target performed using computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, B.L., E-mail: brian.smith@psi.ch [Paul Scherrer Institute, OHSA/C08, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    Such a target forms part of the evolutionary Accelerator-Driven System (ADS) concept in which neutrons are generated in an otherwise sub-critical core by spallation reactions resulting from bombardment by a proton beam. The international project MEGAPIE had the objective of demonstrating the feasibility of the spallation process for a particular target design under strict test conditions. The test was carried over a period of four months at the end of 2006 at the SINQ facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The design studies carried out for the MEGAPIE target prior to irradiation using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) resulted in an optimum flow configuration being defined for the coolant circulation. Simultaneously, stresses in the structural components were examined using Finite Element Method (FEM) techniques. To this purpose, an interface program was written which enabled different specialist groups to carry out the thermal hydraulics and structural mechanics analyses within the project with fully consistent model data. Results for steady-state operation of the target show that the critical lower target components are adequately cooled, and that stresses and displacements are well within tolerances. Transient analyses were also performed to demonstrate the robustness of the design in the event of abnormal operation, including pump failure and burn-through of the target casing by the proton beam. In the latter case, the CFD analyses complemented and extended full-scale tests. (author)

  16. Mobility of Yield-Stress Fluids on Lubricant-Impregnated Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Leonid; Solomon, Brian; Varanasi, Kripa; Varanasi Research Group Team

    2017-11-01

    Assuring the flow of yield-stress fluids is an essential problem for various industries such as consumer products, health care, and energy. Elimination of wall-induced pinning forces can potentially save power and cleaning costs as well as enable the flow of yield-stress fluids in channels previously considered too narrow. Lubricant-Impregnated Surfaces (LIS) have been demonstrated to change the dynamic behavior of yield-stress fluids and enable them to move as bulk without shearing at all. However, despite the wide applicability of this technology and its general appeal, the fundamental principles governing the performance of yield stress fluids on LIS have not yet been fully explained. In this work, we explore the mobility of yield stress fluids on a wide range of LIS, and explain the connection between macroscale behavior and the microscale properties of the LIS. Specifically, we show a striking difference in mobility between an LIS that contains a lubricant which fully spreads on the rough micro-features of the surface, and an LIS that contains a lubricant which only imbibes these features but does spread over them

  17. Steam generator transient studies using a simplified two-fluid computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munshi, P.; Bhatnagar, R.; Ram, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    A simplified two-fluid computer code has been used to simulate reactor-side (or primary-side) transients in a PWR steam generator. The disturbances are modelled as ramp inputs for pressure, internal energy and mass flow-rate for the primary fluid. The CPU time for a transient duration of 4 s is approx. 10 min on a DEC-1090 computer system. The results are thermodynamically consistent and encouraging for further studies. (author)

  18. The Start Of Ebullition In Quiescent, Yield-Stress Fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, G. R.; Sherwood, David J.; Saez, A. Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Non-Newtonian rheology is typical for the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) slurries processed in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Hydrogen and other flammable gases are generated in the aqueous phase by radiolytic and chemical reactions. HLW slurries have a capacity for retaining gas characterized by the shear strength holding the bubbles still. The sizes and degassing characteristics of flammable gas bubbles in the HLW slurries expected to be processed by the WTP are important considerations for designing equipment and operating procedures. Slurries become increasingly susceptible to degassing as the bubble concentration increases. This susceptibility and the process of ebullitive bubble enlargement are described here. When disturbed, the fluid undergoes localized flow around neighboring bubbles which are dragged together and coalesce, producing an enlarged bubble. For the conditions considered in this work, bubble size increase is enough to displace the weight required to overcome the fluid shear strength and yield the surroundings. The buoyant bubble ascends and accumulates others within a zone of influence, enlarging by a few orders of magnitude. This process describes how the first bubbles appear on the surface of a 7 Pa shear strength fluid a few seconds after being jarred

  19. The Start Of Ebullition In Quiescent, Yield-Stress Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, G. R.; Sherwood, David J.; Saez, A. Eduardo

    2012-08-30

    Non-Newtonian rheology is typical for the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) slurries processed in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Hydrogen and other flammable gases are generated in the aqueous phase by radiolytic and chemical reactions. HLW slurries have a capacity for retaining gas characterized by the shear strength holding the bubbles still. The sizes and degassing characteristics of flammable gas bubbles in the HLW slurries expected to be processed by the WTP are important considerations for designing equipment and operating procedures. Slurries become increasingly susceptible to degassing as the bubble concentration increases. This susceptibility and the process of ebullitive bubble enlargement are described here. When disturbed, the fluid undergoes localized flow around neighboring bubbles which are dragged together and coalesce, producing an enlarged bubble. For the conditions considered in this work, bubble size increase is enough to displace the weight required to overcome the fluid shear strength and yield the surroundings. The buoyant bubble ascends and accumulates others within a zone of influence, enlarging by a few orders of magnitude. This process describes how the first bubbles appear on the surface of a 7 Pa shear strength fluid a few seconds after being jarred.

  20. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  1. Analysis of haemodynamic disturbance in the atherosclerotic carotid artery using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birchall, Daniel; Zaman, Azfar; Hacker, Jacob; Davies, Gavin; Mendelow, David

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) provides a means for the quantitative analysis of haemodynamic disturbances in vivo, but most work has used phantoms or idealised geometry. Our purpose was to use CFD to analyse flow in carotid atherosclerosis using patient-specific geometry and flow data. Eight atherosclerotic carotid arteries and one healthy control artery were imaged with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and duplex ultrasound, and the data used to construct patient-specific computational models used for CFD and wall shear stress (WSS) analysis. There is a progressive change in three-dimensional (3-D) velocity profile and WSS profile with increasing severity of stenosis, characterised by increasing restriction of areas of low WSS, change in oscillation patterns, and progressive rise in WSS within stenoses and downstream jets. Areas of turbulent, retrograde flow and of low WSS are demonstrated in the lee of the stenoses. This study presents the largest CFD analysis of abnormal haemodynamics at the atheromatous carotid bifurcation using patient-specific data and provides the basis for further investigation of causal links between haemodynamic variables and atherogenesis and formation of unstable plaque. We propose that this provides a means for the prospective assessment of relative stroke risk in patients with carotid atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  2. Magic angle spinning NMR below 6 K with a computational fluid dynamics analysis of fluid flow and temperature gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesti, Erika L.; Alaniva, Nicholas; Rand, Peter W.; Choi, Eric J.; Albert, Brice J.; Saliba, Edward P.; Scott, Faith J.; Barnes, Alexander B.

    2018-01-01

    We report magic angle spinning (MAS) up to 8.5 kHz with a sample temperature below 6 K using liquid helium as a variable temperature fluid. Cross polarization 13C NMR spectra exhibit exquisite sensitivity with a single transient. Remarkably, 1H saturation recovery experiments show a 1H T1 of 21 s with MAS below 6 K in the presence of trityl radicals in a glassy matrix. Leveraging the thermal spin polarization available at 4.2 K versus 298 K should result in 71 times higher signal intensity. Taking the 1H longitudinal relaxation into account, signal averaging times are therefore predicted to be expedited by a factor of >500. Computer assisted design (CAD) and finite element analysis were employed in both the design and diagnostic stages of this cryogenic MAS technology development. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models describing temperature gradients and fluid flow are presented. The CFD models bearing and drive gas maintained at 100 K, while a colder helium variable temperature fluid stream cools the center of a zirconia rotor. Results from the CFD were used to optimize the helium exhaust path and determine the sample temperature. This novel cryogenic experimental platform will be integrated with pulsed dynamic nuclear polarization and electron decoupling to interrogate biomolecular structure within intact human cells.

  3. Evaluation of Computational Fluids Dynamics (CFD) code Open FOAM in the study of the pressurized thermal stress of PWR reactors. Comparison with the commercial code Ansys-CFX; Evaluacion del codigo de Dinamica de Fluidos Computacional (CFD) Open FOAM en el estudio del estres termico presurizado de los reactores PWR. Comparacion con el codigo comercial Ansys-CFX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.; Verdu Martin, G.; Chiva, S.

    2012-07-01

    In this work is proposed to evaluate the potential of the OpenFOAM code for the simulation of typical fluid flows in reactors PWR, in particular for the study of pressurized thermal stress. Test T1-1 has been simulated , within the OECD ROSA project, with the objective of evaluating the performance of the code OpenFOAM and models of turbulence that has implemented to capture the effect of the thrust forces in the case study.

  4. Shaded computer graphic techniques for visualizing and interpreting analytic fluid flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, F. I.

    1981-01-01

    Mathematical models which predict the behavior of fluid flow in different experiments are simulated using digital computers. The simulations predict values of parameters of the fluid flow (pressure, temperature and velocity vector) at many points in the fluid. Visualization of the spatial variation in the value of these parameters is important to comprehend and check the data generated, to identify the regions of interest in the flow, and for effectively communicating information about the flow to others. The state of the art imaging techniques developed in the field of three dimensional shaded computer graphics is applied to visualization of fluid flow. Use of an imaging technique known as 'SCAN' for visualizing fluid flow, is studied and the results are presented.

  5. Computer simulations of magnetic fluids in laminar pipe flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, D.M.; Cunha, F.R.; Sobral, Y.D.; Fontoura Rodrigues, J.L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Finite volume method is adapted to simulate momentum and magnetic coupled equations of a laminar magnetic fluid flow. An evolution equation is used to calculate the fluid magnetization. Pressure-driven flow under steady and oscillatory magnetic field is investigated. The magnetostatic limit of the Maxwell's equations is treated in terms of a Poisson equation numerically integrated. The SIMPLE algorithm is used to calculate the pressure-velocity coupling when the pressure field is not prescribed. Suitable boundary conditions for velocity, magnetization and field intensity on the pipe wall are described. Results are obtained for velocity and pressure response under several conditions of the identified physical parameters of the flow. The simulations are verified by comparing numerical results and asymptotic theory, and they show a very good agreement

  6. Applications of automatic differentiation in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Carle, A.; Bischof, C.; Haigler, Kara J.; Newman, Perry A.

    1994-01-01

    Automatic differentiation (AD) is a powerful computational method that provides for computing exact sensitivity derivatives (SD) from existing computer programs for multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) or in sensitivity analysis. A pre-compiler AD tool for FORTRAN programs called ADIFOR has been developed. The ADIFOR tool has been easily and quickly applied by NASA Langley researchers to assess the feasibility and computational impact of AD in MDO with several different FORTRAN programs. These include a state-of-the-art three dimensional multigrid Navier-Stokes flow solver for wings or aircraft configurations in transonic turbulent flow. With ADIFOR the user specifies sets of independent and dependent variables with an existing computer code. ADIFOR then traces the dependency path throughout the code, applies the chain rule to formulate derivative expressions, and generates new code to compute the required SD matrix. The resulting codes have been verified to compute exact non-geometric and geometric SD for a variety of cases. in less time than is required to compute the SD matrix using centered divided differences.

  7. Effects of magnetized walls on the particle structure and the yield stress of magnetorheological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianfeng, E-mail: zhoujianfeng@njtech.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, Jiangsu (China); Mo, Jingwen [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Shao, Chunlei [School of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 211816, Jiangsu (China); Li, Zhigang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we investigate the quasi-static shear deformation of magnetic particles (MPs) in a Couette flow of magnetorheological (MR) fluids through Stokesian dynamic simulations. The magnetized walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles and their effects on the MPs are considered. The simple shear flow of the base fluid with linear velocity distribution is used to generate the shear deformation of the MP structure and the yield stresses under different shear rates are obtained. Comparing with the relatively long chains forming in base fluid without the effect of magnetized walls, the initial structure of MPs is mainly in the form of short chains due to the attractive force of walls. At the beginning of the shear deformation of the MP structure, the concentration of MPs near the walls is found. As the shear deformation develops, however, the chains concentrate at the center of the simulation domain and the MPs near wall boundaries are attracted to the center. The yield stress depends on the initial structure of MPs which is affected by the magnetized walls. It is revealed that the larger shear rate of base fluid results in the larger yield stress, and the effects of the magnetization intensity of the walls and their space distance on the yield stress are also investigated. - Highlights: • We model a Couette flow of magnetorheological fluid considering magnetized walls. • The walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles. • Initial structure of MPs is remarkably affected by the walls, so is yield stress. • Larger base fluid shear rate causes the larger shear deformation and larger yield stress.

  8. Effects of magnetized walls on the particle structure and the yield stress of magnetorheological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Mo, Jingwen; Shao, Chunlei; Li, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the quasi-static shear deformation of magnetic particles (MPs) in a Couette flow of magnetorheological (MR) fluids through Stokesian dynamic simulations. The magnetized walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles and their effects on the MPs are considered. The simple shear flow of the base fluid with linear velocity distribution is used to generate the shear deformation of the MP structure and the yield stresses under different shear rates are obtained. Comparing with the relatively long chains forming in base fluid without the effect of magnetized walls, the initial structure of MPs is mainly in the form of short chains due to the attractive force of walls. At the beginning of the shear deformation of the MP structure, the concentration of MPs near the walls is found. As the shear deformation develops, however, the chains concentrate at the center of the simulation domain and the MPs near wall boundaries are attracted to the center. The yield stress depends on the initial structure of MPs which is affected by the magnetized walls. It is revealed that the larger shear rate of base fluid results in the larger yield stress, and the effects of the magnetization intensity of the walls and their space distance on the yield stress are also investigated. - Highlights: • We model a Couette flow of magnetorheological fluid considering magnetized walls. • The walls are modeled by a congregation of magnetic dipoles. • Initial structure of MPs is remarkably affected by the walls, so is yield stress. • Larger base fluid shear rate causes the larger shear deformation and larger yield stress

  9. Computational Psychometrics for Modeling System Dynamics during Stressful Disasters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Cipresso

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Disasters can be very stressful events. However, computational models of stress require data that might be very difficult to collect during disasters. Moreover, personal experiences are not repeatable, so it is not possible to collect bottom-up information when building a coherent model. To overcome these problems, we propose the use of computational models and virtual reality integration to recreate disaster situations, while examining possible dynamics in order to understand human behavior and relative consequences. By providing realistic parameters associated with disaster situations, computational scientists can work more closely with emergency responders to improve the quality of interventions in the future.

  10. Dissertation Defense Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional "validation by test only" mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions. Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in "Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations". This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics

  11. Dissertation Defense: Computational Fluid Dynamics Uncertainty Analysis for Payload Fairing Spacecraft Environmental Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Curtis Edward

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft thermal protection systems are at risk of being damaged due to airflow produced from Environmental Control Systems. There are inherent uncertainties and errors associated with using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict the airflow field around a spacecraft from the Environmental Control System. This paper describes an approach to quantify the uncertainty in using Computational Fluid Dynamics to predict airflow speeds around an encapsulated spacecraft without the use of test data. Quantifying the uncertainty in analytical predictions is imperative to the success of any simulation-based product. The method could provide an alternative to traditional validation by test only mentality. This method could be extended to other disciplines and has potential to provide uncertainty for any numerical simulation, thus lowering the cost of performing these verifications while increasing the confidence in those predictions.Spacecraft requirements can include a maximum airflow speed to protect delicate instruments during ground processing. Computational Fluid Dynamics can be used to verify these requirements; however, the model must be validated by test data. This research includes the following three objectives and methods. Objective one is develop, model, and perform a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis of three (3) generic, non-proprietary, environmental control systems and spacecraft configurations. Several commercially available and open source solvers have the capability to model the turbulent, highly three-dimensional, incompressible flow regime. The proposed method uses FLUENT, STARCCM+, and OPENFOAM. Objective two is to perform an uncertainty analysis of the Computational Fluid Dynamics model using the methodology found in Comprehensive Approach to Verification and Validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations. This method requires three separate grids and solutions, which quantify the error bars around Computational Fluid Dynamics predictions

  12. Description of a general method to compute the fluid-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanpierre, F.; Gibert, R.J.; Hoffmann, A.; Livolant, M.

    1979-01-01

    The vibrational characteristics of a structure in air may be considerably modified when the structure is immersed in a dense fluid. Such fluid structure interaction effects are important for the seismic or flow induced vibrational studies of various nuclear equipments, as for example the PWR internals, the fast reactor vessels, heat exchangers and fuel elements. In some simple situations, the fluid effects can be simulate by added masses, but in general, they are much more complicated. A general formulation to calculate precisely the vibrational behaviour of structures containing dense fluids is presented in this paper. That formulation can be easily introduced in finite elements computer codes, the fluid being described by special fluid elements. Its use is in principle limited to the linear range: small movements of structures, small pressure fluctuations. (orig.)

  13. Computational modeling applied to stress gradient analysis for metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, Susana M.; Assis, Joaquim T. de; Monine, Vladimir I.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays composite materials including materials reinforced by particles are the center of the researcher's attention. There are problems with the stress measurements in these materials, connected with the superficial stress gradient caused by the difference of the stress state of particles on the surface and in the matrix of the composite material. Computer simulation of diffraction profile formed by superficial layers of material allows simulate the diffraction experiment and gives the possibility to resolve the problem of stress measurements when the stress state is characterized by strong gradient. The aim of this paper is the application of computer simulation technique, initially developed for homogeneous materials, for diffraction line simulation of composite materials and alloys. Specifically we applied this technique for siluminum fabricated by powder metallurgy. (author)

  14. Computational fluid dynamic evaluation of the side-to-side anastomosis for arteriovenous fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Jeffrey E; Balakin, Boris V; Kellerman, Brad M; Wrolstad, David K

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this research was to compare side-to-side (STS) and end-to-side (ETS) anastomoses in a computer model of the arteriovenous fistula with computational fluid dynamic analysis. A matrix of 17 computer arteriovenous fistula models (SolidWorks, Dassault Systèmes, France) of artery-vein pairs (3-mm-diameter artery + 3-mm-diameter vein and 4-mm-diameter artery +6-mm-diameter vein elliptical anastomoses) in STS, 45° ETS, and 90° ETS configurations with cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of 3.5 to 18.8 mm(2) were evaluated with computational fluid dynamic software (STAR-CCM+; CD-adapco, Melville, NY) in simulations at defined flow rates from 600 to 1200 mL/min and mean arterial pressures of 50 to 140 mm Hg. Models and configurations were evaluated for pressure drop across the anastomosis, arterial inflow, venous outflow, arterial outflow, velocity vector, and wall shear stress (WSS) profile. Pressure drop across the anastomosis was inversely proportional to anastomotic CSA and to venous outflow and was proportional to arterial inflow. Pressure drop was greater in 3 + 3 models than in 4 + 6 STS models; 90° ETS configurations had the lowest pressure drops and were nearly identical, whereas 45° ETS configurations had the highest pressure drops. Venous outflow in the 4 + 6 model in STS configurations, evaluated at 100 mm Hg arterial inflow pressure, was 390, 592, 610, and 886 mL/min in anastomotic CSAs of 3.5, 5.3, 7.1, and 18.8 mm(2), respectively, and was similar in 90° ETS (609 and 908 mL/min) and lower in 45° ETS (534 and 562 mL/min) configurations at CSAs of 5.3 and 18.8 mm(2). The mean increase in venous outflow was 69 mL/min (range, -59 to 134) between 3 + 3 and 4 + 6 models at 100 mm Hg arterial inflow. The most uniform WSS profile occurs in STS anastomoses followed by 45° ETS and then 90° ETS anastomoses. The STS and 90° ETS anastomoses have high venous outflow and a tendency toward reversed arterial outflow. The 45° ETS anastomosis has reduced venous

  15. Computational modeling with fluid-structure interaction of the severe m1 stenosis before and after stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonchan; Lee, Sang-Wook; Lim, Ok Kyun; Min, Inki; Nguyen, Minhtuan; Ko, Young Bae; Yoon, Kyunghwan; Suh, Dae Chul

    2013-02-01

    Image-based computational models with fluid-structure interaction (FSI) can be used to perform plaque mechanical analysis in intracranial artery stenosis. We described a process in FSI study applied to symptomatic severe intracranial (M1) stenosis before and after stenting. Reconstructed 3D angiography in STL format was transferred to Magics for smoothing of vessel surface and trimming of branch vessels and to HyperMesh for generating tetra volume mesh from triangular surface-meshed 3D angiogram. Computational analysis of blood flow in the blood vessels was performed using the commercial finite element software ADINA Ver 8.5. The distribution of wall shear stress (WSS), peak velocity and pressure was analyzed before and after intracranial stenting. The wall shear stress distributions from Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation with rigid wall assumption as well as FSI simulation before and after stenting could be compared. The difference of WSS between rigid wall and compliant wall model both in pre- and post-stent case is only minor except at the stenosis region. These WSS values were greatly reduced after stenting to 15~20 Pa at systole and 3~5 Pa at end-diastole in CFD simulation, which are similar in FSI simulations. Our study revealed that FSI simulation before and after intracranial stenting was feasible despite of limited vessel wall dimension and could reveal change of WSS as well as flow velocity and wall pressure.

  16. Influence of wall couple stress in MHD flow of a micropolar fluid in a porous medium with energy and concentration transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Khalid

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The intention here is to investigate the effects of wall couple stress with energy and concentration transfer in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow of a micropolar fluid embedded in a porous medium. The mathematical model contains the set of linear conservation forms of partial differential equations. Laplace transforms and convolution technique are used for computation of exact solutions of velocity, microrotations, temperature and concentration equations. Numerical values of skin friction, couple wall stress, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also computed. Characteristics for the significant variables on the physical quantities are graphically discussed. Comparison with previously published work in limiting sense shows an excellent agreement. Keywords: Micropolor fluid, Microrotation, MHD, Porosity, Wall couple stress, Exact solutions

  17. Mechanics of layered anisotropic poroelastic media with applications to effective stress for fluid permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2010-06-01

    The mechanics of vertically layered porous media has some similarities to and some differences from the more typical layered analysis for purely elastic media. Assuming welded solid contact at the solid-solid interfaces implies the usual continuity conditions, which are continuity of the vertical (layering direction) stress components and the horizontal strain components. These conditions are valid for both elastic and poroelastic media. Differences arise through the conditions for the pore pressure and the increment of fluid content in the context of fluid-saturated porous media. The two distinct conditions most often considered between any pair of contiguous layers are: (1) an undrained fluid condition at the interface, meaning that the increment of fluid content is zero (i.e., {delta}{zeta} = 0), or (2) fluid pressure continuity at the interface, implying that the change in fluid pressure is zero across the interface (i.e., {delta}p{sub f} = 0). Depending on the types of measurements being made on the system and the pertinent boundary conditions for these measurements, either (or neither) of these two conditions might be directly pertinent. But these conditions are sufficient nevertheless to be used as thought experiments to determine the expected values of all the poroelastic coefficients. For quasi-static mechanical changes over long time periods, we expect drained conditions to hold, so the pressure must then be continuous. For high frequency wave propagation, the pore-fluid typically acts as if it were undrained (or very nearly so), with vanishing of the fluid increment at the boundaries being appropriate. Poroelastic analysis of both these end-member cases is discussed, and the general equations for a variety of applications to heterogeneous porous media are developed. In particular, effective stress for the fluid permeability of such poroelastic systems is considered; fluid permeabilities characteristic of granular media or tubular pore shapes are treated

  18. Use of the FDA nozzle model to illustrate validation techniques in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Prasanna; D'Souza, Gavin A; Horner, Marc; Morrison, Tina M; Malinauskas, Richard A; Myers, Matthew R

    2017-01-01

    A "credible" computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has the potential to provide a meaningful evaluation of safety in medical devices. One major challenge in establishing "model credibility" is to determine the required degree of similarity between the model and experimental results for the model to be considered sufficiently validated. This study proposes a "threshold-based" validation approach that provides a well-defined acceptance criteria, which is a function of how close the simulation and experimental results are to the safety threshold, for establishing the model validity. The validation criteria developed following the threshold approach is not only a function of Comparison Error, E (which is the difference between experiments and simulations) but also takes in to account the risk to patient safety because of E. The method is applicable for scenarios in which a safety threshold can be clearly defined (e.g., the viscous shear-stress threshold for hemolysis in blood contacting devices). The applicability of the new validation approach was tested on the FDA nozzle geometry. The context of use (COU) was to evaluate if the instantaneous viscous shear stress in the nozzle geometry at Reynolds numbers (Re) of 3500 and 6500 was below the commonly accepted threshold for hemolysis. The CFD results ("S") of velocity and viscous shear stress were compared with inter-laboratory experimental measurements ("D"). The uncertainties in the CFD and experimental results due to input parameter uncertainties were quantified following the ASME V&V 20 standard. The CFD models for both Re = 3500 and 6500 could not be sufficiently validated by performing a direct comparison between CFD and experimental results using the Student's t-test. However, following the threshold-based approach, a Student's t-test comparing |S-D| and |Threshold-S| showed that relative to the threshold, the CFD and experimental datasets for Re = 3500 were statistically similar and the model could be

  19. Computation of principal stresses and stress intensity of a nozzle on a spherical pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.C.; Lyow, B.L.; Koplik, B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a Stress Computation Table that systematically computes the local stresses at various locations of the sphere-nozzle intersection. The six components of external loading are: radial load, two overturning moments, two horizontal shear forces, and a torsional moment. The radial and overturning moments induce local membrane and bending stresses in both the circumferential and meridional directions of the sphere around the nozzle. The shear forces and torsional moment produce local shear stresses. In addition, the shear forces induce local membrane and bending stresses around the nozzle. The local stress factors from each external loading component are taken from recent publications by Lyow, Sun and Koplik who have studied this subject through the use of the finite element method. These factors are a function of the nozzle-sphere geometrical parameters, beta, β, (nozzle radius/sphere radius) and gamma, γ, (sphere radius/thickness), with the beta value ranging from 0.1 to 0.5, and the gamma value ranging from 10 to 100. The Stress Table summarizes all the normal and shear stresses at eight different locations around the nozzle, and finally the principal stresses and stress intensity are computed. The stress factor plots from previous publications are replotted in this paper to provide a handy reference as well as consistency. A numerical sample employing a FORTRAN program is also given. (author)

  20. Yield shear stress model of magnetorheological fluids based on exponential distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Chu-wen; Chen, Fei; Meng, Qing-rui; Dong, Zi-xin

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic chain model that considers the interaction between particles and the external magnetic field in a magnetorheological fluid has been widely accepted. Based on the chain model, a yield shear stress model of magnetorheological fluids was proposed by introducing the exponential distribution to describe the distribution of angles between the direction of magnetic field and the chain formed by magnetic particles. The main influencing factors were considered in the model, such as magnetic flux density, intensity of magnetic field, particle size, volume fraction of particles, the angle of magnetic chain, and so on. The effect of magnetic flux density on the yield shear stress was discussed. The yield stress of aqueous Fe 3 O 4 magnetreological fluids with volume fraction of 7.6% and 16.2% were measured by a device designed by ourselves. The results indicate that the proposed model can be used for calculation of yield shear stress with acceptable errors. - Highlights: • A yield shear stress model of magnetorheological fluids was proposed. • Use exponential distribution to describe the distribution of magnetic chain angles. • Experimental and predicted results were in good agreement for 2 types of MR

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Whole-Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ramesh

    1999-01-01

    The current state of the art in computational aerodynamics for whole-body aircraft flowfield simulations is described. Recent advances in geometry modeling, surface and volume grid generation, and flow simulation algorithms have led to accurate flowfield predictions for increasingly complex and realistic configurations. As a result, computational aerodynamics has emerged as a crucial enabling technology for the design and development of flight vehicles. Examples illustrating the current capability for the prediction of transport and fighter aircraft flowfields are presented. Unfortunately, accurate modeling of turbulence remains a major difficulty in the analysis of viscosity-dominated flows. In the future, inverse design methods, multidisciplinary design optimization methods, artificial intelligence technology, and massively parallel computer technology will be incorporated into computational aerodynamics, opening up greater opportunities for improved product design at substantially reduced costs.

  2. Teaching Computer-Aided Design of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Engineering Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosman, A. D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a teaching program for fluid mechanics and heat transfer which contains both computer aided learning (CAL) and computer aided design (CAD) components and argues that the understanding of the physical and numerical modeling taught in the CAL course is essential to the proper implementation of CAD. (Author/CMV)

  3. Computation of the effect of pipe plasticity on pressure-pulse propagation in a fluid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Kot, C.A.

    1975-04-01

    A simple computational model is developed for incorporating the effect of elastic-plastic deformation of piping on pressure-transient propagation in a fluid system. A computer program (PLWV) is described that incorporates this structural interaction model into a one-dimensional method-of-characteristics procedure for fluid-hammer analysis. Computed results are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data. The most significant effect of plastic deformation is to limit the peak pressure of a pulse leaving a pipe to approximately the yield pressure of the pipe, if the pipe is sufficiently long. 7 references. (U.S.)

  4. 2nd International Conference on Multiscale Computational Methods for Solids and Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume contains the best papers presented at the 2nd ECCOMAS International Conference on Multiscale Computations for Solids and Fluids, held June 10-12, 2015. Topics dealt with include multiscale strategy for efficient development of scientific software for large-scale computations, coupled probability-nonlinear-mechanics problems and solution methods, and modern mathematical and computational setting for multi-phase flows and fluid-structure interaction. The papers consist of contributions by six experts who taught short courses prior to the conference, along with several selected articles from other participants dealing with complementary issues, covering both solid mechanics and applied mathematics. .

  5. Riemann-problem and level-set approaches for two-fluid flow computations I. Linearized Godunov scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Koren (Barry); M.R. Lewis; E.H. van Brummelen (Harald); B. van Leer

    2001-01-01

    textabstractA finite-volume method is presented for the computation of compressible flows of two immiscible fluids at very different densities. The novel ingredient in the method is a two-fluid linearized Godunov scheme, allowing for flux computations in case of different fluids (e.g., water and

  6. Stress assessment in piping under synthetic thermal loads emulating turbulent fluid mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa Garrido, Oriol, E-mail: oriol.costa@ijs.si; El Shawish, Samir, E-mail: samir.elshawish@ijs.si; Cizelj, Leon, E-mail: leon.cizelj@ijs.si

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Generation of complex space-continuous and time-dependent temperature fields. • 1D and 3D thermo-mechanical analyses of pipes under complex surface thermal loads. • Surface temperatures and stress fluctuations are highly linearly correlated. • 1D and 3D results agree for a wide range of Fourier and Biot numbers. • Global thermo-mechanical loading promotes non-equibiaxial stress state. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue assessment of pipes due to turbulent fluid mixing in T-junctions is a rather difficult task because of the existing uncertainties and variability of induced thermal stresses. In these cases, thermal stresses arise on three-dimensional pipe structures due to complex thermal loads, known as thermal striping, acting at the fluid-wall interface. A recently developed approach for the generation of space-continuous and time-dependent temperature fields has been employed in this paper to reproduce fluid temperature fields of a case study from the literature. The paper aims to deliver a detailed study of the three-dimensional structural response of piping under the complex thermal loads arising in fluid mixing in T-junctions. Results of three-dimensional thermo-mechanical analyses show that fluctuations of surface temperatures and stresses are highly linearly correlated. Also, surface stress fluctuations, in axial and hoop directions, are almost equi-biaxial. These findings, representative on cross sections away from system boundaries, are moreover supported by the sensitivity analysis of Fourier and Biot numbers and by the comparison with standard one-dimensional analyses. Agreement between one- and three-dimensional results is found for a wide range of studied parameters. The study also comprises the effects of global thermo-mechanical loading on the surface stress state. Implemented mechanical boundary conditions develop more realistic overall system deformation and promote non-equibiaxial stresses.

  7. Advances in Computational Fluid-Structure Interaction and Flow Simulation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Takizawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    This contributed volume celebrates the work of Tayfun E. Tezduyar on the occasion of his 60th birthday. The articles it contains were born out of the Advances in Computational Fluid-Structure Interaction and Flow Simulation (AFSI 2014) conference, also dedicated to Prof. Tezduyar and held at Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan on March 19-21, 2014. The contributing authors represent a group of international experts in the field who discuss recent trends and new directions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and fluid-structure interaction (FSI). Organized into seven distinct parts arranged by thematic topics, the papers included cover basic methods and applications of CFD, flows with moving boundaries and interfaces, phase-field modeling, computer science and high-performance computing (HPC) aspects of flow simulation, mathematical methods, biomedical applications, and FSI. Researchers, practitioners, and advanced graduate students working on CFD, FSI, and related topics will find this collection to be a defi...

  8. Influence of wall couple stress in MHD flow of a micropolar fluid in a porous medium with energy and concentration transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Asma; Khan, Ilyas; Khan, Arshad; Shafie, Sharidan

    2018-06-01

    The intention here is to investigate the effects of wall couple stress with energy and concentration transfer in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of a micropolar fluid embedded in a porous medium. The mathematical model contains the set of linear conservation forms of partial differential equations. Laplace transforms and convolution technique are used for computation of exact solutions of velocity, microrotations, temperature and concentration equations. Numerical values of skin friction, couple wall stress, Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are also computed. Characteristics for the significant variables on the physical quantities are graphically discussed. Comparison with previously published work in limiting sense shows an excellent agreement.

  9. A substructure method to compute the 3D fluid-structure interaction during blowdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilbaud, D.; Axisa, F.; Gantenbein, F.; Gibert, R.J.

    1983-08-01

    The waves generated by a sudden rupture of a PWR primary pipe have an important mechanical effect on the internal structures of the vessel. This fluid-structure interaction has a strong 3D aspect. 3D finite element explicit methods can be applied. These methods take into account the non linearities of the problem but the calculation is heavy and expensive. We describe in this paper another type of method based on a substructure procedure: the vessel, internals and contained fluid are axisymmetrically described (AQUAMODE computer code). The pipes and contained fluid are monodimensionaly described (TEDEL-FLUIDE Computer Code). These substructures are characterized by their natural modes. Then, they are connected to another (connection of both structural and fluid nodes) the TRISTANA Computer Code. This method allows to compute correctly and cheaply the 3D fluid-structure effects. The treatment of certain non linearities is difficult because of the modal characterization of the substructures. However variations of contact conditions versus time can be introduced. We present here some validation tests and comparison with experimental results of the litterature

  10. Computational modeling for fluid flow and interfacial transport

    CERN Document Server

    Shyy, Wei

    2006-01-01

    Practical applications and examples highlight this treatment of computational modeling for handling complex flowfields. A reference for researchers and graduate students of many different backgrounds, it also functions as a text for learning essential computation elements.Drawing upon his own research, the author addresses both macroscopic and microscopic features. He begins his three-part treatment with a survey of the basic concepts of finite difference schemes for solving parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations. The second part concerns issues related to computati

  11. Overview of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of stirred vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Rizal Mamat; Azraf Azman; Anwar Abdul Rahman; Noraishah Othman

    2010-01-01

    Stirred vessel is one of many widely used equipment in industrial process and chemical industry. The design of stirred vessel typically follows a certain standard chemical engineering practice that may also involve empirical data acquired from experiments. However the design may still take a different route which is computational engineering simulation and analysis. CFD has been identified as one of the possible tools for such purposes. CFD enables the flow fields variables such as velocity, temperature and pressure in the whole computational domain to be obtained and as such it presents an advantage over the experimental setup. (author)

  12. Multiscale Space-Time Computational Methods for Fluid-Structure Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-13

    thermo-fluid analysis of a ground vehicle and its tires ST-SI Computational Analysis of a Vertical - Axis Wind Turbine We have successfully...of a vertical - axis wind turbine . Multiscale Compressible-Flow Computation with Particle Tracking We have successfully tested the multiscale...Tezduyar, Spenser McIntyre, Nikolay Kostov, Ryan Kolesar, Casey Habluetzel. Space–time VMS computation of wind - turbine rotor and tower aerodynamics

  13. Computational fluid mechanics in R and D on uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubbaramayer, O.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium enrichment represents an essential link in the cycle of nuclear fuels for power production. There are many processes of uranium enrichment, but three of them dominate the nuclear history as well in the past (Gaseous diffusion and centrifugation) as in the present (Laser process). The important role played by the Numerical Fluid Mechanics in the three processes is pointed out. The type of problem raised by Gaseous Diffusion is Channel Flow with wall suction, by Centrifugation, flow of a Compressible gas in a strongly rotating cylinder (Stewartson and Ekman layers) and by Laser process, Thermocapillary-buoyancy flow of a molten metal in an evaporation crucible. The methods and results in these problems are reviewed. 18 refs, 11 figs

  14. Computational fluid dynamics simulations and validations of results

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sitek, MA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Wind flow influence on a high-rise building is analyzed. The research covers full-scale tests, wind-tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. In the present paper computational model used in simulations is described and the results, which were...

  15. Photothermoelastic investigation of transient thermal stresses in circular plates with a hole heated by fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Masatoshi; Tsujimura, Soichi; Oda, Masanobu.

    1980-01-01

    In this study, the practical use of the method of measuring the unsteady thermal stress in a body subjected to the thermal load due to fluid by photoelastic method and the improvement of accuracy were attempted. The internal wall of a hollow disk was heated with high temperature fluid, and the external wall was cooled with low temperature fluid or thermally insulated. The photoelastic experiment on this hollow disk was carried out in a vacuum tank to given axisymmetric temperature distribution and to prevent heat dissipation due to the convection from both surfaces of the disk, and the temperature distribution and thermal stress were measured. The experimental values were compared with the theoretical values, and the accuracy of the experimental method and measurement was examined. Moreover, the disk with an eccentric hole was tested by the same method, and the effects of the eccentricity and hole diameter on the maximum thermal stress were examined. The experimental apparatus and method, and the experimental results are described. By this method, the condition of thermal loading with fluid was almost attained, and the experimental values of unsteady thermal stress were in good agreement with the theoretical values. (Kako, I.)

  16. Understanding the fluid mechanics behind transverse wall shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamied, Yumnah; Sherwin, Spencer J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2017-01-04

    The patchy distribution of atherosclerosis within arteries is widely attributed to local variation in haemodynamic wall shear stress (WSS). A recently-introduced metric, the transverse wall shear stress (transWSS), which is the average over the cardiac cycle of WSS components perpendicular to the temporal mean WSS vector, correlates particularly well with the pattern of lesions around aortic branch ostia. Here we use numerical methods to investigate the nature of the arterial flows captured by transWSS and the sensitivity of transWSS to inflow waveform and aortic geometry. TransWSS developed chiefly in the acceleration, peak systolic and deceleration phases of the cardiac cycle; the reverse flow phase was too short, and WSS in diastole was too low, for these periods to have a significant influence. Most of the spatial variation in transWSS arose from variation in the angle by which instantaneous WSS vectors deviated from the mean WSS vector rather than from variation in the magnitude of the vectors. The pattern of transWSS was insensitive to inflow waveform; only unphysiologically high Womersley numbers produced substantial changes. However, transWSS was sensitive to changes in geometry. The curvature of the arch and proximal descending aorta were responsible for the principal features, the non-planar nature of the aorta produced asymmetries in the location and position of streaks of high transWSS, and taper determined the persistence of the streaks down the aorta. These results reflect the importance of the fluctuating strength of Dean vortices in generating transWSS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lattice Boltzmann computation of creeping fluid flow in roll-coating applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Isac; Kesana, Balashanker; Perumal, D. Arumuga

    2018-04-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has advanced as a class of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods used to solve complex fluid systems and heat transfer problems. It has ever-increasingly attracted the interest of researchers in computational physics to solve challenging problems of industrial and academic importance. In this current study, LBM is applied to simulate the creeping fluid flow phenomena commonly encountered in manufacturing technologies. In particular, we apply this novel method to simulate the fluid flow phenomena associated with the "meniscus roll coating" application. This prevalent industrial problem encountered in polymer processing and thin film coating applications is modelled as standard lid-driven cavity problem to which creeping flow analysis is applied. This incompressible viscous flow problem is studied in various speed ratios, the ratio of upper to lower lid speed in two different configurations of lid movement - parallel and anti-parallel wall motion. The flow exhibits interesting patterns which will help in design of roll coaters.

  18. Interactive FORTRAN IV computer programs for the thermodynamic and transport properties of selected cryogens (fluids pack)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarty, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The thermodynamic and transport properties of selected cryogens had programmed into a series of computer routines. Input variables are any two of P, rho or T in the single phase regions and either P or T for the saturated liquid or vapor state. The output is pressure, density, temperature, entropy, enthalpy for all of the fluids and in most cases specific heat capacity and speed of sound. Viscosity and thermal conductivity are also given for most of the fluids. The programs are designed for access by remote terminal; however, they have been written in a modular form to allow the user to select either specific fluids or specific properties for particular needs. The program includes properties for hydrogen, helium, neon, nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and methane. The programs include properties for gaseous and liquid states usually from the triple point to some upper limit of pressure and temperature which varies from fluid to fluid.

  19. Determination of the vibration characteristics of nuclear fuel rods in a fluid flow using multiphysics computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sbragio, Ricardo

    1999-01-01

    The determination of natural frequencies and displacement Power Spectrum Density (PSD) of fuel rods in a fluid using Computational Fluid Dynamics and Finite Element Methods is presented. The rods are modeled as slender beams subjected to small displacements in a fluid using three-dimensional mesh. The incompressible Navier-Stokes and linear momentum balance equations are solved simultaneously using Spectrum code. Two examples from literature are analyzed. The first consists in one rod in a fluid. The excitation is an impulse force at the rod central node. The second example is a two rod system in a fluid. In this case, the excitation force is random and is determined from a PSD. (author)

  20. Experimental and computational fluid dynamics studies of mixing of complex oral health products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortada-Garcia, Marti; Migliozzi, Simona; Weheliye, Weheliye Hashi; Dore, Valentina; Mazzei, Luca; Angeli, Panagiota; ThAMes Multiphase Team

    2017-11-01

    Highly viscous non-Newtonian fluids are largely used in the manufacturing of specialized oral care products. Mixing often takes place in mechanically stirred vessels where the flow fields and mixing times depend on the geometric configuration and the fluid physical properties. In this research, we study the mixing performance of complex non-Newtonian fluids using Computational Fluid Dynamics models and validate them against experimental laser-based optical techniques. To this aim, we developed a scaled-down version of an industrial mixer. As test fluids, we used mixtures of glycerol and a Carbomer gel. The viscosities of the mixtures against shear rate at different temperatures and phase ratios were measured and found to be well described by the Carreau model. The numerical results were compared against experimental measurements of velocity fields from Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and concentration profiles from Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF).

  1. The rising motion of spheres in structured fluids with yield stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaagha, S.; Pasquino, R.; Iuliano, E.; D'Avino, G.; Zonfrilli, F.; Guida, V.; Grizzuti, N.

    2017-09-01

    The rising of spherical bodies in structured fluids with yield stress is studied. The system is a suspension of hydrogenated castor oil colloidal fibers in a surfactant micellar solution. The fiber network confers to the fluid a viscoelastic behavior, with a well-defined yield stress, which increases with increasing fiber concentration. Various fluids with different fiber contents are prepared and rheologically characterized. A home-made time-lapse photography setup is used to monitor the time evolution position of the spherical particles, and the rising motion of both hollow spheres and air bubbles, in the diameter range 65-550 μm, is measured. The experiments last as long as several weeks, corresponding to significantly low measured velocities. Finite element simulations are performed to support the experimental data, assuming both interfacial slip and no slip conditions. The fluid dynamic phenomenon is studied and discussed in terms of dimensionless numbers, such as yield ratio, Bingham number, and Stokes drag coefficient. The results are novel for the system (suspending medium and hollow spheres) and for the covered Bingham number range, which is extended over three orders of magnitude in comparison with already available literature results. Our values provide quantitative data of the mechanical properties (i.e., yield stress value) at very low shear rates, in a prohibitive range for a traditional rheometer, and agree with the macroscopic rheological response. Moreover, the important role of the power law index n of the Herschel-Bulkley model, used to fit the data, has been highlighted. Our results, based on a Bingham-like fluid, are compared with the experimental data already available with Carbopol, treated as a Herschel Bulkley fluid with n = 0.5. The results could have important implications in the fabric and personal care detergency, a technological area where many fluids have composition and show rheological properties similar to those considered in the

  2. Application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation in a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Jui-Hsiang; Tseng, Po-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe the application of CFD (Computational fluid dynamics) technology in the matching of turbine blades and generator to increase the efficiency of a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT). A VAWT is treated as the study case here. The SST (Shear-Stress Transport) k-ω turbulence model with SIMPLE algorithm method in transient state is applied to solve the T (torque)-N (r/min) curves of the turbine blades at different wind speed. The T-N curves of the generator at different CV (constant voltage) model are measured. Thus, the T-N curves of the turbine blades at different wind speed can be matched by the T-N curves of the generator at different CV model to find the optimal CV model. As the optimal CV mode is selected, the characteristics of the operating points, such as tip speed ratio, revolutions per minute, blade torque, and efficiency, can be identified. The results show that, if the two systems are matched well, the final output power at a high wind speed of 9-10 m/s will be increased by 15%.

  3. A proposed methodology for computational fluid dynamics code verification, calibration, and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschliman, D. P.; Oberkampf, W. L.; Blottner, F. G.

    Verification, calibration, and validation (VCV) of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes is an essential element of the code development process. The exact manner in which code VCV activities are planned and conducted, however, is critically important. It is suggested that the way in which code validation, in particular, is often conducted--by comparison to published experimental data obtained for other purposes--is in general difficult and unsatisfactory, and that a different approach is required. This paper describes a proposed methodology for CFD code VCV that meets the technical requirements and is philosophically consistent with code development needs. The proposed methodology stresses teamwork and cooperation between code developers and experimentalists throughout the VCV process, and takes advantage of certain synergisms between CFD and experiment. A novel approach to uncertainty analysis is described which can both distinguish between and quantify various types of experimental error, and whose attributes are used to help define an appropriate experimental design for code VCV experiments. The methodology is demonstrated with an example of laminar, hypersonic, near perfect gas, 3-dimensional flow over a sliced sphere/cone of varying geometrical complexity.

  4. Hemodynamics in stented vertebral artery ostial stenosis based on computational fluid dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Aike; Dai, Xuan; Niu, Jing; Jiao, Liqun

    2016-01-01

    Hemodynamic factors may affect the potential occurrence of in-stent restenosis (ISR) after intervention procedure of vertebral artery ostial stenosis (VAOS). The purpose of the present study is to investigate the influence of stent protrusion length in implantation strategy on the local hemodynamics of the VAOS. CTA images of a 58-year-old female patient with posterior circulation transient ischemic attack were used to perform a 3D reconstruction of the vertebral artery. Five models of the vertebral artery before and after the stent implantation were established. Model 1 was without stent implantation, Model 2-5 was with stent protruding into the subclavian artery for 0, 1, 2, 3 mm, respectively. Computational fluid dynamics simulations based on finite element analysis were employed to mimic the blood flow in arteries and to assess hemodynamic conditions, particularly the blood flow velocity and wall shear stress (WSS). The WSS and the blood flow velocity at the vertebral artery ostium were reduced by 85.33 and 35.36% respectively after stents implantation. The phenomenon of helical flow disappeared. Hemodynamics comparison showed that stent struts that protruded 1 mm into the subclavian artery induced the least decrease in blood speed and WSS. The results suggest that stent implantation can improve the hemodynamics of VAOS, while stent struts that had protruded 1 mm into the subclavian artery would result in less thrombogenesis and neointimal hyperplasia and most likely decrease the risk of ISR.

  5. Theory and computer simulation of structure, transport, and flow of fluid in micropores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, H.T.; Bitsanis, I.; Vanderlick, T.K.; Tirrell, M.V.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is given of recent progress made in our laboratory on this topic. The density profiles of fluid in micropores are found by solving numerically an approximate Yvon-Born-Green equation. A related local average density model (LADM) allows prediction of transport and flow in inhomogeneous fluids from density profiles. A rigorous extension of the Enskog theory of transport is also outlined. Simple results of this general approach for the tracer diffusion and Couette flow between planar micropore walls are presented. Equilibrium and flow (molecular dynamics) simulations are compared with the theoretical predictions. Simulated density profiles of the micropore fluid exhibit substantial fluid layering. The number and sharpness of fluid layers depend sensitively on the pore width. The solvation force and the pore average density and diffusivity are oscillating functions of the pore width. The theoretical predictions for these quantities agree qualitatively with the simulation results. The flow simulations indicate that the flow does not affect the fluid structure and diffusivity even at extremely high shear rates (10/sup 10/s/sup -1/). The fluid structure induces large deviations of the shear stress and the effective viscosity from the bulk fluid values. The flow velocity profiles are correlated with the density profiles and differ from those of a bulk fluid. The LADM and extended Enskog theory predictions for the velocity profiles and the pore average diffusivity agree very well with each other and with the simulation results. The LADM predictions for the shear stress and the effective viscosity agrees fairly well with the simulation results

  6. Fluid/Structure Interaction Studies of Aircraft Using High Fidelity Equations on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruswamy, Guru; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Abstract Aeroelasticity which involves strong coupling of fluids, structures and controls is an important element in designing an aircraft. Computational aeroelasticity using low fidelity methods such as the linear aerodynamic flow equations coupled with the modal structural equations are well advanced. Though these low fidelity approaches are computationally less intensive, they are not adequate for the analysis of modern aircraft such as High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) and Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) which can experience complex flow/structure interactions. HSCT can experience vortex induced aeroelastic oscillations whereas AST can experience transonic buffet associated structural oscillations. Both aircraft may experience a dip in the flutter speed at the transonic regime. For accurate aeroelastic computations at these complex fluid/structure interaction situations, high fidelity equations such as the Navier-Stokes for fluids and the finite-elements for structures are needed. Computations using these high fidelity equations require large computational resources both in memory and speed. Current conventional super computers have reached their limitations both in memory and speed. As a result, parallel computers have evolved to overcome the limitations of conventional computers. This paper will address the transition that is taking place in computational aeroelasticity from conventional computers to parallel computers. The paper will address special techniques needed to take advantage of the architecture of new parallel computers. Results will be illustrated from computations made on iPSC/860 and IBM SP2 computer by using ENSAERO code that directly couples the Euler/Navier-Stokes flow equations with high resolution finite-element structural equations.

  7. Computation of demagnetizing fields and particle distribution in magnetic fluid with inhomogeneous density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pshenichnikov, A.F.

    2012-01-01

    A new algorithm for calculating magnetic fields in a concentrated magnetic fluid with inhomogeneous density is proposed. Inhomogeneity of the fluid is caused by magnetophoresis. In this case, the diffusion and magnetostatic parts of the problem are tightly linked together and are solved jointly. The dynamic diffusion equation is solved by the finite volume method and, to calculate the magnetic field inside the fluid, an iterative process is performed in parallel. The solution to the problem is sought in Cartesian coordinates, and the computational domain is decomposed into rectangular elements. This technique eliminates the need to solve the related boundary-value problem for magnetic fields, accelerates computations and eliminates the error caused by the finite sizes of the outer region. Formulas describing the contribution of the rectangular element to the field intensity in the case of a plane problem are given. Magnetic and concentration fields inside the magnetic fluid filling a rectangular cavity generated under the action of the uniform external filed are calculated. - Highlights: ▶ New algorithm for calculating magnetic field intense magnetic fluid with account of magnetophoresis and diffusion of particles. ▶ We do not need to solve boundary-value problem, but we accelerate computations and eliminate some errors. ▶ We solve nonlinear flow equation by the finite volume method and calculate magnetic and focus fields in the fluid for plane case.

  8. Transient computational fluid dynamics analysis of emergency core cooling injection at natural circulation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheuerer, Martina, E-mail: Martina.Scheuerer@grs.de [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Forschungsinstitute, 85748 Garching (Germany); Weis, Johannes, E-mail: Johannes.Weis@grs.de [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Forschungsinstitute, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pressurized thermal shocks are important phenomena for plant life extension and aging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermal-hydraulics of PTS have been studied experimentally and numerically. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the Large Scale Test Facility a loss of coolant accident was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFD software is validated to simulate the buoyancy driven flow after ECC injection. - Abstract: Within the framework of the European Nuclear Reactor Integrated Simulation Project (NURISP), computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is validated for the simulation of the thermo-hydraulics of pressurized thermal shocks. A proposed validation experiment is the test series performed within the OECD ROSA V project in the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The LSTF is a 1:48 volume-scaled model of a four-loop Westinghouse pressurized water reactor (PWR). ROSA V Test 1-1 investigates temperature stratification under natural circulation conditions. This paper describes calculations which were performed with the ANSYS CFD software for emergency core cooling injection into one loop at single-phase flow conditions. Following the OECD/NEA CFD Best Practice Guidelines (Mahaffy, 2007) the influence of grid resolution, discretisation schemes, and turbulence models (shear stress transport and Reynolds stress model) on the mixing in the cold leg were investigated. A half-model was used for these simulations. The transient calculations were started from a steady-state solution at natural circulation conditions. The final calculations were obtained in a complete model of the downcomer. The results are in good agreement with data.

  9. Transient computational fluid dynamics analysis of emergency core cooling injection at natural circulation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuerer, Martina; Weis, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Pressurized thermal shocks are important phenomena for plant life extension and aging. ► The thermal-hydraulics of PTS have been studied experimentally and numerically. ► In the Large Scale Test Facility a loss of coolant accident was investigated. ► CFD software is validated to simulate the buoyancy driven flow after ECC injection. - Abstract: Within the framework of the European Nuclear Reactor Integrated Simulation Project (NURISP), computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software is validated for the simulation of the thermo-hydraulics of pressurized thermal shocks. A proposed validation experiment is the test series performed within the OECD ROSA V project in the Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The LSTF is a 1:48 volume-scaled model of a four-loop Westinghouse pressurized water reactor (PWR). ROSA V Test 1-1 investigates temperature stratification under natural circulation conditions. This paper describes calculations which were performed with the ANSYS CFD software for emergency core cooling injection into one loop at single-phase flow conditions. Following the OECD/NEA CFD Best Practice Guidelines (Mahaffy, 2007) the influence of grid resolution, discretisation schemes, and turbulence models (shear stress transport and Reynolds stress model) on the mixing in the cold leg were investigated. A half-model was used for these simulations. The transient calculations were started from a steady-state solution at natural circulation conditions. The final calculations were obtained in a complete model of the downcomer. The results are in good agreement with data.

  10. Wall shear stress fixed points in cardiovascular fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzani, Amirhossein; Shadden, Shawn C

    2018-05-17

    Complex blood flow in large arteries creates rich wall shear stress (WSS) vectorial features. WSS acts as a link between blood flow dynamics and the biology of various cardiovascular diseases. WSS has been of great interest in a wide range of studies and has been the most popular measure to correlate blood flow to cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have emphasized different vectorial features of WSS. However, fixed points in the WSS vector field have not received much attention. A WSS fixed point is a point on the vessel wall where the WSS vector vanishes. In this article, WSS fixed points are classified and the aspects by which they could influence cardiovascular disease are reviewed. First, the connection between WSS fixed points and the flow topology away from the vessel wall is discussed. Second, the potential role of time-averaged WSS fixed points in biochemical mass transport is demonstrated using the recent concept of Lagrangian WSS structures. Finally, simple measures are proposed to quantify the exposure of the endothelial cells to WSS fixed points. Examples from various arterial flow applications are demonstrated. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Aerodynamic research of a racing car based on wind tunnel test and computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jianfeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind tunnel test and computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation are two main methods for the study of automotive aerodynamics. CFD simulation software solves the results in calculation by using the basic theory of aerodynamic. Calculation will inevitably lead to bias, and the wind tunnel test can effectively simulate the real driving condition, which is the most effective aerodynamics research method. This paper researches the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing of a racing car. Aerodynamic model of a racing car is established. Wind tunnel test is carried out and compared with the simulation results of computational fluid dynamics. The deviation of the two methods is small, and the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics simulation is verified. By means of CFD software simulation, the coefficients of six aerodynamic forces are fitted and the aerodynamic equations are obtained. Finally, the aerodynamic forces and torques of the racing car travel in bend are calculated.

  12. Assessing Bioinspired Topographies for their Antifouling Potential Control Using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Jacky

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling is the accumulation of unwanted material on surfaces submerged or semi submerged over an extended period. This study investigates the antifouling performance of a new bioinspired topography design. A shark riblets inspired topography was designed with Solidworks and CFD simulations were antifouling performance. The study focuses on the fluid flow velocity, the wall shear stress and the appearance of vortices are to be noted to determine the possible locations biofouling would most probably occur. The inlet mass flow rate is 0.01 kgs-1 and a no-slip boundary condition was applied to the walls of the fluid domain. Simulations indicate that Velocity around the topography averaged at 7.213 x 10-3 ms-1. However, vortices were observed between the gaps. High wall shear stress is observed at the peak of each topography. In contrast, wall shear stress is significantly low at the bed of the topography. This suggests the potential location for the accumulation of biofouling. Results show that bioinspired antifouling topography can be improved by reducing the frequency of gaps between features. Linear surfaces on the topography should also be minimized. This increases the avenues of flow for the fluid, thus potentially increasing shear stresses with surrounding fluid leading to better antifouling performance.

  13. The coupling of fluids, dynamics, and controls on advanced architecture computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    This grant provided for the demonstration of coupled controls, body dynamics, and fluids computations in a workstation cluster environment; and an investigation of the impact of peer-peer communication on flow solver performance and robustness. The findings of these investigations were documented in the conference articles.The attached publication, 'Towards Distributed Fluids/Controls Simulations', documents the solution and scaling of the coupled Navier-Stokes, Euler rigid-body dynamics, and state feedback control equations for a two-dimensional canard-wing. The poor scaling shown was due to serialized grid connectivity computation and Ethernet bandwidth limits. The scaling of a peer-to-peer communication flow code on an IBM SP-2 was also shown. The scaling of the code on the switched fabric-linked nodes was good, with a 2.4 percent loss due to communication of intergrid boundary point information. The code performance on 30 worker nodes was 1.7 (mu)s/point/iteration, or a factor of three over a Cray C-90 head. The attached paper, 'Nonlinear Fluid Computations in a Distributed Environment', documents the effect of several computational rate enhancing methods on convergence. For the cases shown, the highest throughput was achieved using boundary updates at each step, with the manager process performing communication tasks only. Constrained domain decomposition of the implicit fluid equations did not degrade the convergence rate or final solution. The scaling of a coupled body/fluid dynamics problem on an Ethernet-linked cluster was also shown.

  14. Increasing the speed of computational fluid dynamics procedure for minimization the nitrogen oxide polution from the premixed atmospheric gas burner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotev Vasko G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents innovative method for increasing the speed of procedure which includes complex computational fluid dynamic calculations for finding the distance between flame openings of atmospheric gas burner that lead to minimal NO pollution. The method is based on standard features included in commercial computational fluid dynamic software and shortens computer working time roughly seven times in this particular case.

  15. Status of computational fluid dynamics in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutler, P.; Steger, J.L.; Bailey, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    CFD-related progress in U.S. aerospace industries and research institutions is evaluated with respect to methods employed, their applications, and the computer technologies employed in their implementation. Goals for subsonic CFD are primarily aimed at greater fuel efficiency; those of supersonic CFD involve the achievement of high sustained cruise efficiency. Transatmospheric/hypersonic vehicles are noted to have recently become important concerns for CFD efforts. Attention is given to aspects of discretization, Euler and Navier-Stokes general purpose codes, zonal equation methods, internal and external flows, and the impact of supercomputers and their networks in advancing the state-of-the-art. 91 references

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics of Choanoflagellate Filter-Feeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asadzadeh, Seyed Saeed; Walther, Jens Honore; Nielsen, Lasse Tor

    Choanoflagellates are unicellular aquatic organisms with a single flagellum that drives a feeding current through a funnel-shaped collar filter on which bacteria-sized prey are caught. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) we model the beating flagellum and the complex filter flow of the choanoflagell...... to suggest a radically different filtration mechanism that requires a flagellar vane (sheet), and addition of a wide vane in our CFD model allows us to correctly predict the observed clearance rate....

  17. Evaluation charts of thermal stresses in cylindrical vessels induced by thermal stratification of contained fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuhashi, Ichiro; Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Kasahara, Naoto

    2008-01-01

    Temperature and thermal stress in cylindrical vessels were analysed for the thermal stratification of contained fluid. Two kinds of temperature analysis results were obtained such as the exact temperature solution of eigenfunction series and the simple approximate one by the temperature profile method. Furthermore, thermal stress shell solutions were obtained for the simple approximate temperatures. Through comparison with FEM analyses, these solutions were proved to be adequate. The simple temperature solution is described by one parameter that is the temperature decay coefficient. The thermal stress shell solutions are described by two parameters. One is the ratio between the temperature decay coefficient and the load decay coefficient. Another is the nondimensional width of stratification. These solutions are so described by few parameters that those are suitable for the simplified thermal stress evaluation charts. These charts enable quick and accurate thermal stress evaluations of cylindrical vessel of this problem compared with conventional methods. (author)

  18. Evaluation charts of thermal stresses in cylindrical vessels induced by thermal stratification of contained fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuhashi, Ichiro; Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Kasahara, Naoto

    2007-01-01

    Temperature and thermal stress in cylindrical vessels were analysed for the thermal stratification of contained fluid. Two kinds of temperature analysis results were obtained such as the exact temperature solution of eigen-function series and the simple approximate one by the temperature profile method. Furthermore, shell solutions of thermal stress were obtained for the simple approximate temperatures. Through comparison with FEM analyses, these solutions were proved to be adequate. The simple temperature solution is described by one parameter that is the temperature decay factor. The shell solutions of thermal stress are described by two parameters. One is the ratio between the temperature decay factor and the local decay factor. Another is the non-dimensional width of stratification. These solution are so described by few parameters that those are suitable for the simplified thermal stress evaluation charts. These charts enable quick and accurate thermal stress evaluations of cylindrical vessel of this problem compared with conventional methods. (author)

  19. Physical and computational fluid dynamics models for the hemodynamics of the artiodactyl carotid rete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Haley D; Bourke, Jason

    2015-12-07

    In the mammalian order Artiodactyla, the majority of arterial blood entering the intracranial cavity is supplied by a large arterial meshwork called the carotid rete. This vascular structure functionally replaces the internal carotid artery. Extensive experimentation has demonstrated that the artiodactyl carotid rete drives one of the most effective selective brain cooling mechanisms among terrestrial vertebrates. Less well understood is the impact that the unique morphology of the carotid rete may have on the hemodynamics of blood flow to the cerebrum. It has been hypothesized that, relative to the tubular internal carotid arteries of most other vertebrates, the highly convoluted morphology of the carotid rete may increase resistance to flow during extreme changes in cerebral blood pressure, essentially protecting the brain by acting as a resistor. We test this hypothesis by employing simple and complex physical models to a 3D surface rendering of the carotid rete of the domestic goat, Capra hircus. First, we modeled the potential for increased resistance across the carotid rete using an electrical circuit analog. The extensive branching of the rete equates to a parallel circuit that is bound in series by single tubular arteries, both upstream and downstream. This method calculated a near-zero increase in resistance across the rete. Because basic equations do not incorporate drag, shear-stress, and turbulence, we used computational fluid dynamics to simulate the impact of these computationally intensive factors on resistance. Ultimately, both simple and complex models demonstrated negligible changes in resistance and blood pressure across the arterial meshwork. We further tested the resistive potential of the carotid rete by simulating blood pressures known to occur in giraffes. Based on these models, we found resistance (and blood pressure mitigation as a whole) to be an unlikely function for the artiodactyl carotid rete. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  20. Computational multiscale modeling of fluids and solids theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhauser, Martin Oliver

    2017-01-01

    The idea of the book is to provide a comprehensive overview of computational physics methods and techniques, that are used for materials modeling on different length and time scales. Each chapter first provides an overview of the basic physical principles which are the basis for the numerical and mathematical modeling on the respective length-scale. The book includes the micro-scale, the meso-scale and the macro-scale, and the chapters follow this classification. The book explains in detail many tricks of the trade of some of the most important methods and techniques that are used to simulate materials on the perspective levels of spatial and temporal resolution. Case studies are included to further illustrate some methods or theoretical considerations. Example applications for all techniques are provided, some of which are from the author’s own contributions to some of the research areas. The second edition has been expanded by new sections in computational models on meso/macroscopic scales for ocean and a...

  1. Orbital fluid shear stress promotes osteoblast metabolism, proliferation and alkaline phosphates activity in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aisha, M.D. [Institute of Medical Molecular Biotechnology and Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Sungai Buloh 47000, Selangor (Malaysia); Nor-Ashikin, M.N.K. [Institute of Medical Molecular Biotechnology and Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Sungai Buloh 47000, Selangor (Malaysia); DDH, Universiti Teknologi MARA, ShahAlam 40450, Selangor (Malaysia); Sharaniza, A.B.R. [DDH, Universiti Teknologi MARA, ShahAlam 40450, Selangor (Malaysia); Nawawi, H. [Center for Pathology Diagnostic and Research Laboratories, Clinical Training Center, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Sungai Buloh 47000, Selangor (Malaysia); I-PPerForM, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Selayang 47000 Selangor (Malaysia); Froemming, G.R.A., E-mail: gabriele@salam.uitm.edu.my [Institute of Medical Molecular Biotechnology and Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Sungai Buloh 47000, Selangor (Malaysia); I-PPerForM, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Selayang 47000 Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-10

    Prolonged disuse of the musculoskeletal system is associated with reduced mechanical loading and lack of anabolic stimulus. As a form of mechanical signal, the multidirectional orbital fluid shear stress transmits anabolic signal to bone forming cells in promoting cell differentiation, metabolism and proliferation. Signals are channeled through the cytoskeleton framework, directly modifying gene and protein expression. For that reason, we aimed to study the organization of Normal Human Osteoblast (NHOst) cytoskeleton with regards to orbital fluid shear (OFS) stress. Of special interest were the consequences of cytoskeletal reorganization on NHOst metabolism, proliferation, and osteogenic functional markers. Cells stimulated at 250 RPM in a shaking incubator resulted in the rearrangement of actin and tubulin fibers after 72 h. Orbital shear stress increased NHOst mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation, simultaneously preventing apoptosis. The ratio of RANKL/OPG was reduced, suggesting that orbital shear stress has the potential to inhibit osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity. Increase in ALP activity and OCN protein production suggests that stimulation retained osteoblast function. Shear stress possibly generated through actin seemed to hold an anabolic response as osteoblast metabolism and functional markers were enhanced. We hypothesize that by applying orbital shear stress with suitable magnitude and duration as a non-drug anabolic treatment can help improve bone regeneration in prolonged disuse cases. - Highlights: • OFS stress transmits anabolic signals to osteoblasts. • Actin and tubulin fibers are rearranged under OFS stress. • OFS stress increases mitochondrial metabolism and proliferation. • Reduced RANKL/OPG ratio in response to OFS inhibits osteoclastogenesis. • OFS stress prevents apoptosis and stimulates ALP and OCN.

  2. Increased levels of oxidative stress markers in the peritoneal fluid of women with endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Grzegorz; Wertel, Iwona; Barczyński, Bartłomiej; Kwaśniewski, Wojciech; Bednarek, Wiesława; Kotarski, Jan

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-isoprostane levels in the peritoneal fluid (PF) of women with endometriosis. One hundred and ten women with laparoscopically and histopathologically confirmed endometriosis and, as reference groups, 119 patients with simple serous (n=78) and dermoid (n=41) ovarian cysts were studied. Peritoneal fluid 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane concentrations were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane levels in peritoneal fluid were significantly higher in patients with endometriosis compared with the reference groups. Higher PF 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane concentrations were observed in patients with advanced stages of endometriosis. A statistically significant positive correlation was found between 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane levels in peritoneal fluid. Endometriosis induces greater oxidative stress and frequent DNA mutations in peritoneal fluid than nonendometriotic ovarian cysts. The most severe oxidative stress occurs in the peritoneal cavity of women with more advanced stages of the disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluid Flow Characteristic Simulation of the Original TRIGA 2000 Reactor Design Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiantini, Rosalina; Umar, Efrizon

    2010-01-01

    Common energy crisis has modified the national energy policy which is in the beginning based on natural resources becoming based on technology, therefore the capability to understanding the basic and applied science is needed to supporting those policies. National energy policy which aims at new energy exploitation, such as nuclear energy is including many efforts to increase the safety reactor core condition and optimize the related aspects and the ability to build new research reactor with properly design. The previous analysis of the modification TRIGA 2000 Reactor design indicates that forced convection of the primary coolant system put on an effect to the flow characteristic in the reactor core, but relatively insignificant effect to the flow velocity in the reactor core. In this analysis, the lid of reactor core is closed. However the forced convection effect is still presented. This analysis shows the fluid flow velocity vector in the model area without exception. Result of this analysis indicates that in the original design of TRIGA 2000 reactor, there is still forced convection effects occur but less than in the modified TRIGA 2000 design.

  4. Techniques for grid manipulation and adaptation. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yung K.; Eisemann, Peter R.; Lee, Ki D.

    1992-01-01

    Two approaches have been taken to provide systematic grid manipulation for improved grid quality. One is the control point form (CPF) of algebraic grid generation. It provides explicit control of the physical grid shape and grid spacing through the movement of the control points. It works well in the interactive computer graphics environment and hence can be a good candidate for integration with other emerging technologies. The other approach is grid adaptation using a numerical mapping between the physical space and a parametric space. Grid adaptation is achieved by modifying the mapping functions through the effects of grid control sources. The adaptation process can be repeated in a cyclic manner if satisfactory results are not achieved after a single application.

  5. Error Estimation and Uncertainty Propagation in Computational Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J. Z.; He, Guowei; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Numerical simulation has now become an integral part of engineering design process. Critical design decisions are routinely made based on the simulation results and conclusions. Verification and validation of the reliability of the numerical simulation is therefore vitally important in the engineering design processes. We propose to develop theories and methodologies that can automatically provide quantitative information about the reliability of the numerical simulation by estimating numerical approximation error, computational model induced errors and the uncertainties contained in the mathematical models so that the reliability of the numerical simulation can be verified and validated. We also propose to develop and implement methodologies and techniques that can control the error and uncertainty during the numerical simulation so that the reliability of the numerical simulation can be improved.

  6. Computer Pure-Tone and Operator Stress: Report III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Caroline; Covert, Douglas C.

    Pure-tone sound at 15,750 Herz generated by flyback transformers in many computer and video display terminal (VDT) monitors has stress-related productivity effects in some operators, especially women. College-age women in a controlled experiment simulating half a normal work day showed responses within the first half hour of exposure to a tone…

  7. Residual stresses in multilayer ceramic capacitors: measurement and computation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toonder, den J.M.J.; Rademaker, C.W.; Hu, C.L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present a combined experimental and computational study of the thermomechanical reliability of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCC's). We focus on residual stresses introduced into the components during the cooling down step of the sintering process. The technique of

  8. Vectorization on the star computer of several numerical methods for a fluid flow problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.; Howser, L. M.

    1974-01-01

    A reexamination of some numerical methods is considered in light of the new class of computers which use vector streaming to achieve high computation rates. A study has been made of the effect on the relative efficiency of several numerical methods applied to a particular fluid flow problem when they are implemented on a vector computer. The method of Brailovskaya, the alternating direction implicit method, a fully implicit method, and a new method called partial implicitization have been applied to the problem of determining the steady state solution of the two-dimensional flow of a viscous imcompressible fluid in a square cavity driven by a sliding wall. Results are obtained for three mesh sizes and a comparison is made of the methods for serial computation.

  9. Partitioned Fluid-Structure Interaction for Full Rotor Computations Using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinz, Joachim Christian

    ) based aerodynamic model which is computationally cheap but includes several limitations and corrections in order to account for three-dimensional and unsteady eects. The present work discusses the development of an aero-elastic simulation tool where high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD......) is used to model the aerodynamics of the flexible wind turbine rotor. Respective CFD computations are computationally expensive but do not show the limitations of the BEM-based models. It is one of the first times that high-fidelity fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations are used to model the aero......-elastic response of an entire wind turbine rotor. The work employs a partitioned FSI coupling between the multi-body-based structural model of the aero-elastic solver HAWC2 and the finite volume CFD solver EllipSys3D. In order to establish an FSI coupling of sufficient time accuracy and sufficient numerical...

  10. Fast Virtual Fractional Flow Reserve Based Upon Steady-State Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Morris, PhD

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractional flow reserve (FFR-guided percutaneous intervention is superior to standard assessment but remains underused. The authors have developed a novel “pseudotransient” analysis protocol for computing virtual fractional flow reserve (vFFR based upon angiographic images and steady-state computational fluid dynamics. This protocol generates vFFR results in 189 s (cf >24 h for transient analysis using a desktop PC, with <1% error relative to that of full-transient computational fluid dynamics analysis. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that physiological lesion significance was influenced less by coronary or lesion anatomy (33% and more by microvascular physiology (59%. If coronary microvascular resistance can be estimated, vFFR can be accurately computed in less time than it takes to make invasive measurements.

  11. Transepithelial Na+ transport and the intracellular fluids: a computer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civan, M M; Bookman, R J

    1982-01-01

    Computer simulations of tight epithelia under three experimental conditions have been carried out, using the rheogenic nonlinear model of Lew, Ferreira and Moura (Proc. Roy. Soc. London. B 206:53-83, 1979) based largely on the formulation of Koefoed-Johnsen and Ussing (Acta Physiol. Scand. 42: 298-308. 1958). First, analysis of the transition between the short-circuited and open-circuited states has indicated that (i) apical Cl- permeability is a critical parameter requiring experimental definition in order to analyze cell volume regulation, and (ii) contrary to certain experimental reports, intracellular Na+ concentration (ccNa) is expected to be a strong function of transepithelial clamping voltage. Second, analysis of the effects of lowering serosal K+ concentration (csK) indicates that the basic model cannot simulate several well-documented observations; these defects can be overcome, at least qualitatively, by modifying the model to take account of the negative feedback interaction likely to exist between the apical Na+ permeability and ccNa. Third, analysis of the strongly supports the concept that osmotically induced permeability changes in the apical intercellular junctions play a physiological role in conserving the body's stores of NaCl. The analyses also demonstrate that the importance of Na+ entry across the basolateral membrane is strongly dependent upon transepithelial potential, cmNa and csK; under certain conditions, net Na+ entry could be appreciably greater across the basolateral than across the apical membrane.

  12. Intraplaque hemorrhage is associated with higher structural stresses in human atherosclerotic plaques: an in vivo MRI-based 3d fluid-structure interaction study

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xueying; Teng, Zhongzhao; Canton, Gador; Ferguson, Marina; Yuan, Chun; Tang, Dalin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies using medical images have shown that intraplaque hemorrhage may accelerate plaque progression and may produce a stimulus for atherosclerosis development by increasing lipid core and plaque volume and creating new destabilizing factors. Image-based 3D computational models with fluid-structure interactions (FSI) will be used to perform plaque mechanical analysis and investigate possible associations between intraplaque hemorrhage and both plaque wall stress (PWS) and...

  13. BIGHORN Computational Fluid Dynamics Theory, Methodology, and Code Verification & Validation Benchmark Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Yidong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andrs, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This document presents the theoretical background for a hybrid finite-element / finite-volume fluid flow solver, namely BIGHORN, based on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) computational framework developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). An overview of the numerical methods used in BIGHORN are discussed and followed by a presentation of the formulation details. The document begins with the governing equations for the compressible fluid flow, with an outline of the requisite constitutive relations. A second-order finite volume method used for solving the compressible fluid flow problems is presented next. A Pressure-Corrected Implicit Continuous-fluid Eulerian (PCICE) formulation for time integration is also presented. The multi-fluid formulation is being developed. Although multi-fluid is not fully-developed, BIGHORN has been designed to handle multi-fluid problems. Due to the flexibility in the underlying MOOSE framework, BIGHORN is quite extensible, and can accommodate both multi-species and multi-phase formulations. This document also presents a suite of verification & validation benchmark test problems for BIGHORN. The intent for this suite of problems is to provide baseline comparison data that demonstrates the performance of the BIGHORN solution methods on problems that vary in complexity from laminar to turbulent flows. Wherever possible, some form of solution verification has been attempted to identify sensitivities in the solution methods, and suggest best practices when using BIGHORN.

  14. Development of a computational framework on fluid-solid mixture flow simulations for the COMPASS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Shuai; Morita, Koji; Shirakawa, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Yuichi

    2010-01-01

    The COMPASS code is designed based on the moving particle semi-implicit method to simulate various complex mesoscale phenomena relevant to core disruptive accidents of sodium-cooled fast reactors. In this study, a computational framework for fluid-solid mixture flow simulations was developed for the COMPASS code. The passively moving solid model was used to simulate hydrodynamic interactions between fluid and solids. Mechanical interactions between solids were modeled by the distinct element method. A multi-time-step algorithm was introduced to couple these two calculations. The proposed computational framework for fluid-solid mixture flow simulations was verified by the comparison between experimental and numerical studies on the water-dam break with multiple solid rods. (author)

  15. Computational electrochemo-fluid dynamics modeling in a uranium electrowinning cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.R.; Choi, S.Y.; Kim, S.H.; Shim, J.B.; Paek, S.; Kim, I.T.

    2014-01-01

    A computational electrochemo-fluid dynamics model has been developed to describe the electrowinning behavior in an electrolyte stream through a planar electrode cell system. Electrode reaction of the uranium electrowinning process from a molten-salt electrolyte stream was modeled to illustrate the details of the flow-assisted mass transport of ions to the cathode. This modeling approach makes it possible to represent variations of the convective diffusion limited current density by taking into account the concentration profile at the electrode surface as a function of the flow characteristics and applied current density in a commercially available computational fluid dynamics platform. It was possible to predict the conventional current-voltage relation in addition to details of electrolyte fluid dynamics and electrochemical variables, such as the flow field, species concentrations, potential, and current distributions throughout the galvanostatic electrolysis cell. (author)

  16. Extensive use of computational fluid dynamics in the upgrading of hydraulic turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabourin, M.; De Henau, V. [GEC Alsthom Electromechanical Inc., Tracy, PQ (Canada); Eremeef, R. [GEC Alsthom Neyrpic, Grenoble (France)

    1995-12-31

    The use of computational fluid flow dynamics (CFD) and the Navier Stokes equations by GEC Alsthom for turbine rehabilitation were discussed. The process of runner rehabilitation was discussed from a fluid flow perspective, which accounts for the spiral case-distributor set and draft tube. The Kootenay turbine rehabilitation was described with regard to it spiral case and stay vane. The numerical analysis used to model upstream components was explained. The influence of draft tube effects was emphasized as an important efficiency factor. The differences between draft tubes at Sir Adam Beck 2 and La Grande 2 were discussed. Computational fluid flow modelling was claimed to have produced global performance enhancements in a reasonably short time, and at a reasonable cost. 6 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Particle Image Velocimetry and Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Fuel Cell Manifold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebæk, Jesper; Blazniak Andreasen, Marcin; Andresen, Henrik Assenholm

    2010-01-01

    The inlet effect on the manifold flow in a fuel cell stack was investigated by means of numerical methods (computational fluid dynamics) and experimental methods (particle image velocimetry). At a simulated high current density situation the flow field was mapped on a 70 cell simulated cathode...

  18. An Innovative Improvement of Engineering Learning System Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, T. C.; Wang, S. K.; Tai, S. W.; Hung, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    An innovative concept of an electronic learning system has been established in an attempt to achieve a technology that provides engineering students with an instructive and affordable framework for learning engineering-related courses. This system utilizes an existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) package, Active Server Pages programming,…

  19. Computer simulation studies in fluid and calcium regulation and orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The systems analysis approach to physiological research uses mathematical models and computer simulation. Major areas of concern during prolonged space flight discussed include fluid and blood volume regulation; cardiovascular response during shuttle reentry; countermeasures for orthostatic intolerance; and calcium regulation and bone atrophy. Potential contributions of physiologic math models to future flight experiments are examined.

  20. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  1. A computational fluid dynamics model for designing heat exchangers based on natural convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkse, M.H.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Walle, van der T.; Speetjens, S.L.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2006-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics model was created for the design of a natural convection shell-and-tube heat exchanger with baffles. The flow regime proved to be turbulent and this was modelled using the k¿¿ turbulence model. The features of the complex geometry were simplified considerably resulting

  2. Research Summary 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Model Of The Human Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) has developed a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the human respiratory system that allows for the simulation of particulate based contaminant deposition and clearance, while being adaptable for age, ethnicity,...

  3. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of blood flow regularized by 3D phase contrast MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rispoli, Vinicius C; Nielsen, Jon; Nayak, Krishna S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) is used clinically for quantitative assessment of cardiovascular flow and function, as it is capable of providing directly-measured 3D velocity maps. Alternatively, vascular flow can be estimated from model-based computation fluid dyn...

  4. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigation of a Spinning Helicopter Slung Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theorn, J. N.; Duque, E. P. N.; Cicolani, L.; Halsey, R.

    2005-01-01

    After performing steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations using OVERFLOW to validate the CFD method against static wind-tunnel data of a box-shaped cargo container, the same setup was used to investigate unsteady flow with a moving body. Results were compared to flight test data previously collected in which the container is spinning.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics for nuclear applications: from CFD to multi-scale CMFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadigaroglu, G. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology-Zurich (ETHZ), Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, ETH-Zentrum, CLT CH-8092 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: yadi@ethz.ch

    2005-02-01

    New trends in computational methods for nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics are discussed; traditionally, these have been based on the two-fluid model. Although CFD computations for single phase flows are commonplace, Computational Multi-Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) is still under development. One-fluid methods coupled with interface tracking techniques provide interesting opportunities and enlarge the scope of problems that can be solved. For certain problems, one may have to conduct 'cascades' of computations at increasingly finer scales to resolve all issues. The case study of condensation of steam/air mixtures injected from a downward-facing vent into a pool of water and a proposed CMFD initiative to numerically model Critical Heat Flux (CHF) illustrate such cascades. For the venting problem, a variety of tools are used: a system code for system behaviour; an interface-tracking method (Volume of Fluid, VOF) to examine the behaviour of large bubbles; direct-contact condensation can be treated either by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or by analytical methods.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics for nuclear applications: from CFD to multi-scale CMFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadigaroglu, G.

    2005-01-01

    New trends in computational methods for nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics are discussed; traditionally, these have been based on the two-fluid model. Although CFD computations for single phase flows are commonplace, Computational Multi-Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) is still under development. One-fluid methods coupled with interface tracking techniques provide interesting opportunities and enlarge the scope of problems that can be solved. For certain problems, one may have to conduct 'cascades' of computations at increasingly finer scales to resolve all issues. The case study of condensation of steam/air mixtures injected from a downward-facing vent into a pool of water and a proposed CMFD initiative to numerically model Critical Heat Flux (CHF) illustrate such cascades. For the venting problem, a variety of tools are used: a system code for system behaviour; an interface-tracking method (Volume of Fluid, VOF) to examine the behaviour of large bubbles; direct-contact condensation can be treated either by Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or by analytical methods

  7. CFD application to supersonic/hypersonic inlet airframe integration. [computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Supersonic external compression inlets are introduced, and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and tests needed to study flow associated with these inlets are outlined. Normal shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction is discussed. Boundary layer control is considered. Glancing sidewall shock interaction is treated. The CFD validation of hypersonic inlet configurations is explained. Scramjet inlet modules are shown.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  9. Mesh and Time-Step Independent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijdam, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    A homework assignment is outlined in which students learn Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) concepts of discretization, numerical stability and accuracy, and verification in a hands-on manner by solving physically realistic problems of practical interest to engineers. The students solve a transient-diffusion problem numerically using the common…

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics model of stratified atmospheric boundary-layer flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman; Bechmann, Andreas; Sogachev, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on computational fluid dynamics models of the neutrally stratified surface-layer. So far, physical processes that are important to the whole atmospheric boundary-layer, such as the Coriolis effect, buoyancy forces and heat...

  11. Identification of High-Risk Plaques Destined to Cause Acute Coronary Syndrome Using Coronary Computed Tomographic Angiography and Computational Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Myung; Choi, Gilwoo; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Hwang, Doyeon; Park, Jonghanne; Zhang, Jinlong; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Tong, Yaliang; Kim, Hyun Jin; Grady, Leo; Doh, Joon-Hyung; Nam, Chang-Wook; Shin, Eun-Seok; Cho, Young-Seok; Choi, Su-Yeon; Chun, Eun Ju; Choi, Jin-Ho; Nørgaard, Bjarne L; Christiansen, Evald H; Niemen, Koen; Otake, Hiromasa; Penicka, Martin; de Bruyne, Bernard; Kubo, Takashi; Akasaka, Takashi; Narula, Jagat; Douglas, Pamela S; Taylor, Charles A; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2018-03-14

    We investigated the utility of noninvasive hemodynamic assessment in the identification of high-risk plaques that caused subsequent acute coronary syndrome (ACS). ACS is a critical event that impacts the prognosis of patients with coronary artery disease. However, the role of hemodynamic factors in the development of ACS is not well-known. Seventy-two patients with clearly documented ACS and available coronary computed tomographic angiography (CTA) acquired between 1 month and 2 years before the development of ACS were included. In 66 culprit and 150 nonculprit lesions as a case-control design, the presence of adverse plaque characteristics (APC) was assessed and hemodynamic parameters (fractional flow reserve derived by coronary computed tomographic angiography [FFR CT ], change in FFR CT across the lesion [△FFR CT ], wall shear stress [WSS], and axial plaque stress) were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics. The best cut-off values for FFR CT , △FFR CT , WSS, and axial plaque stress were used to define the presence of adverse hemodynamic characteristics (AHC). The incremental discriminant and reclassification abilities for ACS prediction were compared among 3 models (model 1: percent diameter stenosis [%DS] and lesion length, model 2: model 1 + APC, and model 3: model 2 + AHC). The culprit lesions showed higher %DS (55.5 ± 15.4% vs. 43.1 ± 15.0%; p stress than nonculprit lesions (all p values statistic [c-index] 0.789 vs. 0.747; p = 0.014) and reclassification abilities (category-free net reclassification index 0.287; p = 0.047; relative integrated discrimination improvement 0.368; p < 0.001) than model 2. Lesions with both APC and AHC showed significantly higher risk of the culprit for subsequent ACS than those with no APC/AHC (hazard ratio: 11.75; 95% confidence interval: 2.85 to 48.51; p = 0.001) and with either APC or AHC (hazard ratio: 3.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.86 to 5.55; p < 0.001). Noninvasive hemodynamic assessment enhanced

  12. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity Using Finite-Difference Fluid/Finite-Element Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In recent years significant advances have been made for parallel computers in both hardware and software. Now parallel computers have become viable tools in computational mechanics. Many application codes developed on conventional computers have been modified to benefit from parallel computers. Significant speedups in some areas have been achieved by parallel computations. For single-discipline use of both fluid dynamics and structural dynamics, computations have been made on wing-body configurations using parallel computers. However, only a limited amount of work has been completed in combining these two disciplines for multidisciplinary applications. The prime reason is the increased level of complication associated with a multidisciplinary approach. In this work, procedures to compute aeroelasticity on parallel computers using direct coupling of fluid and structural equations will be investigated for wing-body configurations. The parallel computer selected for computations is an Intel iPSC/860 computer which is a distributed-memory, multiple-instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computer with 128 processors. In this study, the computational efficiency issues of parallel integration of both fluid and structural equations will be investigated in detail. The fluid and structural domains will be modeled using finite-difference and finite-element approaches, respectively. Results from the parallel computer will be compared with those from the conventional computers using a single processor. This study will provide an efficient computational tool for the aeroelastic analysis of wing-body structures on MIMD type parallel computers.

  13. Effect of hall currents on thermal instability of dusty couple stress fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Amrish Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, effect of Hall currents on the thermal instability of couple-stress fluid permeated with dust particles has been considered. Following the linearized stability theory and normal mode analysis, the dispersion relation is obtained. For the case of stationary convection, dust particles and Hall currents are found to have destabilizing effect while couple stresses have stabilizing effect on the system. Magnetic field induced by Hall currents has stabilizing/destabilizing effect under certain conditions. It is found that due to the presence of Hall currents (hence magnetic field, oscillatory modes are produced which were non-existent in their absence.

  14. Relationship between Energy Expenditure Related Factors and Oxidative Stress in Follicular Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemi, Ashraf; Ramezanzadeh, Fatemeh; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hosein; Saboor-Yaraghi, Ali Akbar; Nejat, Saharnaz Nejat; Rahimi-Foroshani, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluated the impact of body mass index (BMI), total calorie intake and physical activity (PA) as energy expenditure related factors on oxidative stress (OS) in follicular fluid (FF). Materials and Methods This prospective study conducted on 219 infertile women. We evaluated patients’ BMI, total calorie intake and PA in their assisted reproduction treatment cycles. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in pooled FF at oocyte retrieval were additional...

  15. The Applicability of Different Fluid Media to Measure Effective Stress Coefficient for Rock Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective stress coefficient for permeability (ESCK is the key parameter to evaluate the properties of reservoir stress sensitivity. So far, little studies have clarified which ESCK is correct for a certain reservoir while rock ESCK is measured differently by different fluid media. Thus, three different fluids were taken to measure a fine sandstone sample’s ESCK, respectively. As a result, the ESCK was measured to be the smallest by injecting nitrogen, the largest by injecting water, and between the two by brine. Besides, those microcharacteristics such as rock component, clay mineral content, and pore structure were further analyzed based on some microscopic experiments. Rock elastic modulus was reduced when water-sensitive clay minerals were encountered with aqua fluid media so as to enlarge the rock ESCK value. Moreover, some clay minerals reacting with water can spall and possibly block pore throats. Compared with water, brine can soften the water sensitivity; however, gas has no water sensitivity effects. Therefore, to choose which fluid medium to measure reservoir ESCK is mainly depending on its own exploitation conditions. For gas reservoirs using gas to measure ESCK is more reliable than water or brine, while using brine is more appropriate for oil reservoirs.

  16. Non-linear hydrotectonic phenomena: Part I - fluid flow in open fractures under dynamical stress loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archambeau, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    A fractured solid under stress loading (or unloading) can be viewed as behaving macroscopically as a medium with internal, hidden, degrees of freedom, wherein changes in fracture geometry (i.e. opening, closing and extension) and flow of fluid and gas within fractures will produce major changes in stresses and strains within the solid. Likewise, the flow process within fractures will be strongly coupled to deformation within the solid through boundary conditions on the fracture surfaces. The effects in the solid can, in part, be phenomenologically represented as inelastic or plastic processes in the macroscopic view. However, there are clearly phenomena associated with fracture growth and open fracture fluid flows that produce effects that can not be described using ordinary inelastic phenomenology. This is evident from the fact that a variety of energy release phenomena can occur, including seismic emissions of previously stored strain energy due to fracture growth, release of disolved gas from fluids in the fractures resulting in enhanced buoyancy and subsequent energetic flows of gas and fluids through the fracture system which can produce raid extension of old fractures and the creation of new ones. Additionally, the flows will be modulated by the opening and closing of fractures due to deformation in the solid, so that the flow process is strongly coupled to dynamical processes in the surrounding solid matrix, some of which are induced by the flow itself

  17. Computational modelling of the flow of viscous fluids in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khosravian, N [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, Department of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rafii-Tabar, H [Computational Physical Sciences Research Laboratory, Department of Nano-Science, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes will have extensive application in all areas of nano-technology, and in particular in the field of nano-fluidics, wherein they can be used for molecular separation, nano-scale filtering and as nano-pipes for conveying fluids. In the field of nano-medicine, nanotubes can be functionalized with various types of receptors to act as bio-sensors for the detection and elimination of cancer cells, or be used as bypasses and even neural connections. Modelling fluid flow inside nanotubes is a very challenging problem, since there is a complex interplay between the motion of the fluid and the stability of the walls. A critical issue in the design of nano-fluidic devices is the induced vibration of the walls, due to the fluid flow, which can promote structural instability. It has been established that the resonant frequencies depend on the flow velocity. We have studied, for the first time, the flow of viscous fluids through multi-walled carbon nanotubes, using the Euler-Bernoulli classical beam theory to model the nanotube as a continuum structure. Our aim has been to compute the effect of the fluid flow on the structural stability of the nanotubes, without having to consider the details of the fluid-walls interaction. The variations of the resonant frequencies with the flow velocity are obtained for both unembedded nanotubes, and when they are embedded in an elastic medium. It is found that a nanotube conveying a viscous fluid is more stable against vibration-induced buckling than a nanotube conveying a non-viscous fluid, and that the aspect ratio plays the same role in both cases.

  18. Computational modelling of the flow of viscous fluids in carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khosravian, N; Rafii-Tabar, H

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes will have extensive application in all areas of nano-technology, and in particular in the field of nano-fluidics, wherein they can be used for molecular separation, nano-scale filtering and as nano-pipes for conveying fluids. In the field of nano-medicine, nanotubes can be functionalized with various types of receptors to act as bio-sensors for the detection and elimination of cancer cells, or be used as bypasses and even neural connections. Modelling fluid flow inside nanotubes is a very challenging problem, since there is a complex interplay between the motion of the fluid and the stability of the walls. A critical issue in the design of nano-fluidic devices is the induced vibration of the walls, due to the fluid flow, which can promote structural instability. It has been established that the resonant frequencies depend on the flow velocity. We have studied, for the first time, the flow of viscous fluids through multi-walled carbon nanotubes, using the Euler-Bernoulli classical beam theory to model the nanotube as a continuum structure. Our aim has been to compute the effect of the fluid flow on the structural stability of the nanotubes, without having to consider the details of the fluid-walls interaction. The variations of the resonant frequencies with the flow velocity are obtained for both unembedded nanotubes, and when they are embedded in an elastic medium. It is found that a nanotube conveying a viscous fluid is more stable against vibration-induced buckling than a nanotube conveying a non-viscous fluid, and that the aspect ratio plays the same role in both cases

  19. Computation of the Fluid and Optical Fields About the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) and the Coupling of Fluids, Dynamics, and Control Laws on Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    The June 1992 to May 1993 grant NCC-2-677 provided for the continued demonstration of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) as applied to the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). While earlier grant years allowed validation of CFD through comparison against experiments, this year a new design proposal was evaluated. The new configuration would place the cavity aft of the wing, as opposed to the earlier baseline which was located immediately aft of the cockpit. This aft cavity placement allows for simplified structural and aircraft modification requirements, thus lowering the program cost of this national astronomy resource. Three appendices concerning this subject are presented.

  20. Work related perceived stress and muscle activity during standardized computer work among female computer users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsman, P; Thorn, S; Søgaard, K

    2009-01-01

    The current study investigated the associations between work-related perceived stress and surface electromyographic (sEMG) parameters (muscle activity and muscle rest) during standardized simulated computer work (typing, editing, precision, and Stroop tasks). It was part of the European case......-control study, NEW (Neuromuscular assessment in the Elderly Worker). The present cross-sectional study was based on a questionnaire survey and sEMG measurements among Danish and Swedish female computer users aged 45 or older (n=49). The results show associations between work-related perceived stress...... and trapezius muscle activity and rest during standardized simulated computer work, and provide partial empirical support for the hypothesized pathway of stress induced muscle activity in the association between an adverse psychosocial work environment and musculoskeletal symptoms in the neck and shoulder....

  1. Coupled transient thermo-fluid/thermal-stress analysis approach in a VTBM setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, A.; Narula, M.; Zhang, H.; Abdou, M.

    2008-01-01

    A virtual test blanket module (VTBM) has been envisioned as a utility to aid in streamlining and optimizing the US ITER TBM design effort by providing an integrated multi-code, multi-physics modeling environment. Within this effort, an integrated simulation approach is being developed for TBM design calculations and performance evaluation. Particularly, integrated thermo-fluid/thermal-stress analysis is important for enabling TBM design and performance calculations. In this paper, procedures involved in transient coupled thermo-fluid/thermal-stress analysis are investigated. The established procedure is applied to study the impact of pulsed operational phenomenon on the thermal-stress response of the TBM first wall. A two-way coupling between the thermal strain and temperature field is also studied, in the context of a change in thermal conductivity of the beryllium pebble bed in a solid breeder blanket TBM due to thermal strain. The temperature field determines the thermal strain in beryllium, which in turn changes the temperature field. Iterative thermo-fluid/thermal strain calculations have been applied to both steady-state and pulsed operation conditions. All calculations have been carried out in three dimensions with representative MCAD models, including all the TBM components in their entirety

  2. Moving domain computational fluid dynamics to interface with an embryonic model of cardiac morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Lee

    Full Text Available Peristaltic contraction of the embryonic heart tube produces time- and spatial-varying wall shear stress (WSS and pressure gradients (∇P across the atrioventricular (AV canal. Zebrafish (Danio rerio are a genetically tractable system to investigate cardiac morphogenesis. The use of Tg(fli1a:EGFP (y1 transgenic embryos allowed for delineation and two-dimensional reconstruction of the endocardium. This time-varying wall motion was then prescribed in a two-dimensional moving domain computational fluid dynamics (CFD model, providing new insights into spatial and temporal variations in WSS and ∇P during cardiac development. The CFD simulations were validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV across the atrioventricular (AV canal, revealing an increase in both velocities and heart rates, but a decrease in the duration of atrial systole from early to later stages. At 20-30 hours post fertilization (hpf, simulation results revealed bidirectional WSS across the AV canal in the heart tube in response to peristaltic motion of the wall. At 40-50 hpf, the tube structure undergoes cardiac looping, accompanied by a nearly 3-fold increase in WSS magnitude. At 110-120 hpf, distinct AV valve, atrium, ventricle, and bulbus arteriosus form, accompanied by incremental increases in both WSS magnitude and ∇P, but a decrease in bi-directional flow. Laminar flow develops across the AV canal at 20-30 hpf, and persists at 110-120 hpf. Reynolds numbers at the AV canal increase from 0.07±0.03 at 20-30 hpf to 0.23±0.07 at 110-120 hpf (p< 0.05, n=6, whereas Womersley numbers remain relatively unchanged from 0.11 to 0.13. Our moving domain simulations highlights hemodynamic changes in relation to cardiac morphogenesis; thereby, providing a 2-D quantitative approach to complement imaging analysis.

  3. Tensor Arithmetic, Geometric and Mathematic Principles of Fluid Mechanics in Implementation of Direct Computational Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanov Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The architecture of a digital computing system determines the technical foundation of a unified mathematical language for exact arithmetic-logical description of phenomena and laws of continuum mechanics for applications in fluid mechanics and theoretical physics. The deep parallelization of the computing processes results in functional programming at a new technological level, providing traceability of the computing processes with automatic application of multiscale hybrid circuits and adaptive mathematical models for the true reproduction of the fundamental laws of physics and continuum mechanics.

  4. A parametric study of a solar calcinator using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidaros, D.K.; Baxevanou, C.A.; Vlachos, N.S.

    2007-01-01

    In this work a horizontal rotating solar calcinator is studied numerically using computational fluid dynamics. The specific solar reactor is a 10 kW model designed and used for efficiency studies. The numerical model is based on the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for the gas flow, and on Lagrangean dynamics for the discrete particles. All necessary mathematical models were developed and incorporated into a computational fluid dynamics model with the influence of turbulence simulated by a two-equation (RNG k-ε) model. The efficiency of the reactor was calculated for different thermal inputs, feed rates, rotational speeds and particle diameters. The numerically computed degrees of calcination compared well with equivalent experimental results

  5. Estimation of numerical uncertainty in computational fluid dynamics simulations of a passively controlled wave energy converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Weizhi; Wu, Minghao; Palm, Johannes

    2018-01-01

    for almost linear incident waves. First, we show that the computational fluid dynamics simulations have acceptable agreement to experimental data. We then present a verification and validation study focusing on the solution verification covering spatial and temporal discretization, iterative and domain......The wave loads and the resulting motions of floating wave energy converters are traditionally computed using linear radiation–diffraction methods. Yet for certain cases such as survival conditions, phase control and wave energy converters operating in the resonance region, more complete...... dynamics simulations have largely been overlooked in the wave energy sector. In this article, we apply formal verification and validation techniques to computational fluid dynamics simulations of a passively controlled point absorber. The phase control causes the motion response to be highly nonlinear even...

  6. Non-intrusive uncertainty quantification of computational fluid dynamics simulations: notes on the accuracy and efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimoń, Małgorzata; Sawko, Robert; Emerson, David; Thompson, Christopher

    2017-11-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) is increasingly becoming an indispensable tool for assessing the reliability of computational modelling. Efficient handling of stochastic inputs, such as boundary conditions, physical properties or geometry, increases the utility of model results significantly. We discuss the application of non-intrusive generalised polynomial chaos techniques in the context of fluid engineering simulations. Deterministic and Monte Carlo integration rules are applied to a set of problems, including ordinary differential equations and the computation of aerodynamic parameters subject to random perturbations. In particular, we analyse acoustic wave propagation in a heterogeneous medium to study the effects of mesh resolution, transients, number and variability of stochastic inputs. We consider variants of multi-level Monte Carlo and perform a novel comparison of the methods with respect to numerical and parametric errors, as well as computational cost. The results provide a comprehensive view of the necessary steps in UQ analysis and demonstrate some key features of stochastic fluid flow systems.

  7. Extensive use of computational fluid dynamics in the upgrading of hydraulic turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabourin, M.; Eremeef, R.; De Henau, V.

    1995-12-31

    Computational fluid dynamics codes, based on turbulent Navier-Stokes equations, allow evaluation of the hydraulic losses of each turbine component with precision. Using those codes with the new generation of computers enables a wide variety of component geometries to be modelled and compared to the original designs under flow conditions obtained from testing, at a reasonable cost and in a relatively short time. This paper reviews the actual method used in the design of a solution to a turbine rehabilitation project involving runner replacement, redesign of upstream components (stay vanes and wicket gates), and downstream components (draft tubes and runner outlets). The paper shows how computational fluid dynamics can help hydraulic engineers to obtain valuable information not only on performance enhancement but also on the phenomena that produce the enhancement, and to reduce the variety of modifications to be tested.

  8. Reference Computational Meshing Strategy for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Departure from Nucleate BoilingReference Computational Meshing Strategy for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Departure from Nucleate Boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pointer, William David [ORNL

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this effort is to establish a strategy and process for generation of suitable computational mesh for computational fluid dynamics simulations of departure from nucleate boiling in a 5 by 5 fuel rod assembly held in place by PWR mixing vane spacer grids. This mesh generation process will support ongoing efforts to develop, demonstrate and validate advanced multi-phase computational fluid dynamics methods that enable more robust identification of dryout conditions and DNB occurrence.Building upon prior efforts and experience, multiple computational meshes were developed using the native mesh generation capabilities of the commercial CFD code STAR-CCM+. These meshes were used to simulate two test cases from the Westinghouse 5 by 5 rod bundle facility. The sensitivity of predicted quantities of interest to the mesh resolution was then established using two evaluation methods, the Grid Convergence Index method and the Least Squares method. This evaluation suggests that the Least Squares method can reliably establish the uncertainty associated with local parameters such as vector velocity components at a point in the domain or surface averaged quantities such as outlet velocity magnitude. However, neither method is suitable for characterization of uncertainty in global extrema such as peak fuel surface temperature, primarily because such parameters are not necessarily associated with a fixed point in space. This shortcoming is significant because the current generation algorithm for identification of DNB event conditions relies on identification of such global extrema. Ongoing efforts to identify DNB based on local surface conditions will address this challenge

  9. Effect of the plate surface characteristics and gap height on yield stresses of a magnetorheological fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonkkari, I; Syrjala, S; Kostamo, E; Kostamo, J; Pietola, M

    2012-01-01

    Effects of the plate material, surface roughness and measuring gap height on static and dynamic yield stresses of a magnetorheological (MR) fluid were investigated with a commercial plate–plate magnetorheometer. Magnetic and non-magnetic plates with smooth (Ra ∼ 0.3 μm) and rough (Ra ∼ 10 μm) surface finishes were used. It was shown by Hall probe measurements and finite element simulations that the use of magnetic plates or higher gap heights increases the level of magnetic flux density and changes the shape of the radial flux density profile. The yield stress increase caused by these factors was determined and subtracted from the measured values in order to examine only the effect of the wall characteristics or the gap height. Roughening of the surfaces offered a significant increase in the yield stresses for non-magnetic plates. With magnetic plates the yield stresses were higher to start with, but roughening did not increase them further. A significant part of the difference in measured stresses between rough non-magnetic and magnetic plates was caused by changes in magnetic flux density rather than by better contact of the particles to the plate surfaces. In a similar manner, an increase in gap height from 0.25 to 1.00 mm can lead to over 20% increase in measured stresses due to changes in the flux density profile. When these changes were compensated the dynamic yield stresses generally remained independent of the gap height, even in the cases where it was obvious that the wall slip was present. This suggests that with MR fluids the wall slip cannot be reliably detected by comparison of flow curves measured at different gap heights. (paper)

  10. Computer simulation to predict energy use, greenhouse gas emissions and costs for production of fluid milk using alternative processing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer simulation is a useful tool for benchmarking the electrical and fuel energy consumption and water use in a fluid milk plant. In this study, a computer simulation model of the fluid milk process based on high temperature short time (HTST) pasteurization was extended to include models for pr...

  11. Computational investigation of fluid flow and heat transfer of an economizer by porous medium approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, C. Rajesh; Kumar, P.; Rajamohan, G.

    2017-07-01

    Computation of fluid flow and heat transfer in an economizer is simulated by a porous medium approach, with plain tubes having a horizontal in-line arrangement and cross flow arrangement in a coal-fired thermal power plant. The economizer is a thermal mechanical device that captures waste heat from the thermal exhaust flue gasses through heat transfer surfaces to preheat boiler feed water. In order to evaluate the fluid flow and heat transfer on tubes, a numerical analysis on heat transfer performance is carried out on an 110 t/h MCR (Maximum continuous rating) boiler unit. In this study, thermal performance is investigated using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation using ANSYS FLUENT. The fouling factor ε and the overall heat transfer coefficient ψ are employed to evaluate the fluid flow and heat transfer. The model demands significant computational details for geometric modeling, grid generation, and numerical calculations to evaluate the thermal performance of an economizer. The simulation results show that the overall heat transfer coefficient 37.76 W/(m2K) and economizer coil side pressure drop of 0.2 (kg/cm2) are found to be conformity within the tolerable limits when compared with existing industrial economizer data.

  12. Computer simulation of preflight blood volume reduction as a countermeasure to fluid shifts in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanonok, K. E.; Srinivasan, R.; Charles, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    Fluid shifts in weightlessness may cause a central volume expansion, activating reflexes to reduce the blood volume. Computer simulation was used to test the hypothesis that preadaptation of the blood volume prior to exposure to weightlessness could counteract the central volume expansion due to fluid shifts and thereby attenuate the circulatory and renal responses resulting in large losses of fluid from body water compartments. The Guyton Model of Fluid, Electrolyte, and Circulatory Regulation was modified to simulate the six degree head down tilt that is frequently use as an experimental analog of weightlessness in bedrest studies. Simulation results show that preadaptation of the blood volume by a procedure resembling a blood donation immediately before head down bedrest is beneficial in damping the physiologic responses to fluid shifts and reducing body fluid losses. After ten hours of head down tilt, blood volume after preadaptation is higher than control for 20 to 30 days of bedrest. Preadaptation also produces potentially beneficial higher extracellular volume and total body water for 20 to 30 days of bedrest.

  13. Computational Analysis of Effect of Transient Fluid Force on Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    as they well represent an E-glass fiber reinforced composite frequently used in research and industrial applications. The fluid domain was sized...provide unique perspectives on peak stress ratios . The two models both share increased structural rigidity. The cylinder is reinforced by... Poisson ratio of 0.3 and Young’s modulus of 20 GPa were added to the transient structural engineering data cell (Figure 69). 78 Figure 69. E-Glass

  14. CCM Continuity Constraint Method: A finite-element computational fluid dynamics algorithm for incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, P. T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1993-09-01

    As the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) continues to mature, algorithms are required to exploit the most recent advances in approximation theory, numerical mathematics, computing architectures, and hardware. Meeting this requirement is particularly challenging in incompressible fluid mechanics, where primitive-variable CFD formulations that are robust, while also accurate and efficient in three dimensions, remain an elusive goal. This dissertation asserts that one key to accomplishing this goal is recognition of the dual role assumed by the pressure, i.e., a mechanism for instantaneously enforcing conservation of mass and a force in the mechanical balance law for conservation of momentum. Proving this assertion has motivated the development of a new, primitive-variable, incompressible, CFD algorithm called the Continuity Constraint Method (CCM). The theoretical basis for the CCM consists of a finite-element spatial semi-discretization of a Galerkin weak statement, equal-order interpolation for all state-variables, a 0-implicit time-integration scheme, and a quasi-Newton iterative procedure extended by a Taylor Weak Statement (TWS) formulation for dispersion error control. Original contributions to algorithmic theory include: (a) formulation of the unsteady evolution of the divergence error, (b) investigation of the role of non-smoothness in the discretized continuity-constraint function, (c) development of a uniformly H1 Galerkin weak statement for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes pressure Poisson equation, (d) derivation of physically and numerically well-posed boundary conditions, and (e) investigation of sparse data structures and iterative methods for solving the matrix algebra statements generated by the algorithm.

  15. Psychology of computer use: XXIV. Computer-related stress among technical college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballance, C T; Rogers, S U

    1991-10-01

    Hudiburg's Computer Technology Hassles Scale, along with a measure of global stress and a scale on attitudes toward computers, were administered to 186 students in a two-year technical college. Hudiburg's work with the hassles scale as a measure of "technostress" was affirmed. Moderate, but statistically significant, correlations among the three scales are reported. No relationship between the hassles scale and achievement as measured by GPA was detected.

  16. A Multi-Phase Based Fluid-Structure-Microfluidic interaction sensor for Aerodynamic Shear Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher; Dutta, Diganta; Bashirzadeh, Yashar; Ahmed, Kareem; Qian, Shizhi

    2014-11-01

    A novel innovative microfluidic shear stress sensor is developed for measuring shear stress through multi-phase fluid-structure-microfluidic interaction. The device is composed of a microfluidic cavity filled with an electrolyte liquid. Inside the cavity, two electrodes make electrochemical velocimetry measurements of the induced convection. The cavity is sealed with a flexible superhydrophobic membrane. The membrane will dynamically stretch and flex as a result of direct shear cross-flow interaction with the seal structure, forming instability wave modes and inducing fluid motion within the microfluidic cavity. The shear stress on the membrane is measured by sensing the induced convection generated by membrane deflections. The advantages of the sensor over current MEMS based shear stress sensor technology are: a simplified design with no moving parts, optimum relationship between size and sensitivity, no gaps such as those created by micromachining sensors in MEMS processes. We present the findings of a feasibility study of the proposed sensor including wind-tunnel tests, microPIV measurements, electrochemical velocimetry, and simulation data results. The study investigates the sensor in the supersonic and subsonic flow regimes. Supported by a NASA SBIR phase 1 contract.

  17. Heat transfer and thermal stress analysis in fluid-structure coupled field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ming-Jian; Pan, Jun-Hua; Ni, Ming-Jiu; Zhang, Nian-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this work, three-dimensional simulation on conjugate heat transfer in a fluid-structure coupled field was carried out. The structure considered is from the dual-coolant lithium-lead (DCLL) blanket, which is the key technology of International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The model was developed based on finite element-finite volume method and was employed to investigate mechanical behaviours of Flow Channel Insert (FCI) and heat transfer in the blanket under nuclear reaction. Temperature distribution, thermal deformation and thermal stresses were calculated in this work, and the effects of thermal conductivity, convection heat transfer coefficient and flow velocity were analyzed. Results show that temperature gradients and thermal stresses of FCI decrease when FCI has better heat conductivity. Higher convection heat transfer coefficient will result in lower temperature, thermal deformations and stresses in FCI. Analysis in this work could be a theoretical basis of blanket optimization. - Highlights: • We use FVM and FEM to investigate FCI structural safety considering heat transfer and FSI effects. • Higher convective heat transfer coefficient is beneficial for the FCI structural safety without much affect to bulk flow temperature. • Smaller FCI thermal conductivity can better prevent heat leakage into helium, yet will increase FCI temperature gradient and thermal stress. • Three-dimensional simulation on conjugate heat transfer in a fluid-structure coupled field was carried out

  18. Stress dependent fluid flow in porous rock: experiments and network modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flornes, Olav

    2005-07-01

    During the lifetime of a hydrocarbon reservoir, the pore pressure decreases because fluids are drained. Changed pore pressure causes a deformation of the reservoir rock, and the flow channels may be narrowed by the increased weight carried by the rock matrix. Knowledge of how the rocks ability to transport fluids, the permeability, is changed by increased stress can be important for effective reservoir management. In this work, we present experimental results for how permeability changes with applied stress. The materials tested are several different sandstones and one limestone, all having porosities higher than 19 percent. Application of stress is done in a number of different ways. We subject the sample to an isotropic stress, and see how changing this applied stress affects permeability as opposed to changing the pore fluid pressure. This allows for investigating the effective stress law for permeability. Permeability decreased by 10 to 20 percent, when we deformed the materials hydro statically within the elastic regime. For all of our samples, we observed a higher permeability change than predicted by a conventional model for relating porosity and permeability, the Kozeny Carman model. For Red Wildmoor, a sandstone having some clay content, we observed that a change in pore pressure was slightly more important for permeability than a change in the applied stress with the same amount. A sandstone with no clay content, Bad Durckheim, showed the opposite behavior, with applied stress slightly more important than pore pressure. We present a new method for measuring permeability in two directions in the same experiment. We apply different anisotropic stresses, and see if a high stress in one direction causes a difference in permeability changes parallel and perpendicular to maximum stress. We observe that deforming the sample axially, causes a larger decrease in axial permeability than in the radial at low confining pressure. At high confining pressure, the

  19. Investigation of Swirling Flow in Rod Bundle Subchannels Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, Mary V.; Beasley, Donald E.; Conner, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamics for turbulent flow through rod bundles representative of those used in pressurized water reactors is examined using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The rod bundles of the pressurized water reactor examined in this study consist of a square array of parallel rods that are held on a constant pitch by support grids spaced axially along the rod bundle. Split-vane pair support grids are often used to create swirling flow in the rod bundle in an effort to improve the heat transfer characteristics for the rod bundle during both normal operating conditions and in accident condition scenarios. Computational fluid dynamics simulations for a two subchannel portion of the rod bundle were used to model the flow downstream of a split-vane pair support grid. A high quality computational mesh was used to investigate the choice of turbulence model appropriate for the complex swirling flow in the rod bundle subchannels. Results document a central swirling flow structure in each of the subchannels downstream of the split-vane pairs. Strong lateral flows along the surface of the rods, as well as impingement regions of lateral flow on the rods are documented. In addition, regions of lateral flow separation and low axial velocity are documented next to the rods. Results of the CFD are compared to experimental particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements documenting the lateral flow structures downstream of the split-vane pairs. Good agreement is found between the computational simulation and experimental measurements for locations close to the support grid. (authors)

  20. State of stress in exhumed basins and implications for fluid flow: insights from the Illizi Basin, Algeria

    KAUST Repository

    English, Joseph M.; Finkbeiner, Thomas; English, Kara L.; Yahia Cherif, Rachida

    2017-01-01

    start to become hydraulically conductive again and enable fluid flow and hydrocarbon leakage during fault reactivation. We constrain the present day in situ stresses of the exhumed Illizi Basin in Algeria and demonstrate that the primary north

  1. Quantitative comparison of hemodynamics in simulated and 3D angiography models of cerebral aneurysms by use of computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saho, Tatsunori; Onishi, Hideo

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated hemodynamics using simulated models and determined how cerebral aneurysms develop in simulated and patient-specific models based on medical images. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was analyzed by use of OpenFOAM software. Flow velocity, stream line, and wall shear stress (WSS) were evaluated in a simulated model aneurysm with known geometry and in a three-dimensional angiographic model. The ratio of WSS at the aneurysm compared with that at the basilar artery was 1:10 in simulated model aneurysms with a diameter of 10 mm and 1:18 in the angiographic model, indicating similar tendencies. Vortex flow occurred in both model aneurysms, and the WSS decreased in larger model aneurysms. The angiographic model provided accurate CFD information, and the tendencies of simulated and angiographic models were similar. These findings indicate that hemodynamic effects are involved in the development of aneurysms.

  2. Validation of a multidimensional computational fluid dynamics model for subcooled flow boiling analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Caldeira, Alexandre D.; Borges, Eduardo M., E-mail: fbraz@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: alexdc@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: eduardo@ieav.cta.b [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    In a heated vertical channel, the subcooled flow boiling regime occurs when the bulk fluid temperature is lower than the saturation temperature, but the fluid temperature reaches the saturation point near the channel wall. This phenomenon produces a significant increase in heat flux, limited by the critical heat flux. This study is particularly important to the thermal-hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactors. The purpose of this work is the validation of a multidimensional model to analyze the subcooled flow boiling comparing the results with experimental data found in literature. The computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT was used with Eulerian multiphase model option. The calculated values of wall temperature in the liquid-solid interface presented an excellent agreement when compared to the experimental data. Void fraction calculations presented satisfactory results in relation to the experimental data in pressures of 15, 30 and 45 bars. (author)

  3. Moving on to the modeling and simulation using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norasalwa Zakaria; Rohyiza Baan; Muhd Noor Muhd Yunus

    2006-01-01

    The heat is on but not at the co-combustor plant. Using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), modeling and simulation of an incinerator has been made easy and possible from the comfort of cozy room. CFD has become an important design tool in nearly every industrial field because it provides understanding of flow patterns. CFD provide values for fluid velocity, fluid temperature, pressure and species concentrations throughout a flow domain. MINT has acquired a complete CFD software recently, consisting of GAMBIT, which is use to build geometry and meshing, and FLUENT as the processor or solver. This paper discusses on several trial runs that was carried out on several parts of the co-combustor plant namely the under fire section and the mixing chamber section

  4. Validation of a multidimensional computational fluid dynamics model for subcooled flow boiling analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Caldeira, Alexandre D.; Borges, Eduardo M.

    2011-01-01

    In a heated vertical channel, the subcooled flow boiling regime occurs when the bulk fluid temperature is lower than the saturation temperature, but the fluid temperature reaches the saturation point near the channel wall. This phenomenon produces a significant increase in heat flux, limited by the critical heat flux. This study is particularly important to the thermal-hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactors. The purpose of this work is the validation of a multidimensional model to analyze the subcooled flow boiling comparing the results with experimental data found in literature. The computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT was used with Eulerian multiphase model option. The calculated values of wall temperature in the liquid-solid interface presented an excellent agreement when compared to the experimental data. Void fraction calculations presented satisfactory results in relation to the experimental data in pressures of 15, 30 and 45 bars. (author)

  5. A two-dimensional continuum model of biofilm growth incorporating fluid flow and shear stress based detachment

    KAUST Repository

    Duddu, Ravindra; Chopp, David L.; Moran, Brian

    2009-01-01

    of the biofilm. The model considers fluid flow around the biofilm surface, the advection-diffusion and reaction of substrate, variable biomass volume fraction and erosion due to the interfacial shear stress at the biofilm-fluid interface. The key assumptions

  6. Mechanical Weakening during Fluid Injection in Critically Stressed Sandstones with Acoustic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, C.; Dautriat, J. D.; Sarout, J.; Macault, R.; Bertauld, D.

    2014-12-01

    Water weakening is a well-known phenomenon which can lead to subsidence during the production of hydrocarbon reservoirs. The example of the Ekofisk oil field in the North Sea has been well documented for years. In order to assess water weakening effects in reservoir rocks, previous studies have focused on changes in the failure envelopes derived from mechanical tests conducted on rocks saturated either with water or with inert fluids. However, little attention has been paid so far on the mechanical behaviour during the fluid injection stage, like in enhanced oil recovery operations. We studied the effect of fluid injection on the mechanical behaviour of Sherwood sandstone, a weakly-consolidated sandstone sampled at Ladram Bay in UK. In order to highlight possible weakening effects, water and inert oil have been injected into critically-loaded samples to assess their effect on strength and elastic properties and to derive the acoustic signature of the saturation front for each fluid. The specimens were instrumented with 16 ultrasonic P-wave transducers for both passive and active acoustic monitoring during fluid injection and loading. After conducting standard triaxial tests on three samples saturated with air, water and oil respectively, mechanical creep tests were conducted on dry samples loaded at 80% of the compressive strength of the dry rock. While these conditions are kept constant, a fluid is injected at the bottom end of the sample with a low back pressure (0.5 MPa) to minimize effective stress variations during injection. Both water and oil were used as the injected pore fluid in two experiments. As soon as the fluids start to flow into the samples, creep is taking place with a much higher strain rate for water injection compared to oil injection. A transition from secondary creep to tertiary creep is observed in the water injection test whereas in the oil injection test no significant creep acceleration is observed after one pore volume of oil was

  7. Computer simulation of the effect of dDAVP with saline loading on fluid balance after 24-hour head-down tilt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, R. S.; Simanonok, K. E.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid loading (FL) before Shuttle reentry is a countermeasure currently in use by NASA to improve the orthostatic tolerance of astronauts during reentry and postflight. The fluid load consists of water and salt tablets equivalent to 32 oz (946 ml) of isotonic saline. However, the effectiveness of this countermeasure has been observed to decrease with the duration of spaceflight. The countermeasure's effectiveness may be improved by enhancing fluid retention using analogs of vasopressin such as lypressin (LVP) and desmopressin (dDAVP). In a computer simulation study reported previously, we attempted to assess the improvement in fluid retention obtained by the use of LVP administered before FL. The present study is concerned with the use of dDAVP. In a recent 24-hour, 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) study involving seven men, dDAVP was found to improve orthostatic tolerance as assessed by both lower body negative pressure (LBNP) and stand tests. The treatment restored Luft's cumulative stress index (cumulative product of magnitude and duration of LBNP) to nearly pre-bedrest level. The heart rate was lower and stroke volume was marginally higher at the same LBNP levels with administration of dDAVP compared to placebo. Lower heart rates were also observed with dDAVP during stand test, despite the lower level of cardiovascular stress. These improvements were seen with only a small but significant increase in plasma volume of approximately 3 percent. This paper presents a computer simulation analysis of some of the results of this HDT study.

  8. OpenDx programs for visualization of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Marcelo Mariano da

    2008-01-01

    The search for high performance and low cost hardware and software solutions always guides the developments performed at the IEN parallel computing laboratory. In this context, this dissertation about the building of programs for visualization of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using the open source software OpenDx was written. The programs developed are useful to produce videos and images in two or three dimensions. They are interactive, easily to use and were designed to serve fluid dynamics researchers. A detailed description about how this programs were developed and the complete instructions of how to use them was done. The use of OpenDx as development tool is also introduced. There are examples that help the reader to understand how programs can be useful for many applications. (author)

  9. A code to compute borehole fluid conductivity profiles with multiple feed points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, F.V.; Tsang, C.F.

    1988-03-01

    It is of much current interest to determine the flow characteristics of fractures intersecting a wellbore in order to understand the hydrologic behavior of fractured rocks. Often inflow from these fractures into the wellbore is at very low rates. A new procedure has been proposed and a corresponding method of analysis developed to obtain fracture inflow parameters from a time sequence of electric conductivity logs of the borehole fluid. The present report is a companion document to NTB--88-13 giving the details of equations and computer code used to compute borehole fluid conductivity distributions. Verification of the code used and a listing of the code are also given. (author) 9 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs

  10. Computational fluid dynamics applied to flows in an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, M. D.; Diwakar, R.; Anderson, J. D., Jr.; Jones, E.

    1978-01-01

    The reported investigation is a continuation of studies conducted by Diwakar et al. (1976) and Griffin et al. (1976), who reported the first computational fluid dynamic results for the two-dimensional flowfield for all four strokes of a reciprocating internal combustion (IC) engine cycle. An analysis of rectangular and cylindrical three-dimensional engine models is performed. The working fluid is assumed to be inviscid air of constant specific heats. Calculations are carried out of a four-stroke IC engine flowfield wherein detailed finite-rate chemical combustion of a gasoline-air mixture is included. The calculations remain basically inviscid, except that in some instances thermal conduction is included to allow a more realistic model of the localized sparking of the mixture. All the results of the investigation are obtained by means of an explicity time-dependent finite-difference technique, using a high-speed digital computer.

  11. Computational and Spectroscopic Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, R. James; Kalinichev, Andrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Research supported by this grant focuses on molecular scale understanding of central issues related to the structure and dynamics of geochemically important fluids, fluid-mineral interfaces, and confined fluids using computational modeling and experimental methods. Molecular scale knowledge about fluid structure and dynamics, how these are affected by mineral surfaces and molecular-scale (nano-) confinement, and how water molecules and dissolved species interact with surfaces is essential to understanding the fundamental chemistry of a wide range of low-temperature geochemical processes, including sorption and geochemical transport. Our principal efforts are devoted to continued development of relevant computational approaches, application of these approaches to important geochemical questions, relevant NMR and other experimental studies, and application of computational modeling methods to understanding the experimental results. The combination of computational modeling and experimental approaches is proving highly effective in addressing otherwise intractable problems. In 2006-2007 we have significantly advanced in new, highly promising research directions along with completion of on-going projects and final publication of work completed in previous years. New computational directions are focusing on modeling proton exchange reactions in aqueous solutions using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), metadynamics (MTD), and empirical valence bond (EVB) approaches. Proton exchange is critical to understanding the structure, dynamics, and reactivity at mineral-water interfaces and for oxy-ions in solution, but has traditionally been difficult to model with molecular dynamics (MD). Our ultimate objective is to develop this capability, because MD is much less computationally demanding than quantum-chemical approaches. We have also extended our previous MD simulations of metal binding to natural organic matter (NOM) to a much longer time scale (up to 10 ns) for

  12. Optimization high vortex finder of cyclone separator with computational fluids dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Ketut Caturwati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclone separator is an equipment that separates particles contained in the fluid without using filters. The dust particles in the flue gases can be separated by utilizing centrifugal forces and different densities of particles, so that the exhaust gases to be cleaner before discharged into the environment. In this paper carried out a simulation by Computational of Fluids Dynamics to determine the number of particles that can be separated in several cyclone separator which has a ratio body diameter against vortex finder high varied as : 1:0.5 ; 1:0.75 ; 1:1 ; 1:1.25 and 1:1.5. Fluid inlet are air with antrachite impurity particles that are commonly found in the exhaust gases from tire manufacturers with inlet velocities varied as: 15 m/s and 30 m/s. The results of simulation show the fluids with 15 m/s of inlet velocity is generate particle separation value is higher than the fluids with 30 m/s inlet velocity for ratio of body diameter and height vortex finder a: 1:0.5 and 1:1.5. For both of inlet velocities the best ratio of body diameter and height vortex finder is 1:1.25, where it has the highest values of percentage trapped particles about 86% for 30 m/s input velocity and also for 15 m/s input velocity.

  13. Prediction of velocity and attitude of a yacht sailing upwind by computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Heebum; Park, Mi Yeon; Park, Sunho; Rhee, Shin Hyung

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important factors in sailing yacht design is accurate velocity prediction. Velocity prediction programs (VPP's) are widely used to predict velocity of sailing yachts. VPP's, which are primarily based on experimental data and experience of long years, however suffer limitations when applied in realistic conditions. Thus, in the present study, a high fidelity velocity prediction method using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was proposed. Using the developed method, velocity an...

  14. Disk brake design for cooling improvement using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munisamy, Kannan M; Shafik, Ramel

    2013-01-01

    The car disk brake design is improved with two different blade designs compared to the baseline blade design. The two designs were simulated in Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to obtain heat transfer properties such as Nusselt number and Heat transfer coefficient. The heat transfer property is compared against the baseline design. The improved shape has the highest heat transfer performance. The curved design is inferior to baseline design in heat transfer performance.

  15. Design and Simulation of an Air Conditioning Project in a Hospital Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ding X. R.; Guo Y. Y.; Chen Y. Y.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to design a novel air cleaning facility which conforms to the current situation in China, and moreover can satisfy our demand on air purification under the condition of poor air quality, as well as discuss the development means of a prototype product. Air conditions in the operating room of a hospital were measured as the research subject of this study. First, a suitable turbulence model and boundary conditions were selected and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software was ...

  16. Calculation of shipboard fire conditions for radioactive materials packages with the methods of computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koski, J.A.; Wix, S.D.; Cole, J.K.

    1997-09-01

    Shipboard fires both in the same ship hold and in an adjacent hold aboard a break-bulk cargo ship are simulated with a commercial finite-volume computational fluid mechanics code. The fire models and modeling techniques are described and discussed. Temperatures and heat fluxes to a simulated materials package are calculated and compared to experimental values. The overall accuracy of the calculations is assessed

  17. APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELLING TO A HORIZONTAL SEDIMENTATION TANK IN IRAQ

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Hadi GHAWI

    2017-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling has been applied to examine the hydrodynamic behavior of water treatment sedimentation tanks at Baghdad Water Works, operated by Alkurech Water in Baghdad in Iraq. The existing tanks perform poorly at current flows and flow is unevenly split among online tanks, Therefore, CFD was used to investigate velocity profiles at current and projected loadings for the existing basins. Results from the CFD analysis were used to develop retrofit strategies to improve...

  18. The NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program - Building technology to solve future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Pamela F.; Dwoyer, Douglas L.; Kutler, Paul; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics program in terms of a strategic vision and goals as well as NASA's financial commitment and personnel levels. The paper also identifies the CFD program customers and the support to those customers. In addition, the paper discusses technical emphasis and direction of the program and some recent achievements. NASA's Ames, Langley, and Lewis Research Centers are the research hubs of the CFD program while the NASA Headquarters Office of Aeronautics represents and advocates the program.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) investigation onto passenger car disk brake design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munisamy, Kannan M; Moorthy, Shangkari K Kanasan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the flow and heat transfer in ventilated disc brakes using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). NACA Series blade is designed for ventilated disc brake and the cooling characteristic is compared to the baseline design. The ventilated disc brakes are simulated using commercial CFD software FLUENT TM using simulation configuration that was obtained from experiment data. The NACA Series blade design shows improvements in Nusselt number compared to baseline design.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) investigation onto passenger car disk brake design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munisamy, Kannan M.; Kanasan Moorthy, Shangkari K.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the flow and heat transfer in ventilated disc brakes using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). NACA Series blade is designed for ventilated disc brake and the cooling characteristic is compared to the baseline design. The ventilated disc brakes are simulated using commercial CFD software FLUENTTM using simulation configuration that was obtained from experiment data. The NACA Series blade design shows improvements in Nusselt number compared to baseline design.

  1. Disk brake design for cooling improvement using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munisamy, Kannan M.; Shafik, Ramel

    2013-06-01

    The car disk brake design is improved with two different blade designs compared to the baseline blade design. The two designs were simulated in Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to obtain heat transfer properties such as Nusselt number and Heat transfer coefficient. The heat transfer property is compared against the baseline design. The improved shape has the highest heat transfer performance. The curved design is inferior to baseline design in heat transfer performance.

  2. Characterization and optimization of single-use bioreactors and biopharmaceutical production processes using computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser, Stephan Christian

    2015-01-01

    Durch die örtliche und zeitliche Modellierung der auftretenden Strömungen bietet die numerische Fluiddynamik (engl. Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD) das Potenzial detaillierte Untersuchungen der Hydrodynamik in Bioreaktoren durchzuführen. Allerdings sind bisher nur wenige Studien in Verbindung mit Einwegbioreaktoren, die sich durch konstruktiven Besonderheiten von ihren klassischen Gegenspielern aus Glas und/oder Edelstahl unterscheiden, publiziert. Die vorliegende Arbeit soll daher geeigne...

  3. Comparison of hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms between MR fluid dynamics using 3D cine phase-contrast MRI and MR-based computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoda, Haruo; Sakahara, Harumi; Ohkura, Yasuhide; Kosugi, Takashi; Hirano, Masaya; Alley, Marcus T.; Bammer, Roland; Pelc, Norbert J.; Namba, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to play a very important role in the initiation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of our study was to compare hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms of MR fluid dynamics (MRFD) using 3D cine PC MR imaging (4D-Flow) at 1.5 T and MR-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD). 4D-Flow was performed for five intracranial aneurysms by a 1.5 T MR scanner. 3D TOF MR angiography was performed for geometric information. The blood flow in the aneurysms was modeled using CFD simulation based on the finite element method. We used MR angiographic data as the vascular models and MR flow information as boundary conditions in CFD. 3D velocity vector fields, 3D streamlines, shearing velocity maps, wall shear stress (WSS) distribution maps and oscillatory shear index (OSI) distribution maps were obtained by MRFD and CFD and were compared. There was a moderate to high degree of correlation in 3D velocity vector fields and a low to moderate degree of correlation in WSS of aneurysms between MRFD and CFD using regression analysis. The patterns of 3D streamlines were similar between MRFD and CFD. The small and rotating shearing velocities and higher OSI were observed at the top of the spiral flow in the aneurysms. The pattern and location of shearing velocity in MRFD and CFD were similar. The location of high oscillatory shear index obtained by MRFD was near to that obtained by CFD. MRFD and CFD of intracranial aneurysms correlated fairly well. (orig.)

  4. Heterogeneous Cytoskeletal Force Distribution Delineates the Onset Ca2+ Influx Under Fluid Shear Stress in Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Maneshi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical perturbations increase intracellular Ca2+ in cells, but the coupling of mechanical forces to the Ca2+ influx is not well understood. We used a microfluidic chamber driven with a high-speed pressure servo to generate defined fluid shear stress to cultured astrocytes, and simultaneously measured cytoskeletal forces using a force sensitive actinin optical sensor and intracellular Ca2+. Fluid shear generated non-uniform forces in actinin that critically depended on the stimulus rise time emphasizing the presence of viscoelasticity in the activating sequence. A short (ms shear pulse with fast rise time (2 ms produced an immediate increase in actinin tension at the upstream end of the cell with minimal changes at the downstream end. The onset of Ca2+ rise began at highly strained areas. In contrast to stimulus steps, slow ramp stimuli produced uniform forces throughout the cells and only a small Ca2+ response. The heterogeneity of force distribution is exaggerated in cells having fewer stress fibers and lower pre-tension in actinin. Disruption of cytoskeleton with cytochalasin-D (Cyt-D eliminated force gradients, and in those cells Ca2+ elevation started from the soma. Thus, Ca2+ influx with a mechanical stimulus depends on local stress within the cell and that is time dependent due to viscoelastic mechanics.

  5. Application of computational fluid dynamics for the optimization of homogenization processes in wine tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mixing processes for modern wine-making occur repeatedly during fermentation (e.g. yeast addition, wine fermen- tation additives, as well as after fermentation (e.g. blending, dosage, sulfur additions. In large fermentation vessels or when mixing fluids of different viscosities, an inadequate mixing process can lead to considerable costs and problems (inhomogeneous product, development of layers in the tank, waste of energy, clogging of filters. Considering advancements in computational fluid dynamics (CFD in the last few years and the computational power of computers nowadays, most large-scale wineries would be able to conduct mixing simulations using their own tank and agitator configurations in order to evaluate their efficiency and the necessary power input based on mathematical modeling. Regardless, most companies still rely on estimations and empirical values which are neither validated nor optimized. The free open-source CFD software OpenFOAM (v.2.3.1 is used to simulate flows in wine tanks. Different agitator types, different propeller geometries and rotational speeds can be modeled and compared amongst each other in the process. Moreover, fluid properties of different wine additives can be modeled. During opti- cal post-processing using the open-source software ParaView (v.4.3 the progression of homogenization can be visualized and poorly mixed regions in the tank are revealed.

  6. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulators and thermal cracking of heavy oil and ultraheavy residues using microreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardini, Andre L.; Bineli, Aulus R.R.; Viadana, Adriana M.; Maciel, Maria Regina Wolf; Maciel Filho, Rubens [State University of Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). School of Chemical Engineering; Medina, Lilian C.; Gomes, Alexandre de O. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES); Barros, Ricardo S. [University Foundation Jose Bonifacio (FUJB), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, the design of microreactor with microfluidics channels has been carried out in Computer Aided Design Software (CAD) and constructed in rapid prototyping system to be used in chemical reaction processing of the heavy oil fractions. The flow pattern properties of microreactor (fluid dynamics, mixing behavior) have been considered through CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulations. CFD calculations are also used to study the design and specification of new microreactor developments. The potential advantages of using a microreactor include better control of reaction conditions, improved safety and portability. A more detailed crude assay of the raw national oil, whose importance was evidenced by PETROBRAS/CENPES allows establishing the optimum strategies and processing conditions, aiming at a maximum utilization of the heavy oil fractions, towards valuable products. These residues are able to be processed in microreactor, in which conventional process like as hydrotreating, catalytic and thermal cracking may be carried out in a much more intensified fashion. The whole process development involves a prior thermal study to define the possible operating conditions for a particular task, the microreactor design through computational fluid dynamics and construction using rapid prototyping. This gives high flexibility for process development, shorter time, and costumer/task oriented process/product development. (author)

  7. Thermodynamic and transport properties of nitrogen fluid: Molecular theory and computer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari Nasrabad, A.; Laghaei, R.

    2018-04-01

    Computer simulations and various theories are applied to compute the thermodynamic and transport properties of nitrogen fluid. To model the nitrogen interaction, an existing potential in the literature is modified to obtain a close agreement between the simulation results and experimental data for the orthobaric densities. We use the Generic van der Waals theory to calculate the mean free volume and apply the results within the modified Cohen-Turnbull relation to obtain the self-diffusion coefficient. Compared to experimental data, excellent results are obtained via computer simulations for the orthobaric densities, the vapor pressure, the equation of state, and the shear viscosity. We analyze the results of the theory and computer simulations for the various thermophysical properties.

  8. Protein oxidative stress markers in peritoneal fluids of women with deep infiltrating endometriosis are increased.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santulli, Pietro; Chouzenoux, Sandrine; Fiorese, Mauro; Marcellin, Louis; Lemarechal, Herve; Millischer, Anne-Elodie; Batteux, Frédéric; Borderie, Didier; Chapron, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Are protein oxidative stress markers [thiols, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), protein carbonyls and nitrates/nitrites] in perioperative peritoneal fluid higher in women with histologically proven endometriosis when compared with endometriosis-free controls? Protein oxidative stress markers are significantly increased in peritoneal fluids from women with deep infiltrating endometriosis with intestinal involvement when compared with endometriosis-free controls. Endometriosis is a common gynaecologic condition characterized by an important inflammatory process. Various source of evidence support the role of oxidative stress in the development of endometriosis. We conducted a prospective laboratory study in a tertiary-care university hospital between January 2011 and December 2012, and included 235 non-pregnant women, younger than 42 year old, undergoing surgery for a benign gynaecological condition. After complete surgical exploration of the abdomino-pelvic cavity, 150 women with histologically proven endometriosis and 85 endometriosis-free controls women were enrolled. Women with endometriosis were staged according to a surgical classification in three different phenotypes of endometriosis: superficial peritoneal endometriosis (SUP), ovarian endometrioma (OMA) and deeply infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). Perioperative peritoneal fluids samples were obtained from all study participants. Thiols, AOPP, protein carbonyls and nitrates/nitrites were assayed in all peritoneal samples. Concentrations of peritoneal AOPP were significantly higher in endometriosis patients than in the control group (median, 128.9 µmol/l; range, 0.3-1180.1 versus median, 77.8 µmol/l; range, 0.8-616.1; P peritoneal nitrates/nitrites were higher in endometriosis patients than in the control group (median, 24.8 µmol/l; range, 1.6-681.6 versus median, 18.5 µmol/l; range, 1.6-184.5; P peritoneal fluids protein AOPP and nitrates/nitrites were significantly increased only in DIE samples

  9. Human dental pulp cells exhibit bone cell-like responsiveness to fluid shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, David Christian Evar; Bindslev, Dorth Arenholt; Melsen, Birte; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2011-02-01

    For engineering bone tissue to restore, for example, maxillofacial defects, mechanosensitive cells are needed that are able to conduct bone cell-specific functions, such as bone remodelling. Mechanical loading affects local bone mass and architecture in vivo by initiating a cellular response via loading-induced flow of interstitial fluid. After surgical removal of ectopically impacted third molars, human dental pulp tissue is an easily accessible and interesting source of cells for mineralized tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to determine whether human dental pulp-derived cells (DPC) are responsive to mechanical loading by pulsating fluid flow (PFF) upon stimulation of mineralization in vitro. Human DPC were incubated with or without mineralization medium containing differentiation factors for 3 weeks. Cells were subjected to 1-h PFF (0.7 ± 0.3 Pa, 5 Hz) and the response was quantified by measuring nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production, and gene expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2. We found that DPC are intrinsically mechanosensitive and, like osteogenic cells, respond to PFF-induced fluid shear stress. PFF stimulated NO and PGE₂ production, and up-regulated COX-2 but not COX-1 gene expression. In DPC cultured under mineralizing conditions, the PFF-induced NO, but not PGE₂, production was significantly enhanced. These data suggest that human DPC, like osteogenic cells, acquire responsiveness to pulsating fluid shear stress in mineralizing conditions. Thus DPC might be able to perform bone-like functions during mineralized tissue remodeling in vivo, and therefore provide a promising new tool for mineralized tissue engineering to restore, for example, maxillofacial defects.

  10. A computational fluid dynamics simulation framework for ventricular catheter design optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberg, Sofy H; TerMaath, Stephanie C; Barbier, Charlotte N; Hill, Judith C; Killeffer, James A

    2017-11-10

    OBJECTIVE Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunts are the primary treatment for patients suffering from hydrocephalus. While proven effective in symptom relief, these shunt systems are plagued by high failure rates and often require repeated revision surgeries to replace malfunctioning components. One of the leading causes of CSF shunt failure is obstruction of the ventricular catheter by aggregations of cells, proteins, blood clots, or fronds of choroid plexus that occlude the catheter's small inlet holes or even the full internal catheter lumen. Such obstructions can disrupt CSF diversion out of the ventricular system or impede it entirely. Previous studies have suggested that altering the catheter's fluid dynamics may help to reduce the likelihood of complete ventricular catheter failure caused by obstruction. However, systematic correlation between a ventricular catheter's design parameters and its performance, specifically its likelihood to become occluded, still remains unknown. Therefore, an automated, open-source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation framework was developed for use in the medical community to determine optimized ventricular catheter designs and to rapidly explore parameter influence for a given flow objective. METHODS The computational framework was developed by coupling a 3D CFD solver and an iterative optimization algorithm and was implemented in a high-performance computing environment. The capabilities of the framework were demonstrated by computing an optimized ventricular catheter design that provides uniform flow rates through the catheter's inlet holes, a common design objective in the literature. The baseline computational model was validated using 3D nuclear imaging to provide flow velocities at the inlet holes and through the catheter. RESULTS The optimized catheter design achieved through use of the automated simulation framework improved significantly on previous attempts to reach a uniform inlet flow rate distribution using

  11. Moving finite elements: A continuously adaptive method for computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, A.H.; Miller, K.; Carlson, N.

    1991-01-01

    Moving Finite Elements (MFE), a recently developed method for computational fluid dynamics, promises major advances in the ability of computers to model the complex behavior of liquids, gases, and plasmas. Applications of computational fluid dynamics occur in a wide range of scientifically and technologically important fields. Examples include meteorology, oceanography, global climate modeling, magnetic and inertial fusion energy research, semiconductor fabrication, biophysics, automobile and aircraft design, industrial fluid processing, chemical engineering, and combustion research. The improvements made possible by the new method could thus have substantial economic impact. Moving Finite Elements is a moving node adaptive grid method which has a tendency to pack the grid finely in regions where it is most needed at each time and to leave it coarse elsewhere. It does so in a manner which is simple and automatic, and does not require a large amount of human ingenuity to apply it to each particular problem. At the same time, it often allows the time step to be large enough to advance a moving shock by many shock thicknesses in a single time step, moving the grid smoothly with the solution and minimizing the number of time steps required for the whole problem. For 2D problems (two spatial variables) the grid is composed of irregularly shaped and irregularly connected triangles which are very flexible in their ability to adapt to the evolving solution. While other adaptive grid methods have been developed which share some of these desirable properties, this is the only method which combines them all. In many cases, the method can save orders of magnitude of computing time, equivalent to several generations of advancing computer hardware

  12. VHBORE: A code to compute borehole fluid conductivity profiles with pressure changes in the borehole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, F.V.; Tsang, C.F.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the code VHBORE which can be used to model fluid electric conductivity profiles in a borehole intersecting fractured rock under conditions of changing pressure in the well bore. Pressure changes may be due to water level variations caused by pumping or fluid density effects as formation fluid is drawn into the borehole. Previous reports describe the method of estimating the hydrologic behavior of fractured rock using a time series of electric conductivity logs and an earlier code, BORE, to generate electric conductivity logs under constant pressure and flow rate conditions. The earlier model, BORE, assumed a constant flow rate, q i , for each inflow into the well bore. In the present code the user supplies the location, constant pressure, h i , transmissivity, T i , and storativity, S i , for each fracture, as well as the initial water level in the well, h w (0), In addition, the input data contains changes in the water level at later times, Δh w (t), typically caused by turning a pump on or off. The variable density calculation also requires input of the density of each of the inflow fluids, ρ i , and the initial uniform density of the well bore fluid, ρ w (0). These parameters are used to compute the flow rate for each inflow point at each time step. The numerical method of Jacob and Lohman (1952) is used to compute the flow rate into or out of the fractures based on the changes in pressure in the wellbore. A dimensionless function relates flow rate as a function of time in response to an imposed pressure change. The principle of superposition is used to determine the net flow rate from a time series of pressure changes. Additional reading on the relationship between drawdown and flow rate can be found in Earlougher (1977), particularly his Section 4.6, open-quotes Constant-Pressure Flow Testingclose quotes

  13. Influence of Additive Manufactured Scaffold Architecture on the Distribution of Surface Strains and Fluid Flow Shear Stresses and Expected Osteochondral Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikson, Wim J; Deegan, Anthony J; Yang, Ying; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Verdonschot, Nico; Moroni, Lorenzo; Rouwkema, Jeroen

    2017-01-01

    Scaffolds for regenerative medicine applications should instruct cells with the appropriate signals, including biophysical stimuli such as stress and strain, to form the desired tissue. Apart from that, scaffolds, especially for load-bearing applications, should be capable of providing mechanical stability. Since both scaffold strength and stress-strain distributions throughout the scaffold depend on the scaffold's internal architecture, it is important to understand how changes in architecture influence these parameters. In this study, four scaffold designs with different architectures were produced using additive manufacturing. The designs varied in fiber orientation, while fiber diameter, spacing, and layer height remained constant. Based on micro-CT (μCT) scans, finite element models (FEMs) were derived for finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD). FEA of scaffold compression was validated using μCT scan data of compressed scaffolds. Results of the FEA and CFD showed a significant impact of scaffold architecture on fluid shear stress and mechanical strain distribution. The average fluid shear stress ranged from 3.6 mPa for a 0/90 architecture to 6.8 mPa for a 0/90 offset architecture, and the surface shear strain from 0.0096 for a 0/90 offset architecture to 0.0214 for a 0/90 architecture. This subsequently resulted in variations of the predicted cell differentiation stimulus values on the scaffold surface. Fluid shear stress was mainly influenced by pore shape and size, while mechanical strain distribution depended mainly on the presence or absence of supportive columns in the scaffold architecture. Together, these results corroborate that scaffold architecture can be exploited to design scaffolds with regions that guide specific tissue development under compression and perfusion. In conjunction with optimization of stimulation regimes during bioreactor cultures, scaffold architecture optimization can be used to improve

  14. Natural convection in Bingham plastic fluids from an isothermal spheroid: Effects of fluid yield stress, viscous dissipation and temperature-dependent viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anoop Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay; Chhabra, Rajendra Prasad

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the buoyancy-induced convection from an isothermal spheroid is studied in a Bingham plastic fluid. Extensive results on the morphology of approximate yield surfaces, temperature profiles, and the local and average Nusselt numbers are reported to elucidate the effects of the pertinent dimensionless parameters: Rayleigh number, 102 ≤ Ra ≤ 106; Prandtl number, 20 ≤ Pr ≤ 100; Bingham number, 0 ≤ Bn ≤ 103, and aspect ratio, 0.2 ≤ e ≤ 5. Due to the fluid yield stress, fluid-like (yielded) and solid-like (unyielded) regions coexist in the flow domain depending upon the prevailing stress levels vis-a-vis the value of the fluid yield stress. The yielded parts progressively grow in size with the rising Rayleigh number while this tendency is countered by the increasing Bingham and Prandtl numbers. Due to these two competing effects, a limiting value of the Bingham number ( Bn max) is observed beyond which heat transfer occurs solely by conduction due to the solid-like behaviour of the fluid everywhere in the domain. Such limiting values bear a positive dependence on the Rayleigh number ( Ra) and aspect ratio ( e). In addition to this, oblate shapes ( e 1) impede it. Finally, simple predictive expressions for the maximum Bingham number and the average Nusselt number are developed which can be used to predict a priori the overall heat transfer coefficient in a new application. Also, a criterion is developed in terms of the composite parameter Bn• Gr-1/2 which predicts the onset of convection in such fluids. Similarly, another criterion is developed which delineates the conditions for the onset of settling due to buoyancy effects. The paper is concluded by presenting limited results to delineate the effects of viscous dissipation and the temperature-dependent viscosity on the Nusselt number. Both these effects are seen to be rather small in Bingham plastic fluids.

  15. A finite volume procedure for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Jagad, P. I.

    2018-04-12

    A unified cell-centered unstructured mesh finite volume procedure is presented for fluid flow, heat transfer and solid-body stress analysis. An in-house procedure (A. W. Date, Solution of Transport Equations on Unstructured Meshes with Cell-Centered Colocated Variables. Part I: Discretization, International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, vol. 48 (6), 1117-1127, 2005) is extended to include the solid-body stress analysis. The transport terms for a cell-face are evaluated in a structured grid-like manner. The Cartesian gradients at the center of each cell-face are evaluated using the coordinate transformation relations. The accuracy of the procedure is demonstrated by solving several benchmark problems involving different boundary conditions, source terms, and types of loading.

  16. Universal rescaling of flow curves for yield-stress fluids close to jamming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkgreve, M.; Paredes, J.; Michels, M. A. J.; Bonn, D.

    2015-07-01

    The experimental flow curves of four different yield-stress fluids with different interparticle interactions are studied near the jamming concentration. By appropriate scaling with the distance to jamming all rheology data can be collapsed onto master curves below and above jamming that meet in the shear-thinning regime and satisfy the Herschel-Bulkley and Cross equations, respectively. In spite of differing interactions in the different systems, master curves characterized by universal scaling exponents are found for the four systems. A two-state microscopic theory of heterogeneous dynamics is presented to rationalize the observed transition from Herschel-Bulkley to Cross behavior and to connect the rheological exponents to microscopic exponents for the divergence of the length and time scales of the heterogeneous dynamics. The experimental data and the microscopic theory are compared with much of the available literature data for yield-stress systems.

  17. Orbitally shaken shallow fluid layers. II. An improved wall shear stress model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpresa, Paola; Sherwin, Spencer; Weinberg, Peter; van Reeuwijk, Maarten

    2018-03-01

    A new model for the analytical prediction of wall shear stress distributions at the base of orbitally shaken shallow fluid layers is developed. This model is a generalisation of the classical extended Stokes solution and will be referred to as the potential theory-Stokes model. The model is validated using a large set of numerical simulations covering a wide range of flow regimes representative of those used in laboratory experiments. It is demonstrated that the model is in much better agreement with the simulation data than the classical Stokes solution, improving the prediction in 63% of the studied cases. The central assumption of the model—which is to link the wall shear stress with the surface velocity—is shown to hold remarkably well over all regimes covered.

  18. An investigation of characteristics of thermal stress caused by fluid temperature fluctuation at a T-junction pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Koji; Nakamura, Akira; Utanohara, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    Thermal fatigue cracking may initiate at a T-junction pipe where high and low temperature fluids flow in from different directions and mix. Thermal stress is caused by a temperature gradient in a structure and by its variation. It is possible to obtain stress distributions if the temperature distributions at the pipe inner surface are obtained by experiments. The wall temperature distributions at a T-junction pipe were measured by experiments. The thermal stress distributions were calculated using the experimental data. The circumferential and axial stress fluctuations were larger than the radial stress fluctuation range. The stress fluctuation at the position of the maximum stress fluctuation had 10sec period. The distribution of the stress fluctuation was similar to that of the temperature fluctuation. The large stress fluctuations were caused by the time variation of the heating region by the hot jet flow. (author)

  19. Computational and experimental assessment of influences of hemodynamic shear stress on carotid plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Meng, Long; Zhou, Wei; Xin, Lin; Xia, Xiangxiang; Li, Shuai; Zheng, Hairong; Niu, Lili

    2017-07-29

    Studies have identified hemodynamic shear stress as an important determinant of endothelial function and atherosclerosis. In this study, we assess the influences of hemodynamic shear stress on carotid plaques. Carotid stenosis phantoms with three severity (30, 50, 70%) were made from 10% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel. The phantoms were placed in a pulsatile flow loop with the same systolic/diastolic phase (35/65) and inlet flow rate (16 L/h). Ultrasonic particle imaging velocimetry (Echo PIV) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) were used to calculate the velocity profile and shear stress distribution in the carotid stenosis phantoms. Inlet/outlet boundary conditions used in CFD were extracted from Echo PIV experiments to make sure that the results were comparable. Echo PIV and CFD results showed that velocity was largest in 70% than those in 30 and 50% at peak systole. Echo PIV results indicated that shear stress was larger in the upper wall and the surface of plaque than in the center of vessel. CFD results demonstrated that wall shear stress in the upstream was larger than in downstream of plaque. There was no significant difference in average velocity obtained by CFD and Echo PIV in 30% (p = 0.25). Velocities measured by CFD in 50% (93.01 cm/s) and in 70% (115.07 cm/s) were larger than those by Echo PIV in 50% (60.26 ± 5.36 cm/s) and in 70% (89.11 ± 7.21 cm/s). The results suggested that Echo PIV and CFD could obtain hemodynamic shear stress on carotid plaques. Higher WSS occurred in narrower arteries, and the shoulder of plaque bore higher WSS than in bottom part.

  20. A Transient Analytical Model for Predicting Wellbore/Reservoir Temperature and Stresses during Drilling with Fluid Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisheng Wu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate characterization of heat transfer in a wellbore during drilling, which includes fluid circulation, is important for wellbore stability analysis. In this work, a pseudo-3D model is developed to simultaneously calculate the heat exchange between the flowing fluid and the surrounding media (drill pipe and rock formation and the in-plane thermoelastic stresses. The cold drilling fluid descends through the drill pipe at constant injection rates and returns to the ground surface via the annulus. The fluid circulation will decrease the wellbore bottom temperature and reduce the near-wellbore high compressive stress, potentially leading to tensile fracturing of the well. The governing equations for the coupled heat transfer stress problem are formulated to ensure that the most important parameters are taken into account. The wellbore is subject to a non-hydrostatic in situ far-field stress field. In modeling heat exchange between fluid and surrounding media, the heat transfer coefficients are dependent on fluid properties and flow behavior. Analytical solutions in the Laplace space are obtained for the temperatures of the fluid in both the drill pipe and annulus and for the temperature and stress changes in the formation. The numerical results in the time domain are obtained by using an efficient inversion approach. In particular, the near-well stresses are compared for the cases with fixed and time-dependent cooling wellbore conditions. This comparison indicates that the using a fixed temperature wellbore conditions may over-estimate or under-estimate the bottom-hole stress change, potentially leading to wellbore stability problems.

  1. Reactor physics simulations with coupled Monte Carlo calculation and computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seker, V.; Thomas, J.W.; Downar, T.J.

    2007-01-01

    A computational code system based on coupling the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code STAR-CD was developed as an audit tool for lower order nuclear reactor calculations. This paper presents the methodology of the developed computer program 'McSTAR'. McSTAR is written in FORTRAN90 programming language and couples MCNP5 and the commercial CFD code STAR-CD. MCNP uses a continuous energy cross section library produced by the NJOY code system from the raw ENDF/B data. A major part of the work was to develop and implement methods to update the cross section library with the temperature distribution calculated by STARCD for every region. Three different methods were investigated and implemented in McSTAR. The user subroutines in STAR-CD are modified to read the power density data and assign them to the appropriate variables in the program and to write an output data file containing the temperature, density and indexing information to perform the mapping between MCNP and STAR-CD cells. Preliminary testing of the code was performed using a 3x3 PWR pin-cell problem. The preliminary results are compared with those obtained from a STAR-CD coupled calculation with the deterministic transport code DeCART. Good agreement in the k eff and the power profile was observed. Increased computational capabilities and improvements in computational methods have accelerated interest in high fidelity modeling of nuclear reactor cores during the last several years. High-fidelity has been achieved by utilizing full core neutron transport solutions for the neutronics calculation and computational fluid dynamics solutions for the thermal-hydraulics calculation. Previous researchers have reported the coupling of 3D deterministic neutron transport method to CFD and their application to practical reactor analysis problems. One of the principal motivations of the work here was to utilize Monte Carlo methods to validate the coupled deterministic neutron transport

  2. Fluid history computation methods for reactor safeguards problems using MNODE computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.S.; Savery, C.W.

    1976-10-01

    A method for predicting the pressure-temperature histories of air, water liquid, and vapor flowing in a zoned containment as a result of high energy pipe rupture is described. The computer code, MNODE, has been developed for 12 connected control volumes and 24 inertia flow paths. Predictions by the code are compared with the results of an analytical gas dynamic problem, semiscale blowdown experiments, full scale MARVIKEN test results, Battelle-Frankfurt model PWR containment test data. The MNODE solutions to NRC/AEC subcompartment benchmark problems are also compared with results predicted by other computer codes such as RELAP-3, FLASH-2, CONTEMPT-PS. The analytical consideration is consistent with Section 6.2.1.2 of the Standard Format (Rev. 2) issued by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in September 1975

  3. International Conference on Computer Modelling of Seas and Coastal Regions and Boundary Elements and Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Partridge, P; Boundary Elements in Fluid Dynamics

    1992-01-01

    This book Boundary Elements in Fluid Dynamics is the second volume of the two volume proceedings of the International Conference on Computer Modelling of Seas and Coastal Regions and Boundary Elements and Fluid Dynamics, held in Southampton, U.K., in April 1992. The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is now fully established as an ac­ curate and successful technique for solving engineering problems in a wide range of fields. The success of the method is due to its advantages in data reduction, as only the boundary of the region is modelled. Thus moving boundaries may be more easily handled, which is not the case if domain methods are used. In addition, the method is easily able to model regions to extending to infinity. Fluid mechanics is traditionally one of the most challenging areas of engi­ neering, the simulation of fluid motion, particularly in three dimensions, is always a serious test for any numerical method, and is an area in which BEM analysis may be used taking full advantage of its special character...

  4. A computational model for thermal fluid design analysis of nuclear thermal rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given, J.A.; Anghaie, S.

    1997-01-01

    A computational model for simulation and design analysis of nuclear thermal propulsion systems has been developed. The model simulates a full-topping expander cycle engine system and the thermofluid dynamics of the core coolant flow, accounting for the real gas properties of the hydrogen propellant/coolant throughout the system. Core thermofluid studies reveal that near-wall heat transfer models currently available may not be applicable to conditions encountered within some nuclear rocket cores. Additionally, the possibility of a core thermal fluid instability at low mass fluxes and the effects of the core power distribution are investigated. Results indicate that for tubular core coolant channels, thermal fluid instability is not an issue within the possible range of operating conditions in these systems. Findings also show the advantages of having a nonflat centrally peaking axial core power profile from a fluid dynamic standpoint. The effects of rocket operating conditions on system performance are also investigated. Results show that high temperature and low pressure operation is limited by core structural considerations, while low temperature and high pressure operation is limited by system performance constraints. The utility of these programs for finding these operational limits, optimum operating conditions, and thermal fluid effects is demonstrated

  5. Integrated Experimental and Computational Study of Hydraulic Fracturing and the Use of Alternative Fracking Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, H.; Carey, J. W.; Karra, S.; Porter, M. L.; Rougier, E.; Zhang, D.; Makedonska, N.; Middleton, R. S.; Currier, R.; Gupta, R.; Lei, Z.; Kang, Q.; O'Malley, D.; Hyman, J.

    2014-12-01

    Shale gas is an unconventional fossil energy resource that is already having a profound impact on US energy independence and is projected to last for at least 100 years. Production of methane and other hydrocarbons from low permeability shale involves hydrofracturing of rock, establishing fracture connectivity, and multiphase fluid-flow and reaction processes all of which are poorly understood. The result is inefficient extraction with many environmental concerns. A science-based capability is required to quantify the governing mesoscale fluid-solid interactions, including microstructural control of fracture patterns and the interaction of engineered fluids with hydrocarbon flow. These interactions depend on coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes over scales from microns to tens of meters. Determining the key mechanisms in subsurface THMC systems has been impeded due to the lack of sophisticated experimental methods to measure fracture aperture and connectivity, multiphase permeability, and chemical exchange capacities at the high temperature, pressure, and stresses present in the subsurface. This project uses innovative high-pressure microfluidic and triaxial core flood experiments on shale to explore fracture-permeability relations and the extraction of hydrocarbon. These data are integrated with simulations including lattice Boltzmann modeling of pore-scale processes, finite-element/discrete element models of fracture development in the near-well environment, discrete-fracture modeling of the reservoir, and system-scale models to assess the economics of alternative fracturing fluids. The ultimate goal is to make the necessary measurements to develop models that can be used to determine the reservoir operating conditions necessary to gain a degree of control over fracture generation, fluid flow, and interfacial processes over a range of subsurface conditions.

  6. Computational fluid dynamics application: slosh analysis of a fuel tank model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iu, H.S.; Cleghorn, W.L.; Mills, J.K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of fluid slosh behaviour inside a fuel tank model. The fuel tank model was a simplified version of a stock fuel tank that has a sloshing noise problem. A commercial CFD software, FLOW-3D, was used to simulate the slosh behaviour. Slosh experiments were performed to verify the computer simulation results. High speed video equipment enhanced with a data acquisition system was used to record the slosh experiments and to obtain the instantaneous sound level of each video frame. Five baffle configurations including the no baffle configuration were considered in the computer simulations and the experiments. The simulation results showed that the best baffle configuration can reduce the mean kinetic energy by 80% from the no baffle configuration in a certain slosh situation. The experimental results showed that 15dB(A) noise reduction can be achieved by the best baffle configuration. The correlation analysis between the mean kinetic energy and the noise level showed that high mean kinetic energy of the fluid does not always correspond to high sloshing noise. High correlation between them only occurs for the slosh situations where the fluid hits the top of the tank and creates noise. (author)

  7. Double-diffusive convection in a Darcy porous medium saturated with a couple-stress fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malashetty, M S; Kollur, Premila; Pal, Dulal

    2010-01-01

    The onset of double-diffusive convection in a couple-stress fluid-saturated horizontal porous layer is studied using linear and weak nonlinear stability analyses. The modified Darcy equation that includes the time derivative term and the inertia term is used to model the momentum equation. The expressions for stationary, oscillatory and finite-amplitude Rayleigh number are obtained as a function of the governing parameters. The effect of couple-stress parameter, solute Rayleigh number, Vadasz number and diffusivity ratio on stationary, oscillatory and finite-amplitude convection is shown graphically. It is found that the couple-stress parameter and the solute Rayleigh number have a stabilizing effect on stationary, oscillatory and finite-amplitude convection. The diffusivity ratio has a destabilizing effect in the case of stationary and finite-amplitude modes, with a dual effect in the case of oscillatory convection. The Vadasz number advances the onset of oscillatory convection. The heat and mass transfer decreases with an increase in the values of couple-stress parameter and diffusivity ratio, while both increase with an increase in the value of the solute Rayleigh number.

  8. Compressible Analysis of Bénard Convection of Magneto Rotatory Couple-Stress Fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta C.B.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal Instability (Benard’s Convection in the presence of uniform rotation and uniform magnetic field (separately is studied. Using the linearized stability theory and normal mode analyses the dispersion relation is obtained in each case. In the case of rotatory Benard’s stationary convection compressibility and rotation postpone the onset of convection whereas the couple-stress have duel character onset of convection depending on rotation parameter. While in the absence of rotation couple-stress always postpones the onset of convection. On the other hand, magnetic field on thermal instability problem on couple-stress fluid for stationary convection couple-stress parameter and magnetic field postpones the onset of convection. The effect of compressibility also postpones the onset of convection in both cases as rotation and magnetic field. Graphs have been plotted by giving numerical values to the parameters to depict the stationary characteristics. Further, the magnetic field and rotation are found to introduce oscillatory modes which were non-existent in their absence and then the principle of exchange of stability is valid. The sufficient conditions for non-existence of overstability are also obtained.

  9. Studies on variable swirl intake system for DI diesel engine using computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebamani Rathnaraj David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that a helical port is more effective than a tangential port to attain the required swirl ratio with minimum sacrifice in the volumetric efficiency. The swirl port is designed for lesser swirl ratio to reduce emissions at higher speeds. But this condition increases the air fuel mixing time and particulate smoke emissions at lower speeds. Optimum swirl ratio is necessary according to the engine operating condition for optimum combustion and emission reduction. Hence the engine needs variable swirl to enhance the combustion in the cylinder according to its operating conditions, for example at partial load or low speed condition it requires stronger swirl, while the air quantity is more important than the swirl under very high speed or full load and maximum torque conditions. The swirl and charging quantity can easily trade off and can be controlled by the opening of the valve. Hence in this study the steady flow rig experiment is used to evaluate the swirl of a helical intake port design for different operating conditions. The variable swirl plate set up of the W06DTIE2 engine is used to experimentally study the swirl variation for different openings of the valve. The sliding of the swirl plate results in the variation of the area of inlet port entry. Therefore in this study a swirl optimized combustion system varying according to the operating conditions by a variable swirl plate mechanism is studied experimentally and compared with the computational fluid dynamics predictions. In this study the fluent computational fluid dynamics code has been used to evaluate the flow in the port-cylinder system of a DI diesel engine in a steady flow rig. The computational grid is generated directly from 3-D CAD data and in cylinder flow simulations, with inflow boundary conditions from experimental measurements, are made using the fluent computational fluid dynamics code. The results are in very good agreement with experimental results.

  10. HIGH-FIDELITY SIMULATION-DRIVEN MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR COARSE-GRAINED COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, Botros N.; Dinh, Nam T.; Bolotnov, Igor A.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear reactor safety analysis requires identifying various credible accident scenarios and determining their consequences. For a full-scale nuclear power plant system behavior, it is impossible to obtain sufficient experimental data for a broad range of risk-significant accident scenarios. In single-phase flow convective problems, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) can provide us with high fidelity results when physical data are unavailable. However, these methods are computationally expensive and cannot be afforded for simulation of long transient scenarios in nuclear accidents despite extraordinary advances in high performance scientific computing over the past decades. The major issue is the inability to make the transient computation parallel, thus making number of time steps required in high-fidelity methods unaffordable for long transients. In this work, we propose to apply a high fidelity simulation-driven approach to model sub-grid scale (SGS) effect in Coarse Grained Computational Fluid Dynamics CG-CFD. This approach aims to develop a statistical surrogate model instead of the deterministic SGS model. We chose to start with a turbulent natural convection case with volumetric heating in a horizontal fluid layer with a rigid, insulated lower boundary and isothermal (cold) upper boundary. This scenario of unstable stratification is relevant to turbulent natural convection in a molten corium pool during a severe nuclear reactor accident, as well as in containment mixing and passive cooling. The presented approach demonstrates how to create a correction for the CG-CFD solution by modifying the energy balance equation. A global correction for the temperature equation proves to achieve a significant improvement to the prediction of steady state temperature distribution through the fluid layer.

  11. Parallel computing simulation of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the application of parallel computing techniques to large-scale modeling of fluid flow in the unsaturated zone (UZ) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this study, parallel computing techniques, as implemented into the TOUGH2 code, are applied in large-scale numerical simulations on a distributed-memory parallel computer. The modeling study has been conducted using an over-one-million-cell three-dimensional numerical model, which incorporates a wide variety of field data for the highly heterogeneous fractured formation at Yucca Mountain. The objective of this study is to analyze the impact of various surface infiltration scenarios (under current and possible future climates) on flow through the UZ system, using various hydrogeological conceptual models with refined grids. The results indicate that the one-million-cell models produce better resolution results and reveal some flow patterns that cannot be obtained using coarse-grid modeling models

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of a flexible rotor supported by turbulent journal bearings with couple stress fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.-Y.; Chang-Jian, C.-W.

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a dynamic analysis of a rotor supported by two turbulent flow model journal bearings and lubricated with couple stress fluid under nonlinear suspension. The dynamics of the rotor center and bearing center is studied. The dynamic equations are solved using the Runge-Kutta method. The analysis methods employed in this study is inclusive of the dynamic trajectories of the rotor center and bearing center, power spectra, Poincare maps and bifurcation diagrams. The maximum Lyapunov exponent analysis is also used to identify the onset of chaotic motion. The results show that the values of dimensionless parameters l* strongly influence dynamic motions of bearing and rotor centre. It is found that couple stress fluid improve the stability of the system when l* > 0.4 even if the flow of this system is turbulent. We also demonstrated that the dimensionless rotational speed ratios s and the dimensionless unbalance parameter β are also significant system parameters. The modeling results thus obtained by using the method proposed in this paper can be employed to predict the stability of the rotor-bearing system and the undesirable behavior of the rotor and bearing center can be avoided

  13. GASFLOW-MPI. A scalable computational fluid dynamics code for gases, aerosols and combustion. Vol. 1. Theory and computational model (Revision 1.0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Jianjun; Travis, Jack; Royl, Peter; Necker, Gottfried; Svishchev, Anatoly; Jordan, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is developing the parallel computational fluid dynamics code GASFLOW-MPI as a best-estimate tool for predicting transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containments and other facility buildings. GASFLOW-MPI is a finite-volume code based on proven computational fluid dynamics methodology that solves the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for three-dimensional volumes in Cartesian or cylindrical coordinates.

  14. An Evaluation of the FIDAP Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for the Calculation of Hydrodynamic Forces on Underwater Platforms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, D

    2003-01-01

    ..., spheres, flat plates, and wing profiles. The degree to which FIDAP accurately reproduces known experimental data on these shapes is described and the applicability of other Computational Fluid Dynamics packages is discussed. (13 tables, 2 figures, 38 refs.)

  15. ADDRESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIR POLLUTANTS AROUND BUILDINGS IN URBAN AREAS WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS (CFD) MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations provide a number of unique opportunities for expanding and improving capabilities for modeling exposures to environmental pollutants. The US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) has been c...

  16. A Computation Fluid Dynamic Model for Gas Lift Process Simulation in a Vertical Oil Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadivar Arash

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuous gas-lift in a typical oil well was simulated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD technique. A multi fluid model based on the momentum transfer between liquid and gas bubbles was employed to simulate two-phase flow in a vertical pipe. The accuracy of the model was investigated through comparison of numerical predictions with experimental data. The model then was used to study the dynamic behaviour of the two-phase flow around injection point in details. The predictions by the model were compared with other empirical correlations, as well. To obtain an optimum condition of gas-lift, the influence of the effective parameters including the quantity of injected gas, tubing diameter and bubble size distribution were investigated. The results revealed that increasing tubing diameter, the injected gas rate and decreasing bubble diameter improve gas-lift performance.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation of hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae in a continuous plug-flow reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Savithri, Sivaraman

    2018-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique is used in this work to simulate the hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis sp. microalgae in a lab-scale continuous plug-flow reactor to understand the fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and reaction kinetics in a HTL reactor under hydrothermal condition. The temperature profile in the reactor and the yield of HTL products from the present simulation are obtained and they are validated with the experimental data available in the literature. Furthermore, the parametric study is carried out to study the effect of slurry flow rate, reactor temperature, and external heat transfer coefficient on the yield of products. Though the model predictions are satisfactory in comparison with the experimental results, it still needs to be improved for better prediction of the product yields. This improved model will be considered as a baseline for design and scale-up of large-scale HTL reactor. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a Fast Fluid-Structure Coupling Technique for Wind Turbine Computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sessarego, Matias; Ramos García, Néstor; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Fluid-structure interaction simulations are routinely used in the wind energy industry to evaluate the aerodynamic and structural dynamic performance of wind turbines. Most aero-elastic codes in modern times implement a blade element momentum technique to model the rotor aerodynamics and a modal......, multi-body, or finite-element approach to model the turbine structural dynamics. The present paper describes a novel fluid-structure coupling technique which combines a threedimensional viscous-inviscid solver for horizontal-axis wind-turbine aerodynamics, called MIRAS, and the structural dynamics model...... used in the aero-elastic code FLEX5. The new code, MIRASFLEX, in general shows good agreement with the standard aero-elastic codes FLEX5 and FAST for various test cases. The structural model in MIRAS-FLEX acts to reduce the aerodynamic load computed by MIRAS, particularly near the tip and at high wind...

  19. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a maglev centrifugal left ventricular assist device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgreen, Greg W; Loree, Howard M; Bourque, Kevin; Dague, Charles; Poirier, Victor L; Farrar, David; Hampton, Edward; Wu, Z Jon; Gempp, Thomas M; Schöb, Reto

    2004-10-01

    The fluid dynamics of the Thoratec HeartMate III (Thoratec Corp., Pleasanton, CA, U.S.A.) left ventricular assist device are analyzed over a range of physiological operating conditions. The HeartMate III is a centrifugal flow pump with a magnetically suspended rotor. The complete pump was analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and experimental particle imaging flow visualization (PIFV). A comparison of CFD predictions to experimental imaging shows good agreement. Both CFD and experimental PIFV confirmed well-behaved flow fields in the main components of the HeartMate III pump: inlet, volute, and outlet. The HeartMate III is shown to exhibit clean flow features and good surface washing across its entire operating range.

  20. A review of Green's function methods in computational fluid mechanics: Background, recent developments and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorning, J.

    1981-01-01

    The research and development over the past eight years on local Green's function methods for the high-accuracy, high-efficiency numerical solution of nuclear engineering problems is reviewed. The basic concepts and key ideas are presented by starting with an expository review of the original fully two-dimensional local Green's function methods developed for neutron diffusion and heat conduction, and continuing through the progressively more complicated and more efficient nodal Green's function methods for neutron diffusion, heat conduction and neutron transport to establish the background for the recent development of Green's function methods in computational fluid mechanics. Some of the impressive numerical results obtained via these classes of methods for nuclear engineering problems are briefly summarized. Finally, speculations are proffered on future directions in which the development of these types of methods in fluid mechanics and other areas might lead. (orig.) [de

  1. Utilisation of computational fluid dynamics techniques for design of molybdenum target specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, G.H.; Wassink, D.

    2003-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to investigate the hydraulic behaviour within a model of the liner and irradiation rig, located in the central portion of the HIFAR fuel element is described. Flow visualisation and LDV measurements are performed to better understand the fluid flow around the narrow spaces within the irradiation rig, annular target cans and liner. Based on the unstructured meshing consisted of triangular elements and tetrahedrons within the flow space generated for the geometrical structure, the CFD model was able to predict complex flow structures inside the liner containing the irradiation rig and target cans. The reliability of the model was validated against experiments. The predicted flow behaviour was comparable to the experimental observations. Predicted velocities were also found to be in good agreement with LDV measurements. (author)

  2. Technical and functional analysis of Spanish windmills: 3D modeling, computational-fluid-dynamics simulation and finite-element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Sola, José Ignacio; Bouza-Rodríguez, José Benito; Menéndez-Díaz, Agustín

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Technical and functional analysis of the two typologies of windmills in Spain. • Spatial distribution of velocities and pressures by computational-fluid dynamics (CFD). • Finite-element analysis (FEA) of the rotors of these two types of windmills. • Validation of the operative functionality of these windmills. - Abstract: A detailed study has been made of the two typologies of windmills in Spain, specifically the rectangular-bladed type, represented by the windmill ‘Sardinero’, located near the town of Campo de Criptana (Ciudad Real province, Spain) and the type with triangular sails (lateens), represented by the windmill ‘San Francisco’, in the town of Vejer de la Frontera (Cádiz province, Spain). For this, an ad hoc research methodology has been applied on the basis of three aspects: three-dimensional geometric modeling, analysis by computational-fluid dynamics (CFD), and finite-element analysis (FEA). The results found with the CFD technique show the correct functioning of the two windmills in relation to the spatial distribution of the wind velocities and pressures to which each is normally exposed (4–7 m/s in the case of ‘Sardinero’, and 5–11 for ‘San Francisco’), thereby validating the operative functionality of both types. In addition, as a result of the FEA, the spatial distribution of stresses on the rotor has revealed that the greatest concentrations of these occurs in the teeth of the head wheel in ‘Sardinero’, reaching a value of 12 MPa, and at the base of the masts in the case of the ‘San Francisco’, with a value of 24 MPa. Also, this analysis evidences that simple, effective designs to reinforce the masts absorb a great concentration of stresses that would otherwise cause breakage. Furthermore, it was confirmed that the oak wood from which the rotors were made functioned properly, as the windmill never exceeded the maximum admissible working stress, demonstrating the effectiveness of the materials

  3. Image-based computational fluid dynamics in the lung: virtual reality or new clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrowes, Kelly S; De Backer, Jan; Kumar, Haribalan

    2017-11-01

    The development and implementation of personalized medicine is paramount to improving the efficiency and efficacy of patient care. In the respiratory system, function is largely dictated by the choreographed movement of air and blood to the gas exchange surface. The passage of air begins in the upper airways, either via the mouth or nose, and terminates at the alveolar interface, while blood flows from the heart to the alveoli and back again. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a well-established tool for predicting fluid flows and pressure distributions within complex systems. Traditionally CFD has been used to aid in the effective or improved design of a system or device; however, it has become increasingly exploited in biological and medical-based applications further broadening the scope of this computational technique. In this review, we discuss the advancement in application of CFD to the respiratory system and the contributions CFD is currently making toward improving precision medicine. The key areas CFD has been applied to in the pulmonary system are in predicting fluid transport and aerosol distribution within the airways. Here we focus our discussion on fluid flows and in particular on image-based clinically focused CFD in the ventilatory system. We discuss studies spanning from the paranasal sinuses through the conducting airways down to the level of the alveolar airways. The combination of imaging and CFD is enabling improved device design in aerosol transport, improved biomarkers of lung function in clinical trials, and improved predictions and assessment of surgical interventions in the nasal sinuses. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1392. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1392 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Computational modeling for prediction of the shear stress of three-dimensional isotropic and aligned fiber networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungman

    2017-09-01

    Interstitial flow (IF) is a creeping flow through the interstitial space of the extracellular matrix (ECM). IF plays a key role in diverse biological functions, such as tissue homeostasis, cell function and behavior. Currently, most studies that have characterized IF have focused on the permeability of ECM or shear stress distribution on the cells, but less is known about the prediction of shear stress on the individual fibers or fiber networks despite its significance in the alignment of matrix fibers and cells observed in fibrotic or wound tissues. In this study, I developed a computational model to predict shear stress for different structured fibrous networks. To generate isotropic models, a random growth algorithm and a second-order orientation tensor were employed. Then, a three-dimensional (3D) solid model was created using computer-aided design (CAD) software for the aligned models (i.e., parallel, perpendicular and cubic models). Subsequently, a tetrahedral unstructured mesh was generated and flow solutions were calculated by solving equations for mass and momentum conservation for all models. Through the flow solutions, I estimated permeability using Darcy's law. Average shear stress (ASS) on the fibers was calculated by averaging the wall shear stress of the fibers. By using nonlinear surface fitting of permeability, viscosity, velocity, porosity and ASS, I devised new computational models. Overall, the developed models showed that higher porosity induced higher permeability, as previous empirical and theoretical models have shown. For comparison of the permeability, the present computational models were matched well with previous models, which justify our computational approach. ASS tended to increase linearly with respect to inlet velocity and dynamic viscosity, whereas permeability was almost the same. Finally, the developed model nicely predicted the ASS values that had been directly estimated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The present

  5. Purinergic signaling is required for fluid shear stress-induced NF-{kappa}B translocation in osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genetos, Damian C., E-mail: dgenetos@ucdavis.edu [Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology, and Physiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Karin, Norman J. [Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Geist, Derik J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Donahue, Henry J. [Division of Musculoskeletal Sciences, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States); Duncan, Randall L. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Fluid shear stress regulates gene expression in osteoblasts, in part by activation of the transcription factor NF-{kappa}B. We examined whether this process was under the control of purinoceptor activation. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts under static conditions expressed the NF-{kappa}B inhibitory protein I{kappa}B{alpha} and exhibited cytosolic localization of NF-{kappa}B. Under fluid shear stress, I{kappa}B{alpha} levels decreased, and concomitant nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B was observed. Cells exposed to fluid shear stress in ATP-depleted medium exhibited no significant reduction in I{kappa}B{alpha}, and NF-{kappa}B remained within the cytosol. Similar results were found using oxidized ATP or Brilliant Blue G, P2X{sub 7} receptor antagonists, indicating that the P2X{sub 7} receptor is responsible for fluid shear-stress-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation and nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B. Pharmacologic blockage of the P2Y6 receptor also prevented shear-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation. These phenomena involved neither ERK1/2 signaling nor autocrine activation by P2X{sub 7}-generated lysophosphatidic acid. Our results suggest that fluid shear stress regulates NF-{kappa}B activity through the P2Y{sub 6} and P2X{sub 7} receptor.

  6. Research on integrated simulation of fluid-structure system by computation science techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Akira

    1996-01-01

    In Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, the research on the integrated simulation of fluid-structure system by computation science techniques has been carried out, and by its achievement, the verification of plant systems which has depended on large scale experiments is substituted by computation science techniques, in this way, it has been aimed at to reduce development costs and to attain the optimization of FBR systems. For the purpose, it is necessary to establish the technology for integrally and accurately analyzing complicated phenomena (simulation technology), the technology for applying it to large scale problems (speed increasing technology), and the technology for assuring the reliability of the results of analysis when simulation technology is utilized for the permission and approval of FBRs (verifying technology). The simulation of fluid-structure interaction, the heat flow simulation in the space with complicated form and the related technologies are explained. As the utilization of computation science techniques, the elucidation of phenomena by numerical experiment and the numerical simulation as the substitute for tests are discussed. (K.I.)

  7. R5FORCE: a program to compute fluid induced forces using hydrodynamic output from the RELAP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the computer code R5FORCE, a postprocessor to the RELAP5/MOD1 thermal-hydraulics code. R5FORCE computes piping hydraulic force/time histories that can be input into various structural analysis computer codes. R5FORCE solves the momentum conservation equation using the pressure and wall shear force terms rather than the pressure and fluid acceleration terms; eliminating potential instabilities associated with computing the time derivative in the fluid acceleration term. The updates to REALP5 required to generate the input data to R5FORCE are also discussed

  8. Intraplaque hemorrhage is associated with higher structural stresses in human atherosclerotic plaques: an in vivo MRI-based 3D fluid-structure interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xueying; Teng, Zhongzhao; Canton, Gador; Ferguson, Marina; Yuan, Chun; Tang, Dalin

    2010-12-31

    Studies using medical images have shown that intraplaque hemorrhage may accelerate plaque progression and may produce a stimulus for atherosclerosis development by increasing lipid core and plaque volume and creating new destabilizing factors. Image-based 3D computational models with fluid-structure interactions (FSI) will be used to perform plaque mechanical analysis and investigate possible associations between intraplaque hemorrhage and both plaque wall stress (PWS) and flow shear stress (FSS). In vivo MRI data of carotid plaques from 5 patients with intraplaque hemorrhage confirmed by histology were acquired. 3D multi-component FSI models were constructed for each plaque to obtain mechanical stresses. Plaque Wall Stress (PWS) and Flow Shear Stress (FSS) were extracted from all nodal points on the lumen surface of each plaque for analysis. The mean PWS value from all hemorrhage nodes of the 5 plaques combined was higher than that from non-hemorrhage nodes (75.6 versus 68.1 kPa, P = 0.0003). The mean PWS values from hemorrhage nodes for each of the 5 plaques were all significantly higher (5 out of 5) than those from non-hemorrhage nodes (P shear stress values from individual cases showed mixed results: only one out of five plaques showed mean FSS value from hemorrhage nodes was higher than that from non-hemorrhage nodes; three out of five plaques showed that their mean FSS values from hemorrhage nodes were lower than those from non-hemorrhage nodes; and one plaque showed that the difference had no statistical significance. The results of this study suggested that intraplaque hemorrhage nodes were associated with higher plaque wall stresses. Compared to flow shear stress, plaque wall stress has a better correlation with plaque component feature (hemorrhage) linked to plaque progression and vulnerability. With further validation, plaque stress analysis may provide additional stress indicators for image-based vulnerability assessment.

  9. Intraplaque hemorrhage is associated with higher structural stresses in human atherosclerotic plaques: an in vivo MRI-based 3d fluid-structure interaction study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canton Gador

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies using medical images have shown that intraplaque hemorrhage may accelerate plaque progression and may produce a stimulus for atherosclerosis development by increasing lipid core and plaque volume and creating new destabilizing factors. Image-based 3D computational models with fluid-structure interactions (FSI will be used to perform plaque mechanical analysis and investigate possible associations between intraplaque hemorrhage and both plaque wall stress (PWS and flow shear stress (FSS. Methods In vivo MRI data of carotid plaques from 5 patients with intraplaque hemorrhage confirmed by histology were acquired. 3D multi-component FSI models were constructed for each plaque to obtain mechanical stresses. Plaque Wall Stress (PWS and Flow Shear Stress (FSS were extracted from all nodal points on the lumen surface of each plaque for analysis. Results The mean PWS value from all hemorrhage nodes of the 5 plaques combined was higher than that from non-hemorrhage nodes (75.6 versus 68.1 kPa, P = 0.0003. The mean PWS values from hemorrhage nodes for each of the 5 plaques were all significantly higher (5 out of 5 than those from non-hemorrhage nodes (P 2, P = 0.0002. However, the mean flow shear stress values from individual cases showed mixed results: only one out of five plaques showed mean FSS value from hemorrhage nodes was higher than that from non-hemorrhage nodes; three out of five plaques showed that their mean FSS values from hemorrhage nodes were lower than those from non-hemorrhage nodes; and one plaque showed that the difference had no statistical significance. Conclusion The results of this study suggested that intraplaque hemorrhage nodes were associated with higher plaque wall stresses. Compared to flow shear stress, plaque wall stress has a better correlation with plaque component feature (hemorrhage linked to plaque progression and vulnerability. With further validation, plaque stress analysis may provide

  10. Analysis of molten salt thermal-hydraulics using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaji, B.; Csom, G.; Aszodi, A.

    2003-01-01

    To give a good solution for the problem of high level radioactive waste partitioning and transmutation is expected to be a pro missing option. Application of this technology also could extend the possibilities of nuclear energy. Large number of liquid-fuelled reactor concepts or accelerator driven subcritical systems was proposed as transmutors. Several of these consider fluoride based molten salts as the liquid fuel and coolant medium. The thermal-hydraulic behaviour of these systems is expected to be fundamentally different than the behaviour of widely used water-cooled reactors with solid fuel. Considering large flow domains three-dimensional thermal-hydraulic analysis is the method seeming to be applicable. Since the fuel is the coolant medium as well, one can expect a strong coupling between neutronics and thermal-hydraulics too. In the present paper the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics for three-dimensional thermal-hydraulics simulations of molten salt reactor concepts is introduced. In our past and recent works several calculations were carried out to investigate the capabilities of Computational Fluid Dynamics through the analysis of different molten salt reactor concepts. Homogenous single region molten salt reactor concept is studied and optimised. Another single region reactor concept is introduced also. This concept has internal heat exchanges in the flow domain and the molten salt is circulated by natural convection. The analysis of the MSRE experiment is also a part of our work since it may form a good background from the validation point of view. In the paper the results of the Computational Fluid Dynamics calculations with these concepts are presented. In the further work our objective is to investigate the thermal-hydraulics of the multi-region molten salt reactor (Authors)

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamic Pressure Drop Estimation of Flow between Parallel Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Hyung Min; Yang, Soo Hyung; Park, Jong Hark [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Many pool type reactors have forced downward flows inside the core during normal operation; there is a chance of flow inversion when transients occur. During this phase, the flow undergo transition between turbulent and laminar regions where drastic changes take place in terms of momentum and heat transfer, and the decrease in safety margin is usually observed. Additionally, for high Prandtl number fluids such as water, an effect of the velocity profile inside the channel on the temperature distribution is more pronounced over the low Prandtl number ones. This makes the checking of its pressure drop estimation accuracy less important, assuming the code verification is complete. With an advent of powerful computer hardware, engineering applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have become quite common these days. Especially for a fully-turbulent and single phase convective heat transfer, the predictability of the commercial codes has matured enough so that many well-known companies adopt those to accelerate a product development cycle and to realize an increased profitability. In contrast to the above, the transition models for the CFD code are still under development, and the most of the models show limited generality and prediction accuracy. Unlike the system codes, the CFD codes estimate the pressure drop from the velocity profile which is obtained by solving momentum conservation equations, and the resulting friction factor can be a representative parameter for a constant cross section channel flow. In addition, the flow inside a rectangular channel with a high span to gap ratio can be approximated by flow inside parallel plates. The computational fluid dynamics simulation on the flow between parallel plates showed reasonable prediction capability for the laminar and the turbulent regime.

  12. Nonlinear Hyperbolic Equations - Theory, Computation Methods, and Applications. Volume 24. Note on Numerical Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    IJ-1_1 - from which we deduce: H U 1/ f II Hu A//- + 2M AtAr , and indeed the expected estimate : // un+l //_ lluo/ + (2MT) Ax since nAt _9 T...the propa- gation of a planar premixed flame with one-step chemistry . In this case, diffusive and reactive terms are added to the energy and species...to use exceedingly fine computational scales, to resolve the chemistry and internal fluid layers fully (which would normally be prohibitive in a large

  13. Computer modeling of the dynamics of surface tension on rotating fluids in low and microgravity environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Tsao, Y. D.; Hong, B. B.; Leslie, Fred W.

    1989-01-01

    Time-dependent evolutions of the profile of the free surface (bubble shapes) for a cylindrical container partially filled with a Newtonian fluid of constant density, rotating about its axis of symmetry, have been studied. Numerical computations have been carried out with the following situations: (1) linear functions of spin-up and spin-down in low- and microgravity environments, (2) linear functions of increasing and decreasing gravity environments at high- and low-rotating cylinder speeds, and (3) step functions of spin-up and spin-down in a low-gravity environment.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Of Scaled Hanford Double Shell Tank Mixing - CFD Modeling Sensitivity Study Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, V.L.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  15. Prediction of velocity and attitude of a yacht sailing upwind by computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heebum Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors in sailing yacht design is accurate velocity prediction. Velocity prediction programs (VPP's are widely used to predict velocity of sailing yachts. VPP's, which are primarily based on experimental data and experience of long years, however suffer limitations when applied in realistic conditions. Thus, in the present study, a high fidelity velocity prediction method using computational fluid dynamics (CFD was proposed. Using the developed method, velocity and attitude of a 30 feet sloop yacht, which was developed by Korea Research Institute of Ship and Ocean (KRISO and termed KORDY30, were predicted in upwind sailing condition.

  16. A simple interface to computational fluid dynamics programs for building environment simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, III, C R; Chen, Q [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    It is becoming a popular practice for architects and HVAC engineers to simulate airflow in and around buildings by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods in order to predict indoor and outdoor environment. However, many CFD programs are crippled by a historically poor and inefficient user interface system, particularly for users with little training in numerical simulation. This investigation endeavors to create a simplified CFD interface (SCI) that allows architects and buildings engineers to use CFD without excessive training. The SCI can be easily integrated into new CFD programs. (author)

  17. A computational method to predict fluid-structure interaction of pressure relief valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S. K.; Lee, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Hong, S. R. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    An effective CFD (Computational fluid dynamics) method to predict important performance parameters, such as blowdown and chattering, for pressure relief valves in NPPs is provided in the present study. To calculate the valve motion, 6DOF (six degree of freedom) model is used. A chimera overset grid method is utilized to this study for the elimination of grid remeshing problem, when the disk moves. Further, CFD-Fastran which is developed by CFD-RC for compressible flow analysis is applied to an 1' safety valve. The prediction results ensure the applicability of the presented method in this study.

  18. A discrete force allocation algorithm for modelling wind turbines in computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2012-01-01

    at the position of the wind turbine rotor to estimate correctly the power production and the rotor loading. The method proposed in this paper solves this issue by spreading the force on the direct neighbouring cells and applying an equivalent pressure jump at the cell faces. This can potentially open......This paper describes an algorithm for allocating discrete forces in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Discrete forces are useful in wind energy CFD. They are used as an approximation of the wind turbine blades’ action on the wind (actuator disc/line), to model forests and to model turbulent...

  19. Interactive Data Exploration for High-Performance Fluid Flow Computations through Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Perovic, Nevena

    2014-09-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Huge data advent in high-performance computing (HPC) applications such as fluid flow simulations usually hinders the interactive processing and exploration of simulation results. Such an interactive data exploration not only allows scientiest to \\'play\\' with their data but also to visualise huge (distributed) data sets in both an efficient and easy way. Therefore, we propose an HPC data exploration service based on a sliding window concept, that enables researches to access remote data (available on a supercomputer or cluster) during simulation runtime without exceeding any bandwidth limitations between the HPC back-end and the user front-end.

  20. A Graphical User Interface for the Computational Fluid Dynamics Software OpenFOAM

    OpenAIRE

    Melbø, Henrik Kaald

    2014-01-01

    A graphical user interface for the computational fluid dynamics software OpenFOAM has been constructed. OpenFOAM is a open source and powerful numerical software, but has much to be wanted in the field of user friendliness. In this thesis the basic operation of OpenFOAM will be introduced and the thesis will emerge in a graphical user interface written in PyQt. The graphical user interface will make the use of OpenFOAM simpler, and hopefully make this powerful tool more available for the gene...

  1. Comparison of two methods to determine fan performance curves using computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onma, Patinya; Chantrasmi, Tonkid

    2018-01-01

    This work investigates a systematic numerical approach that employs Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to obtain performance curves of a backward-curved centrifugal fan. Generating the performance curves requires a number of three-dimensional simulations with varying system loads at a fixed rotational speed. Two methods were used and their results compared to experimental data. The first method incrementally changes the mass flow late through the inlet boundary condition while the second method utilizes a series of meshes representing the physical damper blade at various angles. The generated performance curves from both methods are compared with an experiment setup in accordance with the AMCA fan performance testing standard.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of Hydraulics and Sedimentation in Process Reactors During Aeration Tank Settling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Jensen, Mette; Ingildsen, Pernille; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Aeration Tank Settling is a control method alowing settling in the process tank during high hydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration Tank Settling has been applied in several waste water treatment plant's using present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs have...... shown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. The paper discusses the results at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet...

  3. STARS: An Integrated, Multidisciplinary, Finite-Element, Structural, Fluids, Aeroelastic, and Aeroservoelastic Analysis Computer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1997-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, finite element-based, highly graphics-oriented, linear and nonlinear analysis capability that includes such disciplines as structures, heat transfer, linear aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and controls engineering has been achieved by integrating several new modules in the original STARS (STructural Analysis RoutineS) computer program. Each individual analysis module is general-purpose in nature and is effectively integrated to yield aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic solutions of complex engineering problems. Examples of advanced NASA Dryden Flight Research Center projects analyzed by the code in recent years include the X-29A, F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle/Thrust Vectoring Control System, B-52/Pegasus Generic Hypersonics, National AeroSpace Plane (NASP), SR-71/Hypersonic Launch Vehicle, and High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) projects. Extensive graphics capabilities exist for convenient model development and postprocessing of analysis results. The program is written in modular form in standard FORTRAN language to run on a variety of computers, such as the IBM RISC/6000, SGI, DEC, Cray, and personal computer; associated graphics codes use OpenGL and IBM/graPHIGS language for color depiction. This program is available from COSMIC, the NASA agency for distribution of computer programs.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of indoor climate in low energy buildings: Computational set up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risberg Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper CFD was used for simulation of the indoor climate in a part of a low energy building. The focus of the work was on investigating the computational set up, such as grid size and boundary conditions in order to solve the indoor climate problems in an accurate way. Future work is to model a complete building, with reasonable calculation time and accuracy. A limited number of grid elements and knowledge of boundary settings are therefore essential. An accurate grid edge size of around 0.1 m was enough to predict the climate according to a grid independency study. Different turbulence models were compared with only small differences in the indoor air velocities and temperatures. The models show that radiation between building surfaces has a large impact on the temperature field inside the building, with the largest differences at the floor level. Simplifying the simulations by modelling the radiator as a surface in the outer wall of the room is appropriate for the calculations. The overall indoor climate is finally compared between three different cases for the outdoor air temperature. The results show a good indoor climate for a low energy building all around the year.

  5. The effect of ergonomic training and intervention on reducing occupational stress among computer users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yektaee

    2014-05-01

    Result: According to covariance analysis, ergonomic training and interventions lead to reduction of occupational stress of computer users. .Conclusion: Training computer users and informing them of the ergonomic principals and also providing interventions such as correction of posture, reducing duration of work time, using armrest and footrest would have significant implication in reducing occupational stress among computer users.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engine Flowfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daines, Russell L.; Merkle, Charles L.

    1994-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamic techniques are used to study the flowfield of a fixed geometry Rocket Based Combined Cycle engine operating in rocket ejector mode. Heat addition resulting from the combustion of injected fuel causes the subsonic engine flow to choke and go supersonic in the slightly divergent combustor-mixer section. Reacting flow computations are undertaken to predict the characteristics of solutions where the heat addition is determined by the flowfield. Here, adaptive gridding is used to improve resolution in the shear layers. Results show that the sonic speed is reached in the unheated portions of the flow first, while the heated portions become supersonic later. Comparison with results from another code show reasonable agreement. The coupled solutions show that the character of the combustion-based thermal choking phenomenon can be controlled reasonably well such that there is opportunity to optimize the length and expansion ratio of the combustor-mixer.

  7. Post-processing computational fluid dynamic simulations of gas turbine combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturgess, G.J.; Inko-Tariah, W.P.C.; James, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    The flowfield in combustors for gas turbine engines is extremely complex. Numerical simulation of such flowfields using computational fluid dynamics techniques has much to offer the design and development engineer. It is a difficult task, but it is one which is now being attempted routinely in the industry. The results of such simulations yield enormous amounts of information from which the responsible engineer has to synthesize a comprehensive understanding of the complete flowfield and the processes contained therein. The complex picture so constructed must be distilled down to the essential information upon which rational development decisions can be made. The only way this can be accomplished successfully is by extensive post-processing of the calculation. Post processing of a simulation relies heavily on computer graphics, and requires the enhancement provided by color. The application of one such post-processor is presented, and the strengths and weaknesses of various display techniques are illustrated

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W.B.; Jungst, Rudolph G.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, John.

    1999-06-11

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. The model accounts for not only transport of species and charge, but also the electrode porosity variations and the electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures are compared to the experimental data with excellent agreement. Moreover, the simulation results. in conjunction with computer visualization and animation techniques, confirm that cell utilization in the temperature and current range of interest is limited by pore plugging or clogging of the front side of the cathode as a result of LiCl precipitation. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulation also shows that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell header predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  9. Thirteenth annual conference of the Computation Fluid Dynamics Society of Canada (CFD 2005). Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Conference of the Computational Fluid Dynamics Society of Canada, CFD 2005, was held in St. John's, Newfoundland from July 31 to August 3, 2005. The conference covers a variety of disciplines, including hydrodynamics, aerodynamics/aero-acoustics/aero-elasticity, combustion and heat transfer, hydrology, automotive, nuclear and other industrial application areas. Flows considered include non-Newtonian and multiphase flows, subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic flows, cavitating flows, free-surface flows, jet flows, vortex flows, detonation flows, plasma arc flows and porous media flows. A major theme of these flows is turbulence, and there are many papers that consider Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES), although Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods remain popular. There is a strong interest in high performance computing (HPC) because of the increased throughput it affords. Flow visualization and post processing is also highlighted in many papers

  10. Challenges for the computational fluid dynamics codes in the nineties. Various examples of application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabard, J.P.; Viollet, P.L.

    1991-08-01

    Most of the computational fluid dynamics applications which are encountered at the Research and Development Division of EDF (RDD) are dealing with thermal exchanges. The development of numerical tools for the simulation of flows, devoted to this class of application, has been under way for 15 years. At the beginning this work was mainly concerned with a good simulation of the dynamics of the flow. Now these tools can be used to compute flows with thermal exchanges. The presentation will be limited to incompressible and one phase flows. First the softwares developed at RDD will be presented. Then some applications of these tools to flows with thermal exchanges will be discussed. To conclude, the paper will treat be general case of the CFD codes. The challenges for the next years will be detailed in order to make these tools available for users involved in complex physical modeling

  11. Fluid-structure interaction computations for geometrically resolved rotor simulations using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinz, Joachim Christian; Sørensen, Niels N.; Zahle, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    fluid dynamics (CFD) solver EllipSys3D. The paper shows that the implemented loose coupling scheme, despite a non-conservative force transfer, maintains a sufficient numerical stability and a second-order time accuracy. The use of a strong coupling is found to be redundant. In a first test case......This paper presents a newly developed high-fidelity fluid–structure interaction simulation tool for geometrically resolved rotor simulations of wind turbines. The tool consists of a partitioned coupling between the structural part of the aero-elastic solver HAWC2 and the finite volume computational......, the newly developed coupling between HAWC2 and EllipSys3D (HAWC2CFD) is utilized to compute the aero-elastic response of the NREL 5-MW reference wind turbine (RWT) under normal operational conditions. A comparison with the low-fidelity but state-of-the-art aero-elastic solver HAWC2 reveals a very good...

  12. A Computational Fluid Dynamic Model for a Novel Flash Ironmaking Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Fontes, Silvia E.; Sohn, Hong Yong; Olivas-Martinez, Miguel

    A computational fluid dynamic model for a novel flash ironmaking process based on the direct gaseous reduction of iron oxide concentrates is presented. The model solves the three-dimensional governing equations including both gas-phase and gas-solid reaction kinetics. The turbulence-chemistry interaction in the gas-phase is modeled by the eddy dissipation concept incorporating chemical kinetics. The particle cloud model is used to track the particle phase in a Lagrangian framework. A nucleation and growth kinetics rate expression is adopted to calculate the reduction rate of magnetite concentrate particles. Benchmark experiments reported in the literature for a nonreacting swirling gas jet and a nonpremixed hydrogen jet flame were simulated for validation. The model predictions showed good agreement with measurements in terms of gas velocity, gas temperature and species concentrations. The relevance of the computational model for the analysis of a bench reactor operation and the design of an industrial-pilot plant is discussed.

  13. Self-consistent computation of transport barrier formation by fluid drift turbulence in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.; Jenko, F.; Peeters, A.G.; Teo, A.C.Y.

    1999-01-01

    (1) Computations of turbulence from the electromagnetic gyro fluid model are performed in a flux surface geometry representing the actual MHD equilibrium of the ASDEX Upgrade edge flux surfaces. The transition to ideal ballooning seen in simple geometries as the plasma beta rises is suppressed, leaving the transport at quantitatively realistic levels. Computations for core parameters at half-radius geometry show significant contribution due to the finite beta electron dynamics, possibly removing the standard ITG threshold. (2) Strong inward vorticity transport in edge turbulence, resulting from ion diamagnetic flows, may lead to a build up of mean ExB vorticity fast enough to cause an H-mode transition. (3) Friction of mean ion flows against neutrals involves both toroidal and poloidal flow components, leading to a finite radial current due to a given ExB profile even with zero poloidal rotation. (author)

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD): Future role and requirements as viewed by an applied aerodynamicist. [computer systems design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, H.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of designing the wing-fuselage configuration of an advanced transonic commercial airliner and the optimization of a supercruiser fighter are sketched, pointing out the essential fluid mechanical phenomena that play an important role. Such problems suggest that for a numerical method to be useful, it must be able to treat highly three dimensional turbulent separations, flows with jet engine exhausts, and complex vehicle configurations. Weaknesses of the two principal tools of the aerodynamicist, the wind tunnel and the computer, suggest a complementing combined use of these tools, which is illustrated by the case of the transonic wing-fuselage design. The anticipated difficulties in developing an adequate turbulent transport model suggest that such an approach may have to suffice for an extended period. On a longer term, experimentation of turbulent transport in meaningful cases must be intensified to provide a data base for both modeling and theory validation purposes.

  15. Computer Modeling of Sand Transport on Mars Using a Compart-Mentalized Fluids Algorithm (CFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Stratton, D.

    1999-01-01

    of sand comminution on Mars. A multiple-grain transport model using just the equations of grain motion describing lift and drag is impossible to develop owing to stochastic effects --the very effects we wish to model. Also, unless we were to employ supercomputing techniques and extremely complex computer codes that could deal with millions of grains simultaneously, it would also be difficult to model grain transport if we attempted to consider every grain in motion. No existing computer models were found that satisfactorily used the equations of motion to arrive at transport flux numbers for the different populations of saltation and reptation. Modeling all the grains in a transport system was an intractable problem within our resources, and thus we developed what we believe to be a new modeling approach to simulating grain transport. The CFA deals with grain populations, but considers them to belong to various compartmentalized fluid units in the boundary layer. In this way, the model circumvents the multigrain problem by dealing primarily with the consequences of grain transport --momentum transfer between air and grains, which is the physical essence of a dynamic grain-fluid mixture. We thus chose to model the aeolian transport process as a superposition of fluids. These fluids include the air as well as particle populations of various properties. The prime property distinguishing these fluids is upward and downward grain motion. In a normal saltation trajectory, a grain's downwind velocity increases with time, so a rising grain will have a smaller downwind velocity than a failing grain. Because of this disparity in rising and falling grain proper-ties, it seemed appropriate to track these as two separate grain populations within the same physical space. The air itself can be considered a separate fluid superimposed within and interacting with the various grain-cloud "fluids". Additional informaiton is contained in the original.

  16. Deep and Ultra-deep Underground Observatory for In Situ Stress, Fluids, and Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutt, D. F.; Wang, H.; Kieft, T. L.

    2008-12-01

    The question 'How deeply does life extend into the Earth?' forms a single, compelling vision for multidisciplinary science opportunities associated with physical and biological processes occurring naturally or in response to construction in the deep and ultra-deep subsurface environment of the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) in the former Homestake mine. The scientific opportunity is to understand the interaction between the physical environment and microbial life, specifically, the coupling among (1) stress state and deformation; (2) flow and transport and origin of fluids; and (3) energy and nutrient sources for microbial life; and (4) microbial identity, diversity and activities. DUSEL-Homestake offers the environment in which these questions can be addressed unencumbered by competing human activities. Associated with the interaction among these variables are a number of questions that will be addressed at variety of depths and scales in the facility: What factors control the distribution of life as a function of depth and temperature? What patterns in microbial diversity, microbial activity and nutrients are found along this gradient? How do state variables (stress, strain, temperature, and pore pressure) and constitutive properties (permeability, porosity, modulus, etc.) vary with scale (space, depth, time) in a large 4D heterogeneous system: core - borehole - drift - whole mine - regional? How are fluid flow and stress coupled in a low-permeability, crystalline environment dominated by preferential flow paths? How does this interaction influence the distribution of fluids, solutes, gases, colloids, and biological resources (e.g. energy and nutritive substrates) in the deep continental subsurface? What is the interaction between geomechanics/geohydrology and microbiology (microbial abundance, diversity, distribution, and activities)? Can relationships elucidated within the mechanically and hydrologically altered subsurface habitat

  17. Computer Assisted Fluid Power Instruction: A Comparison of Hands-On and Computer-Simulated Laboratory Experiences for Post-Secondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of utilizing a combination of lecture and computer resources to train personnel to assume roles as hydraulic system technicians and specialists in the fluid power industry. This study compared computer simulated laboratory instruction to traditional hands-on laboratory instruction,…

  18. Advanced computational multi-fluid dynamics: a new model for understanding electrokinetic phenomena in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulamali, M. Y.; Saunders, J. H.; Jackson, M. D.; Pain, C. C.

    2009-04-01

    We present results from a new computational multi-fluid dynamics code, designed to model the transport of heat, mass and chemical species during flow of single or multiple immiscible fluid phases through porous media, including gravitational effects and compressibility. The model also captures the electrical phenomena which may arise through electrokinetic, electrochemical and electrothermal coupling. Building on the advanced computational technology of the Imperial College Ocean Model, this new development leads the way towards a complex multiphase code using arbitrary unstructured and adaptive meshes, and domains decomposed to run in parallel over a cluster of workstations or a dedicated parallel computer. These facilities will allow efficient and accurate modelling of multiphase flows which capture large- and small-scale transport phenomena, while preserving the important geology and/or surface topology to make the results physically meaningful and realistic. Applications include modelling of contaminant transport in aquifers, multiphase flow during hydrocarbon production, migration of carbon dioxide during sequestration, and evaluation of the design and safety of nuclear reactors. Simulations of the streaming potential resulting from multiphase flow in laboratory- and field-scale models demonstrate that streaming potential signals originate at fluid fronts, and at geologic boundaries where fluid saturation changes. This suggests that downhole measurements of streaming potential may be used to inform production strategies in oil and gas reservoirs. As water encroaches on an oil production well, the streaming-potential signal associated with the water front encompasses the well even when the front is up to 100 m away, so the potential measured at the well starts to change significantly relative to a distant reference electrode. Variations in the geometry of the encroaching water front could be characterized using an array of electrodes positioned along the well

  19. Computer modelling of the chemical speciation of Americium (III) in human body fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Shu-bin; Lei, Jia-rong; Wang, He-yi; Zhong, Zhi-jing; Yang, Yong; Du, Yang

    2008-01-01

    A multi-phase equilibrium model consisted of multi-metal ion and low molecular mass ligands in human body fluid has been constructed to discuss the speciation of Am 3+ in gastric juice, sweat, interstitial fluid, intracellular fluid and urine of human body, respectively. Computer simulations indicated that the major Am(III)P Species were Am 3+ , [Am Cl] 2+ and [AmH 2 PO 4 ] 2+ at pH 4 became dominant with higher pH value when [Am] = 1 x 10 -7 mol/L in gastric juice model and percentage of AmPO 4 increased with [Am]. in sweat system, Am(III) existed with soluble species at pH 4.2∼pH 7.5 when [Am] = 1 x 10 -7 mol/L and Am(III) existed with Am 3+ and [Am OH] 2+ at pH 6.5 when [Am] -10 mol/L or [Am] > 5 x 10 -8 mol/L . With addition of EDTA, the Am(III) existed with soluble [Am EDTA] - whereas the Am(III) existed with insoluble AmPO 4 when [Am] > 1 x 10 -12 mol/L at interstitial fluid. The major Am(III) species was AmPO 4 at pH 7.0 and [Am]=4 x 10 -12 mol/L in intracellular fluid, which implied Am(III) represented strong cell toxicity. The percentage of Am(III) soluble species increased at lower pH hinted that the Am(III), in the form of aerosol, ingested by macrophage, could released into interstitial fluid and bring strong toxicity to skeleton system. The soluble Am(III) species was dominant when pH 4 when pH > 4.5 when [Am] = 1 x 10 -10 Pmol/L in human urine, so it was favorable to excrete Am(III) from kidney by taking acid materials. (author)

  20. Unit physics performance of a mix model in Eulerian fluid computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vold, Erik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Douglass, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-25

    In this report, we evaluate the performance of a K-L drag-buoyancy mix model, described in a reference study by Dimonte-Tipton [1] hereafter denoted as [D-T]. The model was implemented in an Eulerian multi-material AMR code, and the results are discussed here for a series of unit physics tests. The tests were chosen to calibrate the model coefficients against empirical data, principally from RT (Rayleigh-Taylor) and RM (Richtmyer-Meshkov) experiments, and the present results are compared to experiments and to results reported in [D-T]. Results show the Eulerian implementation of the mix model agrees well with expectations for test problems in which there is no convective flow of the mass averaged fluid, i.e., in RT mix or in the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT). In RM shock-driven mix, the mix layer moves through the Eulerian computational grid, and there are differences with the previous results computed in a Lagrange frame [D-T]. The differences are attributed to the mass averaged fluid motion and examined in detail. Shock and re-shock mix are not well matched simultaneously. Results are also presented and discussed regarding model sensitivity to coefficient values and to initial conditions (IC), grid convergence, and the generation of atomically mixed volume fractions.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Extraction of Heat Transfer Coefficient in Cryogenic Propellant Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Current reduced-order thermal model for cryogenic propellant tanks is based on correlations built for flat plates collected in the 1950's. The use of these correlations suffers from: inaccurate geometry representation; inaccurate gravity orientation; ambiguous length scale; and lack of detailed validation. The work presented under this task uses the first-principles based Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique to compute heat transfer from tank wall to the cryogenic fluids, and extracts and correlates the equivalent heat transfer coefficient to support reduced-order thermal model. The CFD tool was first validated against available experimental data and commonly used correlations for natural convection along a vertically heated wall. Good agreements between the present prediction and experimental data have been found for flows in laminar as well turbulent regimes. The convective heat transfer between tank wall and cryogenic propellant, and that between tank wall and ullage gas were then simulated. The results showed that commonly used heat transfer correlations for either vertical or horizontal plate over predict heat transfer rate for the cryogenic tank, in some cases by as much as one order of magnitude. A characteristic length scale has been defined that can correlate all heat transfer coefficients for different fill levels into a single curve. This curve can be used for the reduced-order heat transfer model analysis.

  2. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P.; Russell, MacKenzie R.; Jones, Robert M.; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition. PMID:25621085

  3. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, M. N. K., E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Zuradzman, M. Razlan, E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Hazry, D., E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Khairunizam, Wan, E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Shahriman, A. B., E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Yaacob, S., E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Ahmed, S. Faiz, E-mail: najibkhir86@gmail.com, E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: hazry@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: shahriman@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: syedfaiz@unimap.edu.my, E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my [Centre of Excellence for Unmanned Aerial Systems, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); and others

    2014-12-04

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  4. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P; Russell, MacKenzie R; Jones, Robert M; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A; Sáez, A Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition.

  5. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, M. N. K.; Zuradzman, M. Razlan; Hazry, D.; Khairunizam, Wan; Shahriman, A. B.; Yaacob, S.; Ahmed, S. Faiz; Hussain, Abadalsalam T.

    2014-12-01

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  6. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, M. N. K.; Zuradzman, M. Razlan; Hazry, D.; Khairunizam, Wan; Shahriman, A. B.; Yaacob, S.; Ahmed, S. Faiz

    2014-01-01

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity

  7. On a numerical strategy to compute gravity currents of non-Newtonian fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vola, D.; Babik, F.; Latche, J.-C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the presentation of a numerical scheme for the simulation of gravity currents of non-Newtonian fluids. The two dimensional computational grid is fixed and the free-surface is described as a polygonal interface independent from the grid and advanced in time by a Lagrangian technique. Navier-Stokes equations are semi-discretized in time by the Characteristic-Galerkin method, which finally leads to solve a generalized Stokes problem posed on a physical domain limited by the free surface to only a part of the computational grid. To this purpose, we implement a Galerkin technique with a particular approximation space, defined as the restriction to the fluid domain of functions of a finite element space. The decomposition-coordination method allows to deal without any regularization with a variety of non-linear and possibly non-differentiable constitutive laws. Beside more analytical tests, we revisit with this numerical method some simulations of gravity currents of the literature, up to now investigated within the simplified thin-flow approximation framework

  8. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation in process reactors during aeration tank settling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M D; Ingildsen, P; Rasmussen, M R; Laursen, J

    2006-01-01

    Aeration tank settling is a control method allowing settling in the process tank during high hydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration tank settling has been applied in several waste water treatment plants using the present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs have shown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. This paper discusses the results at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet and outlet causing a disruption of the sludge blanket at the outlet and thereby reducing the retention of sludge in the process tank. The model has allowed us to establish a clear picture of the problems arising at the plant during aeration tank settling. Secondly, several process tank design changes have been suggested and tested by means of computational fluid dynamics modelling. The most promising design changes have been found and reported.

  9. Analyses and Comparison of Solar Air Heater with Various Rib Roughness using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. Ravi; Cheepu, Muralimohan; Srinivas, B.; Venkateswarlu, D.; Pramod Kumar, G.; Shiva, Apireddi

    2018-03-01

    In solar air heater, artificial roughness on absorber plate become prominent technique to improving heat transfer rate of air flowing passage as a result of laminar sublayer. The selection of rib geometries plays important role on friction characteristics and heat transfer rate. Many researchers studying the roughness shapes over the years to investigate the effect of geometries on the performance of friction factor and heat transfer of the solar air heater. The present study made an attempt to develop the different rib shapes utilised for creating artificial rib roughness and its comparison to investigate higher performance of the geometries. The use of computational fluid dynamics software resulted in correlation of friction factor and heat transfer rate. The simulations studies were performed on 2D computational fluid dynamics model and analysed to identify the most effective parameters of relative roughness of the height, width and pitch on major considerations of friction factor and heat transfer. The Reynolds number is varied in a range from 3000 to 20000, in the current study and modelling has conducted on heat transfer and turbulence phenomena by using Reynolds number. The modelling results showed the formation of strong vortex in the main stream flow due to the right angle triangle roughness over the square, rectangle, improved rectangle and equilateral triangle geometries enhanced the heat transfer extension in the solar air heater. The simulation of the turbulence kinetic energy of the geometry suggests the local turbulence kinetic energy has been influenced strongly by the alignments of the right angle triangle.

  10. Predicting Flow Reversals in a Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, Andrew J; Dubief, Yves; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Danforth, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    A thermal convection loop is a annular chamber filled with water, heated on the bottom half and cooled on the top half. With sufficiently large forcing of heat, the direction of fluid flow in the loop oscillates chaotically, dynamics analogous to the Earth's weather. As is the case for state-of-the-art weather models, we only observe the statistics over a small region of state space, making prediction difficult. To overcome this challenge, data assimilation (DA) methods, and specifically ensemble methods, use the computational model itself to estimate the uncertainty of the model to optimally combine these observations into an initial condition for predicting the future state. Here, we build and verify four distinct DA methods, and then, we perform a twin model experiment with the computational fluid dynamics simulation of the loop using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF) to assimilate observations and predict flow reversals. We show that using adaptively shaped localized covariance outperforms static localized covariance with the ETKF, and allows for the use of less observations in predicting flow reversals. We also show that a Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) of the temperature and velocity fields recovers the low dimensional system underlying reversals, finding specific modes which together are predictive of reversal direction.

  11. Predicting Flow Reversals in a Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulated Thermosyphon Using Data Assimilation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Reagan

    Full Text Available A thermal convection loop is a annular chamber filled with water, heated on the bottom half and cooled on the top half. With sufficiently large forcing of heat, the direction of fluid flow in the loop oscillates chaotically, dynamics analogous to the Earth's weather. As is the case for state-of-the-art weather models, we only observe the statistics over a small region of state space, making prediction difficult. To overcome this challenge, data assimilation (DA methods, and specifically ensemble methods, use the computational model itself to estimate the uncertainty of the model to optimally combine these observations into an initial condition for predicting the future state. Here, we build and verify four distinct DA methods, and then, we perform a twin model experiment with the computational fluid dynamics simulation of the loop using the Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (ETKF to assimilate observations and predict flow reversals. We show that using adaptively shaped localized covariance outperforms static localized covariance with the ETKF, and allows for the use of less observations in predicting flow reversals. We also show that a Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD of the temperature and velocity fields recovers the low dimensional system underlying reversals, finding specific modes which together are predictive of reversal direction.

  12. Modeling of temperature profiles in an environmental transmission electron microscope using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mølgaard Mortensen, Peter; Willum Hansen, Thomas; Birkedal Wagner, Jakob; Degn Jensen, Anker

    2015-01-01

    The temperature and velocity field, pressure distribution, and the temperature variation across the sample region inside an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) have been modeled by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Heating the sample area by a furnace type TEM holder gives rise to temperature gradients over the sample area. Three major mechanisms have been identified with respect to heat transfer in the sample area: radiation from the grid, conduction in the grid, and conduction in the gas. A parameter sensitivity analysis showed that the sample temperature was affected by the conductivity of the gas, the emissivity of the sample grid, and the conductivity of the grid. Ideally the grid should be polished and made from a material with good conductivity, e.g. copper. With hydrogen gas, which has the highest conductivity of the gases studied, the temperature difference over the TEM grid is less than 5 °C, at what must be considered typical conditions, and it is concluded that the conditions on the sample grid in the ETEM can be considered as isothermal during general use. - Highlights: • Computational fluid dynamics used for mapping flow and temperature in ETEM setup. • Temperature gradient across TEM grid in furnace based heating holder very small in ETEM. • Conduction from TEM grid and gas in addition to radiation from TEM grid most important. • Pressure drop in ETEM limited to the pressure limiting apertures

  13. Ex vivo characterization of pathologic fluids with quantitative phase-contrast computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, Vivien, E-mail: vivien.richter@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Weg 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Willner, Marian S., E-mail: marian.willner@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Henningsen, John, E-mail: john.henningsen@tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Birnbacher, Lorenz, E-mail: lorenz.birnbacher@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Marschner, Mathias, E-mail: mathias.marschner@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Herzen, Julia, E-mail: julia.herzen@ph.tum.de [Department of Physics & Institute of Medical Engineering, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Kimm, Melanie A., E-mail: melanie.kimm@tum.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); and others

    2017-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast imaging (PCI) provides additional information beyond absorption characteristics by detecting the phase shift of the X-ray beam passing through material. The grating-based system works with standard polychromatic X-ray sources, promising a possible clinical implementation. PCI has been shown to provide additional information in soft-tissue samples. The aim of this study was to determine if ex vivo quantitative phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) may differentiate between pathologic fluid collections. Materials and methods: PCCT was performed with the grating interferometry method. A protein serial dilution, human blood samples and 17 clinical samples of pathologic fluid retentions were imaged and correlated with clinical chemistry measurements. Conventional and phase-contrast tomography images were reconstructed. Phase-contrast Hounsfield Units (HUp) were used for quantitative analysis analogously to conventional HU. The imaging was analyzed using overall means, ROI values as well as whole-volume-histograms and vertical gradients. Contrast to noise ratios were calculated between different probes and between imaging methods. Results: HUp showed a very good linear correlation with protein concentration in vitro. In clinical samples, HUp correlated rather well with cell count and triglyceride content. PCI was better than absorption imaging at differentiating protein concentrations in the protein samples as well as at differentiating blood plasma from cellular components. PCI also allowed for differentiation of watery samples (such as lymphoceles) from pus. Conclusion: Phase-contrast computed tomography is a promising tool for the differentiation of pathologic fluids that appear homogenous with conventional attenuation imaging.

  14. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vold, Erik L.; Scannapieco, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, ρ i u di = ρ i (u i -u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  15. Effects of fluid dynamic stress on fracturing of cell-aggregated tissue during purification for islets of Langerhans transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintaku, H; Kawano, S [Department of Mechanical Science and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Okitsu, T [Transplantation Unit, Kyoto University Hospital, Kawara-cho Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Matsumoto, S [Baylor Research Institute Islet Cell Laboratory, 1400 Eight Avenue, Fort Worth, TX 76104 (United States); Suzuki, T; Kanno, I; Kotera, H [Department of Microengineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: shintaku@me.es.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-06-07

    Among clinical treatments for type 1 diabetes mellitus, the transplantation of islets of Langerhans to the portal vein of the hepar is a commonly used treatment for glucose homeostasis. Islet purification using the density gradient of a solution in a centrifuge separator is required for safety and efficiency. In the purification, the number of tissues to be transplanted is reduced by removing the acinar tissue and gathering the islet from the digest of pancreas. However, the mechanical effects on the fracture of islets in the centrifuge due to fluid dynamic stress are a serious problem in the purification process. In this study, a preliminary experiment using a cylindrical rotating viscometer with a simple geometry is conducted in order to systematically clarify the effect of fluid dynamic stress on the fracture of islets. The effects of fluid dynamic stress on the islet configuration is quantitatively measured for various flow conditions, and a predictive fracture model is developed based on the experimental results. Furthermore, in the practical purification process in the COBE (Gambro BCT), which is widely used in clinical applications, we perform a numerical analysis of the fluid dynamic stress based on Navier-Stokes equations to estimate the stress conditions for islets. Using the fracture model and numerical analysis, the islet fracture characteristics using the COBE are successfully investigated. The results obtained in this study provide crucial information for the purification of islets by centrifuge in practical and clinical applications.

  16. Effects of fluid dynamic stress on fracturing of cell-aggregated tissue during purification for islets of Langerhans transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintaku, H; Kawano, S; Okitsu, T; Matsumoto, S; Suzuki, T; Kanno, I; Kotera, H

    2008-01-01

    Among clinical treatments for type 1 diabetes mellitus, the transplantation of islets of Langerhans to the portal vein of the hepar is a commonly used treatment for glucose homeostasis. Islet purification using the density gradient of a solution in a centrifuge separator is required for safety and efficiency. In the purification, the number of tissues to be transplanted is reduced by removing the acinar tissue and gathering the islet from the digest of pancreas. However, the mechanical effects on the fracture of islets in the centrifuge due to fluid dynamic stress are a serious problem in the purification process. In this study, a preliminary experiment using a cylindrical rotating viscometer with a simple geometry is conducted in order to systematically clarify the effect of fluid dynamic stress on the fracture of islets. The effects of fluid dynamic stress on the islet configuration is quantitatively measured for various flow conditions, and a predictive fracture model is developed based on the experimental results. Furthermore, in the practical purification process in the COBE (Gambro BCT), which is widely used in clinical applications, we perform a numerical analysis of the fluid dynamic stress based on Navier-Stokes equations to estimate the stress conditions for islets. Using the fracture model and numerical analysis, the islet fracture characteristics using the COBE are successfully investigated. The results obtained in this study provide crucial information for the purification of islets by centrifuge in practical and clinical applications

  17. On the equivalence among stress tensors in a gauge-fluid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Arpan Krishna; Banerjee, Rabin; Ghosh, Subir

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we bring out the subtleties involved in the study of a first-order relativistic field theory with auxiliary field variables playing an essential role. In particular, we discuss the nonisentropic Eulerian (or Hamiltonian) fluid model. Interactions are introduced by coupling the fluid to a dynamical Maxwell (U(1)) gauge field. This dynamical nature of the gauge field is crucial in showing the equivalence, on the physical subspace, of the stress tensor derived from two definitions, i.e. the canonical (Noether) one and the symmetric one. In the conventional equal-time formalism, we have shown that the generators of the space-time transformations obtained from these two definitions agree modulo the Gauss constraint. This equivalence in the physical sector has been achieved only because of the dynamical nature of the gauge fields. Subsequently, we have explicitly demonstrated the validity of the Schwinger condition. A detailed analysis of the model in lightcone formalism has also been done where several interesting features are revealed.

  18. Coping With Stress of Teacher Trainees With Different Levels of Computer Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Ceyhan, Esra

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine whether levels and styles of coping with the stress of teacher trainees having low and high levels of computer anxiety across a number of variables. This research was carried out with 800 teacher trainees. Data were collected using the Computer Anxiety Scale, Coping With Stress Scale, and an Information Form. The results of the study indicate that the computer anxiety levels of teacher trainees differentiate levels and styles of coping with stress. It was f...

  19. Getting Students Familiar with the Use of Computers: Study of the Falling of a Body in a Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisasola, J.; Barragues, J. I.; Valdes, P.; Pedroso, F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes changes in scientific research methods that have been brought about by the use of computers. Presents an example of the falling of a body in a fluid to show students how computers can be used to experiment with mathematical models and to automate experiments. Contains 11 references. (Author/WRM)

  20. New weighted sum of gray gases model applicable to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of oxy-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Johansen, Lars Christian Riis; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    gases model (WSGGM) is derived, which is applicable to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of both air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion. First, a computer code is developed to evaluate the emissivity of any gas mixture at any condition by using the exponential wide band model (EWBM...